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Sample records for 5-lipoxygenase 5-lox activity

  1. Synthesis, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibition activities, and molecular docking study of 7-substituted coumarin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pavan; Vyas, Vivek K; Variya, Bhavesh; Patel, Palak; Qureshi, Gulamnizami; Ghate, Manjunath

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, 7-subsituted coumarin derivatives were synthesized using various aromatic and heterocyclic amines, and evaluated in vivo for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity, and for ulcerogenic risk. The most active compounds were evaluated in vitro for 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibition. Docking study was performed to predict the binding affinity, and orientation at the active site of the enzyme. In vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity, and in vitro 5-LOX enzyme inhibition study revealed that compound 33 and 35 are the most potent compounds in all the screening methods. In vitro kinetic study of 35 showed mixed or non-competitive type of inhibition with 5-LOX enzyme. Presence of OCH3 group in 35 and Cl in 33 at C6-position of benzothiazole ring were found very important substitutions for potent activity. PMID:27376460

  2. 5-Lipoxygenase-activating protein rescues activity of 5-lipoxygenase mutations that delay nuclear membrane association and disrupt product formation.

    PubMed

    Gerstmeier, Jana; Newcomer, Marcia E; Dennhardt, Sophie; Romp, Erik; Fischer, Jana; Werz, Oliver; Garscha, Ulrike

    2016-05-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are proinflammatory lipid mediators formed from arachidonic acid in a 2-step reaction catalyzed by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) requiring the formation of 5-HPETE [5(S)-hydroperoxy-6-trans-8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid] and its subsequent transformation to LTA4 5-LOX is thought to receive arachidonic acid from the nuclear membrane-embedded 5-LOX-activating protein (FLAP). The crystal structure of 5-LOX revealed an active site concealed by F177 and Y181 (FY cork). We examined the influence of the FY cork on 5-LOX activity and membrane binding in HEK293 cells in the absence and presence of FLAP. Uncapping the 5-LOX active site by mutation of F177 and/or Y181 to alanine (5-LOX-F177A, 5-LOX-Y181A, 5-LOX-F177/Y181A) resulted in delayed and diminished 5-LOX membrane association in A23187-stimulated cells. For 5-LOX-F177A and 5-LOX-F177/Y181A, formation of 5-LOX products was dramatically reduced relative to 5-LOX-wild type (wt). Strikingly, coexpression of FLAP in A23187-activated HEK293 cells effectively restored formation of 5-H(p)ETE (5-hydroxy- and 5-peroxy-6-trans-8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid) by these same 5-LOX mutants (≈60-70% 5-LOX-wt levels) but not of LTA4 hydrolysis products. Yet 5-LOX-Y181A generated 5-H(p)ETE at levels comparable to 5-LOX-wt but reduced LTA4 hydrolysis products. Coexpression of FLAP partially restored LTA4 hydrolysis product formation by 5-LOX-Y181A. Together, the data suggest that the concealed FY cork impacts membrane association and that FLAP may help shield an uncapped active site.-Gerstmeier, J., Newcomer, M. E., Dennhardt, S., Romp, E., Fischer, J., Werz, O., Garscha, U. 5-Lipoxygenase-activating protein rescues activity of 5-lipoxygenase mutations that delay nuclear membrane association and disrupt product formation. PMID:26842853

  3. The Medicinal Timber Canarium patentinervium Miq. (Burseraceae Kunth.) Is an Anti-Inflammatory Bioresource of Dual Inhibitors of Cyclooxygenase (COX) and 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX)

    PubMed Central

    Mogana, R.; Teng-Jin, K.; Wiart, C.

    2013-01-01

    The barks and leaves extracts of Canarium patentinervium Miq. (Burseraceae Kunth.) were investigated for cyclooxygenase (COX) and 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibition via in vitro models. The corresponding antioxidative power of the plant extract was also tested via nonenzyme and enzyme in vitro assays. The ethanolic extract of leaves inhibited the enzymatic activity of 5-LOX, COX-1, and COX-2 with IC50 equal to 49.66 ± 0.02 μg/mL, 0.60 ± 0.01 μg/mL, and 1.07 ± 0.01 μg/mL, respectively, with selective COX-2 activity noted in ethanolic extract of barks with COX-1/COX-2 ratio of 1.22. The ethanol extract of barks confronted oxidation in the ABTS, DPPH, and FRAP assay with EC50 values equal to 0.93 ± 0.01 μg/mL, 2.33 ± 0.02 μg/mL, and 67.00 ± 0.32 μg/mL, respectively, while the ethanol extract of leaves confronted oxidation in β-carotene bleaching assay and superoxide dismutase (SOD) assay with EC50 value of 6.04 ± 0.02 μg/mL and IC50 value of 3.05 ± 0.01 μg/mL. The ethanol extract acts as a dual inhibitor of LOX and COX enzymes with potent antioxidant capacity. The clinical significance of these data is quite clear that they support a role for Canarium patentinervium Miq. (Burseraceae Kunth.) as a source of lead compounds in the management of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25937987

  4. Minocycline protects PC12 cells against NMDA-induced injury via inhibiting 5-lipoxygenase activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Wei, Er-Qing; Zhang, Wei-Ping; Ge, Qiu-Fu; Liu, Jian-Ren; Wang, Meng-Ling; Huang, Xiao-Jia; Hu, Xin; Chen, Zhong

    2006-04-26

    Recently, we have reported that minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline with neuroprotective effects, inhibits the in vitro ischemic-like injury and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activation in PC12 cells. In the present study, we further determined whether minocycline protects PC12 cells from excitotoxicity via inhibiting 5-LOX activation. We used N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA, 200 microM) to induce early (exposure for 6 h) and delayed (exposure for 6 h followed by 24 h recovery) injuries. We found that NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, 5-LOX inhibitor caffeic acid and minocycline concentration dependently attenuated NMDA-induced early and delayed cell injuries (viability reduction and cell death). However, only ketamine (1 microM) inhibited NMDA-evoked elevation of intracellular calcium. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis showed that NMDA induced 5-LOX translocation to the nuclear membrane after 1- to 6-h exposure which was confirmed by Western blotting, indicating that 5-LOX was activated. Ketamine, caffeic acid and minocycline (each at 1 microM) inhibited 5-LOX translocation after early injury. After delayed injury, PC12 cells were shrunk, and 5-LOX was translocated to the nuclei and nuclear membrane; ketamine, caffeic acid and minocycline inhibited both cell shrinking and 5-LOX translocation. As a control, 12-LOX inhibitor baicalein showed a weak effect on cell viability and death, but no effect on 5-LOX translocation. Therefore, we conclude that the protective effect of minocycline on NMDA-induced injury is partly mediated by inhibiting 5-LOX activation. PMID:16574083

  5. 5-Lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitory active compounds from Atractylodes lancea.

    PubMed

    Resch, M; Steigel, A; Chen, Z L; Bauer, R

    1998-03-01

    Lipophilic extracts of Atractylodes lancea rhizomes exhibited potent inhibitory activities in 5-lipoxygenase [IC50 (5-LOX) = 2.9 micrograms/mL (n-hexane extract)] and cyclooxygenase-1 [IC50 (COX-1) = 30.5 micrograms/mL (n-hexane extract)] enzymatic assays. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the n-hexane extract led to the isolation of a new compound atractylochromene (1), a potent inhibitor in both test systems [IC50 (5-LOX) = 0.6 microM, IC50 (COX-1) = 3.3 microM]. Also obtained was 2-[(2E)-3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienyl]-6-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadiene-1 ,4-dione (2), which showed a selective inhibitory activity against 5-LOX [IC50 (5-LOX) 0.2 microM, IC50 (COX-1) 64.3 microM]. The sesquiterpene atractylon (3) and the coumarin osthol (4) turned out to be moderate but selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors. Atractylenolides I (5), II (6), and III (7) showed no significant inhibitory effects for either enzyme. Structures were established by spectral data interpretation. PMID:9544564

  6. Effects of MK-886, a 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) inhibitor, and 5-lipoxygenase deficiency on the forced swimming behavior of mice.

    PubMed

    Uz, Tolga; Dimitrijevic, Nikola; Imbesi, Marta; Manev, Hari; Manev, Radmila

    2008-05-01

    A common biological pathway may contribute to the comorbidity of atherosclerosis and depression. Increased activity of the enzymatic 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX, 5LO) pathway is a contributing factor in atherosclerosis and a 5-LOX inhibitor, MK-886, is beneficial in animal models of atherosclerosis. In the brain, MK-886 increases phosphorylation of the glutamate receptor subunit GluR1, and the increased phosphorylation of this receptor has been associated with antidepressant treatment. In this work, we evaluated the behavioral effects of MK-886 in an automated assay of mouse forced swimming, which identifies antidepressant activity as increased climbing behavior and/or decreased rest time. Whereas a single injection of MK-886 (3 and 10 mg/kg) did not affect forced swimming behaviors assayed 30 min later, six daily injections of 3 mg/kg MK-886 slightly increased climbing and significantly reduced rest time in wild-type mice but not in 5-LOX-deficient mice. A diet delivery of MK-886, 4 micro/(100 mg(body-weight)day), required 3 weeks to affect forced swimming; it increased climbing behavior. Climbing behavior was also increased in naive 5-LOX-deficient mice compared to naive wild-type controls. These results suggest that 5-LOX inhibition and deficiency may be associated with antidepressant activity. Increased climbing in a forced swimming assay is a typical outcome of antidepressants that increase noradrenergic and dopaminergic activity. Interestingly, 5-LOX deficiency and MK-886 treatment have been shown to be capable of increasing the behavioral effects of a noradrenaline/dopamine-potentiating drug, cocaine. Future research is needed to evaluate the clinical relevance of our findings. PMID:18403121

  7. Impact of Wines and Wine Constituents on Cyclooxygenase-1, Cyclooxygenase-2, and 5-Lipoxygenase Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Temml, Veronika; Maghradze, David; Vanek, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases are proinflammatory enzymes; the former affects platelet aggregation, vasoconstriction, vasodilatation and later the development of atherosclerosis. Red wines from Georgia and central and western Europe inhibited cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) activity in the range of 63–94%, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity in the range of 20–44% (tested at a concentration of 5 mL/L), and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activity in the range of 72–84% (at a concentration of 18.87 mL/L). White wines inhibited 5-LOX in the range of 41–68% at a concentration of 18.87 mL/L and did not inhibit COX-1 and COX-2. Piceatannol (IC50 = 0.76 μM) was identified as a strong inhibitor of 5-LOX followed by luteolin (IC50 = 2.25 μM), quercetin (IC50 = 3.29 μM), and myricetin (IC50 = 4.02 μM). trans-Resveratrol was identified as an inhibitor of COX-1 (IC50 = 2.27 μM) and COX-2 (IC50 = 3.40 μM). Red wine as a complex mixture is a powerful inhibitor of COX-1, COX-2, and 5-LOX, the enzymes involved in eicosanoid biosynthetic pathway. PMID:24976682

  8. Regulation of rotenone-induced microglial activation by 5-lipoxygenase and cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Lu; Yang, Yi; Xu, Dong-Min; Zhang, Si-Ran; Li, Chen-Tan; Zheng, Wei; Yu, Shu-Ying; Wei, Er-Qing; Zhang, Li-Hui

    2014-07-14

    The 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) products cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) are potent pro-inflammatory mediators. CysLTs mediate their biological actions through activating CysLT receptors (CysLT(1)R and CysLT(2)R). We have recently reported that 5-LOX and CysLT(1)R mediated PC12 cell injury induced by high concentrations of rotenone (0.3-10 μM), which was reduced by the selective 5-LOX inhibitor zileuton and CysLT(1)R antagonist montelukast. The purpose of this study was to examine the regulatory roles of the 5-LOX/CysLT(1)R pathway in microglial activation induced by low concentration rotenone. After mouse microglial BV2 cells were stimulated with rotenone (0.3-3 nM), phagocytosis and release of pro-inflammatory cytokine were assayed as indicators of microglial activation. We found that rotenone (1 and 3 nM) increased BV2 microglial phagocytosis and the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Zileuton and montelukast prevented rotenone (3 nM)-induced phagocytosis and cytokine release. Furthermore, rotenone significantly up-regulated 5-LOX expression, induced 5-LOX translocation to the nuclear envelope, and increased the production of CysLTs. These responses were inhibited by zileuton. Rotenone also increased CysLT(1)R expression and induced nuclear translocation of CysLT(1)R. In primary rat microglia, rotenone (10 nM) increased release of IL-1β and TNF-α, whereas zileuton (0.1 μΜ) and montelukast (0.01 μΜ) significantly inhibited this response. These results indicated that 5-LOX and CysLT(1)R might be key regulators of microglial activation induced by low concentration of rotenone. Interference of 5-LOX/CysLT(1)R pathway may be an effective therapeutic strategy for microglial inflammation. PMID:24858057

  9. Lipid metabolism enzyme 5-LOX and its metabolite LTB4 are capable of activating transcription factor NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Wenhui; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX is able to upregulate expression of NF-{kappa}B p65. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX enhances nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 via increasing p-I{kappa}B-{alpha} level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5-LOX stimulates transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LTB4 activates transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. -- Abstract: The issue that lipid metabolism enzyme and its metabolites regulate transcription factors in cancer cell is not fully understood. In this study, we first report that the lipid metabolism enzyme 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and its metabolite leukotriene B4 (LTB4) are capable of activating nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) in hepatoma cells. We found that the treatment of MK886 (an inhibitor of 5-LOX) or knockdown of 5-LOX was able to downregulate the expression of NF-{kappa}B p65 at the mRNA level and decreased the phosphorylation level of inhibitor {kappa}B{alpha} (I{kappa}B{alpha}) in the cytoplasm of hepatoma HepG2 or H7402 cells, which resulted in the decrease of the level of nuclear NF-{kappa}B p65. These were confirmed by immunofluorescence staining in HepG2 cell. Moreover, the above treatments were able to decrease the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in the cells. The LTB4, one of metabolites of 5-LOX, is responsible for 5-LOX-activated NF-{kappa}B in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that the lipid metabolism enzyme 5-LOX and its metabolite LTB4 are capable of activating transcription factor NF-{kappa}B in hepatoma cells. Our finding provides new insight into the significance of lipid metabolism in activation of transcription factors in cancer.

  10. 5-Lipoxygenase Activity Increases Susceptibility to Experimental Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tristão, Fabrine Sales Massafera; Rocha, Fernanda Agostini; Moreira, Ana Paula; Cunha, Fernando Queiroz; Rossi, Marcos Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic mycosis caused by the thermodimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Leukotrienes and lipoxins are lipid mediators produced after 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) activation that exhibit pro- and anti-inflammatory roles, respectively. Here, we have investigated the contribution of 5-LO enzymatic activity in PCM using an experimental model of P. brasiliensis infection. B6.129 wild-type (B6.129) and 5-LO-deficient (5-LO−/−) mice were intravenously inoculated with a virulent strain of P. brasiliensis (Pb18), and the survival rate of the infected mice was investigated on different days after yeast infection. 5-LO−/− mice exhibited an increased survival rate associated with a decreased number of CFU. The resistance of 5-LO−/− during PCM was associated with augmented nitric oxide (NO) production and the formation of compact granulomas. In addition, the absence of 5-LO was associated with a diminished number of CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells, higher levels of gamma interferon and interleukin-12, and increased T-bet (a T-box transcription factor that directs Th1 lineage commitment) mRNA levels in the lungs. Taken together, our results show for the first time that 5-LO enzymatic activity increases susceptibility to P. brasiliensis, suggesting that this pathway may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention during PCM. PMID:23381993

  11. Phospholipid Ozonation Products Activate the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zemski Berry, Karin A; Murphy, Robert C

    2016-08-15

    Ozone is a highly reactive environmental toxicant that can react with the double bonds of lipids in pulmonary surfactant. This study was undertaken to investigate the proinflammatory properties of the major lipid-ozone product in pulmonary surfactant, 1-palmitoyl-2-(9'-oxo-nonanoyl)-glycerophosphocholine (16:0/9al-PC), with respect to eicosanoid production. A dose-dependent increase in the formation of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products was observed in murine resident peritoneal macrophages (RPM) and alveolar macrophages (AM) upon treatment with 16:0/9al-PC. In contrast, the production of cyclooxygenase (COX) derived eicosanoids did not change from basal levels in the presence of 16:0/9al-PC. When 16:0/9al-PC and the TLR2 ligand, zymosan, were added to RPM or AM, an enhancement of 5-LO product formation along with a concomitant decrease in COX product formation was observed. Neither intracellular calcium levels nor arachidonic acid release was influenced by the addition of 16:0/9al-PC to RPM. Results from mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor studies and direct measurement of phosphorylation of MAPKs revealed that 16:0/9al-PC activates the p38 MAPK pathway in RPM, which results in the activation of 5-LO. Our results indicate that 16:0/9al-PC has a profound effect on the eicosanoid pathway, which may have implications in inflammatory pulmonary disease states where eicosanoids have been shown to play a role. PMID:27448436

  12. Active site characterization and structure based 3D-QSAR studies on non-redox type 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Khan, Naveed; Zafar, Syed Kashif; Moin, Syed Tarique

    2016-06-10

    Structure-based 3D-QSAR study was performed on a class of 5-benzylidene-2-phenylthiazolinones non-redox type 5-LOX inhibitors. In this study, binding pocket of 5-Lipoxygenase (pdb id 3o8y) was identified by manual docking using 15-LOX (pdb id 2p0m) as a reference structure. Additionally, most of the binding site residues were found conserved in both structures. These non-redox inhibitors were then docked into the binding site of 5-LOX. To generate reliable CoMFA and CoMSIA models, atom fit data base alignment method using docked conformation of the most active compound was employed. The q(2)cv and r(2)ncv values for CoMFA model were found to be 0.549 and 0.702, respectively. The q(2)cv and r(2)ncv values for the selected CoMSIA model comprised four descriptors steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydrogen bond donor fields were found to be 0.535 and 0.951, respectively. Obtained results showed that our generated model was statistically reliable. Furthermore, an external test set validates the reliability of the predicted model by calculating r(2)pred i.e.0.787 and 0.571 for CoMFA and CoMSIA model, respectively. 3D contour maps generated from CoMFA and CoMSIA models were utilized to determine the key structural features of ligands responsible for biological activities. The applied protocol will be helpful to design more potent and selective inhibitors of 5-LOX. PMID:27044904

  13. The novel benzimidazole derivative BRP-7 inhibits leukotriene biosynthesis in vitro and in vivo by targeting 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP)

    PubMed Central

    Pergola, C; Gerstmeier, J; Mönch, B; Çalışkan, B; Luderer, S; Weinigel, C; Barz, D; Maczewsky, J; Pace, S; Rossi, A; Sautebin, L; Banoglu, E; Werz, O

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Leukotrienes (LTs) are inflammatory mediators produced via the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) pathway and are linked to diverse disorders, including asthma, allergic rhinitis and cardiovascular diseases. We recently identified the benzimidazole derivative BRP-7 as chemotype for anti-LT agents by virtual screening targeting 5-LOX-activating protein (FLAP). Here, we aimed to reveal the in vitro and in vivo pharmacology of BRP-7 as an inhibitor of LT biosynthesis. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We analysed LT formation and performed mechanistic studies in human neutrophils and monocytes, in human whole blood (HWB) and in cell-free assays. The effectiveness of BRP-7 in vivo was evaluated in rat carrageenan-induced pleurisy and mouse zymosan-induced peritonitis. KEY RESULTS BRP-7 potently suppressed LT formation in neutrophils and monocytes and this was accompanied by impaired 5-LOX co-localization with FLAP. Neither the cellular viability nor the activity of 5-LOX in cell-free assays was affected by BRP-7, indicating that a functional FLAP is needed for BRP-7 to inhibit LTs, and FLAP bound to BRP-7 linked to a solid matrix. Compared with the FLAP inhibitor MK-886, BRP-7 did not significantly inhibit COX-1 or microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1, implying the selectivity of BRP-7 for FLAP. Finally, BRP-7 was effective in HWB and impaired inflammation in vivo, in rat pleurisy and mouse peritonitis, along with reducing LT levels. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS BRP-7 potently suppresses LT biosynthesis by interacting with FLAP and exhibits anti-inflammatory effectiveness in vivo, with promising potential for further development. PMID:24641614

  14. Kinetic investigation of human 5-lipoxygenase with arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Monica; Kumar, Ramakrishnan B; Balagunaseelan, Navisraj; Hamberg, Mats; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Rådmark, Olof; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2016-08-01

    Human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is responsible for the formation of leukotriene (LT)A4, a pivotal intermediate in the biosynthesis of the leukotrienes, a family of proinflammatory lipid mediators. 5-LOX has thus gained attention as a potential drug target. However, details of the kinetic mechanism of 5-LOX are still obscure. In this Letter, we investigated the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 5-LOX with its physiological substrate, arachidonic acid (AA). The observed KIE is 20±4 on kcat and 17±2 on kcat/KM at 25°C indicating a non-classical reaction mechanism. The observed rates show slight temperature dependence at ambient temperatures ranging from 4 to 35°C. Also, we observed low Arrhenius prefactor ratio (AH/AD=0.21) and a small change in activation energy (Ea(D)-Ea(H)=3.6J/mol) which suggests that 5-LOX catalysis involves tunneling as a mechanism of H-transfer. The measured KIE for 5-LOX involves a change in regioselectivity in response to deuteration at position C7, resulting in H-abstraction form C10 and formation of 8-HETE. The viscosity experiments influence the (H)kcat, but not (D)kcat. However the overall kcat/KM is not affected for labeled or unlabeled AA, suggesting that either the product release or conformational rearrangement might be involved in dictating kinetics of 5-LOX at saturating conditions. Investigation of available crystal structures suggests the role of active site residues (F421, Q363 and L368) in regulating the donor-acceptor distances, thus affecting H-transfer as well as regiospecificity. In summary, our study shows that that the H-abstraction is the rate limiting step for 5-LOX and that the observed KIE of 5-LOX is masked by a change in regioselectivity. PMID:27363940

  15. Blockade of TRPM7 Channel Activity and Cell Death by Inhibitors of 5-Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsiang-Chin; Xie, Jia; Zhang, Zheng; Su, Li-Ting; Yue, Lixia; Runnels, Loren W.

