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Sample records for 5-lipoxygenase 5-lox activity

  1. Expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) in T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cook-Moreau, Jeanne M; El-Makhour Hojeij, Yola; Barrière, Guislaine; Rabinovitch-Chable, Hélène C; Faucher, Karine S; Sturtz, Franck G; Rigaud, Michel A

    2007-01-01

    5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is the key enzyme responsible for the synthesis of the biologically active leukotrienes. Its presence has been reported in cells of the myeloid lineage and B lymphocytes but has not been formally defined in T lymphocytes. In this study, we provide evidence for 5-LOX expression on both transcriptional and translational levels in highly purified peripheral blood T cells as well as in human T lymphoblastoid cell lines (MOLT4 and Jurkat). Messenger RNA (mRNA) of 5-LOX was amplified by conventional reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR; MOLT4 and Jurkat cells) and by in situ RT-PCR (T lymphocytes). 5-LOX protein expression was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence studies. 5-LOX was present primarily in the cytoplasm with some nuclear localization and was translocated to the nuclear periphery after culture in a mitosis-supporting medium. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis of different T-lymphocyte populations, including CD4, CD8, CD45RO, CD45RA, T helper type 2, and T-cell receptor-αβ and -γδ expressing cells, did not identify a differential distribution of the enzyme. Purified peripheral blood T lymphocytes were incapable of synthesizing leukotrienes in the absence of exogenous arachidonic acid. Jurkat cells produced leukotriene C4 and a small amount of leukotriene B4 in response to CD3–CD28 cross-linking. This synthesis was abolished by two inhibitors of leukotriene synthesis, MK-886 and AA-861. The presence of 5-LOX in T lymphocytes but the absence of endogenous lipoxygenase metabolite production compared to Jurkat cells may constitute a fundamental difference between resting peripheral lymphocytes and leukaemic cells. PMID:17484769

  2. Possible role for interactions between 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and AMPA GluR1 receptors in depression and in antidepressant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manev, Radmila; Mrazovac, Danijela; Manev, Hari

    2009-01-01

    Summary Emerging evidence suggests that 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) plays a role in central nervous system functioning. It has been shown that 5-LOX metabolic products can decrease the phosphorylation of the glutamate reseptor subunit GluR1, and that this effect can be antagonized by 5-LOX inhibitors. Recent concepts about the pathobiological mechanisms of depression and the molecular mechanisms of antidepressant activity postulate a significant role for glutamatergic neurotransmission and the GluR1 receptor. Regulation of GluR1 phosphorylation, i.e., enhancement of this phosphorylation, may be a part of antidepressant activity. On the other hand, reduced GluR1 phosphorylation may be a pathobiological mechanism contributing to depression. Since 5-LOX inhibitors, along with antidepressants share the capacity to increase GluR1 phosphorylation, we hypothesize that they may also have antidepressant properties. Furthermore, we postulate that increased brain 5-LOX expression may lead to decreased GluR1 phosphorylation and favor the development of depression. For example, brain 5-LOX expression is stimulated by stress hormone glucocorticoids, and stress is a known as a contributing factor to depression. PMID:17449191

  3. A Novel Inhibitor of 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) Prevents Oxidative Stress–Induced Cell Death of Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Preeti; Mendez, Emily F.; Becerra, S. Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) oxygenates arachidonic acid to form 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, which is further converted into biologically detrimental leukotrienes, such as leukotriene B4 (LTB4). The RPE and retina express the PNPLA2 gene for pigment epithelium–derived factor receptor (PEDF-R), a lipase involved in cell survival. The purpose here was to investigate the role of PEDF-R on the 5-LOX pathway in oxidative stress of RPE. Methods Lipoxygenase activity assays were performed with soybean and potato lipoxygenase. Binding was evaluated by peptide-affinity chromatography and pull-down assays with PEDF-R–derived synthetic peptides or recombinant protein. Oxidative stress was induced in human ARPE-19 and primary pig RPE cells with indicated concentrations of H2O2/TNF-α. Reverse transcription–PCR of ALOX5 and PNPLA2 genes was performed. Cell viability and death rates were determined using respective biomarkers. Leukotriene B4 levels were measured by ELISA. Results Among five peptides spanning between positions Leu159 and Met325 of human PEDF-R polypeptide, only two overlapping peptides, E5b and P1, bound and inhibited lipoxygenase activity. Human recombinant 5-LOX bound specifically to peptide P1 and to His6/Xpress-tagged PEDF-R via ionic interactions. The two inhibitor peptides E5b and P1 promoted cell viability and decreased cell death of RPE cells undergoing oxidative stress. Oxidative stress decreased the levels of PNPLA2 transcripts with no effect on ALOX5 expression. Exogenous additions of P1 peptide or overexpression of the PNPLA2 gene decreased both LTB4 levels and death of RPE cells undergoing oxidative stress. Conclusions A novel peptide region of PEDF-R inhibits 5-LOX, which intersects with RPE cell death pathways induced by oxidative stress. PMID:27635633

  4. Regulation of rotenone-induced microglial activation by 5-lipoxygenase and cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Lu; Yang, Yi; Xu, Dong-Min; Zhang, Si-Ran; Li, Chen-Tan; Zheng, Wei; Yu, Shu-Ying; Wei, Er-Qing; Zhang, Li-Hui

    2014-07-14

    The 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) products cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) are potent pro-inflammatory mediators. CysLTs mediate their biological actions through activating CysLT receptors (CysLT(1)R and CysLT(2)R). We have recently reported that 5-LOX and CysLT(1)R mediated PC12 cell injury induced by high concentrations of rotenone (0.3-10 μM), which was reduced by the selective 5-LOX inhibitor zileuton and CysLT(1)R antagonist montelukast. The purpose of this study was to examine the regulatory roles of the 5-LOX/CysLT(1)R pathway in microglial activation induced by low concentration rotenone. After mouse microglial BV2 cells were stimulated with rotenone (0.3-3 nM), phagocytosis and release of pro-inflammatory cytokine were assayed as indicators of microglial activation. We found that rotenone (1 and 3 nM) increased BV2 microglial phagocytosis and the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Zileuton and montelukast prevented rotenone (3 nM)-induced phagocytosis and cytokine release. Furthermore, rotenone significantly up-regulated 5-LOX expression, induced 5-LOX translocation to the nuclear envelope, and increased the production of CysLTs. These responses were inhibited by zileuton. Rotenone also increased CysLT(1)R expression and induced nuclear translocation of CysLT(1)R. In primary rat microglia, rotenone (10 nM) increased release of IL-1β and TNF-α, whereas zileuton (0.1 μΜ) and montelukast (0.01 μΜ) significantly inhibited this response. These results indicated that 5-LOX and CysLT(1)R might be key regulators of microglial activation induced by low concentration of rotenone. Interference of 5-LOX/CysLT(1)R pathway may be an effective therapeutic strategy for microglial inflammation.

  5. The expression and activity of 5-LOX in the large intestine of horses harbouring encysted cyathostomin larvae.

    PubMed

    Giacominelli-Stuffler, Roberto; Frangipane di Regalbono, Antonio; Traversa, Donato; Geurden, Thomas; Marcer, Federica; Di Francesco, Andrea; Angelini, Chiara; di Cesare, Angela; Storelli, Maria Maddalena; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2014-06-16

    Leukotrienes are products of the arachidonic acid metabolism and act as potent inflammatory mediators modulating the immune response and various physiological processes. This study evaluated the expression and activity of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), the enzyme that catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, in horses infected by larval cyathostomins. Tissue samples from dorsal and ventral colon, and from the cecum were collected from 16 horses slaughtered for human consumption. Samples were analyzed to estimate the burdens of encysted cyathostomin larvae and adult luminal stages, and then processed for the evaluation of biochemical parameters. No significant differences were found in the protein expression and enzymatic activity of 5-LOX between animals harbouring only adult parasites and negative horses. The protein expression and enzyme activity of 5-LOX were significantly higher in horses harbouring encysted larvae in comparison with horses free of encysted larvae. Although preliminary, these results indicate that 5-LOX is an important mediator in the course of horse cyathostominosis and further studies are warranted to unveil the possible role this enzyme plays in the pathogenesis of horse cyathostominosis, and its potential as a diagnostic marker.

  6. Lipid metabolism enzyme 5-LOX and its metabolite LTB4 are capable of activating transcription factor NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Wenhui; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX is able to upregulate expression of NF-{kappa}B p65. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX enhances nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 via increasing p-I{kappa}B-{alpha} level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX stimulates transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LTB4 activates transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. -- Abstract: The issue that lipid metabolism enzyme and its metabolites regulate transcription factors in cancer cell is not fully understood. In this study, we first report that the lipid metabolism enzyme 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and its metabolite leukotriene B4 (LTB4) are capable of activating nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) in hepatoma cells. We found that the treatment of MK886 (an inhibitor of 5-LOX) or knockdown of 5-LOX was able to downregulate the expression of NF-{kappa}B p65 at the mRNA level and decreased the phosphorylation level of inhibitor {kappa}B{alpha} (I{kappa}B{alpha}) in the cytoplasm of hepatoma HepG2 or H7402 cells, which resulted in the decrease of the level of nuclear NF-{kappa}B p65. These were confirmed by immunofluorescence staining in HepG2 cell. Moreover, the above treatments were able to decrease the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in the cells. The LTB4, one of metabolites of 5-LOX, is responsible for 5-LOX-activated NF-{kappa}B in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that the lipid metabolism enzyme 5-LOX and its metabolite LTB4 are capable of activating transcription factor NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. Our finding provides new insight into the significance of lipid metabolism in activation of transcription factors in cancer.

  7. 5-lipoxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein gene polymorphisms, dietary linoleic acid, and risk for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2008-10-01

    The n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid 5-lipoxygenase pathway has been shown to play a role in the carcinogenesis of breast cancer. We conducted a population-based case-control study among Latina, African-American, and White women from the San Francisco Bay area to examine the association of the 5-lipoxygenase gene (ALOX5) and 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein gene (ALOX5AP) with breast cancer risk. Three ALOX5AP polymorphisms [poly(A) microsatellite, -4900 A>G (rs4076128), and -3472 A>G (rs4073259)] and three ALOX5 polymorphisms [Sp1-binding site (-GGGCGG-) variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism, -1279 G>T (rs6593482), and 760 G>A (rs2228065)] were genotyped in 802 cases and 888 controls. We did not find significant main effects of ALOX5 and ALOX5AP genotypes on breast cancer risk that were consistent across race or ethnicity; however, there was a significant interaction between the ALOX5AP -4900 A>G polymorphism and dietary linoleic acid intake (P=0.03). Among women consuming a diet high in linoleic acid (top quartile of intake, >17.4 g/d), carrying the AA genotype was associated with higher breast cancer risk (age- and race-adjusted odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.9) compared with carrying genotypes AG or GG. Among women consuming

  8. Distinct parts of leukotriene C{sub 4} synthase interact with 5-lipoxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase activating protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strid, Tobias; Svartz, Jesper; Franck, Niclas; Hallin, Elisabeth; Ingelsson, Bjoern; Soederstroem, Mats; Hammarstroem, Sven

    2009-04-17

    Leukotriene C{sub 4} is a potent inflammatory mediator formed from arachidonic acid and glutathione. 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO), 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) and leukotriene C{sub 4} synthase (LTC{sub 4}S) participate in its biosynthesis. We report evidence that LTC{sub 4}S interacts in vitro with both FLAP and 5-LO and that these interactions involve distinct parts of LTC{sub 4}S. FLAP bound to the N-terminal part/first hydrophobic region of LTC{sub 4}S. This part did not bind 5-LO which bound to the second hydrophilic loop of LTC{sub 4}S. Fluorescent FLAP- and LTC{sub 4}S-fusion proteins co-localized at the nuclear envelope. Furthermore, GFP-FLAP and GFP-LTC{sub 4}S co-localized with a fluorescent ER marker. In resting HEK293/T or COS-7 cells GFP-5-LO was found mainly in the nuclear matrix. Upon stimulation with calcium ionophore, GFP-5-LO translocated to the nuclear envelope allowing it to interact with FLAP and LTC{sub 4}S. Direct interaction of 5-LO and LTC{sub 4}S in ionophore-stimulated (but not un-stimulated) cells was demonstrated by BRET using GFP-5-LO and Rluc-LTC{sub 4}S.

  9. Ethanol Promotes Chemically Induced Oral Cancer in Mice through Activation of the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway of Arachidonic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yizhu; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Xinyan; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol drinking is a known risk factor for oral cancer in humans. However, previous animal studies on the promoting effect of ethanol on oral carcinogenesis were inconclusive. It is necessary to develop an animal model with which the molecular mechanism of ethanol-related oral carcinogenesis may be elucidated in order to develop effective prevention strategies. In this study, mice were first treated with 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO, 100μg/ml in drinking water) for 8 weeks, and then given water or ethanol (8%) as the sole drink for another 16 weeks. During the experiment, 8% ethanol was well tolerated by mice. The incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) increased from 20% (8/41) to 43% (17/40; p<0.05). Expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-Lox) and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) was increased in dysplasia and SCC of 4NQO-treated tongues, and further enhanced by ethanol. Using this mouse model, we further demonstrated that fewer cancers were induced in Alox5−/− mice, as were cell proliferation, inflammation, and angiogenesis in the tongue, as compared with Alox5+/+ mice. Interestingly, Cox-2 expression was induced by ethanol in knockout mice, while 5-Lox and leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) expression and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) biosynthesis were dramatically reduced. Moreover, ethanol enhanced expression and nuclear localization of 5-Lox and stimulated LTB4 biosynthesis in human tongue SCC cells (SCC-15 and SCC-4) in vitro. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrated that ethanol promoted 4NQO-induced oral carcinogenesis, at least in part, through further activation of the 5-Lox pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism. PMID:21881027

  10. Phospholipid Ozonation Products Activate the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zemski Berry, Karin A; Murphy, Robert C

    2016-08-15

    Ozone is a highly reactive environmental toxicant that can react with the double bonds of lipids in pulmonary surfactant. This study was undertaken to investigate the proinflammatory properties of the major lipid-ozone product in pulmonary surfactant, 1-palmitoyl-2-(9'-oxo-nonanoyl)-glycerophosphocholine (16:0/9al-PC), with respect to eicosanoid production. A dose-dependent increase in the formation of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products was observed in murine resident peritoneal macrophages (RPM) and alveolar macrophages (AM) upon treatment with 16:0/9al-PC. In contrast, the production of cyclooxygenase (COX) derived eicosanoids did not change from basal levels in the presence of 16:0/9al-PC. When 16:0/9al-PC and the TLR2 ligand, zymosan, were added to RPM or AM, an enhancement of 5-LO product formation along with a concomitant decrease in COX product formation was observed. Neither intracellular calcium levels nor arachidonic acid release was influenced by the addition of 16:0/9al-PC to RPM. Results from mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor studies and direct measurement of phosphorylation of MAPKs revealed that 16:0/9al-PC activates the p38 MAPK pathway in RPM, which results in the activation of 5-LO. Our results indicate that 16:0/9al-PC has a profound effect on the eicosanoid pathway, which may have implications in inflammatory pulmonary disease states where eicosanoids have been shown to play a role. PMID:27448436

  11. Active site characterization and structure based 3D-QSAR studies on non-redox type 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Khan, Naveed; Zafar, Syed Kashif; Moin, Syed Tarique

    2016-06-10

    Structure-based 3D-QSAR study was performed on a class of 5-benzylidene-2-phenylthiazolinones non-redox type 5-LOX inhibitors. In this study, binding pocket of 5-Lipoxygenase (pdb id 3o8y) was identified by manual docking using 15-LOX (pdb id 2p0m) as a reference structure. Additionally, most of the binding site residues were found conserved in both structures. These non-redox inhibitors were then docked into the binding site of 5-LOX. To generate reliable CoMFA and CoMSIA models, atom fit data base alignment method using docked conformation of the most active compound was employed. The q(2)cv and r(2)ncv values for CoMFA model were found to be 0.549 and 0.702, respectively. The q(2)cv and r(2)ncv values for the selected CoMSIA model comprised four descriptors steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydrogen bond donor fields were found to be 0.535 and 0.951, respectively. Obtained results showed that our generated model was statistically reliable. Furthermore, an external test set validates the reliability of the predicted model by calculating r(2)pred i.e.0.787 and 0.571 for CoMFA and CoMSIA model, respectively. 3D contour maps generated from CoMFA and CoMSIA models were utilized to determine the key structural features of ligands responsible for biological activities. The applied protocol will be helpful to design more potent and selective inhibitors of 5-LOX. PMID:27044904

  12. Discovery of a novel activator of 5-lipoxygenase from an anacardic acid derived compound collection

    PubMed Central

    Wisastra, Rosalina; Kok, Petra A.M; Eleftheriadis, Nikolaos; Baumgartner, Matthew P.; Camacho, Carlos J.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Dekker, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) and cyclooxygenases (COXs) metabolize poly-unsaturated fatty acids into inflammatory signaling molecules. Modulation of the activity of these enzymes may provide new approaches for therapy of inflammatory diseases. In this study, we screened novel anacardic acid derivatives as modulators of human 5-LOX and COX-2 activity. Interestingly, a novel salicylate derivative 23a was identified as a surprisingly potent activator of human 5-LOX. This compound showed both non-competitive activation towards the human 5-LOX activator adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and non-essential mixed type activation against the substrate linoleic acid, while having no effect on the conversion of the substrate arachidonic acid. The kinetic analysis demonstrated a non-essential activation of the linoleic acid conversion with a KA of 8.65 μM, αKA of 0.38 μM and a β value of 1.76. It is also of interest that a comparable derivative 23d showed a mixed type inhibition for linoleic acid conversion. These observations indicate the presence of an allosteric binding site in human 5-LOX distinct from the ATP binding site. The activatory and inhibitory behavior of 23a and 23d on the conversion of linoleic compared to arachidonic acid are rationalized by docking studies, which suggest that the activator 23a stabilizes linoleic acid, whereas the larger inhibitor 23d blocks the enzyme active site. PMID:24231650

  13. Kinetic investigation of human 5-lipoxygenase with arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Monica; Kumar, Ramakrishnan B; Balagunaseelan, Navisraj; Hamberg, Mats; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Rådmark, Olof; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2016-08-01

    Human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is responsible for the formation of leukotriene (LT)A4, a pivotal intermediate in the biosynthesis of the leukotrienes, a family of proinflammatory lipid mediators. 5-LOX has thus gained attention as a potential drug target. However, details of the kinetic mechanism of 5-LOX are still obscure. In this Letter, we investigated the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 5-LOX with its physiological substrate, arachidonic acid (AA). The observed KIE is 20±4 on kcat and 17±2 on kcat/KM at 25°C indicating a non-classical reaction mechanism. The observed rates show slight temperature dependence at ambient temperatures ranging from 4 to 35°C. Also, we observed low Arrhenius prefactor ratio (AH/AD=0.21) and a small change in activation energy (Ea(D)-Ea(H)=3.6J/mol) which suggests that 5-LOX catalysis involves tunneling as a mechanism of H-transfer. The measured KIE for 5-LOX involves a change in regioselectivity in response to deuteration at position C7, resulting in H-abstraction form C10 and formation of 8-HETE. The viscosity experiments influence the (H)kcat, but not (D)kcat. However the overall kcat/KM is not affected for labeled or unlabeled AA, suggesting that either the product release or conformational rearrangement might be involved in dictating kinetics of 5-LOX at saturating conditions. Investigation of available crystal structures suggests the role of active site residues (F421, Q363 and L368) in regulating the donor-acceptor distances, thus affecting H-transfer as well as regiospecificity. In summary, our study shows that that the H-abstraction is the rate limiting step for 5-LOX and that the observed KIE of 5-LOX is masked by a change in regioselectivity. PMID:27363940

  14. Expression, purification and crystallization of human 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein with leukotriene-biosynthesis inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shihua; McKeever, Brian M.; Wisniewski, Douglas; Miller, Douglas K.; Spencer, Robert H.; Chu, Lin; Ujjainwalla, Feroze; Yamin, Ting-Ting; Evans, Jilly F.; Becker, Joseph W.; Ferguson, Andrew D.

    2007-12-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of human 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein in complex with two leukotriene-biosynthesis inhibitors is decribed. The processes that were used to generate diffraction quality crystals are presented in detail. The nuclear membrane protein 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) plays an essential role in leukotriene synthesis. Recombinant full-length human FLAP with a C-terminal hexahistidine tag has been expressed and purified from the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli. Diffraction-quality crystals of FLAP in complex with leukotriene-synthesis inhibitor MK-591 and with an iodinated analogue of MK-591 have been grown using the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method. The crystals exhibit tetragonal symmetry (P42{sub 1}2) and diffracted to a resolution limit of 4 Å.

  15. 5-Lipoxygenase facilitates healing after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Blömer, Nadja; Pachel, Christina; Hofmann, Ulrich; Nordbeck, Peter; Bauer, Wolfgang; Mathes, Denise; Frey, Anna; Bayer, Barbara; Vogel, Benjamin; Ertl, Georg; Bauersachs, Johann; Frantz, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    Early healing after myocardial infarction (MI) is characterized by a strong inflammatory reaction. Most leukotrienes are pro-inflammatory and are therefore potential mediators of healing and remodeling after myocardial ischemia. The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) has a key role in the transformation of arachidonic acid in leukotrienes. Thus, we tested the effect of 5-LOX on healing after MI. After chronic coronary artery ligation, early mortality was significantly increased in 5-LOX(-/-) when compared to matching wildtype (WT) mice due to left ventricular rupture. This effect could be reproduced in mice treated with the 5-LOX inhibitor Zileuton. A perfusion mismatch due to the vasoactive potential of leukotrienes is not responsible for left ventricular rupture since local blood flow assessed by magnetic resonance perfusion measurements was not different. However, after MI, there was an accentuation of the inflammatory reaction with an increase of pro-inflammatory macrophages. Yet, mortality was not changed in chimeric mice (WT vs. 5-LOX(-/-) bone marrow in 5-LOX(-/-) animals), indicating that an altered function of 5-LOX(-/-) inflammatory cells is not responsible for the phenotype. Collagen production and accumulation of fibroblasts were significantly reduced in 5-LOX(-/-) mice in vivo after MI. This might be due to an impaired migration of 5-LOX(-/-) fibroblasts, as shown in vitro to serum. In conclusion, a lack or inhibition of 5-LOX increases mortality after MI because of healing defects. This is not mediated by a change in local blood flow, but through an altered inflammation and/or fibroblast function.

  16. 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitors Attenuate TNF-α-Induced Inflammation in Human Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Han-Ching; Lin, Tzu-Hung; Wu, Ming-Yueh; Chiu, Yung-Cheng; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Hour, Mann-Jen; Liou, Houng-Chi; Tu, Huang-Ju; Yang, Rong-Sen; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2014-01-01

    The lipoxygenase isoform of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is reported to be overexpressed in human rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue and involved in the progress of inflammatory arthritis. However, the detailed mechanism of how 5-lipoxygenase regulates the inflammatory response in arthritis synovial tissue is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of lipoxygenase pathways in TNF-α-induced production of cytokines and chemokines. Human synovial fibroblasts from rheumatoid patients were used in this study. 5-LOX inhibitors and shRNA were used to examine the involvement of 5-LOX in TNF-α-induced cytokines and chemokines expression. The signaling pathways were examined by Western Blotting or immunofluorescence staining. The effect of 5-LOX inhibitor on TNF-α-induced chemokine expression and paw edema was also explored in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. Treatment with 5-LOX inhibitors significantly decreased TNF-α-induced pro-inflammatory mediators including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in human synovial fibroblasts. Knockdown of 5-LOX using shRNA exerted similar inhibitory effects. The abrogation of NF-κB activation was involved in the antagonizing effects of these inhibitors. Furthermore, 5-LOX inhibitor decreased TNF-α-induced up-regulation of serum MCP-1 level and paw edema in mouse model. Our results provide the evidence that the administration of 5-LOX inhibitors is able to ameliorate TNF-α-induced cytokine/chemokine release and paw edema, indicating that 5-LOX inhibitors may be developed for therapeutic treatment of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:25229347

  17. Suppression of oxidative stress and 5-lipoxygenase activation by edaravone improves depressive-like behavior after concussion.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Youichirou; Hoshijima, Michihiro; Yawata, Toshio; Nobumoto, Atsuya; Tsuda, Masayuki; Shimizu, Takahiro; Saito, Motoaki; Ueba, Tetuya

    2014-10-15

    Brain concussions are a serious public concern and are associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as depression. Patients with concussion who suffer from depression often experience distress. Nevertheless, few pre-clinical studies have examined concussion-induced depression, and there is little information regarding its pharmacological management. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, can exert neuroprotective effects in several animal models of neurological disorders. However, the effectiveness of edaravone in animal models of concussion-induced depression remains unclear. In this study, we examined whether edaravone could prevent concussion-induced depression. Mice were subjected to a weight-drop injury and intravenously administered edaravone (3.0 mg/kg) or vehicle immediately after impact. Serial magnetic resonance imaging showed no abnormalities of the cerebrum on diffusion T1- and T2-weighted images. We found that edaravone suppressed concussion-induced depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test, which was accompanied by inhibition of increased hippocampal and cortical oxidative stress (OS) and suppression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) translocation to the nuclear envelope in hippocampal astrocytes. Hippocampal OS in concussed mice was also prevented by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor, apocynin, and administration of BWB70C, a 5-LOX inhibitor, immediately and 24 h after injury prevented depressive-like behaviors in concussed mice. Further, antidepressant effects of edaravone were observed in mice receiving 1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg of edaravone immediately after impact, but not at a lower dose of 0.1 mg/kg. This antidepressant effect persisted up to 1 h after impact, whereas edaravone treatment at 3 h after impact had no effect on concussion-induced depressive-like behavior. These results suggest that edaravone protects against concussion-induced depression, and this protection is mediated by suppression of OS and 5

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of salicylic acid and N-acetyl-2-carboxybenzenesulfonamide regioisomers possessing a N-difluoromethyl-1,2-dihydropyrid-2-one pharmacophore: dual inhibitors of cyclooxygenases and 5-lipoxygenase with anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Morshed A; Abdellatif, Khaled R A; Dong, Ying; Das, Dipankar; Yu, Gang; Velázquez, Carlos A; Suresh, Mavanur R; Knaus, Edward E

    2009-12-15

    A novel class of salicylic acid and N-acetyl-2-carboxybenzenesulfonamide regioisomers possessing a N-difluoromethyl-1,2-dihydropyrid-2-one pharmacophore attached to its C-4 or C-5 position was designed for evaluation as anti-inflammatory (AI) agents. Replacement of the 2,4-difluorophenyl ring in diflunisal by the N-difluoromethyl-1,2-dihydropyrid-2-one moiety provided compounds showing dual selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitory activities. AI structure-activity studies showed that the C-4 (14a) and C-5 (14b) salicylate regioisomers were 1.4- and 1.6-fold more potent than aspirin, and the C-5 N-acetyl-2-carboxybenzenesulfonamide regioisomer (22b) was 1.3- and 2.8-fold more potent than ibuprofen and aspirin, respectively. In vivo ulcer index (UI) studies showed that the 4- and 5-(N-difluoromethyl-1,2-dihydropyrid-2-one-4-yl)salicylic acids (14a and 14b) were completely non-ulcerogenic since no gastric lesions were present (UI=0) relative to aspirin (UI=57) at an equivalent mumol/kg oral dose. The N-difluoromethyl-1,2-dihydropyridin-2-one moiety provides a novel 5-LOX pharmacophore for the design of cyclic hydroxamic mimetics for exploitation in the development of dual COX-2/5-LOX inhibitory AI drugs.

  19. Acrolein increases 5-lipoxygenase expression in murine macrophages through activation of ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chae E.; Lee, Seung J.; Seo, Kyo W.; Park, Hye M.; Yun, Jung W.; Bae, Jin U.; Bae, Sun S.; Kim, Chi D.

    2010-05-15

    Episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants has been linked to acute myocardial infarction, and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is involved in the production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which destabilizes atherosclerotic plaques. Thus, the present study determined the effect of acrolein on 5-LO/leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) production in murine macrophages. Stimulation of J774A.1 cells with acrolein led to increased LTB{sub 4} production in association with increased 5-LO expression. Acrolein-evoked 5-LO expression was blocked by pharmacological inhibition of the ERK pathway, but not by inhibitors for JNK and p38 MAPK pathways. In line with these results, acrolein exclusively increased the phosphorylation of ERK among these MAPK, suggesting a role for the ERK pathway in acrolein-induced 5-LO expression with subsequent production of LTB{sub 4}. Among the receptor tyrosine kinases including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), acrolein-evoked ERK phosphorylation was attenuated by AG1478, an EGFR inhibitor, but not by AG1295, a PDGFR inhibitor. In addition, acrolein-evoked 5-LO expression was also inhibited by inhibition of EGFR pathway, but not by inhibition of PDGFR pathway. These observations suggest that acrolein has a profound effect on the 5-LO pathway via an EGFR-mediated activation of ERK pathway, leading to acute ischemic syndromes through the generation of LTB{sub 4}, subsequent MMP-9 production and plaque rupture.

  20. Identification of the substrate access portal of 5-Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sunayana; Bartlett, Sue G.

    2016-01-01

    The overproduction of inflammatory lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid contributes to asthma and cardiovascular diseases, among other pathologies. Consequently, the enzyme that initiates the synthesis of pro-inflammatory leukotrienes, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), is a target for drug design. The crystal structure of 5-LOX revealed a fully encapsulated active site, thus the point of substrate entry is not known. We asked whether a structural motif, a “cork” present in 5-LOX but absent in other mammalian lipoxygenases, might be ejected to allow substrate access. Our results indicate that reduction of cork volume facilitates access to the active site. However, if cork entry into the site is obstructed, enzyme activity is significantly compromised. The results support a model in which the “cork” that shields the active site in the absence of substrate serves as the active site portal, but the “corking” amino acid Phe-177 plays a critical role in providing a fully functional active site. Thus the more appropriate metaphor for this structural motif is a “twist-and-pour” cap. Additional mutagenesis data are consistent with a role for His-600, deep in the elongated cavity, in positioning the substrate for catalysis. PMID:26427761

  1. MK-886, an inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein, inhibits cyclooxygenase-1 activity and suppresses platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Koeberle, Andreas; Siemoneit, Ulf; Northoff, Hinnak; Hofmann, Bettina; Schneider, Gisbert; Werz, Oliver

    2009-04-17

    MK-886, an inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP), potently suppresses leukotriene biosynthesis in intact cells and is frequently used to define a role of the 5-lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34) pathway in cellular or animal models of inflammation, allergy, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Here we show that MK-886 also interferes with the activities of cyclooxygenases (COX, EC 1.14.99.1). MK-886 inhibited isolated COX-1 (IC(50)=8 microM) and blocked the formation of the COX-1-derived products 12(S)-hydroxy-5-cis-8,10-trans-heptadecatrienoic acid (12-HHT) and thromboxane B(2) in washed human platelets in response to collagen as well as from exogenous arachidonic acid (IC(50)=13-15 microM). Isolated COX-2 was less affected (IC(50)=58 microM), and in A549 cells, MK-886 (33 microM) failed to suppress COX-2-dependent 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F(1alpha) formation. The distinct susceptibility of MK-886 towards COX-1 and -2 is apparent in automated molecular docking studies that indicate a preferred binding of MK-886 to COX-1 into the active site. MK-886 (10 microM) inhibited COX-1-mediated platelet aggregation induced by collagen or arachidonic acid whereas thrombin- or U-46619-induced (COX-independent) aggregation was not affected. Since leukotrienes and prostaglandins share (patho)physiological properties in the development and regulation of carcinogenesis, inflammation, and vascular functions, caution should be used when interpreting data where MK-886 is used as tool to determine the involvement of FLAP and/or the 5-lipoxygenase pathway in respective experimental models.

  2. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase enhances the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin and 5-lipoxygenase activation protein inhibitor in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Yan; Yang, Jun; Inceoglu, Bora; Qiu, Hong; Ulu, Arzu; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D

    2010-03-15

    Inflammation is a multi-staged process whose expansive phase is thought to be driven by acutely released arachidonic acid (AA) and its metabolites. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), or soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is known to be anti-inflammatory. Inhibition of sEH stabilizes the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) products epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Here we used a non-selective COX inhibitor aspirin, a 5-lipoxygenase activation protein (FLAP) inhibitor MK886, and a sEH inhibitor t-AUCB to selectively modulate the branches of AA metabolism in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine model. We used metabolomic profiling to simultaneously monitor representative AA metabolites of each branch. In addition to the significant crosstalk among branches of the AA cascade during selective modulation of COX, LOX, or sEH, we demonstrated that co-administration of t-AUCB enhanced the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin or MK886, which was evidenced by the observations that co-administration resulted in favorable eicosanoid profiles and better control of LPS-mediated hypotension as well as hepatic protein expression of COX-2 and 5-LOX. Targeted disruption of the sEH gene displayed a parallel profile to that produced by t-AUCB. These observations demonstrate a significant level of crosstalk among the three major branches of the AA cascade and that they are not simply parallel pathways. These data illustrate that inhibition of sEH by both pharmacological intervention and gene knockout enhances the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin and MK886, suggesting the possibility of modulating multiple branches to achieve better therapeutic effects. PMID:19896470

  3. Regulation of gamma-secretase activating protein by the 5Lipoxygenase: in vitro and in vivo evidence

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jin; Li, Jian-Guo; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Stough, Alexandra M.; Madesh, Muniswamy; Praticò, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    The formation of Aβ is directly controlled by the γ-secretase complex and its activator, γ-secretase activating protein (GSAP). GSAP derives from a C-terminal fragment of a larger precursor protein via a caspase-3 mediated cleavage. However, the mechanism regulating this process remains unknown. Here we provide in vitro experimental evidence that 5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) is as an endogenous regulator for GSAP formation, but not for other known γ-secretase modulators, by directly and specifically activating caspase-3. These results were confirmed in vivo by using transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease in which 5LO level and activity were modulated genetically or pharmacologically. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that GSAP cleavage via caspase-3 is regulated and depend upon the availability of 5LO further establishing this protein as an attractive and viable therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26076991

  4. Pharmacophore modeling and virtual screening for designing potential 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aparoy, P; Kumar Reddy, K; Kalangi, Suresh K; Chandramohan Reddy, T; Reddanna, P

    2010-02-01

    Inhibitors of the 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) pathway have a therapeutic potential in a variety of inflammatory disorders such as asthma. In this study, chemical feature based pharmacophore models of inhibitors of 5-LOX have been developed with the aid of HipHop and HypoGen modules within Catalyst program package. The best quantitative pharmacophore model, Hypo1, which has the highest correlation coefficient (0.97), consists of two hydrogen-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic feature and one ring aromatic feature. Hypo1 was further validated by test set and cross validation method. The application of the model shows great success in predicting the activities of 65 known 5-LOX inhibitors in our test set with a correlation coefficient of 0.85 with a cross validation of 95% confidence level, proving that the model is reliable in identifying structurally diverse compounds for inhibitory activity against 5-LOX. Furthermore, Hypo1 was used as a 3D query for screening Maybridge and NCI databases within catalyst and also drug like compounds obtained from Enamine Ltd, which follow Lipinski's rule of five. The hit compounds were subsequently subjected to filtering by docking and visualization, to identify the potential lead molecules. Finally 5 potential lead compounds, identified in the above process, were evaluated for their inhibitory activities. These studies resulted in the identification of two compounds with potent inhibition of 5-LOX activity with IC(50) of 14 microM and 35 microM, respectively. These studies thus validate the pharmacophore model generated and suggest the usefulness of the model in screening of various small molecule libraries and identification of potential lead compounds for 5-LOX inhibition. PMID:20045317

  5. Pharmacophore modeling and virtual screening for designing potential 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aparoy, P; Kumar Reddy, K; Kalangi, Suresh K; Chandramohan Reddy, T; Reddanna, P

    2010-02-01

    Inhibitors of the 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) pathway have a therapeutic potential in a variety of inflammatory disorders such as asthma. In this study, chemical feature based pharmacophore models of inhibitors of 5-LOX have been developed with the aid of HipHop and HypoGen modules within Catalyst program package. The best quantitative pharmacophore model, Hypo1, which has the highest correlation coefficient (0.97), consists of two hydrogen-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic feature and one ring aromatic feature. Hypo1 was further validated by test set and cross validation method. The application of the model shows great success in predicting the activities of 65 known 5-LOX inhibitors in our test set with a correlation coefficient of 0.85 with a cross validation of 95% confidence level, proving that the model is reliable in identifying structurally diverse compounds for inhibitory activity against 5-LOX. Furthermore, Hypo1 was used as a 3D query for screening Maybridge and NCI databases within catalyst and also drug like compounds obtained from Enamine Ltd, which follow Lipinski's rule of five. The hit compounds were subsequently subjected to filtering by docking and visualization, to identify the potential lead molecules. Finally 5 potential lead compounds, identified in the above process, were evaluated for their inhibitory activities. These studies resulted in the identification of two compounds with potent inhibition of 5-LOX activity with IC(50) of 14 microM and 35 microM, respectively. These studies thus validate the pharmacophore model generated and suggest the usefulness of the model in screening of various small molecule libraries and identification of potential lead compounds for 5-LOX inhibition.

  6. Conversion of human 5-lipoxygenase to a 15-lipoxygenase by a point mutation to mimic phosphorylation at Serine-663

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Nathaniel C.; Rui, Zhe; Neau, David B.; Waight, Maria T.; Bartlett, Sue G.; Boeglin, William E.; Brash, Alan R.; Newcomer, Marcia E.

    2012-08-31

    The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) initiates biosynthesis of the proinflammatory leukotriene lipid mediators and, together with 15-LOX, is also required for synthesis of the anti-inflammatory lipoxins. The catalytic activity of 5-LOX is regulated through multiple mechanisms, including Ca{sup 2+}-targeted membrane binding and phosphorylation at specific serine residues. To investigate the consequences of phosphorylation at S663, we mutated the residue to the phosphorylation mimic Asp, providing a homogenous preparation suitable for catalytic and structural studies. The S663D enzyme exhibits robust 15-LOX activity, as determined by spectrophotometric and HPLC analyses, with only traces of 5-LOX activity remaining; synthesis of the anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4 from arachidonic acid is also detected. The crystal structure of the S663D mutant in the absence and presence of arachidonic acid (in the context of the previously reported Stable-5-LOX) reveals substantial remodeling of helices that define the active site so that the once fully encapsulated catalytic machinery is solvent accessible. Our results suggest that phosphorylation of 5-LOX at S663 could not only down-regulate leukotriene synthesis but also stimulate lipoxin production in inflammatory cells that do not express 15-LOX, thus redirecting lipid mediator biosynthesis to the production of proresolving mediators of inflammation.

  7. Eugenol--the active principle from cloves inhibits 5-lipoxygenase activity and leukotriene-C4 in human PMNL cells.

    PubMed

    Raghavenra, H; Diwakr, B T; Lokesh, B R; Naidu, K A

    2006-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) play an important role in the modulation of inflammatory conditions in humans. PMNL cells recruited at the site of inflammation, release inflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes, proteolytic enzymes and reactive oxygen species. Among these, leukotrienes are implicated in pathophysiology of allergic and inflammatory disorders like asthma, allergic rhinitis, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the key enzyme in biosynthetic pathway of leukotrienes. Our earlier studies showed that spice phenolic active principles significantly inhibit 5-LO enzyme in human PMNLs. In this study we have further characterized the inhibitory mechanism of eugenol, the active principle of spice-clove on 5-LO enzyme and also its effect on leukotriene C((4)) (LTC(4)). Substrate dependent enzyme kinetics showed that the inhibitory effect of eugenol on 5-LO was of a non-competitive nature. Further, eugenol was found to significantly inhibit the formation of LTC(4) in calcium ionophore A23187 and arachidonic acid (AA) stimulated PMNL cells. These data clearly suggest that eugenol inhibits 5-LO by non-competitive mechanism and also inhibits formation of LTC(4) in human PMNL cells and thus may have beneficial role in modulating 5-LO pathway in human PMNL cells. PMID:16216483

  8. Eugenol--the active principle from cloves inhibits 5-lipoxygenase activity and leukotriene-C4 in human PMNL cells.

    PubMed

    Raghavenra, H; Diwakr, B T; Lokesh, B R; Naidu, K A

    2006-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) play an important role in the modulation of inflammatory conditions in humans. PMNL cells recruited at the site of inflammation, release inflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes, proteolytic enzymes and reactive oxygen species. Among these, leukotrienes are implicated in pathophysiology of allergic and inflammatory disorders like asthma, allergic rhinitis, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the key enzyme in biosynthetic pathway of leukotrienes. Our earlier studies showed that spice phenolic active principles significantly inhibit 5-LO enzyme in human PMNLs. In this study we have further characterized the inhibitory mechanism of eugenol, the active principle of spice-clove on 5-LO enzyme and also its effect on leukotriene C((4)) (LTC(4)). Substrate dependent enzyme kinetics showed that the inhibitory effect of eugenol on 5-LO was of a non-competitive nature. Further, eugenol was found to significantly inhibit the formation of LTC(4) in calcium ionophore A23187 and arachidonic acid (AA) stimulated PMNL cells. These data clearly suggest that eugenol inhibits 5-LO by non-competitive mechanism and also inhibits formation of LTC(4) in human PMNL cells and thus may have beneficial role in modulating 5-LO pathway in human PMNL cells.

  9. Structural optimization and biological evaluation of 1,5-disubstituted pyrazole-3-carboxamines as potent inhibitors of human 5-lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Mingyue; Zheng, Shuli; Jiang, Chunyi; Zhou, Xiaomei; Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Jihui; Ye, Deju; Zheng, Mingfang; Jiang, Hualiang; Liu, Dongxiang; Cheng, Jian; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is a well-validated drug target and its inhibitors are potential drugs for treating leukotriene-related disorders. Our previous work on structural optimization of the hit compound 2 from our in-house collection identified two lead compounds, 3a and 3b, exhibiting a potent inhibitory profile against 5-LOX with IC50 values less than 1 µmol/L in cell-based assays. Here, we further optimized these compounds to prepare a class of novel pyrazole derivatives by opening the fused-ring system. Several new compounds exhibited more potent inhibitory activity than the lead compounds against 5-LOX. In particular, compound 4e not only suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in brain inflammatory cells and protected neurons from oxidative toxicity, but also significantly decreased infarct damage in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia. Molecular docking analysis further confirmed the consistency of our theoretical results and experimental data. In conclusion, the excellent in vitro and in vivo inhibitory activities of these compounds against 5-LOX suggested that these novel chemical structures have a promising therapeutic potential to treat leukotriene-related disorders. PMID:26904397

  10. Integrin-dependent homotypic adhesion of neutrophils. Arachidonic acid activates Raf-1/Mek/Erk via a 5-lipoxygenase- dependent pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Capodici, C; Pillinger, M H; Han, G; Philips, M R; Weissmann, G

    1998-01-01

    AA stimulates integrin-dependent neutrophil adhesion, a critical early step in acute inflammation. However, neither the signaling pathway(s) of AA-stimulated adhesion, nor whether AA acts directly or through the generation of active metabolites, has been elucidated. Previously, we have observed a tight association between neutrophil Erk activation and homotypic adhesion in response to chemoattractants acting through G protein-linked receptors. We now report a similar association between homotypic adhesion and Erk activation in response to AA. Erk activation was cyclooxygenase independent and required AA metabolism to 5(S)- hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HpETE) via 5-lipoxygenase, but not the further lipoxygenase-dependent metabolism of 5-HpETE to leukotrienes. AA stimulation of Erk was accompanied by Raf-1 activation and was sensitive to inhibitors of Raf-1 and Mek. Whereas activation of Erk by AA was pertussis toxin sensitive, [3H]-AA binding to neutrophils was not saturable, suggesting that an AA metabolite activates a G protein. Consistent with this hypothesis, Erk activation by 5(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE; lipoxygenase-independent metabolite of 5-HpETE) was also pertussis toxin sensitive. These data suggest that a 5-lipoxygenase metabolite of AA, e.g., 5-HETE, is released from AA-treated cells to engage a plasma membrane-associated, pertussis toxin-sensitive, G protein-linked receptor, leading to activation of Erk and adhesion via the Raf-1/Mek signal transduction pathway. PMID:9649570

  11. 5-Lipoxygenase-dependent apoptosis of human lymphocytes in the International Space Station: data from the ROALD experiment.

    PubMed

    Battista, Natalia; Meloni, Maria A; Bari, Monica; Mastrangelo, Nicolina; Galleri, Grazia; Rapino, Cinzia; Dainese, Enrico; Agrò, Alessandro Finazzi; Pippia, Proto; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2012-05-01

    The functional adaptation of the immune system to the surrounding environment is also a fundamental issue in space. It has been suggested that a decreased number of lymphocytes might be a cause of immunosuppression, possibly due to the induction of apoptosis. Early activation of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) might play a central role in the initiation of the apoptotic program. The goal of the role of apoptosis in lymphocyte depression (ROALD) experiment, flown on the International Space Station as part of the BIO-4 mission of the European Space Agency, was to ascertain the induction of apoptosis in human lymphocytes under authentic microgravity, and to elucidate the possible involvement of 5-LOX. Our results demonstrate that exposure of human lymphocytes to microgravity for 48 h onboard the ISS remarkably increased apoptotic hallmarks such as DNA fragmentation (∼3-fold compared to ground-based controls) and cleaved-poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein expression (∼3-fold), as well as mRNA levels of apoptosis-related markers such as p53 (∼3-fold) and calpain (∼4-fold); these changes were paralleled by an early increase of 5-LOX activity (∼2-fold). Our findings provide a molecular background for the immune dysfunction observed in astronauts during space missions, and reveal potential new markers to monitor health status of ISS crew members.

  12. Chemoprevention of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis by a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, garcinol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Zhang, Xinyan; Lu, Ye; Shim, Joong-Youn; Sang, Shengmin; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that aberrant arachidonic acid metabolism, especially the 5-lipoxygenase (5-Lox) pathway, is involved in oral carcinogenesis and can be targeted for cancer prevention. To develop potent topical agents for oral cancer chemoprevention, 5 known 5-Lox inhibitors from dietary and synthetic sources (Zileuton, ABT-761, licofelone, curcumin, and garcinol) were evaluated in silico for their potential efficacy. Garcinol, a polyisoprenylated benzophenone from the fruit rind of Garcinia spp., was found to be a promising agent based on the calculation of a theoretical activity index. Computer modeling showed that garcinol well fit the active site of 5-Lox, and potentially inhibited enzyme activity through interactions between the phenolic hydroxyl groups and the non-heme catalytic iron. In a short-term study on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-treated hamster cheek pouch, topical garcinol suppressed leukotriene B4 (LTB4) biosynthesis and inhibited inflammation and cell proliferation in the oral epithelium. In a long-term carcinogenesis study, topical garcinol significantly reduced the size of visible tumors, the number of cancer lesions, cell proliferation, and LTB4 biosynthesis. These results demonstrated that topical application of a 5-Lox inhibitor, garcinol, had chemopreventive effect on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis. PMID:23137051

  13. Sulphatides trigger polymorphonuclear granulocyte spreading on collagen-coated surfaces and inhibit subsequent activation of 5-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Sud'ina, G F; Brock, T G; Pushkareva, M A; Galkina, S I; Turutin, D V; Peters-Golden, M; Ullrich, V

    2001-01-01

    Sulphatides are sulphate esters of galactocerebrosides that are present on the surfaces of many cell types and act as specific ligands to selectins. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of sulphatides on polymorphonuclear granulocyte (PMN) attachment, spreading and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) metabolism. Sulphatides, but not non-sulphated galactocerebrosides, dose-dependently enhanced attachment to collagen, as measured by the myeloperoxidase assay. Studies with blocking antibodies indicated that the increased attachment was mediated by CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) beta 2 integrin. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that sulphatides also greatly enhanced the degree of cell spreading. In PMNs treated in suspension, sulphatides had no effect on the ionophore A23187-stimulated release of arachidonic acid and the synthesis of 5-LO metabolites. In contrast, in PMNs attached to collagen, the enzymic conversion of arachidonic acid by 5-LO was inhibited by sulphatides. Inhibition of 5-LO metabolism by sulphatides was observed even in the presence of exogenous substrate, suggesting that sulphatides directly inhibited 5-LO action. Consistent with this, sulphatides interfered with ionophore-induced translocation of the 5-LO to the nuclear envelope. Substances competing with sulphatide binding to cells, like dextran sulphate, or a strong inhibitor of cell spreading, like the actin-polymerizing agent jasplakinolide, prevented the effects of sulphatides on PMN attachment and spreading and leukotriene synthesis. We conclude that shape changes occurring in response to sulphatides specifically impair PMN leukotriene synthesis by inhibiting translocation of 5-LO. PMID:11672437

  14. 4,5-Diarylisoxazol-3-carboxylic acids: A new class of leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitors potentially targeting 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP).

    PubMed

    Banoglu, Erden; Çelikoğlu, Erşan; Völker, Susanna; Olgaç, Abdurrahman; Gerstmeier, Jana; Garscha, Ulrike; Çalışkan, Burcu; Schubert, Ulrich S; Carotti, Andrea; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Werz, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we report novel leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis inhibitors that may target 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) based on the previously identified isoxazole derivative (8). The design and synthesis was directed towards a subset of 4,5-diaryl-isoxazole-3-carboxylic acid derivatives as LT biosynthesis inhibitors. Biological evaluation disclosed a new skeleton of potential anti-inflammatory agents, exemplified by 39 and 40, which potently inhibit cellular 5-LO product synthesis (IC50 = 0.24 μM, each) seemingly by targeting FLAP with weak inhibition on 5-LO (IC50 ≥ 8 μM). Docking studies and molecular dynamic simulations with 5-LO and FLAP provide valuable insights into potential binding modes of the inhibitors. Together, these diaryl-isoxazol-3-carboxylic acids may possess potential as leads for development of effective anti-inflammatory drugs through inhibition of LT biosynthesis. PMID:26922224

  15. Simultaneous targeting of 5-LOX-COX and EGFR blocks progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Chinthalapally V.; Janakiram, Naveena B.; Madka, Venkateshwar; Devarkonda, Vishal; Brewer, Misty; Biddick, Laura; Lightfoot, Stan; Steele, Vernon E.; Mohammed, Altaf

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGRF) are over-expressed in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis, we show significant increase in COX-2, 5-LOX, and EGFR expression during PDAC progression. Targeting complementary pathways will achieve better treatment efficacy than a single agent high-dose strategy that could increase risk of side effects and tumor resistance. To target COX-2, 5-LOX, and EGFR simultaneously, we tested effects of licofelone (dual 5-LOX-COX inhibitor), and gefitinib (EGFR inhibitor), individually and in combination, on pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs) and their progression to PDAC using genetically engineered mice. Individually, licofelone (L) and gefitinib (G) significantly inhibited incidence of PDAC in male (72% L, 90% G, p < 0.0001) and female (90% L, 85% G, p < 0.0001) mice. The combination drug treatment produced complete inhibition of PDAC in both genders. Pancreata of mice receiving combination treatment showed significantly fewer Dclk1-positive cancer stem-like cells, inhibition of COX-2, 5-LOX, PCNA, EGFR and β-catenin expression (p < 0.05–0.0002), increased p21 expression. Significant changes in tumor immune responses and desmoplastic reaction was observed by NGS analysis in combination treatment (p < 0.05). In summary, early simultaneous targeting of 5-LOX-COX- and EGFR pathways may provide additive inhibitory effects leading to complete suppression of PDAC. PMID:26429877

  16. A Single Amino Acid Difference between Mouse and Human 5-Lipoxygenase Activating Protein (FLAP) Explains the Speciation and Differential Pharmacology of Novel FLAP Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Blevitt, Jonathan M; Hack, Michael D; Herman, Krystal; Chang, Leon; Keith, John M; Mirzadegan, Tara; Rao, Navin L; Lebsack, Alec D; Milla, Marcos E

    2016-06-10

    5-Lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) plays a critical role in the metabolism of arachidonic acid to leukotriene A4, the precursor to the potent pro-inflammatory mediators leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4 Studies with small molecule inhibitors of FLAP have led to the discovery of a drug binding pocket on the protein surface, and several pharmaceutical companies have developed compounds and performed clinical trials. Crystallographic studies and mutational analyses have contributed to a general understanding of compound binding modes. During our own efforts, we identified two unique chemical series. One series demonstrated strong inhibition of human FLAP but differential pharmacology across species and was completely inactive in assays with mouse or rat FLAP. The other series was active across rodent FLAP, as well as human and dog FLAP. Comparison of rodent and human FLAP amino acid sequences together with an analysis of a published crystal structure led to the identification of amino acid residue 24 in the floor of the putative binding pocket as a likely candidate for the observed speciation. On that basis, we tested compounds for binding to human G24A and mouse A24G FLAP mutant variants and compared the data to that generated for wild type human and mouse FLAP. These studies confirmed that a single amino acid mutation was sufficient to reverse the speciation observed in wild type FLAP. In addition, a PK/PD method was established in canines to enable preclinical profiling of mouse-inactive compounds. PMID:27129215

  17. A Single Amino Acid Difference between Mouse and Human 5-Lipoxygenase Activating Protein (FLAP) Explains the Speciation and Differential Pharmacology of Novel FLAP Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Blevitt, Jonathan M; Hack, Michael D; Herman, Krystal; Chang, Leon; Keith, John M; Mirzadegan, Tara; Rao, Navin L; Lebsack, Alec D; Milla, Marcos E

    2016-06-10

    5-Lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) plays a critical role in the metabolism of arachidonic acid to leukotriene A4, the precursor to the potent pro-inflammatory mediators leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4 Studies with small molecule inhibitors of FLAP have led to the discovery of a drug binding pocket on the protein surface, and several pharmaceutical companies have developed compounds and performed clinical trials. Crystallographic studies and mutational analyses have contributed to a general understanding of compound binding modes. During our own efforts, we identified two unique chemical series. One series demonstrated strong inhibition of human FLAP but differential pharmacology across species and was completely inactive in assays with mouse or rat FLAP. The other series was active across rodent FLAP, as well as human and dog FLAP. Comparison of rodent and human FLAP amino acid sequences together with an analysis of a published crystal structure led to the identification of amino acid residue 24 in the floor of the putative binding pocket as a likely candidate for the observed speciation. On that basis, we tested compounds for binding to human G24A and mouse A24G FLAP mutant variants and compared the data to that generated for wild type human and mouse FLAP. These studies confirmed that a single amino acid mutation was sufficient to reverse the speciation observed in wild type FLAP. In addition, a PK/PD method was established in canines to enable preclinical profiling of mouse-inactive compounds.

  18. Exploring the roles of UGT1A1 and UGT1A3 in oral clearance of GSK2190915, a 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Mosteller, Michael; Condreay, Lynn D; Harris, Elizabeth C; Ambery, Claire; Beerahee, Misba; Ghosh, Soumitra

    2014-12-01

    Pharmacokinetic variability in drug exposure is a concern for all compounds in development including those for the treatment of asthma and other respiratory disorders. Substantial variability in the oral clearance of GSK2190915, a 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein inhibitor that attenuates the production of leukotriene B4 and cysteinyl leukotrienes, is largely unaccounted for by clinical variables. A study of 41 patients, 78% (32/41) of whom were non-Hispanic whites, with mild to moderate asthma identified an association of UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A3*2 with the oral clearance of GSK2190915 (P=3.8×10⁻⁴ and 1.2×10⁻⁵, respectively). However, in a subsequent replication study of 403 non-Hispanic white patients with asthma, we failed to observe a statistically significant association between oral clearance of GSK2190915 and either UGT1A1*28 or UGT1A3*2 (P>0.05). Therefore, genetic effects that could explain the systemic exposure level variability of GSK2190915 were not identified. PMID:25192553

  19. 5-Lipoxygenase Activating Protein Reduction Ameliorates Cognitive Deficit, Synaptic Dysfunction, and Neuropathology in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Phillip F.; Chu, Jin; Joshi, Yash B.; Sperow, Margaret; Li, Jin-Guo; Kirby, Lynn G.; Praticò, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Background 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) is abundantly present in the central nervous system. Although its function has been extensively interrogated in the context of peripheral inflammation, novel roles for this protein are emerging in the central nervous system. The objective of our study was to investigate the functional role that FLAP plays in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with plaques and tangles (i.e., 3×Tg mice). Methods By implementing a genetic knockout of FLAP and pharmacologic inhibition with a FLAP inhibitor (MK-591), we evaluated the effect on the AD-like neuropathology, cognition, and synaptic plasticity in the 3×Tg mice. Results We show that reduction of FLAP leads to amelioration of cognition and memory along with the rescuing of synaptic dysfunction at an early age before the development of overt neuropathology. Genetic knockout and pharmacologic inhibition of FLAP also yielded an improvement in AD pathology through a reduction in Aβ via the γ-secretase pathway and a decrease in tau phosphorylation through the cdk5 pathway. Conclusions Our studies identify a novel functional role for FLAP in regulating memory and synaptic plasticity. They establish this protein at the crossroad of multiple pathways that ultimately contribute to the development of the entire AD-like phenotype, making it a viable therapeutic target with disease-modifying capacity for the treatment of this disease. PMID:23683389

  20. Computational insight into the catalytic implication of head/tail-first orientation of arachidonic acid in human 5-lipoxygenase: consequences for the positional specificity of oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Saura, Patricia; Maréchal, Jean-Didier; Masgrau, Laura; Lluch, José M; González-Lafont, Àngels

    2016-08-17

    In the present work we have combined homology modeling, protein-ligand dockings, quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations and molecular dynamics simulations to generate human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX):arachidonic acid (AA) complexes consistent with the 5-lipoxygenating activity (which implies hydrogen abstraction at the C7 position). Our results suggest that both the holo and the apo forms of human Stable 5-LOX could accommodate AA in a productive form for 5-lipoxygenation. The former, in a tail-first orientation, with the AA carboxylate end interacting with Lys409, gives the desired structures with C7 close to the Fe-OH(-) cofactor and suitable barrier heights for H7 abstraction. Only when using the apo form structure, a head-first orientation with the AA carboxylate close to His600 (a residue recently proposed as essential for AA positioning) is obtained in the docking calculations. However, the calculated barrier heights for this head-first orientation are in principle consistent with 5-LOX specificity, but also with 12/8 regioselectivity. Finally, long MD simulations give support to the recent hypothesis that the Phe177 + Tyr181 pair needs to close the active site access during the chemical reaction, and suggest that in the case of a head-first orientation Phe177 may be the residue interacting with the AA carboxylate. PMID:27489112

  1. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates the expression of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of leukotrienes in human blood neutrophils chiefly relies on the activity of two enzymes, phospholipase A2 and 5-lipoxygenase (5- LO). In turn, the activation of the 5-LO requires the participation of a recently characterized membrane-bound protein, the 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP). In this study, we have investigated conditions under which FLAP expression in neutrophils may be modulated. Of several cytokines tested, only granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (and to a lesser extent tumor necrosis factor alpha) significantly increased expression of FLAP. GM-CSF increased FLAP mRNA steady-state levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The stimulatory effect of GM-CSF on FLAP mRNA was inhibited by prior treatment of the cells with the transcription inhibitor, actinomycin D, and pretreatment of the cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, failed to prevent the increase in FLAP mRNA induced by GM-CSF. The accumulation of newly synthesized FLAP, as determined by immunoprecipitation after incorporation of 35S-labeled amino acids, was also increased after incubation of neutrophils with GM-CSF. In addition, the total level of FLAP protein was increased in GM-CSF- treated neutrophils, as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by Western blot. GM-CSF did not alter the stability of the FLAP protein, indicating that the effect of GM-CSF on FLAP accumulation was the consequence of increased de novo synthesis as opposed to decreased degradation of FLAP. Finally, incubation of neutrophils with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone directly stimulated the upregulation of FLAP mRNA and protein, and enhanced the effect of GM-CSF. Taken together, these data demonstrate that FLAP expression may be upmodulated after appropriate stimulation of neutrophils. The increase in FLAP expression induced by GM-CSF in inflammatory conditions could confer upon neutrophils a prolonged capacity to synthesize

  2. 4-Hydroxynonenal enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages via 5-lipoxygenase-mediated activation of ERK and p38 MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung J.; Kim, Chae E.; Yun, Mi R.; Seo, Kyo W.; Park, Hye M.; Yun, Jung W.; Shin, Hwa K.; Bae, Sun S.; Kim, Chi D.

    2010-01-15

    Exaggerated levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) co-exist in macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions, and activated macrophages produce MMP-9 that degrades atherosclerotic plaque constituents. This study investigated the effects of HNE on MMP-9 production, and the potential role for 5-LO derivatives in MMP-9 production in murine macrophages. Stimulation of J774A.1 cells with HNE led to activation of 5-LO, as measured by leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) production. This was associated with an increased production of MMP-9, which was blunted by inhibition of 5-LO with MK886, a 5-LO inhibitor or with 5-LO siRNA. A cysteinyl-LT{sub 1} (cysLT{sub 1}) receptor antagonist, REV-5901 as well as a BLT{sub 1} receptor antagonist, U-75302, also attenuated MMP-9 production induced by HNE. Furthermore, LTB{sub 4} and cysLT (LTC{sub 4} and LTD{sub 4}) enhanced MMP-9 production in macrophages, suggesting a pivotal role for 5-LO in HNE-mediated production of MMP-9. Among the MAPK pathways, LTB{sub 4} and cysLT enhanced phosphorylation of ERK and p38 MAPK, but not JNK. Linked to these results, a p38 MAPK inhibitor as well as an ERK inhibitor blunted MMP-9 production induced by LT. Collectively, these data suggest that 5-LO-derived LT mediates HNE-induced MMP-9 production via activation of ERK and p38 MAPK pathways, consequently leading to plaque instability in atherosclerosis.

  3. Substituted (pyridylmethoxy)naphthalenes as potent and orally active 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors; synthesis, biological profile, and pharmacokinetics of L-739,010.

    PubMed

    Hamel, P; Riendeau, D; Brideau, C; Chan, C C; Desmarais, S; Delorme, D; Dubé, D; Ducharme, Y; Ethier, D; Grimm, E; Falgueyret, J P; Guay, J; Jones, T R; Kwong, E; McAuliffe, M; McFarlane, C S; Piechuta, H; Roumi, M; Tagari, P; Young, R N; Girard, Y

    1997-08-29

    Dioxabicyclooctanyl naphthalenenitriles have been reported as a class of potent and nonredox 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors. These bicyclo derivatives were shown to be metabolically more stable than their tetrahydropyranyl counterparts but were not well orally absorbed. Replacement of the phenyl ring in the naphthalenenitrile 1 by a pyridine ring leads to the potent and orally absorbed inhibitor 3g (L-739,010, 2-cyano-4-(3-furyl)-7-[[6-[3-(3-hydroxy-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1] octanyl)]-2-pyridyl]methoxy]naphthalene). Compound 3g inhibits 5-HPETE production by human 5-LO and LTB4 biosynthesis by human PMN leukocytes and human whole blood (IC50S of 20, 1.6, and 42 nM, respectively). Derivative 3g is orally active in the rat pleurisy model (inhibition of LTB4, ED50 = 0.3 mg/kg) and in the anesthetized dog model (inhibition of ex vivo whole blood LTB4 and urinary LTE4, ED50 = 0.45 and 0.23 microgram/kg/min, respectively, i.v. infusion). In addition, 3g shows excellent functional activity against ovalbumin-induced dyspnea in rats (60% inhibition at 0.5 mg/kg, 4 h pretreatment) and Ascaris-induced bronchoconstriction in conscious sheep (50% and > 85% inhibition in early and late phases, respectively at 2.5 micrograms/kg/min, i.v. infusion) and, more particularly in the conscious antigen sensitive squirrel monkey model (53% inhibition of the increase in RL and 76% in the decrease of Cdyn, at 0.1 mg/kg, po). In rats and dogs, 3g presents excellent pharmacokinetics (estimated half-lives of 5 and 16 h, respectively) and bioavailabilities (26% and 73% when dosed as its hydrochloride salt at doses of 20 and 10 mg/kg, respectively, in methocel suspension). Based on its overall biological profile, compound 3g has been selected for preclinical animal toxicity studies.

  4. A dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase protects against kainic acid-induced brain injury.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Marini, Herbert; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Bitto, Alessandra; Irrera, Natasha; Pizzino, Gabriele; Pallio, Giovanni; Calò, Margherita; Adamo, Elena Bianca; Trichilo, Vincenzo; Interdonato, Monica; Galfo, Federica; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2015-06-01

    Systemic administration of kainic acid causes inflammation and apoptosis in the brain, resulting in neuronal loss. Dual cyclooxygenase/5-lipoxygenase (COX/5-LOX) inhibitors could represent a possible neuroprotective approach in preventing glutamate excitotoxicity. Consequently, we investigated the effects of a dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX following intraperitoneal administration of kainic acid (KA, 10 mg/kg) in rats. Animals were randomized to receive either the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX (flavocoxid, 20 mg/kg i.p.) or its vehicle (1 ml/kg i.p.) 30 min after KA administration. Sham brain injury rats were used as controls. We evaluated protein expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK1/2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as well as levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in the hippocampus. Animals were also observed for monitoring behavioral changes according to Racine Scale. Finally, histological analysis and brain edema evaluation were carried out. Treatment with the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX decreased protein expression of p-ERK1/2 and TNF-α in hippocampus, markedly reduced MDA, LTB4 and PGE2 hippocampal levels, and also ameliorated brain edema. Histological analysis showed a reduction in cell damage in rats treated with the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX, particularly in hippocampal subregion CA3c. Moreover, flavocoxid significantly improved behavioral signs following kainic acid administration. Our results suggest that dual inhibition of COX/5-LOX by flavocoxid has neuroprotective effects during kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity. PMID:25893744

  5. Effects of exogenous arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic acids on the generation of 5-lipoxygenase pathway products by ionophore-activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T H; Mencia-Huerta, J M; Shih, C; Corey, E J; Lewis, R A; Austen, K F

    1984-01-01

    Exogenous eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DCHA) have been compared with exogenous arachidonic acid for their capacity to modulate the oxidative metabolism of membrane-derived arachidonic acid by the 5-lipoxygenase pathway in ionophore-activated human neutrophils and for their suitability as parallel substrates in this pathway. The products from specific 14C- or 3H-labeled substrates were isolated by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and were identified by elution of radiolabel at the retention times of the appropriate synthetic standards. Each product was also characterized by its ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectrum, and 7-hydroxy-DCHA was defined in addition by analysis of its mass spectrum. The metabolites, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 6-trans-LTB4 diastereoisomers, 5-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid, 6-trans-leukotriene B5 diastereoisomers, leukotriene B5 (LTB5), and 7-hydroxy-DCHA were quantitated by integrated UV absorbance during resolution by RP-HPLC. LTB4 and LTB5 were also quantitated by radioimmunoassay of the eluate fractions, and leukotrienes C4 and C5 (LTC4 and LTC5, respectively) were quantitated by radioimmunoassay alone. None of the unlabeled exogenous fatty acids (5-40 micrograms/ml) altered the release of radioactivity from [14C]arachidonic acid-labeled, ionophore-activated neutrophils. The metabolism of 5 and 10 micrograms/ml of exogenous EPA by ionophore-activated, [14C]arachidonic acid-labeled neutrophils not only generated 5-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid, 6-trans-LTB5, LTB5, and LTC5, but also stimulated the formation of 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 6-trans-LTB4 diastereoisomers, and LTC4 from membrane-derived arachidonic acid. In contrast, LTB4 production was diminished throughout the EPA dose-response, beginning at 5 micrograms/ml EPA and reaching 50% suppression at 10 micrograms/ml and 84% suppression at 40 micrograms/ml. The selective decrease in extracellular LTB4

  6. Inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase by vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Reddanna, P; Rao, M K; Reddy, C C

    1985-11-25

    Purified 5-lipoxygenase from potato tubers was inhibited strongly by vitamin E and its analogs. The inhibition by d-alpha-tocopherol was found to be irreversible and non-competitive with respect to arachidonic acid. An IC50 of 5 microM was calculated for d-alpha-tocopherol. The inhibition appears to be unrelated to its antioxidant function. Binding studies with 14C-labelled d-alpha-tocopherol revealed that there is a strong interaction between vitamin E and 5-lipoxygenase. Tryptic digestion and peptide mapping of 5-lipoxygenase-vitamin E complex indicate that vitamin E binds strongly to a single peptide. These studies suggest that cellular vitamin E levels may have profound influence on the formation of leukotrienes. PMID:3934003

  7. 5-Lipoxygenase metabolite 4-HDHA is a mediator of the antiangiogenic effect of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Stahl, Andreas; Chen, Jing; Seaward, Molly R; Willett, Keirnan L; Krah, Nathan M; Dennison, Roberta J; Connor, Kip M; Aderman, Christopher M; Liclican, Elvira; Carughi, Arianna; Perelman, Dalia; Kanaoka, Yoshihide; Sangiovanni, John Paul; Gronert, Karsten; Smith, Lois E H

    2011-02-01

    Lipid signaling is dysregulated in many diseases with vascular pathology, including cancer, diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, and age-related macular degeneration. We have previously demonstrated that diets enriched in ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) effectively reduce pathological retinal neovascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy, in part through metabolic products that suppress microglial-derived tumor necrosis factor-α. To better understand the protective effects of ω-3 PUFAs, we examined the relative importance of major lipid metabolic pathways and their products in contributing to this effect. ω-3 PUFA diets were fed to four lines of mice deficient in each key lipid-processing enzyme (cyclooxygenase 1 or 2, or lipoxygenase 5 or 12/15), retinopathy was induced by oxygen exposure; only loss of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) abrogated the protection against retinopathy of dietary ω-3 PUFAs. This protective effect was due to 5-LOX oxidation of the ω-3 PUFA lipid docosahexaenoic acid to 4-hydroxy-docosahexaenoic acid (4-HDHA). 4-HDHA directly inhibited endothelial cell proliferation and sprouting angiogenesis via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), independent of 4-HDHA's anti-inflammatory effects. Our study suggests that ω-3 PUFAs may be profitably used as an alternative or supplement to current anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment for proliferative retinopathy and points to the therapeutic potential of ω-3 PUFAs and metabolites in other diseases of vasoproliferation. It also suggests that cyclooxygenase inhibitors such as aspirin and ibuprofen (but not lipoxygenase inhibitors such as zileuton) might be used without losing the beneficial effect of dietary ω-3 PUFA. PMID:21307302

  8. Flavocoxid, a dual inhibitor of COX-2 and 5-LOX of natural origin, attenuates the inflammatory response and protects mice from sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) is an inflammatory condition that leads to multisystemic organ failure. Flavocoxid, a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), has been shown in vitro to possess antiinflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated rat macrophages by reducing nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity and COX-2, 5-LOX and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of flavocoxid in a murine model of CLP-induced polymicrobial sepsis. Methods C57BL/6J mice were subjected to CLP or sham operation. In a first set of experiments, an intraperitoneal injection of flavocoxid (20 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered 1 hour after surgery and repeated every 12 hours. Survival rate was monitored every 24 hours throughout 120 hours. Furthermore, additional groups of sham and CLP mice were killed 18 hours after surgical procedures for blood-sample collection and the lung and liver were collected for biomolecular, biochemical and histopathologic studies. Results COX-2, 5-LOX, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, extracellular-regulated-kinase 1/2 (ERK), JunN-terminal kinase (JNK), NF-κB, and β-arrestin 2 protein expression were evaluated in lung and liver with Western blot analysis. In addition, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), cytokines, and lipoxin A4 serum content were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Flavocoxid administration improved survival, reduced the expression of NF-κB, COX-2, 5-LOX, TNF-α and IL-6 and increased IL-10 production. Moreover, flavocoxid inhibited the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway, preserved β-arrestin 2 expression, reduced blood LTB4, PGE2, TNF-α and IL-6, and increased IL-10 and lipoxin A4 serum levels. The treatment with flavocoxid also protected against the histologic damage induced by CLP and reduced the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the lung

  9. Exogenous action of 5-lipoxygenase by its metabolites on luteinizing hormone release in rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Przylipiak, A; Kiesel, L; Habenicht, A J; Przylipiak, M; Runnebaum, B

    1990-02-12

    The stimulatory effect of exogenously administered potato 5-lipoxygenase (0.1-0.3 U/2 ml) on luteinizing hormone (LH) release was demonstrated in rat anterior pituitary cells in a superfusion system. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), an inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase, abolished the effect of the enzyme on LH secretion. The secretory effect on LH after 5-lipoxygenase administration was biphasic and dependent on Ca2+ indicating that 5-lipoxygenase affects LH release through its oxygenation reaction. Another series of experiments demonstrated that activation of 5-lipoxygenase, expressed as production of leukotriene (LT) B4 and C4 (728 +/- 127 pg/10(6) cells and 178 +/- 23 pg/10(6) cells, respectively) occurs in rat pituitary cells after addition of Ca2+ ionophore A23187. However, LTB4 and LTC4 were not formed by pituitary cells that had previously been desensitized by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), the physiological ligand of LH release. These results are consistent with a role of 5-lipoxygenase metabolites in the mechanism of GnRH-induced LH secretion. PMID:2157615

  10. Effects of flavocoxid, a dual inhibitor of COX and 5-lipoxygenase enzymes, on benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Altavilla, D; Minutoli, L; Polito, F; Irrera, N; Arena, S; Magno, C; Rinaldi, M; Burnett, BP; Squadrito, F; Bitto, A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Inflammation plays a key role in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Eicosanoids derived from the COX and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) pathways are elevated in the enlarging prostate. Flavocoxid is a novel flavonoid–based ‘dual inhibitor’ of the COX and 5-LOX enzymes. This study evaluated the effects of flavocoxid in experimental BPH. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Rats were treated daily with testosterone propionate (3 mg·kg−1 s.c.) or its vehicle for 14 days to induce BPH. Animals receiving testosterone were randomized to receive vehicle (1 mL·kg−1, i.p.) or flavocoxid (20 mg·kg−1, i.p.) for 14 days. Histological changes, eicosanoid content and mRNA and protein levels for apoptosis-related proteins and growth factors were assayed in prostate tissue. The effects of flavocoxid were also tested on human prostate carcinoma PC3 cells. KEY RESULTS Flavocoxid reduced prostate weight and hyperplasia, blunted inducible expression of COX-2 and 5-LOX as well as the increased production of PGE2 and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), enhanced pro-apoptotic Bax and caspase-9 and decreased the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 mRNA. Flavocoxid also reduced EGF and VEGF expression. In PC3 cells, flavocoxid stimulated apoptosis and inhibited growth factor expression. Flavocoxid-mediated induction of apoptosis was inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, in PC3 cells, suggesting an essential role of caspases in flavocoxid-mediated apoptosis during prostatic growth. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Our results show that a ‘dual inhibitor’ of the COX and 5-LOX enzymes, such as flavocoxid, might represent a rational approach to reduce BPH through modulation of eicosanoid production and a caspase-induced apoptotic mechanism. PMID:22471974

  11. Novel di-tertiary-butyl phenylhydrazones as dual cyclooxygenase-2/5-lipoxygenase inhibitors: synthesis, COX/LOX inhibition, molecular modeling, and insights into their cytotoxicities.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Shibnath; Vyas, Alok; Misra, Suniti; O'Brien, Paul; Zambre, Ajit; Fresco, Victor M; Markwald, Roger R; Swamy, K Venkateshwara; Afrasiabi, Zahra; Choudhury, Amitava; Khetmalas, Madhukar; Padhye, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Although dual inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) enzymes is highly effective than targeting COX or LOX alone, there are only a few reports of examining such compounds in case of colorectal cancers (CRC). In the present work we report that the novel di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors DTPSAL, DTPBHZ, DTPINH, and DTPNHZ exhibit significant cytotoxicity against human CRC cell lines. Molecular docking studies revealed a good fit of these compounds in the COX-2 and 5-LOX protein cavities. The inhibitors show significant inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and are effective against a panel of human colon cancer cell lines including HCA-7, HT-29, SW480 and intestinal Apc10.1 cells as well as the hyaluronan synthase-2 (Has2) enzyme over-expressing colon cancer cells, through inhibition of the Hyaluronan/CD44v6 cell survival pathway. Western blot analysis and qRT-PCR analyses indicated that the di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors reduce the expression of COX-2, 5-LOX, and CD44v6 in human colon cancer HCA-7 cells, while the combination of CD44v6shRNA and DTPSAL has an additional inhibitory effect on CD44v6 mRNA expression. The synergistic inhibitory effect of Celecoxib and Licofelone on CD44v6 mRNA expression suggests that the present dual inhibitors down-regulate cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes through CD44v6. The compounds also exhibited enhanced antiproliferative potency compared to standard dual COX/LOX inhibitor, viz. Licofelone. Importantly, the HA/CD44v6 antagonist CD44v6shRNA in combination with synthetic compounds had a sensitizing effect on the cancer cells which enhanced their antiproliferative potency, a finding which is crucial for the anti-proliferative potency of the novel synthetic di-tert-butyl phenol based dual COX-LOX inhibitors in colon cancer cells.

  12. Novel di-tertiary-butyl phenylhydrazones as dual cyclooxygenase-2/5-lipoxygenase inhibitors: synthesis, COX/LOX inhibition, molecular modeling, and insights into their cytotoxicities.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Shibnath; Vyas, Alok; Misra, Suniti; O'Brien, Paul; Zambre, Ajit; Fresco, Victor M; Markwald, Roger R; Swamy, K Venkateshwara; Afrasiabi, Zahra; Choudhury, Amitava; Khetmalas, Madhukar; Padhye, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Although dual inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) enzymes is highly effective than targeting COX or LOX alone, there are only a few reports of examining such compounds in case of colorectal cancers (CRC). In the present work we report that the novel di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors DTPSAL, DTPBHZ, DTPINH, and DTPNHZ exhibit significant cytotoxicity against human CRC cell lines. Molecular docking studies revealed a good fit of these compounds in the COX-2 and 5-LOX protein cavities. The inhibitors show significant inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and are effective against a panel of human colon cancer cell lines including HCA-7, HT-29, SW480 and intestinal Apc10.1 cells as well as the hyaluronan synthase-2 (Has2) enzyme over-expressing colon cancer cells, through inhibition of the Hyaluronan/CD44v6 cell survival pathway. Western blot analysis and qRT-PCR analyses indicated that the di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors reduce the expression of COX-2, 5-LOX, and CD44v6 in human colon cancer HCA-7 cells, while the combination of CD44v6shRNA and DTPSAL has an additional inhibitory effect on CD44v6 mRNA expression. The synergistic inhibitory effect of Celecoxib and Licofelone on CD44v6 mRNA expression suggests that the present dual inhibitors down-regulate cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes through CD44v6. The compounds also exhibited enhanced antiproliferative potency compared to standard dual COX/LOX inhibitor, viz. Licofelone. Importantly, the HA/CD44v6 antagonist CD44v6shRNA in combination with synthetic compounds had a sensitizing effect on the cancer cells which enhanced their antiproliferative potency, a finding which is crucial for the anti-proliferative potency of the novel synthetic di-tert-butyl phenol based dual COX-LOX inhibitors in colon cancer cells. PMID:24295787

  13. Stress-induced nuclear export of 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hanaka, Hiromi; Shimizu, Takao; Izumi, Takashi . E-mail: takizumi@med.gunma-u.ac.jp

    2005-12-09

    A key enzyme for leukotriene biosynthesis is 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), which we found is exported from the nucleus when p38 MAPK is activated. CHO-K1 cells stably express green fluorescent protein-5-lipoxygenase fusion protein (GFP-5LO), which is located predominantly in the nucleus, and is exported by anisomycin, hydrogen peroxide, and sorbitol, with activation of p38 MAPK. SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, and Leptomycin B, an inhibitor of the nuclear export, blocked the anisomycin-induced export of GFP-5LO. When HEK293 cells were transformed with plasmids for wild-type GFP-5LO, GFP-5LO-S271A or GFP-5LO-S271E mutants, most wild-type GFP-5LO and GFP-5LO-S271A localized in the nucleus, but GFP-5LO-S271E localized in the cytosol. Thus, phosphorylation at Ser-271 of 5-LO is important for its export. Endogenous 5-LO in RBL cells stimulated with anisomycin was also exported from the nucleus. These results suggest that the nuclear export of 5-LO depends on the stress-induced activation of the p38 MAPK pathway.

  14. Tepoxalin: a dual cyclooxygenase/5-lipoxygenase inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism with potent anti-inflammatory activity and a favorable gastrointestinal profile.

    PubMed

    Argentieri, D C; Ritchie, D M; Ferro, M P; Kirchner, T; Wachter, M P; Anderson, D W; Rosenthale, M E; Capetola, R J

    1994-12-01

    Tepoxalin [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-hydroxy-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-methyl-1H- pyrazole-3-propanamide] is a potent inhibitor of sheep seminal vesicle cyclooxygenase (CO) (IC50 = 4.6 microM), rat basophilic leukemia cell (RBL-1) lysate CO (IC50 = 2.85 microM) and CO from intact RBL-1 cells (IC50 = 4.2 microM). The compound inhibits the production of thromboxane B2 (TxB2) in Ca++ ionophore A-23187-stimulated human peripheral blood leukocytes (HPBL; IC50 = 0.01 microM) and human whole blood (IC50 = 0.08 microM) and is a potent inhibitor of epinephrine-induced human platelet aggregation (IC50 = 0.045 microM). Tepoxalin inhibits lipoxygenase (LO) in RBL-1 lysates (IC50 = 0.15 microM) and intact RBL-1 cells (IC50 = 1.7 microM) and inhibits the generation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in calcium ionophore A-23187-stimulated HPBL (IC50 = 0.07 microM) and human whole blood (IC50 = 1.57 microM). Human platelet 12-LO (IC50 = 3.0 microM) is inhibited, but 15-LO is only weakly so (IC50 = 157 microM). In vivo, tepoxalin, administered orally, demonstrated potent anti-inflammatory activity in the established adjuvant arthritic rat (ED50 = 3.5 mg/kg) and potent analgesic activity in the acetic acid abdominal construction assay in mice (ED50 = 0.45 mg/kg). In an ex vivo whole blood eicosanoid production assay, tepoxalin produces a dose-related inhibition of prostaglandin (PG) and LT production in dogs (PGF2 alpha - ED50 = 0.015 mg/kg; LTB4 - ED50 = 2.37 mg/kg) and adjuvant arthritic rats following oral administration. In adjuvant arthritic rats, tepoxalin is devoid of ulcerogenic activity within its anti-inflammatory therapeutic range (1-33 mg/kg p.o.) and does not exhibit ulcerogenic activity in normal rats at doses lower than 100 mg/kg (UD50 = 173 mg/kg p.o.). Tepoxalin represents a new class of anti-inflammatory drugs which may exhibit less gastrointestinal toxicity and may be efficacious in immunoinflammatory disease states where excessive PG and LT production has been implicated and may

  15. Structural insights into human 5-lipoxygenase inhibition: combined ligand-based and target-based approach.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Caroline; Hénichart, Jean-Pierre; Durant, François; Wouters, Johan

    2006-01-12

    The human 5-LOX enzyme and its interaction with competitive inhibitors were investigated by means of a combined ligand-based and target-based approach. First, a pharmacophore model was generated for 16 non redox 5-LOX inhibitors with Catalyst (HipHop module). It includes two hydrophobic groups, an aromatic ring, and two hydrogen bond acceptors. The 3D structure of human 5-LOX was then modeled based on the crystal structure of rabbit 15-LOX, and the binding modes of representative ligands were studied by molecular docking. Confrontation of the docking results with the pharmacophore model allowed the weighting of the pharmacophoric features and the integration of structural information. This led to the proposal of an interaction model inside the 5-LOX active site, consisting of four major and two secondary interaction points: on one hand, two hydrophobic groups, an aromatic ring, and a hydrogen bond acceptor, and, on the other hand, an acidic moiety and an additional hydrogen bond acceptor. PMID:16392803

  16. Structural insights into human 5-lipoxygenase inhibition: combined ligand-based and target-based approach.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Caroline; Hénichart, Jean-Pierre; Durant, François; Wouters, Johan

    2006-01-12

    The human 5-LOX enzyme and its interaction with competitive inhibitors were investigated by means of a combined ligand-based and target-based approach. First, a pharmacophore model was generated for 16 non redox 5-LOX inhibitors with Catalyst (HipHop module). It includes two hydrophobic groups, an aromatic ring, and two hydrogen bond acceptors. The 3D structure of human 5-LOX was then modeled based on the crystal structure of rabbit 15-LOX, and the binding modes of representative ligands were studied by molecular docking. Confrontation of the docking results with the pharmacophore model allowed the weighting of the pharmacophoric features and the integration of structural information. This led to the proposal of an interaction model inside the 5-LOX active site, consisting of four major and two secondary interaction points: on one hand, two hydrophobic groups, an aromatic ring, and a hydrogen bond acceptor, and, on the other hand, an acidic moiety and an additional hydrogen bond acceptor.

  17. A new 5-lipoxygenase selective inhibitor derived from Artocarpus communis strongly inhibits arachidonic acid-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Koshihara, Y; Fujimoto, Y; Inoue, H

    1988-06-01

    Natural compounds isolated from the Indonesian plant, Artocarpus communis, inhibit 5-lipoxygenase of cultured mastocytoma cells. One of five compounds, AC-5-1, strongly inhibits 5-lipoxygenase with a half-inhibition dose of 5 +/- 0.12 X 10(-8) M. However, prostaglandin synthesizing activity is not inhibited until 10(-5) M. AC-5-1 is a highly selective inhibitor for 5-lipoxygenase. The AC-5-1 at 10(-5) M inhibits 96% of leukotriene C4 synthesis of mouse peritoneal cells facilitated by calcium-ionophore. Arachidonic acid-induced ear edema of mice, an in vivo inflammatory model, involving leukotriene induction, is strongly inhibited by AC-5-1 in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition is the strongest of any inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase reported previously. Since the natural compound AC-5-1 can selectively inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and affect in vivo inflammation, it will be interesting to investigate the role of leukotrienes on inflammation and other physiological processes.

  18. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  19. The metabolic effects of inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase and of cyclooxygenase 1 and 2 are an advancement in the efficacy and safety of anti-inflammatory therapy.

    PubMed

    Celotti, Fabio; Durand, Thierry

    2003-07-01

    Chronic treatment of inflammatory diseases with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is effective but not always devoid of serious side effects. In particular, the use of traditional non-steroidal aspirin-like drugs has been associated with a high incidence of gastrointestinal bleedings. The development of a new class of drugs, the selective cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2) inhibitors, has generated much expectation on the possibility to have safer compounds. After the initial enthusiasm of the scientific community, a re-evaluation of some large, randomized double-blind clinical studies performed with two of these compounds, has disclosed that the late serious gastrointestinal complications are not significantly reduced in comparison with non-selective inhibitors and that cardiovascular concerns might arise particularly if theses drugs are utilized in patients with underlying heart diseases. A new promising class of drugs to control inflammatory diseases is in advanced clinical development. The balanced inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and of cyclooxygenase (both types 1 and 2) block the formation of all the enzymatically arachidonic acid-derived metabolites, both prostaglandins (like COX inhibitors) and leukotrienes (LT); these drugs have been shown to possess a very good anti-inflammatory efficacy without serious side effects. Licofelone, previously known as ML3000, is the molecule in the most advanced phase of clinical development (phase III) among this class of compounds; it is a potent, competitive, and well balanced inhibitor of 5-LOX and COX pathways. The drug has been shown to possess analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic antibronchocostrictory and antiplatelet properties at doses which are safe for the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, the newly performed preclinical studies, here briefly reviewed, appear to indicate that the compound seems particularly suitable to protect the articular cartilage and the synovial space in degenerative joint disease

  20. The selective 5-LOX inhibitor 11-keto-β-boswellic acid protects against myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury in rats: involvement of redox and inflammatory cascades.

    PubMed

    Elshazly, Shimaa M; Abd El Motteleb, Dalia M; Nassar, Noha N

    2013-09-01

    Myocardial ischemia induces 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) translocation and leukotriene production in the heart. Leukotrienes increase inflammatory responses aggravating, thereby, ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. This study aimed to investigate whether the selective 5-LOX inhibitor 11-keto-β-boswellic acid (11-keto BA), in three different dose levels, exert a protective effect on myocardial I/R injury in an in vivo rat heart model. Sixty male Wister rats were used in this study and divided into five equal groups (n=12): GP1, sham-operated receiving normal saline; Gp 2, rats were subjected to 45 min left anterior descending coronary artery ligation followed by 4 h reperfusion to serve as I/R group. Gps 3-5 received 11-keto BA in doses 250, 500, 1,000 mg/kg, respectively, via an oral gavage for 7 days then were exposed to I/R. I/R injury induced a significant elevation in myeloperoxidase activity and gene expression of intracellular adhesion molecules, cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipooxygenasae, nuclear factor kappa-beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, and hemeoxygenease-1 consequently with reduction in glutathione peroxidase in heart tissues. Furthermore, immunohistochemical examination of the heart tissues showed positive immuostaining for both 3-nitrotyrosine and caspase-3 with DNA-ladder formation in all diseased rats. 11-keto BA in three dose levels exerted dose dependent cardioprotective effect manifested by dose-dependent reduction in serum lactate dehydrogenase and infract size through mechanisms related to enhancement of antioxidant capacity and prevention of inflammatory cascades.

  1. 5-Lipoxygenase Deficiency Reduces Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity and Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Miriam S. N.; Cardoso, Renato D. R.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Crespigio, Jefferson; Cunha, Thiago M.; Alves-Filho, José C.; da Silva, Rosiane V.; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2013-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) converts arachidonic acid into leukotrienes (LTs) and is involved in inflammation. At present, the participation of 5-LO in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity and liver damage has not been addressed. 5-LO deficient (5-LO−/−) mice and background wild type mice were challenged with APAP (0.3–6 g/kg) or saline. The lethality, liver damage, neutrophil and macrophage recruitment, LTB4, cytokine production, and oxidative stress were assessed. APAP induced a dose-dependent mortality, and the dose of 3 g/kg was selected for next experiments. APAP induced LTB4 production in the liver, the primary target organ in APAP toxicity. Histopathological analysis revealed that 5-LO−/− mice presented reduced APAP-induced liver necrosis and inflammation compared with WT mice. APAP-induced lethality, increase of plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, liver cytokine (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-10), superoxide anion, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production, myeloperoxidase and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity, Nrf2 and gp91phox mRNA expression, and decrease of reduced glutathione and antioxidant capacity measured by 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline 6-sulfonate) assay were prevented in 5-LO−/− mice compared to WT mice. Therefore, 5-LO deficiency resulted in reduced mortality due to reduced liver inflammatory and oxidative damage, suggesting 5-LO is a promising target to reduce APAP-induced lethality and liver inflammatory/oxidative damage. PMID:24288682

  2. Synthesis, SAR, and series evolution of novel oxadiazole-containing 5-lipoxygenase activating protein inhibitors: discovery of 2-[4-(3-{(r)-1-[4-(2-amino-pyrimidin-5-yl)-phenyl]-1-cyclopropyl-ethyl}-[1,2,4]oxadiazol-5-yl)-pyrazol-1-yl]-N,N-dimethyl-acetamide (BI 665915).

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidenori; Riether, Doris; Bartolozzi, Alessandra; Bosanac, Todd; Berger, Valentina; Binetti, Ralph; Broadwater, John; Chen, Zhidong; Crux, Rebecca; De Lombaert, Stéphane; Dave, Rajvee; Dines, Jonathon A; Fadra-Khan, Tazmeen; Flegg, Adam; Garrigou, Michael; Hao, Ming-Hong; Huber, John; Hutzler, J Matthew; Kerr, Steven; Kotey, Adrian; Liu, Weimin; Lo, Ho Yin; Loke, Pui Leng; Mahaney, Paige E; Morwick, Tina M; Napier, Spencer; Olague, Alan; Pack, Edward; Padyana, Anil K; Thomson, David S; Tye, Heather; Wu, Lifen; Zindell, Renee M; Abeywardane, Asitha; Simpson, Thomas

    2015-02-26

    The synthesis, structure-activity relationship (SAR), and evolution of a novel series of oxadiazole-containing 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) inhibitors are described. The use of structure-guided drug design techniques provided compounds that demonstrated excellent FLAP binding potency (IC50 < 10 nM) and potent inhibition of LTB4 synthesis in human whole blood (IC50 < 100 nM). Optimization of binding and functional potencies, as well as physicochemical properties resulted in the identification of compound 69 (BI 665915) that demonstrated an excellent cross-species drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) profile and was predicted to have low human clearance. In addition, 69 was predicted to have a low risk for potential drug-drug interactions due to its cytochrome P450 3A4 profile. In a murine ex vivo whole blood study, 69 demonstrated a linear dose-exposure relationship and a dose-dependent inhibition of LTB4 production. PMID:25671290

  3. Western blot expression of 5-lipoxygenase in the brain from striped dolphins (stenella coeruleoalba) and bottlenose dolphins (tursiops truncatus) with or without encephalitis/meningo-encephalitis of infectious nature.

    PubMed

    Di Guardo, G; Falconi, A; Di Francesco, A; Mazzariol, S; Centelleghe, C; Casalone, C; Pautasso, A; Cocumelli, C; Eleni, C; Petrella, A; Di Francesco, C E; Sabatucci, A; Leonardi, L; Serroni, A; Marsili, L; Storelli, M M; Giacominelli-Stuffler, R

    2015-01-01

    Dolphin Morbillivirus (DMV), Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella ceti are pathogens of major concern for wild cetaceans. Although a more or less severe encephalitis/meningo-encephalitis may occur in striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) infected by the aforementioned agents, almost no information is available on the neuropathogenesis of brain lesions, including the neuronal and non-neuronal cells targeted during infection, along with the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. We analyzed 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) expression in the brain of 11 striped dolphins and 5 bottlenose dolphins, affected or not by encephalitic lesions of various degrees associated with DMV, T. gondii and B. ceti. All the 8 striped dolphins with encephalitis showed a more consistent 5-LOX expression than that observed in the 3 striped dolphins showing no morphologic evidence of brain lesions, with the most prominent band intensity being detected in a B. ceti-infected animal. Similar results were not obtained in T. gondii-infected vs T. gondii-uninfected bottlenose dolphins. Overall, the higher 5-LOX expression found in the brain of the 8 striped dolphins with infectious neuroinflammation is of interest, given that 5-LOX is a putative marker for neurodegeneration in human patients and in experimental animal models. Therefore, further investigation on this challenging issue is also needed in stranded cetaceans affected by central neuropathies.

  4. Western blot expression of 5-lipoxygenase in the brain from striped dolphins (stenella coeruleoalba) and bottlenose dolphins (tursiops truncatus) with or without encephalitis/meningo-encephalitis of infectious nature.

    PubMed

    Di Guardo, G; Falconi, A; Di Francesco, A; Mazzariol, S; Centelleghe, C; Casalone, C; Pautasso, A; Cocumelli, C; Eleni, C; Petrella, A; Di Francesco, C E; Sabatucci, A; Leonardi, L; Serroni, A; Marsili, L; Storelli, M M; Giacominelli-Stuffler, R

    2015-01-01

    Dolphin Morbillivirus (DMV), Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella ceti are pathogens of major concern for wild cetaceans. Although a more or less severe encephalitis/meningo-encephalitis may occur in striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) infected by the aforementioned agents, almost no information is available on the neuropathogenesis of brain lesions, including the neuronal and non-neuronal cells targeted during infection, along with the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. We analyzed 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) expression in the brain of 11 striped dolphins and 5 bottlenose dolphins, affected or not by encephalitic lesions of various degrees associated with DMV, T. gondii and B. ceti. All the 8 striped dolphins with encephalitis showed a more consistent 5-LOX expression than that observed in the 3 striped dolphins showing no morphologic evidence of brain lesions, with the most prominent band intensity being detected in a B. ceti-infected animal. Similar results were not obtained in T. gondii-infected vs T. gondii-uninfected bottlenose dolphins. Overall, the higher 5-LOX expression found in the brain of the 8 striped dolphins with infectious neuroinflammation is of interest, given that 5-LOX is a putative marker for neurodegeneration in human patients and in experimental animal models. Therefore, further investigation on this challenging issue is also needed in stranded cetaceans affected by central neuropathies. PMID:25864766

  5. 5-Lipoxygenase inhibitors suppress RANKL-induced osteoclast formation via NFATc1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ju-Hee; Ting, Zheng; Moon, Mi-ran; Sim, Jung-Seon; Lee, Jung-Min; Doh, Kyung-Eun; Hong, Sunhye; Cui, Minghua; Choi, Sun; Chang, Hyeun Wook; Park Choo, Hea-Young; Yim, Mijung

    2015-11-01

    5-Lipoxygenase synthesizes leukotrienes from arachidonic acid. We developed three novel 5-LO inhibitors having a benzoxazole scaffold as a potential anti-osteoclastogenics. They significantly suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Furthermore, one compound, K7, inhibited the bone resorptive activity of osteoclasts. The anti-osteoclastogenic effect of K7 was mainly attributable to reduction in the expression of NFATc1, an essential transcription factor for osteoclast differentiation. K7 inhibited osteoclast formation via ERK and p38 MAPK, as well as NF-κB signaling pathways. K7 reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteoclast formation in vivo, corroborating the in vitro data. Thus, K7 exerted an inhibitory effect on osteoclast formation in vitro and in vivo, properties that make it a potential candidate for the treatment of bone diseases associated with excessive bone resorption.

  6. Structure and Ligand Based Drug Design Strategies in the Development of Novel 5-LOX Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Aparoy, Polamarasetty; Kumar Reddy, Kakularam; Reddanna, Pallu

    2012-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) are non-heme iron containing dioxygenases involved in the oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) such as arachidonic acid (AA). Depending on the position of insertion of oxygen, LOXs are classified into 5-, 8-, 9-, 12- and 15-LOX. Among these, 5-LOX is the most predominant isoform associated with the formation of 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HpETE), the precursor of non-peptido (LTB4) and peptido (LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4) leukotrienes. LTs are involved in inflammatory and allergic diseases like asthma, ulcerative colitis, rhinitis and also in cancer. Consequently 5-LOX has become target for the development of therapeutic molecules for treatment of various inflammatory disorders. Zileuton is one such inhibitor of 5-LOX approved for the treatment of asthma. In the recent times, computer aided drug design (CADD) strategies have been applied successfully in drug development processes. A comprehensive review on structure based drug design strategies in the development of novel 5-LOX inhibitors is presented in this article. Since the crystal structure of 5-LOX has been recently solved, efforts to develop 5-LOX inhibitors have mostly relied on ligand based rational approaches. The present review provides a comprehensive survey on these strategies in the development of 5-LOX inhibitors. PMID:22680930

  7. Serum 5-LOX: a progressive protein marker for breast cancer and new approach for therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Singh, Abhay Kumar; Kumar, Manoj; Shekhar, Shashank; Rai, Nitish; Kaur, Punit; Parshad, Rajinder; Dey, Sharmistha

    2016-09-01

    Lipoxygenase (LOX) pathway has emerged to have a role in carcinogenesis. There is an evidence that both 12-LOX and 5-LOX have procarcinogenic role. We have previously reported the elevated level of serum 12-LOX in breast cancer patients. This study evaluated the serum level of 5-LOX in breast cancer patients and its in vitro inhibition assessment with peptide inhibitor YWCS. The level of 5-LOX was determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The peptide inhibitor of 5-LOX was designed by molecular modeling and kinetic assay was performed by spectrophotometry. The siRNA mediated 5-LOX gene silencing was performed to investigate the effect on proliferation of MDA-MB-231, breast cancer cell line. The serum 5-LOX level in breast cancer (5.69±1.97ng/µl) was almost 2-fold elevated compared to control (3.53±1.0ng/µl) (P < 0.0001). The peptide YWCS had shown competitive inhibitory effects with IC50, 2.2 µM and dissociation constant (K D), 4.92×10(-8) M. The siRNA mediated knockdown of 5-LOX, resulted in the decreased gene expression for 5-LOX and increased cell death in MDA-MB-231 cell line and thereby play a key role in reducing tumor proliferation. Thus, it can be concluded that 5-LOX is one of the potential serum protein marker for breast cancer and a promising therapeutic target for the same. PMID:27432812

  8. Synthesis and Evaluation of 5-Lipoxygenase Translocation Inhibitors from Acylnitroso Hetero-Diels-Alder Cycloadducts†

    PubMed Central

    Bolger, Joshua K.; Tian, Wen; Wolter, William R.; Cho, Wonhwa; Suckow, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Acylnitroso cycloadducts have proven to be valuable intermediates in the syntheses of a plethora of biologically active molecules. Recently, organometallic reagents were shown to open bicyclic acylnitroso cycloadducts and, more interestingly, the prospect of highly regioselective openings was raised. This transformation was employed in the synthesis of a compound with excellent inhibitory activity against 5-lipoxygenase ((±)-4a, IC50 51 nM), an important mediator of inflammation intimately involved in a number of disease states including asthma and cancer. Optimization of the copper-mediated organometallic ring opening reaction was accomplished allowing the further exploration of the biological activity. Synthesis of a number of derivatives with varying affinity for metal binding as well as pendant groups in a range of sizes was accomplished. Analogues were tested in a whole cell assay which revealed a subset of the compounds to be inhibitors of enzyme translocation, a mode of action not previously known and, potentially, extremely important for better understanding of the enzyme and inhibitor development. Additionally, the lead compound was tested in vivo in an established colon cancer model and showed very encouraging anti-tumorogenic properties. PMID:21365098

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel pyrazolopyrimidines derivatives as anticancer and anti-5-lipoxygenase agents.

    PubMed

    Rahmouni, Ameur; Souiei, Sawssen; Belkacem, Mohamed Amine; Romdhane, Anis; Bouajila, Jalloul; Ben Jannet, Hichem

    2016-06-01

    A novel series of 6-aryl-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4(5H)-ones 3a-h were synthesized in a single step via condensation of carboxamide 2 with some aromatic aldehydes (presence of iodine). Treatment of aminopyrazole 1a with acetic anhydride afforded pyrazolopyrimidines 4 which on treatment with ethyl chloroacetate in refluxing dry DMF furnished a single product identified as ethyl 2-(3,6-dimethyl-4-oxo-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-5(4H)-yl) acetate 5. On the other hand, esterification of compound 6 with different alcohol, led to the formation of new esters linked pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidinones hybrids 7a-f. The reaction of compound 2 with 3-propargyl bromide gave the compound 8 used as a dipolarophile to access to triazoles (4- and 5-regioisomers (9a-e) and (10a-e), respectively) via the 1,3-dipoar cycloaddition reaction. Finally, condensation reaction of aminopyrazole 1b with α-cyanocinnamonitiles gave the new pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-3,6-dicarbonitriles 11a-e. Structures of compounds were established on the basis of (1)H/(13)C NMR and ESI-HRMS. Compounds were screened for their cytotoxic (HCT-116 and MCF-7) and 5-lipoxygenase inhibition activities. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) was discussed.

  10. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel pyrazolopyrimidines derivatives as anticancer and anti-5-lipoxygenase agents.

    PubMed

    Rahmouni, Ameur; Souiei, Sawssen; Belkacem, Mohamed Amine; Romdhane, Anis; Bouajila, Jalloul; Ben Jannet, Hichem

    2016-06-01

    A novel series of 6-aryl-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4(5H)-ones 3a-h were synthesized in a single step via condensation of carboxamide 2 with some aromatic aldehydes (presence of iodine). Treatment of aminopyrazole 1a with acetic anhydride afforded pyrazolopyrimidines 4 which on treatment with ethyl chloroacetate in refluxing dry DMF furnished a single product identified as ethyl 2-(3,6-dimethyl-4-oxo-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-5(4H)-yl) acetate 5. On the other hand, esterification of compound 6 with different alcohol, led to the formation of new esters linked pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidinones hybrids 7a-f. The reaction of compound 2 with 3-propargyl bromide gave the compound 8 used as a dipolarophile to access to triazoles (4- and 5-regioisomers (9a-e) and (10a-e), respectively) via the 1,3-dipoar cycloaddition reaction. Finally, condensation reaction of aminopyrazole 1b with α-cyanocinnamonitiles gave the new pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-3,6-dicarbonitriles 11a-e. Structures of compounds were established on the basis of (1)H/(13)C NMR and ESI-HRMS. Compounds were screened for their cytotoxic (HCT-116 and MCF-7) and 5-lipoxygenase inhibition activities. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) was discussed. PMID:27179178

  11. Arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) gene polymorphism is associated with Alzheimer's disease and body mass index.

    PubMed

    Šerý, Omar; Hlinecká, Lýdia; Povová, Jana; Bonczek, Ondřej; Zeman, Tomáš; Janout, Vladimír; Ambroz, Petr; Khan, Naim A; Balcar, Vladimir J

    2016-03-15

    Dementias of old age, in particular Alzheimer's disease (AD), pose a growing threat to the longevity and quality of life of individuals as well as whole societies world-wide. The risk factors are both genetic and environmental (life-style) and there is an overlap with similar factors predisposing to cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Using a case-control genetic approach, we have identified a SNP (rs10507391) in ALOX5 gene, previously associated with an increased risk of stroke, as a novel genetic risk factor for AD. ALOX5 gene encodes a 5'-lipoxygenase (5'-LO) activating protein (FLAP), a crucial component of the arachidonic acid/leukotriene inflammatory cascade. A-allele of rs4769874 polymorphism increases the risk of AD 1.41-fold (p<0.0001), while AA genotype does so 1.79-fold (p<0.0001). In addition, GG genotype of rs4769874 polymorphism is associated with a modest increase in body mass index (BMI). We discuss potential biochemical mechanisms linking the SNP to AD and suggest possible preventive pharmacotherapies some of which are based on commonly available natural products. Finally, we set the newly identified AD risk factors into a broader context of similar CVD risk factors to generate a more comprehensive picture of interacting genetics and life-style habits potentially leading to the deteriorating mental health in the old age. PMID:26944113

  12. Arachidonate 5 Lipoxygenase Expression in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Promotes Invasion via MMP-9 Induction

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Nicolas T.; Nowicki, Theodore S; Azzi, Jean Paul; Reyes, Ismael; Iacob, Codrin; Xie, Suqing; Swati, Ismatun; Suslina, Nina; Schantz, Stimson; Tiwari, Raj K.; Geliebter, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) expression and activity has been implicated in tumor pathogenesis, yet its role in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has not been characterized. ALOX5 protein and mRNA were upregulated in PTC compared to matched, normal thyroid tissue, and ALOX5 expression correlated with invasive tumor histopathology. Evidence suggests that PTC invasion is mediated through the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that can degrade and remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM). A correlation between MMP-9 and ALOX5 protein expression was established by immunohistochemical analysis of PTC and normal thyroid tissues using a tissue array. Transfection of ALOX5 into a PTC cell line (BCPAP) increased MMP-9 secretion and cell invasion across an ECM barrier. The ALOX5 product, 5(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid also increased MMP-9 protein expression by BCPAP in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibitors of MMP-9 and ALOX5 reversed ALOX5-enhanced invasion. Here we describe a new role for ALOX5 as a mediator of invasion via MMP-9 induction; this ALOX5/MMP9 pathway represents a new avenue in the search for functional biomarkers and/or potential therapeutic targets for aggressive PTC. PMID:22253131

  13. The 5-lipoxygenase pathway: oxidative and inflammatory contributions to the Alzheimer’s disease phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Yash B.; Praticò, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common, and, arguably, one of the most-well studied, neurodegenerative conditions. Several decades of investigation have revealed that amyloid-β and tau proteins are critical pathological players in this condition. Genetic analyses have revealed specific mutations in the cellular machinery that produces amyloid-β, but these mutations are found in only a small fraction of patients with the early-onset variant of AD. In addition to development of amyloid-β and tau pathology, oxidative damage and inflammation are consistently found in the brains of these patients. The 5-lipoxygenase protein enzyme (5LO) and its downstream leukotriene metabolites have long been known to be important modulators of oxidation and inflammation in other disease states. Recent in vivo evidence using murine knock-out models has implicated the 5LO pathway, which also requires the 5LO activating protein (FLAP), in the molecular pathology of AD, including the metabolism of amyloid-β and tau. In this manuscript, we will provide an overview of 5LO and FLAP, discussing their involvement in biochemical pathways relevant to AD pathogenesis. We will also discuss how the 5LO pathway contributes to the molecular and behavioral insults seen in AD and provide an assessment of how targeting these proteins could lead to therapeutics relevant not only for AD, but also other related neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:25642165

  14. 17β Estradiol Modulates Perfusion Pressure and Expression of 5-LOX and CYP450 4A in the Isolated Kidney of Metabolic Syndrome Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zúñiga-Muñoz, A. M.; Guarner Lans, V.; Soria-Castro, E.; Diaz-Diaz, E.; Torrico-Lavayen, R.; Tena-Betancourt, E.; Pérez-Torres, I.

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and progression of nephropathy depend on sex. We examined a protective effect of estradiol against nephropathy in metabolic syndrome through the modulation of the arachidonic acid metabolism by activating the 5-lipoxygenase and cytochrome p450 4A pathways. 28 female Wistar rats were divided into four groups of seven animals each: control, intact metabolic syndrome, ovariectomized metabolic syndrome, and metabolic syndrome ovariectomized plus estradiol. Blood pressure, body weight, body fat, triglycerides, insulin, HOMA-index, albuminuria, and TNF-α were increased in ovariectomized metabolic syndrome rats (p < 0.001). The perfusion pressure in isolated kidneys of ovariectomized metabolic syndrome rats in presence of 4 μg of arachidonic acid was increased. The inhibitors of the arachidonic acid metabolism Baicalein, Miconazole, and Indomethacin in these rats decreased the perfusion pressure by 57.62%, 99.83%, and 108.5%, respectively and they decreased creatinine clearance and the arachidonic acid percentage. Phospholipase A2 expression in the kidney of ovariectomized metabolic syndrome rats was not modified. 5-lipoxygenase was increased in metabolic syndrome ovariectomized rats while cytochrome p450 4A was decreased. In conclusion, the loss of estradiol increases renal damage while the treatment with estradiol benefits renal function by modulating arachidonic acid metabolism through the 5-lipoxygenase and cytochrome p450 4A pathways. PMID:26491436

  15. Effect of the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZD2138 on aspirin-induced asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, S. M.; Bell, G. S.; Foster, S.; Spruce, K. E.; MacMillan, R.; Williams, A. J.; Lee, T. H.; Arm, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The cysteinyl leukotrienes may play a central part in the mechanisms of aspirin-sensitive asthma. Previous work has shown that individuals with aspirin-sensitive asthma have high basal urinary LTE4 levels which increase further upon aspirin ingestion, and that sulphidopeptide leukotriene receptor antagonists attenuate aspirin-induced airflow obstruction. If the cysteinyl leukotrienes cause aspirin-induced asthmatic reactions, inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway should prevent aspirin-induced bronchospasm. This hypothesis has been tested with ZD2138, a specific non-redox 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor. METHODS--Seven subjects (four men) with aspirin-sensitive asthma with baseline FEV1 values > 67% were studied. ZD2138 (350 mg) or placebo was given on two separate occasions two weeks apart in a randomised double blind fashion. A single dose of aspirin was administered four hours after dosing and FEV1 was measured for six hours. Inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway by ZD2138 was assessed by measurements of urinary LTE4 levels and ex vivo calcium ionophore stimulated LTB4 generation in whole blood, before administration of drug or placebo and at regular time intervals after dosing and aspirin administration. RESULTS--ZD2138 protected against the aspirin-induced reduction in FEV1 with a 20.3 (4.9)% fall in FEV1 following placebo compared with 4.9 (2.9)% following ZD2138. This was associated with 72% inhibition of ex vivo LTB4 generation in whole blood at 12 hours and a 74% inhibition of the rise in urinary LTE4 excretion at six hours after aspirin ingestion. CONCLUSIONS--In aspirin-sensitive asthma the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZD2138 inhibits the fall in FEV1 induced by aspirin and this is associated with substantial inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase. PMID:8091318

  16. On the interference of boswellic acids with 5-lipoxygenase: mechanistic studies in vitro and pharmacological relevance.

    PubMed

    Siemoneit, Ulf; Pergola, Carlo; Jazzar, Bianca; Northoff, Hinnak; Skarke, Carsten; Jauch, Johann; Werz, Oliver

    2009-03-15

    Boswellic acids are pharmacologically active ingredients of frankincense with anti-inflammatory properties. It was shown that in vitro 11-keto-boswellic acids inhibit 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO, EC 1.13.11.34), the key enzyme in leukotriene biosynthesis, which may account for their anti-inflammatory effectiveness. However, whether 11-keto-boswellic acids interfere with 5-LO under physiologically relevant conditions (i.e., in whole blood assays) and whether they inhibit 5-LO in vivo is unknown. Inhibition of human 5-LO by the major naturally occurring boswellic acids was analyzed in cell-free and cell-based activity assays. Moreover, interference of boswellic acids with 5-LO in neutrophil incubations in the presence of albumin and in human whole blood was assessed, and plasma leukotriene B(4) of frankincense-treated healthy volunteers was determined. Factors influencing 5-LO activity (i.e., Ca(2+), phospholipids, substrate concentration) significantly modulate the potency of 11-keto-boswellic acids to inhibit 5-LO. Moreover, 11-keto-boswellic acids efficiently suppressed 5-LO product formation in isolated neutrophils (IC(50)=2.8 to 8.8 muM) but failed to inhibit 5-LO product formation in human whole blood. In the presence of albumin (10 mg/ml), 5-LO inhibition by 11-keto-boswellic acids (up to 30 muM) in neutrophils was abolished, apparently due to strong albumin-binding (>95%) of 11-keto-boswellic acids. Finally, single dose (800 mg) oral administration of frankincense extracts to human healthy volunteers failed to suppress leukotriene B(4) plasma levels. Our data show that boswellic acids are direct 5-LO inhibitors that efficiently suppress 5-LO product synthesis in common in vitro test models, however, the pharmacological relevance of such interference in vivo seems questionable.

  17. Electrophilic Fatty Acid Species Inhibit 5-Lipoxygenase and Attenuate Sepsis-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Khader; Steinbrink, Svenja D.; Frömel, Timo; Lill, Nicole; Isaak, Johann; Häfner, Ann-Kathrin; Roos, Jessica; Hofmann, Bettina; Heide, Heinrich; Geisslinger, Gerd; Steinhilber, Dieter; Freeman, Bruce A.; Maier, Thorsten J.; Fleming, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The reaction of nitric oxide and nitrite-derived species with polyunsaturated fatty acids yields electrophilic fatty acid nitroalkene derivatives (NO2-FA), which display anti-inflammatory properties. Given that the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO, ALOX5) possesses critical nucleophilic amino acids, which are potentially sensitive to electrophilic modifications, we determined the consequences of NO2-FA on 5-LO activity in vitro and on 5-LO-mediated inflammation in vivo. Results: Stimulation of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) with nitro-oleic (NO2-OA) or nitro-linoleic acid (NO2-LA) (but not the parent lipids) resulted in the concentration-dependent and irreversible inhibition of 5-LO activity. Similar effects were observed in cell lysates and using the recombinant human protein, indicating a direct reaction with 5-LO. NO2-FAs did not affect the activity of the platelet-type 12-LO (ALOX12) or 15-LO-1 (ALOX15) in intact cells or the recombinant protein. The NO2-FA-induced inhibition of 5-LO was attributed to the alkylation of Cys418, and the exchange of Cys418 to serine rendered 5-LO insensitive to NO2-FA. In vivo, the systemic administration of NO2-OA to mice decreased neutrophil and monocyte mobilization in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), attenuated the formation of the 5-LO product 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), and inhibited lung injury. The administration of NO2-OA to 5-LO knockout mice had no effect on LPS-induced neutrophil or monocyte mobilization as well as on lung injury. Innovation: Prophylactic administration of NO2-OA to septic mice inhibits inflammation and promotes its resolution by interfering in 5-LO-mediated inflammatory processes. Conclusion: NO2-FAs directly and irreversibly inhibit 5-LO and attenuate downstream acute inflammatory responses. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2667–2680. PMID:24206143

  18. On the inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase product formation by tryptanthrin: mechanistic studies and efficacy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pergola, C; Jazzar, B; Rossi, A; Northoff, H; Hamburger, M; Sautebin, L; Werz, O

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Leukotrienes (LTs) are pro-inflammatory mediators produced by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). Currently available 5-LO inhibitors either lack efficacy or are toxic and novel approaches are required to establish a successful anti-LT therapy. Here we provide a detailed evaluation of the effectiveness of the plant-derived alkaloid tryptanthrin as an inhibitor of LT biosynthesis. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We analysed LT formation and performed mechanistic studies in human neutrophils stimulated with pathophysiologically relevant stimuli (LPS and formyl peptide), as well as in cell-free assays (neutrophil homogenates or recombinant human 5-LO) and in human whole blood. The in vivo effectiveness of tryptanthrin was evaluated in the rat model of carrageenan-induced pleurisy. KEY RESULTS Tryptanthrin potently reduced LT-formation in human neutrophils (IC50 = 0.6 µM). However, tryptanthrin is not a redox-active compound and did not directly interfere with 5-LO activity in cell-free assays. Similarly, tryptanthrin did not inhibit the release of arachidonic acid, the activation of MAPKs, or the increase in [Ca2+]i, but it modified the subcellular localization of 5-LO. Moreover, tryptanthrin potently suppressed LT formation in human whole blood (IC50 = 10 µM) and reduced LTB4 levels in the rat pleurisy model after a single oral dose of 10 mg·kg−1. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our data reveal that tryptanthrin is a potent natural inhibitor of cellular LT biosynthesis with proven efficacy in whole blood and is effective in vivo after oral administration. Its unique pharmacological profile supports further analysis to exploit its pharmacological potential. PMID:21797843

  19. Regulation of tumorigenic Wnt signaling by cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase and their pharmacological inhibitors: A basis for novel drugs targeting cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Roos, Jessica; Grösch, Sabine; Werz, Oliver; Schröder, Peter; Ziegler, Slava; Fulda, Simone; Paulus, Patrick; Urbschat, Anja; Kühn, Benjamin; Maucher, Isabelle; Fettel, Jasmin; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Piesche, Matthias; Matrone, Carmela; Steinhilber, Dieter; Parnham, Michael J; Maier, Thorsten J

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is a highly conserved pathway with a prominent role in embryogenic development, adult tissue homeostasis, cell polarization, stem cell biology, cell differentiation, and proliferation. Furthermore, canonical Wnt signaling is of pivotal importance in the pathogenesis of a number of cancer types and crucially affects tumor initiation, cancer cell proliferation, cancer cell apoptosis, and metastasis. Reports over the last decade have provided strong evidence for a pathophysiological role of Wnt signaling in non-malignant classical inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Although, several agents suppressing the Wnt pathway at different levels have been identified, the development of clinically relevant Wnt-inhibiting agents remains challenging due to selectivity and toxicity issues. Several studies have shown that long-term administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs protects against colon cancer and potentially other tumor types by interfering both with the COX and the Wnt pathway. Our own studies have shown that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs suppress Wnt signaling by targeting the pro-inflammatory enzyme 5-lipoxygenase which is the key enzyme pathophysiologically involved in the synthesis of leukotrienes. Furthermore, we found a direct link between the 5-lipoxygenase and Wnt signaling pathways, which is essential for the maintenance of leukemic stem cells. Accordingly, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase led to an impairment of Wnt-dependent acute and chronic myeloid leukemic stem cells. We believe that 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors might represent a novel type of Wnt inhibitor activating a potentially naturally occurring novel mechanism of suppression of Wnt signaling that is non-toxic, at least in mice, and is potentially well tolerated in patients.

  20. Design, synthesis and evaluation of semi-synthetic triazole-containing caffeic acid analogues as 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    De Lucia, Daniela; Lucio, Oscar Méndez; Musio, Biagia; Bender, Andreas; Listing, Monika; Dennhardt, Sophie; Koeberle, Andreas; Garscha, Ulrike; Rizzo, Roberta; Manfredini, Stefano; Werz, Oliver; Ley, Steven V

    2015-08-28

    In this work the synthesis, structure-activity relationship (SAR) and biological evaluation of a novel series of triazole-containing 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors are described. The use of structure-guided drug design techniques provided compounds that demonstrated excellent 5-LO inhibition with IC50 of 0.2 and 3.2 μm in cell-based and cell-free assays, respectively. Optimization of binding and functional potencies resulted in the identification of compound 13d, which showed an enhanced activity compared to the parent bioactive compound caffeic acid 5 and the clinically approved zileuton 3. Compounds 15 and 16 were identified as lead compounds in inhibiting 5-LO products formation in neutrophils. Their interference with other targets on the arachidonic acid pathway was also assessed. Cytotoxicity tests were performed to exclude a relationship between cytotoxicity and the increased activity observed after structure optimization.

  1. Syntheses and evaluation of novel isoliquiritigenin derivatives as potential dual inhibitors for amyloid-beta aggregation and 5-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Zi-Ying; Li, Yan-Ping; Li, Ding; Huang, Shi-Liang; Gu, Lian-Quan; Xu, Jun; Huang, Zhi-Shu

    2013-08-01

    A series of new isoliquiritigenin (ISL) derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as dual inhibitors for amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregation and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). It was found that all these synthetic compounds inhibited Aβ (1-42) aggregation effectively with their IC₅₀ values ranged from 2.2 ± 1.5 μM to 23.8 ± 2.0 μM. These derivatives also showed inhibitory activity to 5-LO with their IC50 values ranged from 6.1 ± 0.1 μM to 35.9 ± 0.3 μM. Their structure-activity relationships (SAR) and mechanisms of inhibitions were studied. This study provided potentially important information for further development of ISL derivatives as multifunctional agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment.

  2. 5-Lipoxygenase is a direct p53 target gene in humans.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Bianca; Ahmad, Khalil; Roos, Jessica; Lehmann, Christoph; Chiba, Tomohiro; Ulrich-Rückert, Sandra; Smeenk, Leonie; van Heeringen, Simon; Maier, Thorsten J; Groner, Bernd; Steinhilber, Dieter

    2015-08-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a critical role in cancer, and more than 50% of human tumors contain mutations or deletions of the TP53 gene. p53 can transactivate or repress target genes in response to diverse stress signals, such as transient growth arrest, DNA repair, cellular differentiation, senescence and apoptosis. Through an unbiased genome-wide ChIP-seq analysis, we have found that 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5, 5-LO) which is a key enzyme of leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis, is a direct target gene of p53 and its expression is induced by genotoxic stress via actinomycin D (Act.D) or etoposide (Eto) treatment. 5-LO and LTs play a role in immunological diseases as well as in tumorigenesis and tumor growth. p53 binds to a specific binding site consisting of a complete p53 consensus-binding motif in ALOX5 intron G which is located about 64kbp downstream of the transcriptional start site. We confirmed the strong binding of p53 to the 5-LO target site in ChIP-qPCR experiments. Expression analyses by qRT-PCR and immunoblot further revealed that genotoxic stress induces the ALOX5 mRNA and protein expression in a p53-dependent manner. Knockdown of p53 in U2OS cells leads to a downregulation of 5-LO mRNA and protein expression. In addition, immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation assays indicate the direct binding of 5-LO to p53 protein. Furthermore, we found that 5-LO can inhibit the transcriptional activity of p53 suggesting that 5-LO acts in a negative feedback loop to limit induction of p53 target genes.