    2010-01-01

    TRPM7 is a ubiquitous divalent-selective ion channel with its own kinase domain. Recent studies have shown that suppression of TRPM7 protein expression by RNA interference increases resistance to ischemia-induced neuronal cell death in vivo and in vitro, making the channel a potentially attractive pharmacological target for molecular intervention. Here, we report the identification of the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors, NDGA, AA861, and MK886, as potent blockers of the TRPM7 channel. Using a cell-based assay, application of these compounds prevented cell rounding caused by overexpression of TRPM7 in HEK-293 cells, whereas inhibitors of 12-lipoxygenase and 15-lipoxygenase did not prevent the change in cell morphology. Application of the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors blocked heterologously expressed TRPM7 whole-cell currents without affecting the protein's expression level or its cell surface concentration. All three inhibitors were also effective in blocking the native TRPM7 current in HEK-293 cells. However, two other 5-lipoxygenase specific inhibitors, 5,6-dehydro-arachidonic acid and zileuton, were ineffective in suppressing TRPM7 channel activity. Targeted knockdown of 5-lipoxygenase did not reduce TRPM7 whole-cell currents. In addition, application of 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE), the product of 5-lipoxygenase, or 5-HPETE's downstream metabolites, leukotriene B4 and leukotriene D4, did not stimulate TRPM7 channel activity. These data suggested that NDGA, AA861, and MK886 reduced the TRPM7 channel activity independent of their effect on 5-lipoxygenase activity. Application of AA861 and NDGA reduced cell death for cells overexpressing TRPM7 cultured in low extracellular divalent cations. Moreover, treatment of HEK-293 cells with AA861 increased cell resistance to apoptotic stimuli to a level similar to that obtained for cells in which TRPM7 was knocked down by RNA interference. In conclusion, NDGA, AA861, and MK886 are potent blockers of the TRPM7 channel

  16. Expression, purification and crystallization of human 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein with leukotriene-biosynthesis inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shihua; McKeever, Brian M.; Wisniewski, Douglas; Miller, Douglas K.; Spencer, Robert H.; Chu, Lin; Ujjainwalla, Feroze; Yamin, Ting-Ting; Evans, Jilly F.; Becker, Joseph W.; Ferguson, Andrew D.

    2007-12-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of human 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein in complex with two leukotriene-biosynthesis inhibitors is decribed. The processes that were used to generate diffraction quality crystals are presented in detail. The nuclear membrane protein 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) plays an essential role in leukotriene synthesis. Recombinant full-length human FLAP with a C-terminal hexahistidine tag has been expressed and purified from the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli. Diffraction-quality crystals of FLAP in complex with leukotriene-synthesis inhibitor MK-591 and with an iodinated analogue of MK-591 have been grown using the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method. The crystals exhibit tetragonal symmetry (P42{sub 1}2) and diffracted to a resolution limit of 4 Å.

  17. ATP Allosterically Activates the Human 5-Lipoxygenase Molecular Mechanism of Arachidonic Acid and 5(S)-Hydroperoxy-6(E),8(Z),11(Z),14(Z)-eicosatetraenoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) reacts with arachidonic acid (AA) to first generate 5(S)-hydroperoxy-6(E),8(Z),11(Z),14(Z)-eicosatetraenoic acid [5(S)-HpETE] and then an epoxide from 5(S)-HpETE to form leukotriene A4, from a single polyunsaturated fatty acid. This work investigates the kinetic mechanism of these two processes and the role of ATP in their activation. Specifically, it was determined that epoxidation of 5(S)-HpETE (dehydration of the hydroperoxide) has a rate of substrate capture (Vmax/Km) significantly lower than that of AA hydroperoxidation (oxidation of AA to form the hydroperoxide); however, hyperbolic kinetic parameters for ATP activation indicate a similar activation for AA and 5(S)-HpETE. Solvent isotope effect results for both hydroperoxidation and epoxidation indicate that a specific step in its molecular mechanism is changed, possibly because of a lowering of the dependence of the rate-limiting step on hydrogen atom abstraction and an increase in the dependency on hydrogen bond rearrangement. Therefore, changes in ATP concentration in the cell could affect the production of 5-LOX products, such as leukotrienes and lipoxins, and thus have wide implications for the regulation of cellular inflammation. PMID:24893149

  18. Flavocoxid, a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase, blunts pro-inflammatory phenotype activation in endotoxin-stimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Altavilla, D; Squadrito, F; Bitto, A; Polito, F; Burnett, BP; Di Stefano, V; Minutoli, L

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The flavonoids, baicalin and catechin, from Scutellaria baicalensis and Acacia catechu, respectively, have been used for various clinical applications. Flavocoxid is a mixed extract containing baicalin and catechin, and acts as a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX) and 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) enzymes. The anti-inflammatory activity, measured by protein and gene expression of inflammatory markers, of flavocoxid in rat peritoneal macrophages stimulated with Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was investigated. Experimental approach: LPS-stimulated (1 µg·mL−1) peritoneal rat macrophages were co-incubated with different concentrations of flavocoxid (32–128 µg·mL−1) or RPMI medium for different incubation times. Inducible COX-2, 5-LOX, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and inhibitory protein κB-α (IκB-α) levels were evaluated by Western blot analysis. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) binding activity was investigated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) gene and protein expression were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay respectively. Finally, malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitrite levels in macrophage supernatants were evaluated. Key results: LPS stimulation induced a pro-inflammatory phenotype in rat peritoneal macrophages. Flavocoxid (128 µg·mL−1) significantly inhibited COX-2 (LPS = 18 ± 2.1; flavocoxid = 3.8 ± 0.9 integrated intensity), 5-LOX (LPS = 20 ± 3.8; flavocoxid = 3.1 ± 0.8 integrated intensity) and iNOS expression (LPS = 15 ± 1.1; flavocoxid = 4.1 ± 0.4 integrated intensity), but did not modify COX-1 expression. PGE2 and LTB4 levels in culture supernatants were consequently decreased. Flavocoxid also prevented the loss of IκB-α protein (LPS = 1.9 ± 0.2; flavocoxid = 7.2 ± 1.6 integrated intensity), blunted increased NF-κB binding activity (LPS = 9.2 ± 2; flavocoxid = 2.4 ± 0.7 integrated intensity) and the

  19. Natural Forms of Vitamin E and 13′-Carboxychromanol, a Long-Chain Vitamin E Metabolite, Inhibit Leukotriene Generation from Stimulated Neutrophils by Blocking Calcium Influx and Suppressing 5-Lipoxygenase Activity, Respectively

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ziying; Yin, Xinmin; Jiang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Leukotrienes generated by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX)–catalyzed reaction are key regulators of inflammation. In ionophore-stimulated (A23187; 1–2.5 μM) human blood neutrophils or differentiated HL-60 cells, vitamin E forms differentially inhibited leukotriene B4 (LTB4) with an IC50 of 5–20 μM for γ-tocopherol, δ-tocopherol (δT), and γ-tocotrienol, but a much higher IC50 for α-tocopherol. 13′-Carboxychromanol, a long-chain metabolite of δT, suppressed neutrophil- and HL-60 cell-generated LTB4 with an IC50 of 4–7 μM and potently inhibited human recombinant 5-LOX activity with an IC50 of 0.5–1 μM. In contrast, vitamin E forms had no effect on human 5-LOX activity but impaired ionophore-induced intracellular calcium increase and calcium influx as well as the subsequent signaling including ERK1/2 phosphorylation and 5-LOX translocation from cytosol to the nucleus, a key event for 5-LOX activation. Further investigation showed that δT suppressed cytosolic Ca2+ increase and/or LTB4 formation triggered by ionophores, sphingosine 1-phosphate, and lysophosphatidic acid but not by fMLP or thapsigargin, whereas 13′-carboxychromanol decreased cellular production of LTB4 regardless of different stimuli, consistent with its strong inhibition of the 5-LOX activity. These observations suggest that δT does not likely affect fMLP receptor-mediated signaling or store depletion-induced calcium entry. Instead, we found that δT prevented ionophore-caused cytoplasmic membrane disruption, which may account for its blocking of calcium influx. These activities by vitamin E forms and long-chain carboxychromanol provide potential molecular bases for the differential anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin E forms in vivo. PMID:21169551

  20. Inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase triggers apoptosis in prostate cancer cells via down-regulation of protein kinase C-epsilon

    PubMed Central

    Sarveswaran, Sivalokanathan; Thamilselvan, Vijayalakshmi; Brodie, Chaya; Ghosh, Jagadananda

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that human prostate cancer cells constitutively generate 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolites from arachidonic acid, and inhibition of 5-LOX blocks production of 5-LOX metabolites and triggers apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. This apoptosis is prevented by exogenous metabolites of 5-LOX, suggesting an essential role of 5-LOX metabolites in the survival of prostate cancer cells. However, downstream signaling mechanisms which mediate the survival-promoting effects of 5-LOX metabolites in prostate cancer cells are still unknown. Recently, we reported that MK591, a specific inhibitor of 5-LOX activity, induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells without inhibition of Akt, or ERK, two well-characterized regulators of pro-survival mechanisms, suggesting the existence of an Akt and ERK-independent survival mechanism in prostate cancer cells regulated by 5-LOX. Here, we report that 5-LOX inhibition-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells occurs via rapid inactivation of protein kinase C-epsilon (PKCε), and that exogenous 5-LOX metabolites prevent both 5-LOX inhibition-induced down-regulation of PKCε and induction of apoptosis. Interestingly, pre-treatment of prostate cancer cells with diazoxide (a chemical activator of PKCε), or KAE1-1 (a cell-permeable, octa-peptide specific activator of PKCε) prevents 5-LOX inhibition-induced apoptosis, which indicates that inhibition of 5-LOX triggers apoptosis in prostate cancer cells via down-regulation of PKCε. Altogether, these findings suggest that metabolism of arachidonic acid by 5-LOX activity promotes survival of prostate cancer cells via signaling through PKCε, a pro-survival serine/threonine kinase. PMID:21824498

  1. Increased activity of 5-lipoxygenase in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from asthmatic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Mita, H.; Yui, Y.; Taniguchi, N.; Yasueda, H.; Shida, T.

    1985-09-09

    The formation of 5-lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid, 5-HETE and 5,12-diHETE, was determined in 100,000 x g supernatant of polymorphonuclear leukocytes from 17 healthy subjects, 17 patients with extrinsic asthma and 15 patients with intrinsic asthma. After the supernatant was incubated with /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid in the presence of calcium and indomethacin, the lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid were separated by thin layer chromatography. The results were expressed as the percentage conversion of /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid into the product per 10/sup 7/ cells. The formation of 5,12-diHETE, but not of the 5-HETE, was significantly increased in the cells from the group of patients with extrinsic asthma (4.38 +/- 0.78%, mean +/- S.E.; p < 0.01) and intrinsic asthma (6.09 +/- 1.11%; p < 0.01), when compared to normal subjects (1.74 +/- 0.30%). Both extrinsic and intrinsic asthmatics had significantly enhanced 5-lipoxygenase activity, which was expressed as the sum of percentage conversion of /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid into 5-HETE and 5,12-diHETE. The percentage conversion in normal subjects was 4.19 +/- 0.39%, 6.24 +/- 0.84% for 17 patients with extrinsic asthma (p < 0.05), and 8.59 +/- 1.29% for 15 patients with intrinsic asthma (p < 0.01). There was no significant difference between these asthmatic groups. These results indicate that 5-lipoxygenase activity is increased in patients with bronchial asthma. 22 references, 3 figures.

  2. Suppression of Oxidative Stress and 5-Lipoxygenase Activation by Edaravone Improves Depressive-Like Behavior after Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Hoshijima, Michihiro; Yawata, Toshio; Nobumoto, Atsuya; Tsuda, Masayuki; Shimizu, Takahiro; Saito, Motoaki; Ueba, Tetuya

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Brain concussions are a serious public concern and are associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as depression. Patients with concussion who suffer from depression often experience distress. Nevertheless, few pre-clinical studies have examined concussion-induced depression, and there is little information regarding its pharmacological management. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, can exert neuroprotective effects in several animal models of neurological disorders. However, the effectiveness of edaravone in animal models of concussion-induced depression remains unclear. In this study, we examined whether edaravone could prevent concussion-induced depression. Mice were subjected to a weight-drop injury and intravenously administered edaravone (3.0 mg/kg) or vehicle immediately after impact. Serial magnetic resonance imaging showed no abnormalities of the cerebrum on diffusion T1- and T2-weighted images. We found that edaravone suppressed concussion-induced depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test, which was accompanied by inhibition of increased hippocampal and cortical oxidative stress (OS) and suppression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) translocation to the nuclear envelope in hippocampal astrocytes. Hippocampal OS in concussed mice was also prevented by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor, apocynin, and administration of BWB70C, a 5-LOX inhibitor, immediately and 24 h after injury prevented depressive-like behaviors in concussed mice. Further, antidepressant effects of edaravone were observed in mice receiving 1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg of edaravone immediately after impact, but not at a lower dose of 0.1 mg/kg. This antidepressant effect persisted up to 1 h after impact, whereas edaravone treatment at 3 h after impact had no effect on concussion-induced depressive-like behavior. These results suggest that edaravone protects against concussion-induced depression, and this protection is mediated by suppression of

  3. Synthesis and biological evaluation of salicylic acid and N-acetyl-2-carboxybenzenesulfonamide regioisomers possessing a N-difluoromethyl-1,2-dihydropyrid-2-one pharmacophore: dual inhibitors of cyclooxygenases and 5-lipoxygenase with anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Morshed A; Abdellatif, Khaled R A; Dong, Ying; Das, Dipankar; Yu, Gang; Velázquez, Carlos A; Suresh, Mavanur R; Knaus, Edward E

    2009-12-15

    A novel class of salicylic acid and N-acetyl-2-carboxybenzenesulfonamide regioisomers possessing a N-difluoromethyl-1,2-dihydropyrid-2-one pharmacophore attached to its C-4 or C-5 position was designed for evaluation as anti-inflammatory (AI) agents. Replacement of the 2,4-difluorophenyl ring in diflunisal by the N-difluoromethyl-1,2-dihydropyrid-2-one moiety provided compounds showing dual selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitory activities. AI structure-activity studies showed that the C-4 (14a) and C-5 (14b) salicylate regioisomers were 1.4- and 1.6-fold more potent than aspirin, and the C-5 N-acetyl-2-carboxybenzenesulfonamide regioisomer (22b) was 1.3- and 2.8-fold more potent than ibuprofen and aspirin, respectively. In vivo ulcer index (UI) studies showed that the 4- and 5-(N-difluoromethyl-1,2-dihydropyrid-2-one-4-yl)salicylic acids (14a and 14b) were completely non-ulcerogenic since no gastric lesions were present (UI=0) relative to aspirin (UI=57) at an equivalent mumol/kg oral dose. The N-difluoromethyl-1,2-dihydropyridin-2-one moiety provides a novel 5-LOX pharmacophore for the design of cyclic hydroxamic mimetics for exploitation in the development of dual COX-2/5-LOX inhibitory AI drugs. PMID:19884005

  4. Rapid Stimulation of 5-Lipoxygenase Activity in Potato by the Fungal Elicitor Arachidonic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Bostock, Richard M.; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Choi, Doil; Ricker, Karin E.; Ward, Bernard L.

    1992-01-01

    The activity of lipoxygenase (LOX) in aged potato tuber discs increased by almost 2-fold following treatment of the discs with the fungal elicitor arachidonic acid (AA). Enzyme activity increased above that in untreated discs within 30 min after AA treatment, peaked at 1 to 3 h, and returned to near control levels by 6 h. The majority of the activity was detected in a soluble fraction (105,000g supernatant), but a minor portion was also associated with a particulate fraction enriched in microsomal membranes (105,000g pellet); both activities were similarly induced. 5-Hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid was the principal product following incubation of these extracts with AA. Antibodies to soybean LOX strongly reacted with a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 95-kD present in both soluble and particulate fractions whose abundance generally corresponded with LOX activity in extracts. LOX activity was not enhanced by treatment of the discs with nonelicitor fatty acids or by branched β-glucans from the mycelium of Phytophthora infestans. Prior treatment of the discs with abscisic acid, salicylhydroxamic acid, or n-propyl gallate, all of which have been shown to suppress AA induction of the hypersensitive response, inhibited the AA-induced increment in LOX activity. Cycloheximide pretreatment, which abolishes AA elicitor activity for other responses such as phytoalexin induction, did not inhibit LOX activity in water- or elicitor-treated discs but enhanced activity similar to that observed by AA treatment. The elicitor-induced increase in 5-LOX activity preceded or temporally paralleled the induction of other studied responses to AA, including the accumulation of mRNAs for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase reported here. The results are discussed in relation to the proposed role of the 5-LOX in signal-response coupling of arachidonate elicitation of the hypersensitive response. Images Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID

  5. Myeloid Cell 5-Lipoxygenase Activating Protein Modulates the Response to Vascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhou; Ricciotti, Emanuela; Miwa, Takashi; Liu, Shulin; Ihida-Stansbury, Kaori; Landersberg, Gavin; Jones, Peter L.; Scalia, Rosario; Song, Wenchao; Assoian, Richard K.; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Human genetics have implicated the 5- lipoxygenase (5-LO) enzyme in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and an inhibitor of the 5-LO activating protein (FLAP) is in clinical development for asthma. Objective Here we determined whether FLAP deletion modifies the response to vascular injury. Methods and Results Vascular remodeling was characterized 4 weeks after femoral arterial injury in FLAP knockout (FLAP KO) mice and wild type (WT) controls. Both neointimal hyperplasia and the intima/media ratio of the injured artery were significantly reduced in the FLAP KOs while endothelial integrity was preserved. Lesional myeloid cells were depleted and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, as reflected by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, was markedly attenuated by FLAP deletion. Inflammatory cytokine release from FLAP KO macrophages was depressed and their restricted ability to induce VSMC migration ex vivo was rescued with leukotriene B4 (LTB4). FLAP deletion restrained injury and attenuated upregulation of the extracellular matrix protein, tenascin C (TNC), which affords a scaffold for VSMC migration. Correspondingly, the phenotypic modulation of VSMC to a more synthetic phenotype, reflected by morphological change, loss of α-smooth muscle cell actin and upregulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) -1 was also suppressed in FLAP KO mice. Transplantation of FLAP replete myeloid cells rescued the proliferative response to vascular injury. Conclusion Expression of lesional FLAP in myeloid cells promotes LTB4 dependent VSMC phenotypic modulation, intimal migration and proliferation. PMID:23250985

  6. Acrolein increases 5-lipoxygenase expression in murine macrophages through activation of ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chae E.; Lee, Seung J.; Seo, Kyo W.; Park, Hye M.; Yun, Jung W.; Bae, Jin U.; Bae, Sun S.; Kim, Chi D.

    2010-05-15

    Episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants has been linked to acute myocardial infarction, and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is involved in the production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which destabilizes atherosclerotic plaques. Thus, the present study determined the effect of acrolein on 5-LO/leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) production in murine macrophages. Stimulation of J774A.1 cells with acrolein led to increased LTB{sub 4} production in association with increased 5-LO expression. Acrolein-evoked 5-LO expression was blocked by pharmacological inhibition of the ERK pathway, but not by inhibitors for JNK and p38 MAPK pathways. In line with these results, acrolein exclusively increased the phosphorylation of ERK among these MAPK, suggesting a role for the ERK pathway in acrolein-induced 5-LO expression with subsequent production of LTB{sub 4}. Among the receptor tyrosine kinases including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), acrolein-evoked ERK phosphorylation was attenuated by AG1478, an EGFR inhibitor, but not by AG1295, a PDGFR inhibitor. In addition, acrolein-evoked 5-LO expression was also inhibited by inhibition of EGFR pathway, but not by inhibition of PDGFR pathway. These observations suggest that acrolein has a profound effect on the 5-LO pathway via an EGFR-mediated activation of ERK pathway, leading to acute ischemic syndromes through the generation of LTB{sub 4}, subsequent MMP-9 production and plaque rupture.

  7. Identification of the substrate access portal of 5-Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sunayana; Bartlett, Sue G.

    2016-01-01

    The overproduction of inflammatory lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid contributes to asthma and cardiovascular diseases, among other pathologies. Consequently, the enzyme that initiates the synthesis of pro-inflammatory leukotrienes, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), is a target for drug design. The crystal structure of 5-LOX revealed a fully encapsulated active site, thus the point of substrate entry is not known. We asked whether a structural motif, a “cork” present in 5-LOX but absent in other mammalian lipoxygenases, might be ejected to allow substrate access. Our results indicate that reduction of cork volume facilitates access to the active site. However, if cork entry into the site is obstructed, enzyme activity is significantly compromised. The results support a model in which the “cork” that shields the active site in the absence of substrate serves as the active site portal, but the “corking” amino acid Phe-177 plays a critical role in providing a fully functional active site. Thus the more appropriate metaphor for this structural motif is a “twist-and-pour” cap. Additional mutagenesis data are consistent with a role for His-600, deep in the elongated cavity, in positioning the substrate for catalysis. PMID:26427761

  8. Impact of simultaneous stimulation of 5-lipoxygenase and myeloperoxidase in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zschaler, Josefin; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophil 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) oxidizes arachidonic acid (AA) to 5S-hydro(pero)xy-6E,8Z,11Z, 14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-H(p)ETE) and leukotriene (LT)A4, which is further converted to the chemoattractant LTB4. These cells contain also the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) producing several potent oxidants such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Previously, it was shown that MPO-metabolites influence 5-LOX product formation. Here, we addressed the question, whether a simultaneous activation of MPO and 5-LOX in neutrophils results in comparable changes of 5-LOX activity. Human neutrophils were stimulated with H2O2 or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) for MPO activation and subsequently treated with calcium ionophore A23187 inducing 5-LOX product formation on endogenous AA. Special attention was drawn to neutrophil vitality, formation of MPO-derived metabolites and redox status. The pre-stimulation with H2O2 resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in the ratio of 5-HETE to the sum of LTB4+6-trans-LTB4 in consequence of MPO activation. Thereby no impairment of cell vitality and only a slightly reduction of total glutathione level was observed. An influence of MPO on 5-LOX product formation could be suggested using an MPO inhibitor. In contrast, the pre-stimulation with PMA resulted in different changes of 5-LOX product formation leading to a reduced amount of 5-HETE unaffected by MPO inhibition. Furthermore, impaired cell vitality and diminished redox status was detected after PMA stimulation. Nevertheless, a MPO-induced diminution of LTB4 was obvious. Further work is necessary to define the type of 5-LOX modification and investigate the effect of physiological MPO activators. PMID:27033421

  9. Mesenteric lymph diversion abrogates 5-lipoxygenase activation in the kidney following trauma and hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Stringham, John R.; Moore, Ernest E.; Gamboni, Fabia; Harr, Jeffrey N.; Fragoso, Miguel; Chin, Theresa L.; Carr, Caitlin E.; Silliman, Christopher C.; Banerjee, Anirban

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Early acute kidney injury (AKI) following trauma is associated with multiorgan failure and mortality. Leukotrienes have been implicated both in AKI and in acute lung injury. Activated 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) colocalizes with 5-LO–activating protein (FLAP) in the first step of leukotriene production following trauma and hemorrhagic shock (T/HS). Diversion of postshock mesenteric lymph, which is rich in the 5-LO substrate of arachidonate, attenuates lung injury and decreases 5-LO/FLAP associations in the lung after T/HS. We hypothesized that mesenteric lymph diversion (MLD) will also attenuate postshock 5-LO–mediated AKI. METHODS Rats underwent T/HS (laparotomy, hemorrhagic shock to a mean arterial pressure of 30 mm Hg for 45 minutes, and resuscitation), and MLD was accomplished via cannulation of the mesenteric duct. Extent of kidney injury was determined via histology score and verified by urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin assay. Kidney sections were immunostained for 5-LO and FLAP, and colocalization was determined by fluorescence resonance energy transfer signal intensity. The end leukotriene products of 5-LO were determined in urine. RESULTS AKI was evident in the T/HS group by derangement in kidney tubule architecture and confirmed by neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin assay, whereas MLD during T/HS preserved renal tubule morphology at a sham level. MLD during T/HS decreased the associations between 5-LO and FLAP demonstrated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy and decreased leukotriene production in urine. CONCLUSION 5-LO and FLAP colocalize in the interstitium of the renal medulla following T/HS. MLD attenuates this phenomenon, which coincides with pathologic changes seen in tubules during kidney injury and biochemical evidence of AKI. These data suggest that gut-derived leukotriene substrate predisposes the kidney and the lung to subsequent injury. PMID:24747451

  10. Impact of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants on the product profile of human 5-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Zschaler, Josefin; Dorow, Juliane; Schöpe, Louisa; Ceglarek, Uta; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    Human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) oxidizes arachidonic acid to 5S-hydroperoxy-6 E,8 Z,11 Z,14 Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HpETE) and leukotriene (LT) A4. In neutrophils, LTA4 is further converted to the potent chemoattractant LTB4. These cells also contain the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO), which produces several potent oxidants such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl), which are involved in pathogen defense and immune regulation. Here, we addressed the question whether MPO-derived oxidants are able to affect the activity of 5-LOX and the product profile of this enzyme. Human 5-LOX was incubated with increasing amounts of HOCl or HOBr. Afterward, arachidonic acid metabolites of 5-LOX were analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography as well as by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. The incubation of 5-LOX with the MPO-derived oxidants significantly changed the product profile of 5-LOX. Thereby, HOCl and HOBr increased the ratio of 5-H(p)ETE to 6-trans-LTB4 in a concentration-dependent manner. At low oxidant concentrations, there was a strong decrease in the yield of 6-trans-LTB4, whereas 5-HpETE did not change or increased. Additionally, the formation of 8-HpETE and 12-HpETE by 5-LOX rose slightly with increasing HOCl and HOBr. Comparable results were obtained with the MPO-H2O2-Cl(-) system when glucose oxidase and glucose were applied as a source of H2O2. This was necessary because of a strong impairment of 5-LOX activity by H2O2. In summary, MPO-derived oxidants showed a considerable impact on 5-LOX, impairing the epoxidation of 5-HpETE, whereas the hydroperoxidation of arachidonic acid was unaffected. Apparently, this was caused by an oxidative modification of critical amino acid residues of 5-LOX. Further work is necessary to assess the specific type and position of oxidation in the substrate-binding cavity of 5-LOX and to specify whether this interaction between 5-LOX and MPO-derived oxidants also takes place in

  11. Elucidation of the molecular mechanism and the efficacy in vivo of a novel 1,4-benzoquinone that inhibits 5-lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Schaible, A M; Filosa, R; Temml, V; Krauth, V; Matteis, M; Peduto, A; Bruno, F; Luderer, S; Roviezzo, F; Di Mola, A; Rosa, M; D'Agostino, B; Weinigel, C; Barz, D; Koeberle, A; Pergola, C; Schuster, D; Werz, O

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose 1,4-Benzoquinones are well-known inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX, the key enzyme in leukotriene biosynthesis), but the molecular mechanisms of 5-LOX inhibition are not completely understood. Here we investigated the molecular mode of action and the pharmacological profile of the novel 1,4-benzoquinone derivative 3-((decahydronaphthalen-6-yl)methyl)-2,5-dihydroxycyclohexa-2,5-diene-1,4-dione (RF-Id) in vitro and its effectiveness in vivo. Experimental Approach Mechanistic investigations in cell-free assays using 5-LOX and other enzymes associated with eicosanoid biosynthesis were conducted, along with cell-based studies in human leukocytes and whole blood. Molecular docking of RF-Id into the 5-LOX structure was performed to illustrate molecular interference with 5-LOX. The effectiveness of RF-Id in vivo was also evaluated in two murine models of inflammation. Key Results RF-Id consistently suppressed 5-LOX product synthesis in human leukocytes and human whole blood. RF-Id also blocked COX-2 activity but did not significantly inhibit COX-1, microsomal PGE2 synthase-1, cytosolic PLA2 or 12- and 15-LOX. Although RF-Id lacked radical scavenging activity, reducing conditions facilitated its inhibitory effect on 5-LOX whereas cell stress impaired its efficacy. The reduced hydroquinone form of RF-Id (RED-RF-Id) was a more potent inhibitor of 5-LOX as it had more bidirectional hydrogen bonds within the 5-LOX substrate binding site. Finally, RF-Id had marked anti-inflammatory effects in mice in vivo. Conclusions and Implications RF-Id represents a novel anti-inflammatory 1,4-benzoquinone that potently suppresses LT biosynthesis by direct inhibition of 5-LOX with effectiveness in vivo. Mechanistically, RF-Id inhibits 5-LOX in a non-redox manner by forming discrete molecular interactions within the active site of 5-LOX. PMID:24467325

  12. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase enhances the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin and 5-lipoxygenase activation protein inhibitor in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Yan; Yang, Jun; Inceoglu, Bora; Qiu, Hong; Ulu, Arzu; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D

    2010-03-15

    Inflammation is a multi-staged process whose expansive phase is thought to be driven by acutely released arachidonic acid (AA) and its metabolites. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), or soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is known to be anti-inflammatory. Inhibition of sEH stabilizes the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) products epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Here we used a non-selective COX inhibitor aspirin, a 5-lipoxygenase activation protein (FLAP) inhibitor MK886, and a sEH inhibitor t-AUCB to selectively modulate the branches of AA metabolism in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine model. We used metabolomic profiling to simultaneously monitor representative AA metabolites of each branch. In addition to the significant crosstalk among branches of the AA cascade during selective modulation of COX, LOX, or sEH, we demonstrated that co-administration of t-AUCB enhanced the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin or MK886, which was evidenced by the observations that co-administration resulted in favorable eicosanoid profiles and better control of LPS-mediated hypotension as well as hepatic protein expression of COX-2 and 5-LOX. Targeted disruption of the sEH gene displayed a parallel profile to that produced by t-AUCB. These observations demonstrate a significant level of crosstalk among the three major branches of the AA cascade and that they are not simply parallel pathways. These data illustrate that inhibition of sEH by both pharmacological intervention and gene knockout enhances the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin and MK886, suggesting the possibility of modulating multiple branches to achieve better therapeutic effects. PMID:19896470

  13. Association between arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (ALOX5AP) and lung function in a Korean population.

    PubMed

    Ro, M; Kim, S; Pyun, J-A; Shin, C; Cho, N H; Lee, J-Y; Koh, I; Kwack, K

    2012-08-01

    Arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (ALOX5AP) plays a role in the 5-lipoxygenase (LO) pathway, which includes the LTC(4), LTD(4), LTE(4) and LTB(4). These leukotrienes are known causative factors of asthma, allergy, atopy and cardiovascular diseases. ALOX5AP lacks enzyme activity and acts by helping 5-LO function. In this study, healthy and general subjects who live in rural and urban areas of Korea were tested for the association of ALOX5AP polymorphisms with lung function. Lung function was also estimated by calculating the predicted values for forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1) _%PRED) and the proportion of the forced vital capacity exhaled in the first second (FEV(1) /FVC_PRED). The linear regression was adjusted for residence area, gender, age, height and smoking status. The analysis revealed associations between FEV(1) and the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs9506352 and the haplotype TCAC (permuted P-value < 0.05). The linkage disequilibrium block that included the significant SNPs overlapped with SNPs that were revealed previously to associate with myocardial infarction and asthma and to affect lung function. This study is the first to demonstrate the association between lung function and ALOX5AP polymorphisms in a healthy and general population. PMID:22537113

  14. Pharmacophore modeling and virtual screening for designing potential 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aparoy, P; Kumar Reddy, K; Kalangi, Suresh K; Chandramohan Reddy, T; Reddanna, P

    2010-02-01

    Inhibitors of the 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) pathway have a therapeutic potential in a variety of inflammatory disorders such as asthma. In this study, chemical feature based pharmacophore models of inhibitors of 5-LOX have been developed with the aid of HipHop and HypoGen modules within Catalyst program package. The best quantitative pharmacophore model, Hypo1, which has the highest correlation coefficient (0.97), consists of two hydrogen-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic feature and one ring aromatic feature. Hypo1 was further validated by test set and cross validation method. The application of the model shows great success in predicting the activities of 65 known 5-LOX inhibitors in our test set with a correlation coefficient of 0.85 with a cross validation of 95% confidence level, proving that the model is reliable in identifying structurally diverse compounds for inhibitory activity against 5-LOX. Furthermore, Hypo1 was used as a 3D query for screening Maybridge and NCI databases within catalyst and also drug like compounds obtained from Enamine Ltd, which follow Lipinski's rule of five. The hit compounds were subsequently subjected to filtering by docking and visualization, to identify the potential lead molecules. Finally 5 potential lead compounds, identified in the above process, were evaluated for their inhibitory activities. These studies resulted in the identification of two compounds with potent inhibition of 5-LOX activity with IC(50) of 14 microM and 35 microM, respectively. These studies thus validate the pharmacophore model generated and suggest the usefulness of the model in screening of various small molecule libraries and identification of potential lead compounds for 5-LOX inhibition. PMID:20045317

  15. Conversion of human 5-lipoxygenase to a 15-lipoxygenase by a point mutation to mimic phosphorylation at Serine-663

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Nathaniel C.; Rui, Zhe; Neau, David B.; Waight, Maria T.; Bartlett, Sue G.; Boeglin, William E.; Brash, Alan R.; Newcomer, Marcia E.

    2012-08-31

    The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) initiates biosynthesis of the proinflammatory leukotriene lipid mediators and, together with 15-LOX, is also required for synthesis of the anti-inflammatory lipoxins. The catalytic activity of 5-LOX is regulated through multiple mechanisms, including Ca{sup 2+}-targeted membrane binding and phosphorylation at specific serine residues. To investigate the consequences of phosphorylation at S663, we mutated the residue to the phosphorylation mimic Asp, providing a homogenous preparation suitable for catalytic and structural studies. The S663D enzyme exhibits robust 15-LOX activity, as determined by spectrophotometric and HPLC analyses, with only traces of 5-LOX activity remaining; synthesis of the anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4 from arachidonic acid is also detected. The crystal structure of the S663D mutant in the absence and presence of arachidonic acid (in the context of the previously reported Stable-5-LOX) reveals substantial remodeling of helices that define the active site so that the once fully encapsulated catalytic machinery is solvent accessible. Our results suggest that phosphorylation of 5-LOX at S663 could not only down-regulate leukotriene synthesis but also stimulate lipoxin production in inflammatory cells that do not express 15-LOX, thus redirecting lipid mediator biosynthesis to the production of proresolving mediators of inflammation.