  3. 5-lipoxygenase pathway is essential for the control of granuloma extension induced by Schistosoma mansoni eggs in lung.

    PubMed

    Toffoli da Silva, Gabriel; Espíndola, Milena Sobral; Fontanari, Caroline; Rosada, Rogerio Silva; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Frantz, Fabiani Gai

    2016-08-01

    According to WHO, it is estimated that approximately 2 billion people are infected with intestinal helminths worldwide and the number of people who are cured of these diseases is relatively low, resulting in a large percentage of chronically infected individuals. Schistosomiasis is one of the most important parasitic diseases present in developing countries configuring it as a serious public health problem, directly related to poverty and social disadvantage. Once the parasite infection is established, Schistosoma mansoni eggs fall into the bloodstream and are trapped in the liver microcirculation where a strong granulomatous response and fibrosis formation occurs. In the experimental model, granulomas develop in the mouse lung after intravenous injection of purified eggs. Here we aim to understand how leukotrienes are involved in the granuloma formation. Leukotrienes are lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid metabolites via 5-lipoxygenase (5LO) enzyme. They are potent proinflammatory agents and induce recruitment, cell activation, regulation of microbicidal activity of polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells. In this study, 5LO deficient mice (5LO(-/-)) were inoculated with S. mansoni eggs for evaluation of immunopathological parameters involved in the induction of type 2 granulomas. We showed that in the absence of leukotrienes, the size of granulomas were decreased comparing to the wild type mice and the inflammatory compromised areas had a lower extension. In 5LO(-/-) mice granulomas presented extensive areas of fibrosis, detected by α-SMA expression along the lesions, indicating remodeling in attempt to reestablish the normal tissue. Also, comparing to WT mice we detected decrease of IL-4 and IL-13 and increase of TGF-β in the lung of 5LO(-/-), but these mice failed to produce protective IFN-γ and IL-12. These results evidenced 5-Lipoxygenase as an important pathway during lung injury due to Schistosoma-eggs injection. PMID:27262746

  4. Virtual Dual inhibition of COX-2 / 5-LOX enzymes based on binding properties of alpha-amyrins, the anti-inflammatory compound as a promising anti-cancer drug

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Mehdi; Assadolahi, Vahideh; Yazdani, Mohsen; Nikaein, Donya; Rashidieh, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of Cordia myxa was considerably effective on curing acute inflammation in mouse model. Previous studies suggested significant anti-inflammatory activities as well as potential anticancer agent of α-amyrins in seeds. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipooxygenase (5-LOX) is significant in cancer prevention and therapeutics although this inhibition with chemo-drugs has its own side-effects. It is shown that these enzymes pathways are related to several cancers including colon, breast and lung cancer. This study was conducted based on Cordia species' α-amyrins as a safer natural anti-cancer compound for inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes by molecular docking. The X-ray crystal structure of COX2 / 5-LOX enzymes and α-amyrins was retrieved and energetically minimized respectively. The binding site and surface of enzymes were detected. Docking studies were performed by AutoDock 4.2 using Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA). Finally drug likeness, molecular pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity of α-amyrins was calculated. Molecular Docking revealed hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions between α-amyrins with both active sites of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes. Interestingly, it covalently bonded to Fe cofactor of 5-LOX enzyme and chelated this molecule. Base on binding energies (∆G) α-amyrin has more inhibitory effects on 5-LOX (-10.45 Kcal/mol) than COX-2 (-8.02 Kcal/mol). Analysis of molecular pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that α-amyrins complied with most sets of Lipinski's rules, and so it could be a suitable ligand for docking studies. Eventually, bioactivity score showed α-amyrins possess considerable biological activities as nuclear receptor, enzyme inhibitor, GPCR and protease inhibitor ligand. These results clearly demonstrate that α-amyrins could act as potential highly selective COX-/5-LOX inhibitor. Also, it is a safe compound in comparison with classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs

  5. Virtual Dual inhibition of COX-2 / 5-LOX enzymes based on binding properties of alpha-amyrins, the anti-inflammatory compound as a promising anti-cancer drug.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Mehdi; Assadolahi, Vahideh; Yazdani, Mohsen; Nikaein, Donya; Rashidieh, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of Cordia myxa was considerably effective on curing acute inflammation in mouse model. Previous studies suggested significant anti-inflammatory activities as well as potential anticancer agent of α-amyrins in seeds. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipooxygenase (5-LOX) is significant in cancer prevention and therapeutics although this inhibition with chemo-drugs has its own side-effects. It is shown that these enzymes pathways are related to several cancers including colon, breast and lung cancer. This study was conducted based on Cordia species' α-amyrins as a safer natural anti-cancer compound for inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes by molecular docking. The X-ray crystal structure of COX2 / 5-LOX enzymes and α-amyrins was retrieved and energetically minimized respectively. The binding site and surface of enzymes were detected. Docking studies were performed by AutoDock 4.2 using Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA). Finally drug likeness, molecular pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity of α-amyrins was calculated. Molecular Docking revealed hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions between α-amyrins with both active sites of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes. Interestingly, it covalently bonded to Fe cofactor of 5-LOX enzyme and chelated this molecule. Base on binding energies (∆G) α-amyrin has more inhibitory effects on 5-LOX (-10.45 Kcal/mol) than COX-2 (-8.02 Kcal/mol). Analysis of molecular pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that α-amyrins complied with most sets of Lipinski's rules, and so it could be a suitable ligand for docking studies. Eventually, bioactivity score showed α-amyrins possess considerable biological activities as nuclear receptor, enzyme inhibitor, GPCR and protease inhibitor ligand. These results clearly demonstrate that α-amyrins could act as potential highly selective COX-/5-LOX inhibitor. Also, it is a safe compound in comparison with classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs

  6. Virtual Dual inhibition of COX-2 / 5-LOX enzymes based on binding properties of alpha-amyrins, the anti-inflammatory compound as a promising anti-cancer drug.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Mehdi; Assadolahi, Vahideh; Yazdani, Mohsen; Nikaein, Donya; Rashidieh, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of Cordia myxa was considerably effective on curing acute inflammation in mouse model. Previous studies suggested significant anti-inflammatory activities as well as potential anticancer agent of α-amyrins in seeds. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipooxygenase (5-LOX) is significant in cancer prevention and therapeutics although this inhibition with chemo-drugs has its own side-effects. It is shown that these enzymes pathways are related to several cancers including colon, breast and lung cancer. This study was conducted based on Cordia species' α-amyrins as a safer natural anti-cancer compound for inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes by molecular docking. The X-ray crystal structure of COX2 / 5-LOX enzymes and α-amyrins was retrieved and energetically minimized respectively. The binding site and surface of enzymes were detected. Docking studies were performed by AutoDock 4.2 using Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA). Finally drug likeness, molecular pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity of α-amyrins was calculated. Molecular Docking revealed hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions between α-amyrins with both active sites of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes. Interestingly, it covalently bonded to Fe cofactor of 5-LOX enzyme and chelated this molecule. Base on binding energies (∆G) α-amyrin has more inhibitory effects on 5-LOX (-10.45 Kcal/mol) than COX-2 (-8.02 Kcal/mol). Analysis of molecular pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that α-amyrins complied with most sets of Lipinski's rules, and so it could be a suitable ligand for docking studies. Eventually, bioactivity score showed α-amyrins possess considerable biological activities as nuclear receptor, enzyme inhibitor, GPCR and protease inhibitor ligand. These results clearly demonstrate that α-amyrins could act as potential highly selective COX-/5-LOX inhibitor. Also, it is a safe compound in comparison with classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs

  7. Naturally occurring biflavonoid, ochnaflavone, inhibits cyclooxygenases-2 and 5-lipoxygenase in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    Son, Min Jung; Moon, Tae Chul; Lee, Eun Kyung; Son, Kun Ho; Kim, Hyun Pyo; Kang, Sam Sik; Son, Jong Keun; Lee, Seung Ho; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2006-04-01

    Ochnaflavone is a medicinal herbal product isolated from Lonicera japonica that inhibits cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) dependent phases of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) generation in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 0.6 microM. Western blotting probed with specific anti-COX-2 antibodies showed that the decrease in quantity of the PGD2 product was accompanied by a decrease in the COX-2 protein level. In addition, this compound consistently inhibited the production of leukotriene C4 (LTC4) in a dose dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 6.56 microM. These results demonstrate that ochnaflavone has a dual cyclooxygenase-2/5-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity. Furthermore, this compound strongly inhibited degranulation reaction in a dose dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 3.01 microM. Therefore, this compound might provide a basis for novel anti-inflammatory drugs.

  8. Repeated allergen exposure reduce early phase airway response and leukotriene release despite upregulation of 5-lipoxygenase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergen induced early phase airway response and airway plasma exudation are predominantly mediated by inflammatory mast cell mediators including histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated allergen exposure affects early phase airway response to allergen challenge. Methods A trimellitic anhydride (TMA) sensitized guinea pig model was used to investigate the effects of low dose repeated allergen exposure on cholinergic airway responsiveness, early phase airway response and plasma exudation, as well as local airway production of mast cell derived cysteinyl leukotrienes and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) after allergen challenge. Results Repeated low dose allergen exposure increased cholinergic airway responsiveness. In contrast, early phase airway response and plasma exudation in response to a high-dose allergen challenge were strongly attenuated after repeated low dose allergen exposure. Inhibition of the airway response was unspecific to exposed allergen and independent of histamine receptor blocking. Furthermore, a significant reduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2 was found in the airways of animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen. However, in vitro stimulation of airway tissue from animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen with arachidonic acid and calcium ionophore (A23187) induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2, suggesting enhanced activity of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Conclusions The inhibition of the early phase airway response, cysteinyl leukotriene and TXB2 production after repeated allergen exposure may result from unresponsive effector cells. PMID:22439792

  9. 5-Lipoxygenase gene transfer worsens memory, amyloid and tau brain pathologies in a mouse model of AD

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jin; Giannopoulos, Phillip F.; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Golde, Todd E.; Pratico, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Objective The 5-lipoxygenase (5LO) enzyme is up-regulated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and its genetic absence reduces Aβ levels in APP mice. However, its functional role in modulating tau neuropathology remains to be elucidated. Methods To this end, we generated triple transgenic mice (3xTg-AD) over-expressing neuronal 5LO and investigated their phenotype. Results Compared with controls, 3xTg-AD mice over-expressing 5LO manifested an exacerbation of memory deficits, plaques and tangles pathologies. The elevation in Aβ was secondary to an up-regulation of γ-secretase pathway, whereas tau hyperphosphorylation resulted from an activation of the Cdk5 kinase. In vitro study confirmed the involvement of this kinase in the 5-LO-dependent tau phosphorylation, which was independent of the effect on Aβ. Interpretation Our findings highlight the novel functional role that neuronal 5LO plays in exacerbating AD-related tau pathologies. They provide critical preclinical evidence to justify testing selective 5LO inhibitors for AD treatment. PMID:23034916

  10. One-step semisynthesis of oleacein and the determination as a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Vougogiannopoulou, Konstantina; Lemus, Christelle; Halabalaki, Maria; Pergola, Carlo; Werz, Oliver; Smith, Amos B; Michel, Sylvie; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Deguin, Brigitte

    2014-03-28

    The dialdehydes oleacein (2) and oleocanthal (4) are closely related to oleuropein (1) and ligstroside (3), the two latter compounds being abundant iridoids of Olea europaea. By exploiting oleuropein isolated from the plant leaf extract, an efficient procedure has been developed for a one-step semisynthesis of oleacein under Krapcho decarbomethoxylation conditions. Highlighted is the fact that 5-lipoxygenase is a direct target for oleacein with an inhibitory potential (IC50: 2 μM) more potent than oleocanthal (4) and oleuropein (1). This enzyme catalyzes the initial steps in the biosynthesis of pro-inflammatory leukotrienes. Taken together, the methodology presented here offers an alternative solution to isolation or total synthesis for the procurement of oleacein, thus facilitating the further development as a potential anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:24568174

  11. Gene expression of 5-lipoxygenase and LTA4 hydrolase in renal tissue of nephrotic syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Menegatti, E; Roccatello, D; Fadden, K; Piccoli, G; De Rosa, G; Sena, L M; Rifai, A

    1999-01-01

    Leukotrienes (LT) of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway constitute a class of potent biological lipid mediators of inflammation implicated in the pathogenesis of different models of experimental glomerulonephritis. The key enzyme, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), catalyses oxygenation of arachidonic acid to generate the primary leukotriene LTA4. This LT, in turn, serves as a substrate for either LTA4 hydrolase, to form the potent chemoattractant LTB4, or LTC4 synthase, to produce the powerful vasoconstrictor LTC4. To investigate the potential role of LT in the pathogenesis of human glomerulonephritis with nephrotic syndrome, we examined the gene expression of 5-LO and LTA4 hydrolase in renal tissue of 21 adult patients with nephrotic syndrome and 11 controls. The patients consisted of 11 cases of membranous nephropathy (MN), seven focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), two non-IgA mesangial glomerulonephritis and one minimal change disease. Total RNA purified from renal tissue was reverse transcribed into cDNA and amplified with specific primers in a polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Eight patients' renal tissue, four MN and four FSGS, co-expressed 5-LO and LTA4 hydrolase. In situ hybridization analysis revealed 5-LO expression and distribution limited to the interstitial cells surrounding the peritubular capillaries. Comparative clinical and immunohistological data showed that these eight patients had impaired renal function and interstitial changes that significantly correlated with 5-LO expression. These findings suggest that leukotrienes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of MN and FSGS. These results are also relevant to elucidating the pathophysiologic mechanisms which underlie progression to renal failure in these diseases. PMID:10337029

  12. Antinociceptive and antitumor activity of novel synthetic mononuclear Ruthenium (II) compounds

    PubMed Central

    Sunder A, Shyam; Dhulipala, Satyavati; Thota, Sreekanth; Yerra, Rajeshwar; Balzarini, Jan; De Clercq, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Background: From the thousands of years, metal compounds have been used in medicine for treatment of various diseases including various types of cancers. Ruthenium was seen as a promising metal due to its similar kinetics to platinum and its lower toxicity. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the newer mononuclear ruthenium (II) compounds for antinociceptive and antitumor activities. Materials and Methods: Ruthenium (II) compounds were evaluated for antinociceptive and antitumor activity using the various in vitro and in vivo models. The compounds were injected to mice at concentrations of 1 and 2 mg kg-1 intraperitoneally and were screened for antinociceptive activity, and the antiproliferative effect was evaluated against murine leukemia cells (L1210), human T-lymphocyte cells (CEM) and human cervix carcinoma cells (HeLa) using MTT assay. Results: The results for antitumor activity clearly indicated that compound R1 was potent cytotoxic agent than R2 with IC50 values ranging from 4-6 μM for R1, whereas IC50 values for compound R2 ranging from 65-103 μM. The compounds have shown a significant anti-inflammatory effect in carrageenan and dextran models but do not having the central analgesic activity, this indicating that the antinociceptive activity is related to the peripheral nervous system. The results for 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activity showed that both R1 and R2 compounds were found to be significant 5-LOX inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 14.35 μg ml-1 and 29.24 μg ml-1 respectively. Conclusion: These findings concluded that the new ruthenium compounds might be the promising antiproliferative agents as these compounds showing significant 5-LOX inhibitory activity and potential agents in the management of pain related disorders. PMID:23930118

  13. Age-dependent relevance of endogenous 5-lipoxygenase derivatives in anxiety-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Leo, Luciana M; Almeida-Corrêa, Suellen; Canetti, Claudio A; Amaral, Olavo B; Bozza, Fernando A; Pamplona, Fabricio A

    2014-01-01

    When 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is inhibited, roughly half of the CNS effect of the prototypic endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) is lost. Therefore, we decided to investigate whether inhibiting this enzyme would influence physiological functions classically described as being under control of the endocannabinoid system. Although 5-LO inhibition by MK-886 reduced lipoxin A4 levels in the brain, no effect was found in the elevated plus maze (EPM), even at the highest possible doses, via i.p. (10 mg/kg,) or i.c.v. (500 pmol/2 µl) routes. Accordingly, no alterations in anxiety-like behavior in the EPM test were observed in 5-LO KO mice. Interestingly, aged mice, which show reduced circulating lipoxin A4 levels, were sensitive to MK-886, displaying an anxiogenic-like state in response to treatment. Moreover, exogenous lipoxin A4 induced an anxiolytic-like profile in the EPM test. Our findings are in line with other reports showing no difference between FLAP KO or 5-LO KO and their control strains in adult mice, but increased anxiety-like behavior in aged mice. We also show for the first time that lipoxin A4 affects mouse behavior. In conclusion, we propose an age-dependent relevancy of endogenous 5-LO derivatives in the modulation of anxiety-like behavior, in addition to a potential for exogenous lipoxin A4 in producing an anxiolytic-like state.

  14. Structural and Functional Analysis of Calcium Ion Mediated Binding of 5-Lipoxygenase to Nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramakrishnan B.; Zhu, Lin; Idborg, Helena; Rådmark, Olof; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes; Hebert, Hans; Jegerschöld, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    An important step in the production of inflammatory mediators of the leukotriene family is the Ca2+ mediated recruitment of 5 Lipoxygenase (5LO) to nuclear membranes. To study this reaction in vitro, the natural membrane mimicking environment of nanodiscs was used. Nanodiscs with 10.5 nm inner diameter were made with the lipid POPC and membrane scaffolding protein MSP1E3D1. Monomeric and dimeric 5LO were investigated. Monomeric 5LO mixed with Ca2+ and nanodiscs are shown to form stable complexes that 1) produce the expected leukotriene products from arachidonic acid and 2) can be, for the first time, visualised by native gel electrophoresis and negative stain transmission electron microscopy and 3) show a highest ratio of two 5LO per nanodisc. We interpret this as one 5LO on each side of the disc. The dimer of 5LO is visualised by negative stain transmission electron microscopy and is shown to not bind to nanodiscs. This study shows the advantages of nanodiscs to obtain basic structural information as well as functional information of a complex between a monotopic membrane protein and the membrane. PMID:27010627

  15. Meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid isolated from Saururus chinensis inhibits cyclooxygenase-2 and 5-lipoxygenase in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Tae Chul; Seo, Chang Seob; Haa, Kyungmi; Kim, Jin Cheul; Hwang, Nam Kyung; Hong, Tae Gyun; Kim, Jee Hyeun; Kim, Do Hun; Son, Jong Keun; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2008-05-01

    Meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (MDGA) is a medicinal herbal product isolated from the aerial parts of Saururus chinensis that inhibits the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-dependent phase of prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) generation in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) (IC(50) 9.8 microM). However, this compound did not inhibit COX-2 protein expression in BMMC at concentrations up to 30 microM, indicating that MDGA directly inhibits COX-2 activity. In addition, this compound consistently inhibited the production of leukotriene C(4) (IC(50) 1.3 microM). These results demonstrate that MDGA inhibits both COX-2 and 5-lipoxygenase. Furthermore, this compound strongly inhibited the degranulation reaction in BMMC (IC(50) 11.4 microM). Therefore, this compound might provide a basis for novel anti-inflammatory drug development.

  16. Novel and known constituents from Buddleja species and their activity against leukocyte eicosanoid generation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Y H; Houghton, P J; Hoult, J R

    1999-09-01

    We have undertaken a systematic survey of the genus Buddleja used in traditional Chinese medicine for antiinflammatory and other indications by testing extracts and isolated natural products for their activity against the enzymes of the arachidonate cascade. This was done by using elicited rat peritoneal leukocytes, a physiologically relevant established whole cell system that expresses both cyclo-oxygenase (COX) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activity. Lipophilic extracts of B. globosa roots and B. myriantha stem exhibited inhibitory activities in the 5-LOX and COX enzyme assays, whereas those of B. officinalis flowers, B. yunanesis stems, and B. asiatica stems showed inhibitory activities only against COX. The phytochemical investigation of these extracts, and consequent structure elucidation of isolated compounds using spectroscopic data, led to the isolation from B. globosa of three new terpenoid compounds named dihydrobuddledin A, buddledone A, and buddledone B and four known compounds-buddledins A, B, and C and zerumbone; 12 known compounds from B. officinalis-calceolarioside, campneoside, verbascoside, echinacoside, forsythoside B, angoroside A, crocetin monogentibiosyl ester, acacetin, acacetin-7-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, acacetin-7-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-6)[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-2)]-beta-D-glucopyranoside, songarosaponin A, delta-amyrone; and eight known compounds fromB. yunanesis-11,14-dihydroxy-8,11, 13-abietatrien-7-one, beta-sitosterol, verbascoside, echinacoside, forsythoside B, angoroside A, methylcatapol, and sucrose. Tests on the isolated compounds for inhibition of eicosanoid synthesis showed that buddledin A, crocetin monogentibiosyl ester, and acacetin exhibited an inhibitory effect on COX with IC(50) values of 13.7 microM, 28.2 microM, and 77.5 microM, respectively, whereas buddledin A exhibited inhibitory effect on 5-LOX with an IC(50) value of 50.4 microM.

  17. 5-Lipoxygenase Negatively Regulates Th1 Response during Brucella abortus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fahel, Júlia Silveira; de Souza, Mariana Bueno; Gomes, Marco Túlio Ribeiro; Corsetti, Patricia P.; Carvalho, Natalia B.; Marinho, Fabio A. V.; de Almeida, Leonardo A.; Caliari, Marcelo V.; Machado, Fabiana Simão

    2015-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects humans and cattle, causing a chronic inflammatory disease known as brucellosis. A Th1-mediated immune response plays a critical role in host control of this pathogen. Recent findings indicate contrasting roles for lipid mediators in host responses against infections. 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) is an enzyme required for the production of the lipid mediators leukotrienes and lipoxins. To determine the involvement of 5-LO in host responses to B. abortus infection, we intraperitoneally infected wild-type and 5-LO-deficient mice and evaluated the progression of infection and concomitant expression of immune mediators. Here, we demonstrate that B. abortus induced the upregulation of 5-LO mRNA in wild-type mice. Moreover, this pathogen upregulated the production of the lipid mediators leukotriene B4 and lipoxin A4 in a 5-LO-dependent manner. 5-LO-deficient mice displayed lower bacterial burdens in the spleen and liver and less severe liver pathology, demonstrating an enhanced resistance to infection. Host resistance paralleled an increased expression of the proinflammatory mediators interleukin-12 (IL-12), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) during the course of infection. Moreover, we demonstrated that 5-LO downregulated the expression of IL-12 in macrophages during B. abortus infection. Our results suggest that 5-LO has a major involvement in B. abortus infection, by functioning as a negative regulator of the protective Th1 immune responses against this pathogen. PMID:25583526

  18. The inhibitory activity of cocoa phenolic extract against pro-inflammatory mediators secretion induced by lipopolysaccharide in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Ranneh, Yazan; Ali, Faisal; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna; Esa, Norhaizan Mohd; Ismail, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Cocoa is a rich source of polyphenols that has been traditionally used as the treatment of several types of inflammation related disease. The response to inflammation comprises the consecutive release of mediators and the enlistment of circulating leukocytes, such as macrophages. Currently, Cocoa-derived polyphenolics have shown anti-inflammatory effects in vivo, but the therapeutic benefits in vitro remain unclear. Therefore, in this study, the effect of cocoa polyphenolic extract (CPE) on RAW 264.7 macrophage cells sensitized by lipopolysaccharide as in vitro inflammatory model was investigated. The anti-inflammatory activity of CPE was assessed by measuring its ability to inhibit the pro-inflammatory enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and the pro-inflammatory mediators prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). The results show that CPE significantly inhibits 5-LOX activity (p < 0.01). In addition, CPE dose-dependently suppressed the production of PGE2, ROS, NO and TNF-α in RAW 264.7 cells. These data suggest that CPE may be used for the treatment of inflammation and it's related-diseases. PMID:27190746

  19. Analysis of a nucleotide-binding site of 5-lipoxygenase by affinity labelling: binding characteristics and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Y; Hammarberg, T; Radmark, O; Samuelsson, B; Ng, C F; Funk, C D; Loscalzo, J

    2000-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) catalyses the first two steps in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, which are inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid. 5LO activity is stimulated by ATP; however, a consensus ATP-binding site or nucleotide-binding site has not been found in its protein sequence. In the present study, affinity and photoaffinity labelling of 5LO with 5'-p-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine (FSBA) and 2-azido-ATP showed that 5LO bound to the ATP analogues quantitatively and specifically and that the incorporation of either analogue inhibited ATP stimulation of 5LO activity. The stoichiometry of the labelling was 1.4 mol of FSBA/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 1 mol/mol) or 0.94 mol of 2-azido-ATP/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 0.77 mol/mol). Labelling with FSBA prevented further labelling with 2-azido-ATP, indicating that the same binding site was occupied by both analogues. Other nucleotides (ADP, AMP, GTP, CTP and UTP) also competed with 2-azido-ATP labelling, suggesting that the site was a general nucleotide-binding site rather than a strict ATP-binding site. Ca(2+), which also stimulates 5LO activity, had no effect on the labelling of the nucleotide-binding site. Digestion with trypsin and peptide sequencing showed that two fragments of 5LO were labelled by 2-azido-ATP. These fragments correspond to residues 73-83 (KYWLNDDWYLK, in single-letter amino acid code) and 193-209 (FMHMFQSSWNDFADFEK) in the 5LO sequence. Trp-75 and Trp-201 in these peptides were modified by the labelling, suggesting that they were immediately adjacent to the C-2 position of the adenine ring of ATP. Given the stoichiometry of the labelling, the two peptide sequences of 5LO were probably near each other in the enzyme's tertiary structure, composing or surrounding the ATP-binding site of 5LO. PMID:11042125

  20. Chronic adventitial inflammation, vasa vasorum expansion, and 5-lipoxygenase up-regulation in irradiated arteries from cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Halle, Martin; Christersdottir, Tinna; Bäck, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced cardiovascular disease is an emerging problem in a steadily increasing population of survivors of cancer. However, the underlying biology is poorly described, and the late onset, which occurs several years after exposure, precludes adequate investigations in animal and cell culture models. We investigated the role of the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO)/leukotriene pathway in radiation-induced vascular changes. Use of paired samples of irradiated arteries and nonirradiated internal control arteries from the same patient that were harvested during surgery for cancer reconstruction ≤10 yr after radiotherapy provides a unique human model of chronic radiation–induced vascular changes. Immunohistochemical stainings and perioperative inspection revealed an adventitial inflammatory response, with vasa vasorum expansion and chronic infiltration of CD68+ macrophages. These macrophages stained positive for the leukotriene-forming enzyme 5-LO. Messenger RNA levels of 5-LO and leukotriene B4 receptor 1 were increased in irradiated arterial segments compared with control vessels. These results point to targeting the 5-LO/leukotriene pathway as a therapeutic adjunct to prevent late adverse vascular effects of radiotherapy.—Halle, M., Christersdottir, T., Bäck, M. Chronic adventitial inflammation, vasa vasorum expansion, and 5-lipoxygenase up-regulation in irradiated arteries from cancer survivors. PMID:27530979

  1. The selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, A63162 reduces PC3 proliferation and initiates morphologic changes consistent with secretion.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K. M.; Seed, T.; Ondrey, F.; Harris, J. E.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Rush Medical Coll.; Univ. of Minnesota

    1994-09-01

    We examined the effect of A63162 (Abbott), a selective inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase on human prostate (PC3) cell proliferation. Within 5 min DNA synthesis was reversibly inhibited by 40 {micro}M A63162, without altered cellular attachment or uptake of trypan blue. After 72 Hr, cells continues to be attached and exclude dye, were reduced in number and their histology was altered. Many treated cells were larger, more pleomorphic, with nuclear and cytoplasmic ultrastructural changes consistent with preparation for secretion. Some cells contained moderately swollen, distorted mitochondria. ETYA, a less selective inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase that also inhibits cell replication, acutely reduced O2 uptake by 40%, but A63162 did not. The retention of the supravital mitochondrial dye, rhodamine 123 was increased by ETYA at 4 hr, but not after 24 hr; retention was not altered by A63162. Although the mechanism by which A63162 reversibly inhibits PC3 proliferation and initiates preparation for secretion is not identified, additional studies should further define its role in these events

  2. Modulation of LPS-induced memory insult, γ-secretase and neuroinflammation in 3xTg mice by 5-Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Yash B.; Giannopoulos, Phillip F.; Chu, Jin; Praticò, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Besides amyloid and tau pathology, a constant feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an intense inflammatory response, which is considered an active player in its pathogenesis. The 5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) is a proinflammatory enzyme and an endogenous modulator of AD-like phenotype in mouse models of the disease. To further understand the role of 5LO in AD pathogenesis, we exposed the 3xTg and 3xTg/5LO knockout mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a known inducer of neuroinflammation, and evaluated its effect on their AD-like phenotype. 3xTg mice treated with LPS manifested a worsening of behavior, γ-secretase up-regulation, and increased neuroinflammatory responses. These effects were completely prevented in 3xTg mice genetically deficient for 5LO. By contrast, the absence of 5LO did not protect against increase in tau phosphorylation at specific epitopes that were mediated by the activation of the cyclin-dependent kinase 5. Our data demonstrate that the 5LO pathway affects key neuropathological features of the AD-like phenotype (behavior, Abeta, microgliosis, astrocytosis) but not others (tau pathology) in the LPS-dependent neuroinflammation model. The opposite ways whereby 5LO influences the LPS-dependent effects in vivo supports the complex nature of the neuroinflammatory response in AD and its differential role in modulating amyloid and tau neuropathology. PMID:24332986

  3. Systems Pharmacology Models Can Be Used to Understand Complex Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Behavior: An Example Using 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Demin, O; Karelina, T; Svetlichniy, D; Metelkin, E; Speshilov, G; Demin Jr, O; Fairman, D; van der Graaf, P H; Agoram, B M

    2013-01-01

    Zileuton, a 5-lipoxygenase (5LO) inhibitor, displays complex pharmaokinetic (PK)-pharmacodynamic (PD) behavior. Available clinical data indicate a lack of dose–bronchodilatory response during initial treatment, with a dose response developing after ~1–2 weeks. We developed a quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP) model to understand the mechanism behind this phenomenon. The model described the release, maturation, and trafficking of eosinophils into the airways, leukotriene synthesis by the 5LO enzyme, leukotriene signaling and bronchodilation, and the PK of zileuton. The model provided a plausible explanation for the two-phase bronchodilatory effect of zileuton–the short-term bronchodilation was due to leukotriene inhibition and the long-term bronchodilation was due to inflammatory cell infiltration blockade. The model also indicated that the theoretical maximum bronchodilation of both 5LO inhibition and leukotriene receptor blockade is likely similar. QSP modeling provided interesting insights into the effects of leukotriene modulation. PMID:24026253

  4. Chemical constituents of the root of Dystaenia takeshimana and their anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Sun; Kim, Jin Cheul; Shim, Sang Hee; Lee, Eun Ju; Jin, WenYi; Bae, KiHwan; Son, Kun Ho; Kim, Hyun Pyo; Kang, Sam Sik; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2006-08-01

    In our ongoing search for bioactive compounds originating from the endemic species in Korea, we found that the hexane and EtOAc fractions of the MeOH extract from the root of Dystaenia takeshimana (Nakai) Kitagawa (Umbelliferae) showed cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) dual inhibitory activity by assessing their effects on the production of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and leukotriene C4 (LTC4) in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells. By activity-guided fractionation, five coumarins, viz. psoralen (2), xanthotoxin (3), scopoletin (4), umbelliferone (5), and (+)-marmesin (6), together with beta-sitosterol (1), were isolated from the hexane fraction, and two phenethyl alcohol derivatives, viz. 2-methoxy-2-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)ethanol (7) and 2-hydroxy-2-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)ethanol (8), three flavonoids, viz. apigenin (9), luteolin (10), and cynaroside (11), as well as daucosterol (12) were isolated from the EtOAc fraction using silica gel column chromatography. In addition, D-mannitol (13) was isolated from the BuOH fraction by recrystallization. Two of the coumarins, scopoletin (4) and (+)-marmesin (6), the two phenethyl alcohol derivatives (7, 8) and the three flavonoids (9-11) were isolated for the first time from this plant. Among the compounds isolated from this plant, the five coumarins as well as the three flavonoids showed COX-2/5-LOX dual inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of D. takeshimana might in part occur via the inhibition of the generation of eicosanoids. PMID:16964755

  5. Anti-inflammatory activity studies on the stems and roots of Jasminum lanceolarium Roxb.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wen-xia; Zhang, Jian-hua; Zhang, Yi; Meng, Da-li; Yan, Dan

    2015-08-01

    Jasminum lanceolarium Roxb is an important traditional Chinese medicine. Its stems and roots have been used for the treatment of rheumatism and fever while the leaves are used as an anti-inflammatory agent to relieve pain. In order to support its traditional Chinese medicinal uses, five animal models were designed and the anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of the 70% EtOH-H2O extracts of J. lanceolarium (EJL) were investigated. Meanwhile, biochemical parameters such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) in blood serum of rats exposed to acute (carrageenan) inflammation model were evaluated. At doses of 400 mg/kg, EJL exhibited higher anti-inflammation effect than that of indomethacin and better analgesic activity than that of aspirin (P<0.001). Furthermore, eleven isolated compounds including six lignanoids (1, 2, 6, 7, 8, and 11) and five iridoids (3, 4, 5, 9, and 10) were isolated from the active extracts and showed significant anti-inflammatory activities with the IC50 values of 1.76-5.22 mg/mL, respectively, when testing their inhibitory effects on phospholipase A2 in vitro. The results demonstrated that the possible anti-inflammatory mechanisms might be attributed to inhibit the hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids, production on both COX-2 and 5-LOX, and then finally inhibit the release of prostaglandins (PGs), which suggested that EJL had a non-selective inhibitory effect on the release or actions of these mediators, and might be a dual LOX-COX inhibitor for the treatment of inflammation from the natural resource. The studies on the animals and the inflammatory mediators, along with the bioactive compounds presumed that the existences of iridoids and lignanoids could be response for their bioactivities of the whole plants.

  6. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester, a 5-lipoxygenase enzyme inhibitor, alleviates diabetic atherosclerotic manifestations: effect on vascular reactivity and stiffness.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Noura Ahmed; El-Bassossy, Hany M; Mahmoud, Mona Fouad; Fahmy, Ahmed

    2014-04-25

    Atherosclerosis is a major macrovascular complication of diabetes that increases the risks for myocardial infarction, stroke, and other vascular diseases. The effect of a selective 5-lipoxygenase enzyme inhibitor; caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on diabetes-induced atherosclerotic manifestations was investigated. Insulin deficiency or resistance was induced by STZ or fructose respectively. Atherosclerosis developed when rats were left for 8 or 12 weeks subsequent STZ or fructose administration respectively. CAPE (30 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was given in the last 6 weeks. Afterwards, blood pressure (BP) was recorded. Then, isolated aorta reactivity to KCl and phenylephrine (PE) was studied. Blood glucose level, serum levels of insulin, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) as well as advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were determined. Moreover aortic haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression and collagen deposition were also assessed. Insulin deficiency and resistance were accompanied with elevated BP, exaggerated response to KCl and PE, elevated serum TNF-α and AGEs levels. Both models showed marked increase in collagen deposition. However, CAPE alleviated systolic and diastolic BP elevations and the exaggerated vascular contractility to both PE and KCl in both models without affecting AGEs level. CAPE inhibited TNF-α serum level elevation, induced aortic HO-1 expression and reduced collagen deposition. CAPE prevented development of hyperinsulinemia in insulin resistance model without any impact on the developed hyperglycemia in insulin deficiency model. In conclusion, CAPE offsets the atherosclerotic changes associated with diabetes via amelioration of the significant functional and structural derangements in the vessels in addition to its antihyperinsulinemic effect in insulin resistant model.

  7. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel myrtucommulones and structural analogues that target mPGES-1 and 5-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Wiechmann, Katja; Müller, Hans; Huch, Volker; Hartmann, David; Werz, Oliver; Jauch, Johann

    2015-08-28

    The natural acylphloroglucinol myrtucommulone A (1) inhibits microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase (mPGES)-1 and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), and induces apoptosis of cancer cells. Starting from 1 as lead, 28 analogues were synthesized following a straightforward modular strategy with high yielding convergent steps. Major structural variations concerned (I) replacement of the syncarpic acid moieties by dimedone or indandione, (II) cyclization of the syncarpic acid with the acylphloroglucinol core, and (III) substitution of the methine bridges and the acyl residue with isopropyl, isobutyl, n-pentyl or phenyl groups, each. The potency for mPGES-1 inhibition was improved by 12.5-fold for 43 (2-(1-(3-hexanoyl-2,4,6-trihydroxy-5-(1-(3-hydroxy-1-oxo-1H-inden-2-yl)-2-methylpropyl)phenyl)-2-methylpropyl)-3-hydroxy-1H-inden-1-one) with IC50 = 0.08 μM, and 5-LO inhibition was improved 33-fold by 47 (2-((3-hexanoyl-2,4,6-trihydroxy-5-((3-hydroxy-1-oxo-1H-inden-2-yl) (phenyl)methyl)phenyl) (phenyl)methyl)-3-hydroxy-1H-inden-1-one) with IC50 = 0.46 μM. SAR studies revealed divergent structural determinants for induction of cell death and mPGES-1/5-LO inhibition, revealing 43 and 47 as non-cytotoxic mPGES-1 and 5-LO inhibitors that warrant further preclinical assessment as anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:26123643

  8. Deletion of 5-Lipoxygenase in the Tumor Microenvironment Promotes Lung Cancer Progression and Metastasis through Regulating T Cell Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Poczobutt, Joanna M.; Nguyen, Teresa T.; Hanson, Dwight; Li, Howard; Sippel, Trisha R.; Weiser-Evans, Mary C. M.; Gijon, Miguel; Murphy, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids, including PGs, produced by cyclooxygenases (COX), and leukotrienes, produced by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) have been implicated in cancer progression. These molecules are produced by both cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME). We previously reported that both COX and 5-LO metabolites increase during progression in an orthotopic immunocompetent model of lung cancer. Although PGs in the TME have been well studied, less is known regarding 5-LO products produced by the TME. We examined the role of 5-LO in the TME using a model in which Lewis lung carcinoma cells are directly implanted into the lungs of syngeneic WT mice or mice globally deficient in 5-LO (5-LO-KO). Unexpectedly, primary tumor volume and liver metastases were increased in 5-LO-KO mice. This was associated with an ablation of leukotriene (LT) production, consistent with production mainly mediated by the microenvironment. Increased tumor progression was partially reproduced in global LTC4 synthase KO or mice transplanted with LTA4 hydrolase-deficient bone marrow. Tumor-bearing lungs of 5-LO-KO had decreased numbers of CD4 and CD8 T cells compared with WT controls, as well as fewer dendritic cells. This was associated with lower levels of CCL20 and CXL9, which have been implicated in dendritic and T cell recruitment. Depletion of CD8 cells increased tumor growth and eliminated the differences between WT and 5-LO mice. These data reveal an antitumorigenic role for 5-LO products in the microenvironment during lung cancer progression through regulation of T cells and suggest that caution should be used in targeting this pathway in lung cancer. PMID:26663781

  9. Preclinical toxicity evaluation of tepoxalin, a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase, in Sprague-Dawley rats and beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Knight, E V; Kimball, J P; Keenan, C M; Smith, I L; Wong, F A; Barrett, D S; Dempster, A M; Lieuallen, W G; Panigrahi, D; Powers, W J; Szot, R J

    1996-09-01

    Tepoxalin [5- (4-chlorophenyl)-N-hydroxy-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-methyl-1H-pyrazole -3-propanamide] is an orally active anti-inflammatory agent, which inhibits both cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase activities. The oral toxicity of tepoxalin was evaluated in 1- and 6-month rat (up to 50 mg/kg/day) and dog (up to 150 mg/kg bid) studies. In rats, increased liver weight, centrilobular hypertrophy, and hepatic necrosis were observed at dosages >/=20 mg/kg/day. Renal changes indicative of analgesic nephropathy syndrome (i.e., papillary edema or necrosis, cortical tubular dilatation) were seen at >/=15 mg/kg. In rats treated for 1 month, these hepatic and renal effects were largely reversible after a 1-month recovery period. Gastrointestinal erosions and ulcers were seen in female rats given 40 mg/kg/day for 6 months. Changes in clinical pathology parameters included decreases in red blood cell count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit mean values; elevation in platelet counts; and an increase in prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times. Mild increases in alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and cholesterol were also noted in rats. Decreased erythrocyte parameters, increased leukocyte counts, and decreased total protein, albumin, and/or calcium were noted in some dogs in the 300 mg/kg/day group following 6 months of dosing. Small pyloric ulcerations were seen at 100 and 300 mg/kg/day dosages for up to 6 months. In both rats and dogs, no accumulation of tepoxalin or its carboxylic acid metabolite was detected in plasma following multiple dosing over a range of 5 to 50 mg/kg/day for rats and 20 to 300 mg/kg/day for dogs. Plasma concentrations of the carboxylic acid metabolite were severalfold higher than those of the parent compound. The no-effect dosages in rats (5 mg/kg/day) and dogs (20 mg/kg/day) were approximately one and six times the ED50 (3.5 mg/kg), respectively, for inhibition of inflammatory effects in the adjuvant arthritic rat without

  10. Assessment of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cholinesterase and cytotoxic activities of pomegranate (Punica granatum) leaves.

    PubMed

    Bekir, Jalila; Mars, Mohamed; Souchard, Jean Pierre; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2013-05-01

    This study evaluated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cholinesterase and cytotoxic activities of extracts with different polarities (hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, ethanol and methanol) obtained from Punica granatum leaves. Total phenolics (8.8-127.3mg gallic acid equivalent/g dry weight), flavonoids (1.2-76.9mg quercetin equivalent/g dry weight), tannins (63.7-260.8mg catechin equivalent/kg dry weight) and anthocyanins (0.41-3.73mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalent/g dry weight) of different extracts were evaluated. The methanolic extract presented a good IC50 by DPPH and ABTS assays (5.62 and 1.31mg/l respectively). The strongest 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibition activities were obtained for the ethanol extract (IC50 values of 6.20, 14.83 and 2.65mg/l, respectively) and the best cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 cells was obtained for the methanol extract (IC50=31mg/l). These important biological activities showed that P. granatum leaves could be a potential source of the active molecules intended for applications in pharmaceutical industry, but only after additional in vivo experiments.

  11. Assessment of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cholinesterase and cytotoxic activities of pomegranate (Punica granatum) leaves.

    PubMed

    Bekir, Jalila; Mars, Mohamed; Souchard, Jean Pierre; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2013-05-01

    This study evaluated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cholinesterase and cytotoxic activities of extracts with different polarities (hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, ethanol and methanol) obtained from Punica granatum leaves. Total phenolics (8.8-127.3mg gallic acid equivalent/g dry weight), flavonoids (1.2-76.9mg quercetin equivalent/g dry weight), tannins (63.7-260.8mg catechin equivalent/kg dry weight) and anthocyanins (0.41-3.73mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalent/g dry weight) of different extracts were evaluated. The methanolic extract presented a good IC50 by DPPH and ABTS assays (5.62 and 1.31mg/l respectively). The strongest 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibition activities were obtained for the ethanol extract (IC50 values of 6.20, 14.83 and 2.65mg/l, respectively) and the best cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 cells was obtained for the methanol extract (IC50=31mg/l). These important biological activities showed that P. granatum leaves could be a potential source of the active molecules intended for applications in pharmaceutical industry, but only after additional in vivo experiments. PMID:23380204

  12. Increased PUFA Content and 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway Expression Are Associated with Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Obese Women with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Heemskerk, Mattijs M.; Giera, Martin; el Bouazzaoui, Fatiha; Lips, Mirjam A.; Pijl, Hanno; Willems van Dijk, Ko; van Harmelen, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Obese women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have more inflammation in their subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT) than age-and-BMI similar obese women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). We aimed to investigate whether WAT fatty acids and/or oxylipins are associated with the enhanced inflammatory state in WAT of the T2DM women. Fatty acid profiles were measured in both subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue (vWAT) of 19 obese women with NGT and 16 age-and-BMI similar women with T2DM. Oxylipin levels were measured in sWAT of all women. Arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) percentages were higher in sWAT, but not vWAT of the T2DM women, and AA correlated positively to the gene expression of macrophage marker CD68. We found tendencies for higher oxylipin concentrations of the 5-LOX leukotrienes in sWAT of T2DM women. Gene expression of the 5-LOX leukotriene biosynthesis pathway was significantly higher in sWAT of T2DM women. In conclusion, AA and DHA content were higher in sWAT of T2DM women and AA correlated to the increased inflammatory state in sWAT. Increased AA content was accompanied by an upregulation of the 5-LOX pathway and seems to have led to an increase in the conversion of AA into proinflammatory leukotrienes in sWAT. PMID:26378572

  13. Morphologic changes of apoptosis induced in human chronic myelogenous leukemia "blast" cells by SC41661A (SEARLE), a selective inhibitor of 5-Lipoxygenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K. M.; Seed, T. M.; Jajeh, A.; Jia, P.; Harris, J. E.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Rush Medical Coll.; Cook County Hospital

    1994-01-01

    Several inhibitors of the arachidonic acid-metabolizing enzyme, 5-lipoxygenase reduce proliferation of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells and cell lines and some cells undergo limited differentiation. Cells were cultured from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in 'blast' crisis with the selective inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase, SC41661A[3-(3,5-bis(1,1-dimethyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl)hiol]-N-me thyl-N-[2-(2- phridinyl-propanamide)]. Cells cultured for 3 to 5 days with 40 {micro}M SC41661A exhibited reduced cellular numbers along with ultrastructural changes and DNA laddering characteristic of apoptosis. Similar culture conditions reduced proliferation of U937 monoblastoid cells. In U937 cells, the ultrastructural features of apoptosis were not observed at 72 hours, when DNA laddering was present and cell numbers were reduced, but was present after 144 hours of culture. Dissociation between certain morphologic and biochemical sequelae of apoptosis has been described in other systems. These observations are of interest since the induction of apoptosis in dividing chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells by a non-cytotoxic agent suggests paradigmatically new sites for therapeutic intervention.

  14. Protective activity of salidroside against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer via the MAPK/NF-κB pathway in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiayun; Luo, Fen; Jiang, Wenjiao; Zhu, Lingpeng; Gao, Jin; He, He; Wei, Tingting; Gong, Shilin; Yan, Tianhua

    2015-09-01

    Salidroside (Sal) is a traditional Chinese medicine with various pharmacological effects. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effect of Sal on ethanol-induced acute gastric ulcer and H2O2-induced gastric epithelial cell damage. 0.2 ml ethanol and 400 μM H2O2 were applied to establish a gastric ulcer model in vivo and in vitro respectively. The production of interleukin (IL)-6, interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was analyzed, as well as myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). MTT assay was used to detect cell viability. In addition, MAPK/NF-κB signal pathway-related proteins p-ERK, p-JNK, p-p38, p-IκBα and p-NF-κBp65 were analyzed to determine the underlying protective mechanism. Downstream genes such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and leukotrienes B4 (LTB4) were also measured. Obtained data indicated that Sal inhibited the overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enhanced antioxidant activity. Collectively, it is assumed that Sal could alleviate ethanol-induced acute gastric ulcer and H2O2-induced gastric epithelial cell damage through the MAPK/NF-κB pathway.

  15. Simultaneous targeting of 5-LOX-COX and ODC block NNK-induced lung adenoma progression to adenocarcinoma in A/J mice

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gaurav; Patlolla, Jagan Mohan R; Madka, Venkateshwar; Mohammed, Altaf; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yuting; Biddick, Laura; Singh, Anil; Gillaspy, Allison; Lightfoot, Stanley; Steele, Vernon E; Kopelovich, Levy; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Targeting complementary pathways will achieve better treatment efficacy than a single agent high-dose strategy that could increase risk of side effects and tumor resistance. To target COX-2, 5-LOX, and ODC simultaneously, we tested the effects of a dual 5-LOX-COX inhibitor, licofelone, and an ODC inhibitor, DFMO, alone and in combination, on NNK-induced lung tumors in female A/J mice. Seven-week-old mice were treated with NNK (10 μmol/mouse, single dose, i.p.) and randomized to different treatment groups. Three weeks after injection, mice were fed control or experimental diets (DFMO 1500/3000 ppm, licofelone 200/400 ppm, or a low-dose combination of 1500 ppm DFMO and 200 ppm licofelone) for 17 or 34 weeks. Both agents significantly inhibited tumor formation in a dose-dependent manner. As anticipated more adenomas and adenocarcinomas were observed at 17 and 34 weeks, respectively. Importantly, low dose combination of DFMO and licofelone showed more pronounced effects at 17 or 34 weeks in inhibiting the total tumor formation (~60%, p < 0.0001) and adenocarcinoma (~65%, p < 0.0001) compared to individual high dose of DFMO (~44% and 46%, p < 0.0001) and licofelone (~48% and 55%, p < 0.0001). DFMO and combination-treated mice lung tumors exhibited modulated ODC pathway components (Oat, Oaz, SRM, SMS, and SAT, p < 0.05) along with decreased proliferation (PCNA, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin A) and increased expression of p53, p21 and p27 compared to mice fed control diet. Both DFMO and licofelone significantly inhibited tumor inflammatory markers. Our findings suggest that a low-dose combined treatment targeting inflammation and polyamine synthesis may provide effective chemoprevention. PMID:27293987

  16. Simultaneous targeting of 5-LOX-COX and ODC block NNK-induced lung adenoma progression to adenocarcinoma in A/J mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gaurav; Patlolla, Jagan Mohan R; Madka, Venkateshwar; Mohammed, Altaf; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yuting; Biddick, Laura; Singh, Anil; Gillaspy, Allison; Lightfoot, Stanley; Steele, Vernon E; Kopelovich, Levy; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Targeting complementary pathways will achieve better treatment efficacy than a single agent high-dose strategy that could increase risk of side effects and tumor resistance. To target COX-2, 5-LOX, and ODC simultaneously, we tested the effects of a dual 5-LOX-COX inhibitor, licofelone, and an ODC inhibitor, DFMO, alone and in combination, on NNK-induced lung tumors in female A/J mice. Seven-week-old mice were treated with NNK (10 μmol/mouse, single dose, i.p.) and randomized to different treatment groups. Three weeks after injection, mice were fed control or experimental diets (DFMO 1500/3000 ppm, licofelone 200/400 ppm, or a low-dose combination of 1500 ppm DFMO and 200 ppm licofelone) for 17 or 34 weeks. Both agents significantly inhibited tumor formation in a dose-dependent manner. As anticipated more adenomas and adenocarcinomas were observed at 17 and 34 weeks, respectively. Importantly, low dose combination of DFMO and licofelone showed more pronounced effects at 17 or 34 weeks in inhibiting the total tumor formation (~60%, p < 0.0001) and adenocarcinoma (~65%, p < 0.0001) compared to individual high dose of DFMO (~44% and 46%, p < 0.0001) and licofelone (~48% and 55%, p < 0.0001). DFMO and combination-treated mice lung tumors exhibited modulated ODC pathway components (Oat, Oaz, SRM, SMS, and SAT, p < 0.05) along with decreased proliferation (PCNA, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin A) and increased expression of p53, p21 and p27 compared to mice fed control diet. Both DFMO and licofelone significantly inhibited tumor inflammatory markers. Our findings suggest that a low-dose combined treatment targeting inflammation and polyamine synthesis may provide effective chemoprevention. PMID:27293987

  17. Gene Knockout of 5-Lipoxygenase Rescues Synaptic Dysfunction and Improves Memory in the Triple-Transgenic Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Phillip F.; Chu, Jin; Joshi, Yash B.; Sperow, Margaret; Li, Jin-Luo; Kirby, Lynn G.; Praticò, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    The 5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) is upregulated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and in vivo modulates the amyloidotic phenotype of APP transgenic mice. However, no data are available on the effects that 5LO has on synaptic function, integrity and cognition. To address this issue we used a genetic and a pharmacologic approach by generating 3xTg mice deficient for 5LO, and administering 3xTg mice which a 5LO inhibitor. Compared with controls, we found that even before the development of overt neuropathology, both animals manifested significant memory improvement, rescue of their synaptic dysfunction and amelioration of synaptic integrity. In addition, later in life these mice had a significant reduction of Aβ and tau pathology. Our findings support a novel functional role for 5LO in regulating synaptic plasticity and memory. They establish this proetin as a pleiotropic contributor to the development of the full spectrum of the AD phenotype, making it a valid therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:23478745

  18. Chemical composition of the essential oils of variegated pink-fleshed lemon (Citrus x limon L. Burm. f.) and their anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Dalia; Ashour, Mohamed L; Mulyaningsih, Sri; El-Shazly, Assem; Wink, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The volatile secondary metabolites of essential oils from fruit peel and leaves of variegated pink-fleshed lemon (Citrus x limon) were investigated using GLC and GLC-MS (gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy). Altogether 141 compounds were identified and quantified, accounting for 99.59% and 96.33% of the total hydrodistilled peel and leaf oil, respectively. Limonene occurred in higher amounts in fruit peel (52.73%) than in leaf oil (29.13%). Neral (12.72%), neryl acetate (8.53%), p-menth-1-en-7-al (4.63%), beta-pinene (6.35%), and nerol (4.42%) were the most abundant constituents in leaf oil, whereas gamma-terpinene (9.88%), beta-pinene (7.67%), geranial (4.44%), and neral (3.64%) dominated in the fruit peel oil. The antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antitrypanosomal, and antimicrobial activities of the fruit peel essential oil were evaluated. The oil had a low antioxidant activity with an IC50 value of (26.66 +/- 2.07) mg/ml as compared to the efficient antioxidant ascorbic acid [IC50 (16.32 +/- 0.16) microg/ml]. The oil moderately inhibited soybean 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) with an IC50 value of (32.05 +/- 3.91) microg/ml and had moderate antitrypanosomal activity [IC50 (60.90 +/- 0.91) microg/ml]. In addition, moderate antimicrobial activities were detected against Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus capitis, Micrococcus luteus), one Gram-negative bacterium (Pseudomonas fluorescens), and yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida parapsilosis).

  19. Modulation of coronary flow rate and cardiac contractility by the divalent cation ionophore A23187 and inhibitors of the cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase pathways: development of heterogeneous patterns of myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Björnsson, O G; Kobayashi, K; Williamson, J R

    1988-02-01

    In the present studies, we demonstrate in buffer-perfused isolated working guinea pig hearts that indometacin reduces coronary flow rate in a dose-dependent manner (max 56.7 +/- 5.5%, SEM, n = 6, of control at 5 x 10(-6) mol/l of indometacin, P less than 0.01), and that this leads to a development of heterogeneous patterns of myocardial ischemia (elevated myocardial levels of reduced pyridine nucleotide, NADH) and depressed cardiac work (64.7 +/- 11.7%, SEM, of control at 5 x 10(-6) mol/l of indometacin, P less than 0.05). The effect of indometacin on coronary flow rate and consequently on myocardial tissue oxygenation was completely prevented by the preferential 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) (1 x 10(-6) mol/l), or the sulfidopeptide leukotriene receptor antagonist FPL 55712 (2 x 10(-5) mol/l), indicating that the isolated working guinea pig heart, even when deprived of blood, is able to produce vasoactive sulfidopeptide leukotrienes at significant levels. At higher concentrations of indometacin (5 x 10(-5) mol/l, 1 x 10(-4) mol/l), coronary flow rate returned to initial levels while cardiac work became further depressed despite normoxic levels of NADH. These data support that indometacin also has a direct suppressive effect on the myocardium independent of its coronary vascular effect. This conclusion is supported by the observation that addition of sodium arachidonate (6 x 10(-5) mol/l) completely inhibited the vascular effect of indometacin, but not the depressive effect on the myocardium. The divalent cation ionophore A23187 (6 x 10(-6) mol/l) had a strong positive chronotropic effect on the heart and a biphasic effect on coronary flow rate. After a brief period of increased coronary flow rate, presumably due to coronary vasodilatation, the ionophore caused a sustained reduction in coronary flow, and this was accompanied by high myocardial levels of NADH fluorescence of characteristically heterogeneous pattern. This is presumably

  20. Roles of 5-lipoxygenase and cysteinyl-leukotriene type 1 receptors in the hematological response to allergen challenge and its prevention by diethylcarbamazine in a murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Masid-de-Brito, Daniela; Queto, Túlio; Gaspar-Elsas, Maria Ignez C; Xavier-Elsas, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Diethylcarbamazine (DEC), which blocks leukotriene production, abolishes the challenge-induced increase in eosinopoiesis in bone-marrow from ovalbumin- (OVA-) sensitized mice, suggesting that 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products contribute to the hematological responses in experimental asthma models. We explored the relationship between 5-LO, central and peripheral eosinophilia, and effectiveness of DEC, using PAS or BALB/c mice and 5-LO-deficient mutants. We quantified eosinophil numbers in freshly harvested or cultured bone-marrow, peritoneal lavage fluid, and spleen, with or without administration of leukotriene generation inhibitors (DEC and MK886) and cisteinyl-leukotriene type I receptor antagonist (montelukast). The increase in eosinophil numbers in bone-marrow, observed in sensitized/challenged wild-type mice, was abolished by MK886 and DEC pretreatment. In ALOX mutants, by contrast, there was no increase in bone-marrow eosinophil counts, nor in eosinophil production in culture, in response to sensitization/challenge. In sensitized/challenged ALOX mice, challenge-induced migration of eosinophils to the peritoneal cavity was significantly reduced relative to the wild-type PAS controls. DEC was ineffective in ALOX mice, as expected from a mechanism of action dependent on 5-LO. In BALB/c mice, challenge significantly increased spleen eosinophil numbers and DEC treatment prevented this increase. Overall, 5-LO appears as indispensable to the systemic hematological response to allergen challenge, as well as to the effectiveness of DEC. PMID:25477712

  1. Fuscoside: an anti-inflammatory marine natural product which selectively inhibits 5-lipoxygenase. Part I: Physiological and biochemical studies in murine inflammatory models.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, P B; Jacobs, R S

    1992-08-01

    The biological and biochemical pharmacology of fuscoside, a novel anti-inflammatory marine natural product isolated from the Caribbean gorgonian Eunicea fusca, has recently been characterized using murine (part I) and human (part II) models of inflammation. Topically applied fuscoside (FSD) effectively inhibits phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced edema in mouse ears at levels comparable with indomethacin over a 3.3-hr exposure period, and is significantly more efficacious than indomethacin over 24 hr in the PMA model. Histological preparations and quantification of the neutrophil-specific marker, myeloperoxidase, demonstrate that FSD inhibits neutrophil infiltration into PMA-induced regions of edema and inflammation. In systemic studies, where FSD is injected i.p. before the topical application of PMA, negligible effects on ear inflammation are observed. FSD does not inhibit bee venom or human synovial fluid phospholipase A2 up to concentrations of 500 microM. In calcium ionophore-activated cultures of mouse peritoneal macrophages, FSD selectively and irreversibly inhibits leukotriene C4 biosynthesis (IC50 = 8 microM), yet has negligible effects on prostaglandin E2 production. FSD is also without effect on the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandin E2 by ram seminal vesicle cyclooxygenase. Chromatographic and spectroscopic studies suggest that FSD is not metabolized, and that drug uptake/binding by macrophages is time dependent, saturable and independent of active transport mechanisms. These studies represent the first report of an anti-inflammatory marine natural product that selectively inhibits leukotriene biosynthesis.

  2. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5), and its expression in response to the ratio of linolenic acid to linoleic acid in diets of large yellow croaker (Larmichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianjiao; Zuo, Rantao; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Ai, Qinghui

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to clone and functionally characterize a full-length cDNA encoding arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5) from large yellow croaker (Larmichthys crocea) and investigate its gene expression in response to graded dietary ratio of linolenic acid (ALA) to linoleic acid (LNA) (0.03, 0.06, 0.45, 0.90 and 1.51). An isolated 2372bp cDNA clone of Alox5 contained an open reading frame spanning 2025bp encoding a protein with the ability to modify arachidonate acid (AA) to 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic (5-HETE). In the liver, the Alox5 mRNA expression levels significantly increased to the maximum when the dietary ALA/LNA increased from 0.03 to 0.06, and then significantly decreased with dietary ALA/LNA increased to 1.51 (P<0.05). In the kidney, the expression levels of Alox5 of fish fed diets with low dietary ALA/LNA (0.03-0.06) were significantly higher than those of fish fed diets with high dietary ALA/LNA (0.45-1.51) (P<0.05). The dual-luciferase reporter assays showed that the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) could act on cognate cis-acting elements in the promoter of Alox5 and increased the transcription of Alox5. Results of the present study suggested that the expression of Alox5 is higher in croakers fed high concentrations of LNA compared to those fed high concentrations of ALA, which might be regulated by NF-κB and contribute to the inflammation process by catalyzing the dioxygenation of AA. PMID:27378407

  3. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5), and its expression in response to the ratio of linolenic acid to linoleic acid in diets of large yellow croaker (Larmichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianjiao; Zuo, Rantao; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Ai, Qinghui

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to clone and functionally characterize a full-length cDNA encoding arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5) from large yellow croaker (Larmichthys crocea) and investigate its gene expression in response to graded dietary ratio of linolenic acid (ALA) to linoleic acid (LNA) (0.03, 0.06, 0.45, 0.90 and 1.51). An isolated 2372bp cDNA clone of Alox5 contained an open reading frame spanning 2025bp encoding a protein with the ability to modify arachidonate acid (AA) to 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic (5-HETE). In the liver, the Alox5 mRNA expression levels significantly increased to the maximum when the dietary ALA/LNA increased from 0.03 to 0.06, and then significantly decreased with dietary ALA/LNA increased to 1.51 (P<0.05). In the kidney, the expression levels of Alox5 of fish fed diets with low dietary ALA/LNA (0.03-0.06) were significantly higher than those of fish fed diets with high dietary ALA/LNA (0.45-1.51) (P<0.05). The dual-luciferase reporter assays showed that the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) could act on cognate cis-acting elements in the promoter of Alox5 and increased the transcription of Alox5. Results of the present study suggested that the expression of Alox5 is higher in croakers fed high concentrations of LNA compared to those fed high concentrations of ALA, which might be regulated by NF-κB and contribute to the inflammation process by catalyzing the dioxygenation of AA.

  4. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity of chalcone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Herencia, F; Ferrándiz, M L; Ubeda, A; Domínguez, J N; Charris, J E; Lobo, G M; Alcaraz, M J

    1998-05-19

    Chalcones and their derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity. In vitro, chalcones 2, 4, 8, 10 and 13 inhibited degranulation and 5-lipoxygenase in human neutrophils, whereas 11 behaved as scavenger of superoxide. Only four compounds (4-7) inhibited cyclo-oxygenase-2 activity. The majority of these samples showed anti-inflammatory effects in the mouse air pouch model.

  5. Inhibition of inflammatory mediators contributes to the anti-inflammatory activity of KYKZL-1 via MAPK and NF-κB pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Guang-Lin; Du, Yi-Fang; Cheng, Jing; Huan, Lin; Chen, Shi-Cui; Wei, Shao-Hua; Gong, Zhu-Nan; Cai, Jie; Qiu, Ting; Wu, Hao; Sun, Ting; Ao, Gui-Zhen

    2013-10-01

    KYKZL-1, a newly synthesized compound with COX/5-LOX dual inhibition, was subjected to the anti-inflammatory activity test focusing on its modulation of inflammatory mediators as well as intracellular MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. In acute ear edema model, pretreatment with KYKZL-1 (p.o.) dose-dependently inhibited the xylene-induced ear edema in mice with a higher inhibition than diclofenac. In a three-day TPA-induced inflammation, KYKZL-1 also showed significant anti-inflammatory activity with inhibition ranging between 20% and 64%. In gastric lesion test, KYKZL-1 elicited markedly fewer stomach lesions with a low index of ulcer as compared to diclofenac in rats. In further studies, KYKZL-1 was found to significantly inhibit the production of NO, PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4} in LPS challenged RAW264.7, which is parallel to its attenuation of the expression of iNOS, COX-2, 5-LOX mRNAs or proteins and inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAPKs and activation of NF-κB. Taken together, our data indicate that KYKZL-1 comprises dual inhibition of COX and 5-LOX and exerts an obvious anti-inflammatory activity with an enhanced gastric safety profile via simultaneous inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAPKs and activation of NF-κB. - Highlights: • KYKZL-1 is designed to exhibit COX/5-LOX dual inhibition. • KYKZL-1 inhibits NO, PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4} and iNOS, COX-2 and 5-LOX mRNAs and MAPKs. • KYKZL-1 inhibits phosphorylation of MAPKs. • KYKZL-1 inactivates NF-κB pathway.

  6. MK591, a second generation leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor, prevents invasion and induces apoptosis in the bone-invading C4-2B human prostate cancer cells: implications for the treatment of castration-resistant, bone-metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sarveswaran, Sivalokanathan; Ghosh, Ritisha; Morisetty, Shravan; Ghosh, Jagadananda

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a major clinical challenge for which no cure is currently available primarily because of the lack of proper understanding about appropriate molecular target(s). Previously we observed that inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-Lox) activity induces apoptosis in some types of prostate cancer cells, suggesting an important role of 5-Lox in the viability of prostate cancer cells. However, nothing is known about the role of 5-Lox in the survival of castration-resistant, metastatic prostate cancer cells. Thus, we tested the effects of MK591, a second-generation, specific inhibitor of 5-Lox activity, on the viability and metastatic characteristics of CRPC cells. We observed that MK591 effectively kills the bone-invading C4-2B human prostate cancer cells (which bear characteristics of CRPC), but does not affect normal, non-cancer fibroblasts (which do not express 5-Lox) in the same experimental conditions. We also observed that MK591 dramatically inhibits the in vitro invasion and soft-agar colony formation of C4-2B cells. Interestingly, we found that treatment with MK591 dramatically down-regulates the expression of c-Myc and its targets at sub-lethal doses. In light of frequent over-activation of c-Myc in a spectrum of aggressive cancers (including CRPC), and the challenges associated with inhibition of c-Myc (because of its non-enzymatic nature), our novel findings of selective killing, and blockade of invasive and soft-agar colony-forming abilities of the castration-resistant, bone-metastatic C4-2B prostate cancer cells by MK591, open up a new avenue to attack CRPC cells for better management of advanced prostate cancer while sparing normal, non-cancer body cells.

  7. Platelets abrogate leukotriene B(4) generation by human blood neutrophils stimulated with monosodium urate monohydrate or f-Met-Leu-Phe in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chabannes, Bernard; Poubelle, Patrice E; Molière, Patrick; De Médicis, Rinaldo; Lussier, André; Lagarde, Michel

    2003-04-01

    Neutrophils are physiologically associated with platelets in whole blood. Inflammatory reactions can be modulated by the presence of platelets. To investigate the influence of platelets on neutrophil activity, we studied the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolic pathway in normal human blood neutrophils stimulated with f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) or monosodium urate monohydrate (MSUM) in the presence of autologous platelets. Platelets inhibited by more than 90% the synthesis of leukotriene B(4) and 5-HETE in neutrophils activated with fMLP or MSUM. The addition of exogenous arachidonic acid did not reverse the inhibitory effect of platelets on 5-LOX-generated metabolites in fMLP- or MSUM-activated neutrophils. Preincubation of neutrophils with adenosine deaminase reversed the inhibitory effect of platelets in fMLP-treated neutrophils, indicating that adenosine was responsible for the platelet inhibition of leukotriene B(4) and 5-HETE formation. In contrast, adenosine deaminase had no influence on the inhibitory effects of platelets in MSUM-stimulated cells. These results suggest that platelets can inhibit the synthesis of 5-LOX products (a). by acting mainly downstream to phospholipase A(2) in cells stimulated by fMLP or MSUM, (b). through adenosine when neutrophils are activated with fMLP, and (c). by an adenosine-independent mechanism in MSUM-activated neutrophils by an as-yet-unidentified mediator.

  8. Antioxidant and antifungal activity of different extracts obtained from aerial parts of Inula crithmoides L.

    PubMed

    Bucchini, Anahi; Ricci, Donata; Messina, Federica; Marcotullio, Maria Carla; Curini, Massimo; Giamperi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The total phenolic content, antioxidant and antifungal activities of three Inula crithmoides extracts (n-hexane, methylene chloride and MeOH) were investigated. The methanolic extract showed the highest total phenolic content. In the DPPH assay, the methanolic and hexane extracts exhibited the highest DPPH-radical scavenging activity; in the 5-lipoxygenase assay, the hexane extract showed greater inhibitory effect with an IC50 similar to that of Trolox and ascorbic acid. The antifungal activity of the methanolic extract revealed a higher activity against Phytophtora cryptogea and Alternaria solani. PMID:25426874

  9. Synthesis and biological activity of arylspiroborate salts derived from caffeic Acid phenethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Martin J G; Flewelling, Andrew J; Clark, Trevor N; Levesque, Natalie A; Jean-François, Jacques; Surette, Marc E; Gray, Christopher A; Vogels, Christopher M; Touaibia, Mohamed; Westcott, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Two novel boron compounds containing caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) derivatives have been prepared and characterized fully. These new compounds and CAPE have been investigated for potential antioxidant and antimicrobial properties and their ability to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and whether chelation to boron improves their biological activity. Sodium salt 4 was generally more active than ammonium salt 5 in the biological assays and surpassed the radical scavenging ability of CAPE. Compounds 4 and 5 were more active than CAPE and Zileuton in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. These results clearly show the effectiveness of the synthesized salts as transporter of CAPE. PMID:25834744

  10. Synthesis and Biological Activity of Arylspiroborate Salts Derived from Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester

    PubMed Central

    Hébert, Martin J. G.; Flewelling, Andrew J.; Clark, Trevor N.; Jean-François, Jacques; Surette, Marc E.; Gray, Christopher A.; Vogels, Christopher M.; Touaibia, Mohamed; Westcott, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Two novel boron compounds containing caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) derivatives have been prepared and characterized fully. These new compounds and CAPE have been investigated for potential antioxidant and antimicrobial properties and their ability to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and whether chelation to boron improves their biological activity. Sodium salt 4 was generally more active than ammonium salt 5 in the biological assays and surpassed the radical scavenging ability of CAPE. Compounds 4 and 5 were more active than CAPE and Zileuton in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. These results clearly show the effectiveness of the synthesized salts as transporter of CAPE. PMID:25834744

  11. Flavocoxid, a Nutraceutical Approach to Blunt Inflammatory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Squadrito, Francesco; Mecchio, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids, from Scutellaria baicalensis (Chinese skullcap) and Acacia catechu (black catechu), have been shown to exert a variety of therapeutic effects, including anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, and anticancer activities. Flavocoxid is a mixed extract containing baicalin and catechin and it acts as a dual balanced inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and COX-2 peroxidase enzyme activities with a significant inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) enzyme activity in vitro. Flavocoxid downregulates gene or protein expression of several inflammatory markers and exerts also strong antioxidant activity in several experimental models. Controlled clinical trials and a postmarketing study have clearly shown that flavocoxid is as effective as naproxen in managing the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis of the knee and it has better upper gastrointestinal, renal, and respiratory safety profile than naproxen. Flavocoxid may therefore provide a potential therapeutic approach to the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:25242871

  12. Pro-inflammatory enzymes, cyclooxygenase 1, cyclooxygenase 2, and 5-lipooxygenase, inhibited by stabilized rice bran extracts.

    PubMed

    Roschek, Bill; Fink, Ryan C; Li, Dan; McMichael, Matthew; Tower, Christine M; Smith, Robert D; Alberte, Randall S

    2009-06-01

    Rice bran, the outer bran and germ of the kernel and a by-product of rice milling, is rich in phytonutrients but has been underutilized because of lipid content instability. New methods for the processing of rice bran have yielded a stabilized form that is increasingly used in foods and dietary supplements. Recent studies have documented a role for stabilized rice bran (SRB) in treating diabetes and arthritis, although little is known of the bioactive compounds that impart these health benefits. Here we characterize the chemical composition of three extracts of SRB and identify the functional bioactives contributing to the inhibitory properties against three key pro-inflammatory enzymes (cyclooxygenase [COX] 1, COX2, and 5-lipoxygenase [5-LOX]) that control the inflammatory cascade involved in impaired joint health, pain, and arthritis. One extract (SRB-AI) demonstrated significant COX1 and COX2 inhibitory activities with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values for COX1 and COX2 of 305 and 29 microg/mL, respectively, but no 5-LOX inhibition. The second extract (SRB-AII) inhibited COX1, COX2, and 5-LOX with IC(50) values of 310, 19, and 396 microg/mL, respectively. The third extract (SRB-AIII), a blend of SRB-AI and SRB-AIII, inhibited COX1, COX2, and 5-LOX with respective IC(50) values of 48, 11, and 197 microg/mL. Analysis of the extracts by direct analysis in real time time of flight-mass spectrometry revealed that SRB-AI, SRB-AII, and SRB-AIII contain over 620, 770, and 810 compounds, respectively. Of these, 17 were identified as key bioactives for COX and/or LOX inhibition. These SRB extracts have applications for functional foods and dietary supplements for control of inflammation and joint health.

  13. Correlation between arachidonic acid oxygenation and luminol-induced chemiluminescence in neutrophils: inhibition by diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Chabannes, B; Perraut, C; El Habib, R; Moliere, P; Pacheco, Y; Lagarde, M

    1997-04-01

    Neutrophils from allergic subjects were hypersensitive to stimulation by low calcium ionophore concentration (0.15 microM), resulting in an increased formation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 5S-hydroxy-6,8,11,14-(E,Z,Z,Z)-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), and other arachidonic acid metabolites through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. In parallel, luminol-dependent chemiluminescence was also higher in neutrophils from allergic patients at the basal state and after stimulation by calcium ionophore, revealing an enhancement of radical oxygen species and peroxide production. The activity of glutathione peroxidase, the main enzyme responsible for hydroperoxide reduction, was lowered in these cells. Diethyl-dithiocarbamate (DTC) induced a concentration-dependent decrease in chemiluminescence and arachidonic acid metabolism after neutrophil stimulation. These data show that the elevation of arachidonic acid metabolism in neutrophils from allergic patients is strongly correlated with oxidative status. This elevation may be the consequence of an increased cellular hydroperoxide known to activate 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activity and/or an increased arachidonic acid availability, due either to phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activation or inhibition of arachidonate reesterification into phospholipids. Lowering this oxidative status was associated with a concomitant decrease of this metabolism. Our results suggest that the effect of DTC may be the consequence of an inhibition of peroxyl radical and cellular lipid hydroperoxide production. Thus, DTC may modulate arachidonic acid metabolism in neutrophils by modulating the cellular hydroperoxide level.

  14. Intravenous anesthetic propofol suppresses prostaglandin E2 and cysteinyl leukotriene production and reduces edema formation in arachidonic acid-induced ear inflammation.

    PubMed

    Inada, Takefumi; Hirota, Kiichi; Shingu, Koh

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is an intravenous drug widely used for anesthesia and sedation. Previously, propofol was shown to inhibit cyclo-oxygenase (COX) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activities. Because these enzyme-inhibiting effects have only been demonstrated in vitro, this study sought to ascertain whether similar effects might also be observed in vivo. In the current studies, effects of propofol were tested in a murine model of arachidonic acid-induced ear inflammation. Specifically, propofol - as a pre-treatment -- was intraperitoneally and then topical application of arachidonic acid was performed. After 1 h, tissue biopsies were collected and tested for the presence of edema and for levels of inflammatory mediators. The results indicated that the administration of propofol significantly suppressed ear edema formation, tissue myeloperoxidase activity, and tissue production of both prostaglandin E2 and cysteinyl leukotrienes. From the data, it can be concluded that propofol could exert anti-COX and anti-5-LOX activities in an in vivo model and that these activities in turn could have, at least in part, suppressed arachidonic acid-induced edema formation in the ear.

  15. EXCESSIVE LEUKOTRIENE B4 IN NUCLEUS TRACTUS SOLITARII IS PROHYPERTENSIVE IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Waki, Hidefumi; Hendy, Emma B.; Hindmarch, Charles C.T.; Gouraud, Sabine; Toward, Marie; Kasparov, Sergey; Murphy, David; Paton, Julian F.R.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation within the brainstem microvasculature has been associated with chronic cardiovascular diseases. We found that the expression of several enzymes involved in arachidonic acid (AA) - leukotriene B4 (LTB4) production was altered in NTS of SHR. LTB4 produced from AA by 5-lipoxygenase (5LOX) is a potent chemoattractant of leukocytes. Leukotriene B4-12-hydroxydehydrogenase (LTB4-12-HD), which degrades leukotriene B4 (LTB4), was down-regulated compared to Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that LTB4-12-HD was reduced by 63 and 58% in the NTS of adult SHR and pre-hypertensive (PH) SHR respectively, compared to age-matched WKY rats (n=6). 5LOX gene expression was up-regulated in the NTS of SHR (~50%; n=6). LTB4 levels were increased in the NTS of the SHR (17%; n=10, p<0.05). LTB4 receptors BLT1 (but not BLT2), were expressed on astroglia in the NTS but not neurons or vessels. Microinjection of LTB4 into the NTS of WKY rats increased both leukocyte adherence and arterial pressure for over 4 days (peak: +15 mmHg; P<0.01). In contrast, blockade of NTS BLT1 receptors lowered blood pressure in the SHR (peak: -13 mmHg; P<0.05) but not WKY rats. Thus, excessive amounts of LTB4 in NTS of SHR possibly as a result of up-regulation of 5LOX and down regulation of LTB412-HD, can induce inflammation. Since blockade of NTS BLT1 receptors lowered arterial pressure in the SHR their endogenous activity may contribute to the hypertensive state of this rodent model. Thus, inflammatory reactions in the brainstem are causally associated with neurogenic hypertension. PMID:23172924

  16. Gastroprotective Effect of Cochinchina momordica Seed Extract in Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Acute Gastric Damage in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji Hwan; Kim, Joo-Hyun; Lee, Byoung Hwan; Seo, Pyoung Ju; Kang, Jung Mook; Jo, So Young; Park, Ji Hyun; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Chang, Hyun; Kwon, Jin-Won; Lee, Dong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The major compounds of Cochinchina momordica seed extract (SK-MS10) include momordica saponins. We report that the gastroprotective effect of SK-MS10 in an ethanol-induced gastric damage rat model is mediated by suppressing proinflammatory cytokines and downregulating cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), and the activation of calcitonin gene-related peptide. In this study, we evaluated the gastroprotective effects of SK-MS10 in the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastric damage rat model. Methods The pretreatment effect of SK-MS10 was evaluated in the NSAID-induced gastric damage rat model using aspirin, indomethacin, and diclofenac in 7-week-old rats. Gastric damage was evaluated based on the gross ulcer index by gastroenterologists, and the damage area (%) was measured using the MetaMorph 7.0 video image analysis system. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blotting was used to analyze the levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, COX-2, cPLA2, and 5-LOX. Results All NSAIDs induced gastric damage based on the gross ulcer index and damage area (p<0.05). Gastric damage was significantly attenuated by SK-MS10 pretreatment compared with NSAID treatment alone (p<0.05). The SK-MS10 pretreatment group exhibited lower MPO levels than the diclofenac group. The expression of cPLA2 and 5-LOX was decreased by SK-MS10 pretreatment in each of the three NSAID treatment groups. Conclusions SK-MS10 exhibited a gastroprotective effect against NSAID-induced acute gastric damage in rats. However, its protective mechanism may be different across the three types of NSAID-induced gastric damage models in rats. PMID:24516701

  17. Comparative study on anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of Caesalpinia crista and Centella asiatica leaf extracts

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, B. N.; Girish, T. K.; Raghavendra, R. H.; Naidu, K. Akhilender; Rao, U. J. S. Prasada; Rao, K. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Amyloidosis, oxidative stress and inflammation have been strongly implicated in neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease. Traditionally, Caesalpinia crista and Centella asiatica leaf extracts are used to treat brain related diseases in India. C. crista is used as a mental relaxant drink as well as to treat inflammatory diseases, whereas C. asiatica is reported to be used to enhance memory and to treat dementia. Objective: The present study is aimed to understand the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of C. asiatica and C. crista leaf extracts. Materials and Methods: Phenolic acid composition of the aqueous extracts of C. crista and C. asiatica were separated on a reverse phase C18 column (4.6 x 250 mm) using HPLC system. Antioxidant properties of the leaf extracts were determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay and the reducing potential assay. The anti-inflammatory activities of aqueous extracts of C. crista and C. asiatica were studied using 5-lipoxygenase assay. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) were isolated from blood by Ficoll-Histopaque density gradient followed by hypotonic lysis of erythrocytes. Results: Gallic, protocatechuic, gentisic, chlorogenic, caffeic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids were the phenolic acids identified in C. crista and C. asiatica leaf aqueous extracts. However, gallic acid and ferulic acid contents were much higher in C. crista compared to C. asiatica. Leaf extracts of C. asiatica and C. crista exhibited antioxidant properties and inhibited 5-lipoxygenase (anti-inflammatory) in a dose dependent manner. However, leaf extracts of C. crista had better antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity compared to that of C. asiatica. The better activity of C. crista is attributed to high gallic acid and ferulic acid compared to C. asiatica. Conclusions: Thus, the leaf extract of C. crista can be a potential therapeutic role for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24741275

  18. Anti-inflammatory potential of an ethyl acetate fraction isolated from Justicia gendarussa roots through inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 expression via NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kavitha S; Vijayan, Viji; Bhaskar, Shobha; Krishnan, Kripa; Shalini, V; Helen, A

    2012-01-01

    Justicia gendarussa Burm.f. (J. gendarussa) is a plant used as traditional medicine in different parts of India and China to treat inflammatory disorders like rheumatoid arthritis. But its mechanism of anti-inflammatory action is still unclear. Hence in this context, the objective of our study is to reveal the mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity of J. gendarussa which would form an additional proof to the traditional knowledge of this plant. The anti-inflammatory function and mechanism(s) of action was studied in an ethyl acetate fraction isolated from methanolic extract of J. gendarussa roots (EJG). Anti-inflammatory studies were conducted on rats using partitioned fractions isolated from methanolic extract of J. gendarussa roots. In carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, ethyl acetate fraction brought about 80% and 93% edema inhibition at 3rd and 5th hour at a dose of 50 mg/kg, when compared to other extracts and Voveran. We investigated whether EJG inhibits the release of cycloxygenase (COX), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in LPS stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs). Results shows that EJG dose dependently inhibited LPS-activated COX, 5-LOX, IL-6, and NF-κB in hPBMCs. EJG also reduced LPS induced levels of iNOS and COX-2 mRNA expression in hPBMCs. This study provides an insight into the probable mechanism(s) underlying the anti-inflammatory activity of EJG and therefore, we report the first confirmation of the anti-inflammatory potential of this traditionally employed herbal medicine in vitro. PMID:22063737

  19. Evaluating the inhibitory potential of Withania somnifera on platelet aggregation and inflammation enzymes: An in vitro and in silico study.

    PubMed

    M, Madhusudan; Zameer, Farhan; Naidu, Akhilender; M N, Nagendra Prasad; Dhananjaya, Bhadrapura Lakkappa; Hegdekatte, Raghavendra

    2016-09-01

    Context Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal is traditionally used for treating various ailments, but lacks scientific evaluation. Objective This study evaluates Withania somnifera (WS) for its effect on platelet activity and inflammatory enzymes. Materials and methods Aqueous and ethanolic (1:1) leaf extracts were subjected to in vitro indirect haemolytic activity using Naja naja venom, human platelet aggregation was quantified for lipid peroxidation using arachidonic acid (AA) as agonist and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) levels were determined using standard spectrometric assays. Further, molecular docking was performed by the ligand fit method using molegro software package (Molegro ApS, Aarhus, Denmark). Results The study found that aqueous and ethanol extracts have very negligible effect (15%) with an IC50 value of 13.8 mg/mL on PLA2 from Naja naja venom. Further, extracts of WS also had very little effect (18%) with an IC50 value of 16.6 mg/mL on malondialdehyde (MDA) formation. However, a 65% inhibition of 5-LOX with an IC50 value of 0.92 mg/mL was observed in 1:1 ethanol extracts. The same was evident from SAR model with the active ingredient withaferin A binding predominantly on Phe 77, Tyr 98, Arg 99, Asp 164, Leu 168, Ser 382, Arg 395, Tyr 396 and Tyr 614 with an atomic contact energy value of -128.96 compared to standard phenidone (-103.61). Thus, the current study validates the application of WS for inflammatory diseases. Conclusion This study reveals the inhibitory potential of W. somnifera on inflammatory enzymes and platelet aggregation. Thus, WS can serve as a newer, safer and affordable medicine for inflammatory diseases. PMID:26704448

  20. Evaluating the inhibitory potential of Withania somnifera on platelet aggregation and inflammation enzymes: An in vitro and in silico study.

    PubMed

    M, Madhusudan; Zameer, Farhan; Naidu, Akhilender; M N, Nagendra Prasad; Dhananjaya, Bhadrapura Lakkappa; Hegdekatte, Raghavendra

    2016-09-01

    Context Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal is traditionally used for treating various ailments, but lacks scientific evaluation. Objective This study evaluates Withania somnifera (WS) for its effect on platelet activity and inflammatory enzymes. Materials and methods Aqueous and ethanolic (1:1) leaf extracts were subjected to in vitro indirect haemolytic activity using Naja naja venom, human platelet aggregation was quantified for lipid peroxidation using arachidonic acid (AA) as agonist and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) levels were determined using standard spectrometric assays. Further, molecular docking was performed by the ligand fit method using molegro software package (Molegro ApS, Aarhus, Denmark). Results The study found that aqueous and ethanol extracts have very negligible effect (15%) with an IC50 value of 13.8 mg/mL on PLA2 from Naja naja venom. Further, extracts of WS also had very little effect (18%) with an IC50 value of 16.6 mg/mL on malondialdehyde (MDA) formation. However, a 65% inhibition of 5-LOX with an IC50 value of 0.92 mg/mL was observed in 1:1 ethanol extracts. The same was evident from SAR model with the active ingredient withaferin A binding predominantly on Phe 77, Tyr 98, Arg 99, Asp 164, Leu 168, Ser 382, Arg 395, Tyr 396 and Tyr 614 with an atomic contact energy value of -128.96 compared to standard phenidone (-103.61). Thus, the current study validates the application of WS for inflammatory diseases. Conclusion This study reveals the inhibitory potential of W. somnifera on inflammatory enzymes and platelet aggregation. Thus, WS can serve as a newer, safer and affordable medicine for inflammatory diseases.

  1. Identification and absolute configuration of dihydroxy-arachidonic acids formed by oxygenation of 5S-HETE by native and aspirin-acetylated COX-2.

    PubMed

    Mulugeta, Surafel; Suzuki, Takashi; Hernandez, Noemi Tejera; Griesser, Markus; Boeglin, William E; Schneider, Claus

    2010-03-01

    Biosynthesis of the prostaglandin endoperoxide by the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes is accompanied by formation of a small amount of 11R-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), 15R-HETE, and 15S-HETE as by-products. Acetylation of COX-2 by aspirin abrogates prostaglandin synthesis and triggers formation of 15R-HETE as the sole product of oxygenation of arachidonic acid. Here, we investigated the formation of by-products of the transformation of 5S-HETE by native COX-2 and by aspirin-acetylated COX-2 using HPLC-ultraviolet, GC-MS, and LC-MS analysis. 5S,15S- dihydroxy (di)HETE, 5S,15R-diHETE, and 5S,11R-diHETE were identified as by-products of native COX-2, in addition to the previously described di-endoperoxide (5S,15S-dihydroxy-9S,11R,8S,12S-diperoxy-6E,13E-eicosadienoic acid) as the major oxygenation product. 5S,15R-diHETE was the only product formed by aspirin-acetylated COX-2. Both 5,15-diHETE and 5,11-diHETE were detected in CT26 mouse colon carcinoma cells as well as in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW264.7 cells incubated with 5S-HETE, and their formation was attenuated in the presence of the COX-2 specific inhibitor, NS-398. Aspirin-treated CT26 cells gave 5,15-diHETE as the most prominent product formed from 5S-HETE. 5S,15S-diHETE has been described as a product of the cross-over of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and 15-LOX activities in elicited rat mononuclear cells and human leukocytes, and our studies implicate cross-over of the 5-LOX and COX-2 pathways as an additional biosynthetic route.

  2. Leukotriene D4-induced Caco-2 cell proliferation is mediated by prostaglandin E2 synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Marisol; Martín-Venegas, Raquel; Moreno, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Leukotriene D4 (LTD4) is a pro-inflammatory mediator formed from arachidonic acid through the action of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX). Its biological effects are mediated by at least two G-coupled plasmatic cysteinyl LT receptors (CysLT1-2R). It has been reported an upregulation of the 5-LOX pathway in tumor tissue unlike in normal colon mucosa. Colon tumors generally have an increased expression of CysLT1R and colon cancer patients with high expression levels of CysLT1R have poor prognosis. We previously observed that the cyclooxygenase pathway is involved in the control of intestinal epithelial cancer cell growth through PGE2 production. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the effect of LTD4 binding with CysLT1R on Caco-2 cell growth. We note a number of key findings from this research. We observed that at a concentration similar to that found under inflammatory conditions, LTD4 was able to induce Caco-2 cell proliferation and DNA synthesis. Moreover, with the use of a specific receptor antagonist this study has demonstrated that the effect of LTD4 is a result of its interaction with CystLT1R. We also note the possible participation of the PLC-IP3-Ca2+/DAG-PKC signaling pathways in cytosolic PLA2 and [3H]AA release induced by LTD4-CystLT1R interaction. Finally, we found that the resulting activation of the AA cascade and the production of PGE2 eicosanoid could be related to the activation of cell signaling pathways such as ERK and CREB. These findings will help facilitate our understanding of how inflammatory mediators can affect the survival and dissemination of intestinal carcinoma cells. PMID:26216432

  3. Role of MAP kinases in regulating expression of antioxidants and inflammatory mediators in mouse keratinocytes following exposure to the half mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Adrienne T.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Casillas, Robert P.; Heck, Diane E.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-06-15

    Dermal exposure to sulfur mustard causes inflammation and tissue injury. This is associated with changes in expression of antioxidants and eicosanoids which contribute to oxidative stress and toxicity. In the present studies we analyzed mechanisms regulating expression of these mediators using an in vitro skin construct model in which mouse keratinocytes were grown at an air-liquid interface and exposed directly to 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a model sulfur mustard vesicant. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) was found to cause marked increases in keratinocyte protein carbonyls, a marker of oxidative stress. This was correlated with increases in expression of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, thioredoxin reductase and the glutathione S-transferases, GSTA1-2, GSTP1 and mGST2. CEES also upregulated several enzymes important in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-2 (mPGES-2), prostaglandin D synthase (PGDS), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), leukotriene A{sub 4} (LTA{sub 4}) hydrolase and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) synthase. CEES readily activated keratinocyte JNK and p38 MAP kinases, signaling pathways which are known to regulate expression of antioxidants, as well as prostaglandin and leukotriene synthases. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase suppressed CEES-induced expression of GSTA1-2, COX-2, mPGES-2, PGDS, 5-LOX, LTA{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase, while JNK inhibition blocked PGDS and GSTP1. These data indicate that CEES modulates expression of antioxidants and enzymes producing inflammatory mediators by distinct mechanisms. Increases in antioxidants may be an adaptive process to limit tissue damage. Inhibiting the capacity of keratinocytes to generate eicosanoids may be important in limiting inflammation and protecting the skin from vesicant-induced oxidative stress and injury.

  4. Cerumen of Australian stingless bees ( Tetragonula carbonaria): gas chromatography-mass spectrometry fingerprints and potential anti-inflammatory properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, Flavia Carmelina; Brooks, Peter Richard; Wallace, Helen Margaret; Russell, Fraser Donald

    2011-04-01

    Cerumen, or propolis, is a mixture of plant resins enriched with bee secretions. In Australia, stingless bees are important pollinators that use cerumen for nest construction and possibly for colony's health. While extensive research attests to the therapeutic properties of honeybee ( Apis mellifera) propolis, the biological and medicinal properties of Australian stingless bee cerumen are largely unknown. In this study, the chemical and biological properties of polar extracts of cerumen from Tetragonula carbonaria in South East Queensland, Australia were investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses and in vitro 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) cell-free assays. Extracts were tested against comparative (commercial tincture of A. mellifera propolis) and positive controls (Trolox and gallic acid). Distinct GC-MS fingerprints of a mixed diterpenic profile typical of native bee cerumen were obtained with pimaric acid (6.31 ± 0.97%, w/w), isopimaric acid (12.23 ± 3.03%, w/w), and gallic acid (5.79 ± 0.81%, w/w) tentatively identified as useful chemical markers. Characteristic flavonoids and prenylated phenolics found in honeybee propolis were absent. Cerumen extracts from T. carbonaria inhibited activity of 5-LOX, an enzyme known to catalyse production of proinflammatory mediators (IC50 19.97 ± 2.67 μg/ml, mean ± SEM, n = 4). Extracts had similar potency to Trolox (IC50 12.78 ± 1.82 μg/ml), but were less potent than honeybee propolis (IC50 5.90 ± 0.62 μg/ml) or gallic acid (IC50 5.62 ± 0.35 μg/ml, P < 0.001). These findings warrant further investigation of the ecological and medicinal properties of this stingless bee cerumen, which may herald a commercial potential for the Australian beekeeping industry.

  5. Endogenous n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids delay progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in Fat-1-p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B; Brewer, Misty; Duff, Ashley; Lightfoot, Stan; Brush, Richard S; Anderson, Robert E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2012-12-01

    Preclinical studies suggest that diets rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) may be beneficial for prevention of pancreatic cancer. Nutritional intervention studies are often complex, and there is no clear evidence, without potential confounding factors, on whether conversion of n-6 PUFAs to n-3 PUFAs in pancreatic tissues would provide protection. Experiments were designed using n-3 fatty acid desaturase (Fat-1) transgenic mice, which can convert n-6 PUFA to n-3 FAs endogenously, to determine the impact of n-3 PUFAs on pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs) and their progression to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Six-week-old female p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) and compound Fat-1-p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) mice were fed (AIN-76A) diets containing 10% safflower oil for 35 weeks. Pancreata were evaluated histopathologically for PanINs and PDAC. Results showed a dramatic reduction in incidence of PDAC (84%; P < .02) in Fat-1-p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) mice compared to p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) mice. Importantly, significant reductions of pancreatic ducts with carcinoma (90%; P < .0001) and PanIN 3 (~50%; P < .001) lesions were observed in the compound transgenic mice. The levels of n-3 PUFA were much higher (>85%; P < .05-0.01) in pancreas of compound transgenic mice than in those of p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) mice. Molecular analysis of the pancreas showed a significant down-regulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), 5-LOX-activating protein, Bcl-2, and cyclin D1 expression levels in Fat-1-p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) mice compared to p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) mice. These data highlight the promise of dietary n-3 FAs for chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer in high-risk individuals.

  6. ROS-Mediated Autophagy Induced by Dysregulation of Lipid Metabolism Plays a Protective Role in Colorectal Cancer Cells Treated with Gambogic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Lei, Yunlong; Yuan, Ping; Li, Lingjun; Luo, Chao; Gao, Rui; Tian, Jun; Feng, Zuohua; Nice, Edouard C.; Sun, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Gambogic acid (GA), the main active component of gamboge resin, has potent antitumor activity both in vivo and in vitro. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we found that GA could initiate autophagy in colorectal cancer cells, and inhibition of the autophagy process accelerated the effect of proliferative inhibition and apoptotic cell death induced by GA, implying a protective role of autophagy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis-based proteomics showed that GA treatment altered the expression of multiple proteins involved in redox signaling and lipid metabolism. Functional studies revealed that GA-induced dysregulation of lipid metabolism could activate 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), resulting in intracellular ROS accumulation, followed by inhibition of Akt-mTOR signaling and autophagy initiation. Finally, results using a xenograft model suggested ROS-induced autophagy protect against the antitumor effect of GA. Taken together, these data showed new biological activities of GA against colorectal cancer underlying the protective role of ROS-induced autophagy. This study will provide valuable insights for future studies regarding the anticancer mechanisms of GA. PMID:24810758

  7. The Cell Nucleus Serves as a Mechanotransducer of Tissue Damage-Induced Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Enyedi, Balázs; Jelcic, Mark; Niethammer, Philipp

    2016-05-19

    Tissue damage activates cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), releasing arachidonic acid (AA), which is oxidized to proinflammatory eicosanoids by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) on the nuclear envelope. How tissue damage is sensed to activate cPLA2 is unknown. We investigated this by live imaging in wounded zebrafish larvae, where damage of the fin tissue causes osmotic cell swelling at the wound margin and the generation of a chemotactic eicosanoid signal. Osmotic swelling of cells and their nuclei activates cPla2 by translocating it from the nucleoplasm to the nuclear envelope. Elevated cytosolic Ca(2+) was necessary but not sufficient for cPla2 translocation, and nuclear swelling was required in parallel. cPla2 translocation upon nuclear swelling was reconstituted in isolated nuclei and appears to be a simple physical process mediated by tension in the nuclear envelope. Our data suggest that the nucleus plays a mechanosensory role in inflammation by transducing cell swelling and lysis into proinflammatory eicosanoid signaling.

  8. The Cell Nucleus Serves as a Mechanotransducer of Tissue Damage-Induced Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Enyedi, Balázs; Jelcic, Mark; Niethammer, Philipp

    2016-05-19

    Tissue damage activates cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), releasing arachidonic acid (AA), which is oxidized to proinflammatory eicosanoids by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) on the nuclear envelope. How tissue damage is sensed to activate cPLA2 is unknown. We investigated this by live imaging in wounded zebrafish larvae, where damage of the fin tissue causes osmotic cell swelling at the wound margin and the generation of a chemotactic eicosanoid signal. Osmotic swelling of cells and their nuclei activates cPla2 by translocating it from the nucleoplasm to the nuclear envelope. Elevated cytosolic Ca(2+) was necessary but not sufficient for cPla2 translocation, and nuclear swelling was required in parallel. cPla2 translocation upon nuclear swelling was reconstituted in isolated nuclei and appears to be a simple physical process mediated by tension in the nuclear envelope. Our data suggest that the nucleus plays a mechanosensory role in inflammation by transducing cell swelling and lysis into proinflammatory eicosanoid signaling. PMID:27203112

  9. Sickle erythrocytes and platelets augment lung leukotriene synthesis with downregulation of anti-inflammatory proteins: relevance in the pathology of the acute chest syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Opene, Michael; Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph; Husain, Sumair

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Initiation, progression, and resolution of vaso-occlusive pain episodes in sickle cell disease (SCD) have been recognized as reperfusion injury, which provokes an inflammatory response in the pulmonary circulation. Some 5-lipoxygenase (5-lox) metabolites are potent vasoconstrictors in the pulmonary circulation. We studied stimulation of production of the inflammatory eicosanoids leukotrienes (LTs) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by isolated rat lungs perfused with sickle (HbSS) erythrocytes. Our hypothesis is that HbSS erythrocytes produce more LTs than normal (HbAA) erythrocytes, which can induce vaso-occlusive episodes in SCD patients. Lung perfusates were collected at specific time points and purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography, and LTC4 and PGE2 contents were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Rat lung explants were also cultured with purified HbAA and HbSS peptides, and 5-lox, cyclooxygenase 1/2, and platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) proteins were measured by Western blotting, while prostacyclin and LTs produced by cultured lung explants were measured by ELISA. Lung weight gain and blood gas data were not different among the groups. HbSS-perfused lungs produced more LTC4 and PGE2 than HbAA-perfused lungs: 10.40 ± 0.62 versus 0.92 ± 0.2 ng/g dry lung weight (mean ± SEM; P = 0.0001) for LTC4. Inclusion of autologous platelets (platelet-rich plasma) elevated LTC4 production to 12.6 ± 0.96 and 7 ± 0.60 ng/g dry lung weight in HbSS and HbAA perfusates, respectively. HbSS lungs also expressed more 5-lox and PAFR. The data suggest that HbSS erythrocytes and activated platelets in patient’s pulmonary microcirculation will enhance the synthesis and release of the proinflammatory mediators LTC4 and PGE2, both of which may contribute to onset of the acute chest syndrome in SCD. PMID:25621162

  10. Melatonin promotes Bax sequestration to mitochondria reducing cell susceptibility to apoptosis via the lipoxygenase metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Radogna, F; Albertini, M C; De Nicola, M; Diederich, M; Bejarano, I; Ghibelli, L

    2015-03-01

    Extra-neurological functions of melatonin include control of the immune system and modulation of apoptosis. We previously showed that melatonin inhibits the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in leukocytes via stimulation of high affinity MT1/MT2 receptors, thereby promoting re-localization of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein to mitochondria. Here we show that Bcl-2 sequesters pro-apoptotic Bax into mitochondria in an inactive form after melatonin treatment, thus reducing cell propensity to apoptosis. Bax translocation and the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin are strictly dependent on the presence of Bcl-2, and on the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), which we have previously shown to be produced as a consequence of melatonin binding to its low affinity target calmodulin. Therefore, the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin requires the simultaneous, independent interaction with high (MT1/MT2) and low (calmodulin) affinity targets, eliciting two independent signal transduction pathways converging into Bax sequestration and inactivation. MT1/MT2 vs. lipoxygenase pathways are activated by 10(-9) vs. 10(-5)M melatonin, respectively; the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin is achieved at 10(-5)M, but drops to 10(-9)M upon addition of exogenous 5-HETE, revealing that lipoxygenase activation is the rate-limiting pathway. Therefore, in areas of inflammation with increased 5-HETE levels, physiological nanomolar concentrations of melatonin may suffice to maintain leukocyte viability.

  11. Foeniculum vulgare essential oils: chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Maria Graça; Cruz, Cláudia; Faleiro, Leonor; Simões, Mariana T F; Figueiredo, Ana Cristina; Barroso, José G; Pedro, Luis G

    2010-02-01

    The essential oils from Foeniculum vulgare commercial aerial parts and fruits were isolated by hydrodistillation, with different distillation times (30 min, 1 h, 2 h and 3 h), and analyzed by GC and GC-MS. The antioxidant ability was estimated using four distinct methods. Antibacterial activity was determined by the agar diffusion method. Remarkable differences, and worrying from the quality and safety point of view, were detected in the essential oils. trans-Anethole (31-36%), alpha-pinene (14-20%) and limonene (11-13%) were the main components of the essentials oil isolated from F. vulgare dried aerial parts, whereas methyl chavicol (= estragole) (79-88%) was dominant in the fruit oils. With the DPPH method the plant oils showed better antioxidant activity than the fruits oils. With the TBARS method and at higher concentrations, fennel essential oils showed a pro-oxidant activity. None of the oils showed a hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity > 50%, but they showed an ability to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase. The essential oils showed a very low antimicrobial activity. In general, the essential oils isolated during 2 h were as effective, from the biological activity point of view, as those isolated during 3 h.

  12. The effect of dietary arachidonic acid (ARA) on growth performance, fatty acid composition and expression of ARA metabolism-related genes in larval half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuhui; Li, Songlin; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Yanjiao; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-05-28

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary arachidonic acid (ARA) on growth performance, fatty acid composition and ARA metabolism-related gene expression in larval half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). Larvae (35 d after hatching, 54 (SEM 1) mg) were fed diets with graded concentrations of ARA (0.01, 0.39, 0.70, 1.07, 1.42 and 2.86 % dry weight) five times per d to apparent satiation for 30 d. Results showed that increased dietary ARA concentration caused a significant non-linear rise to a plateau in survival rate, final body weight and thermal growth coefficient, and the maximum values occurred with the 1.42 % ARA treatment. As dietary ARA increased to 1.07 or 1.42 %, activities of trypsin, leucine aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase levels increased, but they decreased with higher ARA concentrations. The fatty acid composition of tongue sole larvae was almost well correlated with their dietary fatty acid profiles, and the EPA content of the larvae decreased with increasing dietary ARA. Meanwhile, the partial sequences of COX-1a (cyclo-oxygenase-1a), COX-1b (cyclo-oxygenase-1b), COX-2 (cyclo-oxygenase-2), 5-LOX (5-lipoxygenase) and CYP2J6-like (cytochrome P450 2J6-like) were also obtained. Both COX-2 and 5-LOX mRNA expression levels significantly increased to a plateau in an 'L'-shaped manner as dietary ARA increased to 1.07 or 1.42 %, but no significant differences were found in the gene expression of COX-1a, COX-1b or CYP2J6-like. These results suggest that 1.07-1.42 % dietary ARA was beneficial to the growth performance of larval tongue sole, and the regulation of dietary ARA on the growth performance of larvae was probably involved in altering the mRNA expression of COX-2 and 5-LOX.

  13. The effect of 1-furan-2-yl-3-pyridine-2-yl-propenone on pharmacokinetic parameters of warfarin.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Srinivasan; Lee, Eung Seok; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon; Woo, Jong-Soo; Yoo, Bong Kyu

    2007-07-01

    1-Furan-2-yl-3-pyridine-2-yl-propenone (FPP-3) is an investigatory drug which has a dual inhibitory action on cyclooxygenase (COX) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX). We examined its effect on the pharmacokinetics of warfarin. Three consecutive days of pretreatment with 17 mg/kg of FPP-3 had no significant effect on the pharmacokinetic parameters of warfarin when orally administered to rats. A higher dosage of FPP-3 however, did cause significant changes in the pharmacokinetic parameters of wafarin. The cytochrome P450 activity test demonstrated that the metabolism of R-warfarin was significantly inhibited by FPP-3 while there was little or no inhibition of the metabolism of S-warfarin, which is mainly responsible for its anticoagulant effect. Therefore, it appears that the alteration in the pharmacokinetic parameters of warfarin was due to the inhibitory effect of FPP-3 on the metabolism of R-warfarin. Although there was a significant increase in the plasma concentration, the area under the curve, half life of warfarin, and prothrombin time were not significantly changed. Based on these findings, the pharmacokinetic drug interaction between FPP-3 and warfarin mainly involves R-warfarin and, therefore, this interaction may not be of clinical significance in terms of warfarin-related toxicity. PMID:17703744

  14. Impact of Arachidonic Acid and the Leukotriene Signaling Pathway on Vasculogenesis of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Han; Sharifpanah, Fatemeh; Becker, Sven; Wartenberg, Maria; Sauer, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate into various kinds of cells, such as endothelial and hematopoietic cells. In addition, some evidence suggests that inflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes (LTs), which include the 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) family, can regulate endothelial cell differentiation. In the present study, the eicosanoid precursor arachidonic acid (AA) stimulated vasculogenesis of ES cells by increasing the number of fetal liver kinase-1+ vascular progenitor cells as well as vascular structures positive for platelet endothelial cell adhesion protein-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin. The stimulation of vasculogenesis and expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in the LT signaling pathway, 5-LOX-activating protein (FLAP), was blunted upon treatment with the FLAP inhibitors AM643 and REV5901. Vasculogenesis was significantly restored upon exogenous addition of LTs. Downstream of FLAP, the LTB4 receptor (BLT1) blocker U75302, the BLT2 receptor blocker LY255283 as well as the cysteinyl LT blocker BAY-u9773 inhibited vasculogenesis of ES cells. AA treatment of differentiating ES cells increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which was not affected upon either FLAP or cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition. Prevention of ROS generation by either the free radical scavengers vitamin E and N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)glycine or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor VAS2870 downregulated vasculogenesis of ES cells and blunted the provasculogenic effect of AA. In summary, our data demonstrate that proinflammatory AA stimulates vasculogenesis of ES cells via the LT pathway by mechanisms involving ROS generation. PMID:27198524

  15. The Dual Cyclooxygenase/5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor Licofelone Attenuates P-Glycoprotein-Mediated Drug Resistance in the Injured Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Dulin, Jennifer N.; Moore, Meredith L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract There are currently no proven effective treatments that can improve recovery of function in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Many therapeutic compounds have shown promise in pre-clinical studies, but clinical trials have been largely unsuccessful. P-glycoprotein (Pgp, Abcb1b) is a drug efflux transporter of the blood–spinal cord barrier that limits spinal cord penetration of blood-borne xenobiotics. Pathological Pgp upregulation in diseases such as cancer causes heightened resistance to a broad variety of therapeutic drugs. Importantly, several drugs that have been evaluated for the treatment of SCI, such as riluzole, are known substrates of Pgp. We therefore examined whether Pgp-mediated pharmacoresistance diminishes delivery of riluzole to the injured spinal cord. Following moderate contusion injury at T10 in male Sprague–Dawley rats, we observed a progressive, spatial spread of increased Pgp expression from 3 days to 10 months post-SCI. Spinal cord uptake of i.p.-delivered riluzole was significantly reduced following SCI in wild type but not Abcb1a-knockout rats, highlighting a critical role for Pgp in mediating drug resistance following SCI. Because inflammation can drive Pgp upregulation, we evaluated the ability of the new generation dual anti-inflammatory drug licofelone to promote spinal cord delivery of riluzole following SCI. We found that licofelone both reduced Pgp expression and enhanced riluzole bioavailability within the lesion site at 72 h post-SCI. This work highlights Pgp-mediated drug resistance as an important obstacle to therapeutic drug delivery for SCI, and suggests licofelone as a novel combinatorial treatment strategy to enhance therapeutic drug delivery to the injured spinal cord. PMID:22947335

  16. Microsporols A-C from the Plant Endophytic Fungus Pestalotiopsis microspore.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianfu; Wang, Yadan; Liu, Shuchun; Liu, Xinzhong; Guo, Liangdong

    2015-10-01

    Three new ambuic acid derivatives, microsporols A-C (1-3) and the known compound ambuic acid (4), were isolated from the solid-substrate fermentation cultures of the plant endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis microspora. Their structures were elucidated primarily by NMR experiments. The absolute configurations of the 6,7-diol moiety in 1 and 2 were assigned using the Snatzke's method, whereas that of 3 was deduced by circular dichroism (CD) exciton chirality method. Compounds 1, 3, and 4 showed moderate 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitory effects. PMID:26669093

  17. Anti-allergic activity of sesquiterpenes from the rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jeong Ho; Lee, Dong-Ung; Kim, Yeong Shik; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2011-02-01

    From the 70% ethanol extract of the rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus (CRE), several major constituents including the sesquiterpene derivatives (valencene, nootkatone, and caryophyllene α-oxide), monoterpenes (β-pinene, 1,8-cineole, and limonene) and 4-cymene were isolated and examined for their anti-allergic activity in vitro and in vivo. In rat basophilic leukemia (RBL)-1 cells, the sesquiterpenes strongly inhibited 5-lipoxygenase-catalyzed leukotrienes production. In addition, they inhibited β-hexosaminidase release by antigen-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells, with valencene having the highest inhibitory effect. CRE inhibited leukotrienes production and β-hexosaminidase release at 300 μg/mL. It was also found that the most active sesquiterpene (valencene) and CRE inhibited β-hexosaminidase degranulation by inhibiting the initial activation reaction, Lyn phosphorylation, in IgE-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells. Moreover, CRE, valencene and nootkatone significantly inhibited the delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in mice when administered orally at 50-300 mg/kg. In conclusion, C. rotundus and its constituents, valencene, nootkatone, and caryophyllene α-oxide, exert anti-allergic activity in vitro and in vivo. These sesquiterpenes, but not monoterpenes, certainly contribute to the anti-allergic activity of the rhizomes of C. rotundus. PMID:21380805

  18. Salvia officinalis L. essential oils: effect of hydrodistillation time on the chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Miguel, G; Cruz, C; Faleiro, M L; Simões, M T F; Figueiredo, A C; Barroso, J G; Pedro, L G

    2011-03-01

    Salvia officinalis L. oils were isolated from the plant's commercial dried aerial parts, by hydrodistillation, with different distillation times. The essential oils were analysed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The antioxidant ability was measured using a free radical scavenging activity assay using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), a thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay, a deoxyribose assay for the scavenging of hydroxyl radical, an assay for site-specific actions and a 5-lipoxygenase assay. Antibacterial activity was determined by the agar diffusion method. 1,8-Cineole, α-pinene and camphor were the dominant components of all the essential oils. The different hydrodistillation times did not affect the oil yield nor the relative amount of the oil components. The time of hydrodistillation influenced the antioxidant activity. With the DPPH method, the oils isolated for 2 and 3 h were stronger free radical scavengers, while with the TBARS method, the highest antioxidant values were obtained in the oils isolated for 30 min, 2 and 3 h. Hydroxyl radical scavenging and lipoxygenase activity assays showed the best results with oils isolated for 1 and 3 h. With the deoxyribose method, sage oils at concentrations <1000 mg L(-1) showed better activity than mannitol. The essential oil of S. officinalis showed very weak antimicrobial activity.

  19. 5,7-dihydroxy-2-(3-hydroxy-4, 5-dimethoxy-phenyl)-chromen-4-one-a flavone from Bruguiera gymnorrhiza displaying anti-inflammatory properties

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Rajib; Sarkar, Ratul; Biswas, Prova; Bera, Rammohan; Sharma, Soma; Nath, Suvadeep; Karmakar, Sanmoy; Sen, Tuhinadri

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (BRG) (L.) Lamk (Rhizophoraceae), a mangrove species, is widely distributed in the Pacific region, eastern Africa, Indian subcontinent, and subtropical Australia. The leaves of this plant are traditionally used for treating burns and inflammatory lesions. This study isolates the bioactive compound from the methanol extract of BRG leaves and evaluates the possible mechanisms of anti-inflammatory activity involved. Materials and Methods: Bioassay-guided fractionation of BRG was performed to identify the bioactive fraction (displaying inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 [COX2] - 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activities and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production at the tested concentrations of 100 and 10 μg/ml). The fractionation was performed by solvent extraction and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography. The bioactive compound was characterized by ultraviolet–visible, liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The antioxidant potential was evaluated by electron spin resonance spectrum of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical at 250 μM. The effect of the compound was also studied on TNF-α converting enzyme and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activities at the concentrations 100, 10 and 1 μg/ml. Results: Bioassay-guided purification of BRG revealed the presence of a flavone (5,7-dihydroxy-2- [3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethoxy-phenyl]-chromen-4-one) of molecular weight 330Da. It demonstrated more than 80% inhibition against COX2, 5-LOX activities and TNF-α production at 100 μg/ml. It also displayed 40% inhibition against DPPH radical at the tested concentration along with 23.1% inhibition of NF-κB activity at 100 μg/ml. Conclusions: The isolated methoxy-flavone may play a predominant role in the anti-inflammatory properties displayed by BRG leaves. Such activity may involve multiple mechanisms, namely (a) modulation of oxidative stress (b) inhibition of arachidonic acid

  20. The antioxidant effect of β-caryophyllene protects rat liver from carbon tetrachloride-induced fibrosis by inhibiting hepatic stellate cell activation.

    PubMed

    Calleja, Miguel Angel; Vieites, Jose María; Montero-Meléndez, Trinidad; Montero-Meterdez, Trinidad; Torres, María Isabel; Faus, María José; Gil, Angel; Suárez, Antonio

    2013-02-14

    Plant-based whole foods provide thousands of bioactive metabolites to the human diet that reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases. β-Caryophyllene (CAR) is a common constituent of the essential oil of numerous plants, vegetables, fruits and medicinal herbs, and has been used as a flavouring agent since the 1930 s. Here, we report the antioxidant activity of CAR, its protective effect on liver fibrosis and its inhibitory capacity on hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. CAR was tested for the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and as a free radical scavenger. CAR had higher inhibitory capacity on lipid peroxidation than probucol, α-humulene and α-tocopherol. Also, CAR showed high scavenging activities against hydroxyl radical and superoxide anion. The activity of 5-lipoxygenase, an enzyme that actively participates in fibrogenesis, was significantly inhibited by CAR. Carbon tetrachloride-treated rats received CAR at 2, 20 and 200 mg/kg. CAR significantly improved liver structure, and reduced fibrosis and the expression of Col1a1, Tgfb1 and Timp1 genes. Oxidative stress was used to establish a model of HSC activation with overproduction of extracellular matrix proteins. CAR (1 and 10 μm) increased cell viability and significantly reduced the expression of fibrotic marker genes. CAR, a sesquiterpene present in numerous plants and foods, is as a natural antioxidant that reduces carbon tetrachloride-mediated liver fibrosis and inhibits hepatic cell activation.

  1. Secondary metabolites of ponderosa lemon (Citrus pyriformis) and their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Dalia; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki; Tahrani, Ahmad; Herrmann, Florian; Kaufmann, Dorothea; Farrag, Nawal; El-Shazly, Assem; Wink, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Column chromatography of the dichloromethane fraction from an aqueous methanolic extract of fruit peel of Citrus pyriformis Hassk. (Rutaceae) resulted in the isolation of seven compounds including one coumarin (citropten), two limonoids (limonin and deacetylnomilin), and four sterols (stigmasterol, ergosterol, sitosteryl-3-beta-D-glucoside, and sitosteryl-6'-O-acyl-3-beta-D-glucoside). From the ethyl acetate fraction naringin, hesperidin, and neohesperidin were isolated. The dichloromethane extract of the defatted seeds contained three additional compounds, nomilin, ichangin, and cholesterol. The isolated compounds were identified by MS (EI, CI, and ESI), 1H, 13C, and 2D-NMR spectral data. The limonoids were determined qualitatively by LC-ESI/MS resulting in the identification of 11 limonoid aglycones. The total methanolic extract of the peel and the petroleum ether, dichloromethane, and ethyl acetate fractions were screened for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The ethyl acetate fraction exhibited a significant scavenging activity for DPPH free radicals (IC50 = 132.3 microg/mL). The petroleum ether fraction inhibited 5-lipoxygenase with IC50 = 30.6 microg/mL indicating potential anti-inflammatory properties. Limonin has a potent cytotoxic effect against COS7 cells [IC50 = (35.0 +/- 6.1) microM] compared with acteoside as a positive control [IC50 = (144.5 +/- 10.96) microM].

  2. Isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating arachidonic acid metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Wang, Yuzhong; Zheng, Hao; Yu, Wei; Chai, Hongyan; Zhang, Jing; Falck, John R.; Guo, Austin M.; Yue, Jiang; Peng, Renxiu; Yang, Jing

    2013-10-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA)-derived eicosanoids and its downstream pathways have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in growth control of breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate that isoliquiritigenin, a flavonoid phytoestrogen from licorice, induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating multiple key enzymes in AA metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer. Isoliquiritigenin diminished cell viability, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, and clonogenic ability in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231cells, and induced apoptosis as evidenced by an analysis of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry and hoechst staining. Furthermore, isoliquiritigenin inhibited mRNA expression of multiple forms of AA-metabolizing enzymes, including phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenases (COX)-2 and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A, and decreased secretion of their products, including prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), without affecting COX-1, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP), and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}). In addition, it downregulated the levels of phospho-PI3K, phospho-PDK (Ser{sup 241}), phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}), phospho-Bad (Ser{sup 136}), and Bcl-x{sub L} expression, thereby activating caspase cascades and eventually cleaving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Conversely, the addition of exogenous eicosanoids, including PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4} and a 20-HETE analog (WIT003), and caspase inhibitors, or overexpression of constitutively active Akt reversed isoliquiritigenin-induced apoptosis. Notably, isoliquiritigenin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice, together with decreased intratumoral levels of eicosanoids and phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}). Collectively, these data suggest that isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating AA metabolic

  3. Protectin DX, a double lipoxygenase product of DHA, inhibits both ROS production in human neutrophils and cyclooxygenase activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Boussetta, Tarek; Makni-Maalej, Karama; Fay, Michèle; Driss, Fathi; El-Benna, Jamel; Lagarde, Michel; Guichardant, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils play a major role in inflammation by releasing large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NADPH oxidase (NOX) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). This ROS overproduction is mediated by phosphorylation of the NOX subunits with an uncontrolled manner. Therefore, targeting neutrophil subunits would represent a promising strategy to moderate NOX activity, lower ROS, and other inflammatory agents, such as cytokines and leukotrienes, produced by neutrophils. For this purpose, we investigated the effects of protectin DX (PDX) - a docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) di-hydroxylated product which inhibits blood platelet aggregation - on neutrophil activation in vitro. We found that PDX decreases ROS production, inhibits NOX activation and MPO release from neutrophils. We also confirm, that PDX is an anti-aggregatory and anti-inflammatory agent by inhibiting both cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and COX-2, E.C. 1.14.99.1) as well as COX-2 in lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-treated human neutrophils. However, PDX has no effect on the 5-lipoxygenase pathway that produces the chemotactic agent leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Taken together, our results suggest that PDX could be a protective agent against neutrophil invasion in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:24254970

  4. Chemical composition and antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferation activities of pomegranate (Punica granatum) flowers.

    PubMed

    Bekir, Jalila; Mars, Mohamed; Vicendo, Patricia; Fterrich, Amira; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2013-06-01

    The chemical composition, antioxidant (DPPH and ABTS assays), anti-inflammatory (5-LOX), and cytotoxic (MCF-7) activities from flowers of seven pomegranate varieties (Punica granatum) were investigated. The highest phenolics (330.9±11.3 mg gallic acid equivalent/g dry weight (dw)), flavonoids (29.5±0.8 mg quercetin equivalent/g dw), tannins (30.6±0.6 mg catechin equivalent/g dw), and anthocyanins (0.70±0.03 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalent/g dw) content were determined in the Chetoui (CH) variety. It was found that Garsi (GR) (IC₅₀=4.9±0.2 mg/L by ABTS assay) and Zaghwani (ZG) (IC₅₀=3.9±0.2 mg/L by ABTS assay) varieties exhibited the highest antioxidant activity. For the anti-inflammatory activity, all varieties were active; the ZH variety was the strongest (2.5±0.1 mg/L). The CH, ES, and RA pomegranate varieties were not active against human breast cancer cells MCF-7, whereas inhibition was more evident with extracts from ZH and GR varieties (IC₅₀=33.00±2.64 and 35.00±4.58 mg/L, respectively). Statistical analysis showed that the variety factor influenced significantly (P<.01) the chemical composition and biological activities of pomegranate flowers.