  16. Eugenol--the active principle from cloves inhibits 5-lipoxygenase activity and leukotriene-C4 in human PMNL cells.

    PubMed

    Raghavenra, H; Diwakr, B T; Lokesh, B R; Naidu, K A

    2006-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) play an important role in the modulation of inflammatory conditions in humans. PMNL cells recruited at the site of inflammation, release inflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes, proteolytic enzymes and reactive oxygen species. Among these, leukotrienes are implicated in pathophysiology of allergic and inflammatory disorders like asthma, allergic rhinitis, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the key enzyme in biosynthetic pathway of leukotrienes. Our earlier studies showed that spice phenolic active principles significantly inhibit 5-LO enzyme in human PMNLs. In this study we have further characterized the inhibitory mechanism of eugenol, the active principle of spice-clove on 5-LO enzyme and also its effect on leukotriene C((4)) (LTC(4)). Substrate dependent enzyme kinetics showed that the inhibitory effect of eugenol on 5-LO was of a non-competitive nature. Further, eugenol was found to significantly inhibit the formation of LTC(4) in calcium ionophore A23187 and arachidonic acid (AA) stimulated PMNL cells. These data clearly suggest that eugenol inhibits 5-LO by non-competitive mechanism and also inhibits formation of LTC(4) in human PMNL cells and thus may have beneficial role in modulating 5-LO pathway in human PMNL cells. PMID:16216483

  17. Structural optimization and biological evaluation of 1,5-disubstituted pyrazole-3-carboxamines as potent inhibitors of human 5-lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Mingyue; Zheng, Shuli; Jiang, Chunyi; Zhou, Xiaomei; Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Jihui; Ye, Deju; Zheng, Mingfang; Jiang, Hualiang; Liu, Dongxiang; Cheng, Jian; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is a well-validated drug target and its inhibitors are potential drugs for treating leukotriene-related disorders. Our previous work on structural optimization of the hit compound 2 from our in-house collection identified two lead compounds, 3a and 3b, exhibiting a potent inhibitory profile against 5-LOX with IC50 values less than 1 µmol/L in cell-based assays. Here, we further optimized these compounds to prepare a class of novel pyrazole derivatives by opening the fused-ring system. Several new compounds exhibited more potent inhibitory activity than the lead compounds against 5-LOX. In particular, compound 4e not only suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in brain inflammatory cells and protected neurons from oxidative toxicity, but also significantly decreased infarct damage in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia. Molecular docking analysis further confirmed the consistency of our theoretical results and experimental data. In conclusion, the excellent in vitro and in vivo inhibitory activities of these compounds against 5-LOX suggested that these novel chemical structures have a promising therapeutic potential to treat leukotriene-related disorders. PMID:26904397

  18. The anti-inflammatory pharmacology of Pycnogenol in humans involves COX-2 and 5-LOX mRNA expression in leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Canali, Raffaella; Comitato, Raffaella; Schonlau, Frank; Virgili, Fabio

    2009-09-01

    We investigated the effects of Pycnogenol supplementation on the arachidonic acid pathway in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) in response to an inflammatory stimulus. Pycnogenol is a standardised extract of French maritime pine bark consisting of procyanidins and polyphenolic monomers. Healthy volunteers aged 35 to 50 years were supplemented with 150 mg Pycnogenol a day for five days. Before and after the final day of supplementation, blood was drawn and PMNL were isolated. PMNL were primed with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and stimulated with the receptor-mediated agonist formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) to activate the arachidonic acid pathway and the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, thromboxane and prostaglandins. Pycnogenol supplementation inhibited 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity. This effect was associated with a compensatory up-regulation of COX-1 gene expression. Interestingly, Pycnogenol suspended the interdependency between 5-LOX and 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) expression. Pycnogenol supplementation reduced leukotriene production but did not leave prostaglandins unaltered, which we attribute to a decline of COX-2 activity in favour of COX-1. Here we show for the first time that Pycnogenol supplementation simultaneously inhibits COX-2 and 5-LOX gene expression and reduces leukotriene biosynthesis in human PMNL upon pro-inflammatory stimulation ex vivo. PMID:19508901

  19. Chemoprevention of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced Hamster Cheek Pouch Carcinogenesis by a 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor, Garcinol

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Sang, Shengmin; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that aberrant arachidonic acid metabolism, especially the 5-lipoxygenase (5-Lox) pathway, is involved in oral carcinogenesis, and can be targeted for cancer prevention. In order to develop potent topical agents for oral cancer chemoprevention, five known 5-Lox inhibitors from dietary and synthetic sources, Zileuton, ABT-761, Licofelone, Curcumin and Garcinol, were evaluated in silico for their potential efficacy. Garcinol, a polyisoprenylated benzophenone from the fruit rind of Garcinia spp., was found to be a promising agent based on the calculation of a theoretical activity index. Computer modeling showed that garcinol well fit the active site of 5-Lox, and potentially inhibited enzyme activity through interactions between the phenolic hydroxyl groups and the non-heme catalytic iron. In a short-term study on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-treated hamster cheek pouch, topical garcinol suppressed leukotriene B4 (LTB4) biosynthesis and inhibited inflammation and cell proliferation in the oral epithelium. In a long-term carcinogenesis study, topical garcinol significantly reduced the size of visible tumors, the number of cancer lesions, cell proliferation, and LTB4 biosynthesis. These results demonstrated that topical application of a 5-Lox inhibitor, garcinol, had chemopreventive effect on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis. PMID:23137051

  20. Chemoprevention of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis by a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, garcinol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Zhang, Xinyan; Lu, Ye; Shim, Joong-Youn; Sang, Shengmin; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that aberrant arachidonic acid metabolism, especially the 5-lipoxygenase (5-Lox) pathway, is involved in oral carcinogenesis and can be targeted for cancer prevention. To develop potent topical agents for oral cancer chemoprevention, 5 known 5-Lox inhibitors from dietary and synthetic sources (Zileuton, ABT-761, licofelone, curcumin, and garcinol) were evaluated in silico for their potential efficacy. Garcinol, a polyisoprenylated benzophenone from the fruit rind of Garcinia spp., was found to be a promising agent based on the calculation of a theoretical activity index. Computer modeling showed that garcinol well fit the active site of 5-Lox, and potentially inhibited enzyme activity through interactions between the phenolic hydroxyl groups and the non-heme catalytic iron. In a short-term study on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-treated hamster cheek pouch, topical garcinol suppressed leukotriene B4 (LTB4) biosynthesis and inhibited inflammation and cell proliferation in the oral epithelium. In a long-term carcinogenesis study, topical garcinol significantly reduced the size of visible tumors, the number of cancer lesions, cell proliferation, and LTB4 biosynthesis. These results demonstrated that topical application of a 5-Lox inhibitor, garcinol, had chemopreventive effect on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis. PMID:23137051

  1. 5-Lipoxygenase is located in the euchromatin of the nucleus in resting human alveolar macrophages and translocates to the nuclear envelope upon cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, J W; Coffey, M J; Brock, T G; Singer, I I; Peters-Golden, M

    1995-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) and 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) are two key proteins involved in the synthesis of leukotrienes (LT) from arachidonic acid. Although both alveolar macrophages (AM) and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) produce large amounts of LT after activation, 5-LO translocates from a soluble pool to a particulate fraction upon activation of PBL, but is contained in the particulate fraction in AM irrespective of activation. We have therefore examined the subcellular localization of 5-LO in autologous human AM and PBL collected from normal donors. While immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated little 5-LO in resting PBL, resting AM exhibited abundant 5-LO epitopes in the euchromatin region of the nucleus. The presence of substantial quantities of 5-LO in the nucleus of resting AM was verified by cell fractionation and immunoblot analysis and by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. In both AM and PBL activated by A23187, all of the observable 5-LO immunogold labeling was found associated with the nuclear envelope. In resting cells of both types, FLAP was predominantly associated with the nuclear envelope, and its localization was not affected by activation with A23187. The effects of MK-886, which binds to FLAP, were examined in ionophore-stimulated AM and PBL. Although MK-886 inhibited LT synthesis in both cell types, it failed to prevent the translocation of 5-LO to the nuclear envelope. These results indicate that the nuclear envelope is the site at which 5-LO interacts with FLAP and arachidonic acid to catalyze LT synthesis in activated AM as well as PBL, and that in resting AM the euchromatin region of the nucleus is the predominant source of the translocated enzyme. In addition, LT synthesis is a two-step process consisting of FLAP-independent translocation of 5-LO to the nuclear envelope followed by the FLAP-dependent activation of the enzyme. Images PMID:7738170

  2. 4,5-Diarylisoxazol-3-carboxylic acids: A new class of leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitors potentially targeting 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP).

    PubMed

    Banoglu, Erden; Çelikoğlu, Erşan; Völker, Susanna; Olgaç, Abdurrahman; Gerstmeier, Jana; Garscha, Ulrike; Çalışkan, Burcu; Schubert, Ulrich S; Carotti, Andrea; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Werz, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we report novel leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis inhibitors that may target 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) based on the previously identified isoxazole derivative (8). The design and synthesis was directed towards a subset of 4,5-diaryl-isoxazole-3-carboxylic acid derivatives as LT biosynthesis inhibitors. Biological evaluation disclosed a new skeleton of potential anti-inflammatory agents, exemplified by 39 and 40, which potently inhibit cellular 5-LO product synthesis (IC50 = 0.24 μM, each) seemingly by targeting FLAP with weak inhibition on 5-LO (IC50 ≥ 8 μM). Docking studies and molecular dynamic simulations with 5-LO and FLAP provide valuable insights into potential binding modes of the inhibitors. Together, these diaryl-isoxazol-3-carboxylic acids may possess potential as leads for development of effective anti-inflammatory drugs through inhibition of LT biosynthesis. PMID:26922224

  3. 5-lipoxygenase activation is involved in the mechanisms of chronic hepatic injury in a rat model of chronic aluminum overload exposure.

    PubMed

    Mai, Shaoshan; He, Qin; Wang, Hong; Hu, Xinyue; Luo, Ying; Yang, Yang; Kuang, Shengnan; Tian, Xiaoyan; Ma, Jie; Yang, Junqing

    2016-08-15

    We previously confirmed that rats overloaded with aluminum exhibited hepatic function damage and increased susceptibility to hepatic inflammation. However, the mechanism of liver toxicity by chronic aluminum overload is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated changes in the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) signaling pathway and its effect on liver injury in aluminum-overloaded rats. A rat hepatic injury model of chronic aluminum injury was established via the intragastric administration of aluminum gluconate (Al(3+) 200mg/kg per day, 5days a week for 20weeks). The 5-LO inhibitor, caffeic acid (10 and 30mg/kg), was intragastrically administered 1h after aluminum administration. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to visualize pathological changes in rat liver tissue. A series of biochemical indicators were measured with biochemistry assay or ELISAs. Immunochemistry and RT-PCR methods were used to detect 5-LO protein and mRNA expression in the liver, respectively. Caffeic acid administration protected livers against histopathological injury, decreased plasma ALT, AST, and ALP levels, decreased TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and LTs levels, increased the reactive oxygen species content, and down-regulated the mRNA and protein expressions of 5-LO in aluminum overloaded rats. Our results indicate that 5-lipoxygenase activation is mechanistically involved in chronic hepatic injury in a rat model of chronic aluminum overload exposure and that the 5-LO signaling pathway, which associated with inflammation and oxidative stress, is a potential therapeutic target for chronic non-infection liver diseases. PMID:27368151

  4. Simultaneous targeting of 5-LOX-COX and EGFR blocks progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Chinthalapally V.; Janakiram, Naveena B.; Madka, Venkateshwar; Devarkonda, Vishal; Brewer, Misty; Biddick, Laura; Lightfoot, Stan; Steele, Vernon E.; Mohammed, Altaf

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGRF) are over-expressed in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis, we show significant increase in COX-2, 5-LOX, and EGFR expression during PDAC progression. Targeting complementary pathways will achieve better treatment efficacy than a single agent high-dose strategy that could increase risk of side effects and tumor resistance. To target COX-2, 5-LOX, and EGFR simultaneously, we tested effects of licofelone (dual 5-LOX-COX inhibitor), and gefitinib (EGFR inhibitor), individually and in combination, on pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs) and their progression to PDAC using genetically engineered mice. Individually, licofelone (L) and gefitinib (G) significantly inhibited incidence of PDAC in male (72% L, 90% G, p < 0.0001) and female (90% L, 85% G, p < 0.0001) mice. The combination drug treatment produced complete inhibition of PDAC in both genders. Pancreata of mice receiving combination treatment showed significantly fewer Dclk1-positive cancer stem-like cells, inhibition of COX-2, 5-LOX, PCNA, EGFR and β-catenin expression (p < 0.05–0.0002), increased p21 expression. Significant changes in tumor immune responses and desmoplastic reaction was observed by NGS analysis in combination treatment (p < 0.05). In summary, early simultaneous targeting of 5-LOX-COX- and EGFR pathways may provide additive inhibitory effects leading to complete suppression of PDAC. PMID:26429877

  5. Computational insight into the catalytic implication of head/tail-first orientation of arachidonic acid in human 5-lipoxygenase: consequences for the positional specificity of oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Saura, Patricia; Maréchal, Jean-Didier; Masgrau, Laura; Lluch, José M; González-Lafont, Àngels

    2016-08-17

    In the present work we have combined homology modeling, protein-ligand dockings, quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations and molecular dynamics simulations to generate human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX):arachidonic acid (AA) complexes consistent with the 5-lipoxygenating activity (which implies hydrogen abstraction at the C7 position). Our results suggest that both the holo and the apo forms of human Stable 5-LOX could accommodate AA in a productive form for 5-lipoxygenation. The former, in a tail-first orientation, with the AA carboxylate end interacting with Lys409, gives the desired structures with C7 close to the Fe-OH(-) cofactor and suitable barrier heights for H7 abstraction. Only when using the apo form structure, a head-first orientation with the AA carboxylate close to His600 (a residue recently proposed as essential for AA positioning) is obtained in the docking calculations. However, the calculated barrier heights for this head-first orientation are in principle consistent with 5-LOX specificity, but also with 12/8 regioselectivity. Finally, long MD simulations give support to the recent hypothesis that the Phe177 + Tyr181 pair needs to close the active site access during the chemical reaction, and suggest that in the case of a head-first orientation Phe177 may be the residue interacting with the AA carboxylate. PMID:27489112

  6. A Single Amino Acid Difference between Mouse and Human 5-Lipoxygenase Activating Protein (FLAP) Explains the Speciation and Differential Pharmacology of Novel FLAP Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Blevitt, Jonathan M; Hack, Michael D; Herman, Krystal; Chang, Leon; Keith, John M; Mirzadegan, Tara; Rao, Navin L; Lebsack, Alec D; Milla, Marcos E

    2016-06-10

    5-Lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) plays a critical role in the metabolism of arachidonic acid to leukotriene A4, the precursor to the potent pro-inflammatory mediators leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4 Studies with small molecule inhibitors of FLAP have led to the discovery of a drug binding pocket on the protein surface, and several pharmaceutical companies have developed compounds and performed clinical trials. Crystallographic studies and mutational analyses have contributed to a general understanding of compound binding modes. During our own efforts, we identified two unique chemical series. One series demonstrated strong inhibition of human FLAP but differential pharmacology across species and was completely inactive in assays with mouse or rat FLAP. The other series was active across rodent FLAP, as well as human and dog FLAP. Comparison of rodent and human FLAP amino acid sequences together with an analysis of a published crystal structure led to the identification of amino acid residue 24 in the floor of the putative binding pocket as a likely candidate for the observed speciation. On that basis, we tested compounds for binding to human G24A and mouse A24G FLAP mutant variants and compared the data to that generated for wild type human and mouse FLAP. These studies confirmed that a single amino acid mutation was sufficient to reverse the speciation observed in wild type FLAP. In addition, a PK/PD method was established in canines to enable preclinical profiling of mouse-inactive compounds. PMID:27129215

  7. Characterization of the human 5-lipoxygenase gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshiko, S.; Radmark, O.; Samuelsson, B. )

    1990-12-01

    Nucleotide sequences that direct transcription of the human 5-lipoxygenase gene have been examined by ligation to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity in transfected HeLa and HL-60 cells. Various lengths of 5{prime}-flanking sequences up to 5.9 kilobase pairs 5{prime} of the transcriptional initiation sites were tested. Two positive and two negative apparent regulatory regions were seen. Part of the promoter sequence ({minus}179 to {minus}56 from ATG), which includes five repeated GC boxes (the putative Spl binding sequence) was essential for transcription in both HeLa and HL-60 cells. Gel-shift assays (using the DNA fragment {minus}212 to {minus}88) revealed that the transcriptional factor Spl could bind to this region of the 5-lipoxygenase promoter. Furthermore, HL-60 nuclear extracts contained specific nuclear factor(s) binding to 5-lipoxygenase promoter DNA, which could not be detected in HeLa cell nuclear extracts.

  8. 4-Hydroxynonenal enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages via 5-lipoxygenase-mediated activation of ERK and p38 MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung J.; Kim, Chae E.; Yun, Mi R.; Seo, Kyo W.; Park, Hye M.; Yun, Jung W.; Shin, Hwa K.; Bae, Sun S.; Kim, Chi D.

    2010-01-15

    Exaggerated levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) co-exist in macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions, and activated macrophages produce MMP-9 that degrades atherosclerotic plaque constituents. This study investigated the effects of HNE on MMP-9 production, and the potential role for 5-LO derivatives in MMP-9 production in murine macrophages. Stimulation of J774A.1 cells with HNE led to activation of 5-LO, as measured by leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) production. This was associated with an increased production of MMP-9, which was blunted by inhibition of 5-LO with MK886, a 5-LO inhibitor or with 5-LO siRNA. A cysteinyl-LT{sub 1} (cysLT{sub 1}) receptor antagonist, REV-5901 as well as a BLT{sub 1} receptor antagonist, U-75302, also attenuated MMP-9 production induced by HNE. Furthermore, LTB{sub 4} and cysLT (LTC{sub 4} and LTD{sub 4}) enhanced MMP-9 production in macrophages, suggesting a pivotal role for 5-LO in HNE-mediated production of MMP-9. Among the MAPK pathways, LTB{sub 4} and cysLT enhanced phosphorylation of ERK and p38 MAPK, but not JNK. Linked to these results, a p38 MAPK inhibitor as well as an ERK inhibitor blunted MMP-9 production induced by LT. Collectively, these data suggest that 5-LO-derived LT mediates HNE-induced MMP-9 production via activation of ERK and p38 MAPK pathways, consequently leading to plaque instability in atherosclerosis.

  9. The shunt from the cyclooxygenase to lipoxygenase pathway in human osteoarthritic subchondral osteoblasts is linked with a variable expression of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Maxis, Kelitha; Delalandre, Aline; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Duval, Nicolas; Lajeunesse, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by articular cartilage degradation and hypertrophic bone changes with osteophyte formation and abnormal bone remodeling. Two groups of OA patients were identified via the production of variable and opposite levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or leukotriene B4 (LTB4) by subchondral osteoblasts, PGE2 levels discriminating between low and high subgroups. We studied whether the expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) or 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP) is responsible for the shunt from prostaglandins to leukotrienes. FLAP mRNA levels varied in low and high OA groups compared with normal, whereas mRNA levels of 5-LO were similar in all osteoblasts. Selective inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) with NS-398-stimulated FLAP expression in the high OA osteoblasts subgroup, whereas it was without effect in the low OA osteoblasts subgroup. The addition of PGE2 to the low OA osteoblasts subgroup decreased FLAP expression but failed to affect it in the high OA osteoblasts subgroup. LTB4 levels in OA osteoblasts were stimulated about twofold by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) plus transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a situation corresponding to their effect on FLAP mRNA levels. Treatments with 1,25(OH)2D3 and TGF-beta also modulated PGE2 production. TGF-beta stimulated PGE2 production in both OA osteoblast groups, whereas 1,25(OH)2D3 alone had a limited effect but decreased the effect of TGF-beta in the low OA osteoblasts subgroup. This modulation of PGE2 production was mirrored by the synthesis of COX-2. IL-18 levels were only slightly increased in a subgroup of OA osteoblasts compared with normal; however, no relationship was observed overall between IL-18 and PGE2 levels in normal and OA osteoblasts. These results suggest that the shunt from the production of PGE2 to LTB4 is through regulation of the expression of FLAP, not 5-LO, in OA osteoblasts. The expression of FLAP in OA osteoblasts is also modulated differently by 1,25(OH

  10. A dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase protects against kainic acid-induced brain injury.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Marini, Herbert; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Bitto, Alessandra; Irrera, Natasha; Pizzino, Gabriele; Pallio, Giovanni; Calò, Margherita; Adamo, Elena Bianca; Trichilo, Vincenzo; Interdonato, Monica; Galfo, Federica; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2015-06-01

    Systemic administration of kainic acid causes inflammation and apoptosis in the brain, resulting in neuronal loss. Dual cyclooxygenase/5-lipoxygenase (COX/5-LOX) inhibitors could represent a possible neuroprotective approach in preventing glutamate excitotoxicity. Consequently, we investigated the effects of a dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX following intraperitoneal administration of kainic acid (KA, 10 mg/kg) in rats. Animals were randomized to receive either the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX (flavocoxid, 20 mg/kg i.p.) or its vehicle (1 ml/kg i.p.) 30 min after KA administration. Sham brain injury rats were used as controls. We evaluated protein expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK1/2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as well as levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in the hippocampus. Animals were also observed for monitoring behavioral changes according to Racine Scale. Finally, histological analysis and brain edema evaluation were carried out. Treatment with the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX decreased protein expression of p-ERK1/2 and TNF-α in hippocampus, markedly reduced MDA, LTB4 and PGE2 hippocampal levels, and also ameliorated brain edema. Histological analysis showed a reduction in cell damage in rats treated with the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX, particularly in hippocampal subregion CA3c. Moreover, flavocoxid significantly improved behavioral signs following kainic acid administration. Our results suggest that dual inhibition of COX/5-LOX by flavocoxid has neuroprotective effects during kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity. PMID:25893744