  5. Recent advances in researches on physiologically active substances in holothurians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashi, Hirata; Nobuhiro, Zaima; Kyoko, Yamashita; Ryoko, Noguchi; Xue, Changhu; Tatsuya, Sugawara

    2005-07-01

    In this report, we reviewed recent literature on physiologically active substances from sea cucumbers (SCs) and their activities together with results obtained from our study. Preventive properties against lipid metabolism were reported in rats using a whole SC preparation with no particular constituent specified. Administration of the preparation lowered serum and hepatic cholesterol levels and improved the HDL/LDL ratio. These functions may be attributed to the stimulatory effect of the extract on the secretion of cholesterol in feces. Novel fucosylated chondroitin sulfates (FCSs) from Ludwigothurea grisea significantly induced fibroblast growth factor 2-dependent angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HU-VECs). The proangiogenetic activity seemed attributable to the action of the sulfated fucose branches on the polysaccharide. SCs contain mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) that are capable of absorbing UV. A biogenetic precursor of MAAs was first reported in SCs. The anti-proliferative effects of a branched chain fatty acid from a sea cucumber on prostate cancer cells was reported with the activity of 5-lipoxygenase. Glycosphingolipid constituents in SCs have been systematically analyzed over the past ten years. The results showed that the gangliosides in several SCs differed from those of mammals in that a sialic acid of SC gangliosides directly binded to glucose of cerebroside. Neuritogenic activity of the glycosphingolipids was demonstrated in vitro experiments and may lead to the development of therapeutic products for neurological disorders. Our study also showed that sphingoid bases, the hydrolyzed products of glycosphingolipids from SCs, induced significant apoptosis in several tumor cell lines.

  6. Inhibition of NF-κB-induced inflammatory responses by angiotensin II antagonists in aged rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Min; Heo, Hyoung-Sam; Choi, Yean Ja; Ye, Byeong Hyeok; Seo, Arnold Young; Yu, Byung Pal; Leeuwenburgh, Chrstiaan; Chung, Hae Young; Carter, Christy S.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we explored the mechanisms by which the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), enalapril, and the Ang II receptor blocker (ARB), losartan suppress oxidative stress and NF-κB activation-induced inflammatory responses in aged rat kidney. The experimentations were carried out utilizing aged (24-month-old) Brown Norway x Fischer 344 (F1) male rats which were randomized into 3 groups and administered enalapril (40 mg/kg), losartan (30 mg/kg) or placebo for 6 months (daily p.o.). The level of reactive species (RS), peroxynitrite (ONOO−), GSH/GSSG and lipid peroxidation were measured. The activity of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB, and gene expression of proteins in upstream signaling cascades were measured by electro-mobility shift assay (EMSA) and Western blotting. Enalapril and losartan differentially attenuated redox imbalance and the redox-sensitive transcription factor, NF-κB pathway. Furthermore, stimulation of the NF-κB activation pathway by phosphorylation of p65 was attenuated by both compounds. Moreover, mediation of phosphorylation of p65 by phosphorylation of IκB kinase αβ (IKKαβ) and mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase-1 (MSK1), were also inhibited by enalapril and losartan. Finally, both compounds also lowered expression of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes, such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2),) and inducible NO synthase (iNOS). Only losartan lowered levels of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX). These findings indicate that enalapril and losartan differentially suppress inflammatory responses via inhibition of oxidative stress-induced NF-κB activation in aged rat kidney. PMID:21377515

  7. Activation of tracheal smooth muscle responsiveness by fMLP-treated HL-60 cells and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Munoz, N M; Hamann, K J; Vita, A; Cozzi, P J; Baranowski, S; Solway, J; Leff, A R

    1993-03-01

    We assessed the effects of cultured human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) isolated from peripheral human blood on tracheal smooth muscle responsiveness in 40 male Hartley guinea pigs. Undifferentiated HL-60 cells (16-25 passages) were activated in vitro by incubation with 1 microM f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP), and force of contraction was measured isometrically using an in situ preparation of tracheal smooth muscle. Increasing concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh; 10(-10) to 10(-6) mol/cm2 tracheal surface) were applied topically to the epithelial surface pretreated with 4 x 10(6) fMLP-activated HL-60 cells, 4 x 10(6) fMLP-activated neutrophils, 4 x 10(6) sham-activated HL-60 cells, fMLP+vehicle, or vehicle control. Topical application of fMLP-activated HL-60 cells caused a maximum active tension (AT) of 1.13 +/- 0.2 g/cm after 5 min; fMLP-activated neutrophils, sham-activated HL-60 cells, or fMLP+vehicle had no effect. The fMLP-activated HL-60 cells also caused substantial augmentation of tracheal contraction to ACh (P < 0.05 vs. sham-activated cells for all concentrations > 10(-9) mol/cm2). Although fMLP treatment caused 247 +/- 28% increase from baseline level in O2-. production, neither direct contraction nor augmentation of muscarinic stimulation was demonstrated after topical application of 4 x 10(6) neutrophils. In 12 other preparations, fMLP-activated HL-60 cells were pretreated with either 10 microM indomethacin (Indo) or 100 microM A63162, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor. Pretreatment with Indo caused complete blockade of direct tracheal contraction and 88 +/- 13% blockade of muscarinic augmentation; there was no effect after A63162.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8460711

  8. Zyflamend reduces LTB4 formation and prevents oral carcinogenesis in a 7,12-dimethylbenz[alpha]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peiying; Sun, Zheng; Chan, Diana; Cartwright, Carrie A; Vijjeswarapu, Mary; Ding, Jibin; Chen, Xiaoxin; Newman, Robert A

    2008-11-01

    Aberrant arachidonic acid metabolism, especially altered cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) activities, has been associated with chronic inflammation as well as carcinogenesis in human oral cavity tissues. Here, we examined the effect of Zyflamend, a product containing 10 concentrated herbal extracts, on development of 7,12-dimethylbenz[alpha]anthracene (DMBA)-induced inflammation and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). A hamster cheek pouch model was used in which 0.5% DMBA was applied topically onto the left cheek pouch of male Syrian golden hamsters either three times per week for 3 weeks (short term) or 6 weeks (long term). Zyflamend was then applied topically at one of three different doses (25, 50 and 100 microl) onto the left cheek pouch three times for 1 week (short-term study) or chronically for 18 weeks. Zyflamend significantly reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells, incidence of hyperplasia and dysplastic lesions, bromodeoxyuridine-labeling index as well as number of SCC in a concentration-dependent manner. Application of Zyflamend (100 microl) reduced formation of leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) by 50% compared with DMBA-treated tissues. The reduction of LTB(4) was concentration dependent. The effect of Zyflamend on inhibition of LTB(4) formation was further confirmed with in vitro cell-based assay. Adding LTB(4) to RBL-1 cells, a rat leukemia cell line expressing high levels of 5-LOX and LTA(4) hydrolase, partially blocked antiproliferative effect of Zyflamend. This study demonstrates that Zyflamend inhibited LTB(4) formation and modulated adverse histopathological changes in the DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch model. The study suggests that Zyflamend might prevent oral carcinogenesis at the post-initiation stage. PMID:18687669

  9. Use of a balanced dual cyclooxygenase-1/2 and 5-lypoxygenase inhibitor in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Pallio, Giovanni; Bitto, Alessandra; Pizzino, Gabriele; Galfo, Federica; Irrera, Natasha; Minutoli, Letteria; Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Squadrito, Giovanni; Macrì, Antonio; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2016-10-15

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) play an important role in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). We investigated the effects of flavocoxid, a dual COX/LOX inhibitor, in experimental colitis induced with either dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS) or dextrane sulphate sodium (DSS) In the first model, colitis was induced in rats by a single intra-colonic instillation (25mg in 0.8ml 50% ethanol) of DNBS; after 24h animals were randomized to receive orally twice a day, flavocoxid (10mg/kg), zileuton (50mg/kg), or celecoxib (5mg/kg). Sham animals received 0.8ml of saline by a single intra-colonic instillation. Rats were killed 4 days after induction and samples were collected for analysis. In the second model, colitis was induced in rats by the administration of 8% DSS dissolved in drinking water; after 24h animals were randomized to the same above reported treatments. Sham animals received standard drinking water. Rats were killed 5 days after induction and samples were collected for analysis. Flavocoxid, zileuton and celecoxib improved weight loss, reduced colonic myeloperoxydase activity, macroscopic and microscopic damage, and TNF-α serum levels. Flavocoxid and celecoxib also reduced malondialdheyde, 6-keto PGF1α and PGE-2 levels while flavocoxid and zileuton decreased LTB-4 levels. In addition, flavocoxid treatment improved histological features and apoptosis as compared to zileuton and celecoxib; moreover only flavocoxid reduced TXB2, thus avoiding an imbalance in eicosanoids production. Our results show that flavocoxid has protective effect in IBDs and may represents a future safe treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases.

  10. Suppression of leukotriene B4 generation by ex-vivo neutrophils isolated from asthma patients on dietary supplementation with gammalinolenic acid-containing borage oil: possible implication in asthma.

    PubMed

    Ziboh, Vincent A; Naguwa, Stanley; Vang, Kao; Wineinger, Julie; Morrissey, Brian M; Watnik, Mitchell; Gershwin, M Eric

    2004-03-01

    Dietary gammalinolenic acid (GLA), a potent inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and suppressor of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), can attenuate the clinical course of rheumatoid arthritics, with negligible side effects. Since Zileuton, also an inhibitor of 5-LOX, attenuates asthma but with an undesirable side effect, we investigated whether dietary GLA would suppress biosynthesis of PMN-LTB4 isolated from asthma patients and attenuate asthma. Twenty-four mild-moderate asthma patients (16-75 years) were randomized to receive either 2.0 g daily GLA (borage oil) or corn oil (placebo) for 12 months. Blood drawn at 3 months intervals was used to prepare sera for fatty acid analysis, PMNs for determining phospholipid fatty acids and for LTB4 generation. Patients were monitored by daily asthma scores, pulmonary function, and exhaled NO. Ingestion of daily GLA (i) increased DGLA (GLA metabolite) in PMN-phospholipids; (ii) increased generation of PMN-15-HETrE (5-LOX metabolite of DGLA). Increased PMN-DGLA/15-HETrE paralleled the decreased PMN generation of proinflammatory LTB4. However, the suppression of PMN-LTB4 did not reveal statistically significant suppression of the asthma scores evaluated. Nonetheless, the study demonstrated dietary fatty acid modulation of endogenous inflammatory mediators without side effects and thus warrant further explorations into the roles of GLA at higher doses, leukotrienes and asthma. PMID:15154607

  11. Suppression of leukotriene B4 generation by ex-vivo neutrophils isolated from asthma patients on dietary supplementation with gammalinolenic acid-containing borage oil: possible implication in asthma.

    PubMed

    Ziboh, Vincent A; Naguwa, Stanley; Vang, Kao; Wineinger, Julie; Morrissey, Brian M; Watnik, Mitchell; Gershwin, M Eric

    2004-03-01

    Dietary gammalinolenic acid (GLA), a potent inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and suppressor of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), can attenuate the clinical course of rheumatoid arthritics, with negligible side effects. Since Zileuton, also an inhibitor of 5-LOX, attenuates asthma but with an undesirable side effect, we investigated whether dietary GLA would suppress biosynthesis of PMN-LTB4 isolated from asthma patients and attenuate asthma. Twenty-four mild-moderate asthma patients (16-75 years) were randomized to receive either 2.0 g daily GLA (borage oil) or corn oil (placebo) for 12 months. Blood drawn at 3 months intervals was used to prepare sera for fatty acid analysis, PMNs for determining phospholipid fatty acids and for LTB4 generation. Patients were monitored by daily asthma scores, pulmonary function, and exhaled NO. Ingestion of daily GLA (i) increased DGLA (GLA metabolite) in PMN-phospholipids; (ii) increased generation of PMN-15-HETrE (5-LOX metabolite of DGLA). Increased PMN-DGLA/15-HETrE paralleled the decreased PMN generation of proinflammatory LTB4. However, the suppression of PMN-LTB4 did not reveal statistically significant suppression of the asthma scores evaluated. Nonetheless, the study demonstrated dietary fatty acid modulation of endogenous inflammatory mediators without side effects and thus warrant further explorations into the roles of GLA at higher doses, leukotrienes and asthma.

  12. Inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway with piriprost (U-60,257) protects normal primates from ozone-induced methacholine hyperresponsive small airways

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.G.; Stout, B.K.; Ruppel, P.L.

    1988-03-01

    Weekly exposure to ozone in seven normal Rhesus monkeys led to induction of methacholine hypersensitive airways (RL increases 242 +/- 60% and Cdyn decreases 68 +/- 13% of baseline methacholine responses). It took 19 weeks to establish this hyperresponse that persisted for greater than 15 weeks once ozone was stopped. A second exposure led to similar response peaks in 6 weeks. At the peak of the second response, weekly 1% piriprost exposure before ozone led to a return to baseline that was not different between placebo and piriprost treated animals (9.4 +/- 1.0 and 4.3 +/- 2.9 weeks, placebo and treated, respectively P = 0.09 NS). A statistical difference in the mecholyl response in placebo and piriprost treated groups while on ozone was shown only in the Cdyn measurement (Cdyn% change 68 +/- 13 vs 24 +/- 14, placebo and piriprost, respectively P = 0.03). Off ozone (or return to baseline), a statistical difference could be detected both in RL and Cdyn (RL% changed 151 +/- 41 vs 31.1 +/- 49, P = 0.03, and for Cdyn 62.7 +/- 8 vs 9 +/- 10, P = 0.0006, placebo and piriprost, respectively). We conclude tha the primate provides a chronic model of airways reactivity in which the role of lipoxygenase is implicated because of the beneficial role of piriprost, and further that the ozone lesion is primarily in the smaller airways (possibly and alveolitis).

  13. Natural Product Total Synthesis in the Organic Laboratory: Total Synthesis of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE), a Potent 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor from Honeybee Hives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touaibia, Mohamed; Guay, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Natural products play a critical role in modern organic synthesis and learning synthetic techniques is an important component of the organic laboratory experience. In addition to traditional one-step organic synthesis laboratories, a multistep natural product synthesis is an interesting experiment to challenge students. The proposed three-step…

  14. Autocrine enhancement of leukotriene synthesis by endogenous leukotriene B4 and platelet-activating factor in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, P. P.; McColl, S. R.; Braquet, P.; Borgeat, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), two potent lipid mediators synthesized by activated neutrophils, are known to stimulate several neutrophil functional responses. In this study, we have determined that endogenous LTB4 and PAF exert autocrine effects on LT synthesis, as well as the underlying mechanism involved. 2. Pretreatment of neutrophils with either pertussis toxin (PT), or with receptor antagonists for LTB4 and PAF, resulted in an inhibition of LT synthesis induced by calcium ionophore, A23187. This inhibition was most marked at submaximal (100-300 nM) A23187 concentrations, whilst it was least at ionophore concentrations which induce maximal LT synthesis (1-3 microM). Thus newly-synthesized PAF and LTB4 can enhance LT synthesis induced by A23187 under conditions where the LT-generating system is not fully activated. 3. In recombinant human (rh) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-primed neutrophils, LT synthesis in response to chemoattractants (fMet-Leu-Phe or rhC5a) was also significantly inhibited by the LTB4 receptor antagonist, and to a lesser extent by PAF receptor antagonists. 4. Further investigation revealed that LTB4 and/or PAF exert their effects on LT synthesis via an effect on arachidonic acid (AA) availability, as opposed to 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) activation. Indeed, the receptor antagonists, as well as PT, inhibited LT synthesis and AA release to a similar extent, whereas 5-LO activation (assessed with an exogenous 5-LO substrate) was virtually unaffected under the same conditions. Accordingly, we showed that addition of exogenous LTB4 could enhance AA availability in response to chemoattractant challenge in rhGM-CSF-primed cells, without significantly affecting the 5-LO activation status.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8019762

  15. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to HIV-infected subjects augments reduced leukotriene synthesis and anticryptococcal activity in neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, M J; Phare, S M; George, S; Peters-Golden, M; Kazanjian, P H

    1998-01-01

    Neutrophil (PMN) dysfunction occurs in HIV infection. Leukotrienes (LT) are mediators derived from the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway that play a role in host defense and are synthesized by PMN. We investigated the synthesis of LT by PMN from HIV-infected subjects. There was a reduction (4.0+/-1.3% of control) in LT synthesis in PMN from HIV-infected compared with normal subjects. This was associated with reduced expression of 5-LO-activating protein (31.2+/-9.6% of normal), but not of 5-LO itself. Since HIV does not directly infect PMN, we considered that these effects were due to reduced release of cytokines, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We examined the effect of G-CSF treatment (300 microgram daily for 5 d) on eight HIV-infected subjects. PMN were studied in vitro before therapy (day 1) and on days 4 and 7. LTB4 synthesis was increased on day 4 of G-CSF treatment, and returned toward day 1 levels on day 7. 5-LO and 5-LO-activating protein expression were increased in parallel. As a functional correlate to this increase in PMN LT synthesis by G-CSF, we examined the effects on killing of Cryptococcus neoformans. Anticryptococcal activity of PMN from HIV-infected subjects was less than that of PMN from normal subjects. G-CSF treatment improved fungistatic activity of PMN. This increase in antifungal activity was attenuated by in vitro treatment with the LT synthesis inhibitor, MK-886. In conclusion, PMN from HIV-infected subjects demonstrate reduced 5-LO metabolism and antifungal activity in vitro, which was reversed by in vivo G-CSF therapy. PMID:9710433

  16. Implications of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligand clofibrate in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Karthic; Goswami, Sudeshna; Sharma-Walia, Neelam

    2016-03-29

    Inflammatory and invasive breast cancers are aggressive and require better understanding for the development of new treatments and more accurate prognosis. Here, we detected high expression of PPARα in human primary inflammatory (SUM149PT) and highly invasive (SUM1315MO2) breast cancer cells, and tissue sections of human breast cancer. PPARα ligands are clinically used to treat dyslipidemia. Among lipid lowering drugs clofibrate, fenofibrate and WY14643, clofibrate showed high chemo-sensitivity towards breast cancer cells. Clofibrate treatment significantly induced PPARα DNA binding activity, and remarkably reduced cyclooxygenase-2/PGE2 and 5-lipoxygenase/LTB4 inflammatory pathways. Clofibrate treatment reduced the proliferation of breast cancer cells probably by inhibiting NF-κB and ERK1/2 activation, reducing cyclinD1, cyclinA, cyclinE, and inducing pro-apoptotic P21 levels. Surprisingly, the expression of lipogenic pathway genes including SREBP-1c (sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c), HMG-CoA synthase, SPTLC1 (serine palmitoyltransferase long-chain), and Acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) decreased with a concurrent increase in fatty acid oxidation genes such as CPT-1a (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a) and SREBP-2 (Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2). Clofibrate treatment induced secretion of free fatty acids and effectively decreased the level of phosphorylated active form of fatty acid synthase (FASN), an enzyme catalyzing de novo synthesis of fatty acids. High level of coactivators steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and histone acetylase CBP-300 (CREB binding protein-300) were observed in the nuclear complexes of clofibrate treated breast cancer cells. These findings implicate that stimulating PPARα by safe, well-tolerated, and clinically approved clofibrate may provide a safer and more effective strategy to target the signaling, lipogenic, and inflammatory pathways in aggressive forms of breast cancer. PMID:26621841

  17. Implications of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligand clofibrate in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sudeshna

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory and invasive breast cancers are aggressive and require better understanding for the development of new treatments and more accurate prognosis. Here, we detected high expression of PPARα in human primary inflammatory (SUM149PT) and highly invasive (SUM1315MO2) breast cancer cells, and tissue sections of human breast cancer. PPARα ligands are clinically used to treat dyslipidemia. Among lipid lowering drugs clofibrate, fenofibrate and WY14643, clofibrate showed high chemo-sensitivity towards breast cancer cells. Clofibrate treatment significantly induced PPARα DNA binding activity, and remarkably reduced cyclooxygenase-2/PGE2 and 5-lipoxygenase/LTB4 inflammatory pathways. Clofibrate treatment reduced the proliferation of breast cancer cells probably by inhibiting NF-κB and ERK1/2 activation, reducing cyclinD1, cyclinA, cyclinE, and inducing pro-apoptotic P21 levels. Surprisingly, the expression of lipogenic pathway genes including SREBP-1c (sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c), HMG-CoA synthase, SPTLC1 (serine palmitoyltransferase long-chain), and Acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) decreased with a concurrent increase in fatty acid oxidation genes such as CPT-1a (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a) and SREBP-2 (Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2). Clofibrate treatment induced secretion of free fatty acids and effectively decreased the level of phosphorylated active form of fatty acid synthase (FASN), an enzyme catalyzing de novo synthesis of fatty acids. High level of coactivators steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and histone acetylase CBP-300 (CREB binding protein-300) were observed in the nuclear complexes of clofibrate treated breast cancer cells. These findings implicate that stimulating PPARα by safe, well-tolerated, and clinically approved clofibrate may provide a safer and more effective strategy to target the signaling, lipogenic, and inflammatory pathways in aggressive forms of breast cancer. PMID:26621841

  18. Phytochemical composition and in vitro pharmacological activity of two rose hip (Rosa canina L.) preparations.

    PubMed

    Wenzig, E M; Widowitz, U; Kunert, O; Chrubasik, S; Bucar, F; Knauder, E; Bauer, R

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare powdered rose hip with and without fruits (Rosae pseudofructus cum/sine fructibus, Rosa canina L., Rosaceae) with regard to their phytochemical profile and their in vitro anti-inflammatory and radical-scavenging properties. The two powders were subsequently extracted with solvents of increasing polarity and tested for inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX-1, COX-2) and of 5-LOX-mediated leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) formation as well as for DPPH-radical-scavenging capacity. While the water and methanol extracts were inactive in the COX-1, COX-2 and LTB(4) inhibition assays, the n-hexane and the dichloromethane extracts inhibited all three enzymes. In the active extracts, the triterpenoic acids ursolic acid, oleanolic acid and betulinic acid were identified, although only in minute amounts. Furthermore, oleic, linoleic and alpha-linolenic acid were identified apart from several saturated fatty acids. Even though unsaturated fatty acids are known to be good inhibitors of COX-1, COX-2 and LT formation, no clear correlation between their concentration in the extracts and their activity was found. We suggest that other, yet unidentified, lipophilic constituents might play a more important role for the observed in vitro inhibitory activity on arachidonic acid metabolism. Some of the extracts also showed considerable DPPH radical scavenging activity, the methanolic extracts being most potent. The radical scavenging activity of the extracts correlated very well with their total phenolic content, while ascorbic acid contributes only little to the radical-scavenging activity due to its low concentration present in the extracts. In summary, extracts derived from powdered rose hip without fruits were more effective in all assays carried out compared with extracts derived from powdered rose hip with fruits.

  19. Chemical composition and antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferation activities of pomegranate (Punica granatum) flowers.

    PubMed

    Bekir, Jalila; Mars, Mohamed; Vicendo, Patricia; Fterrich, Amira; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2013-06-01

    The chemical composition, antioxidant (DPPH and ABTS assays), anti-inflammatory (5-LOX), and cytotoxic (MCF-7) activities from flowers of seven pomegranate varieties (Punica granatum) were investigated. The highest phenolics (330.9±11.3 mg gallic acid equivalent/g dry weight (dw)), flavonoids (29.5±0.8 mg quercetin equivalent/g dw), tannins (30.6±0.6 mg catechin equivalent/g dw), and anthocyanins (0.70±0.03 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalent/g dw) content were determined in the Chetoui (CH) variety. It was found that Garsi (GR) (IC₅₀=4.9±0.2 mg/L by ABTS assay) and Zaghwani (ZG) (IC₅₀=3.9±0.2 mg/L by ABTS assay) varieties exhibited the highest antioxidant activity. For the anti-inflammatory activity, all varieties were active; the ZH variety was the strongest (2.5±0.1 mg/L). The CH, ES, and RA pomegranate varieties were not active against human breast cancer cells MCF-7, whereas inhibition was more evident with extracts from ZH and GR varieties (IC₅₀=33.00±2.64 and 35.00±4.58 mg/L, respectively). Statistical analysis showed that the variety factor influenced significantly (P<.01) the chemical composition and biological activities of pomegranate flowers. PMID:23767863

  20. Chebulagic acid (CA) attenuates LPS-induced inflammation by suppressing NF-{kappa}B and MAPK activation in RAW 264.7 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, D. Bharat; Reddanna, Pallu

    2009-03-27

    Chebulagic acid (CA), a natural anti-oxidant, showed potent anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7, a mouse macrophage cell line. These effects were exerted via inhibition of NO and PGE{sub 2} production and down-regulation of iNOS, COX-2, 5-LOX, TNF-{alpha} and IL-6. CA inhibited NF-{kappa}B activation by LPS, and this was associated with the abrogation of I{kappa}B-{alpha} phosphorylation and subsequent decreases in nuclear p50 and p65 protein levels. Further, the phosphorylation of p38, ERK 1/2 and JNK in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells was suppressed by CA in a concentration-dependent manner. LPS-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was also effectively inhibited by CA. These results suggest that CA exerts anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages by inhibition of NF-{kappa}B activation and MAP kinase phosphorylation.

  1. Modulation of haem oxygenase-1 expression by nitric oxide and leukotrienes in zymosan-activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Ana María; Guillén, María Isabel; Alcaraz, María José

    2001-01-01

    Phagocytosis of unopsonized zymosan by RAW 264.7 macrophages upregulated protein expression of haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of zymosan, exogenous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) did not exert significant effects on the expression of these three enzymes. In contrast, exogenous leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and LTC4 in the nanomolar range inhibited HO-1 and iNOS expression, as well as nitrite accumulation. The COX inhibitors indomethacin and NS398 weakly inhibited HO-1 expression but had no effect on iNOS and COX-2 expression or nitrite. In contrast, the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitor ZM 230,487 significantly decreased HO-1, iNOS and nitrite, which were not affected by zileuton. Dexamethasone showed an inhibitory effect on HO-1 expression induced by zymosan. ZM 230,487 but not zileuton, inhibited the shift due to nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), whereas they did not modify activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding. Our results suggest that inhibition of NF-κB binding could mediate the effects of ZM 230,487 on the modulation of HO-1 and iNOS protein expression. NOS inhibition by L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 1400 W abolished nitrite production and strongly reduced HO-1 expression. These results show an induction of HO-1 protein expression by zymosan phagocytosis in macrophages, with a positive modulatory role for endogenous NO and a negative regulation by exogenous LTs, likely dependent on the reduction of iNOS expression and NO production. PMID:11454666

  2. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, Charlene; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students collect and organize data from a real-world simulation of the scientific concept of half life. Students collect data using a marble sifter, analyze the data using a graphing calculator, and determine an appropriate mathematical model. Includes reproducible worksheets. (MDH)

  3. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teacher, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The material presented is designed to help students explore geometric patterns involving Fibonnaci numbers and the golden ratio, and to aid in review of basic geometry skills. Worksheet masters intended for duplication are provided. Suggestions are made of possible classroom extensions to the initial activities. (MP)

  4. Pharmacological inhibition of eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor signaling impairs zymosan-induced release of IL-23 by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mario; Márquez, Saioa; Montero, Olimpio; Alonso, Sara; Frade, Javier García; Crespo, Mariano Sánchez; Fernández, Nieves

    2016-02-15

    The engagement of the receptors for fungal patterns induces the expression of cytokines, the release of arachidonic acid, and the production of PGE2 in human dendritic cells (DC), but few data are available about other lipid mediators that may modulate DC function. The combined antagonism of leukotriene (LT) B4, cysteinyl-LT, and platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) inhibited IL23A mRNA expression in response to the fungal surrogate zymosan and to a lower extent TNFA (tumor necrosis factor-α) and CSF2 (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) mRNA. The combination of lipid mediators and the lipid extract of zymosan-conditioned medium increased the induction of IL23A by LPS (bacterial lipopolysaccharide), thus suggesting that unlike LPS, zymosan elicits the production of mediators at a concentration enough for optimal response. Zymosan induced the release of LTB4, LTE4, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), and PAF C16:0. DC showed a high expression and detectable Ser663 phosphorylation of 5-lipoxygenase in response to zymosan, and a high expression and activity of LPCAT1/2 (lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 and 2), the enzymes that incorporate acetate from acetyl-CoA into choline-containing lysophospholipids to produce PAF. Pharmacological modulation of the arachidonic acid cascade and the PAF receptor inhibited the binding of P-71Thr-ATF2 (activating transcription factor 2) to the IL23A promoter, thus mirroring their effects on the expression of IL23A mRNA and IL-23 protein. These results indicate that LTB4, cysteinyl-LT, and PAF, acting through their cognate G protein-coupled receptors, contribute to the phosphorylation of ATF2 and play a central role in IL23A promoter trans-activation and the cytokine signature induced by fungal patterns. PMID:26673542

  5. Pharmacological inhibition of eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor signaling impairs zymosan-induced release of IL-23 by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mario; Márquez, Saioa; Montero, Olimpio; Alonso, Sara; Frade, Javier García; Crespo, Mariano Sánchez; Fernández, Nieves

    2016-02-15

    The engagement of the receptors for fungal patterns induces the expression of cytokines, the release of arachidonic acid, and the production of PGE2 in human dendritic cells (DC), but few data are available about other lipid mediators that may modulate DC function. The combined antagonism of leukotriene (LT) B4, cysteinyl-LT, and platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) inhibited IL23A mRNA expression in response to the fungal surrogate zymosan and to a lower extent TNFA (tumor necrosis factor-α) and CSF2 (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) mRNA. The combination of lipid mediators and the lipid extract of zymosan-conditioned medium increased the induction of IL23A by LPS (bacterial lipopolysaccharide), thus suggesting that unlike LPS, zymosan elicits the production of mediators at a concentration enough for optimal response. Zymosan induced the release of LTB4, LTE4, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), and PAF C16:0. DC showed a high expression and detectable Ser663 phosphorylation of 5-lipoxygenase in response to zymosan, and a high expression and activity of LPCAT1/2 (lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 and 2), the enzymes that incorporate acetate from acetyl-CoA into choline-containing lysophospholipids to produce PAF. Pharmacological modulation of the arachidonic acid cascade and the PAF receptor inhibited the binding of P-71Thr-ATF2 (activating transcription factor 2) to the IL23A promoter, thus mirroring their effects on the expression of IL23A mRNA and IL-23 protein. These results indicate that LTB4, cysteinyl-LT, and PAF, acting through their cognate G protein-coupled receptors, contribute to the phosphorylation of ATF2 and play a central role in IL23A promoter trans-activation and the cytokine signature induced by fungal patterns.

  6. Biochemical pathogenesis of aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD).

    PubMed

    Narayanankutty, Arun; Reséndiz-Hernández, Juan Manuel; Falfán-Valencia, Ramcés; Teran, Luis M

    2013-05-01

    Aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is a distinct clinical entity characterized by eosinophilic rhinosinusitis, asthma and often nasal polyposis. Exposure to aspirin or other nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) exacerbates bronchospasms with asthma and rhinitis. Disease progression suggests a skewing towards TH2 type cellular response along with moderate to severe eosinophil and mast cell infiltration. Alterations in upper and lower airway cellular milieu with abnormalities in eicosanoid metabolism and altered eicosanoid receptor expression are the key features underlying AERD pathogenesis. Dysregulation of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism, notably reduced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis compared to their aspirin tolerant counterpart and relatively increased PGD2 production, a TH2/eosinophil chemoattractant are reported in AERD. Underproduced PGE2 is metabolized by overexpression of 15 prostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) to inactive products further reducing PGE2 at real time. This relives the inhibitory effect of PGE2 on 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) resulting in overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs). Diminished formation of CysLT antagonists called lipoxins (LXs) also augments CysLTs responsiveness. Occasional intake of NSAIDs favors even more 5-LOX product formation, further narrowing the bronchoconstrictive bottle neck, resulting in acute asthmatic exacerbations along with increased mucus production. This review focuses on abnormalities in biochemical and molecular mechanisms in eicosanoid biosynthesis, eicosanoid receptor dysregulation and associated polymorphisms with special reference to arachidonic acid metabolism in AERD. PMID:23246457

  7. Potentiation of antinociceptive effect of NSAIDs by a specific lipooxygenase inhibitor, acetyl 11-keto-beta boswellic acid.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Mahendra; Patil, Chandrashekar S; Kumar, Anil; Kulkarni, Shrinivas K

    2006-02-01

    The present study was aimed to assess the combined effects of cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase (COX/5-LOX) inhibitors in different animal models of nociception. Naproxen, nimesulide and rofecoxib are well-established antinociceptive agents acting via COX inhibition. AKBA (acetyl-keto-beta-boswellic acid) is a 5-LOX inhibitor. AKBA (50-200 mg/kg) produced a dose dependent and significant antinociceptive effect in different animal models of nociception. Based on the earlier reports from our laboratory, sub effective doses of all the three COX Inhibitors were selected and they were administered (naproxen, 5 mg/kg; nimesulide, 1 mg/kg; and rofecoxib, 1 mg/kg) with AKBA (100 mg/kg). This produced a more significant antinociceptive effect as compared to per se effect observed in all the three models of nociception. However, the effect of combination of nimesulide with AKBA was more pronounced as compared to naproxen and rofecoxib and their combination with AKBA. The present finding provided an evidence for the potentiation of antinociceptive effect of NSAIDs with AKBA. Such a combination may help to reduce the therapeutic doses of conventional NSAIDs and also reduce side effects (gastric, cardiac and renal) that are popularly associated with the NSAIDs.

  8. Modulation of voltage-dependent and inward rectifier potassium channels by 15-epi-lipoxin-A4 in activated murine macrophages: implications in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Cristina; Prieto, Patricia; Macías, Álvaro; Pimentel-Santillana, María; de la Cruz, Alicia; Través, Paqui G; Boscá, Lisardo; Valenzuela, Carmen

    2013-12-15

    Potassium channels modulate macrophage physiology. Blockade of voltage-dependent potassium channels (Kv) by specific antagonists decreases macrophage cytokine production and inhibits proliferation. In the presence of aspirin, acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 loses the activity required to synthesize PGs but maintains the oxygenase activity to produce 15R-HETE from arachidonate. This intermediate product is transformed via 5-LOX into epimeric lipoxins, termed 15-epi-lipoxins (15-epi-lipoxin A4 [e-LXA4]). Kv have been proposed as anti-inflammatory targets. Therefore, we studied the effects of e-LXA4 on signaling and on Kv and inward rectifier potassium channels (Kir) in mice bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). Electrophysiological recordings were performed in these cells by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Treatment of BMDM with e-LXA4 inhibited LPS-dependent activation of NF-κB and IκB kinase β activity, protected against LPS activation-dependent apoptosis, and enhanced the accumulation of the Nrf-2 transcription factor. Moreover, treatment of LPS-stimulated BMDM with e-LXA4 resulted in a rapid decrease of Kv currents, compatible with attenuation of the inflammatory response. Long-term treatment of LPS-stimulated BMDM with e-LXA4 significantly reverted LPS effects on Kv and Kir currents. Under these conditions, e-LXA4 decreased the calcium influx versus that observed in LPS-stimulated BMDM. These effects were partially mediated via the lipoxin receptor (ALX), because they were significantly reverted by a selective ALX receptor antagonist. We provide evidence for a new mechanism by which e-LXA4 contributes to inflammation resolution, consisting of the reversion of LPS effects on Kv and Kir currents in macrophages.

  9. Platelet membranes induce airway smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Grenegård, Magnus; Lindström, Eva G

    2011-01-01

    The role of platelets in airway disease is poorly understood although they have been suggested to influence on proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC). Platelets have been found localized in the airways in autopsy material from asthmatic patients and have been implicated in airway remodeling. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of various platelet fractions on proliferation of ASMC obtained from guinea pigs (GP-ASMC) and humans (H-ASMC). Proliferation of ASMC was measured by the MTS assay and the results confirmed by measurements of the DNA content. A key observation was that the platelet membrane preparations induced a significant increase in the proliferation of both GP-ASMC (129.9 ± 3.0 %) and H-ASMC (144.8 ± 12.2). However, neither supernatants from lysed or filtrated thrombin stimulated platelets induced ASMC proliferation to the same extent as the membrane preparation. We have previously shown that platelet-induced proliferation is dependent on 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) pathways. In the present work we established that platelet membrane-induced ASMC proliferation was reduced in the presence of the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI and the 5-LOX inhibitor AA-861. In conclusion, our results showed that platelet membranes significantly induced ASMC proliferation, demonstrating that the mitogenic effect of platelets and platelet membranes on ASMC is mainly due to membrane-associated factors. The effects of platelet membranes were evident on both GP-ASMC and H-ASMC and involved 5-LOX and ROS. These new findings are of importance in understanding the mechanisms contributing to airway remodeling and may contribute to the development of new pharmacological tools in the treatment of inflammatory airway diseases.

  10. Xenobiotic-contaminated diets affect hepatic lipid metabolism: Implications for liver steatosis in Sparus aurata juveniles.

    PubMed

    Maradonna, F; Nozzi, V; Santangeli, S; Traversi, I; Gallo, P; Fattore, E; Mita, D G; Mandich, A; Carnevali, O

    2015-10-01

    The metabolic effects induced by feed contaminated with a lower or a higher concentration of -nonylpnenol (NP), 4-tert-octylphenol (t-OP) or bisphenol A (BPA), three environmental endocrine disruptors, were assessed in juvenile sea bream liver. Histological analysis demonstrated that all these three xenobiotics induced hepatic lipid accumulation and steatosis. These findings prompted analysis of the expression of the major molecules involved in lipid metabolism: peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (which is encoded by ppars), fatty acid synthase (encoded by fas), lipoprotein lipase (encoded by lpl) and hormone-sensitive lipase (encoded by hsl). The enzymes encoded by ppars and fas are in fact responsible for lipid accumulation, whereas lpl- and hsl- encoded proteins play a pivotal role in fat mobilization. The three xenobiotics modulated ppar mRNA expression: pparα mRNA expression was induced by the higher dose of each contaminant; pparβ mRNA expression was upregulated by the lower doses and in BPA2 fish ppary mRNA overexpression was induced by all pollutants. These data agreed with the lipid accumulation profiles documented by histology. Fas mRNA levels were modulated by the two NP doses and the higher BPA concentration. Lpl mRNA was significantly upregulated in all experimental groups except for BPA1 fish while hsl mRNA was significantly downregulated in all groups except for t-OP2 and BPA1 fish. The plasma concentrations of cortisol, the primary stress biomarker, were correlated with the levels of pepck mRNA level. This gene encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase which is one of the key enzymes of gluconeogenesis. Pepck mRNA was significantly overexpressed in fish exposed to NP2 and both t-OP doses. Finally, the genes encoding cyclooxygenase 2 (cox2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5 lox), the products of which are involved in the inflammatory response, transcriptions were significantly upregulated in NP and BPA fish, whereas they were unchanged in t

  11. Xenobiotic-contaminated diets affect hepatic lipid metabolism: Implications for liver steatosis in Sparus aurata juveniles.

    PubMed

    Maradonna, F; Nozzi, V; Santangeli, S; Traversi, I; Gallo, P; Fattore, E; Mita, D G; Mandich, A; Carnevali, O

    2015-10-01

    The metabolic effects induced by feed contaminated with a lower or a higher concentration of -nonylpnenol (NP), 4-tert-octylphenol (t-OP) or bisphenol A (BPA), three environmental endocrine disruptors, were assessed in juvenile sea bream liver. Histological analysis demonstrated that all these three xenobiotics induced hepatic lipid accumulation and steatosis. These findings prompted analysis of the expression of the major molecules involved in lipid metabolism: peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (which is encoded by ppars), fatty acid synthase (encoded by fas), lipoprotein lipase (encoded by lpl) and hormone-sensitive lipase (encoded by hsl). The enzymes encoded by ppars and fas are in fact responsible for lipid accumulation, whereas lpl- and hsl- encoded proteins play a pivotal role in fat mobilization. The three xenobiotics modulated ppar mRNA expression: pparα mRNA expression was induced by the higher dose of each contaminant; pparβ mRNA expression was upregulated by the lower doses and in BPA2 fish ppary mRNA overexpression was induced by all pollutants. These data agreed with the lipid accumulation profiles documented by histology. Fas mRNA levels were modulated by the two NP doses and the higher BPA concentration. Lpl mRNA was significantly upregulated in all experimental groups except for BPA1 fish while hsl mRNA was significantly downregulated in all groups except for t-OP2 and BPA1 fish. The plasma concentrations of cortisol, the primary stress biomarker, were correlated with the levels of pepck mRNA level. This gene encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase which is one of the key enzymes of gluconeogenesis. Pepck mRNA was significantly overexpressed in fish exposed to NP2 and both t-OP doses. Finally, the genes encoding cyclooxygenase 2 (cox2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5 lox), the products of which are involved in the inflammatory response, transcriptions were significantly upregulated in NP and BPA fish, whereas they were unchanged in t

  12. Substance P primes lipoteichoic acid- and Pam3CysSerLys4-mediated activation of human mast cells by up-regulating Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Tancowny, Brian P; Karpov, Victor; Schleimer, Robert P; Kulka, Marianna

    2010-10-01

    Substance P (SP) is a neuropeptide with neuroimmunoregulatory activity that may play a role in susceptibility to infection. Human mast cells, which are important in innate immune responses, were analysed for their responses to pathogen-associated molecules via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the presence of SP. Human cultured mast cells (LAD2) were activated by SP and TLR ligands including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Pam3CysSerLys4 (Pam3CSK4) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and mast cell leukotriene and chemokine production was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and gene expression by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Mast cell degranulation was determined using a β-hexosaminidase (β-hex) assay. SP treatment of LAD2 up-regulated mRNA for TLR2, TLR4, TLR8 and TLR9 while anti-immunoglobulin E (IgE) stimulation up-regulated expression of TLR4 only. Flow cytometry and western blot confirmed up-regulation of TLR2 and TLR8. Pretreatment of LAD2 with SP followed by stimulation with Pam3CSK4 or LTA increased production of leukotriene C4 (LTC(4) ) and interleukin (IL)-8 compared with treatment with Pam3CSK4 or LTA alone (>2-fold; P<0·01). SP alone activated 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) nuclear translocation but also augmented Pam3CSK4 and LTA-mediated 5-LO translocation. Pam3CSK4, LPS and LTA did not induce LAD2 degranulation. SP primed LTA and Pam3CSK4-mediated activation of JNK, p38 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and activated the nuclear translocation of c-Jun, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) and cyclic-AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) transcription factors. Pretreatment with SP followed by LTA stimulation synergistically induced production of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8)/IL-8, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)/monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-6 protein. SP primes TLR2-mediated activation of human mast cells by up-regulating TLR expression and

  13. High anti-inflammatory activity of harpagoside-enriched extracts obtained from solvent-modified super- and subcritical carbon dioxide extractions of the roots of Harpagophytum procumbens.

    PubMed

    Günther, M; Laufer, S; Schmidt, P C

    2006-01-01

    Solvent-modified carbon dioxide extractions of the roots of Harpagophytum procumbens have been investigated with respect to extraction efficiency and content of harpagoside, and compared with a conventional extract. The effects of pressure, temperature, type and concentration of the modifier have been examined. Two extraction steps were necessary in order to achievehigh anti-inflammatory harpagoside-enriched extracts. The first extraction step was carried out in the supercritical state using carbon dioxide modified with n-propanol to remove undesired lipophilic substances. The main extraction was performed either in the supercritical or in the subcritical state with carbon dioxide modified with ethanol. The supercritical fluid extraction resulted in extracts containing up to 30% harpagoside. The subcritical extracts showed a harpagoside content of ca. 20%, but the extraction yield was nearly three times greater compared with supercritical conditions. The total harpagoside recovery resulting from the sum of the extract and the crude drug residue was greater than 99% in all experiments. The conventional extract and two carbon dioxide extracts were tested for in-vitro inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase or cyclooxygenase-2 biosynthesis. Both carbon dioxide extracts showed total inhibition on 5-lipoxygenase biosynthesis at a concentration of 51.8 mg/L. In contrast, the conventional extract failed to show any inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase biosynthesis. PMID:16454469

  14. Inhibitory effects of mulberry fruit extract in combination with naringinase on the allergic response in IgE-activated RBL-2H3 cells.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae-Myung; Kim, Na Yeon; Seo, Jeong Min; Kim, Sun-Ju; Lee, Sang Yoon; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kim, Hyung Don; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Mee Ree

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the anti-allergic action of mulberry fruit extract (MFE) or MFE in combination with naringinase (MFEN) in IgE-activated RBL-2H3 cells, and investigated the mechanisms responsible for the anti-allergic effects of MFEN. β-hexosaminidase release assay was used to measure the amount of β-hexosaminidase released from the cells, and ELISA was used to measure the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). We found that MFE significantly reduced the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC(50), 10.59 mg/ml) and TNF-α (IC(50), 4.87 mg/ml). Moreover, MFEN enhanced the inhibitory effects on the release of β-hexosaminidase (IC(50), 123.10 µg/ml) and TNF-α (IC(50), 65.01 µg/ml). Furthermore, MFEN had no cytotoxicity at the concentration range used to exert the anti-allergic effects. In addition, we evaluated the effects of MFEN on the formation of pro-inflammatory lipid mediators, such as prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)), leukotriene C(4) (LTC(4)) and leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) using enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kits. MFEN markedly reduced the formation of PGD(2) (IC(50), 6.47 µg/ml) and LTC(4) (IC(50), 0.31 µg/ml), but not LTB(4) (IC(50), 25.75 µg/ml). In mechanistic analyses, we measured the phosphorylation of Syk, Lyn and Fyn by immunoblot analysis. MFEN significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of Syk, but not that of Lyn or Fyn. MFEN also suppressed the phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)γ1/2, protein kinase C (PKC)δ, linker for activation of T cells (LAT), extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK)1/2, JNK, GRB2-associated binding protein 2 (Gab2), phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, cytosolic phospholipase A2 and 5-lipoxygenase, as well as the expression of cyclooxygenase-2. In conclusion, these results suggest that MFEN exerts potent inhibitory effects on allergic response through the suppression of the activation of the FcεRI signaling cascade. Our data demonstrating the anti-allergic effects of MFEN may provide further

  15. MUC5AC mucin release from human airways in vitro: effects of indomethacin and Bay X1005.

    PubMed Central

    Roger, P; Gascard, J P; Bara, J; de Montpreville, V T; Brink, C

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased secretion of mucus is a hallmark of many respiratory diseases and contributes significantly to the airflow limitation experienced by many patients. While the current pharmacological approach to reducing mucus and sputum production in patients is limited, clinical studies have suggested that drugs which inhibit the cyclooxygenase and/or 5-lipoxygenase enzymatic pathways may reduce secretory activity in patients with airway disease. AIM: This study was performed to investigate the effects of indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and Bay x 1005 (5-lipoxygenase inhibitor) on MUC5AC release from human airways in vitro. METHODS: An immunoradiometric assay was used to determine the quantities of MUC5AC present in the biological fluids derived from human airways in vitro. The measurements were made with a mixture of eight monoclonal antibodies (MAbs; PM8) of which the 21 M1 MAb recognized a recombinant M1 mucin partially encoded by the MUC5AC gene. RESULTS: The quantities of MUC5AC detected in the biological fluids derived from human bronchial preparations were not modified after treatment with indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and/or an inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase metabolic pathway (BAY x 1005). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase metabolic pathways play little or no role in the release of MUC5AC from human airways. PMID:11324902

  16. Deficiency of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids is mainly responsible for atopic dermatitis-like pruritic skin inflammation in special diet-fed hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Masanori; Nakashima, Hiroyuki; Tomozawa, Junko; Shimazaki, Yuki; Ohyanagi, Chie; Kawaguchi, Naomi; Ohya, Susumu; Kohno, Shigekatsu; Nabe, Takeshi

    2013-04-01

    Hairless mice fed a special diet, HR-AD, develop atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin inflammation with skin barrier defects and itch-related scratching; however, the ingredient(s) causing the dermatitis remains unclear. In this study, we examined whether deficiency of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is involved in HR-AD-induced AD. High-purity PUFAs were given to HR-AD-fed mice by dietary supplementation or gavage. Fatty acid levels in the serum and skin were determined by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In serum from HR-AD-fed mice, linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6) and α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3), as well as their metabolites, were markedly decreased. When mice were fed HR-AD supplemented with LA or ALA in an amount equal to that contained in a normal diet, the development of AD-like symptoms was completely prevented by supplementation with LA but not with ALA. Relatively high dose of ALA slightly alleviated skin barrier defects, but did neither itch-related scratching nor skin inflammation. On the other hand, gavage administration of LA metabolites, such as γ-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid (AA), significantly ameliorated established dermatitis without increasing LA in the serum and skin. Moreover, AA-induced amelioration of dermatitis was not affected by pharmacological blockade of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and cyclooxygenase (COX), suggesting no involvement of 5-LOX- or COX-mediated AA metabolites in the amelioration. In conclusion, our results indicate that deficiency of n-6 PUFAs is mainly responsible for AD-like symptoms by HR-AD feeding. Thus, this model could be useful for studying the pathomechanisms associated with deficiency of n-6 PUFAs in AD.

  17. Co-administration of 3-Acetyl-11-Keto-Beta-Boswellic Acid Potentiates the Protective Effect of Celecoxib in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Cognitive Impairment in Mice: Possible Implication of Anti-inflammatory and Antiglutamatergic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Aya Shoukry; El Sayed, Nesrine Salah El Dine

    2016-05-01

    Neuro-inflammation is known to initiate the underlying pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders which may progress to cognitive, behavioral, and functional impairment. Boswellia serrata is a well-known powerful anti-inflammatory agent used to treat several inflammatory diseases. The aim of the current study is to investigate the effect of the combination therapy of 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA), a 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitor and celecoxib, and a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor as dual enzyme inhibitors compared to monotherapies with celecoxib and AKBA. Cognitive dysfunction is induced by intraperational injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice. Radial maze, Y maze, and novel object recognition (NOR) were performed to evaluate the possible behavioral changes. Moreover, estimation of glutamate and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), as well as an immunohistochemical investigation of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) was performed to evaluate the molecular changes that followed the LPS or drug treatment. The results showed that the combination therapy of AKBA and celecoxib reversed the behavioral and molecular changes caused by LPS cognitive dysfunction model that predispose cognitive dysfunction in mice. This study showed the effectiveness of the dual therapy with AKBA and celecoxib as anti-inflammatory, antiglutamatergic, and anti-amyloidogenic agents in the management of cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26984336

  18. [Pyridazino(3,4-c)quinolines and pyridazino(4,5-c)quinolines--synthesis and investigation of lipoxygenase inhibition].

    PubMed

    Görlitzer, K; Fabian, J; Jones, P G; Frohberg, P; Drutkowski, G

    2002-06-01

    The cyclic hemiketone acetal 6 reacts with hydrazine in tert-butanol to yield the 1-amino-2,3-dihydro-2-hydroxy-pyrrole 7, while in acetic acid a mixture of the 1-amino-pyrrole 8 and the 1,4-dihydropyridazine 9 is obtained. The X-ray crystal structure of 9 shows a boat conformation flattened about N-1 with respect to nifedipine. Removing the boc-group of 9 gives the tautomeric 2,5-dihydropyridazine 13. The lactams 15 and 17 and the cyclic hydroxamic acids 16 and 18, respectively, are synthesized from 13 or from its oxidation product 14 using reductive conditions. The cyclic hemiacetal 21 reacts with hydrazine in a different manner from 6. In acetic acid the 1-aminopyrrole 22 is formed, while ethanol yields the 1,4-dihydropyridazine 23. The pyridazine 24, obtained by dehydrogenation of 23, gives the lactam 25 and the hydroxamic acid 26, respectively, when the nitro-group is reduced. The dihydropyridazines 9, 11 and 23 are transformed photochemically to give the nitrosophenyl-pyridazines 19, 20 and 27. The chloro-substituted hydroxamic acid 28 is isolated after treatment of 27 with hydrochloric acid. The stability of the partially saturated pyridazine compounds is discussed on the basis of half wave potentials measured by anodic oxidation by means of differential pulse voltammetry. The tricyclic hydroxamic acids 18 and 28 show only a weak inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX). PMID:12116871

  19. Isoorientin, a Selective Inhibitor of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) from the Tubers of Pueraria tuberosa.

    PubMed

    Sumalatha, Manne; Munikishore, Rachakunta; Rammohan, Aluru; Gunasekar, Duvvuru; Kumar, Kotha Anil; Reddy, Kakularam Kumar; Azad, Rajaram; Reddanna, Pallu; Bodo, Bernard

    2015-10-01

    Bioassay-guided fraction of the methanol extract of the roots of Pueraria tuberose DC yielded puerarin, an isoflavone C-glycoside (PT-1), isoorientin, a flavone C-glycoside (PT-2) and mangiferin, a xanthone C-glycoside (PT-3). The extracts and the isolated compounds were screened for potent anti-inflammatory components inhibiting the cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), the target enzymes of inflammation, by employing spectroscopic/polorographic methods. Among these, isoorientin was found to be a potent inhibitor of COX-2with an IC50 value of 39 μM. Docking studies were carried out to understand the interactions of isorientin (PT-2) with COX-2.The structures of the isolates were determined by mass spectrometry and 2D-NMR techniques including HSQC, HMBC, NOESY and 1H-1H COSY experiments. Although isoorientin and mangiferin have been reported from several plant sources, this is the first report of their isolation from a Pueraria species. PMID:26669106

  20. Macrophage Polarization during Murine Lyme Borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Lasky, Carrie E; Olson, Rachel M; Brown, Charles R

    2015-07-01

    Infection of C3H mice with Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, reliably produces an infectious arthritis and carditis that peak around 3 weeks postinfection and then spontaneously resolve. Macrophage polarization has been suggested to drive inflammation, the clearance of bacteria, and tissue repair and resolution in a variety of infectious disease models. During Lyme disease it is clear that macrophages are capable of clearing Borrelia spirochetes and exhausted neutrophils; however, the role of macrophage phenotype in disease development or resolution has not been studied. Using classical (NOS2) and alternative (CD206) macrophage subset-specific markers, we determined the phenotype of F4/80(+) macrophages within the joints and heart throughout the infection time course. Within the joint, CD206(+) macrophages dominated throughout the course of infection, and NOS2(+) macrophage numbers became elevated only during the peak of inflammation. We also found dual NOS2(+) CD206(+) macrophages which increased during resolution. In contrast to findings for the ankle joints, numbers of NOS2(+) and CD206(+) macrophages in the heart were similar at the peak of inflammation. 5-Lipoxygenase-deficient (5-LOX(-/-)) mice, which display a failure of Lyme arthritis resolution, recruited fewer F4/80(+) cells to the infected joints and heart, but macrophage subset populations were unchanged. These results highlight differences in the inflammatory infiltrates during Lyme arthritis and carditis and demonstrate the coexistence of multiple macrophage subsets within a single inflammatory site.

  1. Maternal transcription of non-protein coding RNAs from the PWS-critical region rescues growth retardation in mice.

    PubMed

    Rozhdestvensky, Timofey S; Robeck, Thomas; Galiveti, Chenna R; Raabe, Carsten A; Seeger, Birte; Wolters, Anna; Gubar, Leonid V; Brosius, Jürgen; Skryabin, Boris V

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by loss of paternally expressed genes on chromosome 15q11-q13. The PWS-critical region (PWScr) contains an array of non-protein coding IPW-A exons hosting intronic SNORD116 snoRNA genes. Deletion of PWScr is associated with PWS in humans and growth retardation in mice exhibiting ~15% postnatal lethality in C57BL/6 background. Here we analysed a knock-in mouse containing a 5'HPRT-LoxP-Neo(R) cassette (5'LoxP) inserted upstream of the PWScr. When the insertion was inherited maternally in a paternal PWScr-deletion mouse model (PWScr(p-/m5'LoxP)), we observed compensation of growth retardation and postnatal lethality. Genomic methylation pattern and expression of protein-coding genes remained unaltered at the PWS-locus of PWScr(p-/m5'LoxP) mice. Interestingly, ubiquitous Snord116 and IPW-A exon transcription from the originally silent maternal chromosome was detected. In situ hybridization indicated that PWScr(p-/m5'LoxP) mice expressed Snord116 in brain areas similar to wild type animals. Our results suggest that the lack of PWScr RNA expression in certain brain areas could be a primary cause of the growth retardation phenotype in mice. We propose that activation of disease-associated genes on imprinted regions could lead to general therapeutic strategies in associated diseases. PMID:26848093

  2. The nuclear membrane organization of leukotriene synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Asim K; Jones, Phillip B; Bair, Angela M; Christmas, Peter; Miller, Douglas; Yamin, Ting-ting D; Wisniewski, Douglas; Menke, John; Evans, Jilly F; Hyman, Bradley T; Bacskai, Brian; Chen, Mei; Lee, David M; Nikolic, Boris; Soberman, Roy J

    2008-12-23

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are signaling molecules derived from arachidonic acid that initiate and amplify innate and adaptive immunity. In turn, how their synthesis is organized on the nuclear envelope of myeloid cells in response to extracellular signals is not understood. We define the supramolecular architecture of LT synthesis by identifying the activation-dependent assembly of novel multiprotein complexes on the outer and inner nuclear membranes of mast cells. These complexes are centered on the integral membrane protein 5-Lipoxygenase-Activating Protein, which we identify as a scaffold protein for 5-Lipoxygenase, the initial enzyme of LT synthesis. We also identify these complexes in mouse neutrophils isolated from inflamed joints. Our studies reveal the macromolecular organization of LT synthesis.

  3. Active-R filter

    DOEpatents

    Soderstrand, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational amplifier-type active filter in which the only capacitor in the circuit is the compensating capacitance of the operational amplifiers, the various feedback and coupling elements being essentially solely resistive.

  4. Research Article Flavocoxid Protects Against Cadmium-Induced Disruption of the Blood-Testis Barrier and Improves Testicular Damage and Germ Cell Impairment in Mice.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Micali, Antonio; Pisani, Antonina; Puzzolo, Domenico; Bitto, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Pizzino, Gabriele; Irrera, Natasha; Galfo, Federica; Arena, Salvatore; Pallio, Giovanni; Mecchio, Anna; Germanà, Antonino; Bruschetta, Daniele; Laurà, Rosaria; Magno, Carlo; Marini, Herbert; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) causes male infertility. There is the need to identify safe treatments counteracting this toxicity. Flavocoxid is a flavonoid that induces a balanced inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 peroxidase moieties and of 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) and has efficacy in the male genitourinary system. We investigated flavocoxid effects on Cd-induced testicular toxicity in mice. Swiss mice were divided into 4 groups: 2 control groups received 0.9% NaCl (vehicle; 1 ml/kg/day) or flavocoxid (20 mg/kg/day ip); 2 groups were challenged with cadmium chloride (CdCl2; 2 mg/kg/day ip) and administered with vehicle or flavocoxid. The treatment lasted for 1 or 2 weeks. The testes were processed for biochemical and morphological studies. CdCl2 increased phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) 1/2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, COX-2, 5-LOX, malondialdehyde (MDA), B-cell-lymphoma (Bcl)-2-associated X protein (Bax), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), transforming growth factor (TGF) -β3, decreased Bcl-2, testosterone, inhibin-B, occludin, N-Cadherin, induced structural damages in the testis and disrupted the blood-testis barrier. Many TUNEL-positive germ cells and changes in claudin-11, occludin, and N-cadherin localization were present. Flavocoxid administration reduced, in a time-dependent way, p-ERK 1/2, TNF-α, COX-2, 5-LOX, MDA, Bax, FSH, LH, TGF-β3, augmented Bcl-2, testosterone, inhibin B, occludin, N-Cadherin, and improved the structural organization of the testis and the blood-testis barrier. Few TUNEL-positive germ cells were present and a morphological retrieval of the intercellular junctions was observed. In conclusion, flavocoxid has a protective anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiapoptotic function against Cd-induced toxicity in mice testis. We suggest that flavocoxid may play a relevant positive role against environmental levels of Cd, otherwise deleterious to gametogenesis and tubular integrity.

  5. Research Article Flavocoxid Protects Against Cadmium-Induced Disruption of the Blood-Testis Barrier and Improves Testicular Damage and Germ Cell Impairment in Mice.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Micali, Antonio; Pisani, Antonina; Puzzolo, Domenico; Bitto, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Pizzino, Gabriele; Irrera, Natasha; Galfo, Federica; Arena, Salvatore; Pallio, Giovanni; Mecchio, Anna; Germanà, Antonino; Bruschetta, Daniele; Laurà, Rosaria; Magno, Carlo; Marini, Herbert; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) causes male infertility. There is the need to identify safe treatments counteracting this toxicity. Flavocoxid is a flavonoid that induces a balanced inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 peroxidase moieties and of 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) and has efficacy in the male genitourinary system. We investigated flavocoxid effects on Cd-induced testicular toxicity in mice. Swiss mice were divided into 4 groups: 2 control groups received 0.9% NaCl (vehicle; 1 ml/kg/day) or flavocoxid (20 mg/kg/day ip); 2 groups were challenged with cadmium chloride (CdCl2; 2 mg/kg/day ip) and administered with vehicle or flavocoxid. The treatment lasted for 1 or 2 weeks. The testes were processed for biochemical and morphological studies. CdCl2 increased phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) 1/2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, COX-2, 5-LOX, malondialdehyde (MDA), B-cell-lymphoma (Bcl)-2-associated X protein (Bax), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), transforming growth factor (TGF) -β3, decreased Bcl-2, testosterone, inhibin-B, occludin, N-Cadherin, induced structural damages in the testis and disrupted the blood-testis barrier. Many TUNEL-positive germ cells and changes in claudin-11, occludin, and N-cadherin localization were present. Flavocoxid administration reduced, in a time-dependent way, p-ERK 1/2, TNF-α, COX-2, 5-LOX, MDA, Bax, FSH, LH, TGF-β3, augmented Bcl-2, testosterone, inhibin B, occludin, N-Cadherin, and improved the structural organization of the testis and the blood-testis barrier. Few TUNEL-positive germ cells were present and a morphological retrieval of the intercellular junctions was observed. In conclusion, flavocoxid has a protective anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiapoptotic function against Cd-induced toxicity in mice testis. We suggest that flavocoxid may play a relevant positive role against environmental levels of Cd, otherwise deleterious to gametogenesis and tubular integrity. PMID

  6. Growth inhibitory effect of KYKZL-1 on Hep G{sub 2} cells via inhibition of AA metabolites and caspase-3 pathway and cell cycle arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jing; Du, Yi-Fang; Xiao, Zhi-Yi; Pan, Li-Li; Li, Wei; Huan, Lin; Gong, Zhu-Nan; Wei, Shao-Hua; Huang, Shi-Qian; Xun, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Chang, Lei-Lei; Xie, Meng-Yu; Ao, Gui-Zhen; Cai, Jie; Qiu, Ting; Wu, Hao; Sun, Ting; Xu, Guang-Lin

    2014-01-01

    KYKZL-1, a newly synthesized compound with COX/5-LOX dual inhibition, was subjected to the inhibitory activity test on Hep G{sub 2} growth. We found that KYKZL-1 inhibited the growth of Hep G{sub 2} cells via inducing apoptosis. Further studies showed that KYKZL-1 activated caspase-3 through cytochrome c release from mitochondria and down regulation of Bcl-2/Bax ratio and reduced the high level of COX-2 and 5-LOX. As shown in its anti-inflammatory effect, KYKZL-1 also exhibited inhibitory effect on the PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4} production in Hep G{sub 2} cells. Accordingly, exogenous addition of PGE{sub 2} or LTB{sub 4} reversed the decreases in cell viability. In addition, KYKZL-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the S–G{sub 2} checkpoint via the activation of p21{sup CIP1} protein and down-regulation of cyclin A expression. These data indicate that the growth inhibitory effect of KYKZL-1 is associated with inhibition of AA metabolites and caspase-3 pathway and cell cycle arrest. Combined with our previous findings, KYKZL-1 exhibiting COX/5-LOX inhibition may be a promising potential agent not only for inflammation control but also for cancer prevention/therapy with an enhanced gastric safety profile. - Highlights: • KYKZL-1 is designed to exhibit COX/5-LOX dual inhibition. • KYKZL-1 resulted in apoptosis of Hep G{sub 2} cells. • KYKZL-1 activated caspase-3 through cytochrome c and bcl-2/bax ratio. • KYKZL-1 caused cell cycle arrest via modulation of p21{sup CIP1} and cyclin A level.

  7. Active turbulence in active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, S. P.; Yeomans, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Dense, active systems show active turbulence, a state characterised by flow fields that are chaotic, with continually changing velocity jets and swirls. Here we review our current understanding of active turbulence. The development is primarily based on the theory and simulations of active liquid crystals, but with accompanying summaries of related literature.

  8. D-002 (Beeswax Alcohols): Concurrent Joint Health Benefits and Gastroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Vivian; Mas, R.; Carbajal, D.

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs include the traditional drugs and more selective COX-2 inhibitors. Traditional nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use is hampered by their gastrotoxicity, while COX-2-inhibitors increase the cardiovascular risk. The search of safer substances for managing inflammatory conditions is updated, a challenge wherein dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors have a place. This review summarizes the benefits of D-002, a mixture of higher aliphatic beeswax alcohols, on joint health and gastric mucosa. D-002 elicits gastroprotection through a multiple mechanism that involves the increased secretion and improved quality of the gastric mucus, the reduction of hydroxyl radical, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, neutrophil infiltration and the increase of antioxidant enzymes on the gastric mucosa. Consistently, D-002 inhibits NSAIDs, ethanol, pylorus-ligation and acetic acid-induced gastric ulceration in rats, and has reduced gastrointestinal symptoms in clinical studies. Early results found that D-002 was effective in the cotton pellet-induced granuloma and carrageenan-induced pleurisy model in rats, lowering pleural leukotriene B4 levels without causing gastrointestinal ulceration. However, D-002 effects on inflammation received little attention for years. Recent data have shown that D-002 inhibited both COX and 5-LOX activities with a greater affinity for 5-LOX and could act as a dual COX/5-LOX inhibitor. This mechanism might explain efficacy in experimental inflammatory and osteoarthritic models as well as clinical efficacy in osteoarthritic patients while supporting the lack of D-002 gastrotoxicity, but not the gastroprotective effects, which appear to be due to multiple mechanisms. In summary oral D-002 intake could help manage inflammatory conditions that impair joint health, while offering gastroprotection. PMID:26009643

  9. Activity Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerpelman, Larry C.; Weiner, Michael J.

    This twenty-four item scale assesses students' actual and desired political-social activism in terms of physical participation, communication activities, and information-gathering activities. About ten minutes are required to complete the instrument. The scale is divided into two subscales. The first twelve items (ACT-A) question respondents on…

  10. Proteasome Activators

    PubMed Central

    Stadtmueller, Beth M.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Proteasomes degrade a multitude of protein substrates in the cytosol and nucleus, and thereby are essential for many aspects of cellular function. Because the proteolytic sites are sequestered in a closed barrel-shaped structure, activators are required to facilitate substrate access. Structural and biochemical studies of two activator families, 11S and Blm10, have provided insights to proteasome activation mechanisms, although the biological functions of these factors remain obscure. Recent advances have improved our understanding of the third activator family, including the 19S activator, which targets polyubiquitylated proteins for degradation. PMID:21211719

  11. Specificity of an HPETE peroxidase from rat PMN

    SciTech Connect

    Skoog, M.T.; Nichols, J.S.; Harrison, B.L.; Wiseman, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    The 15,000xg supernatant of sonicated rat PMN contains 5-lipoxygenase that converts arachidonic acid to 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE) and leukotriene A4 and an HPETE peroxidase that catalyzes reduction of the 5-HPETE. The specificity of this HPETE peroxidase for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors has been characterized to distinguish this enzyme from other peroxidase activities. In addition to 5-HPETE, the HPETE peroxidase will catalyze reduction of 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid, and 15-hydroperoxy-8,11,13-eicosatrienoic acid, but not cumene or t-butylhydroperoxides. The HPETE peroxidase accepted 5 of 11 thiols tested as reducing agents. However, glutathione is greater than 15 times more effective than any other thiol tested. Other reducing agents, ascorbate, NADH, NADPH, phenol, p-cresol, and homovanillic acid, were not accepted by HPETE peroxidase. This enzyme is not inhibited by 10 mM KCN, 2 mM aspirin, 2 mM salicylic acid, or 0.5 mM indomethacin. When 5-(14C)HPETE is generated from (14C)arachidonic acid in the presence of unlabeled 5-HPETE and the HPETE peroxidase, the 5-(14C)HETE produced is of much lower specific activity than the (14C)arachidonic acid. This indicates that the 5-(14C)HPETE leaves the active site of 5-lipoxygenase and mixes with the unlabeled 5-HPETE in solution prior to reduction and is a kinetic demonstration that 5-lipoxygenase has no peroxidase activity. Specificity for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors differentiates HPETE peroxidase from glutathione peroxidase, phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase, a 12-HPETE peroxidase, and heme peroxidases. The HPETE peroxidase could be a glutathione S-transferase selective for fatty acid hydroperoxides.

  12. Active ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, L.; Costanzo, A.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze self-propelling organisms, or active particles, in a periodic asymmetric potential. Unlike standard ratchet effect for Brownian particles requiring external forcing, in the case of active particles asymmetric potential alone produces a net drift speed (active ratchet effect). By using theoretical models and numerical simulations we demonstrate the emergence of the rectification process in the presence of an asymmetric piecewise periodic potential. The broken spatial symmetry (external potential) and time symmetry (active particles) are sufficient ingredients to sustain unidirectional transport. Our findings open the way to new mechanisms to move in directional manner motile organisms by using external periodic static fields.

  13. Astronomy Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid

    This document consists of activities and references for teaching astronomy. The activities (which include objectives, list of materials needed, and procedures) focus on: observing the Big Dipper and locating the North Star; examining the Big Dipper's stars; making and using an astrolabe; examining retograde motion of Mars; measuring the Sun's…

  14. Faculty Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academe, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Blending scholarship and activism, whether domestic or international, takes some real work. Two scholar-activists reflect on why and how activism can be more than academic labor in this feature of the "Academe" journal. This feature includes the following brief reflections on political work, both local and global that demonstrates how on campus…

  15. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  16. Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Independent School District 275, Minn.

    Twenty-four activities suitable for outdoor use by elementary school children are outlined. Activities designed to make children aware of their environment include soil painting, burr collecting, insect and pond water collecting, studies of insect galls and field mice, succession studies, and a model of natural selection using dyed toothpicks. A…

  17. Platelets may inhibit leucotriene biosynthesis by human neutrophils at the integrin level.

    PubMed

    Chabannes, Bernard; Moliere, Patrick; Merhi-Soussi, Faten; Poubelle, Patrice E; Lagarde, Michel

    2003-04-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocytes and blood platelets co-operate in several pathophysiological processes, and arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites produced in response to the activation of these cells are potent mediators of their functions. We studied the role of platelets in the formation of 5-lipoxygenase products from AA by autologous neutrophils, especially the chemotactic agent leucotriene (LT) B4. The formation of all products, namely 5-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), LTB4 and the other LTA4-derived metabolites, in response to the calcium ionophore A23187 was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography. All the 5-lipoxygenase products were significantly diminished by physiological concentrations of platelets. This inhibitory effect was lost when platelets were previously degranulated by thrombin in non-aggregating conditions. Peptides containing the Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser or His-His-Leu-Gly-Gly-Ala-Lys-Gln-Ala-Gly-Asp-Val sequence, which prevent the adhesion of platelets to neutrophils via the fibrinogen released from platelet granules and the integrin glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, markedly decreased the inhibitory effect of non-degranulated platelets. The production of transcellular metabolites of AA such as LTC4, the dual 5- and 12-lipoxygenase product 5,12-diHETE and lipoxins could not account for the decreased formation of 5-HETE and LTA4-derived metabolites. It is concluded that platelets may inhibit the neutrophil 5-lipoxygenase activity at the integrin level and in turn may play a role in slowing down the production of LTB4 in the course of inflammation.

  18. Activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alfassi, Z.B. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains 16 chapters on the application of activation analysis in the fields of life sciences, biological materials, coal and its effluents, environmental samples, archaeology, material science, and forensics. Each chapter is processed separately for the data base.

  19. Integrin activation

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion is important for development, immune responses, hemostasis and wound healing. Integrins also function as signal transducing receptors that can control intracellular pathways that regulate cell survival, proliferation, and cell fate. Conversely, cells can modulate the affinity of integrins for their ligands a process operationally defined as integrin activation. Analysis of activation of integrins has now provided a detailed molecular understanding of this unique form of “inside-out” signal transduction and revealed new paradigms of how transmembrane domains (TMD) can transmit long range allosteric changes in transmembrane proteins. Here, we will review how talin and mediates integrin activation and how the integrin TMD can transmit these inside out signals. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(12): 655-659] PMID:25388208

  20. Active Cytokinins

    PubMed Central

    Mornet, René; Theiler, Jane B.; Leonard, Nelson J.; Schmitz, Ruth Y.; Moore, F. Hardy; Skoog, Folke

    1979-01-01

    Four series of azidopurines have been synthesized and tested for cytokinin activity in the tobacco callus bioassay: 2- and 8-azido-N6-benzyladenines, -N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenines, and -zeatins, and N6-(2- and 4-azidobenzyl)adenines. The compounds having 2-azido substitution on the adenine ring are as active as the corresponding parent compounds, while those with 8-azido substitution are about 10 or more times as active. The 8-azidozeatin, which is the most active cytokinin observed, exhibited higher than minimal detectable activity at 1.2 × 10−5 micromolar, the lowest concentration tested. The shape of the growth curve indicates that even a concentration as low as 5 × 10−6 micromolar would probably be effective. By comparison, the lowest active concentration ever reported for zeatin has been 5 × 10−5 micromolar, representing a sensitivity rarely attained. All of the azido compounds have been submitted to photolysis in aqueous ethanol, and the photoproducts have been detected and identified by low and high resolution mass spectrometry. They are rationalized as products of abstraction and insertion reactions of the intermediate nitrenes. The potential of the major released products as cytokinins was also assessed by bioassay. 2-Azido-N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenine competed with [14C]kinetin for the cytokinin-binding protein isolated from wheat germ. When the azido compound was photolysed in the presence of this protein, its attachment effectively blocked the binding of [14C]kinetin. PMID:16661017

  1. Active microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D.; Vidal-Madjar, D.

    1994-01-01

    Research on the use of active microwaves in remote sensing, presented during plenary and poster sessions, is summarized. The main highlights are: calibration techniques are well understood; innovative modeling approaches have been developed which increase active microwave applications (segmentation prior to model inversion, use of ERS-1 scatterometer, simulations); polarization angle and frequency diversity improves characterization of ice sheets, vegetation, and determination of soil moisture (X band sensor study); SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) interferometry potential is emerging; use of multiple sensors/extended spectral signatures is important (increase emphasis).

  2. Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  3. Classroom Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Frances R.

    This pamphlet suggests activities that may be used in the elementary school classroom. Chapter I lists various short plays that children can easily perform which encourage their imagination. Chapter II details a few quiet classroom games such as "I Saw,""Corral the Wild Horse,""Who Has Gone from the Room," and "Six-Man-Football Checkers." A number…

  4. Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Tom, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a flow chart for naming inorganic compounds. Although it is not necessary for students to memorize rules, preliminary skills needed before using the chart are outlined. Also presents an activity in which the mass of an imaginary atom is determined using lead shot, Petri dishes, and a platform balance. (JN)

  5. Leaf Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingie, Walter

    Leaf activities can provide a means of using basic concepts of outdoor education to learn in elementary level subject areas. Equipment needed includes leaves, a clipboard with paper, and a pencil. A bag of leaves may be brought into the classroom if weather conditions or time do not permit going outdoors. Each student should pick a leaf, examine…

  6. Get Active

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lifting small weights – you can even use bottled water or cans of food as weights Watch these videos for muscle strengthening exercises to do at home or at the gym. If you do muscle-strengthening activities with weights, check out the do’s and don’ ...

  7. Activated Sludge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, F. Michael

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. This review covers: (1) activated sludge process; (2) process control; (3) oxygen uptake and transfer; (4) phosphorus removal; (5) nitrification; (6) industrial wastewater; and (7) aerobic digestion. A list of 136 references is also presented. (HM)

  8. Glucokinase activators.

    PubMed

    Filipski, Kevin J; Futatsugi, Kentaro; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Stevens, Benjamin D

    2012-07-01

    In this review we highlight recently disclosed progress in the field of small-molecule activators of the human glucokinase enzyme. Several of the reported chemotypes possess structural features that diverge from known leads; some of these modifications appear to be specifically designed to modulate tissue selectivity or discrete parameters of enzyme function (e.g., S0.5 v Vmax). This review will inform the reader of the extent of continued effort being directed toward discovery of a first-in-class drug for Type II diabetes mellitus that functions through this target. Patents were selected from those published in December 2009 up to November 2011; foreign filings were translated where possible to understand the claims and biological techniques utilized to characterize the reported glucokinase activators. Overall, there appears to be a recent trend leading to reduced patent filings for small-molecule glucokinase activators. There are many possible explanations for this trend; however, it is likely that the field has reached maturity and that the downturn of new disclosures represents the transition of many of these programs to the clinic.

  9. Active packaging with antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van Long, N; Joly, Catherine; Dantigny, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    There have been many reviews concerned with antimicrobial food packaging, and with the use of antifungal compounds, but none provided an exhaustive picture of the applications of active packaging to control fungal spoilage. Very recently, many studies have been done in these fields, therefore it is timely to review this topic. This article examines the effects of essential oils, preservatives, natural products, chemical fungicides, nanoparticles coated to different films, and chitosan in vitro on the growth of moulds, but also in vivo on the mould free shelf-life of bread, cheese, and fresh fruits and vegetables. A short section is also dedicated to yeasts. All the applications are described from a microbiological point of view, and these were sorted depending on the name of the species. Methods and results obtained are discussed. Essential oils and preservatives were ranked by increased efficacy on mould growth. For all the tested molecules, Penicillium species were shown more sensitive than Aspergillus species. However, comparison between the results was difficult because it appeared that the efficiency of active packaging depended greatly on the environmental factors of food such as water activity, pH, temperature, NaCl concentration, the nature, the size, and the mode of application of the films, in addition to the fact that the amount of released antifungal compounds was not constant with time.

  10. Active packaging with antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van Long, N; Joly, Catherine; Dantigny, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    There have been many reviews concerned with antimicrobial food packaging, and with the use of antifungal compounds, but none provided an exhaustive picture of the applications of active packaging to control fungal spoilage. Very recently, many studies have been done in these fields, therefore it is timely to review this topic. This article examines the effects of essential oils, preservatives, natural products, chemical fungicides, nanoparticles coated to different films, and chitosan in vitro on the growth of moulds, but also in vivo on the mould free shelf-life of bread, cheese, and fresh fruits and vegetables. A short section is also dedicated to yeasts. All the applications are described from a microbiological point of view, and these were sorted depending on the name of the species. Methods and results obtained are discussed. Essential oils and preservatives were ranked by increased efficacy on mould growth. For all the tested molecules, Penicillium species were shown more sensitive than Aspergillus species. However, comparison between the results was difficult because it appeared that the efficiency of active packaging depended greatly on the environmental factors of food such as water activity, pH, temperature, NaCl concentration, the nature, the size, and the mode of application of the films, in addition to the fact that the amount of released antifungal compounds was not constant with time. PMID:26803804

  11. Active tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This study is part of a series of Studies in Geophysics that have been undertaken for the Geophysics Research Forum by the Geophysics Study Committee. One purpose of each study is to provide assessments from the scientific community to aid policymakers in decisions on societal problems that involve geophysics. An important part of such assessments is an evaluation of the adequacy of current geophysical knowledge and the appropriateness of current research programs as a source of information required for those decisions. The study addresses our current scientific understanding of active tectonics --- particularly the patterns and rates of ongoing tectonic processes. Many of these processes cannot be described reasonably using the limited instrumental or historical records; however, most can be described adequately for practical purposes using the geologic record of the past 500,000 years. A program of fundamental research focusing especially on Quaternary tectonic geology and geomorphology, paleoseismology, neotectonics, and geodesy is recommended to better understand ongoing, active tectonic processes. This volume contains 16 papers. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Database.

  12. Amelioration of inflammation by phenolic rich methanolic extract of Ocimum sanctum Linn. leaves in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, S; John, Febi; Indira, M

    2015-10-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Oxidative stress and inflammation play vital role in the development of MI. The Indian basil or Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum Linn.), owing to its antioxidant potential, is used in the traditional system of Indian medicine to treat various disorders. We evaluated methanolic extract of O. sanctum (Tulsi) leaves on inflammation in isoproterenol (ISP) induced MI in rats. ISP-induced MI increased the levels of cardiac markers, phospholipases and phospholipid content. However, the same were reduced on pre-treatment with methanolic extract of O. sanctum leaves. The activities of 5-lipoxygenase and cycloxygenase-2 and levels of leukotriene B4 and thromboxane B2 were also elevated in ISP-treated rats, which were significantly decreased (P < 0.001) in extract pre-treated rats. The enhanced mRNA expressions of nuclear factor kappa-B, 5-lipoxygenase activating protein and receptor for leukotriene B4 on MI induction, were considerably reduced (P < 0.001) on extract pre-treatment. Histopathological analysis also confirmed the findings. The results also revealed the high phenolic content of methanolic extract of O. sanctum leaves. The study demonstrated that methanolic extract of Tulsi leaves can decrease inflammation in the cardiac tissue of ISP-induced MI in rats and its effect may be through downregulation of oxidative stress and arachidonic acid pathway. This cardioprotective effect may be due to the high phenolic content of methanolic extract of O. sanctum leaves. PMID:26665293

  13. DAVIC activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    1995-12-01

    DAVIC (Digital Audio Visual Council) is the defacto standardization organization established in Mar. 1994, based on international consensus for digital audio visual services. After completion of MPEG2 standardization, the broadcasting industry, the communication industry, the computer industry, and consumer electronics industry have started development of concrete services and products. Especially the interactive digital audio visual services, such as Video On Demand (VOD) or Near Video On Demand (NVOD), have become hot topics all over the world. Such interactive digital audio visual services are combined technologies of multi-media coding, digital transmission and computer networking. Therefore more than 150 organizations from all industry sectors have participated in DAVIC and are contributing from their own industrial contexts. DAVIC's basic policy is to use the available technologies specified by the other standards bodies as much as possible. So DAVIC's standardization activities have close relationship with ISO IEC/JTC1/SC29, ITU-T SG 9, ATM-Forum, IETF, IMA, DVB, etc. DAVIC is trying to specify Applications, Reference Models, Security, Usage Information Control, and the interfaces and protocols among the Content Provider, the Server, the core network, the access network, and the Set Top Unit. DAVIC's first goal is to specify DAVIC1.0 based on CFP1 (Call for Proposal) and CFP2 by Dec. 1995, and the next direction is under preparation for further progress based on CFP3 and CFP4.

  14. Active knee joint flexibility and sports activity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, T; Foldspang, A; Vestergaard, E; Ingemann-Hansen, T

    1999-04-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate active knee flexion and active knee extension in athletes and to investigate the potential association of each to different types of sports activity. Active knee extension and active knee flexion was measured in 339 athletes. Active knee extension was significantly higher in women than in men and significantly positively associated with weekly hours of swimming and weekly hours of competitive gymnastics. Active knee flexion was significantly positively associated with participation in basketball, and significantly negatively associated with age and weekly hours of soccer, European team handball and swimming. The results point to sport-specific adaptation of active knee flexion and active knee extension.

  15. IASS Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojaev, Alisher S.; Ibragimova, Elvira M.

    2015-08-01

    It’s well known, astronomy in Uzbekistan has ancient roots and traditions (e.g., Mirzo Ulugh Beg, Abū al-Rayhān al-Bīrūnī, Abū ‘Abdallāh al-Khwārizmī) and astronomical heritage carefully preserved. Nowadays uzbek astronomers play a key role in scientific research but also in OAD and Decadal Plan activity in the Central Asia region. International Aerospace School (IASS) is an amazing and wonderful event held annually about 30 years. IASS is unique project in the region, and at the beginning we spent the Summer and Winter Schools. At present in the summer camp we gather about 50 teenage and undergraduate students over the country and abroad (France, Malaysia, Turkey, Azerbaijan, Pakistan, Russia, etc.). They are selected on the basis of tests of astronomy and space issues. During two weeks of IASS camp the invited scientists, cosmonauts and astronauts as well as other specialists give lectures and engage in practical exercises with IASS students in astronomy, including daily observations of the Sun and night sky observations with meniscus telescope, space research and exploration, aerospace modelling, preparation and presentation of original projects. This is important that IASS gives not theoretical grounds only but also practically train the students and the hands-on training is the major aims of IASS. Lectures and practice in the field of astronomy carried out with the direct involvement and generous assistance of Uranoscope Association (Paris, France). The current 26-th IASS is planned to held in July 2015.

  16. Activation Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadeken, Owen

    2002-01-01

    Teaming is so common in today's project management environment that most of us assume it comes naturally. We further assume that when presented with meaningful and challenging work, project teams will naturally engage in productive activity to complete their tasks. This assumption is expressed in the simple (but false) equation: Team + Work = Teamwork. Although this equation appears simple and straightforward, it is far from true for most project organizations whose reality is a complex web of institutional norms based on individual achievement and rewards. This is illustrated by the very first successful team experience from my early Air Force career. As a young lieutenant, I was sent to Squadron Officer School, which was the first in the series of Air Force professional military education courses I was required to complete during my career. We were immediately formed into teams of twelve officers. Much of the course featured competition between these teams. As the most junior member of my team, I quickly observed the tremendous pressure to show individual leadership capability. At one point early in the course, almost everyone in our group was vying to become the team leader. This conflict was so intense that it caused us to fail miserably in our first outdoor team building exercise. We spent so much time fighting over leadership that we were unable to complete any of the events on the outdoor obstacle course. This complete lack of success was so disheartening to me that I gave our team little hope for future success. What followed was a very intense period of bickering, conflict, and even shouting matches as our dysfunctional team tried to cope with our early failures and find some way to succeed. British physician and researcher Wilfred Bion (Experiences in Groups, 1961) discovered that there are powerful psychological forces inherent in all groups that divert from accomplishing their primary tasks. To overcome these restraining forces and use the potential

  17. Novel in vitro inhibitory functions of potato tuber proteinaceous inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias; Kuckenberg, Markus; Kastilan, Robin; Muth, Jost; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2015-02-01

    Plant protease inhibitors are a structurally highly diverse and ubiquitous class of small proteins, which play various roles in plant development and defense against pests and pathogens. Particular isoforms inhibit in vitro proteases and other enzymes that are not their natural substrates, for example proteases that have roles in human diseases. Mature potato tubers are a rich source of several protease inhibitor families. Different cultivars have different inhibitor profiles. With the objective to explore the functional diversity of the natural diversity of potato protease inhibitors, we randomly selected and sequenced 9,600 cDNA clones originated from mature tubers of ten potato cultivars. Among these, 120 unique inhibitor cDNA clones were identified by homology searches. Eighty-eight inhibitors represented novel sequence variants of known plant protease inhibitor families. Most frequent were Kunitz-type inhibitors (KTI), potato protease inhibitors I and II (PIN), pectin methylesterase inhibitors, metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitors and defensins. Twenty-three inhibitors were functionally characterized after heterologous expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The purified recombinant proteins were tested for inhibitory activity on trypsin, eleven pharmacological relevant proteases and the non-proteolytic enzyme 5-lipoxygenase. Members of the KTI and PIN families inhibited pig pancreas elastase, β-Secretase, Cathepsin K, HIV-1 protease and potato 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate in vitro inhibitory diversity of small potato tuber proteins commonly known as protease inhibitors, which might have biotechnological or medical applications.

  18. Novel in vitro inhibitory functions of potato tuber proteinaceous inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias; Kuckenberg, Markus; Kastilan, Robin; Muth, Jost; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2015-02-01

    Plant protease inhibitors are a structurally highly diverse and ubiquitous class of small proteins, which play various roles in plant development and defense against pests and pathogens. Particular isoforms inhibit in vitro proteases and other enzymes that are not their natural substrates, for example proteases that have roles in human diseases. Mature potato tubers are a rich source of several protease inhibitor families. Different cultivars have different inhibitor profiles. With the objective to explore the functional diversity of the natural diversity of potato protease inhibitors, we randomly selected and sequenced 9,600 cDNA clones originated from mature tubers of ten potato cultivars. Among these, 120 unique inhibitor cDNA clones were identified by homology searches. Eighty-eight inhibitors represented novel sequence variants of known plant protease inhibitor families. Most frequent were Kunitz-type inhibitors (KTI), potato protease inhibitors I and II (PIN), pectin methylesterase inhibitors, metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitors and defensins. Twenty-three inhibitors were functionally characterized after heterologous expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The purified recombinant proteins were tested for inhibitory activity on trypsin, eleven pharmacological relevant proteases and the non-proteolytic enzyme 5-lipoxygenase. Members of the KTI and PIN families inhibited pig pancreas elastase, β-Secretase, Cathepsin K, HIV-1 protease and potato 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate in vitro inhibitory diversity of small potato tuber proteins commonly known as protease inhibitors, which might have biotechnological or medical applications. PMID:25260821

  19. Placenta growth factor augments airway hyperresponsiveness via leukotrienes and IL-13.

    PubMed

    Eiymo Mwa Mpollo, Marthe-Sandrine; Brandt, Eric B; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Arumugam, Paritha I; Tiwari, Swati; Loberg, Anastacia; Pillis, Devin; Rizvi, Tilat; Lindsey, Mark; Jonck, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter; Kalra, Vijay K; Le Cras, Timothy D; Ratner, Nancy; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Hershey, Gurjit K Khurana; Malik, Punam

    2016-02-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) affects 55%-77% of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and occurs even in the absence of asthma. While asthma increases SCD morbidity and mortality, the mechanisms underlying the high AHR prevalence in a hemoglobinopathy remain unknown. We hypothesized that placenta growth factor (PlGF), an erythroblast-secreted factor that is elevated in SCD, mediates AHR. In allergen-exposed mice, loss of Plgf dampened AHR, reduced inflammation and eosinophilia, and decreased expression of the Th2 cytokine IL-13 and the leukotriene-synthesizing enzymes 5-lipoxygenase and leukotriene-C4-synthase. Plgf-/- mice treated with leukotrienes phenocopied the WT response to allergen exposure; conversely, anti-PlGF Ab administration in WT animals blunted the AHR. Notably, Th2-mediated STAT6 activation further increased PlGF expression from lung epithelium, eosinophils, and macrophages, creating a PlGF/leukotriene/Th2-response positive feedback loop. Similarly, we found that the Th2 response in asthma patients is associated with increased expression of PlGF and its downstream genes in respiratory epithelial cells. In an SCD mouse model, we observed increased AHR and higher leukotriene levels that were abrogated by anti-PlGF Ab or the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton. Overall, our findings indicate that PlGF exacerbates AHR and uniquely links the leukotriene and Th2 pathways in asthma. These data also suggest that zileuton and anti-PlGF Ab could be promising therapies to reduce pulmonary morbidity in SCD.

  20. Physical Activity (Exercise)

    MedlinePlus

    ... fitness. Your fitness routine should include aerobic and strength-training activities, and may also include stretching activities. Aerobic ... Examples include walking, jogging, bicycling, swimming, and tennis. Strength-training activities These activities increase the strength and endurance ...

  1. Reactive oxygen species and lipoxygenases regulate the oncogenicity of NPM-ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Thornber, K; Colomba, A; Ceccato, L; Delsol, G; Payrastre, B; Gaits-Iacovoni, F

    2009-07-23

    The chimera nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK), the tyrosine kinase activity of which is constitutively upregulated, is the causative agent of 75% of the anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs). We have demonstrated that NPM-ALK induces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by a pathway involving the arachidonic acid-metabolizing enzymes of the lipoxygenase (LOX) family. The use of the LOX inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) and of the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) demonstrated that ROS are important in maintaining the ALK kinase active. Consistent with this, NDGA treatment resulted in the inhibition of key pathways, such as Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which are involved in NPM-ALK antiapoptotic and pro-mitogenic functions. Conversely, the stress-activated kinase p38, described in some instances as a mediator of apoptosis, was activated. Interestingly, 5-LOX, an isoform involved in many cancers, was found to be activated in NPM-ALK(+) cells. Functional studies have shown that transforming properties, namely proliferation and resistance to apoptosis, were abrogated by treatment with either NDGA or the 5-LOX inhibitor (N-(3-phenoxycinnamyl)-acetohydroxamic acid) (BW A4C). Together, these data point to the ROS/LOX pathway as a potential new target for therapy in NPM-ALK-positive tumors.

  2. [Adapting physical activities for an active retirement].

    PubMed

    Renaudie, François

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of doing adapted physical exercise for elderly people have been proven. For more than thirty years, the French Federation for an Active Retirement has been striving to help people age well by proposing multiple activities to remain in good health after the age of 50. Doctors, activity leaders and federal instructors are attentive to each individual's capacities. PMID:27449307

  3. Genotoxic activity and induction of biotransformation enzymes in two human cell lines after treatment by Erika fuel extract.

    PubMed

    Amat-Bronnert, Agnès; Castegnaro, Marcel; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie

    2007-01-01

    On 12 December 1999, the tanker Erika broke in two parts at about 60km from the Brittany French coasts (Point of Penmarc'h, Sud Finistère, France). About 10,000tonnes of heavy oil fuel were released in the sea. DNA adduct have been detected in fish liver and mussels digestive gland exposed to the Erika oil spill. In order to investigate the mechanism by which Erika fuel extract exhibits genotoxic effects the induction of DNA adducts by an Erika fuel extract have been analysed on two cell lines, human epithelial bronchial cells (WI) and human hepatoma cells. DNA adducts, reflected by a diagonal radioactive zone and individual adducts are detected only in hepatoma cells indicating biotransformation via CYP 1A2 and CYP 1B1. In addition, Erika fuel extract induces some metabolizing enzymes such CYP 1A2, COX2 and 5-LOX, the two later are involved in cancer processes. Formation of leucotrienes B4 (LTB(4)), a mediator playing a role in inflammation, is induced in epithelial bronchial cells. Since inhalation is one of the ways of contamination for human, the above results are important for human health and prevention. PMID:21783741

  4. A Metabolomic Approach to Target Compounds from the Asteraceae Family for Dual COX and LOX Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chagas-Paula, Daniela A.; Zhang, Tong; Da Costa, Fernando B.; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie

    2015-01-01

    The application of metabolomics in phytochemical analysis is an innovative strategy for targeting active compounds from a complex plant extract. Species of the Asteraceae family are well-known to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory (AI) activity. Dual inhibition of the enzymes COX-1 and 5-LOX is essential for the treatment of several inflammatory diseases, but there is not much investigation reported in the literature for natural products. In this study, 57 leaf extracts (EtOH-H2O 7:3, v/v) from different genera and species of the Asteraceae family were tested against COX-1 and 5-LOX while HPLC-ESI-HRMS analysis of the extracts indicated high diversity in their chemical compositions. Using O2PLS-DA (R2 > 0.92; VIP > 1 and positive Y-correlation values), dual inhibition potential of low-abundance metabolites was determined. The O2PLS-DA results exhibited good validation values (cross-validation = Q2 > 0.7 and external validation = P2 > 0.6) with 0% of false positive predictions. The metabolomic approach determined biomarkers for the required biological activity and detected active compounds in the extracts displaying unique mechanisms of action. In addition, the PCA data also gave insights on the chemotaxonomy of the family Asteraceae across its diverse range of genera and tribes. PMID:26184333

  5. Protective effect of Justicia gendarussa Burm.f. on carrageenan-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, S K; Viji, V; Kripa, K; Helen, A

    2011-07-01

    The present study focuses on the anti-inflammatory activity of Justicia gendarussa Burm.f. on an acute model of inflammation: the carrageenan-induced paw edema assay. Methanolic extract of J. gendarussa (JRM) roots at a dose of 100 mg/kg significantly inhibited edema formation 5 h after carrageenan induction. JRM inhibited carrageenan-elicited total cycloxygenase activity, 5-lipoxygenase and 15-lipoxygenase activities in blood mononuclear cells of rats, decreased neutrophil infiltration in paw tissue as shown by low myeloperoxidase activity, and also caused a 53% inhibition in cyclooxygenase-2 activity in paw tissue. Purification of JRM by liquid-liquid partitioning yielded an ethyl acetate fraction of JRM that showed interleukin-6 downregulation potential and the ability to inhibit prostaglandin E2 production in vivo. The present investigation provides pharmacological evidence to support the folklore claim that J. gendarussa is an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:21416126

  6. Learning as Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H.

    2002-01-01

    Integrates contemporary theories of learning into a theory of learning as activity. Explains ecological psychology, changes in understanding of learning, activity systems and activity theory (including the integration of consciousness and activity), and activity structure; and discusses learning as a cognitive and social process. (LRW)

  7. Physical Activity Assessment

    Cancer.gov

    Current evidence convincingly indicates that physical activity reduces the risk of colon and breast cancer. Physical activity may also reduce risk of prostate cancer. Scientists are also evaluating potential relationships between physical activity and other cancers.

  8. Facts about Physical Activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Facts about Physical Activity ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How ...

  9. Enzyme activities in activated sludge flocs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-Hui; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2007-12-01

    This study quantified the activities of enzymes in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and in pellets. Seven commonly adopted extraction schemes were utilized to extract from aerobic flocs the contained EPS, which were further categorized into loosely bound (LB) and tightly bound (TB) fractions. Ultrasonication effectively extracted the EPS from sludge flocs. Enzyme assay tests showed that the protease activity was localized mainly on the pellets, alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase activities were largely bound with LB-EPS, and few protease, alpha-amylase, or alpha-glucosidase activities were associated with the TB-EPS fraction. There exists no correlation between the biochemical compositions of EPS and the distribution of enzyme activities in the sludge matrix. The 44-65% of alpha-amylase and 59-100% of alpha-glucosidase activities noted with the LB-EPS indicate heterogeneous hydrolysis patterns in the sludge flocs with proteins and carbohydrates.

  10. Phytochemical and biological studies of bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Yoshinori; Ludwiczuk, Agnieszka; Nagashima, Fumihiro

    2013-07-01

    The bryophytes contain the Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses) and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). Of these, the Marchantiophyta have a cellular oil body which produce a number of mono-, sesqui- and di-terpenoids, aromatic compounds like bibenzyl, bis-bibenzyls and acetogenins. Most sesqui- and di-terpenoids obtained from liverworts are enantiomers of those found in higher plants. Many of these compounds display a characteristic odor, and can have interesting biological activities. These include: allergenic contact dermatitis, antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral, cytotoxic, insecticidal, insect antifeedant, superoxide anion radical release, 5-lipoxygenase, calmodulin, hyaluronidase, cyclooxygenase, DNA polymerase β, and α-glucosidase and NO production inhibitory, antioxidant, piscicidal, neurotrophic and muscle relaxing activities among others. Each liverwort biosynthesizes unique components, which are valuable for their chemotaxonomic classification. Typical chemical structures and biological activity of the selected liverwort constituents as well as the hemi- and total synthesis of some biologically active compounds are summarized.

  11. Active commuting to school

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Declines in physical activity levels have coincided with increasing rates of obesity in children. This is problematic because physical activity has been shown to attenuate weight gain in children. Active commuting to school is one way of increasing children's physical activity. However, given the hi...

  12. Home Activities for Fours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson-Florissant School District, Ferguson, MO.

    These home learning activity guides have been developed for parents to use with their 4-year-old children. Most of the activities require only household items that are often thrown away and can be recycled for learning activities. Some require no materials at all. The guides frequently begin with a discussion of home activities; progress through…

  13. [Positive Activities Campaign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    This packet contains four pamphlets that are part of a campaign to encourage adults to provide and promote positive activities for youth and to serve as role models for young people. "Positive Activities: A Campaign for Youth" includes information on what positive activities are, how to get involved in helping to provide positive activities for…

  14. Increasing Youth Physical Activity with Activity Calendars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckler, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Physical educators often struggle with ways to get their students to be active beyond the school day. One strategy to accomplish this is the use of physical activity calendars (PACs). The purpose of this article is to support the use of PACs and give practical advice for creating effective PACs.

  15. Natural forms of vitamin E: metabolism, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities and the role in disease prevention and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    The Vitamin E family consists of four tocopherols and four tocotrienols. α-Tocopherol (αT) is the predominant form of vitamin E in tissues and its deficiency leads to ataxia in humans. However, results from many clinical studies do not support protective roles of αT in disease prevention in people with adequate nutrient status. On the other hand, recent mechanistic studies indicate that other forms of vitamin E such as γ-tocopherol (γT), δ-tocopherol (δT) and γ-tocotrienol (γTE) have unique antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that are superior to αT in prevention and therapy against chronic diseases. These vitamin E forms scavenge reactive nitrogen species, inhibit cyclooxygenase- and 5-lipoxygenase-catalyzed eicosanoids and suppress pro-inflammatory signaling such as NF-κB and STAT3/6. Unlike αT, other vitamin E forms are significantly metabolized to carboxychromanols via cytochrome P-450 (CYP4F2)-initiated side-chain ω-oxidation. Long-chain carboxychromanols, esp.13’-carboxychromanols, are shown to have stronger anti-inflammatory effects than un-metabolized vitamins and may therefore contribute to beneficial effects of vitamin E forms in vivo. Consistent with mechanistic findings, animal and human studies show that γT and tocotrienols may be useful against inflammation-associated diseases. This review focuses on non-αT forms of vitamin E with respect to their metabolism, anti-inflammatory effects and mechanisms and in vivo efficacy in preclinical models as well as human clinical intervention studies. PMID:24704972

  16. Virucidal activity of an activated sludge supernatant.

    PubMed

    Rehn, Y; Schwartzbrod, L

    1993-09-01

    The virucidal activity of the activated sludge aqueous phase was studied from the time of initial inoculation with a poliovirus type 1 suspension and for durations of three and nine days. The mixtures were incubated in presence of a nutritive medium at 26 degrees C and samples were drawn at regular intervals of time for viral titration. The activated sludge supernatant (ASS) caused an important decrease of the titer of the poliovirus type 1 suspension especially after nine days of incubation. There was an average reduction of the viral titer of 79% after three days and 97% after nine days. When incubating the ASS with a nutritive medium before inoculating it, the viral decrease was much greater than when incubating without nutritive medium. When sterilizing the ASS before incubation and then inoculating it, no significant virucidal activity was observed (0% to 6%). Furthermore, when the ASS was subjected to a sterilization by filtration after incubation and was then inoculated, there existed a lower but not negligible viral inactivation (53% to 64%). The virucidal activity potentiality of the ASS is therefore due to microorganisms acting both directly as a support for viral particles adsorption and indirectly via the synthesis of substances with virucidal activity. When freezing and thawing the incubated ASS, and then sterilizing it by filtration before inoculation, the viral decrease reached 87% to 94%. This proves that the virucidal substances are only partly excreted by the microorganisms.

  17. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Steyert, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  18. Preschoolers’ Physical Activity Behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Jennifer D.; He, Meizi; Bouck, L. Michelle Sangster; Tucker, Patricia; Pollett, Graham L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To understand parents’ perspectives of their preschoolers’ physical activity behaviours. Methods A maximum variation sample of 71 parents explored their preschoolers’ physical activity behaviours through 10 semi-structured focus group discussions. Results Parents perceived Canada’s Physical Activity Guidelines for Children as inadequate; that their preschoolers get and need more than 30–90 minutes of activity daily; and that physical activity habits must be established during the preschool years. Nine barriers against and facilitators toward adequate physical activity were proposed: child’s age, weather, daycare, siblings, finances, time, society and safety, parents’ impact, and child’s activity preferences. Discussion The need for education and interventions that address current barriers are essential for establishing physical activity as a lifestyle behaviour during early childhood and, consequently, helping to prevent both childhood and adulthood obesity. PMID:16625802

  19. Balance Food and Activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Health Professionals Tools and Resources Promotional Materials Programming Materials Weight Management Nutrition Physical Activity Reduce Screen ... Training For Health Professionals Tools & Resources Promotional ... Programming Materials Weight Management Nutrition Physical Activity Reduce Screen ...

  20. Population Education. Awareness Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouse, Deborah E.

    1990-01-01

    Described are awareness activities that deal with human population growth, resources, and the environment. Activities include simulations, mathematical exercises, and discussions of the topic. Specific examples of what individuals can do to help are listed. (KR)

  1. Major operations and activities

    SciTech Connect

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the major operations and activities on the site. These operations and activities include site management, waste management, environmental restoration and corrective actions, and research and technology development.

  2. Active Fire Mapping Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS ... Data Web Services Latest Detected Fire Activity Other MODIS Products Frequently Asked Questions About Active Fire Maps ...

  3. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  4. Green Schools Activity Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacramento Tree Foundation, CA.

    This collection of interdisciplinary hands-on activities covers a variety of topics related to trees and conservation. Twenty-four activities integrate the subjects of social studies, fine arts, science, language arts, math, geography, and music. Although activity instructions are not consistent they usually contain details on objectives and…

  5. Activity Sheets. Draft Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke Power Company, Educational Services Dept., Charlotte, NC.

    This document consists of energy vocabulary activities, three games, worksheets, laboratory activities/exercises, and an introductory classroom exercise designed to introduce energy concepts to students. Vocabulary activities focus on coal and energy consumption. The three games (with instructions) focus on various aspects of energy and energy…

  6. Bonus Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Provides on-task activities to fill in unexpected extra moments in elementary classes. The activities require little preparation and take 5-15 minutes to complete. There are activities for math, language arts, social science, science, critical thinking, and computer. An outer space board game is also included. (SM)

  7. Climate Change: An Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Garry

    1995-01-01

    Presents a segment of the Geoscience Education booklet, Climate Change, that contains information and activities that enable students to gain a better appreciation of the possible effects human activity has on the Earth's climate. Describes the Terrace Temperatures activity that leads students through an investigation using foraminifera data to…

  8. Active Learning Crosses Generations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Diane K.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the benefits of intergenerational programs, highlighting a child care program that offers age-appropriate and mutually beneficial activities for children and elders within a nearby retirement community. The program has adopted High/Scope's active learning approach to planning and implementing activities that involve both generations. The…

  9. Activity Theory and Ontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peim, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This paper seeks to re-examine Yrio Engestrom's activity theory as a technology of knowledge designed to enable positive transformations of specific practices. The paper focuses on a key paper where Engestrom defines the nature and present state of activity theory. Beginning with a brief account of the relations between activity theory and…

  10. Highlights of 1981 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The highlights of NASA's 1981 activities are presented, including the results of the two flights of the space shuttle Columbia and the Voyager 2 encounter with Saturn. Accomplishments in the areas of space transportation operations; space science; aeronautical, energy, and space research and development; as well as space tracking, international activities, and 1981 launch activities are discussed.

  11. Measurement of Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.; Washburn, Richard A.; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2001-01-01

    Valid assessment of physical activity must be unobtrusive, practical to administer, and specific about physical activity type, frequency, duration, and intensity. Assessment methods can be categorized according to whether they provide direct or indirect (e.g., self-report) observation of physical activity, body motion, physiological response…

  12. FL Activities & Festivals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY.

    A collection of student, class, and school foreign language activities suggests a variety of projects and describes three specific school efforts. The suggested activities include: (1) individual student efforts such as writing to pen-pals; (2) group activities such as a foreign language auction or sing-along; (3) group projects for the school…

  13. Technology Learning Activities I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Technology Education Association, Reston, VA.

    This guide contains 30 technology learning activities. Activities may contain all or some of the following: an introduction, objectives, materials and equipment, challenges, limitations, notes and investigations, resources and references used, and evaluation ideas. Activity titles are: (1) Occupations in Construction Technology; (2) Designing a…

  14. Woodsy Owl Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This guide offers teachers and after-school group leaders 12 fun and engaging activities. Activities feature lessons on trees, water, wind, the earth, food, and waste. The activities are designed to help children aged 5-8 become more aware of the natural environment and fundamental conservation principles. Titles of children's books are embedded…

  15. Tea enhances insulin activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Richard A; Polansky, Marilyn M

    2002-11-20

    The most widely known health benefits of tea relate to the polyphenols as the principal active ingredients in protection against oxidative damage and in antibacterial, antiviral, anticarcinogenic, and antimutagenic activities, but polyphenols in tea may also increase insulin activity. The objective of this study was to determine the insulin-enhancing properties of tea and its components. Tea, as normally consumed, was shown to increase insulin activity >15-fold in vitro in an epididymal fat cell assay. Black, green, and oolong teas but not herbal teas, which are not teas in the traditional sense because they do not contain leaves of Camellia senensis, were all shown to increase insulin activity. High-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of tea extracts utilizing a Waters SymmetryPrep C18 column showed that the majority of the insulin-potentiating activity for green and oolong teas was due to epigallocatechin gallate. For black tea, the activity was present in several regions of the chromatogram corresponding to, in addition to epigallocatechin gallate, tannins, theaflavins, and other undefined compounds. Several known compounds found in tea were shown to enhance insulin with the greatest activity due to epigallocatechin gallate followed by epicatechin gallate, tannins, and theaflavins. Caffeine, catechin, and epicatechin displayed insignificant insulin-enhancing activities. Addition of lemon to the tea did not affect the insulin-potentiating activity. Addition of 5 g of 2% milk per cup decreased the insulin-potentiating activity one-third, and addition of 50 g of milk per cup decreased the insulin-potentiating activity approximately 90%. Nondairy creamers and soy milk also decreased the insulin-enhancing activity. These data demonstrate that tea contains in vitro insulin-enhancing activity and the predominant active ingredient is epigallocatechin gallate. PMID:12428980

  16. Vestibular activation of sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The vestibulosympathetic reflex refers to sympathetic nerve activation by the vestibular system. Animal studies indicate that the vestibular system assists in blood pressure regulation during orthostasis. Although human studies clearly demonstrate activation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during engagement of the otolith organs, the role of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in maintaining blood pressure during orthostasis is not well-established. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes indicates that it is a powerful and independent reflex. Ageing, which is associated with an increased risk for orthostatic hypotension, attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex. The attenuated reflex is associated with a reduction in arterial pressure. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the vestibulosympathetic reflex assists in blood pressure regulation in humans, but future studies examining this reflex in other orthostatically intolerant populations are necessary to address this hypothesis.

  17. The effects of bleomycin on alveolar macrophage growth factor secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Denholm, E. M.; Phan, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous work in this laboratory has demonstrated increased secretion of fibroblast growth factor (MDGF) activity by alveolar macrophages obtained from mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The mechanism by which bleomycin promotes this increase in MDGF secretion is not clear, however. The purpose of this study was to determine the direct effects of bleomycin on alveolar macrophages. Normal rat alveolar macrophages obtained by lavage were cultured in the presence or absence of bleomycin; conditioned media from these cultures were dialyzed to remove bleomycin and then assayed in vitro for MDGF activity. Alveolar macrophages incubated with 0.01 microgram to 1 microgram/ml bleomycin for 18 hours secreted significantly more MDGF than macrophages incubated without bleomycin. Viability of macrophages as determined by exclusion of trypan blue and release of LDH was unaffected by any dose tested. Maximal MDGF production was seen with bleomycin doses of greater than or equal to 0.1 microgram/ml. When alveolar macrophages were incubated with 0.1 microgram/ml bleomycin for 0.5-18 hours, MDGF activity was detected as early as 1 hour, with peak responses found at 4-8 hours. Macrophages stimulated with bleomycin continued to produce significant amounts of MDGF even after bleomycin was removed and replaced with fresh (bleomycin-free) media. MDGF secretion by bleomycin-stimulated alveolar macrophages was inhibited by cycloheximide, and the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors NDGA (nordihydroguairetic acid) and BW755c, indicating not only a requirement for protein synthesis but also for metabolites of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism for full expression of activity(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2464942

  18. Physical Activity and Albuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Emily S.; Fisher, Naomi D.; Forman, John P.; Curhan, Gary C.

    2010-01-01

    Higher urinary albumin excretion predicts future cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. Physical activity improves endothelial function so activity may reduce albuminuria. Among diabetics, physical activity decreases albuminuria. In nondiabetics, prior studies have shown no association. The authors explored the cross-sectional association between physical activity and albuminuria in 3,587 nondiabetic women in 2 US cohorts, the Nurses’ Health Study I in 2000 and the Nurses’ Health Study II in 1997. Physical activity was expressed as metabolic equivalents per week. The outcome was the top albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) decile. Multivariate logistic regression was used. Secondary analyses explored the ACR association with strenuous activity and walking. The mean age was 58.6 years. Compared with women in the lowest physical activity quintile, those in the highest quintile had a multivariate-adjusted odds ratio for the top ACR decile of 0.65 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.46, 0.93). The multivariate-adjusted odds ratio for the top ACR decile for those with greater than 210 minutes per week of strenuous activity compared with no strenuous activity was 0.61 (95% CI: 0.37, 0.99), and for those in the highest quintile of walking compared with the lowest quintile, it was 0.69 (95% CI: 0.47, 1.02). Greater physical activity is associated with a lower ACR in nondiabetic women. PMID:20133515

  19. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  20. Physiologic activities of the contact activation system.

    PubMed

    Schmaier, Alvin H

    2014-05-01

    The plasma contact activation (CAS) and kallikrein/kinin (KKS) systems consist of 4 proteins: factor XII, prekallikrein, high molecular weight kininogen, and the bradykinin B2 receptor. Murine genetic deletion of factor XII (F12(-/-)), prekallikrein (Klkb1(-/-)), high molecular weight kininogen (Kgn1(-/-)) and the bradykinin B2 receptor (Bdkrb2(-/-)) yield animals protected from thrombosis. With possible exception of F12(-/-) and Kgn1(-/-) mice, the mechanism(s) for thrombosis protection is not reduced contact activation. Bdkrb2(-/-) mice are best characterized and they are protected from thrombosis through over expression of components of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) leading to elevated prostacyclin with vascular and platelet inhibition. Alternatively, prolylcarboxypeptidase, a PK activator and degrader of angiotensin II, when deficient in the mouse leads to a prothrombotic state. Its mechanism for increased thrombosis also is mediated in part by components of the RAS. These observations suggest that thrombosis in mice of the CAS and KKS are mediated in part through the RAS and independent of reduced contact activation. PMID:24759141

  1. Marine Biology Activities. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  2. Lightning Activities and Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jann-Yenq

    2016-04-01

    The lightning activity is one of the key parameters to understand the atmospheric electric fields and/or currents near the Earth's surface as well as the lithosphere-atmosphere coupling during the earthquake preparation period. In this study, to see whether or not lightning activities are related to earthquakes, we statistically examine lightning activities 30 days before and after 78 land and 230 sea M>5.0 earthquakes in Taiwan during the 12-year period of 1993-2004. Lightning activities versus the location, depth, and magnitude of earthquakes are investigated. Results show that lightning activities tend to appear around the forthcoming epicenter and are significantly enhanced a few, especially 17-19, days before the M>6.0 shallow (depth D< 20 km) land earthquakes. Moreover, the size of the area around the epicenter with the statistical significance of lightning activity enhancement is proportional to the earthquake magnitude.

  3. Thermally Activated Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, William H.; Murray, Robert C.; Walsh, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    Space-qualified, precise, large-force, thermally activated driver (TAD) developed for use in space on astro-physics experiment to measure abundance of rare actinide-group elements in cosmic rays. Actinide cosmic rays detected using thermally activated driver as heart of event-thermometer (ET) system. Thermal expansion and contraction of silicone oil activates driver. Potential applications in fluid-control systems where precise valve controls are needed.

  4. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  5. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  6. Active unilateral condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Luz, J G; de Rezende, J R; de Araújo, V C; Chilvarquer, I

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of active unilateral condylar hyperplasia which were treated with condylectomy alone are presented. The first case was an adult form and the other a juvenile form. Both were classified as active by using 99Tc bone scintigraphy. Clinical and radiographic features of both cases conformed to the hemimandibular hypertrophy type. Satisfactory facial symmetry and dental occlusion were achieved. Histopathological data confirmed the activity of the articular cartilage layers. PMID:8181091

  7. Activity in distant comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, Jane X.

    1992-01-01

    Activity in distant comets remains a mystery in the sense that we still have no complete theory to explain the various types of activity exhibited by different comets at large distances. This paper explores the factors that should play a role in determining activity in a distant comet, especially in the cases of comet P/Tempel 2, comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, and 2060 Chiron.

  8. Crew activities in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluford, G. S., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    One of the mission requirements of the Space Shuttle is to serve as a working platform for experiments in space. Many of these experiments will be performed by crewmembers (mission specialists and payload specialists) in a general purpose laboratory called Spacelab. All nonexperiment-related activities or housekeeping activities will be done in the Orbiter, while most of the mission-related activities (experiments) will be done in Spacelab. In order for experimenters to design their experiments to best utilize the capabilities of the Orbiter, the Spacelab, and the crew, the working environment in the Orbiter and in Spacelab is described. In addition, the housekeeping activities required of the crew are summarized.

  9. Physical Activity and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of scientists, ranging from experts in basic biological science to those with expertise in community behavioral interventions to increase physical activity. This combination of scientists and expertise will ...

  10. NASA metrication activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlannes, P. N.

    1978-01-01

    NASA's organization and policy for metrification, history from 1964, NASA participation in Federal agency activities, interaction with nongovernmental metrication organizations, and the proposed metrication assessment study are reviewed.

  11. Imbricaric Acid and Perlatolic Acid: Multi-Targeting Anti-Inflammatory Depsides from Cetrelia monachorum

    PubMed Central

    Oettl, Sarah K.; Gerstmeier, Jana; Khan, Shafaat Y.; Wiechmann, Katja; Bauer, Julia; Atanasov, Atanas G.; Malainer, Clemens; Awad, Ezzat M.; Uhrin, Pavel; Heiss, Elke H.; Waltenberger, Birgit; Remias, Daniel; Breuss, Johannes M.; Boustie, Joel; Dirsch, Verena M.; Stuppner, Hermann; Werz, Oliver; Rollinger, Judith M.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro screening of 17 Alpine lichen species for their inhibitory activity against 5-lipoxygenase, microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 and nuclear factor kappa B revealed Cetrelia monachorum (Zahlbr.) W.L. Culb. & C.F. Culb. As conceivable source for novel anti-inflammatory compounds. Phytochemical investigation of the ethanolic crude extract resulted in the isolation and identification of 11 constituents, belonging to depsides and derivatives of orsellinic acid, olivetolic acid and olivetol. The two depsides imbricaric acid (4) and perlatolic acid (5) approved dual inhibitory activities on microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (IC50 = 1.9 and 0.4 µM, resp.) and on 5-lipoxygenase tested in a cell-based assay (IC50 = 5.3 and 1.8 µM, resp.) and on purified enzyme (IC50 = 3.5 and 0.4 µM, resp.). Additionally, these two main constituents quantified in the extract with 15.22% (4) and 9.10% (5) showed significant inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced nuclear factor kappa B activation in luciferase reporter cells with IC50 values of 2.0 and 7.0 µM, respectively. In a murine in vivo model of inflammation, 5 impaired the inflammatory, thioglycollate-induced recruitment of leukocytes to the peritoneum. The potent inhibitory effects on the three identified targets attest 4 and 5 a pronounced multi-target anti-inflammatory profile which warrants further investigation on their pharmacokinetics and in vivo efficacy. PMID:24130812

  12. Cell Death Inducing Microbial Protein Phosphatase Inhibitors--Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Kleppe, Rune; Herfindal, Lars; Døskeland, Stein Ove

    2015-10-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and microcystin (MC) as well as several other microbial toxins like nodularin and calyculinA are known as tumor promoters as well as inducers of apoptotic cell death. Their intracellular targets are the major serine/threonine protein phosphatases. This review summarizes mechanisms believed to be responsible for the death induction and tumor promotion with focus on the interdependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II (CaM-KII). New data are presented using inhibitors of specific ROS producing enzymes to curb nodularin/MC-induced liver cell (hepatocyte) death. They indicate that enzymes of the arachidonic acid pathway, notably phospholipase A2, 5-lipoxygenase, and cyclooxygenases, may be required for nodularin/MC-induced (and presumably OA-induced) cell death, suggesting new ways to overcome at least some aspects of OA and MC toxicity. PMID:26506362

  13. Humudifucol and Bioactive Prenylated Polyphenols from Hops (Humulus lupulus cv. "Cascade").

    PubMed

    Forino, Martino; Pace, Simona; Chianese, Giuseppina; Santagostini, Laura; Werner, Markus; Weinigel, Christina; Rummler, Silke; Fico, Gelsomina; Werz, Oliver; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

    2016-03-25

    Humulus lupulus (hop plant) has long been used in traditional medicine as a sedative and antimicrobial agent. More recently, attention has been devoted to the phytoestrogenic activity of the plant extracts as well as to the anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties of the prenylated chalcones present. In this study, an Italian sample of H. lupulus cv. "Cascade" has been investigated and three new compounds [4-hydroxycolupulone (6), humudifucol (7) and cascadone (8)] have been purified and identified by means of NMR spectroscopy along with four known metabolites. Notably, humudifucol (7) is the first prenylated dimeric phlorotannin discovered in nature. Because structurally related phloroglucinols from natural sources were found previously to inhibit microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase (mPGES)-1 and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), the isolated compounds were evaluated for their bioactivity against these pro-inflammatory target proteins. The prenylated chalcone xanthohumol inhibited both enzymes at low μM concentrations.

  14. Humudifucol and Bioactive Prenylated Polyphenols from Hops (Humulus lupulus cv. "Cascade").

    PubMed

    Forino, Martino; Pace, Simona; Chianese, Giuseppina; Santagostini, Laura; Werner, Markus; Weinigel, Christina; Rummler, Silke; Fico, Gelsomina; Werz, Oliver; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

    2016-03-25

    Humulus lupulus (hop plant) has long been used in traditional medicine as a sedative and antimicrobial agent. More recently, attention has been devoted to the phytoestrogenic activity of the plant extracts as well as to the anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties of the prenylated chalcones present. In this study, an Italian sample of H. lupulus cv. "Cascade" has been investigated and three new compounds [4-hydroxycolupulone (6), humudifucol (7) and cascadone (8)] have been purified and identified by means of NMR spectroscopy along with four known metabolites. Notably, humudifucol (7) is the first prenylated dimeric phlorotannin discovered in nature. Because structurally related phloroglucinols from natural sources were found previously to inhibit microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase (mPGES)-1 and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), the isolated compounds were evaluated for their bioactivity against these pro-inflammatory target proteins. The prenylated chalcone xanthohumol inhibited both enzymes at low μM concentrations. PMID:26918635

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of C(5)-substituted derivatives of leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor BRP-7.