  11. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of GSK2190915, a 5-lipoxygenase activating protein inhibitor, in adults and adolescents with persistent asthma: a randomised dose-ranging study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background GSK2190915 is a high affinity 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein inhibitor being developed for the treatment of asthma. The objective of this study was to evaluate GSK2190915 efficacy, dose–response and safety in subjects with persistent asthma treated with short-acting beta2-agonists (SABAs) only. Methods Eight-week multicentre, randomised, double-blind, double-dummy, stratified (by age and smoking status), parallel-group, placebo-controlled study in subjects aged ≥12 years with a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of 50–85% predicted. Subjects (n = 700) were randomised to receive once-daily (QD) oral GSK2190915 (10–300 mg), twice-daily inhaled fluticasone propionate 100 μg, oral montelukast 10 mg QD or placebo. The primary endpoint was mean change from baseline (randomisation) in trough (morning pre-dose and pre-rescue bronchodilator) FEV1 at the end of the 8-week treatment period. Secondary endpoints included morning and evening peak expiratory flow, symptom-free days and nights, rescue-free days and nights, day and night-time symptom scores, day and night-time rescue medication use, withdrawals due to lack of efficacy, Asthma Control Questionnaire and Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire scores. Results For the primary endpoint, there was no statistically significant difference between any dose of GSK2190915 QD and placebo. However, repeated measures sensitivity analysis demonstrated nominal statistical significance for GSK2190915 30 mg QD compared with placebo (mean difference: 0.115 L [95% confidence interval: 0.00, 0.23], p = 0.044); no nominally statistically significant differences were observed with any of the other doses. For the secondary endpoints, decreases were observed in day-time symptom scores and day-time SABA use for GSK2190915 30 mg QD versus placebo (p ≤ 0.05). No dose–response relationship was observed for the primary and secondary endpoints across the GSK2190915 dose range studied; the 10

  12. Inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase by vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Reddanna, P; Rao, M K; Reddy, C C

    1985-11-25

    Purified 5-lipoxygenase from potato tubers was inhibited strongly by vitamin E and its analogs. The inhibition by d-alpha-tocopherol was found to be irreversible and non-competitive with respect to arachidonic acid. An IC50 of 5 microM was calculated for d-alpha-tocopherol. The inhibition appears to be unrelated to its antioxidant function. Binding studies with 14C-labelled d-alpha-tocopherol revealed that there is a strong interaction between vitamin E and 5-lipoxygenase. Tryptic digestion and peptide mapping of 5-lipoxygenase-vitamin E complex indicate that vitamin E binds strongly to a single peptide. These studies suggest that cellular vitamin E levels may have profound influence on the formation of leukotrienes. PMID:3934003

  13. 5-Lipoxygenase metabolite 4-HDHA is a mediator of the antiangiogenic effect of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Stahl, Andreas; Chen, Jing; Seaward, Molly R; Willett, Keirnan L; Krah, Nathan M; Dennison, Roberta J; Connor, Kip M; Aderman, Christopher M; Liclican, Elvira; Carughi, Arianna; Perelman, Dalia; Kanaoka, Yoshihide; Sangiovanni, John Paul; Gronert, Karsten; Smith, Lois E H

    2011-02-01

    Lipid signaling is dysregulated in many diseases with vascular pathology, including cancer, diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, and age-related macular degeneration. We have previously demonstrated that diets enriched in ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) effectively reduce pathological retinal neovascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy, in part through metabolic products that suppress microglial-derived tumor necrosis factor-α. To better understand the protective effects of ω-3 PUFAs, we examined the relative importance of major lipid metabolic pathways and their products in contributing to this effect. ω-3 PUFA diets were fed to four lines of mice deficient in each key lipid-processing enzyme (cyclooxygenase 1 or 2, or lipoxygenase 5 or 12/15), retinopathy was induced by oxygen exposure; only loss of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) abrogated the protection against retinopathy of dietary ω-3 PUFAs. This protective effect was due to 5-LOX oxidation of the ω-3 PUFA lipid docosahexaenoic acid to 4-hydroxy-docosahexaenoic acid (4-HDHA). 4-HDHA directly inhibited endothelial cell proliferation and sprouting angiogenesis via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), independent of 4-HDHA's anti-inflammatory effects. Our study suggests that ω-3 PUFAs may be profitably used as an alternative or supplement to current anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment for proliferative retinopathy and points to the therapeutic potential of ω-3 PUFAs and metabolites in other diseases of vasoproliferation. It also suggests that cyclooxygenase inhibitors such as aspirin and ibuprofen (but not lipoxygenase inhibitors such as zileuton) might be used without losing the beneficial effect of dietary ω-3 PUFA. PMID:21307302

  14. Alveolar lining fluid regulates mononuclear phagocyte 5-lipoxygenase metabolism.

    PubMed

    Phare, S M; Peters-Golden, M; Coffey, M J

    1998-11-01

    The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyses the synthesis of leukotrienes (LT), which are important in phagocytosis and killing of microorganisms. The alveolar macrophage (AM), the primary resident defender of the alveolar space, has a greater capacity for LT synthesis than its precursor, the peripheral blood monocyte (PBM). This study investigated whether the alveolar lining fluid (ALF) upregulates LT synthetic capacity in mononuclear phagocytes. Rat AM, peritoneal macrophages (PM) and ALF were obtained by lavage from pathogen-free animals. Human PBM were isolated from normal subjects. 5-LO metabolism and expression were measured with and without ALF. Rat ALF increased 5-LO metabolism (136.4+/-15.1% of control) in cultured PBM. This was associated with increased 5-LO activating protein (FLAP) (357+/-29.5 %), and 5-LO expression (188+/-31.3%). Culture of AM for 3 days resulted in a greater decrement in LTB4 synthesis (LTB4 15.4+/-6.9% of day 1) than in PM (54.7+/-8.3% of day 1), suggesting a greater dependence of AM 5-LO metabolism on ALF. 5-LO and FLAP expression decreased to a greater degree in AM than PM in culture. Furthermore, AM cultured with ALF maintained their LT synthetic capacity, FLAP and 5-LO expression compared with control cells cultured in medium alone. In conclusion, alveolar lining fluid increased 5-lipoxygenase metabolism in peripheral blood monocytes and maintained it in cultured alveolar macrophages, by a mechanism of increased 5-lipoxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase activating protein expression. This may boost host defence capabilities. PMID:9864011

  15. Exogenous action of 5-lipoxygenase by its metabolites on luteinizing hormone release in rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Przylipiak, A; Kiesel, L; Habenicht, A J; Przylipiak, M; Runnebaum, B

    1990-02-12

    The stimulatory effect of exogenously administered potato 5-lipoxygenase (0.1-0.3 U/2 ml) on luteinizing hormone (LH) release was demonstrated in rat anterior pituitary cells in a superfusion system. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), an inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase, abolished the effect of the enzyme on LH secretion. The secretory effect on LH after 5-lipoxygenase administration was biphasic and dependent on Ca2+ indicating that 5-lipoxygenase affects LH release through its oxygenation reaction. Another series of experiments demonstrated that activation of 5-lipoxygenase, expressed as production of leukotriene (LT) B4 and C4 (728 +/- 127 pg/10(6) cells and 178 +/- 23 pg/10(6) cells, respectively) occurs in rat pituitary cells after addition of Ca2+ ionophore A23187. However, LTB4 and LTC4 were not formed by pituitary cells that had previously been desensitized by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), the physiological ligand of LH release. These results are consistent with a role of 5-lipoxygenase metabolites in the mechanism of GnRH-induced LH secretion. PMID:2157615

  16. Novel di-tertiary-butyl phenylhydrazones as dual cyclooxygenase-2/5-lipoxygenase inhibitors: synthesis, COX/LOX inhibition, molecular modeling, and insights into their cytotoxicities.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Shibnath; Vyas, Alok; Misra, Suniti; O'Brien, Paul; Zambre, Ajit; Fresco, Victor M; Markwald, Roger R; Swamy, K Venkateshwara; Afrasiabi, Zahra; Choudhury, Amitava; Khetmalas, Madhukar; Padhye, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Although dual inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) enzymes is highly effective than targeting COX or LOX alone, there are only a few reports of examining such compounds in case of colorectal cancers (CRC). In the present work we report that the novel di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors DTPSAL, DTPBHZ, DTPINH, and DTPNHZ exhibit significant cytotoxicity against human CRC cell lines. Molecular docking studies revealed a good fit of these compounds in the COX-2 and 5-LOX protein cavities. The inhibitors show significant inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and are effective against a panel of human colon cancer cell lines including HCA-7, HT-29, SW480 and intestinal Apc10.1 cells as well as the hyaluronan synthase-2 (Has2) enzyme over-expressing colon cancer cells, through inhibition of the Hyaluronan/CD44v6 cell survival pathway. Western blot analysis and qRT-PCR analyses indicated that the di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors reduce the expression of COX-2, 5-LOX, and CD44v6 in human colon cancer HCA-7 cells, while the combination of CD44v6shRNA and DTPSAL has an additional inhibitory effect on CD44v6 mRNA expression. The synergistic inhibitory effect of Celecoxib and Licofelone on CD44v6 mRNA expression suggests that the present dual inhibitors down-regulate cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes through CD44v6. The compounds also exhibited enhanced antiproliferative potency compared to standard dual COX/LOX inhibitor, viz. Licofelone. Importantly, the HA/CD44v6 antagonist CD44v6shRNA in combination with synthetic compounds had a sensitizing effect on the cancer cells which enhanced their antiproliferative potency, a finding which is crucial for the anti-proliferative potency of the novel synthetic di-tert-butyl phenol based dual COX-LOX inhibitors in colon cancer cells. PMID:24295787

  17. Discovery of a Novel Dual Fungal CYP51/Human 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor: Implications for Anti-Fungal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hoobler, Eric K.; Rai, Ganesha; Warrilow, Andrew G. S.; Perry, Steven C.; Smyrniotis, Christopher J.; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Parker, Josie E.; Kelly, Diane E.; Maloney, David J.; Kelly, S. L.; Holman, Theodore R.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a novel dual inhibitor targeting fungal sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51 or Erg11) and human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) with improved potency against 5-LOX due to its reduction of the iron center by its phenylenediamine core. A series of potent 5-LOX inhibitors containing a phenylenediamine core, were synthesized that exhibit nanomolar potency and >30-fold selectivity against the LOX paralogs, platelet-type 12-human lipoxygenase, reticulocyte 15-human lipoxygenase type-1, and epithelial 15-human lipoxygenase type-2, and >100-fold selectivity against ovine cyclooxygenase-1 and human cyclooxygnease-2. The phenylenediamine core was then translated into the structure of ketoconazole, a highly effective anti-fungal medication for seborrheic dermatitis, to generate a novel compound, ketaminazole. Ketaminazole was found to be a potent dual inhibitor against human 5-LOX (IC50 = 700 nM) and CYP51 (IC50 = 43 nM) in vitro. It was tested in whole blood and found to down-regulate LTB4 synthesis, displaying 45% inhibition at 10 µM. In addition, ketaminazole selectively inhibited yeast CYP51 relative to human CYP51 by 17-fold, which is greater selectivity than that of ketoconazole and could confer a therapeutic advantage. This novel dual anti-fungal/anti-inflammatory inhibitor could potentially have therapeutic uses against fungal infections that have an anti-inflammatory component. PMID:23826084

  18. Deoxyhypusine Hydroxylase from Plasmodium vivax, the Neglected Human Malaria Parasite: Molecular Cloning, Expression and Specific Inhibition by the 5-LOX Inhibitor Zileuton

    PubMed Central

    Atemnkeng, Veronika Anyigoh; Pink, Mario; Schmitz-Spanke, Simone; Wu, Xian-Jun; Dong, Liang-Liang; Zhao, Kai-Hong; May, Caroline; Laufer, Stefan; Langer, Barbara; Kaiser, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Primaquine, an 8-aminoquinoline, is the only drug which cures the dormant hypnozoites of persistent liver stages from P. vivax. Increasing resistance needs the discovery of alternative pathways as drug targets to develop novel drug entities. Deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH) completes hypusine biosynthesis in eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF-5A) which is the only cellular protein known to contain the unusual amino acid hypusine. Modified EIF-5A is important for proliferation of the malaria parasite. Here, we present the first successful cloning and expression of DOHH from P. vivax causing tertiary malaria. The nucleic acid sequence of 1041 bp encodes an open reading frame of 346 amino acids. Histidine tagged expression of P. vivax DOHH detected a protein of 39.01 kDa in E. coli. The DOHH protein from P. vivax shares significant amino acid identity to the simian orthologues from P. knowlesi and P. yoelii strain H. In contrast to P. falciparum only four E-Z-type HEAT-like repeats are present in P. vivax DOHH with different homology to phycocyanin lyase subunits from cyanobacteria and in proteins participating in energy metabolism of Archaea and Halobacteria. However, phycocyanin lyase activity is absent in P. vivax DOHH. The dohh gene is present as a single copy gene and transcribed throughout the whole erythrocytic cycle. Specific inhibition of recombinant P. vivax DOHH is possible by complexing the ferrous iron with zileuton, an inhibitor of mammalian 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX). Ferrous iron in the active site of 5-LOX is coordinated by three conserved histidines and the carboxylate of isoleucine673. Zileuton inhibited the P. vivax DOHH protein with an IC50 of 12,5 nmol determined by a relative quantification by GC/MS. By contrast, the human orthologue is only less affected with an IC50 of 90 nmol suggesting a selective iron-complexing strategy for the parasitic enzyme. PMID:23505486

  19. In vitro inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase by protolichesterinic acid from Cetraria islandica.

    PubMed

    Ingolfsdottir, K; Breu, W; Huneck, S; Gudjonsdottir, G A; Müller-Jakic, B; Wagner, H

    1994-12-01

    The aliphatic α-methylene-γ-lactone (+)-protolichesterinic acid (1), isolated from Cetraria islandica, has been shown to exhibit inhibitory effects on the enzyme 5-lipoxygenase in an in vitro assay in which porcine leucocytes are used as a source of the enzyme system. The isomeric compounds (+)-lichesterinic acid (2) and (-)-lichesterinic acid (4), prepared from (+)-protolichesterinic- and (-)-allo-protolichesterinic acids, respectively, exhibited anti-5-lipoxygenase activity of the same order of magnitude. (+)-Methyl lichesterinate (3) was, however, inactive. It was shown that despite its lipophilic nature, protolichesterinic acid is extractable into an aqueous medium, the concentration being dependent on the length of extraction. PMID:23195937

  20. Structural insights into human 5-lipoxygenase inhibition: combined ligand-based and target-based approach.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Caroline; Hénichart, Jean-Pierre; Durant, François; Wouters, Johan

    2006-01-12

    The human 5-LOX enzyme and its interaction with competitive inhibitors were investigated by means of a combined ligand-based and target-based approach. First, a pharmacophore model was generated for 16 non redox 5-LOX inhibitors with Catalyst (HipHop module). It includes two hydrophobic groups, an aromatic ring, and two hydrogen bond acceptors. The 3D structure of human 5-LOX was then modeled based on the crystal structure of rabbit 15-LOX, and the binding modes of representative ligands were studied by molecular docking. Confrontation of the docking results with the pharmacophore model allowed the weighting of the pharmacophoric features and the integration of structural information. This led to the proposal of an interaction model inside the 5-LOX active site, consisting of four major and two secondary interaction points: on one hand, two hydrophobic groups, an aromatic ring, and a hydrogen bond acceptor, and, on the other hand, an acidic moiety and an additional hydrogen bond acceptor. PMID:16392803

  1. The regulation of human MMP-13 by licofelone, an inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenases and 5-lipoxygenase, in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes is mediated by the inhibition of the p38 MAP kinase signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Boileau, C; Pelletier, J; Tardif, G; Fahmi, H; Laufer, S; Lavigne, M; Martel-Pelletier, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: MMP-13 is one of the most important metalloproteases (MMP) involved in osteoarthritis. Licofelone, a novel dual inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenases (COX) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), can modulate MMP-13 production in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Objective: To evaluate the impact of licofelone on MMP-13 expression/production, promoter, and major MAP kinase signalling pathways and transcription factors. Methods: Human osteoarthritis chondrocytes were stimulated by interleukin 1ß (IL1ß) and treated with or without: licofelone (0.3, 1, or 3 µg/ml); NS-398 (10 µM; a specific COX-2 inhibitor); or BayX-1005 (10 µM; a specific 5-LOX inhibitor). MMP-13 synthesis was determined by specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, and expression by real time polymerase chain reaction. The effect of licofelone on the MMP-13 promoter was studied through transient transfection; dexamethasone (10–7 M) was used as comparison. The effect on IL1ß induced MMP-13 signalling pathways was determined using specific ELISA for phosphorylated MAP kinases and transcription factors. Results: Licofelone dose dependently inhibited the IL1ß stimulated production and expression of MMP-13. NS-398 and BayX-1005 had very little effect. Licofelone also inhibited MMP-13 transcription on each of the promoter constructs used. The licofelone inhibition was comparable to that obtained with dexamethasone. Licofelone had no effect on phosphorylated p44/42 or JNK1/2; however, it decreased phosphorylated c-jun and inhibited phosphorylated p38, CREB, and AP-1 activity. Conclusions: Licofelone inhibited MMP-13 production under proinflammatory conditions on human osteoarthritis chondrocytes, through inhibition of the p38/AP-1 pathway and the transcription factor CREB. This may explain some of the mechanisms whereby licofelone exerts its positive effect on osteoarthritic changes. PMID:15498796

  2. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  3. 5-Lipoxygenase Deficiency Reduces Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity and Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Miriam S. N.; Cardoso, Renato D. R.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Crespigio, Jefferson; Cunha, Thiago M.; Alves-Filho, José C.; da Silva, Rosiane V.; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2013-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) converts arachidonic acid into leukotrienes (LTs) and is involved in inflammation. At present, the participation of 5-LO in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity and liver damage has not been addressed. 5-LO deficient (5-LO−/−) mice and background wild type mice were challenged with APAP (0.3–6 g/kg) or saline. The lethality, liver damage, neutrophil and macrophage recruitment, LTB4, cytokine production, and oxidative stress were assessed. APAP induced a dose-dependent mortality, and the dose of 3 g/kg was selected for next experiments. APAP induced LTB4 production in the liver, the primary target organ in APAP toxicity. Histopathological analysis revealed that 5-LO−/− mice presented reduced APAP-induced liver necrosis and inflammation compared with WT mice. APAP-induced lethality, increase of plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, liver cytokine (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-10), superoxide anion, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production, myeloperoxidase and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity, Nrf2 and gp91phox mRNA expression, and decrease of reduced glutathione and antioxidant capacity measured by 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline 6-sulfonate) assay were prevented in 5-LO−/− mice compared to WT mice. Therefore, 5-LO deficiency resulted in reduced mortality due to reduced liver inflammatory and oxidative damage, suggesting 5-LO is a promising target to reduce APAP-induced lethality and liver inflammatory/oxidative damage. PMID:24288682

  4. Synthesis, SAR, and series evolution of novel oxadiazole-containing 5-lipoxygenase activating protein inhibitors: discovery of 2-[4-(3-{(r)-1-[4-(2-amino-pyrimidin-5-yl)-phenyl]-1-cyclopropyl-ethyl}-[1,2,4]oxadiazol-5-yl)-pyrazol-1-yl]-N,N-dimethyl-acetamide (BI 665915).

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidenori; Riether, Doris; Bartolozzi, Alessandra; Bosanac, Todd; Berger, Valentina; Binetti, Ralph; Broadwater, John; Chen, Zhidong; Crux, Rebecca; De Lombaert, Stéphane; Dave, Rajvee; Dines, Jonathon A; Fadra-Khan, Tazmeen; Flegg, Adam; Garrigou, Michael; Hao, Ming-Hong; Huber, John; Hutzler, J Matthew; Kerr, Steven; Kotey, Adrian; Liu, Weimin; Lo, Ho Yin; Loke, Pui Leng; Mahaney, Paige E; Morwick, Tina M; Napier, Spencer; Olague, Alan; Pack, Edward; Padyana, Anil K; Thomson, David S; Tye, Heather; Wu, Lifen; Zindell, Renee M; Abeywardane, Asitha; Simpson, Thomas

    2015-02-26

    The synthesis, structure-activity relationship (SAR), and evolution of a novel series of oxadiazole-containing 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) inhibitors are described. The use of structure-guided drug design techniques provided compounds that demonstrated excellent FLAP binding potency (IC50 < 10 nM) and potent inhibition of LTB4 synthesis in human whole blood (IC50 < 100 nM). Optimization of binding and functional potencies, as well as physicochemical properties resulted in the identification of compound 69 (BI 665915) that demonstrated an excellent cross-species drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) profile and was predicted to have low human clearance. In addition, 69 was predicted to have a low risk for potential drug-drug interactions due to its cytochrome P450 3A4 profile. In a murine ex vivo whole blood study, 69 demonstrated a linear dose-exposure relationship and a dose-dependent inhibition of LTB4 production. PMID:25671290

  5. Western blot expression of 5-lipoxygenase in the brain from striped dolphins (stenella coeruleoalba) and bottlenose dolphins (tursiops truncatus) with or without encephalitis/meningo-encephalitis of infectious nature.

    PubMed

    Di Guardo, G; Falconi, A; Di Francesco, A; Mazzariol, S; Centelleghe, C; Casalone, C; Pautasso, A; Cocumelli, C; Eleni, C; Petrella, A; Di Francesco, C E; Sabatucci, A; Leonardi, L; Serroni, A; Marsili, L; Storelli, M M; Giacominelli-Stuffler, R

    2015-01-01

    Dolphin Morbillivirus (DMV), Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella ceti are pathogens of major concern for wild cetaceans. Although a more or less severe encephalitis/meningo-encephalitis may occur in striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) infected by the aforementioned agents, almost no information is available on the neuropathogenesis of brain lesions, including the neuronal and non-neuronal cells targeted during infection, along with the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. We analyzed 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) expression in the brain of 11 striped dolphins and 5 bottlenose dolphins, affected or not by encephalitic lesions of various degrees associated with DMV, T. gondii and B. ceti. All the 8 striped dolphins with encephalitis showed a more consistent 5-LOX expression than that observed in the 3 striped dolphins showing no morphologic evidence of brain lesions, with the most prominent band intensity being detected in a B. ceti-infected animal. Similar results were not obtained in T. gondii-infected vs T. gondii-uninfected bottlenose dolphins. Overall, the higher 5-LOX expression found in the brain of the 8 striped dolphins with infectious neuroinflammation is of interest, given that 5-LOX is a putative marker for neurodegeneration in human patients and in experimental animal models. Therefore, further investigation on this challenging issue is also needed in stranded cetaceans affected by central neuropathies. PMID:25864766

  6. Dimethyl ester of bilirubin exhibits anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of secretory phospholipase A2, lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Vikram; Umashankara, M; Ramakrishnan, Chandrasekaran; Nanjaraj Urs, Ankanahalli N; Suvilesh, Kanve Nagaraj; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S; Vishwanath, Bannikuppe Sannanaik

    2016-05-15

    Overproduction of arachidonic acid (AA) mediated by secretory phospholipase A2 group IIA (sPLA2IIA) is a hallmark of many inflammatory disorders. AA is subsequently converted into pro-inflammatory eicosanoids through 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and cyclooxygenase-1/2 (COX-1/2) activities. Hence, inhibition of sPLA2IIA, 5-LOX and COX-1/2 activities is critical in regulating inflammation. We have previously reported unconjugated bilirubin (UCB), an endogenous antioxidant, as sPLA2IIA inhibitor. However, lipophilic UCB gets conjugated in liver with glucuronic acid into hydrophilic conjugated bilirubin (CB). Since hydrophobicity is pre-requisite for sPLA2IIA inhibition, conjugation reduces the efficacy of UCB. In this regard, UCB was chemically modified and derivatives were evaluated for sPLA2IIA, 5-LOX and COX-1/2 inhibition. Among the derivatives, BD1 (dimethyl ester of bilirubin) exhibited ∼ 3 fold greater inhibitory potency towards sPLA2IIA compared to UCB. Both UCB and BD1 inhibited human 5-LOX and COX-2 activities; however only BD1 inhibited AA induced platelet aggregation. Molecular docking studies demonstrated BD1 as better inhibitor of aforesaid enzymes than UCB and other endogenous antioxidants. These data suggest that BD1 exhibits strong anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of AA cascade enzymes which is of great therapeutic importance. PMID:27060751

  7. Structure and Ligand Based Drug Design Strategies in the Development of Novel 5-LOX Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Aparoy, Polamarasetty; Kumar Reddy, Kakularam; Reddanna, Pallu

    2012-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) are non-heme iron containing dioxygenases involved in the oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) such as arachidonic acid (AA). Depending on the position of insertion of oxygen, LOXs are classified into 5-, 8-, 9-, 12- and 15-LOX. Among these, 5-LOX is the most predominant isoform associated with the formation of 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HpETE), the precursor of non-peptido (LTB4) and peptido (LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4) leukotrienes. LTs are involved in inflammatory and allergic diseases like asthma, ulcerative colitis, rhinitis and also in cancer. Consequently 5-LOX has become target for the development of therapeutic molecules for treatment of various inflammatory disorders. Zileuton is one such inhibitor of 5-LOX approved for the treatment of asthma. In the recent times, computer aided drug design (CADD) strategies have been applied successfully in drug development processes. A comprehensive review on structure based drug design strategies in the development of novel 5-LOX inhibitors is presented in this article. Since the crystal structure of 5-LOX has been recently solved, efforts to develop 5-LOX inhibitors have mostly relied on ligand based rational approaches. The present review provides a comprehensive survey on these strategies in the development of 5-LOX inhibitors. PMID:22680930

  8. Serum 5-LOX: a progressive protein marker for breast cancer and new approach for therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Singh, Abhay Kumar; Kumar, Manoj; Shekhar, Shashank; Rai, Nitish; Kaur, Punit; Parshad, Rajinder; Dey, Sharmistha

    2016-09-01

    Lipoxygenase (LOX) pathway has emerged to have a role in carcinogenesis. There is an evidence that both 12-LOX and 5-LOX have procarcinogenic role. We have previously reported the elevated level of serum 12-LOX in breast cancer patients. This study evaluated the serum level of 5-LOX in breast cancer patients and its in vitro inhibition assessment with peptide inhibitor YWCS. The level of 5-LOX was determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The peptide inhibitor of 5-LOX was designed by molecular modeling and kinetic assay was performed by spectrophotometry. The siRNA mediated 5-LOX gene silencing was performed to investigate the effect on proliferation of MDA-MB-231, breast cancer cell line. The serum 5-LOX level in breast cancer (5.69±1.97ng/µl) was almost 2-fold elevated compared to control (3.53±1.0ng/µl) (P < 0.0001). The peptide YWCS had shown competitive inhibitory effects with IC50, 2.2 µM and dissociation constant (K D), 4.92×10(-8) M. The siRNA mediated knockdown of 5-LOX, resulted in the decreased gene expression for 5-LOX and increased cell death in MDA-MB-231 cell line and thereby play a key role in reducing tumor proliferation. Thus, it can be concluded that 5-LOX is one of the potential serum protein marker for breast cancer and a promising therapeutic target for the same. PMID:27432812

  9. Ablation of 5-lipoxygenase mitigates pancreatic lesion development

    PubMed Central

    Knab, Lawrence M.; Schultz, Michelle; Principe, Daniel R.; Mascarinas, Windel E.; Gounaris, Elias; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.; Grippo, Paul J.; Bentrem, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which continues to have a dismal prognosis, is associated with a pronounced fibro-inflammatory response. Inflammation in vivo can be mediated by 5-lipoxygenase (5LO), an enzyme that converts omega-6 fatty acids to eicosanoids, including leukotriene B4 (LTB4). We have previously shown that diets rich in omega-6 fatty acids (FA) increase pancreatic lesions and mast cell infiltration in EL-Kras mice. In this study, we evaluated the role of 5LO in generating higher levels of LTB4 from human cells and in mediating lesion development and mast cell infiltration in EL-Kras mice. Materials and Methods Human pancreatic ductal epithelial (HPDE) and cancer cells were treated with omega-6 FA in vitro. EL-Kras mice lacking 5LO (EL-Kras/5LO−/−) mice were generated and fed standard chow or omega-6 FA diets. Pancreatic lesion frequency and mast cell infiltration were compared to EL-Kras/5LO+/+ mice. Human PDAC tumors were evaluated for 5LO expression and mast cells. Results HPDE and cancer cells treated with omega-6 FA generated increased LTB4 levels in vitro. EL-Kras/5LO−/− developed fewer pancreatic lesions and had decreased mast cell infiltration when compared to EL-Kras/5LO+/+ mice. Human PDAC tumors with increased 5LO expression demonstrate increased mast cell infiltration. Additionally, diets rich in omega-6 FA failed to increase pancreatic lesion development and mast cell infiltration in EL-Kras/5LO−/− mice. Conclusions The expansion of mutant Kras-induced lesions via omega-6 FA is dependent on 5LO, and 5LO functions downstream of mutant Kras to mediate inflammation, suggesting that 5LO may be a potential chemo-preventive and therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. PMID:25454978

  10. Synthesis and Evaluation of 5-Lipoxygenase Translocation Inhibitors from Acylnitroso Hetero-Diels-Alder Cycloadducts†

    PubMed Central

    Bolger, Joshua K.; Tian, Wen; Wolter, William R.; Cho, Wonhwa; Suckow, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Acylnitroso cycloadducts have proven to be valuable intermediates in the syntheses of a plethora of biologically active molecules. Recently, organometallic reagents were shown to open bicyclic acylnitroso cycloadducts and, more interestingly, the prospect of highly regioselective openings was raised. This transformation was employed in the synthesis of a compound with excellent inhibitory activity against 5-lipoxygenase ((±)-4a, IC50 51 nM), an important mediator of inflammation intimately involved in a number of disease states including asthma and cancer. Optimization of the copper-mediated organometallic ring opening reaction was accomplished allowing the further exploration of the biological activity. Synthesis of a number of derivatives with varying affinity for metal binding as well as pendant groups in a range of sizes was accomplished. Analogues were tested in a whole cell assay which revealed a subset of the compounds to be inhibitors of enzyme translocation, a mode of action not previously known and, potentially, extremely important for better understanding of the enzyme and inhibitor development. Additionally, the lead compound was tested in vivo in an established colon cancer model and showed very encouraging anti-tumorogenic properties. PMID:21365098

  11. Inhibitory effects of Angelica pubescens f. biserrata on 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Liu, J H; Zschocke, S; Reininger, E; Bauer, R

    1998-08-01

    Linoleic acid, osthol, osthenol and two polyacetylenes, falcarindiol and 11(S),16(R)-dihydroxyoctadeca-9Z,17-diene-12,14-diyn-1 -yl acetate were found to be the most active compounds responsible for the inhibitory activity of the dichloromethane extract of the roots of Angelica pubescens f. biserrata on 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) and cyclooxygenase (COX-1) in vitro. They showed prominent inhibitory effect on 5-LO with IC50 values of 27.9 microM, 36.2 microM, 43.1 microM, 9.4 microM and 24.0 microM, respectively. Linoleic acid, osthenol, falcarindiol and 11(S), 16(R)-dihydroxyoctadeca-9Z,17-diene-12,14-diyn-1-yl acetate exhibited inhibitory activity on COX-1 with IC50 values of 13.3 microM, 64.3 microM, 66.0 microM and 73.3 microM. PMID:9741298

  12. Penta- and hexadienoic acid derivatives: a novel series of 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Malleron, J L; Roussel, G; Gueremy, G; Ponsinet, G; Robin, J L; Terlain, B; Tissieres, J M

    1990-10-01

    The synthesis of a series of pentadienoic and hexadienoic acid derivatives is reported. These compounds were tested as inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase (5 LO) and cyclooxygenase (CO) in vitro and as inhibitors of arachidonic acid (AA) induced ear edema in mice in vivo. Their potency is compared with that of the standard inhibitors nafazatrom, BW 755C, NDGA, KME4, quercetine, and L 652,243. The most potent compound in vivo, diethyl 2-hydroxy-5-(ethylthio)-2(Z),4(Z)-hexadienedioate (20) inhibited AA-induced ear edema when administered topically or orally, with an ED50 value of 0.01 mg/ear and 20 mg/kg, respectively. Among the standard compounds tested, L 652,243 was the most active compound in this test with an ED50 value of 0.01 mg/ear and 1 mg/kg po, but unlike this compound, 20 is a selective inhibitor of 5-LO (IC50 = 2 microM) without any significant activity against CO (IC50 greater than 50 microM). Most of the other compounds in this series are also selective 5-LO inhibitors. PMID:2213827

  13. 5-Lipoxygenase/cyclooxygenase-2 cross-talk through cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 2 in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lötzer, Katharina; Jahn, Steffen; Kramer, Cornelia; Hildner, Markus; Nüsing, Rolf; Funk, Colin D; Habenicht, Andreas J R

    2007-11-01

    The 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway generates lipid mediators, i.e. the cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) LTC(4)/LTD(4) and LTB(4). CysLT receptors are expressed in endothelial cells (EC) and EC cysLT(2)-R activation induces diverse pro-inflammatory genes in vitro. We now report that LTD(4) promotes formation of an atherosclerosis-protective and anti-thrombotic eicosanoid by markedly up-regulating EC cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). CysLT-induced COX-2 transcripts were transiently up-regulated as determined by microarray and QRT-PCR analyses though COX-2 protein remained elevated for several hours. Prostacyclin formation, measured as its stable metabolite 6-keto-PGF(1alpha), was increased several fold in LTD(4)-stimulated ECs, and was inhibited by the COX-2-specific inhibitor, NS-398. COX-2 up-regulation was Ca(2+)-dependent and was partially blocked by cyclosporin A indicating that the 5-LO/COX-2 cross-talk involved signaling through a nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) dependent pathway. Since prostacyclin is a major blood vessel-protective and anti-thrombotic eicosanoid, the EC cysLT(2)-R may limit its otherwise pro-inflammatory actions through a protective Ca(2+)/calcineurin/NFAT-dependent COX-2 feedback loop. PMID:17991613

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel pyrazolopyrimidines derivatives as anticancer and anti-5-lipoxygenase agents.

    PubMed

    Rahmouni, Ameur; Souiei, Sawssen; Belkacem, Mohamed Amine; Romdhane, Anis; Bouajila, Jalloul; Ben Jannet, Hichem

    2016-06-01

    A novel series of 6-aryl-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4(5H)-ones 3a-h were synthesized in a single step via condensation of carboxamide 2 with some aromatic aldehydes (presence of iodine). Treatment of aminopyrazole 1a with acetic anhydride afforded pyrazolopyrimidines 4 which on treatment with ethyl chloroacetate in refluxing dry DMF furnished a single product identified as ethyl 2-(3,6-dimethyl-4-oxo-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-5(4H)-yl) acetate 5. On the other hand, esterification of compound 6 with different alcohol, led to the formation of new esters linked pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidinones hybrids 7a-f. The reaction of compound 2 with 3-propargyl bromide gave the compound 8 used as a dipolarophile to access to triazoles (4- and 5-regioisomers (9a-e) and (10a-e), respectively) via the 1,3-dipoar cycloaddition reaction. Finally, condensation reaction of aminopyrazole 1b with α-cyanocinnamonitiles gave the new pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-3,6-dicarbonitriles 11a-e. Structures of compounds were established on the basis of (1)H/(13)C NMR and ESI-HRMS. Compounds were screened for their cytotoxic (HCT-116 and MCF-7) and 5-lipoxygenase inhibition activities. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) was discussed. PMID:27179178

  15. The 5-lipoxygenase pathway: oxidative and inflammatory contributions to the Alzheimer’s disease phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Yash B.; Praticò, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common, and, arguably, one of the most-well studied, neurodegenerative conditions. Several decades of investigation have revealed that amyloid-β and tau proteins are critical pathological players in this condition. Genetic analyses have revealed specific mutations in the cellular machinery that produces amyloid-β, but these mutations are found in only a small fraction of patients with the early-onset variant of AD. In addition to development of amyloid-β and tau pathology, oxidative damage and inflammation are consistently found in the brains of these patients. The 5-lipoxygenase protein enzyme (5LO) and its downstream leukotriene metabolites have long been known to be important modulators of oxidation and inflammation in other disease states. Recent in vivo evidence using murine knock-out models has implicated the 5LO pathway, which also requires the 5LO activating protein (FLAP), in the molecular pathology of AD, including the metabolism of amyloid-β and tau. In this manuscript, we will provide an overview of 5LO and FLAP, discussing their involvement in biochemical pathways relevant to AD pathogenesis. We will also discuss how the 5LO pathway contributes to the molecular and behavioral insults seen in AD and provide an assessment of how targeting these proteins could lead to therapeutics relevant not only for AD, but also other related neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:25642165

  16. Arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) gene polymorphism is associated with Alzheimer's disease and body mass index.

    PubMed

    Šerý, Omar; Hlinecká, Lýdia; Povová, Jana; Bonczek, Ondřej; Zeman, Tomáš; Janout, Vladimír; Ambroz, Petr; Khan, Naim A; Balcar, Vladimir J

    2016-03-15

    Dementias of old age, in particular Alzheimer's disease (AD), pose a growing threat to the longevity and quality of life of individuals as well as whole societies world-wide. The risk factors are both genetic and environmental (life-style) and there is an overlap with similar factors predisposing to cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Using a case-control genetic approach, we have identified a SNP (rs10507391) in ALOX5 gene, previously associated with an increased risk of stroke, as a novel genetic risk factor for AD. ALOX5 gene encodes a 5'-lipoxygenase (5'-LO) activating protein (FLAP), a crucial component of the arachidonic acid/leukotriene inflammatory cascade. A-allele of rs4769874 polymorphism increases the risk of AD 1.41-fold (p<0.0001), while AA genotype does so 1.79-fold (p<0.0001). In addition, GG genotype of rs4769874 polymorphism is associated with a modest increase in body mass index (BMI). We discuss potential biochemical mechanisms linking the SNP to AD and suggest possible preventive pharmacotherapies some of which are based on commonly available natural products. Finally, we set the newly identified AD risk factors into a broader context of similar CVD risk factors to generate a more comprehensive picture of interacting genetics and life-style habits potentially leading to the deteriorating mental health in the old age. PMID:26944113

  17. Arachidonate 5 Lipoxygenase Expression in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Promotes Invasion via MMP-9 Induction

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Nicolas T.; Nowicki, Theodore S; Azzi, Jean Paul; Reyes, Ismael; Iacob, Codrin; Xie, Suqing; Swati, Ismatun; Suslina, Nina; Schantz, Stimson; Tiwari, Raj K.; Geliebter, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) expression and activity has been implicated in tumor pathogenesis, yet its role in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has not been characterized. ALOX5 protein and mRNA were upregulated in PTC compared to matched, normal thyroid tissue, and ALOX5 expression correlated with invasive tumor histopathology. Evidence suggests that PTC invasion is mediated through the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that can degrade and remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM). A correlation between MMP-9 and ALOX5 protein expression was established by immunohistochemical analysis of PTC and normal thyroid tissues using a tissue array. Transfection of ALOX5 into a PTC cell line (BCPAP) increased MMP-9 secretion and cell invasion across an ECM barrier. The ALOX5 product, 5(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid also increased MMP-9 protein expression by BCPAP in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibitors of MMP-9 and ALOX5 reversed ALOX5-enhanced invasion. Here we describe a new role for ALOX5 as a mediator of invasion via MMP-9 induction; this ALOX5/MMP9 pathway represents a new avenue in the search for functional biomarkers and/or potential therapeutic targets for aggressive PTC. PMID:22253131

  18. 17β Estradiol Modulates Perfusion Pressure and Expression of 5-LOX and CYP450 4A in the Isolated Kidney of Metabolic Syndrome Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zúñiga-Muñoz, A. M.; Guarner Lans, V.; Soria-Castro, E.; Diaz-Diaz, E.; Torrico-Lavayen, R.; Tena-Betancourt, E.; Pérez-Torres, I.