    PubMed

    Levent, Serkan; Gerstmeier, Jana; Olgaç, Abdurrahman; Nikels, Felix; Garscha, Ulrike; Carotti, Andrea; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Werz, Oliver; Banoglu, Erden; Çalışkan, Burcu

    2016-10-21

    Pharmacological intervention with 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway leading to suppression of leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis is a clinically validated strategy for treatment of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases such as asthma and atherosclerosis. Here we describe the synthesis of a series of C(5)-substituted analogues of the previously described 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP) inhibitor BRP-7 (IC50 = 0.31 μM) to explore the effects of substitution at the C(5)-benzimidazole (BI) ring as a strategy to increase the potency against FLAP-mediated 5-LO product formation. Incorporation of polar substituents on the C(5) position of the BI core, exemplified by compound 11 with a C(5)-nitrile substituent, significantly enhances the potency for suppression of 5-LO product synthesis in human neutrophils (IC50 = 0.07 μM) and monocytes (IC50 = 0.026 μM). PMID:27423639

  16. The membrane organization of leukotriene synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Asim K; Skoch, Jesse; Bacskai, Brian J; Hyman, Bradley T; Christmas, Peter; Miller, Douglas; Yamin, Ting-ting D; Xu, Shihua; Wisniewski, Douglas; Evans, Jilly F; Soberman, Roy J

    2004-04-27

    Cell signaling leading to the formation of leukotriene (LT)C(4) requires the localization of the four key biosynthetic enzymes on the outer nuclear membrane and endoplasmic reticulum. Whether any macromolecular organization of these proteins exists is unknown. By using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and biochemical analysis, we demonstrate the presence of two distinct multimeric complexes that regulate the formation of LTs in RBL-2H3 cells. One complex consists of multimers of LTC(4) synthase and the 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP). The second complex consists of multimers of FLAP. Surprisingly, all LTC(4) synthase was found to be in association with FLAP. The results indicate that the formation of LTC(4) and LTB(4) may be determined by the compartmentalization of biosynthetic enzymes in discrete molecular complexes.

  17. Active Flow Control Activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Sellers, William L., III; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley continues to aggressively investigate the potential advantages of active flow control over more traditional aerodynamic techniques. This paper provides an update to a previous paper and describes both the progress in the various research areas and the significant changes in the NASA research programs. The goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids as well as to address engineering challenges. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several projects is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research are to be demonstrated either in bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight as part of the fundamental NASA R&D program and then transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD, and U.S. industry.

  18. Activity Book: Ocean Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents a collection of activities to help elementary students study ocean ecology. The activities have students investigate ocean inhabitants, analyze animal adaptations, examine how temperature and saltiness affect ocean creatures, and learn about safeguarding the sea. Student pages offer reproducible learning sheets. (SM)

  19. [Field Learning Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolde Forest Environmental Education Center, Reading, PA.

    Seventy field activities, pertinent to outdoor, environmental studies, are described in this compilation. Designed for elementary and junior high school students, the activities cover many discipline areas--science, social studies, language arts, health, history, mathematics, and art--and many are multidisciplinary in use. Topics range from soil…

  20. Rainy Day Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Experienced caregivers plan ahead for rainy days. This article describes specific rainy day activities for young children, such as books and crafts to learn about rain (rain in a jar, making a rainbow), simple cooking activities (taffy pull, cinnamon candy tea), and games (mummy wrap, hunt the thimble, rain lotto). (EV)

  1. Activities of the ILO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labour Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Seven articles on International Labour Organization (ILO) activities cover study groups at ILO headquarters, a Philippine rural workers seminar, women's participation in Central American union activities, worksite courses in India, and seminars and symposia in Cape Verde, Mauritius, and Sierra Leone. (SK)

  2. Active Students in Webinars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolås, Line; Nordseth, Hugo; Yri, Jørgen Sørlie

    2015-01-01

    To ensure student activity in webinars we have defined 10 learning tasks focusing on production and communication e.g. collaborative writing, discussion and polling, and investigated how the technology supports the learning activities. The three project partners in the VisPed-project use different video-conferencing systems, and we analyzed how it…

  3. The Activity of Trypsin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Salvatore F.; Holzman, Tom

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that illustrates the following points concerning the experimental determination of trypsin activity: (1) there is a difference in basing enzyme concentration on weight, absorbance, or active sites; and (2) the method of expressing enzyme concentration determines the value of specific, molecular, and catalytic center…

  4. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-01-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of…

  5. Games and Word Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    Games and word activities give children another way to integrate their learning and reinforce their literacy skills. They provide different and enjoyable contexts in which children can apply what they are learning. This booklet offers activities which provide a sampling of "fun" ways for tutors to support and supplement their tutees' classroom…

  6. Active Healthy Summer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Eloise

    2005-01-01

    Summer break is almost here for most elementary teachers and students. Warmer weather and additional free time to make choices create more opportunities to be physically active, whether home alone or out with friends and family. This article describes ways by which physical education specialists can encourage students' physical activity by…

  7. Coordinating Shared Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley

    2004-01-01

    Shared Activity Coordination (ShAC) is a computer program for planning and scheduling the activities of an autonomous team of interacting spacecraft and exploratory robots. ShAC could also be adapted to such terrestrial uses as helping multiple factory managers work toward competing goals while sharing such common resources as floor space, raw materials, and transports. ShAC iteratively invokes the Continuous Activity Scheduling Planning Execution and Replanning (CASPER) program to replan and propagate changes to other planning programs in an effort to resolve conflicts. A domain-expert specifies which activities and parameters thereof are shared and reports the expected conditions and effects of these activities on the environment. By specifying these conditions and effects differently for each planning program, the domain-expert subprogram defines roles that each spacecraft plays in a coordinated activity. The domain-expert subprogram also specifies which planning program has scheduling control over each shared activity. ShAC enables sharing of information, consensus over the scheduling of collaborative activities, and distributed conflict resolution. As the other planning programs incorporate new goals and alter their schedules in the changing environment, ShAC continually coordinates to respond to unexpected events.

  8. Reflections on Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhurst, David

    2009-01-01

    It is sometimes suggested that activity theory represents the most important legacy of Soviet philosophy and psychology. But what exactly "is" activity theory? The canonical account in the West is given by Engestrom, who identifies three stages in the theory's development: from Vygotsky's insights, through Leontiev's articulation of the…

  9. Obesity, Physical Activity - Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Thomas B.

    Childhood obesity starts at a very early age, and preventive measures taken early enough may retard the development of fat cells. It appears that physical activity plays an important role in reducing obesity. The activity program must start early, in preschool days. It is felt that screening children for obesity when they first enter school and…

  10. Science World Activities Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, Madison.

    This document consists of three sections. Section I contains 19 activities developed by master teachers for the Science World '84 summer science program. These activities focus on studies involving airplane controls, trash bag kites, computers, meteorology, compass orienteering, soils, aquatic ecosystems, bogs, and others. Objectives, materials…

  11. Peak Longevity Physical Activity

    Cancer.gov

    People who engage in three to five times the recommended minimum level of leisure-time physical activity derive the greatest benefit in terms of mortality reduction when compared with people who do not engage in leisure-time physical activity.

  12. ZOOMsci Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Meredith

    This activity guide is based on the Public Broadcasting System's (PBS) program "ZOOM." It is designed for educators with activities that are categorized into three themes: (1) Things That Go, which includes "Air" which explores air pressure, "Rubber Bands" which discovers the potential energy of rubber bands, "Baking Soda and Vinegar" which…

  13. Active galactic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Andrew C.

    1999-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei are the most powerful, long-lived objects in the Universe. Recent data confirm the theoretical idea that the power source is accretion into a massive black hole. The common occurrence of obscuration and outflows probably means that the contribution of active galactic nuclei to the power density of the Universe has been generally underestimated. PMID:10220363

  14. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  15. Laboratory Activities in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Barnea, Nitza

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory activities have long had a distinctive and central role in the science curriculum, and science educators have suggested that many benefits accrue from engaging students in science laboratory activities. Many research studies have been conducted to investigate the educational effectiveness of laboratory work in science education in…

  16. Curriculum Activities on Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmall, Vicki L.; Benge, Nancy

    This paper contains learning activities on aging for use with elementary, high school, and university students in health, family relationships, social studies, and art courses. The activities are intended to help youth develop a more realistic understanding of the aging process and to become aware of both the problems and benefits associated with…

  17. Nutrition Activities Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Special Education.

    The resource guide suggests activities to help special education students make appropriate choices about their nutritional habits. It is explained that the activities can be infused into other curriculum areas. The guide consists of five themes and includes performance objectives for each: foods eaten at school (planning a school lunch, keeping a…

  18. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, David R.; Velenyi, Louis J.; Pepera, Marc A.; Dolhyj, Serge R.

    1986-01-01

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  19. Learning Activities for Toddlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Suggests activities to help toddlers develop skills in the four important areas of self-help, creativity, world mastery, and coordination. Activities include hand washing, button practice, painting, movement and music, bubble making, creation of a nature mural, and a shoe print trail. (TJQ)

  20. Active and Healthy Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen; Kovarik, Jessica; Leidy, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The Active and Healthy School Program (AHS) can be used to alter the culture and environment of a school to help children make healthier choices. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of AHS to increase physical activity while decreasing total screen time, increase healthy food choices, and improve knowledge about physical…

  1. Calculator-Active Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy, Ed.; Harris, Julia, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This journal contains brief descriptions of calculator-active materials that were found using Resource Finder, the searchable online catalog of curriculum resources from the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC). It features both the calculators themselves and the activity books that are used with them. Among the calculators included are those…

  2. Activating Event Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world events, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized events that they denote or…

  3. Bonus Activity Book. Peacemakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Betsy Blizard

    1992-01-01

    Activity book helps elementary students learn about peace and see themselves as peacemakers and peacekeepers. Students are introduced to literary and historical figures who have worked for peace and won the Nobel Peace Prize. Activities teach students that peace means more than calm situations or absence of war. (SM)

  4. Vegetable Soup Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Mary; Shepard, Ray

    Vegetable Soup is a new children's television series whose purpose is to counter the negative and destructive effects of racial isolation. This manual gives detailed instructions for discussion of activities that are presented during the television series such as: crafts, games, recipes, language activities, and children's questions. A list of…

  5. Student Activities. Managing Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Barbara; And Others

    This monograph suggests ways that college or university administrations can undertake a systematic and careful review of the risks posed by students' activities. Its purpose is to provide guidance in integrating the risk management process into a school's existing approaches to managing student organizations and activities. It is noted that no…

  6. Untangling occupation and activity.

    PubMed

    Pierce, D

    2001-01-01

    Activity and occupation are two core concepts of occupational therapy that are in need of differentiation. Occupation is defined here as a person's personally constructed, one-time experience within a unique context. Activity is defined as a more general, culturally shared idea about a category of action. The ways in which subjectivity and context are handled within the concepts of occupation and activity are keys to disentangling them. The proposed untangling of the two concepts into distinct definitions is congruent with their historical origins as well as with current definitional trends. Once occupation and activity are recognized as two separate and equally valuable concepts, they offer a rich set of theoretical relations for exploration. The clarity that will result from differentiating occupation and activity will enhance disciplinary discourse and research as well as enhance the intervention efficacy, moral surety, and political strength of the profession.

  7. Active element pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozar, D. M.

    1994-08-01

    This review article will discuss the use of the active element pattern for prediction of the scan performance of large phased array antennas. The introduction and application of the concept of the active element pattern goes back at least 30 years (1) -(6) , but the subject is generally not covered in modern antenna engineering textbooks or handbooks, and many contemporary workers are unfamiliar with this simple but powerful idea. In addition, early references on this subject do not provide a rigorous discussion or derivation of the active element pattern, relying instead on a more qualitative interpretation. The purpose of this communication is to make the technique of active element patterns more accessible to antenna engineers, and to provide a new derivation of the basic active element pattern relations in terms of scattering parameters.

  8. Down-regulation of vinculin upon MK886-induced apoptosis in LN18 glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Magro, A. D.; Cunningham, C.; Miller, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastomas are a type of malignant brain tumor and are among the most difficult cancers to treat. One strategy to treat aggressive cancers is the use of drugs that target multiple signaling pathways. MK886 is a drug known to inhibit both 5-lipoxygenase-activating-protein (FLAP) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPAR-α). The objectives of this study were to investigate the ability of MK886 to induce apoptotic cell death in LN18 glioblastoma cells and to characterize the cell death mechanisms. MK886 induced massive apoptotic LN18 cell death that was manifested by the release of nucleosomes, annexinV binding to phosphatidylserine in the absence of nuclear staining, and changes in the fluorescent intensity of Mito Tracker Deep Red 633 indicating changes in mitochondrial oxidative function and mass. The alteration of the mitochondrial function implied that MK886 induced apoptosis in LN18 cells via a mitochondrial pathway. The broad caspases inhibitor ZVAD-FMK inhibited MK886-induced nucleosome release, but not annexinV binding or MK886-altered mitochondrial function. Real time RT-PCR demonstrated that LN18 cells expressed significant levels of FLAP and PPAR-α mRNAs. A low level of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX-5) mRNA was detected, but little, if any, arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase (ALOX-12) mRNA was present. In addition, MK886-induced apoptosis in LN18 cells was accompanied by a decrease in the protein and mRNA levels of vinculin, but not other focal adhesion proteins. In summary, the data presented here indicate that disruption of the actin-vinculin-cell-cytoskeleton matrix of the LN18 glioblastoma is a component of the MK886 induced apoptosis. In addition, MK886 treated LN18 cells could provide one model in which to investigate drugs that target lipoxygenase and PPAR-α pathways in the chemotherapeutic treatment of glioblastomas. PMID:17949236

  9. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  10. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-08-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of each lesson were analysed to identify individual student's emotions. Results from two representative students are presented as case studies. Using a theoretical perspective drawn from theories of emotions founded in sociology, two assertions emerged. First, during the demonstration activity, students experienced the emotions of wonder and surprise; second, during a laboratory activity, students experienced the intense positive emotions of happiness/joy. Characteristics of these activities that contributed to students' positive experiences are highlighted. The study found that choosing activities that evoked strong positive emotional experiences, focused students' attention on the phenomenon they were learning, and the activities were recalled positively. Furthermore, such positive experiences may contribute to students' interest and engagement in science and longer term memorability. Finally, implications for science teachers and pre-service teacher education are suggested.

  11. Active touch sensing

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Tony J.; Diamond, Mathew E.; Wing, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Active sensing systems are purposive and information-seeking sensory systems. Active sensing usually entails sensor movement, but more fundamentally, it involves control of the sensor apparatus, in whatever manner best suits the task, so as to maximize information gain. In animals, active sensing is perhaps most evident in the modality of touch. In this theme issue, we look at active touch across a broad range of species from insects, terrestrial and marine mammals, through to humans. In addition to analysing natural touch, we also consider how engineering is beginning to exploit physical analogues of these biological systems so as to endow robots with rich tactile sensing capabilities. The different contributions show not only the varieties of active touch—antennae, whiskers and fingertips—but also their commonalities. They explore how active touch sensing has evolved in different animal lineages, how it serves to provide rapid and reliable cues for controlling ongoing behaviour, and even how it can disintegrate when our brains begin to fail. They demonstrate that research on active touch offers a means both to understand this essential and primary sensory modality, and to investigate how animals, including man, combine movement with sensing so as to make sense of, and act effectively in, the world. PMID:21969680

  12. Biological activity of purpurogallin.

    PubMed

    Inamori, Y; Muro, C; Sajima, E; Katagiri, M; Okamoto, Y; Tanaka, H; Sakagami, Y; Tsujibo, H

    1997-05-01

    Purpurogallin showed antibacterial activity toward gram-positive bacteria. Strong activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against methicillin of 1600 micrograms/ml] was found, with MIC of 11.0 micrograms/ml. Purpurogallin inhibited the growth of all tested plants and decreased the chlorophyll content in the cotyledons of Brassica campestris subsp. rapa. It showed potent inhibitory activity against prolyl endopeptidase (the 50% inhibitory concentration was 1.6 x 10(-5) M), unlike its analogues, hinokitiol and tropolone.

  13. Algorithm-development activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, Kendall L.

    1994-01-01

    The task of algorithm-development activities at USF continues. The algorithm for determining chlorophyll alpha concentration, (Chl alpha) and gelbstoff absorption coefficient for SeaWiFS and MODIS-N radiance data is our current priority.

  14. Microglial Activation & Chronic Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lull, Melinda E.; Block, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Microglia, the resident innate immune cells in the brain, have long been implicated in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Accumulating evidence points to activated microglia as a chronic source of multiple neurotoxic factors, including TNFα, NO, IL1-β, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), driving progressive neuron damage. Microglia can become chronically activated by either a single stimulus (ex. LPS or neuron damage) or multiple stimuli exposures to result in cumulative neuronal loss over time. While the mechanisms driving these phenomena are just beginning to be understood, reactive microgliosis (the microglial response to neuron damage) and ROS have been implicated as key mechanisms of chronic and neurotoxic microglial activation, particularly in the case of Parkinson’s Disease. Here, we review the mechanisms of neurotoxicity associated with chronic microglial activation and discuss the role of neuronal death and microglial ROS driving the chronic and toxic microglial phenotype. PMID:20880500

  15. Active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J.

    1984-01-01

    Active Noise Reduction (ANR) techniques, singly and in combination with passive hearing protectors, offer the potential for increased sound protection, enhanced voice communications and improved wearability features for personnel exposed to unacceptable noise conditions. An enhanced closed loop active noise reduction system was miniaturized and incorporated into a standard Air Force flight helmet (HGU-26/P). This report describes the theory of design and operation, prototype configuration and operation, and electroacoustic performance and specifications for the ANR system. This system is theoretically capable of producing in excess of 30 decibels of active noise reduction. Electroacoustic measurements on a flat plate coupler demonstrated approximately 20 decibels of active noise reduction with the prototype unit. A performance evaluation of the integrated ANR unit will be conducted under laboratory and field conditions by government personnel to determine the feasibility of the system for use in military applications.

  16. Activities in Teaching Weather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonn, Martin

    1977-01-01

    Presented is a unit composed of activities for teaching weather. Topics include cloud types and formation, simple weather instruments, and the weather station. Illustrations include a weather chart and instruments. A bibliography is given. (MA)

  17. Island Watershed Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Rod

    2003-01-01

    Describes a 90-minute "Island Watershed" activity to help earth science students understand the concept of the water cycle. Introduces a surface waters unit appropriate for students in grades 7-10. Includes watershed project guidelines. (Author/KHR)

  18. Authentic Listening Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Don; Roberts, Jon

    1981-01-01

    Discusses use of authentic listening experiences in second language classroom so that students will become involved in listening process demanded in authentic listening situations. Gives examples of sample classroom activities. (BK)

  19. French space activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanc, R.

    1982-01-01

    The four main points of research and development of space programs by France are explained. The National Center of Space Studies is discussed, listing the missions of the Center and describing the activities of the staff.

  20. Creating Art Appreciation Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidt, Ann H.

    1986-01-01

    The experiences of college students enrolled as majors in elementary education in designing art appreciation activities for use in elementary classrooms are described. The college students had no art background. (RM)

  1. Active terahertz metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate planar terahertz metamaterial devices enabling actively controllable transmission amplitude, phase, or frequency at room temperature via carrier depletion or photoexcitation in the semiconductor substrate or in semiconductor materials incorporated into the metamaterial structure.

  2. Planning activities in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Kai-Hsiung

    1987-01-01

    Three aspects of planning activities in space are presented. These include generating plans efficiently, coordinating actions among multiple agents, and recovering from plan execution errors. Each aspect is discussed separately.

  3. A Big Gulp Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    Explains how to implement an activity in which students measure the volume of their oral cavities. Enables students to develop skills in estimation, measurement, connections, statistics, applying concepts and procedures, and communication. (DDR)

  4. PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

  5. Intercreativity: Mapping Online Activism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meikle, Graham

    How do activists use the Internet? This article maps a wide range of activist practice and research by applying and developing Tim Berners-Lee's concept of ‘intercreativity' (1999). It identifies four dimensions of Net activism: intercreative texts, tactics, strategies and networks. It develops these through examples of manifestations of Net activism around one cluster of issues: support campaigns for refugees and asylum seekers.

  6. RMS active damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Scott, Michael A.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: RMS active damping augmentation; potential space station assembly benefits to CSI; LaRC/JSC bridge program; control law design process; draper RMS simulator; MIMO acceleration control laws improve damping; potential load reduction benefit; DRS modified to model distributed accelerations; accelerometer location; Space Shuttle aft cockpit simulator; simulated shuttle video displays; SES test goals and objectives; and SES modifications to support RMS active damping augmentation.

  7. Information Activities in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Takeyoshi

    The last few years have seen an explosive growth in database and computer networking activities in Australia. At present there are six major information networks in Australia, which carry more than 400 locally produced databases and many others from overseas. AUSINET databases are exemplified. MIDAS (Multi-mode International Data Aquisition System) provides lower cost access to overseas databases than before. The paper also gives brief outline of various bodies which relate to information and library policy in Australia and regional cooperative activities.

  8. RAVEN Quality Assurance Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cogliati, Joshua Joseph

    2015-09-01

    This report discusses the quality assurance activities needed to raise the Quality Level of Risk Analysis in a Virtual Environment (RAVEN) from Quality Level 3 to Quality Level 2. This report also describes the general RAVEN quality assurance activities. For improving the quality, reviews of code changes have been instituted, more parts of testing have been automated, and improved packaging has been created. For upgrading the quality level, requirements have been created and the workflow has been improved.

  9. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  10. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  11. Tinnitus activities treatment.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Richard S; Gogel, Stephanie A; Gehringer, Anne K

    2007-01-01

    Tinnitus Activities Treatment includes counseling of the whole person, and considers individual differences and needs. We consider four areas: thoughts and emotions, hearing and communication, sleep, and concentration. We typically use Partial Masking Sound Therapy, with a noise or music set to the lowest level that provides relief. A picture-based approach facilitates engagement of the patient, and provides thorough and structured counseling. We engage the patient by including homework and activities to demonstrate understanding and facilitate progress. PMID:17956807

  12. Phytase activity in lichens.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Niall F; Crittenden, Peter D

    2015-10-01

    Phytase activity was investigated in 13 lichen species using a novel assay method. The work tested the hypothesis that phytase is a component of the suite of surface-bound lichen enzymes that hydrolyse simple organic forms of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) deposited onto the thallus surface. Hydrolysis of inositol hexaphosphate (InsP6 , the substrate for phytase) and appearance of lower-order inositol phosphates (InsP5 -InsP1 ), the hydrolysis products, were measured by ion chromatography. Phytase activity in Evernia prunastri was compared among locations with contrasting rates of N deposition. Phytase activity was readily measurable in epiphytic lichens (e.g. 11.3 μmol InsP6 hydrolysed g(-1)  h(-1) in Bryoria fuscescens) but low in two terricolous species tested (Cladonia portentosa and Peltigera membranacea). Phytase and phosphomonoesterase activities were positively correlated amongst species. In E. prunastri both enzyme activities were promoted by N enrichment and phytase activity was readily released into thallus washings. InsP6 was not detected in tree canopy throughfall but was present in pollen leachate. Capacity to hydrolyse InsP6 appears widespread amongst lichens potentially promoting P capture from atmospheric deposits and plant leachates, and P cycling in forest canopies. The enzyme assay used here might find wider application in studies on plant root-fungal-soil systems.

  13. Physical activity and obesity.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, A

    1999-04-01

    The regular practice of physical activity promotes metabolic adaptations that facilitate the regulation of energy and fat balance. These effects are important for a better control of body weight in the obese individual and should enable him or her to involve adipose tissue to a lesser extent in this regulation. Physical activity favours a negative energy and fat balance, particularly if activities are prolonged and vigorous. The achievement of a negative energy and fat balance with physical activity also strongly depends on the nutritional context in which it is performed. In the long term, an active lifestyle and low-fat food habits are expected to induce a substantial body weight loss in the obese. This weight loss is progressively attenuated over time, presumably because of the decreased impact of a reduced adipose tissue mass on the regulation of energy and fat balance. For the obese individual complying with an activity programme and healthy food habits, a body weight loss of 10% is a realistic goal before the occurrence of resistance to further loss of body fat.

  14. ABB: active bandwidth broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kason; Law, Eddie

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we shall discuss a novel design on the policy-based management for the Internet. This design deploys the concept of active networking. As opposed to the traditional network design, active network empowers network node with the ability to manipulate data and program code in packets, and configure the network properties according to the needs of different applications. The policy-based management can control network routers in order to realize end-to-end Quality of Service (QoS), such as differentiated and integrated services, across the Internet. For the moment, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) has defined the framework of the policy-based management. It employs a simple client/server model that uses Common Open Policy Service (COPS) protocol to facilitate policy management and control. Our design of Active Bandwidth Broker (ABB) belongs to an active application. Our goals are to distribute centralized workload of the policy-based management over multiple active nodes in the active networks, introduce mobility of the bandwidth brokers, and allows load sharing to the policy-based management. This results a network-wide intelligent, highly available, and consistent QoS control that allows performance protection for voice, video and Internet business application while reducing costs for growing networks.

  15. Group V Secretory Phospholipase A2 Translocates to the Phagosome after Zymosan Stimulation of Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages and Regulates Phagocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Balestrieri, Barbara; Hsu, Victor W.; Gilbert, Huiya; Leslie, Christina C.; Han, Won K.; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Arm, Jonathan P.

    2006-01-01

    We have previously reported that group V secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) amplifies the action of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) α in regulating eicosanoid biosynthesis by mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with zymosan (Satake, Y., Diaz, B. L., Balestrieri, B., Lam, B. K., Kanaoka, Y., Grusby, M. J., and Arm, J. P. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 16488–16494). To further understand the role of group V sPLA2, we studied its localization in resting mouse peritoneal macrophages before and after stimulation with zymosan and the effect of deletion of the gene encoding group V sPLA2 on phagocytosis of zymosan. We report that group V sPLA2 is present in the Golgi apparatus and recycling endosome in the juxtanuclear region of resting peritoneal macrophages. Upon ingestion of zymosan by mouse peritoneal macrophages, group V sPLA2 is recruited to the phagosome. There it co-localizes with cPLA2α, 5-lipoxygenase, 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein, and leukotriene C4 synthase. Using immunostaining for the cysteinyl leukotrienes in carbodiimide-fixed cells, we show, for the first time, that the phagosome is a site of cysteinyl leukotriene formation. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages from group V sPLA2-null mice demonstrated a >50% attenuation in phagocytosis of zymosan particles, which was restored by adenoviral expression of group V sPLA2 but not group IIA sPLA2. These data demonstrate that group V sPLA2 contributes to the innate immune response both through regulation of eicosanoid generation in response to a phagocytic stimulus and also as a component of the phagocytic machinery. PMID:16407308

  16. Placenta growth factor augments airway hyperresponsiveness via leukotrienes and IL-13

    PubMed Central

    Eiymo Mwa Mpollo, Marthe-Sandrine; Brandt, Eric B.; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Arumugam, Paritha I.; Tiwari, Swati; Loberg, Anastacia; Pillis, Devin; Rizvi, Tilat; Lindsey, Mark; Jonck, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter; Kalra, Vijay K.; Le Cras, Timothy D.; Ratner, Nancy; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Hershey, Gurjit K. Khurana; Malik, Punam

    2015-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) affects 55%–77% of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and occurs even in the absence of asthma. While asthma increases SCD morbidity and mortality, the mechanisms underlying the high AHR prevalence in a hemoglobinopathy remain unknown. We hypothesized that placenta growth factor (PlGF), an erythroblast-secreted factor that is elevated in SCD, mediates AHR. In allergen-exposed mice, loss of Plgf dampened AHR, reduced inflammation and eosinophilia, and decreased expression of the Th2 cytokine IL-13 and the leukotriene-synthesizing enzymes 5-lipoxygenase and leukotriene-C4-synthase. Plgf–/– mice treated with leukotrienes phenocopied the WT response to allergen exposure; conversely, anti-PlGF Ab administration in WT animals blunted the AHR. Notably, Th2-mediated STAT6 activation further increased PlGF expression from lung epithelium, eosinophils, and macrophages, creating a PlGF/leukotriene/Th2-response positive feedback loop. Similarly, we found that the Th2 response in asthma patients is associated with increased expression of PlGF and its downstream genes in respiratory epithelial cells. In an SCD mouse model, we observed increased AHR and higher leukotriene levels that were abrogated by anti-PlGF Ab or the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton. Overall, our findings indicate that PlGF exacerbates AHR and uniquely links the leukotriene and Th2 pathways in asthma. These data also suggest that zileuton and anti-PlGF Ab could be promising therapies to reduce pulmonary morbidity in SCD. PMID:26690703

  17. Antimutagenic activity of spearmint.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian-Wei; Xu, Meirong; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2004-01-01

    The antimutagenic activity of spearmint (Mentha spicata), a popular food flavoring agent, was studied in the Salmonella assay. Spearmint leaves were brewed in hot water for 5 min at concentrations up to 5% (w/v), and the water extracts were tested against the direct-acting mutagens 4-nitro-1,2-phenylenediamine (NPD) and 2-hydroxyamino-3-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (N-OH-IQ) using Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98. Nontoxic concentrations of spearmint extract inhibited the mutagenic activity of N-OH-IQ in a concentration-dependent fashion, but had no effect against NPD. These experiments by design focused on the water extract consumed commonly as an herbal tea, but chloroform and methanol extracts of spearmint also possessed antimutagenic activity against N-OH-IQ. Water extract of spearmint inhibited the mutagenic activity of the parent compound, 2-amino-3-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), in the presence of rat liver S9; however, the concentration for 50% inhibition (IC50) against IQ was approximately 10-fold higher than in assays with N-OH-IQ minus S9. At concentrations similar to those used in the Salmonella assays, spearmint extract inhibited two of the major enzymes that play a role in the metabolic activation of IQ, namely, cytochromes P4501A1 and 1A2, based on ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and methoxyresorufin O-demethylase assays in vitro. In vivo, rats were given spearmint water extract (2%; w/v) as the sole source of drinking fluid before, during, and after 2-week treatment with IQ; colonic aberrant crypt foci were inhibited significantly at 8 weeks (P < 0.05, compared with rats given IQ alone). Collectively, these findings suggest that spearmint tea protects against IQ and possibly other heterocyclic amines through inhibition of carcinogen activation and via direct effects on the activated metabolite(s).

  18. Walkability and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Rodrigo Siqueira; Hino, Adriano Akira Ferreira; Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Kerr, Jacqueline; Hallal, Pedro Curi

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence from developing countries is limited on how income level for a given neighborhood is related to physical activity among its residents. Purpose The goal of the study was to examine the association between walkability and physical activity outcomes, and the effect of income on the relationship between walkability and physical activity in adults. Methods The Spaces for Physical Activity in Adults Study (ESPACOS Project) took place in Curitiba, Brazil. Data were collected in 2010 in 32 census tracts selected to vary in income and walkability, as measured by GIS. Participants were 697 individuals aged 18–65 years (52.0% were women) randomly sampled from the selected neighborhoods. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to measure physical activity. All analyses were conducted in 2012. Results The proportion of those who walked for transportation for ≥150 minutes/week was 21.1% in low-walkability areas, and ranged from 33.5% to 35.0% in high-walkability areas. A total of 12.6% of residents were found to walk for leisure for ≥150 minutes/week; this result did not vary across quadrants of walkability and income level. The prevalence of leisure-time moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was 7.1–10.5 percentage points higher in high-compared to low-walkability areas. After adjusting for all individual confounders, walkability showed an independent association with walking for transport (OR=2.10, 95% CI=1.31, 3.37, p=0.002) and leisure-time MVPA (OR=1.57; 95% CI=1.06, 2.32; p=0.024). Neighborhood income level was independently associated with leisure-time MVPA (OR=1.70; 95% CI=1.06, 2.74, p=0.029). No association was found between walkability and walking for leisure. No interaction was found between walkability and neighborhood income level. Conclusions This study, among adults living in Curitiba, Brazil, confirms findings from studies of high-income countries showing that walkability is positively associated with

  19. Mechanochemically Active Soft Robots.

    PubMed

    Gossweiler, Gregory R; Brown, Cameron L; Hewage, Gihan B; Sapiro-Gheiler, Eitan; Trautman, William J; Welshofer, Garrett W; Craig, Stephen L

    2015-10-14

    The functions of soft robotics are intimately tied to their form-channels and voids defined by an elastomeric superstructure that reversibly stores and releases mechanical energy to change shape, grip objects, and achieve complex motions. Here, we demonstrate that covalent polymer mechanochemistry provides a viable mechanism to convert the same mechanical potential energy used for actuation in soft robots into a mechanochromic, covalent chemical response. A bis-alkene functionalized spiropyran (SP) mechanophore is cured into a molded poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) soft robot walker and gripper. The stresses and strains necessary for SP activation are compatible with soft robot function. The color change associated with actuation suggests opportunities for not only new color changing or camouflaging strategies, but also the possibility for simultaneous activation of latent chemistry (e.g., release of small molecules, change in mechanical properties, activation of catalysts, etc.) in soft robots. In addition, mechanochromic stress mapping in a functional robotic device might provide a useful design and optimization tool, revealing spatial and temporal force evolution within the robot in a way that might be coupled to autonomous feedback loops that allow the robot to regulate its own activity. The demonstration motivates the simultaneous development of new combinations of mechanophores, materials, and soft, active devices for enhanced functionality.

  20. Photon-activation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) is a technique in which radiation dose to tumor is enhanced via introduction of stable /sup 127/I in the form of iodinated deoxyuridine (IdUrd). Stimulation of cytotoxic effects from IdUrd is accomplished by activation with external (or implanted) radiation sources. Thus, accumulations of this nucleoside in actively competing cellpools do not preclude therapy in so far as such tissues can be excluded from the radiation field. Calculations show that 5% replacement of thymidine (Tyd) in tumor DNA should enhance the biological effectiveness of a given photon radiotherapy dose by a factor of approx. 3. Proportionally higher gains would result from higher replacements of Tyd and IdUrd. In addition, biological response is enhanced by chemical sensitization with IdUrd. The data indicate that damage from photon activation as well as chemical sensitization does not repair. Thus, at low dose rates, a further increase in therapeutic gain should accrue as normal tissues are allowed to repair and regenerate. A samarium-145 source has been developed for PAT, with activating x-ray energies of from 38 to 45 keV. Favorable clinical results can be expected through the use of IdUrd and protracted irradiations with low energy x-rays. In particular, PAT may provide unique advantages at selected sites such as brain, or head and neck tumors. (ERB)

  1. Mechanochemically Active Soft Robots.

    PubMed

    Gossweiler, Gregory R; Brown, Cameron L; Hewage, Gihan B; Sapiro-Gheiler, Eitan; Trautman, William J; Welshofer, Garrett W; Craig, Stephen L

    2015-10-14

    The functions of soft robotics are intimately tied to their form-channels and voids defined by an elastomeric superstructure that reversibly stores and releases mechanical energy to change shape, grip objects, and achieve complex motions. Here, we demonstrate that covalent polymer mechanochemistry provides a viable mechanism to convert the same mechanical potential energy used for actuation in soft robots into a mechanochromic, covalent chemical response. A bis-alkene functionalized spiropyran (SP) mechanophore is cured into a molded poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) soft robot walker and gripper. The stresses and strains necessary for SP activation are compatible with soft robot function. The color change associated with actuation suggests opportunities for not only new color changing or camouflaging strategies, but also the possibility for simultaneous activation of latent chemistry (e.g., release of small molecules, change in mechanical properties, activation of catalysts, etc.) in soft robots. In addition, mechanochromic stress mapping in a functional robotic device might provide a useful design and optimization tool, revealing spatial and temporal force evolution within the robot in a way that might be coupled to autonomous feedback loops that allow the robot to regulate its own activity. The demonstration motivates the simultaneous development of new combinations of mechanophores, materials, and soft, active devices for enhanced functionality. PMID:26390078

  2. Prenucleosomes and Active Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Khuong, Mai T.; Fei, Jia; Ishii, Haruhiko; Kadonaga, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin consists of nucleosomes as well as nonnucleosomal histone-containing particles. Here we describe the prenucleosome, which is a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome that associates with ~80 bp DNA. Prenucleosomes are formed rapidly upon the deposition of histones onto DNA and can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by an ATP-driven chromatin assembly factor such as ACF. Different lines of evidence reveal that there are prenucleosome-sized DNA-containing particles with histones in the upstream region of active promoters. Moreover, p300 acetylates histone H3K56 in prenucleosomes but not in nucleosomes, and H3K56 acetylation is found at active promoters and enhancers. These findings therefore suggest that there may be prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles in the upstream region of active promoters. More generally, we postulate that prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles are present at dynamic chromatin, whereas canonical nucleosomes are at static chromatin. PMID:26767995

  3. [Physical activity and obesity].

    PubMed

    Winkler, S; Hebestreit, A; Ahrens, W

    2012-01-01

    One reason for the high prevalence of overweight and obesity might be the differences in lifestyle compared to earlier decades, called the "obesogenic environment." With this, the decline in physical activity (PA) in favor of a sedentary lifestyle is assumed to play an important role. Physical activity or inactivity has a major impact on the development of overweight and obesity as well as on certain metabolic disorders. This review summarizes current scientific knowledge regarding the association between PA and overweight/obesity. The term "physical activity" is defined and different methods of its assessment are introduced. In addition, certain methods for the evaluation/operationalization of collected PA data are described. Finally, some epidemiological studies dealing with the associations between PA and overweight/obesity in children/adolescents as well as in adults are presented.

  4. Shared Activity Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley J.; Barrett, Anthony C.

    2003-01-01

    Interacting agents that interleave planning and execution must reach consensus on their commitments to each other. In domains where agents have varying degrees of interaction and different constraints on communication and computation, agents will require different coordination protocols in order to efficiently reach consensus in real time. We briefly describe a largely unexplored class of real-time, distributed planning problems (inspired by interacting spacecraft missions), new challenges they pose, and a general approach to solving the problems. These problems involve self-interested agents that have infrequent communication but collaborate on joint activities. We describe a Shared Activity Coordination (SHAC) framework that provides a decentralized algorithm for negotiating the scheduling of shared activities in a dynamic environment, a soft, real-time approach to reaching consensus during execution with limited communication, and a foundation for customizing protocols for negotiating planner interactions. We apply SHAC to a realistic simulation of interacting Mars missions and illustrate the simplicity of protocol development.

  5. Stochastic optical active rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Shin, Yongdae; Kim, Sun Taek; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Lang, Matthew J.

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a stochastic based method for performing active rheology using optical tweezers. By monitoring the displacement of an embedded particle in response to stochastic optical forces, a rapid estimate of the frequency dependent shear moduli of a sample is achieved in the range of 10-1-103 Hz. We utilize the method to probe linear viscoelastic properties of hydrogels at varied cross-linker concentrations. Combined with fluorescence imaging, our method demonstrates non-linear changes of bond strength between T cell receptors and an antigenic peptide due to force-induced cell activation.

  6. SCOR announces new activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Edward R., Jr.

    Roger Revelle had many good ideas during his long and productive career. One of them came to fruition in 1957 in the form of the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR), which the International Council for Science created as its first interdisciplinary body, to promote international activities in oceanography. Revelle served as SCOR's first president from 1957 to 1960. SCOR offers opportunities for scientists from different countries to cooperate in planning and executing international programs in ocean sciences. Over its 44 years in existence, SCOR has sponsored 120 working groups and has actively participated in many of the major international oceanographic projects. Thirty-six nations presently participate as SCOR members.

  7. Active cleaning technique device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a laboratory demonstration model of an active cleaning technique (ACT) device. The principle of this device is based primarily on the technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces. This active cleaning technique involves exposing contaminated surfaces to a plasma containing atomic oxygen or combinations of other reactive gases. The ACT device laboratory demonstration model incorporates, in addition to plasma cleaning, the means to operate the device as an ion source for sputtering experiments. The overall ACT device includes a plasma generation tube, an ion accelerator, a gas supply system, a RF power supply and a high voltage dc power supply.

  8. Cosmogenic activation of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Amare, J.; Beltran, B.; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrian, S.; Garcia, E.; Irastorza, I.G.; Gomez, H.; Luzon, G.; Martinez, M.; Morales, J.; Ortiz de Solorzano, A.; Pobes, C.; Puimedon, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Torres, L.; Villar, J.A.; Capelli, S.; Capozzi, F.

    2005-09-08

    The problem of cosmogenic activation produced at sea level in materials typically used in underground experiments looking for rare events is being studied. Several nuclear data libraries have been screened looking for relevant isotope production cross-sections and different codes which can be applied to activation studies have been reviewed. The excitation functions for some problems of interest like production of 60Co and 68Ge in germanium and production of 60Co in tellurium have been obtained taking into account both measurements and calculations and a preliminary estimate of the corresponding rates of production at sea level has been performed.

  9. Optical activity and evolution.

    PubMed

    Khasanov, M M; Gladyshev, G P

    1980-09-01

    It is noted that the chemical reactions occurring in rarefied cosmic clouds (molecular concentration less than or approximately to 10(2) cm-3) differ from similar laboratory reactions by the much greater effect on the outcome of external force fields. In this light it is hypothesized that the synthesis of optically active substances may occur in the outer space under the conjoint stereospecific effect of a magnetic and other molecule-orienting field. It is further conjectured that the optically active substances of the Solar System had been produced in the course of its formation out of the primal rarefield cloud.

  10. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  11. Inflammasomes and Their Activation

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Sonal; Luc, Nancy; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The innate immune system relies on the recognition of pathogens by pattern recognition receptors as a first line of defense and to initiate the adaptive immune response. Substantial progress has been made in defining the role of Nod (nucleotide-binding oligimerization domain)-like receptors and AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2) as pattern recognition receptors that activate inflammasomes in macrophages. Inflammasomes are protein platforms essential for the activation of inflammatory caspases and subsequent maturation of their pro-inflammatory cytokine substrates and induction of pyroptosis. This paper summarizes recent developments regarding the function of Nod-like receptors in immunity and disease. PMID:21083527

  12. Space construction activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Center for Space Construction at the University of Colorado at Boulder was established in 1988 as a University Space Engineering Research Center. The mission of the Center is to conduct interdisciplinary engineering research which is critical to the construction of future space structures and systems and to educate students who will have the vision and technical skills to successfully lead future space construction activities. The research activities are currently organized around two central projects: Orbital Construction and Lunar Construction. Summaries of the research projects are included.

  13. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  14. [Adolescents' physical activity].

    PubMed

    Pagaeva, E K; Misho, P -A; Zhanin, A; Chanturishvili, T P; Pagaeva, K I

    2006-01-01

    The paper defines the parameters reflecting the physical activity of adolescents and their correlation with health and a risk of behavioral disorders, bad habits, and cravings. A total of 9499 Georgian adolescents aged 14-18 years, the senior (9th-llth-form) pupils, selected through two-step cluster sampling were surveyed. The pupils anonymously filled in special questionnaires. This yielded the parameters reflecting the intensity of physical activity of the adolescents and the latter's going in for sports. The parameters were shown to have a beneficial effect on health, including mental health, and on the magnitude of unhealthy behavior.

  15. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  16. Active-bridge oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2001-01-01

    An active bridge oscillator is formed from a differential amplifier where positive feedback is a function of the impedance of one of the gain elements and a relatively low value common emitter resistance. This use of the nonlinear transistor parameter h stabilizes the output and eliminates the need for ALC circuits common to other bridge oscillators.

  17. Antifungal activity of diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Allerberger, F; Reisinger, E C; Söldner, B; Dierich, M P

    1989-10-01

    Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DTC) was evaluated for its ability to combat four different species of fungi in vitro. Using a microtiter-broth-dilution method we were able to demonstrate an antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus and Mucor mucedo in doses achievable by intravenous administration in man.

  18. Activities of the ILO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labour Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the Workers' Education Branch of the ILO (International Labour Organisation), which has been developing workers' education activities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America for the purpose of assisting rural workers' organizations in identifying and developing plans to overcome their own major organizational and financial problems. (CT)

  19. Activities of the ILO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enevoldsen, Niels; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A series of articles reviews educational activities of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), including international seminars on workers' education, a study of women workers, trade union training courses at the ILO Turin Centre, and the importance of information dissemination to trade unions. (SK)

  20. Valuing Families. Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glashagel, Jerry; Glashagel, Char

    Developed as a resource for family life education, this activity guide can be used to lead experiential learning situations for intergenerational groups by a counselor, in a course, in a family organization like the YMCA, or in the home. The goals of this guide are to increase the self-esteem of each person and to strengthen the family as a human…

  1. Classroom Speaking Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuying, Yang

    1999-01-01

    Because most language teaching in China is focused on national tests, language is treated as a knowledge subject and development of communicative abilities is often ignored. This article describes activities that one English-as-a-Foreign-Language teacher used to teach oral English to university students in China. (Author/VWL)

  2. Ocean Drilling Simulation Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telese, James A.; Jordan, Kathy

    The Ocean Drilling Project brings together scientists and governments from 20 countries to explore the earth's structure and history as it is revealed beneath the oceans' basins. Scientific expeditions examine rock and sediment cores obtained from the ocean floor to learn about the earth's basic processes. The series of activities in this…

  3. Physical Education Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Letty P.

    1978-01-01

    Described are three physical activity games designed to help young children develop a sense of mastery over their bodies: (which will in turn improve their self concepts): a poem to be acted out, Simon Says, and a story play to be acted out. (DLS)

  4. Sexual activity and aging.

    PubMed

    Ni Lochlainn, Mary; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2013-08-01

    Sexuality is an important component of emotional and physical intimacy that men and women experience throughout their lives. Research suggesting that a high proportion of men and women remain sexually active well into later life refutes the prevailing myth that aging and sexual dysfunction are inexorably linked. Age-related physiological changes do not render a meaningful sexual relationship impossible or even necessarily difficult. Many of these physiological changes are modifiable. There are various therapeutic options available to patients to achieve maximum sexual capacity in old age. This article reviews the prevalence of sexual activity among older adults, the problems these adults encounter with sexual activity, and the role of the health care professional in addressing these problems. The physiological sex-related changes that occur as part of the normal aging process in men and women are reviewed, as well as the effect of age-related physical and psychological illness on sexual function. The attitudes and perceptions of the media and general public toward sexual activity and aging are summarized. An understanding of the sexual changes that accompany the aging process may help general practitioners and other doctors to give practical and useful advice on sexuality as well as refute the misconception that aging equates to celibacy. A thorough awareness of this aspect of older people's quality of life can raise meaningful expectations for aging patients. PMID:23540950

  5. Discovering Columbus: Classroom Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulden, Rick

    1992-01-01

    Presents learning activities concerning Christopher Columbus and his voyages. Includes lessons requiring students to (1) write a pledge of allegiance to the world; (2) examine the Americas before Columbus; (3) prepare a newscast on Columbus' arrival in the Americas; (4) imagine being a Native American encountering Columbus; and (5) explore what…

  6. Nutrition. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Carolyn

    This learning activity package on nutrition is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, a list of definitions, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics are…

  7. Highlights of 1978 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    General highlights of NASA's activities for 1978 are presented. The highlights are categorized into topics such as space science, space transportation systems, space and terrestrial applications, environment, technology utilization, aeronautics, space research and technology, energy programs, and international. A list of the 1978 launches including: (1) launch date; (2) payload designation; (3) launch vehicle; (4) launch site and (5) mission remarks is also presented.

  8. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  9. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  10. Activating silent argonautes.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Mary Anne; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2013-07-01

    Multiple Argonaute proteins are implicated in gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi), but only one is known to be an endonuclease that can cleave target mRNAs. Chimeric Argonaute proteins now reveal an unexpected mechanism by which mutations distal to the catalytic center can unmask intrinsic catalytic activity, results hinting at structurally mediated regulation. PMID:23984440

  11. Highlights of 1976 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.

    1976-01-01

    Highlights of NASA's 1976 activities are summarized. Sixteen successful launches were made. Two landings of Viking spacecraft on Mars and rollout of the space shuttle orbiter are reviewed. Applications of aerospace science to education, health care, and community services are also discussed.

  12. Educating for Political Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitty, Clyde

    2010-01-01

    The term "political activity" can be interpreted in a myriad of different ways, but in this paper, it is taken to mean involvement in a variety of campaigns around issues affecting the way we live and the sort of society we want to live in. At a time when support for the main political parties has never been weaker, it is essential that teachers…

  13. Geology: The Active Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Geology: The Active Earth." Contents are organized into the following…

  14. Environmental Chemistry Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackland, Thomas; And Others

    The authors of this curriculum supplement believe in a laboratory approach to chemistry and express the feeling that environmental chemistry provides the students an opportunity to apply theoretical chemistry to important practical problems. There are eighteen activities presented, each accompanied with behavioral objectives, one or more suggested…

  15. Regional Activities Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library network activities in Canada, the Third World, Japan, Malaysia, Brazil, and Sweden which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Canada: A Voluntary and Flexible Network," a review by Guy Sylvestre of the political, social, and economic structures affecting…

  16. Classification of Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Paulino, Thiago Marques Luz; Zaharieva, Dessi P.; Yavelberg, Loren; Jamnik, Veronica; Riddell, Michael C.; Cinar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity has a wide range of effects on glucose concentrations in type 1 diabetes (T1D) depending on the type (ie, aerobic, anaerobic, mixed) and duration of activity performed. This variability in glucose responses to physical activity makes the development of artificial pancreas (AP) systems challenging. Automatic detection of exercise type and intensity, and its classification as aerobic or anaerobic would provide valuable information to AP control algorithms. This can be achieved by using a multivariable AP approach where biometric variables are measured and reported to the AP at high frequency. We developed a classification system that identifies, in real time, the exercise intensity and its reliance on aerobic or anaerobic metabolism and tested this approach using clinical data collected from 5 persons with T1D and 3 individuals without T1D in a controlled laboratory setting using a variety of common types of physical activity. The classifier had an average sensitivity of 98.7% for physiological data collected over a range of exercise modalities and intensities in these subjects. The classifier will be added as a new module to the integrated multivariable adaptive AP system to enable the detection of aerobic and anaerobic exercise for enhancing the accuracy of insulin infusion strategies during and after exercise. PMID:26443291

  17. Physical Activities for Preschool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkins, Dorothy C.; And Others

    The underlying premise of the University of Hawaii Physical Activities for Preschool curriculum is that important contributions to a positive self-concept are made by motor independence and a realistic body image. Program objectives include: (1) the development of strength, endurance, and flexibility in skills that involve the muscles,…

  18. Shark Tagging Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current: The Journal of Marine Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    In this group activity, children learn about the purpose of tagging and how scientists tag a shark. Using a cut-out of a shark, students identify, measure, record data, read coordinates, and tag a shark. Includes introductory information about the purpose of tagging and the procedure, a data sheet showing original tagging data from Tampa Bay, and…

  19. Communication Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This communication systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 32 modules on the following topics: story…

  20. Activity: Computer Talk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students create a computer program capable of recording and projecting paper use at school. Includes instructional strategies and background information such as requirements for pounds of paper/tree, energy needs, water consumption, and paper value at the recycling center. A sample program is included. (DH)

  1. Grooming. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Pamela

    This learning activity package on grooming for health workers is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics are…

  2. Dissemination Activities Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Hanna; Batatia, Hudj; Bauters, Merja; Ben Ami, Zvi; Drachman, Raul; Flouris, Giorgos; Jadin, Tanja; Jalonen, Satu; Karlgren, Klas; Karpati, Andrea; Kotzinos, Dimitris; Lakkala, Minna; Lallimo, Jiri; Moen, Anne; Nygard, Kathrine; Paavola, Sami; Padiglia, Sheila; Scapolla, Marina; Sins, Patrick; Vasileva, Tania

    2008-01-01

    In the first 24 months of the project, KP-Lab members were highly dedicated to dissemination and were engaged in various dissemination activities that contributed to the prime objective of the KP-Lab dissemination efforts which is "to make the project widely known to a variety of prospective users and, at a later stage, to promote the…

  3. Engineers and Active Responsibility.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Udo

    2015-08-01

    Knowing that technologies are inherently value-laden and systemically interwoven with society, the question is how individual engineers can take up the challenge of accepting the responsibility for their work? This paper will argue that engineers have no institutional structure at the level of society that allows them to recognize, reflect upon, and actively integrate the value-laden character of their designs. Instead, engineers have to tap on the different institutional realms of market, science, and state, making their work a 'hybrid' activity combining elements from the different institutional realms. To deal with this institutional hybridity, engineers develop routines and heuristics in their professional network, which do not allow societal values to be expressed in a satisfactory manner. To allow forms of 'active' responsibility, there have to be so-called 'accountability forums' that guide moral reflections of individual actors. The paper will subsequently look at the methodologies of value-sensitive design (VSD) and constructive technology assessment (CTA) and explore whether and how these methodologies allow engineers to integrate societal values into the design technological artifacts and systems. As VSD and CTA are methodologies that look at the process of technological design, whereas the focus of this paper is on the designer, they can only be used indirectly, namely as frameworks which help to identify the contours of a framework for active responsibility of engineers.

  4. TI-73 Calculator Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips-Bey, Carol K.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes TI-73 calculator activities appropriate for middle school students. It was found that the use of the calculator allowed for higher-level thinking and a richer exploration of mathematical ideas by students. [Included with this article are "Dice Roll Worksheet" and "Transforming Tree Worksheet".] (Contains 9 figures.)

  5. 85 Engaging Movement Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weikart, Phyllis S.; Carlton, Elizabeth B.

    This book presents activities to keep K-6 students moving in a variety of ways as they learn. The movement experiences are planned around key curriculum concepts in movement and music as well as in academic curriculum areas. The experiences develop students' basic timing, language abilities, vocabulary, concentration, planning skills, and…

  6. Bonus Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Elementary level activity book presents suggestions for teaching students about endangered and threatened species worldwide. Students learn about what is causing the rapid extinction rate and what needs to be done. They also discover the value of rainforests and why conservationists are fighting to save them. (SM)

  7. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  8. Earthfest. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weilbacher, Mike

    1991-01-01

    An activity book to help elementary teachers and students explore the environment offers information and questions about spaceships; an ecology primer and poster with questions; information on animal adaptation with poster and questions; ecological and dramatic arts projects; a script for performance; and suggestions to make Earth Day celebrations…

  9. Antimalarial activity of cedronin.

    PubMed

    Moretti, C; Deharo, E; Sauvain, M; Jardel, C; David, P T; Gasquet, M

    1994-06-01

    Cedronin was isolated from Simaba cedron Planchon (Simaroubaceae), a species popularly believed in South America to have antimalarial properties. It was examined for in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activities and for cytotoxicity against KB cells. Experimental results showed that cedronin was active against chloroquine-sensitive and resistant strain, with an IC50 of 0.25 micrograms/ml (0.65 mumol/ml). It was also found to be active in vivo against Plasmodium vinkei with an IC50 of 1.8 mg/kg (4.7 nM/kg) in the classic 4-day test. Cedronin belongs to the small group of quassinoids with a C19 basic skeleton and shows a rather low cytotoxicity against KB cells (IC50 = 4 micrograms/ml, 10.4 microM) as compared with C20 biologically active quassinoids; however its toxic/therapeutic ratio (10/1.8) remains lower than chloroquine (10/0.5).

  10. Active rejector filter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchinskii, A.G.; Pirogov, S.G.; Savchenko, V.M.; Yakushev, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes an active rejector filter for suppressing noise signals in the frequency range 50-100 Hz and for extracting a vlf information signal. The filter has the following characteristics: a high input impedance, a resonant frequency of 75 Hz, a Q of 1.25, and an attenuation factor of 53 dB at resonant frequency.

  11. [Problem Solving Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ. - Stout, Menomonie. Center for Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    The teacher directed problem solving activities package contains 17 units: Future Community Design, Let's Build an Elevator, Let's Construct a Catapult, Let's Design a Recreational Game, Let's Make a Hand Fishing Reel, Let's Make a Wall Hanging, Let's Make a Yo-Yo, Marooned in the Past, Metrication, Mousetrap Vehicles, The Multi System…

  12. Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2012-04-01

    Commission 10 of the International Astronomical Union has more than 650 members who study a wide range of activity phenomena produced by our nearest star, the Sun. Solar activity is intrinsically related to solar magnetic fields and encompasses events from the smallest energy releases (nano- or even picoflares) to the largest eruptions in the Solar System, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which propagate into the Heliosphere reaching the Earth and beyond. Solar activity is manifested in the appearance of sunspot groups or active regions, which are the principal sources of activity phenomena from the emergence of their magnetic flux through their dispersion and decay. The period 2008-2009 saw an unanticipated extended solar cycle minimum and unprecedentedly weak polar-cap and heliospheric field. Associated with that was the 2009 historical maximum in galactic cosmic rays flux since measurements begun in the middle of the 20th Century. Since then Cycle 24 has re-started solar activity producing some spectacular eruptions observed with a fleet of spacecraft and ground-based facilities. In the last triennium major advances in our knowledge and understanding of solar activity were due to continuing success of space missions as SOHO, Hinode, RHESSI and the twin STEREO spacecraft, further enriched by the breathtaking images of the solar atmosphere produced by the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) launched on 11 February 2010 in the framework of NASA's Living with a Star program. In August 2012, at the time of the IAU General Assembly in Beijing when the mandate of this Commission ends, we will be in the unique position to have for the first time a full 3-D view of the Sun and solar activity phenomena provided by the twin STEREO missions about 120 degrees behind and ahead of Earth and other spacecraft around the Earth and ground-based observatories. These new observational insights are continuously posing new questions, inspiring and advancing theoretical analysis and

  13. Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerantzis, Nikolaos; Mitrouda, Aikaterini; Reizopoulou, Ioanna; Sidiropoulou, Eirini; Hatzidimitriou, Antonios

    2016-04-01

    On November 9th, 2015, three didactical hours were dedicated to Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities (http://wp.me/p6Hte2-1I). Our students and their teachers formed three groups and in rotation, were engaged with the following activities: (a) viewing unique images of the Cosmos in the mobile planetarium STARLAB (http://www.planitario.gr/tholos-starlab-classic-standard.html), (b) watching the following videos: Journey to the end of the universe (https://youtu.be/Ufl_Nwbl8xs), Rosetta update (https://youtu.be/nQ9ivd7wv30), The Solar System (https://youtu.be/d66dsagrTa0), Ambition the film (https://youtu.be/H08tGjXNHO4) in the school's library. Students and teachers were informed about our solar system, the Rosetta mission, the universe, etc. and (c) tactile activities such as Meet our home and Meet our neighbors (http://astroedu.iau.org, http://nuclio.org/astroneighbours/resources) and the creation of planets' 3D models (Geology-Geography A' Class Student's book, pg.15). With the activities above we had the pleasure to join the Cosmic Light Edu Kit / International Year of Light 2015 program. After our Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities, we did a "small" research: our students had to fill an evaluation about their educational gains and the results can be found here http://wp.me/p6Hte2-2q. Moreover, we discussed about Big Ideas of Science (http://wp.me/p3oRiZ-dm) and through the "big" impact of the Rosetta mission & the infinity of our universe, we print posters with relevant topics and place them to the classrooms. We thank Rosa Doran (Nuclio - President of the Executive Council) for her continuous assistance and support on innovative science teaching proposals. She is an inspiration.

  14. Asteroseismic stellar activity relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, A.; Corsaro, E.; Karoff, C.

    2014-11-01

    Context. In asteroseismology an important diagnostic of the evolutionary status of a star is the small frequency separation which is sensitive to the gradient of the mean molecular weight in the stellar interior. It is thus interesting to discuss the classical age-activity relations in terms of this quantity. Moreover, as the photospheric magnetic field tends to suppress the amplitudes of acoustic oscillations, it is important to quantify the importance of this effect by considering various activity indicators. Aims: We propose a new class of age-activity relations that connects the Mt. Wilson S index and the average scatter in the light curve with the small frequency separation and the amplitude of the p-mode oscillations. Methods: We used a Bayesian inference to compute the posterior probability of various empirical laws for a sample of 19 solar-like active stars observed by the Kepler telescope. Results: We demonstrate the presence of a clear correlation between the Mt. Wilson S index and the relative age of the stars as indicated by the small frequency separation, as well as an anti-correlation between the S index and the oscillation amplitudes. We argue that the average activity level of the stars shows a stronger correlation with the small frequency separation than with the absolute age that is often considered in the literature. Conclusions: The phenomenological laws discovered in this paper have the potential to become new important diagnostics to link stellar evolution theory with the dynamics of global magnetic fields. In particular we argue that the relation between the Mt. Wilson S index and the oscillation amplitudes is in good agreement with the findings of direct numerical simulations of magneto-convection.

  15. Is Enhanced Physical Activity Possible Using Active Videogames?

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Tom; Baranowski, Janice; O'Connor, Teresia; Lu, Amy Shirong; Thompson, Debbe

    2012-06-01

    Our research indicated that 10-12-year-old children receiving two active Wii(™) (Nintendo(®); Nintendo of America, Inc., Redmond, WA) console videogames were no more physically active than children receiving two inactive videogames. Research is needed on how active videogames may increase physical activity.

  16. 101 Environmental Education Activities. Booklet 6--Social Studies Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Helen, Comp.