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and progression of nephropathy depend on sex. We examined a protective effect of estradiol against nephropathy in metabolic syndrome through the modulation of the arachidonic acid metabolism by activating the 5-lipoxygenase and cytochrome p450 4A pathways. 28 female Wistar rats were divided into four groups of seven animals each: control, intact metabolic syndrome, ovariectomized metabolic syndrome, and metabolic syndrome ovariectomized plus estradiol. Blood pressure, body weight, body fat, triglycerides, insulin, HOMA-index, albuminuria, and TNF-α were increased in ovariectomized metabolic syndrome rats (p < 0.001). The perfusion pressure in isolated kidneys of ovariectomized metabolic syndrome rats in presence of 4 μg of arachidonic acid was increased. The inhibitors of the arachidonic acid metabolism Baicalein, Miconazole, and Indomethacin in these rats decreased the perfusion pressure by 57.62%, 99.83%, and 108.5%, respectively and they decreased creatinine clearance and the arachidonic acid percentage. Phospholipase A2 expression in the kidney of ovariectomized metabolic syndrome rats was not modified. 5-lipoxygenase was increased in metabolic syndrome ovariectomized rats while cytochrome p450 4A was decreased. In conclusion, the loss of estradiol increases renal damage while the treatment with estradiol benefits renal function by modulating arachidonic acid metabolism through the 5-lipoxygenase and cytochrome p450 4A pathways. PMID:26491436

  19. The effects of oral Cardax (disodium disuccinate astaxanthin) on multiple independent oxidative stress markers in a mouse peritoneal inflammation model: influence on 5-lipoxygenase in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Samuel F; Penn, Marc S; Hazen, Stanley L; Bikádi, Zsolt; Zsila, Ferenc

    2006-06-01

    observed at time points two and five. When normalized to the concentration of the oxidative substrates, statistically significant reductions of 8-isoprostane-F(2alpha) (8-iso-F(2alpha)) at time point three (maximal neutrophil recruitment/activation), and 5-HETE, 5-oxo-EET, 11-HETE, 9-HODE, and PGF(2alpha) at time point five (maximal monocyte/macrophage recruitment/activation) were observed. Subsequently, the direct interaction of the optically inactive stereoisomer of Cardax (meso-dAST) with human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) was evaluated in vitro with circular dichroism (CD) and electronic absorption (UV/Vis) spectroscopy, and subsequent molecular docking calculations were made using mammalian 15-LOX as a surrogate (for which XRC data has been reported). The results suggested that the meso-compound was capable of interaction with, and binding to, the solvent-exposed surface of the enzyme. These preliminary studies provide the foundation for more detailed evaluation of the therapeutic effects of this compound on the 5-LOX enzyme, important in chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis, asthma, and prostate cancer in humans. PMID:16466747

  20. THE 5-LIPOXYGENASE PATHWAY IS REQUIRED FOR ACUTE LUNG INJURY FOLLOWING HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Eun, John C.; Moore, Ernest E.; Mauchley, David C.; Johnson, Chris A.; Meng, Xianzhong; Banerjee, Anirban; Wohlauer, Max V.; Zarini, Simona; Gijón, Miguel A.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    The cellular and biochemical mechanisms leading to acute lung injury and subsequent multiple organ failure are only partially understood. In order to study the potential role of eicosanoids, particularly leukotrienes, as possible mediators of acute lung injury, we used a murine experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock after blood removal via cardiac puncture. Neutrophil sequestration as shown by immunofluorescence, and protein leakage into the alveolar space, were measured as markers of injury. We used liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry to unequivocally identify several eicosanoids in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of experimental animals. MK886, a specific inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway, as well as transgenic mice deficient in 5-lipoxygenase, were used to determine the role of this enzymatic pathway in this model. Leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4 were consistently elevated in shock-treated mice compared to sham-treated mice. MK886 attenuated neutrophil infiltration and protein extravasation induced by hemorrhagic shock. 5-lipoxygenase-deficient mice showed reduced neutrophil infiltration and protein extravasation after shock treatment, indicating greatly reduced lung injury. These results support the hypothesis that 5-lipoxygenase, most likely through the generation of leukotrienes, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock in mice. This pathway could represent a new target for pharmacological intervention to reduce lung damage following severe primary injury. PMID:22392149

  1. Arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase gene variants affect response to fish oil supplementation by healthy African Americans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To determine the effects of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase gene (ALOX5) variants on plasma lipid and lipoprotein concentrations and changes in response to fish oil supplementation. We hypothesized that Sp1 variants in the ALOX5 promoter, which have previously been associated with cardiovascu...

  2. Effect of the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZD2138 on aspirin-induced asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, S. M.; Bell, G. S.; Foster, S.; Spruce, K. E.; MacMillan, R.; Williams, A. J.; Lee, T. H.; Arm, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The cysteinyl leukotrienes may play a central part in the mechanisms of aspirin-sensitive asthma. Previous work has shown that individuals with aspirin-sensitive asthma have high basal urinary LTE4 levels which increase further upon aspirin ingestion, and that sulphidopeptide leukotriene receptor antagonists attenuate aspirin-induced airflow obstruction. If the cysteinyl leukotrienes cause aspirin-induced asthmatic reactions, inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway should prevent aspirin-induced bronchospasm. This hypothesis has been tested with ZD2138, a specific non-redox 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor. METHODS--Seven subjects (four men) with aspirin-sensitive asthma with baseline FEV1 values > 67% were studied. ZD2138 (350 mg) or placebo was given on two separate occasions two weeks apart in a randomised double blind fashion. A single dose of aspirin was administered four hours after dosing and FEV1 was measured for six hours. Inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway by ZD2138 was assessed by measurements of urinary LTE4 levels and ex vivo calcium ionophore stimulated LTB4 generation in whole blood, before administration of drug or placebo and at regular time intervals after dosing and aspirin administration. RESULTS--ZD2138 protected against the aspirin-induced reduction in FEV1 with a 20.3 (4.9)% fall in FEV1 following placebo compared with 4.9 (2.9)% following ZD2138. This was associated with 72% inhibition of ex vivo LTB4 generation in whole blood at 12 hours and a 74% inhibition of the rise in urinary LTE4 excretion at six hours after aspirin ingestion. CONCLUSIONS--In aspirin-sensitive asthma the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZD2138 inhibits the fall in FEV1 induced by aspirin and this is associated with substantial inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase. PMID:8091318

  3. Regulation of tumorigenic Wnt signaling by cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase and their pharmacological inhibitors: A basis for novel drugs targeting cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Roos, Jessica; Grösch, Sabine; Werz, Oliver; Schröder, Peter; Ziegler, Slava; Fulda, Simone; Paulus, Patrick; Urbschat, Anja; Kühn, Benjamin; Maucher, Isabelle; Fettel, Jasmin; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Piesche, Matthias; Matrone, Carmela; Steinhilber, Dieter; Parnham, Michael J; Maier, Thorsten J

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is a highly conserved pathway with a prominent role in embryogenic development, adult tissue homeostasis, cell polarization, stem cell biology, cell differentiation, and proliferation. Furthermore, canonical Wnt signaling is of pivotal importance in the pathogenesis of a number of cancer types and crucially affects tumor initiation, cancer cell proliferation, cancer cell apoptosis, and metastasis. Reports over the last decade have provided strong evidence for a pathophysiological role of Wnt signaling in non-malignant classical inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Although, several agents suppressing the Wnt pathway at different levels have been identified, the development of clinically relevant Wnt-inhibiting agents remains challenging due to selectivity and toxicity issues. Several studies have shown that long-term administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs protects against colon cancer and potentially other tumor types by interfering both with the COX and the Wnt pathway. Our own studies have shown that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs suppress Wnt signaling by targeting the pro-inflammatory enzyme 5-lipoxygenase which is the key enzyme pathophysiologically involved in the synthesis of leukotrienes. Furthermore, we found a direct link between the 5-lipoxygenase and Wnt signaling pathways, which is essential for the maintenance of leukemic stem cells. Accordingly, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase led to an impairment of Wnt-dependent acute and chronic myeloid leukemic stem cells. We believe that 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors might represent a novel type of Wnt inhibitor activating a potentially naturally occurring novel mechanism of suppression of Wnt signaling that is non-toxic, at least in mice, and is potentially well tolerated in patients. PMID:26549540

  4. Design, synthesis and evaluation of semi-synthetic triazole-containing caffeic acid analogues as 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    De Lucia, Daniela; Lucio, Oscar Méndez; Musio, Biagia; Bender, Andreas; Listing, Monika; Dennhardt, Sophie; Koeberle, Andreas; Garscha, Ulrike; Rizzo, Roberta; Manfredini, Stefano; Werz, Oliver; Ley, Steven V

    2015-08-28

    In this work the synthesis, structure-activity relationship (SAR) and biological evaluation of a novel series of triazole-containing 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors are described. The use of structure-guided drug design techniques provided compounds that demonstrated excellent 5-LO inhibition with IC50 of 0.2 and 3.2 μm in cell-based and cell-free assays, respectively. Optimization of binding and functional potencies resulted in the identification of compound 13d, which showed an enhanced activity compared to the parent bioactive compound caffeic acid 5 and the clinically approved zileuton 3. Compounds 15 and 16 were identified as lead compounds in inhibiting 5-LO products formation in neutrophils. Their interference with other targets on the arachidonic acid pathway was also assessed. Cytotoxicity tests were performed to exclude a relationship between cytotoxicity and the increased activity observed after structure optimization. PMID:26197161

  5. 5-lipoxygenase pathway is essential for the control of granuloma extension induced by Schistosoma mansoni eggs in lung.

    PubMed

    Toffoli da Silva, Gabriel; Espíndola, Milena Sobral; Fontanari, Caroline; Rosada, Rogerio Silva; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Frantz, Fabiani Gai

    2016-08-01

    According to WHO, it is estimated that approximately 2 billion people are infected with intestinal helminths worldwide and the number of people who are cured of these diseases is relatively low, resulting in a large percentage of chronically infected individuals. Schistosomiasis is one of the most important parasitic diseases present in developing countries configuring it as a serious public health problem, directly related to poverty and social disadvantage. Once the parasite infection is established, Schistosoma mansoni eggs fall into the bloodstream and are trapped in the liver microcirculation where a strong granulomatous response and fibrosis formation occurs. In the experimental model, granulomas develop in the mouse lung after intravenous injection of purified eggs. Here we aim to understand how leukotrienes are involved in the granuloma formation. Leukotrienes are lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid metabolites via 5-lipoxygenase (5LO) enzyme. They are potent proinflammatory agents and induce recruitment, cell activation, regulation of microbicidal activity of polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells. In this study, 5LO deficient mice (5LO(-/-)) were inoculated with S. mansoni eggs for evaluation of immunopathological parameters involved in the induction of type 2 granulomas. We showed that in the absence of leukotrienes, the size of granulomas were decreased comparing to the wild type mice and the inflammatory compromised areas had a lower extension. In 5LO(-/-) mice granulomas presented extensive areas of fibrosis, detected by α-SMA expression along the lesions, indicating remodeling in attempt to reestablish the normal tissue. Also, comparing to WT mice we detected decrease of IL-4 and IL-13 and increase of TGF-β in the lung of 5LO(-/-), but these mice failed to produce protective IFN-γ and IL-12. These results evidenced 5-Lipoxygenase as an important pathway during lung injury due to Schistosoma-eggs injection. PMID:27262746

  6. Bioassay-guided identification of an anti-inflammatory prenylated acylphloroglucinol from Melicope ptelefolia and molecular insights into its interaction with 5-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Shaari, Khozirah; Suppaiah, Velan; Wai, Lam Kok; Stanslas, Johnson; Tejo, Bimo Ario; Israf, Daud Ahmad; Abas, Faridah; Ismail, Intan Safinar; Shuaib, Nor Hasifi; Zareen, Seema; Lajis, Nordin Hj

    2011-11-01

    A bioassay-guided investigation of Melicope ptelefolia Champ ex Benth (Rutaceae) resulted in the identification of an acyphloroglucinol, 2,4,6-trihydroxy-3-geranylacetophenone or tHGA, as the active principle inhibiting soybean 15-LOX. The anti-inflammatory action was also demonstrated on human leukocytes, where the compound showed prominent inhibitory activity against human PBML 5-LOX, with an IC(50) value of 0.42 μM, very close to the effect produced by the commonly used standard, NDGA. The compound concentration-dependently inhibited 5-LOX product synthesis, specifically inhibiting cysteinyl leukotriene LTC(4) with an IC(50) value of 1.80 μM, and showed no cell toxicity effects. The anti-inflammatory action does not seem to proceed via redox or metal chelating mechanism since the compound tested negative for these bioactivities. Further tests on cyclooxygenases indicated that the compound acts via a dual LOX/COX inhibitory mechanism, with greater selectivity for 5-LOX and COX-2 (IC(50) value of 0.40 μM). The molecular features that govern the 5-LOX inhibitory activity was thus explored using in silico docking experiments. The residues Ile 553 and Hie 252 were the most important residues in the interaction, each contributing significant energy values of -13.45 (electrostatic) and -5.40 kcal/mol (electrostatic and Van der Waals), respectively. The hydroxyl group of the phloroglucinol core of the compound forms a 2.56Å hydrogen bond with the side chain of the carboxylate group of Ile 553. Both Ile 553 and Hie 252 are crucial amino acid residues which chelate with the metal ion in the active site. Distorting the geometry of these ligands could be the reason for the inhibition activity shown by tHGA. The molecular simulation studies supported the bioassay results and served as a good model for understanding the way tHGA binds in the active site of human 5-LOX enzyme. PMID:21958738

  7. Virtual Dual inhibition of COX-2 / 5-LOX enzymes based on binding properties of alpha-amyrins, the anti-inflammatory compound as a promising anti-cancer drug.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Mehdi; Assadolahi, Vahideh; Yazdani, Mohsen; Nikaein, Donya; Rashidieh, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of Cordia myxa was considerably effective on curing acute inflammation in mouse model. Previous studies suggested significant anti-inflammatory activities as well as potential anticancer agent of α-amyrins in seeds. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipooxygenase (5-LOX) is significant in cancer prevention and therapeutics although this inhibition with chemo-drugs has its own side-effects. It is shown that these enzymes pathways are related to several cancers including colon, breast and lung cancer. This study was conducted based on Cordia species' α-amyrins as a safer natural anti-cancer compound for inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes by molecular docking. The X-ray crystal structure of COX2 / 5-LOX enzymes and α-amyrins was retrieved and energetically minimized respectively. The binding site and surface of enzymes were detected. Docking studies were performed by AutoDock 4.2 using Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA). Finally drug likeness, molecular pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity of α-amyrins was calculated. Molecular Docking revealed hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions between α-amyrins with both active sites of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes. Interestingly, it covalently bonded to Fe cofactor of 5-LOX enzyme and chelated this molecule. Base on binding energies (∆G) α-amyrin has more inhibitory effects on 5-LOX (-10.45 Kcal/mol) than COX-2 (-8.02 Kcal/mol). Analysis of molecular pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that α-amyrins complied with most sets of Lipinski's rules, and so it could be a suitable ligand for docking studies. Eventually, bioactivity score showed α-amyrins possess considerable biological activities as nuclear receptor, enzyme inhibitor, GPCR and protease inhibitor ligand. These results clearly demonstrate that α-amyrins could act as potential highly selective COX-/5-LOX inhibitor. Also, it is a safe compound in comparison with classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs

  8. Virtual Dual inhibition of COX-2 / 5-LOX enzymes based on binding properties of alpha-amyrins, the anti-inflammatory compound as a promising anti-cancer drug

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Mehdi; Assadolahi, Vahideh; Yazdani, Mohsen; Nikaein, Donya; Rashidieh, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of Cordia myxa was considerably effective on curing acute inflammation in mouse model. Previous studies suggested significant anti-inflammatory activities as well as potential anticancer agent of α-amyrins in seeds. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipooxygenase (5-LOX) is significant in cancer prevention and therapeutics although this inhibition with chemo-drugs has its own side-effects. It is shown that these enzymes pathways are related to several cancers including colon, breast and lung cancer. This study was conducted based on Cordia species' α-amyrins as a safer natural anti-cancer compound for inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes by molecular docking. The X-ray crystal structure of COX2 / 5-LOX enzymes and α-amyrins was retrieved and energetically minimized respectively. The binding site and surface of enzymes were detected. Docking studies were performed by AutoDock 4.2 using Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA). Finally drug likeness, molecular pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity of α-amyrins was calculated. Molecular Docking revealed hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions between α-amyrins with both active sites of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes. Interestingly, it covalently bonded to Fe cofactor of 5-LOX enzyme and chelated this molecule. Base on binding energies (∆G) α-amyrin has more inhibitory effects on 5-LOX (-10.45 Kcal/mol) than COX-2 (-8.02 Kcal/mol). Analysis of molecular pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that α-amyrins complied with most sets of Lipinski's rules, and so it could be a suitable ligand for docking studies. Eventually, bioactivity score showed α-amyrins possess considerable biological activities as nuclear receptor, enzyme inhibitor, GPCR and protease inhibitor ligand. These results clearly demonstrate that α-amyrins could act as potential highly selective COX-/5-LOX inhibitor. Also, it is a safe compound in comparison with classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs

  9. The 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor RF-22c potently suppresses leukotriene biosynthesis in cellulo and blocks bronchoconstriction and inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schaible, Anja M; Filosa, Rosanna; Krauth, Verena; Temml, Veronika; Pace, Simona; Garscha, Ulrike; Liening, Stefanie; Weinigel, Christina; Rummler, Silke; Schieferdecker, Sebastian; Nett, Markus; Peduto, Antonella; Collarile, Selene; Scuotto, Maria; Roviezzo, Fioretina; Spaziano, Giuseppe; de Rosa, Mario; Stuppner, Hermann; Schuster, Daniela; D'Agostino, Bruno; Werz, Oliver

    2016-07-15

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyzes the first two steps in leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis. Because LTs play pivotal roles in allergy and inflammation, 5-LO represents a valuable target for anti-inflammatory drugs. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism, the pharmacological profile, and the in vivo effectiveness of the novel 1,2-benzoquinone-featured 5-LO inhibitor RF-22c. Compound RF-22c potently inhibited 5-LO product synthesis in neutrophils and monocytes (IC50⩾22nM) and in cell-free assays (IC50⩾140nM) without affecting 12/15-LOs, cyclooxygenase (COX)-1/2, or arachidonic acid release, in a specific and reversible manner, supported by molecular docking data. Antioxidant or iron-chelating properties were not evident for RF-22c and 5-LO-regulatory cofactors like Ca(2+) mobilization, ERK-1/2 activation, and 5-LO nuclear membrane translocation and interaction with 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP) were unaffected. RF-22c (0.1mg/kg; i.p.) impaired (I) bronchoconstriction in ovalbumin-sensitized mice challenged with acetylcholine, (II) exudate formation in carrageenan-induced paw edema, and (III) zymosan-induced leukocyte infiltration in air pouches. Taken together, RF-22c is a highly selective and potent 5-LO inhibitor in intact human leukocytes with pronounced effectiveness in different models of inflammation that warrants further preclinical analysis of this agent as anti-inflammatory drug. PMID:27157409

  10. Effect of a 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO)/cyclooxygenase (CO) inhibitor, WY-47, 288, on cutaneous models of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Carlson, R P; O'Neill-Davis, L; Calhoun, W; Datko, L; Musser, J H; Kreft, A F; Chang, J Y

    1989-03-01

    WY-47,288 (2-[(1-naphthalenyloxy)methyl]quinoline) demonstrated topical antiinflammatory activity in several animal models of skin inflammation. Application of WY-47,288 to mouse ear surfaces inhibited arachidonic acid (ED50 = 0.3 mg/ear) and tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation (40% at 1 mg/ear). Administration of WY-47,288 (1 mg/ear) at 30 min and 5 h after TPA reduced ear edema and epidermal proliferation by 50%. WY-47,288 also inhibited oxazolone-induced contact hypersensitivity in mouse ears (ED50 = 0.4 mg/ear) and UVB-induced guinea pig skin erythema (ED50 approximately 0.25 mg/spot). These antiinflammatory effects may be due to inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) and cyclooxygenase (CO) since the synthesis of 5-LO and CO products by rat neutrophils and mouse macrophages was dose-dependently reduced by WY-47,288. By contrast, WY-47,288 demonstrated no appreciable inhibition of 12-LO (rabbit platelet), 15-LO (soybean) or phospholipase A2 (human platelet). Furthermore, no systemic adverse effects were observed after topical, parenteral or oral administration of WY-47,288, suggesting that WY-47,288 is a safe topical 5-LO/CO inhibitor for treating skin inflammation. PMID:2500009

  11. Repeated allergen exposure reduce early phase airway response and leukotriene release despite upregulation of 5-lipoxygenase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergen induced early phase airway response and airway plasma exudation are predominantly mediated by inflammatory mast cell mediators including histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated allergen exposure affects early phase airway response to allergen challenge. Methods A trimellitic anhydride (TMA) sensitized guinea pig model was used to investigate the effects of low dose repeated allergen exposure on cholinergic airway responsiveness, early phase airway response and plasma exudation, as well as local airway production of mast cell derived cysteinyl leukotrienes and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) after allergen challenge. Results Repeated low dose allergen exposure increased cholinergic airway responsiveness. In contrast, early phase airway response and plasma exudation in response to a high-dose allergen challenge were strongly attenuated after repeated low dose allergen exposure. Inhibition of the airway response was unspecific to exposed allergen and independent of histamine receptor blocking. Furthermore, a significant reduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2 was found in the airways of animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen. However, in vitro stimulation of airway tissue from animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen with arachidonic acid and calcium ionophore (A23187) induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2, suggesting enhanced activity of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Conclusions The inhibition of the early phase airway response, cysteinyl leukotriene and TXB2 production after repeated allergen exposure may result from unresponsive effector cells. PMID:22439792

  12. Synthesis of New Harmine Isoxazoles and Evaluation of their Potential Anti-Alzheimer, Anti-inflammatory, and Anticancer Activities.