    Based on the environment and directed at elementary and intermediate level students, 5 field trips are a significant part of the 12 social studies activities in the sixth booklet by the Upper Mississippi River ECO-Center outlining environmental and outdoor education activities. Most of the activities include objectives, activity description,…

  17. Is Enhanced Physical Activity Possible Using Active Videogames?

    PubMed Central

    Baranowski, Janice; O'Connor, Teresia; Lu, Amy Shirong; Thompson, Debbe

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Our research indicated that 10–12-year-old children receiving two active Wii™ (Nintendo®; Nintendo of America, Inc., Redmond, WA) console videogames were no more physically active than children receiving two inactive videogames. Research is needed on how active videogames may increase physical activity. PMID:24416640

  18. Integration of Active Video Games in Extracurricular Activity at Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jung Eun; Huang, Charles; Pope, Zachary; Gao, Zan

    2015-01-01

    Active video games require players to be physically active. Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) is an interactive dancing game that requires fast-foot movement coordinated with energetic music and visuals. The Wii and Xbox Kinect games have also become good active video games for the promotion of physical activity participation. These games are much more…

  19. Myofilament length dependent activation

    SciTech Connect

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Mateja, Ryan D.; Tachampa, Kittipong; Mou, Younss Ait; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.

    2010-05-25

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca{sup 2+} ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the 'Frank-Starling law of the heart' constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  20. Sulfur activation in Hiroshima

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Pace, J.V. III

    1987-01-01

    In 1979, we attempted to establish the validity of source terms for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs using experimental data on sulfur activation. Close agreement was observed between measured and calculated values for test firings of Nagasaki-type bombs. The calculated values were based on source terms developed by W.E. Preeg at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A discrepancy was found, however, when we compared calculated values for the two bombs because a 1956 report by R.R. Wilson stated that sulfur acitvation by fast neutrons in Hiroshima was approximately three times greater than in Nagasaki. Our calculations based on Preeg's source-term data predicted about equal sulfur activation in the two cities.

  1. LANSCE Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Amy Robinson; Audrey Archuleta; Barbara Maes; Dan Strottman; Earl Hoffman; Garth Tietjen; Gene Farnum; Geoff Greene; Joyce Roberts; Ken Johnson; Paul Lewis; Roger Pynn; Stan Schriber; Steve Sterbenz; Steve Wender; Sue Harper

    1999-02-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Activity Report describes scientific and technological progress and achievements in LANSCE Division during the period of 1995 to 1998. This report includes a message from the Division Director, an overview of LANSCE, sponsor overviews, research highlights, advanced projects and facility upgrades achievements, experimental and user program accomplishments, news and events, and a list of publications. The research highlights cover the areas of condensed-matter science and engineering, accelerator science, nuclear science, and radiography. This report also contains a compact disk that includes an overview, the Activity Report itself, LANSCE operations progress reports for 1996 and 1997, experiment reports from LANSCE users, as well as a search capability.

  2. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  3. Active region seismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, Tom; Braun, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    Active region seismology is concerned with the determination and interpretation of the interaction of the solar acoustic oscillations with near-surface target structures, such as magnetic flux concentration, sunspots, and plage. Recent observations made with a high spatial resolution and a long temporal duration enabled measurements of the scattering matrix for sunspots and solar active regions to be carried out as a function of the mode properties. Based on this information, the amount of p-mode absorption, partial-wave phase shift, and mode mixing introduced by the sunspot, could be determined. In addition, the possibility of detecting the presence of completely submerged magnetic fields was raised, and new procedures for performing acoustic holography of the solar interior are being developed. The accumulating evidence points to the mode conversion of p-modes to various magneto-atmospheric waves within the magnetic flux concentration as being the unifying physical mechanism responsible for these diverse phenomena.

  4. Finsler Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Melonakos, John; Pichon, Eric; Angenent, Sigurd; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an image segmentation technique based on augmenting the conformal (or geodesic) active contour framework with directional information. In the isotropic case, the euclidean metric is locally multiplied by a scalar conformal factor based on image information such that the weighted length of curves lying on points of interest (typically edges) is small. The conformal factor that is chosen depends only upon position and is in this sense isotropic. Although directional information has been studied previously for other segmentation frameworks, here, we show that if one desires to add directionality in the conformal active contour framework, then one gets a well-defined minimization problem in the case that the factor defines a Finsler metric. Optimal curves may be obtained using the calculus of variations or dynamic programming-based schemes. Finally, we demonstrate the technique by extracting roads from aerial imagery, blood vessels from medical angiograms, and neural tracts from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imagery. PMID:18195436

  5. Active gel physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prost, J.; Jülicher, F.; Joanny, J.-F.

    2015-02-01

    The mechanical behaviour of cells is largely controlled by a structure that is fundamentally out of thermodynamic equilibrium: a network of crosslinked filaments subjected to the action of energy-transducing molecular motors. The study of this kind of active system was absent from conventional physics and there was a need for both new theories and new experiments. The field that has emerged in recent years to fill this gap is underpinned by a theory that takes into account the transduction of chemical energy on the molecular scale. This formalism has advanced our understanding of living systems, but it has also had an impact on research in physics per se. Here, we describe this developing field, its relevance to biology, the novelty it conveys to other areas of physics and some of the challenges in store for the future of active gel physics.

  6. Endocrine activation in tachycardias.

    PubMed

    Lukac, P; Lukacova, S; Vigas, M; Hatala, R

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the complex character of neuroendocrine response to paroxysmal tachycardia. While the endocrine influences in arrhythmogenesis are well perceived by the cardiologists, less attention has been paid to influence of tachycardia on neuroendocrine activation. However, this may significantly alter the clinical course of tachycardias and its responses to pharmacotherapeutic interventions. Main characteristics of hormones with direct relationship to cardiovascular system (ANP, AVP, catecholamines, angiotensin and others) are listed with description of regulation of their secretion and main biological effects, especially with regard to regulation of circulation. Changes in hemodynamics during tachycardia with accompanying changes in ANP, AVP renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympatho-neural and sympatho-adrenal activation are reviewed. Further research and understanding require more complex approach and concentration on interrelationship of different regulatory hormones in tachycardia. (Fig. 2, Ref. 96.) PMID:11763674

  7. Apheresis activity in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, Christiane

    2005-07-01

    Interest for apheresis activity has been growing in Venezuela. In 1976 there were only a few devices; in 2003, 80 apheresis machines performed 27,675 donor apheresis procedures and 547 therapeutic procedures countrywide. We report the activity at the Metropolitan Blood Bank (the largest one of the country) in the period 1999-2003: 597 therapeutic procedures were performed in 171 patients, during 212 crisis episodes. The average age was 38 +/- 16 years, 65% male and 35% female. Most of the therapeutic procedures were therapeutic plasma exchange for hematology diseases (mainly thrombotic thrombocitopenic purpura and hemophilia inhibitors), including 184 therapeutic procedures with the Autopheresis-C (Baxter Healthcare Corp., Deerfield, IL). Most common adverse effects (3.9%) were hypotension and allergic reactions to the plasma.

  8. The Structure of Human 15-Lipoxygenase-2 with a Substrate Mimic*

    PubMed Central

    Kobe, Matthew J.; Neau, David B.; Mitchell, Caitlin E.; Bartlett, Sue G.; Newcomer, Marcia E.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is associated with chronic inflammation occurring over decades. The enzyme 15-lipoxygenase-2 (15-LOX-2) is highly expressed in large atherosclerotic plaques, and its activity has been linked to the progression of macrophages to the lipid-laden foam cells present in atherosclerotic plaques. We report here the crystal structure of human 15-LOX-2 in complex with an inhibitor that appears to bind as a substrate mimic. 15-LOX-2 contains a long loop, composed of hydrophobic amino acids, which projects from the amino-terminal membrane-binding domain. The loop is flanked by two Ca2+-binding sites that confer Ca2+-dependent membrane binding. A comparison of the human 15-LOX-2 and 5-LOX structures reveals similarities at the active sites, as well striking differences that can be exploited for design of isoform-selective inhibitors. PMID:24497644

  9. Phloroglucinol and Terpenoid Derivatives from Hypericum cistifolium and H. galioides (Hypericaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Crockett, Sara L.; Kunert, Olaf; Pferschy-Wenzig, Eva-Maria; Jacob, Melissa; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Bauer, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    A new simple phloroglucinol derivative characterized as 1-(6-hydroxy-2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-methyl-1-propanone (1) was isolated from Hypericum cistifolium (Hypericaceae) as a major constituent of the non-polar plant extract. Minor amounts of this new compound, in addition to two known structurally related phloroglucinol derivatives (2 and 3), and two new terpenoid derivatives characterized, respectively, as 2-benzoyl-3,3-dimethyl-4R,6S-bis-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-cyclohexanone (4a) and 2-benzoyl-3,3-dimethyl-4S,6R-bis-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-cyclohexanone (4b), were isolated from a related species, H. galioides Lam. The chemical structures were established using 2D-NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. These compounds were evaluated in vitro for antimicrobial activity against a panel of pathogenic microorganisms and anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of COX-1, COX-2, and 5-LOX catalyzed LTB4 formation. PMID:27458464

  10. Protective effects of Commiphora erythraea resin constituents against cellular oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Marcotullio, Maria Carla; Messina, Federica; Curini, Massimo; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Cellanetti, Marco; Ricci, Donata; Giamperi, Laura; Bucchini, Anahi; Minelli, Alba; Mierla, Anna Lisa; Bellezza, Ilaria

    2011-12-14

    By bioguided fractionation of the hexane extract of Commiphora erythraea resin we isolated four furanosesquiterpenoids that were tested for their protective activity against oxidative stress. Furanodienone and 1,10(15)-furanogermacra-dien-6-ones showed to be potent inhibitors of lipid peroxidation (IC(50) of -0.087 μM), being more active than the methoxylated analogues. Furthermore, using BV2 microglial cells, we found that furanodienone from C. erythraea is able to counteract LPS-induced cell death and decrease LPS-induced NO generation thus protecting microglial cells from LPS-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, docking studies were undertaken to gain insight into the possible binding mode of the isolated compounds at 5-LOX binding site.

  11. Phloroglucinol and Terpenoid Derivatives from Hypericum cistifolium and H. galioides (Hypericaceae).

    PubMed

    Crockett, Sara L; Kunert, Olaf; Pferschy-Wenzig, Eva-Maria; Jacob, Melissa; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Bauer, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    A new simple phloroglucinol derivative characterized as 1-(6-hydroxy-2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-methyl-1-propanone (1) was isolated from Hypericum cistifolium (Hypericaceae) as a major constituent of the non-polar plant extract. Minor amounts of this new compound, in addition to two known structurally related phloroglucinol derivatives (2 and 3), and two new terpenoid derivatives characterized, respectively, as 2-benzoyl-3,3-dimethyl-4R,6S-bis-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-cyclohexanone (4a) and 2-benzoyl-3,3-dimethyl-4S,6R-bis-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-cyclohexanone (4b), were isolated from a related species, H. galioides Lam. The chemical structures were established using 2D-NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. These compounds were evaluated in vitro for antimicrobial activity against a panel of pathogenic microorganisms and anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of COX-1, COX-2, and 5-LOX catalyzed LTB4 formation. PMID:27458464

  12. Environmental health program activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergtholdt, C. P.

    1969-01-01

    Activities reported include studies on toxic air contaminants, excessive noise, poor lighting, food sanitation, water pollution, and exposure to nonionizing radiation as health hazards. Formulations for a radiological health manual provide guidance to personnel in the procurement and safe handling of radiation producing equipment and Apollo mission planning. A literature search and development of a water analysis laboratory are outlined to obtain information regarding microbiological problems involving potable water, waste management, and personal hygiene.

  13. Ongoing Space Nuclear Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    Most ongoing US activities related to space nuclear power and propulsion are sponsored by NASA. NASA-spons0red space nuclear work is currently focused on evaluating potential fission surface power (FSP) systems and on radioisotope power systems (RPS). In addition, significant efforts related to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been completed and will provide a starting point for potential future NTP work.

  14. European Neutron Activation System.

    2013-01-11

    Version 03 EASY-2010 (European Activation System) consists of a wide range of codes, data and documentation all aimed at satisfying the objective of calculating the response of materials irradiated in a neutron flux. The main difference from the previous version is the upper energy limit, which has increased from 20 to 60 MeV. It is designed to investigate both fusion devices and accelerator based materials test facilities that will act as intense sources of high-energymore » neutrons causing significant activation of the surrounding materials. The very general nature of the calculational method and the data libraries means that it is applicable (with some reservations) to all situations (e.g. fission reactors or neutron sources) where materials are exposed to neutrons below 60 MeV. EASY can be divided into two parts: data and code development tools and user tools and data. The former are required to develop the latter, but EASY users only need to be able to use the inventory code FISPACT and be aware of the contents of the EAF library (the data source). The complete EASY package contains the FISPACT-2007 inventory code, the EAF-2003, EAF-2005, EAF-2007 and EAF-2010 libraries, and the EASY User Interface for the Window version. The activation package EASY-2010 is the result of significant development to extend the upper energy range from 20 to 60 MeV so that it is capable of being used for IFMIF calculations. The EAF-2010 library contains 66,256 reactions, almost five times more than in EAF-2003 (12,617). Deuteron-induced and proton-induced cross section libraries are also included, and can be used with EASY to enable calculations of the activation due to deuterons and proton [2].« less

  15. Proposed SOLCOST maintenance activities

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    This document provides a short description of work that has been accomplished to date and work in progress. A discussion of the program status as it is currently configured follows and finally proposed work by Solar Environmental Engineering Company (SEEC) in its most recently signed contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) is given. Early statements are designed to give the reader a good background so that the suggested SOLCOST maintenance activities will be more easily understood.

  16. Semiconductor active plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendach, Stefan; Nötzel, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Plasmonics is a research area in nanophotonics attracting increasing interest due to the potential applications in sensing and detecting, sub-wavelength confinement of light, integrated circuits, and many others. In particular, when plasmonic structures such as metal nanostructures or highly doped semiconductor particles are combined with active semiconductor materials and nanostructures, novel exciting physics and applications arise. This special section on semiconductor active plasmonics covers several of the most important and complementary directions in the field. First is the modification of the optical properties of a semiconductor nanostructure due to the close proximity of a metallic film or nanostructure. These arise from the formation hybrid plasmon/exciton states and may lead to enhanced spontaneous emission rates, directional far field emission patterns, strong coupling phenomena, and many more. Second is the realization of sub-wavelength scale nanolasers by coupling a semiconductor gain medium with a plasmonic metallic cavity. Particular emphasis is given on the major technical challenges in the fabrication of these nanolasers, such as device patterning, surface passivation, and metal deposition. While the above topics address mainly active structures and devices operating in the visible or near-infrared wavelength region, in the third, the enhanced THz extinction by periodic arrays of semiconductor particles is discussed. This is based on the build-up of surface plasmon resonances in the doped semiconductor particles which can be resonantly coupled and widely tuned by the carrier density in the semiconductor. We believe these highly diverse aspects give insight into the wide variety of new physics and applications that semiconductor active plasmonics is offering. Finally, we would like to thank the IOP editorial staff, in particular Alice Malhador, for their support, and we would also like to thank the contributors for their efforts and participation

  17. Prebiotic activation processes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    Questions regarding the combination of amino acids and ribonucleotides to polypeptides and polynucleotides are investigated. Each of the reactions considered occurs in the solid state in plausible prebiotic conditions. Together they provide the basis for a unified scheme of amino acid and nucleotide activation. Urea, imidazole and Mg(++) are essential catalytic components of the reaction mixtures. However, these compounds could probably be replaced by other organic molecules.

  18. Active quantum plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K.; M. Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics. PMID:26824066

  19. THE ACTIVE ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, David

    2012-03-15

    Some asteroids eject dust, unexpectedly producing transient, comet-like comae and tails. First ascribed to the sublimation of near-surface water ice, mass-losing asteroids (also called 'main-belt comets') can in fact be driven by a surprising diversity of mechanisms. In this paper, we consider 11 dynamical asteroids losing mass, in nine of which the ejected material is spatially resolved. We address mechanisms for producing mass loss including rotational instability, impact ejection, electrostatic repulsion, radiation pressure sweeping, dehydration stresses, and thermal fracture, in addition to the sublimation of ice. In two objects (133P and 238P) the repetitive nature of the observed activity leaves ice sublimation as the only reasonable explanation, while in a third ((596) Scheila), a recent impact is the cause. Another impact may account for activity in P/2010 A2, but this tiny object can also be explained as having shed mass after reaching rotational instability. Mass loss from (3200) Phaethon is probably due to cracking or dehydration at extreme ({approx}1000 K) perihelion temperatures, perhaps aided by radiation pressure sweeping. For the other bodies, the mass-loss mechanisms remain unidentified, pending the acquisition of more and better data. While the active asteroid sample size remains small, the evidence for an astonishing diversity of mass-loss processes in these bodies is clear.

  20. Determining activated carbon performance

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, W.F.; Rester, D.O.

    1995-07-01

    This article discusses the key elements involved in evaluating a system`s performance. Empty bed contact time (EBCT) is a term used to describe the length of time a liquid stream being treated is in contact with a granular activated carbon bed. The EBCT is the time required for a fluid to pass through the volume equivalent of the media bed, without the media being present. In a bed of granular activated carbon, the void volume or space between particles is usually about 45 percent. Therefore, the EBCT is about twice the true or actual time of contact between the fluid being treated and the GAC particles. The EBCT plays an important role in determining the effectiveness and longevity of granular activated carbon (GAC) used to treat liquids in a fixed-bed adsorber. Factors that influence and are influenced by EBCT, and their relationship to GAC performance in a treatment scheme include: adsorption, mass transfer zone, impurity concentration, adsorption affinity, flow rate and system design considerations.

  1. Active quantum plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K; M Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G

    2015-12-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics.

  2. Cooperative nonproliferation activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.; Furaus, J.; Lucero, R.

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under DOE sponsorship is engaged in nuclear nonproliferation activities with the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. From 1995 to the present SNL and PNC have been participating in a cooperative project to implement and assess the use of remote monitoring to achieve nuclear nonproliferation objectives. Implementation of remote monitoring at the PNC Joyo facility took place during 1996 and continues to date. An International Fellowship began in the Fall of 1995 and has complemented the nonproliferation study. Plans are underway to extend the Fellowship and to upgrade the existing Remote Monitoring System to include another area at the Joyo facility. SNL and PNC are currently exploring the possibility of exchanging experts with the objective of promoting regional confidence building in Northeast Asia, possibly using some of the same remote monitoring technologies. This paper will provide an overview of these activities and report on the status of cooperative nonproliferation activities being conducted by PNC and SNL.

  3. Active quantum plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K; M Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G

    2015-12-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics. PMID:26824066

  4. Sesterterpenoids with Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Evidente, Antonio; Kornienko, Alexander; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Dasari, Ramesh; Evidente, Marco; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Terpenes have received a great deal of attention in the scientific literature due to complex, synthetically challenging structures and diverse biological activities associated with this class of natural products. Based on the number of C5 isoprene units they are generated from, terpenes are classified as hemi- (C5), mono- (C10), sesqui- (C15), di- (C20), sester- (C25), tri (C30), and tetraterpenes (C40). Among these, sesterterpenes and their derivatives known as sesterterpenoids, are ubiquitous secondary metabolites in fungi, marine organisms, and plants. Their structural diversity encompasses carbotricyclic ophiobolanes, polycyclic anthracenones, polycyclic furan-2-ones, polycyclic hydroquinones, among many other carbon skeletons. Furthermore, many of them possess promising biological activities including cytotoxicity and the associated potential as anticancer agents. This review discusses the natural sources that produce sesterterpenoids, provides sesterterpenoid names and their chemical structures, biological properties with the focus on anticancer activities and literature references associated with these metabolites. A critical summary of the potential of various sesterterpenoids as anticancer agents concludes the review. PMID:26295461

  5. Multilayer Active Shell Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeves, John

    This thesis presents a novel active mirror technology based on carbon fiber composites and replication manufacturing processes. Multiple additional layers are implemented into the structure in order to provide the reflective layer, actuation capabilities and electrode routing. The mirror is thin, lightweight, and has large actuation capabilities. These features, along with the associated manufacturing processes, represent a significant change in design compared to traditional optics. Structural redundancy in the form of added material or support structures is replaced by thin, unsupported lightweight substrates with large actuation capabilities. Several studies motivated by the desire to improve as-manufactured figure quality are performed. Firstly, imperfections in thin CFRP laminates and their effect on post-cure shape errors are studied. Numerical models are developed and compared to experimental measurements on flat laminates. Techniques to mitigate figure errors for thicker laminates are also identified. A method of properly integrating the reflective facesheet onto the front surface of the CFRP substrate is also presented. Finally, the effect of bonding multiple initially flat active plates to the backside of a curved CFRP substrate is studied. Figure deformations along with local surface defects are predicted and characterized experimentally. By understanding the mechanics behind these processes, significant improvements to the overall figure quality have been made. Studies related to the actuation response of the mirror are also performed. The active properties of two materials are characterized and compared. Optimal active layer thicknesses for thin surface-parallel schemes are determined. Finite element simulations are used to make predictions on shape correction capabilities, demonstrating high correctabiliity and stroke over low-order modes. The effect of actuator saturation is studied and shown to significantly degrade shape correction performance. The

  6. Changing Conceptions of Activation Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Philip D.

    1981-01-01

    Provides background material which relates to the concept of activation energy, fundamental in the study of chemical kinetics. Compares the related concepts of the Arrhenius activation energy, the activation energy at absolute zero, the enthalpy of activation, and the threshold energy. (CS)

  7. Science Activities in Energy: Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 14 activities relating to energy conservation. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades, which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a simple card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  8. Metric Activities, Grades K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Bob, Comp.

    This pamphlet presents worksheets for use in fifteen activities or groups of activities designed for teaching the metric system to children in grades K through 6. The approach taken in several of the activities is one of conversion between metric and English units. The majority of the activities concern length, area, volume, and capacity. A…

  9. [Fernbank Science Center Environmental Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Lewis

    This document is a compilation of environmental activities related directly to the environment in Georgia. A description of the physiographic characteristics of Georgia is presented upon which the activities that follow are based. These activities include soil, stream and forest investigations; meteorology activities; and plant and animal studies.…

  10. Epsiodic Activity in Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, D.J.; Konar, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Machalski, J.; Gupta, Neeraj; Stawarz, L.; Mack, K.-H.; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-10-15

    One of the interesting issues in our understanding of active galactic nuclei is the duration of their active phase and whether such activity is episodic. In this paper we summarize our recent results on episodic activity in radio galaxies obtained with the GMRT and the VLA.

  11. Activated human platelets induce factor XIIa-mediated contact activation.

    PubMed

    Bäck, Jennie; Sanchez, Javier; Elgue, Graciela; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson; Nilsson, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that isolated platelets in buffer systems can promote activation of FXII or amplify contact activation, in the presence of a negatively charge substance or material. Still proof is lacking that FXII is activated by platelets in a more physiological environment. In this study we investigate if activated platelets can induce FXII-mediated contact activation and whether this activation affects clot formation in human blood. Human platelets were activated with a thrombin receptor-activating peptide, SFLLRN-amide, in platelet-rich plasma or in whole blood. FXIIa and FXIa in complex with preferentially antithrombin (AT) and to some extent C1-inhibitor (C1INH) were generated in response to TRAP stimulation. This contact activation was independent of surface-mediated contact activation, tissue factor pathway or thrombin. In clotting whole blood FXIIa-AT and FXIa-AT complexes were specifically formed, demonstrating that AT is a potent inhibitor of FXIIa and FXIa generated by platelet activation. Contact activation proteins were analyzed by flow cytometry and FXII, FXI, high-molecular weight kininogen, and prekallikrein were detected on activated platelets. Using chromogenic assays, enzymatic activity of platelet-associated FXIIa, FXIa, and kallikrein were demonstrated. Inhibition of FXIIa in non-anticoagulated blood also prolonged the clotting time. We conclude that platelet activation triggers FXII-mediated contact activation on the surface and in the vicinity of activated platelets. This leads specifically to generation of FXIIa-AT and FXIa-AT complexes, and contributes to clot formation. Activated platelets may thereby constitute an intravascular locus for contact activation, which may explain the recently reported importance of FXII in thrombus formation. PMID:19878657

  12. The active asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewitt, D.

    2014-07-01

    Active asteroids simultaneously possess the orbits of main-belt asteroids and the physical appearances of comets; they show transient dust comae and solar-radiation pressure-swept tails. Apart from the shear surprise at finding such strange objects in the asteroid belt, the active asteroids are scientifically interesting for several reasons. Although we are limited to scarcely more than a dozen examples, the active asteroids already reveal the distinct action of different physical processes, each previously unobserved and carrying big-picture importance for understanding the solar system. 1. IMPACT. An unambiguous asteroid-asteroid impact was observed in 2010, when a 30-m scale body struck 100-km diameter (596) Scheila. Direct observations of impacts hold scientific importance both by sampling this natural process at full scale (compared with laboratory impacts conducted at tiny scales) and because impact statistics will allow us to assess the erosion rate in the asteroid belt and the contribution of asteroid dust to the interplanetary medium. 2. CRITICAL ROTATION. Several objects have been observed in which the best explanation seems to lie with spin-up to critical periods, presumably (but not certainly) caused by YORP. Examples of both likely mass-shedding (P/2010 A2, P/2013 P5) and full break-up (P/2013 R3, shown below) exist. It has been suggested that, at sub-kilometer sizes, spin-up disruption rates may surpass impact disruption rates. Future observations will show whether or not this is true, and may ultimately lead to an improved understanding of the physics of break-up. 3. THERMAL DISINTEGRATION. Geminid parent (3200) Phaethon shows on-going mass-loss at perihelion, driven by the 1000-K surface temperatures found there. The mechanisms appear to be some combination of thermal fracture and desiccation stress. 4. SUBLIMATION. Two objects have shown repeated activity that appears to be correlated with position in the orbit. The best example is 133P, which has

  13. Advances in Activity Cliff Research.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Activity cliffs, i.e. similar compounds with large potency differences, are of interest from a chemical and informatics viewpoint; as a source of structure-activity relationship information, for compound optimization, and activity prediction. Herein, recent highlights of activity cliff research are discussed including studies that have further extended our understanding of activity cliffs, yielded unprecedented insights, or paved the way for practical applications.

  14. Advances in Activity Cliff Research.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Activity cliffs, i.e. similar compounds with large potency differences, are of interest from a chemical and informatics viewpoint; as a source of structure-activity relationship information, for compound optimization, and activity prediction. Herein, recent highlights of activity cliff research are discussed including studies that have further extended our understanding of activity cliffs, yielded unprecedented insights, or paved the way for practical applications. PMID:27492084

  15. Metadata Activities in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Inigo, Gil San; HUTCHISON, VIVIAN; Frame, Mike; Palanisamy, Giri

    2010-01-01

    The National Biological Information Infrastructure program has advanced the biological sciences ability to standardize, share, integrate and synthesize data by making the metadata program a core of its activities. Through strategic partnerships, a series of crosswalks for the main biological metadata specifications have enabled data providers and international clearinghouses to aggregate and disseminate tens of thousands of metadata sets describing petabytes of data records. New efforts at the National Biological Information Infrastructure are focusing on better metadata creation and curation tools, semantic mediation for data discovery and other curious initiatives.

  16. ASTP RBCC Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Karl W.; McArthur, Craig; Leopard, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This presentation reviews the activities of the Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) in the development of Rocket-Based Combined Cycle (RBCC)technology. The document consist of the presentation slides for a talk scheduled to be given to the World Aviation Congress and Exhibit of SAE. Included in the review is discussion of recent accomplishments in the area of Advanced Reusable technologies (ART), which includes work in flowpath testing, and system studies of the various vehicle/engine combinations including RBCC, Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) and Pulsed Detonation Engine (PDE). Pictures of the proposed RBCC Flowpaths are included. The next steps in the development process are reviewed.

  17. GPS Activities at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Behrend, Dirk

    2002-11-19

    The Alignment Engineering Group of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) started to use RTK (real-time kinematic) GPS equipment in order to perform structure mapping and GIS-related tasks on the SLAC campus. In a first step a continuously observing GPS station (SLAC M40) was set up. This station serves as master control station for all differential GPS activities on site and its coordinates have been determined in the well-defined global geodetic datum ITRF2000 at a given reference epoch. Some trials have been performed to test the RTK method. The tests have proven RTK to be very fast and efficient.

  18. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  19. Active terahertz metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong; O' Hara, John F; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an overview of research in our group in terahertz (THz) metamaterials and their applications. We have developed a series of planar metamaterials operating at THz frequencies, all of which exhibit a strong resonant response. By incorporating natural materials, e.g. semiconductors, as the substrates or as critical regions of metamaterial elements, we are able to effectively control the metamaterial resonance by the application of external stimuli, e.g., photoexcitation and electrical bias. Such actively controllable metamaterials provide novel functionalities for solid-state device applications with unprecedented performance, such as THz spectroscopy, imaging, and many others.

  20. Revitalizing AIDS activism.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M

    1998-12-01

    Maxine Wolf, an activist with ACT UP New York, suggests ways to motivate others in her organization and revitalize AIDS activism. Reach out to the gay and lesbian community, get them involved in grassroots efforts, and gain their input. Participate in discussions on larger issues such as research, funding, and treatment options. Wolf also suggests becoming educated, acting in a more public way, and finding more creative ways to act. Lastly, strive for goals with high expectations that can effect change instead of merely gathering and dispensing information.

  1. Crew Activity Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, James; Kirillov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The crew activity analyzer (CAA) is a system of electronic hardware and software for automatically identifying patterns of group activity among crew members working together in an office, cockpit, workshop, laboratory, or other enclosed space. The CAA synchronously records multiple streams of data from digital video cameras, wireless microphones, and position sensors, then plays back and processes the data to identify activity patterns specified by human analysts. The processing greatly reduces the amount of time that the analysts must spend in examining large amounts of data, enabling the analysts to concentrate on subsets of data that represent activities of interest. The CAA has potential for use in a variety of governmental and commercial applications, including planning for crews for future long space flights, designing facilities wherein humans must work in proximity for long times, improving crew training and measuring crew performance in military settings, human-factors and safety assessment, development of team procedures, and behavioral and ethnographic research. The data-acquisition hardware of the CAA (see figure) includes two video cameras: an overhead one aimed upward at a paraboloidal mirror on the ceiling and one mounted on a wall aimed in a downward slant toward the crew area. As many as four wireless microphones can be worn by crew members. The audio signals received from the microphones are digitized, then compressed in preparation for storage. Approximate locations of as many as four crew members are measured by use of a Cricket indoor location system. [The Cricket indoor location system includes ultrasonic/radio beacon and listener units. A Cricket beacon (in this case, worn by a crew member) simultaneously transmits a pulse of ultrasound and a radio signal that contains identifying information. Each Cricket listener unit measures the difference between the times of reception of the ultrasound and radio signals from an identified beacon

  2. ECLSS medical support activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crump, William J.; Kilgore, Melvin V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    During the period from April 10, 1990 to April 9, 1991, the Consortium for the Space Life Sciences provided technical assistance to the NASA/MSFC water recovery efforts. This assistance was in the form of literature reviews, technical recommendations, and presentations. This final report summarizes the activities completed during this period and identifies those areas requiring additional efforts. The tasks which the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) water recovery team addressed were either identified by MSFC technical representatives or chosen from those outlined in the subject statement of work.

  3. Physical Activity in Elderly.

    PubMed

    Cvecka, Jan; Tirpakova, Veronika; Sedliak, Milan; Kern, Helmut; Mayr, Winfried; Hamar, Dušan

    2015-08-24

    Aging is a multifactorial irreversible process associated with significant decline in muscle mass and neuromuscular functions. One of the most efficient methods to counteract age-related changes in muscle mass and function is physical exercise. An alternative effective intervention to improve muscle structure and performance is electrical stimulation. In the present work we present the positive effects of physical activity in elderly and a study where the effects of a 8-week period of functional electrical stimulation and strength training with proprioceptive stimulation in elderly are compared. PMID:26913164

  4. Physical Activity in Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Tirpakova, Veronika; Sedliak, Milan; Kern, Helmut; Mayr, Winfried; Hamar, Dušan

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a multifactorial irreversible process associated with significant decline in muscle mass and neuromuscular functions. One of the most efficient methods to counteract age-related changes in muscle mass and function is physical exercise. An alternative effective intervention to improve muscle structure and performance is electrical stimulation. In the present work we present the positive effects of physical activity in elderly and a study where the effects of a 8-week period of functional electrical stimulation and strength training with proprioceptive stimulation in elderly are compared. PMID:26913164

  5. Activities for the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Joyce

    From my research experiences on board the R/V Atlantis, I have developed experiments that can be used in an integrated science program or for biology. These activities reflect life in extreme environments on Earth such as the hydrothermal vents and on other planets and moons in our solar system. Students can learn to map the oceans of Europa and discover how plants grow on Mars. Students have designed research projects from the experimentation that I was involved with through the REVEL program.

  6. Rationales for regulatory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Perhac, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    The author provides an outline which touches on the types of concerns about risk evaluation which are addressed in the process of establishing regulatory guides. Broadly he says regulatory activity serves three broad constituents: (1) Paternalism (private risk); (2) Promotion of social welfare (public risks); (3) Protection of individual rights (public risks). He then discusses some of the major issues encountered in reaching a decision on what is an acceptable level of risk within each of these areas, and how one establishes such a level.

  7. FY 1996 activity summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety provides nuclear safety policy, independent technical evaluation, and technical support. A summary of these activities is provided in this report. These include: (1) changing the mission of the former production facilities to storage and waste management; (2) stabilizing nuclear materials not recycled due to production cessation or interruptions; (3) reformulating the authorization basis for existing facilities to convert to a standards based approach for operations consistent with modern expectations; and (4) implementing a modern regulatory framework for nuclear facilities. Enforcement of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act is also reported.

  8. WFIRST Project Science Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The WFIRST Project is a joint effort between GSFC and JPL. The project scientists and engineers are working with the community Science Definition Team to define the requirements and initial design of the mission. The objective is to design an observatory that meets the WFIRST science goals of the Astr02010 Decadal Survey for minimum cost. This talk will be a report of recent project activities including requirements flowdown, detector array development, science simulations, mission costing and science outreach. Details of the interim mission design relevant to scientific capabilities will be presented.

  9. Minor meteor shower activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendtel, J.

    2016-01-01

    Video meteor observations provide us with data to analyze structures in minor meteor showers or weak features in flux profiles. Samples obtained independently by other techniques allow to calibrate the data sets and to improve the confidence of results as demonstrated with a few results. Both, the confirmation of events predicted by model calculation and the input of observational data to improve the modelling results may help to better understand meteoroid stream evolution processes. Furthermore, calibrated data series can be used for studies of the long-term evolution of meteor shower activity.

  10. Enceladus: Starting Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Johnson, T. V.; Lunine, J. I.; Davies, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a process for starting the hydrothermal activity in Enceladus' South Polar Region. The process takes advantage of fissures that reach the water table, about 1 kilometer below the surface. Filling these fissures with fresh ocean water initiates a flow of water up from an ocean that can be self-sustaining. In this hypothesis the heat to sustain the thermal anomalies and the plumes comes from a slightly warm ocean at depth. The heat is brought to the surface by water that circulates up, through the crust and then returns to the ocean.

  11. Reuse of activated alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Hobensack, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    Activated alumina is used as a trapping media to remove trace quantities of UF{sub 6} from process vent streams. The current uranium recovery method employs concentrated nitric acid which destroys the alumina pellets and forms a sludge which is a storage and disposal problem. A recently developed technique using a distilled water rinse followed by three dilute acid rinses removes on average 97% of the uranium, and leaves the pellets intact with crush strength and surface area values comparable with new material. Trapping tests confirm the effectiveness of the recycled alumina as UF{sub 6} trapping media.

  12. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  13. Athena: Assessment Phase Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, David; Ayre, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The Athena mission concept has been proposed by the community in response to science themes of the Hot and Energetic Universe. Unlike other, competitive, mission selection exercises this "Large" class observatory mission has essentially been pre-selected. Nevertheless it has to be demonstrated that Athena meets the programmatic constraints of 1Bn euro cost cap, and a readiness level appropriate for formal mission adoption by the end 2019. This should be confirmed through a Phase A study conducted with two parallel industry activities. We describe the technical and programmatic content of these and latest progress in space and ground segment definition.

  14. Active travel intervention and physical activity behaviour: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Patricia; Eberth, Barbara; Farrar, Shelley; Anable, Jillian; Ludbrook, Anne

    2014-07-01

    A physically active lifestyle is an important contributor to individual health and well-being. The evidence linking higher physical activity levels with better levels of morbidity and mortality is well understood. Despite this, physical inactivity remains a major global risk factor for mortality and, consequently, encouraging individuals to pursue physically active lifestyles has been an integral part of public health policy in many countries. Physical activity promotion and interventions are now firmly on national health policy agendas, including policies that promote active travel such as walking and cycling. This study evaluates one such active travel initiative, the Smarter Choices, Smarter Places programme in Scotland, intended to encourage uptake of walking, cycling and the use of public transport as more active forms of travel. House to house surveys were conducted before and after the programme intervention, in May/June 2009 and 2012 (12,411 surveys in 2009 and 9542 in 2012), for the evaluation of the programme. This paper analyses the physical activity data collected, focussing on what can be inferred from the initiative with regards to adult uptake of physical activity participation and whether, for those who participated in physical activity, the initiative impacted on meeting recommended physical activity guidelines. The results suggest that the initiative impacted positively on the likelihood of physical activity participation and meeting the recommended physical activity guidelines. Individuals in the intervention areas were on average 6% more likely to meet the physical activity guidelines compared to individuals in the non intervention areas. However, the absolute prevalence of physical activity participation declined in both intervention and control areas over time. Our evaluation of this active transport initiative indicates that similar programmes may aid in contributing to achieving physical activity targets and adds to the international

  15. Active travel intervention and physical activity behaviour: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Patricia; Eberth, Barbara; Farrar, Shelley; Anable, Jillian; Ludbrook, Anne

    2014-07-01

    A physically active lifestyle is an important contributor to individual health and well-being. The evidence linking higher physical activity levels with better levels of morbidity and mortality is well understood. Despite this, physical inactivity remains a major global risk factor for mortality and, consequently, encouraging individuals to pursue physically active lifestyles has been an integral part of public health policy in many countries. Physical activity promotion and interventions are now firmly on national health policy agendas, including policies that promote active travel such as walking and cycling. This study evaluates one such active travel initiative, the Smarter Choices, Smarter Places programme in Scotland, intended to encourage uptake of walking, cycling and the use of public transport as more active forms of travel. House to house surveys were conducted before and after the programme intervention, in May/June 2009 and 2012 (12,411 surveys in 2009 and 9542 in 2012), for the evaluation of the programme. This paper analyses the physical activity data collected, focussing on what can be inferred from the initiative with regards to adult uptake of physical activity participation and whether, for those who participated in physical activity, the initiative impacted on meeting recommended physical activity guidelines. The results suggest that the initiative impacted positively on the likelihood of physical activity participation and meeting the recommended physical activity guidelines. Individuals in the intervention areas were on average 6% more likely to meet the physical activity guidelines compared to individuals in the non intervention areas. However, the absolute prevalence of physical activity participation declined in both intervention and control areas over time. Our evaluation of this active transport initiative indicates that similar programmes may aid in contributing to achieving physical activity targets and adds to the international

  16. Tracking dynamic team activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tambe, M.

    1996-12-31

    AI researchers are striving to build complex multi-agent worlds with intended applications ranging from the RoboCup robotic soccer tournaments, to interactive virtual theatre, to large-scale real-world battlefield simulations. Agent tracking - monitoring other agent`s actions and inferring their higher-level goals and intentions - is a central requirement in such worlds. While previous work has mostly focused on tracking individual agents, this paper goes beyond by focusing on agent teams. Team tracking poses the challenge of tracking a team`s joint goals and plans. Dynamic, real-time environments add to the challenge, as ambiguities have to be resolved in real-time. The central hypothesis underlying the present work is that an explicit team-oriented perspective enables effective team tracking. This hypothesis is instantiated using the model tracing technology employed in tracking individual agents. Thus, to track team activities, team models are put to service. Team models are a concrete application of the joint intentions framework and enable an agent to track team activities, regardless of the agent`s being a collaborative participant or a non-participant in the team. To facilitate real-time ambiguity resolution with team models: (i) aspects of tracking are cast as constraint satisfaction problems to exploit constraint propagation techniques; and (ii) a cost minimality criterion is applied to constrain tracking search. Empirical results from two separate tasks in real-world, dynamic environments one collaborative and one competitive - are provided.

  17. Activating Event Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world events, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized events that they denote or typically play a role in. We used short stimulus onset asynchrony priming to demonstrate that (1) event nouns prime people (sale-shopper) and objects (trip-luggage) commonly found at those events; (2) location nouns prime people/animals (hospital-doctor) and objects (barn-hay) commonly found at those locations; and (3) instrument nouns prime things on which those instruments are commonly used (key-door), but not the types of people who tend to use them (hose-gardener). The priming effects are not due to normative word association. On our account, facilitation results from event knowledge relating primes and targets. This has much in common with computational models like LSA or BEAGLE in which one word primes another if they frequently occur in similar contexts. LSA predicts priming for all six experiments, whereas BEAGLE correctly predicted that priming should not occur for the instrument-people relation but should occur for the other five. We conclude that event-based relations are encoded in semantic memory and computed as part of word meaning, and have a strong influence on language comprehension. PMID:19298961

  18. The Active Solid Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinger, Cynthia

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic processes in Earth's crust, mantle and core shape Earth's surface and magnetic field over time scales of seconds to millennia, and even longer time scales as recorded in the ca. 4 Ga rock record. Our focus is the earthquake-volcano deformation cycles that occur over human time scales, and their comparison with time-averaged deformation studies, with emphasis on mantle plume provinces where magma and volatile release and vertical tectonics are readily detectable. Active deformation processes at continental and oceanic rift and back arc zones provide critical constraints on mantle dynamics, the role of fluids (volatiles, magma, water), and plate rheology. For example, recent studies of the East African rift zone, which formed above one of Earth's largest mantle upwellings reveal that magma production and volatile release rates are comparable to those of magmatic arcs, the archetypal zones of continental crustal creation. Finite-length faults achieve some plate deformation, but magma intrusion in the form of dikes accommodates extension in continental, back-arc, and oceanic rifts, and intrusion as sills causes permanent uplift that modulates the local time-space scales of earthquakes and volcanoes. Volatile release from magma intrusion may reduce fault friction and permeability, facilitating aseismic slip and creating magma pathways. We explore the implications of active deformation studies to models of the time-averaged structure of plume and extensional provinces in continental and oceanic plate settings.

  19. Active Astronomy Roadshow Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, Silas; Oram, Kathleen; Alabre, Dayana; Douyon, Ralph; UMass Lowell Haiti Development Studies Center

    2016-01-01

    College-age Haitian students working with advisors and volunteers from UMass Lowell in 2015 developed and tested an activity-based K-8 curriculum in astronomy, space, and earth science. Our partner school is located in Les Cayes, Haiti a city where only 65% of children attend school, and only half of those will complete 6th grade. Astronomy provides an accessible and non-intimidating entry into science, and activity-based learning contrasts with the predominant traditional teaching techniques in use in Haiti, to reach and inspire a different cohort of learners. Teachers are predominantly women in Haiti, so part of the effort involves connecting them with scientists, engineers and teacher peers in the US. As a developing nation, it is vital for Haitian (as for all) children to grow up viewing women as leaders in science. Meanwhile in the US, few are aware of the reality of getting an education in a 3rd world nation (i.e. most of the world), so we also joined with teachers in Massachusetts to give US school children a peek at what daily life is like for their peers living in our vibrant but impoverished neighbor. Our Haitian partners are committed to helping their sister-schools with curriculum and educator workshops, so that the overall quality of education can rise, and not be limited to the very few schools with access to resources. We will describe the activites, motivation, and and the lessons learned from our first year of the project.

  20. Active Near Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Past activity from Near Earth Asteroids is recorded in the meteoroid streams that cause our meteor showers. Automated meteoroid orbit surveys by photographic, low-light video, specular radar, and head-echo radar reflections are providing the first maps of meteor shower activity at different particle sizes. There are distinct differences in particle size distributions among streams. The underlaying mechanisms that created these streams are illuminated: fragmentation from spin-up or thermal stresses, meteoroid ejection by water vapor drag, and ejection of icy particles by CO and CO2 sublimation. The distribution of the meteoroid orbital elements probe the subsequent evolution by planetary perturbations and sample the range of dynamical processes to which Near Earth Asteroids are exposed. The non-stream "sporadic" meteors probe early stages in the evolution from meteoroid streams into the zodiacal dust cloud. We see that the lifetime of large meteoroids is generally not limited by collisions. Results obtained by the CAMS video survey of meteoroid orbits are compared to those from other orbit surveys. Since October 2010, over 200,000 meteoroid orbits have been measured. First results from an expansion into the southern hemisphere are also presented, as are first results from the measurement of main element compositions. Among the many streams detected so far, the Geminid and Sextantid showers stand out by having a relatively high particle density and derive from parent bodies that appear to have originated in the main belt.

  1. Neutron activation for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Loughlin, M.J.; Nishitani, Takeo

    1996-04-29

    There are three primary goals for the Neutron Activation system for ITER: maintain a robust relative measure of fusion power with stability and high dynamic range (7 orders of magnitude); allow an absolute calibration of fusion power (energy); and provide a flexible and reliable system for materials testing. The nature of the activation technique is such that stability and high dynamic range can be intrinsic properties of the system. It has also been the technique that demonstrated (on JET and TFTR) the highest accuracy neutron measurements in DT operation. Since the gamma-ray detectors are not located on the tokamak and are therefore amenable to accurate characterization, and if material foils are placed very close to the ITER plasma with minimum scattering or attenuation, high overall accuracy in the fusion energy production (7--10%) should be achievable on ITER. In the paper, a conceptual design is presented. A system is shown to be capable of meeting these three goals, also detailed design issues remain to be solved.

  2. Active frequency selective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Walter R.; Hendrickson, Joshua; Cleary, Justin W.; Guo, Junpeng

    2013-05-01

    Split ring resonator arrays are investigated for use as active elements for the realization of voltage controllable frequency selective surfaces. Finite difference time domain simulations suggest the absorptive and reflective properties of such surfaces can be externally controlled through modifications of the split ring resonator gap impedance. In this work, such voltage-controlled resonance tuning is obtained through the addition of an appropriately designed high electron mobility transistor positioned across the split ring resonator gap. It is shown that a 0.5μm gate length high electron mobility transistor allows voltage controllable switching between the two resonant conditions associated with a split ring resonator and that of a closed loop geometry when the surface is illuminated with THz radiation. Partial switching between these two resonant conditions is observed at larger gate lengths. Such active frequency selective surfaces are proposed, for example, for use as modulators in THz detection schemes and as RF filters in radar applications when scaled to operate at GHz frequencies.

  3. Active Chiral Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xinghui; Schäferling, Martin; Michel, Ann-Katrin U; Tittl, Andreas; Wuttig, Matthias; Taubner, Thomas; Giessen, Harald

    2015-07-01

    Active control over the handedness of a chiral metamaterial has the potential to serve as key element for highly integrated polarization engineering approaches, polarization sensitive imaging devices, and stereo display technologies. However, this is hard to achieve as it seemingly involves the reconfiguration of the metamolecule from a left-handed into a right-handed enantiomer and vice versa. This type of mechanical actuation is intricate and usually neither monolithically realizable nor viable for high-speed applications. Here, enabled by the phase change material Ge3Sb2Te6 (GST-326), we demonstrate a tunable and switchable mid-infrared plasmonic chiral metamaterial in a proof-of-concept experiment. A large tunability range of the circular dichroism response from λ = 4.15 to 4.90 μm is achieved, and we experimentally demonstrate that the combination of a passive bias-type chiral layer with the active chiral metamaterial allows for switchable chirality, that is, the reversal of the circular dichroism sign, in a fully planar, layered design without the need for geometrical reconfiguration. Because phase change materials can be electrically and optically switched, our designs may open up a path for highly integrated mid-IR polarization engineering devices that can be modulated on ultrafast time scales.

  4. Regulation of inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Man, Si Ming; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Inflammasome biology is one of the most exciting and rapidly growing areas in immunology. Over the past 10 years, inflammasomes have been recognized for their roles in the host defense against invading pathogens and in the development of cancer, autoinflammatory, metabolic, and neurodegenerative diseases. Assembly of an inflammasome complex requires cytosolic sensing of pathogen-associated molecular patterns or danger-associated molecular patterns by a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat receptor (NLR) or absent in melanoma 2-like receptor (ALR). NLRs and ALRs engage caspase-1, in most cases requiring the adapter protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC), to catalyze proteolytic cleavage of pro-interleukin-1β (pro-IL-1β) and pro-IL-18 and drive pyroptosis. Recent studies indicate that caspase-8, caspase-11, IL-1R–associated kinases (IRAK), and receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinases contribute to inflammasome functions. In addition, post-translational modifications, including ubiquitination, deubiquitination, phosphorylation, and degradation, control almost every aspect of inflammasome activities. Genetic studies indicate that mutations in NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRC4, and AIM2 are linked to the development of autoinflammatory diseases, enterocolitis, and cancer. Overall, these findings transform our understanding of the basic biology and clinical relevance of inflammasomes. In this review, we provide an overview of the latest development of inflammasome research and discuss how inflammasome activities govern health and disease. PMID:25879280

  5. Harmonic active contours.

    PubMed

    Estellers, Virginia; Zosso, Dominique; Bresson, Xavier; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We propose a segmentation method based on the geometric representation of images as 2-D manifolds embedded in a higher dimensional space. The segmentation is formulated as a minimization problem, where the contours are described by a level set function and the objective functional corresponds to the surface of the image manifold. In this geometric framework, both data-fidelity and regularity terms of the segmentation are represented by a single functional that intrinsically aligns the gradients of the level set function with the gradients of the image and results in a segmentation criterion that exploits the directional information of image gradients to overcome image inhomogeneities and fragmented contours. The proposed formulation combines this robust alignment of gradients with attractive properties of previous methods developed in the same geometric framework: 1) the natural coupling of image channels proposed for anisotropic diffusion and 2) the ability of subjective surfaces to detect weak edges and close fragmented boundaries. The potential of such a geometric approach lies in the general definition of Riemannian manifolds, which naturally generalizes existing segmentation methods (the geodesic active contours, the active contours without edges, and the robust edge integrator) to higher dimensional spaces, non-flat images, and feature spaces. Our experiments show that the proposed technique improves the segmentation of multi-channel images, images subject to inhomogeneities, and images characterized by geometric structures like ridges or valleys.

  6. Active Wollaston polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, R. M.; Dayton, David; Gonglewski, John

    2005-10-01

    Active imaging polarimetry is a unique imaging technique in which a particular scene of interest is illuminated by a laser source with a known polarization state. Changes in the state of polarization of the received light yields information beyond what is available in conventional intensity imaging. This approach has an advantage over passive polarimetry in that one has control over the polarization state of the illumination with the potential of determining all sixteen elements of the associated Mueller matrix. While determining the entire Mueller matrix is the most comprehensive method for describing the polarization changing properties of the scene, for most cases it does not yield significantly more information than simply determining the 4 diagonal elements of the Mueller matrix. The Active Wollaston Polarimeter is based around the ability of the Wollaston prism to split orthogonal polarization states into two beams propagating at slightly different angles allowing two images to be formed on a single camera. The Wollaston prism, combined with a series of liquid crystal variable retarders allows monopulse determination of any polarization contrast image (PCI), which is directly related to a specific Muller matrix element. This technique results in a fast, compact polarization measurement system. This paper presents the continued investigation and analysis of the performance of the polarimeter and possible viability as a practical polarization measurement system.

  7. [Psychotropic effects of physical activity].

    PubMed

    Nespor, K; Csémy, L

    2006-01-01

    Physical activity can improve mental health. Positive effect of physical activity on depression and anxiety are mentioned. Moreover physical activity increases resistance against memory loss during aging. Physical activity also improves quality and life satisfaction in all age group; this fact was confirmed also in Czech children. Physical activity should be sufficient, but not excessive, and it should be combined with pharmacotherapy in severe and long-term depression. The kind of physical activity depends on the preferences and possibilities of patients; walking, yoga, swimming, etc. are usually appropriate.

  8. Structure-Activity Relationship of Azaindole-Based Glucokinase Activators.

    PubMed

    Paczal, Attila; Bálint, Balázs; Wéber, Csaba; Szabó, Zoltán B; Ondi, Levente; Theret, Isabelle; De Ceuninck, Frédéric; Bernard, Catherine; Ktorza, Alain; Perron-Sierra, Francoise; Kotschy, András

    2016-01-28

    7-Azaindole has been identified as a novel bidentate anchor point for allosteric glucokinase activators. A systematic investigation around three principal parts of the new small molecule glucokinase activators led to a robust SAR in agreement with structural data that also helped to assess the conformational flexibility of the allosteric activation site. The increase in glucose uptake resulting from glucokinase activation in hepatocytes in vitro translated into the efficient lowering of glucose levels in vivo with the best compounds. PMID:26685731

  9. Summary of JPL Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, Paul J.; Surampudi, Subbarao

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) flight programs, including past, present and future missions targeting Solar System exploration. Details, including launch dates and batteries used, are given for Deep Space 1 (Asteroid Rendezvous), Deep Space 2 (Mars Penetrator), Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Surveyor '98, Stardust, Europa Orbiter, Mars Surveyor 2001, Mars 2003 Lander and Rover, and Genesis (Solar Dust Return). Earth science projects are also outlined: Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ARIMSAT), Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX/Poseidon), Jason-1 (TOPEX follow-on), and QuikScat/Seawinds (Ocean Winds Tracking). The status, background, and plans are given for several batteries: (1) 2.5 inch common pressure vessel (CPV), (2) 3.5 inch CPV, (3) Ni-H2, and (4) Li-Ion.

  10. Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchuk, James A.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Melrose, Donald B.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk; Harrison, Richard A.; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Tsuneta, Saku; Vršnak, Bojan; Wang, Jing-Xiu

    Commission 10 deals with solar activity in all of its forms, ranging from the smallest nanoflares to the largest coronal mass ejections. This report reviews scientific progress over the roughly two-year period ending in the middle of 2008. This has been an exciting time in solar physics, highlighted by the launches of the Hinode and STEREO missions late in 2006. The report is reasonably comprehensive, though it is far from exhaustive. Limited space prevents the inclusion of many significant results. The report is divided into the following sections: Photosphere and chromosphere; Transition region; Corona and coronal heating; Coronal jets; flares; Coronal mass ejection initiation; Global coronal waves and shocks; Coronal dimming; The link between low coronal CME signatures and magnetic clouds; Coronal mass ejections in the heliosphere; and Coronal mass ejections and space weather. Primary authorship is indicated at the beginning of each section.

  11. Active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Carolyn R.

    Active noise reduction (ANR) techniques are described with reference to their application to crewmembers during aircraft operation to enhance productivity and safety. ANR concepts and theory are explained, and the development of protective ANR systems for direct implementation are described. Sound attenuation testing was conducted to study the feasibility of aircraft-powered ANR systems, and the positive results spurred their development for compatibility with flight helmets. The Helmets Limited ANR system uses a bypass mode at times of limited available power and complements the use of passive sound attenuation. Subjective testing results show that the device is effective, and a planned program of intensive evaluation is discussed. The aircraft that require an ANR system are listed, and key areas of implementation include battery power and the combination of ANR circuitry and helmet oxygen masks. It is suggested that ANR techniques can positively impact the efficiency and performance of crewmembers in high-noise-level aircraft.

  12. ESA Spacecraft Propulsion Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccoccia, G.

    2004-10-01

    ESA is currently involved in several activities related to spacecraft chemical and electric propulsion, from the basic research and development of conventional and new concepts to the manufacturing, AIV and flight control of the propulsion subsystems of several European satellites. In the commercial application field, the strong competition among satellite manufacturers is a major driver for advancements in the area of propulsion, where increasing better performance together with low prices are required. Furthermore, new scientific and Earth observation missions dictate new challenging requirements for propulsion systems and components based on advanced technologies. For all these reasons, the technology area of spacecraft propulsion is in strong evolution and this paper presents an overview of the current European programmes and initiatives in this technology field. Specific attention is devoted in the paper to the performance and flight experience of spacecraft currently in orbit or ready to be launched.

  13. Monitoring active volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most spectacular, awesomely beautiful, and at times destructive displays of natural energy is an erupting volcano, belching fume and ash thousands of meters into the atmosphere and pouring out red-hot molten lava in fountains and streams. Countless eruptions in the geologic past have produced volcanic rocks that form much of the Earth's present surface. The gradual disintegration and weathering of these rocks have yielded some of the richest farmlands in the world, and these fertile soils play a significant role in sustaining our large and growing population. Were it not for volcanic activity, the Hawaiian Islands with their sugar cane and pineapple fields and magnificent landscapes and seascapes would not exist to support their residents and to charm their visitors. Yet, the actual eruptive processes are catastrophic and can claim life and property.

  14. Extravehicular activity welding experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The In-Space Technology Experiments Program (INSTEP) provides an opportunity to explore the many critical questions which can only be answered by experimentation in space. The objective of the Extravehicular Activity Welding Experiment definition project was to define the requirements for a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the feasibility of performing manual welding tasks during EVA. Consideration was given to experiment design, work station design, welding hardware design, payload integration requirements, and human factors (including safety). The results of this effort are presented. Included are the specific objectives of the flight test, details of the tasks which will generate the required data, and a description of the equipment which will be needed to support the tasks. Work station requirements are addressed as are human factors, STS integration procedures and, most importantly, safety considerations. A preliminary estimate of the cost and the schedule for completion of the experiment through flight and postflight analysis are given.

  15. Adrenocortical activity during meditation.

    PubMed

    Jevning, R; Wilson, A F; Davidson, J M

    1978-02-01

    We studied acute plasma cortisol and testosterone concentration changes during the practice known as "transcendental meditation" (TM) and during control rest. Three groups of normal, young adult volunteers were studied: a group of controls, these same controls restudied as practitioners after 3 to 4 months of TM practice, and a group of long-term, regular TM practitioners (3 to 5 years of practice). No change was found in controls during rest. Cortisol declined, but not significantly, in restudied controls, while cortisol decreased significantly in long-term practitioners during meditation and remained somewhat low afterward. No change in testerone concentration was noted during either rest or TM. Apparently, the practice of TM becomes associated with psychophysiologic response(s) which acutely inhibit pituitary-adrenal activity.

  16. Respiratory active mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Peleato, Maria Luisa; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Enriquez, Jose Antonio

    2008-11-21

    The structural organization of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes as four big independently moving entities connected by the mobile carriers CoQ and cytochrome c has been challenged recently. Blue native gel electrophoresis reveals the presence of high-molecular-weight bands containing several respiratory complexes and suggesting an in vivo assembly status of these structures (respirasomes). However, no functional evidence of the activity of supercomplexes as true respirasomes has been provided yet. We have observed that (1) supercomplexes are not formed when one of their component complexes is absent; (2) there is a temporal gap between the formation of the individual complexes and that of the supercomplexes; (3) some putative respirasomes contain CoQ and cytochrome c; (4) isolated respirasomes can transfer electrons from NADH to O(2), that is, they respire. Therefore, we have demonstrated the existence of a functional respirasome and propose a structural organization model that accommodates these findings.

  17. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Sanjeev S.; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is an essential component of numerous physiological processes including not only conscious senses of touch and hearing, but also unconscious senses such as blood pressure regulation. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  18. DPAL activities in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Wani, Fumio

    2015-02-01

    Activities on diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) in Japan is reviewed. We have started alkali laser works in 2011, and currently, we are the only players in Japan. Our interests are application oriented, and it is not only defense but also industrial. DPAL is a good candidate as a source of remote laser machining, thanks to its scalability and extremely good beam quality. We are studying on scientific and engineering problems of Cs DPAL with a small-scale apparatus. A commercial diode laser with volume Bragg grating outcoupler is used to pump the gain cell longitudinally. A 6.5 W continuous-wave output with optical to optical efficiency of 56% (based on the absorbed power) has been achieved. Numerical simulation codes are developed to understand the physics of DPAL and to help future developments.

  19. Active Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Effinger, Robert T., IV; Aranda, Isaiah, Jr.; Copeland, Ben M.; Covington, Ed W., III

    2002-01-01

    Several active piezoelectric diaphragms were fabricated by placing unelectroded piezoelectric disks between copper clad films patterned with Inter-Circulating Electrodes "ICE". When a voltage potential is applied to the electrodes, the result is radially distributed electric field that mechanically strains the piezo-ceramic along the Z-axis (perpendicular to the applied electric field), rather than the expected in-plane (XY-axis) direction. Unlike other out of plane piezoelectric actuators, which are benders, these Radial Field Diaphragms (RFDs) strain concentrically yet afford high displacements while maintaining a constant circumference. This paper covers the fabrication and characterization of these diaphragms as a function of poling field strength, ceramic diameter and line spacing, as well as the surface topography, the resulting strain field and displacement as a function of applied voltage ranging from DC to 10 Hz.

  20. Tension in active shapes.

    PubMed

    Papari, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The concept of tension is introduced in the framework of active contours with prior shape information, and it is used to improve image segmentation. In particular, two properties of this new quantity are shown: 1) high values of the tension correspond to undesired equilibrium points of the cost function under minimization and 2) tension decreases if a curve is split into two or more parts. Based on these ideas, a tree is generated whose nodes are different local minima of the cost function. Deeper nodes in the tree are expected to correspond to lower values of the cost function. In this way, the search for the global optimum is reduced to visiting and pruning a binary tree. The proposed method has been applied to the problem of fish segmentation from low quality underwater images. Qualitative and quantitative comparison with existing algorithms based on the Euler–Lagrange diffusion equations shows the superiority of the proposed approach in avoiding undesired local minima.