    PubMed

    Filali, Insaf; Romdhane, Anis; Znati, Mansour; Jannet, Hichem B; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2016-01-01

    Harmine 1 was extracted from the seeds of Peganum harmala. From this natural molecule, a new series of isoxazole derivatives with complete regiospecificity were prepared using 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions with various arylnitrile oxides. Harmine and its derivatives were characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and HRMS. The evaluation of their anti-acetylcholinesterase (AChE), anti-5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), anti-xanthine oxidase (XOD) and anticancer activities were studied in vitro against AChE, 5-LOX and XOD enzymes, respectively, and in HTC-116, MCF7 and OVCAR-3 cancer cell lines. The prepared derivatives were shown to be inactive against the XOD enzyme (0-38.3 ± 1.9% at 100 µM). Compound 2 exhibited the best anti-AChE activity (IC50=1.9 ± 1.5 µM). Derivatives 3a, 3b and 3d had moderate cytotoxic activities (IC50=5.0 ± 0.3 µM (3a) and IC50=6.3 ± 0.4 µM (3b) against HCT 116 cells, IC50=5.0 ± 1.0 µM (3d) against MCF7 cells). PMID:26362768

  13. Zileuton, 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor, Acts as a Chemopreventive Agent in Intestinal Polyposis, by Modulating Polyp and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Heiferman, Jeffrey R.; Shrivastav, Manisha; Vitello, Dominic; Blatner, Nichole R.; Knab, Lawrence M.; Phillips, Joseph D.; Cheon, Eric C.; Grippo, Paul J.; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.; Bentrem, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leukotrienes and prostaglandins, products of arachidonic acid metabolism, sustain both systemic and lesion-localized inflammation. Tumor-associated Inflammation can also contribute to the pathogenesis of colon cancer. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have increased risk of developing colon cancer. The levels of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), the key enzyme for leukotrienes production, are increased in colon cancer specimens and colonic dysplastic lesions. Here we report that Zileuton, a specific 5-LO inhibitor, can prevent polyp formation by efficiently reducing the tumor-associated and systemic inflammation in APCΔ468 mice. Experimental Design In the current study, we inhibited 5-LO by dietary administration of Zileuton in the APCΔ468 mouse model of polyposis and analyzed the effect of in vivo 5-LO inhibition on tumor-associated and systemic inflammation. Results Zileuton-fed mice developed fewer polyps and displayed marked reduction in systemic and polyp-associated inflammation. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-inflammatory innate and adaptive immunity cells were reduced both in the lesions and systemically. As part of tumor-associated inflammation Leukotriene B4 (LTB4), product of 5-LO activity, is increased focally in human dysplastic lesions. The 5-LO enzymatic activity was reduced in the serum of Zileuton treated polyposis mice. Conclusions This study demonstrates that dietary administration of 5-LO specific inhibitor in the polyposis mouse model decreases polyp burden, and suggests that Zileuton may be a potential chemo-preventive agent in patients that are high-risk of developing colon cancer. PMID:25747113

  14. Anti-proliferative effects of lichen-derived inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase on malignant cell-lines and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ogmundsdóttir, H M; Zoëga, G M; Gissurarson, S R; Ingólfsdóttir, K

    1998-01-01

    microg mL(-1) for protolichesterinic acid and 30 microg mL(-1) for lobaric acid. We conclude that the anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects observed might be related to the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of protolichesterinic acid and lobaric acid. These results open up the opportunity for future studies of these lichen metabolites with regard to their anti-tumour and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:9504441

  15. Pharmacological characterization of SB 202235, a potent and selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor: effects in models of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Chabot-Fletcher, M C; Underwood, D C; Breton, J J; Adams, J L; Kagey-Sobotka, A; Griswold, D E; Marshall, L A; Sarau, H M; Winkler, J D; Hay, D W

    1995-06-01

    The peptidoleukotrienes and leukotriene B4, formed from arachidonic acid through the action of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), exert a spectrum of biological effects. It has been proposed that potent and selective 5-LO inhibitors will be effective therapy in diseases in which the peptidoleukotrienes and leukotriene B4 have been implicated, such as asthma and arthritis. The novel compound (S)-N-hydroxy-N-(2,3-dihydro-6-phenylmethoxy-3-benzyofuranyl )urea (SB 202235) was evaluated as a selective inhibitor of 5-LO in a cell-free system as well as in various cellular assays. In addition, the potential therapeutic value of SB 202235 was assessed in preclinical models of allergic asthma. The activity of the 5-LO enzyme isolated from rat basophilic leukemia-1 cells was inhibited by SB 202235 in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 1.9 microM. Consistent with its ability to inhibit 5-LO, SB 202235 inhibited the production of leukotriene B4 by human monocytes and in human whole blood (IC50 values of 1.5 microM and 1.1 microM, respectively). The selectivity of SB 202235 was confirmed by its lack of effect against several other enzymes and receptors. SB 202235 potently and effectively inhibited the contraction produced by a single concentration of ovalbumin in guinea pig trachea (IC50 = 20 microM) and of anti-IgE in human bronchus (IC50 = 2 microM). SB 202235 (3-30 microM) also inhibited the contraction of guinea pig trachea in response to increasing concentration of ovalbumin. When administered orally (30 mg/kg) to conscious guinea pigs, SB 202235 attenuated antigen-induced broncho-constriction and the subsequent eosinophil influx.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7791085

  16. Structural and Functional Analysis of Calcium Ion Mediated Binding of 5-Lipoxygenase to Nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramakrishnan B.; Zhu, Lin; Idborg, Helena; Rådmark, Olof; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes; Hebert, Hans; Jegerschöld, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    An important step in the production of inflammatory mediators of the leukotriene family is the Ca2+ mediated recruitment of 5 Lipoxygenase (5LO) to nuclear membranes. To study this reaction in vitro, the natural membrane mimicking environment of nanodiscs was used. Nanodiscs with 10.5 nm inner diameter were made with the lipid POPC and membrane scaffolding protein MSP1E3D1. Monomeric and dimeric 5LO were investigated. Monomeric 5LO mixed with Ca2+ and nanodiscs are shown to form stable complexes that 1) produce the expected leukotriene products from arachidonic acid and 2) can be, for the first time, visualised by native gel electrophoresis and negative stain transmission electron microscopy and 3) show a highest ratio of two 5LO per nanodisc. We interpret this as one 5LO on each side of the disc. The dimer of 5LO is visualised by negative stain transmission electron microscopy and is shown to not bind to nanodiscs. This study shows the advantages of nanodiscs to obtain basic structural information as well as functional information of a complex between a monotopic membrane protein and the membrane. PMID:27010627

  17. The inhibitory activity of cocoa phenolic extract against pro-inflammatory mediators secretion induced by lipopolysaccharide in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Ranneh, Yazan; Ali, Faisal; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna; Esa, Norhaizan Mohd; Ismail, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Cocoa is a rich source of polyphenols that has been traditionally used as the treatment of several types of inflammation related disease. The response to inflammation comprises the consecutive release of mediators and the enlistment of circulating leukocytes, such as macrophages. Currently, Cocoa-derived polyphenolics have shown anti-inflammatory effects in vivo, but the therapeutic benefits in vitro remain unclear. Therefore, in this study, the effect of cocoa polyphenolic extract (CPE) on RAW 264.7 macrophage cells sensitized by lipopolysaccharide as in vitro inflammatory model was investigated. The anti-inflammatory activity of CPE was assessed by measuring its ability to inhibit the pro-inflammatory enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and the pro-inflammatory mediators prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). The results show that CPE significantly inhibits 5-LOX activity (p < 0.01). In addition, CPE dose-dependently suppressed the production of PGE2, ROS, NO and TNF-α in RAW 264.7 cells. These data suggest that CPE may be used for the treatment of inflammation and it's related-diseases. PMID:27190746

  18. Nutrigenetic association of the 5-lipoxygenase gene with myocardial infarction123

    PubMed Central

    Allayee, Hooman; Baylin, Ana; Hartiala, Jaana; Wijesuriya, Hemani; Mehrabian, Margarete; Lusis, Aldons J; Campos, Hannia

    2010-01-01

    Background 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of the biosynthesis of proinflammatory leukotrienes from arachidonic acid (AA) and has been associated with atherosclerosis in animal models and humans. We previously reported that variants of a 5-LO promoter repeat polymorphism were associated with carotid atherosclerosis in humans, an effect that was exacerbated by high dietary AA but mitigated by high dietary n–3 fatty acids. Objective We sought to confirm these initial observations with a more clinically relevant phenotype such as myocardial infarction (MI). Design The 5-LO polymorphism was genotyped in 1885 Costa Rican case-control pairs and tested for association with MI. Functional experiments were carried out to determine whether the associated alleles had differences in mRNA expression. Results The frequency of variant genotype groups did not differ significantly between cases and controls. However, a significant gene × diet interaction was observed, in which, relative to the common 5 repeat allele, the 3 and 4 alleles were associated with a higher MI risk in the high (≥0.25 g/d) dietary AA group (odds ratio: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.61) and with a lower risk in the low (<0. 25 g/d)AA group (0.77; 0.63, 0.94) (P for interaction = 0.015). Using allele-specific quantitation, the short alleles had expression approximately twice that of the 5 allele (P < 0.0001). Conclusions The 3 and 4 variants lead to higher 5-LO expression and provide additional evidence that these alleles are associated with greater risks of atherosclerosis and MI in the context of a high-AA diet. PMID:18842779

  19. 5-Lipoxygenase Negatively Regulates Th1 Response during Brucella abortus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fahel, Júlia Silveira; de Souza, Mariana Bueno; Gomes, Marco Túlio Ribeiro; Corsetti, Patricia P.; Carvalho, Natalia B.; Marinho, Fabio A. V.; de Almeida, Leonardo A.; Caliari, Marcelo V.; Machado, Fabiana Simão

    2015-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects humans and cattle, causing a chronic inflammatory disease known as brucellosis. A Th1-mediated immune response plays a critical role in host control of this pathogen. Recent findings indicate contrasting roles for lipid mediators in host responses against infections. 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) is an enzyme required for the production of the lipid mediators leukotrienes and lipoxins. To determine the involvement of 5-LO in host responses to B. abortus infection, we intraperitoneally infected wild-type and 5-LO-deficient mice and evaluated the progression of infection and concomitant expression of immune mediators. Here, we demonstrate that B. abortus induced the upregulation of 5-LO mRNA in wild-type mice. Moreover, this pathogen upregulated the production of the lipid mediators leukotriene B4 and lipoxin A4 in a 5-LO-dependent manner. 5-LO-deficient mice displayed lower bacterial burdens in the spleen and liver and less severe liver pathology, demonstrating an enhanced resistance to infection. Host resistance paralleled an increased expression of the proinflammatory mediators interleukin-12 (IL-12), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) during the course of infection. Moreover, we demonstrated that 5-LO downregulated the expression of IL-12 in macrophages during B. abortus infection. Our results suggest that 5-LO has a major involvement in B. abortus infection, by functioning as a negative regulator of the protective Th1 immune responses against this pathogen. PMID:25583526

  20. Effect of 5-lipoxygenase on the development of pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Jones, John E; Walker, Jennifer L; Song, Yanli; Weiss, Norbert; Cardoso, Wellington V; Tuder, Rubin M; Loscalzo, Joseph; Zhang, Ying-Yi

    2004-05-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) and its downstream leukotriene products have been implicated in the development of pulmonary hypertension. In this study, we examined the effects of 5-LO overexpression in rat lungs on pulmonary hypertension using a recombinant adenovirus expressing 5-LO (Ad5-LO). Transthoracic echocardiography and right heart catheterization data showed that 5-LO overexpression in the lung did not cause pulmonary hypertension in normal rats; however, it markedly accelerated the progression of pulmonary hypertension in rats treated with monocrotaline (MCT). An increase in pulmonary artery pressure occurred earlier in the rats treated with MCT + Ad5-LO (7-10 days) compared with those treated with control vector, MCT + adenovirus expressing green fluorescent protein (AdGFP), or MCT alone (15-18 days). The weight ratio of the right ventricle to left ventricle plus septum was higher in the MCT + Ad5-LO group than that of the MCT + AdGFP or MCT group (0.45 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.35 +/- 0.03 or 0.33 +/- 0.06). Lung tissue histological sections from MCT + Ad5-LO rats exhibited more severe inflammatory cell infiltration and pulmonary vascular muscularization than those from MCT + AdGFP- or MCT-treated rats. Administration of 5-LO inhibitors, zileuton or MK-886, to either MCT- or MCT + Ad5-LO-treated rats prevented the development of pulmonary hypertension. These data suggest that 5-LO plays a critical role in the progression of pulmonary hypertension in rats and that the detrimental effect of 5-LO is manifest only in the setting of pulmonary vascular endothelial cell dysfunction. PMID:14726295

  1. Analysis of a nucleotide-binding site of 5-lipoxygenase by affinity labelling: binding characteristics and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Y; Hammarberg, T; Radmark, O; Samuelsson, B; Ng, C F; Funk, C D; Loscalzo, J

    2000-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) catalyses the first two steps in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, which are inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid. 5LO activity is stimulated by ATP; however, a consensus ATP-binding site or nucleotide-binding site has not been found in its protein sequence. In the present study, affinity and photoaffinity labelling of 5LO with 5'-p-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine (FSBA) and 2-azido-ATP showed that 5LO bound to the ATP analogues quantitatively and specifically and that the incorporation of either analogue inhibited ATP stimulation of 5LO activity. The stoichiometry of the labelling was 1.4 mol of FSBA/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 1 mol/mol) or 0.94 mol of 2-azido-ATP/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 0.77 mol/mol). Labelling with FSBA prevented further labelling with 2-azido-ATP, indicating that the same binding site was occupied by both analogues. Other nucleotides (ADP, AMP, GTP, CTP and UTP) also competed with 2-azido-ATP labelling, suggesting that the site was a general nucleotide-binding site rather than a strict ATP-binding site. Ca(2+), which also stimulates 5LO activity, had no effect on the labelling of the nucleotide-binding site. Digestion with trypsin and peptide sequencing showed that two fragments of 5LO were labelled by 2-azido-ATP. These fragments correspond to residues 73-83 (KYWLNDDWYLK, in single-letter amino acid code) and 193-209 (FMHMFQSSWNDFADFEK) in the 5LO sequence. Trp-75 and Trp-201 in these peptides were modified by the labelling, suggesting that they were immediately adjacent to the C-2 position of the adenine ring of ATP. Given the stoichiometry of the labelling, the two peptide sequences of 5LO were probably near each other in the enzyme's tertiary structure, composing or surrounding the ATP-binding site of 5LO. PMID:11042125

  2. Modulation of LPS-induced memory insult, γ-secretase and neuroinflammation in 3xTg mice by 5-Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Yash B.; Giannopoulos, Phillip F.; Chu, Jin; Praticò, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Besides amyloid and tau pathology, a constant feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an intense inflammatory response, which is considered an active player in its pathogenesis. The 5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) is a proinflammatory enzyme and an endogenous modulator of AD-like phenotype in mouse models of the disease. To further understand the role of 5LO in AD pathogenesis, we exposed the 3xTg and 3xTg/5LO knockout mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a known inducer of neuroinflammation, and evaluated its effect on their AD-like phenotype. 3xTg mice treated with LPS manifested a worsening of behavior, γ-secretase up-regulation, and increased neuroinflammatory responses. These effects were completely prevented in 3xTg mice genetically deficient for 5LO. By contrast, the absence of 5LO did not protect against increase in tau phosphorylation at specific epitopes that were mediated by the activation of the cyclin-dependent kinase 5. Our data demonstrate that the 5LO pathway affects key neuropathological features of the AD-like phenotype (behavior, Abeta, microgliosis, astrocytosis) but not others (tau pathology) in the LPS-dependent neuroinflammation model. The opposite ways whereby 5LO influences the LPS-dependent effects in vivo supports the complex nature of the neuroinflammatory response in AD and its differential role in modulating amyloid and tau neuropathology. PMID:24332986

  3. Further studies on ethyl 5-hydroxy-indole-3-carboxylate scaffold: design, synthesis and evaluation of 2-phenylthiomethyl-indole derivatives as efficient inhibitors of human 5-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Peduto, Antonella; Bruno, Ferdinando; Dehm, Friedrike; Krauth, Verena; de Caprariis, Paolo; Weinigel, Christina; Barz, Dagmar; Massa, Antonio; De Rosa, Mario; Werz, Oliver; Filosa, Rosanna

    2014-06-23

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO), an enzyme that catalyzes the initial steps in the biosynthesis of pro-inflammatory leukotrienes, is an attractive drug target for the pharmacotherapy of inflammatory and allergic diseases. Here, we present the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel series of ethyl 5-hydroxyindole-3-carboxylate derivatives that efficiently inhibit human 5-LO. SAR analysis revealed that the potency of compounds is closely related to the positioning of the substituents at the phenylthiomethyl ring. The introduction of methyl or chlorine groups in ortho- and ortho/para-position of thiophenol represent the most favorable modifications. Among all tested compounds, ethyl 5-hydroxy-2-(mesitylthiomethyl)-1-methyl-1H-indole-3-carboxylate (19) is the most potent derivative which blocks 5-LO activity in cell-free assays with IC50 = 0.7 μM, and suppressed 5-LO product synthesis in polymorphonuclear leukocytes with IC50 = 0.23 μM. PMID:24871899

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity studies on the stems and roots of Jasminum lanceolarium Roxb.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wen-xia; Zhang, Jian-hua; Zhang, Yi; Meng, Da-li; Yan, Dan

    2015-08-01

    Jasminum lanceolarium Roxb is an important traditional Chinese medicine. Its stems and roots have been used for the treatment of rheumatism and fever while the leaves are used as an anti-inflammatory agent to relieve pain. In order to support its traditional Chinese medicinal uses, five animal models were designed and the anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of the 70% EtOH-H2O extracts of J. lanceolarium (EJL) were investigated. Meanwhile, biochemical parameters such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) in blood serum of rats exposed to acute (carrageenan) inflammation model were evaluated. At doses of 400 mg/kg, EJL exhibited higher anti-inflammation effect than that of indomethacin and better analgesic activity than that of aspirin (P<0.001). Furthermore, eleven isolated compounds including six lignanoids (1, 2, 6, 7, 8, and 11) and five iridoids (3, 4, 5, 9, and 10) were isolated from the active extracts and showed significant anti-inflammatory activities with the IC50 values of 1.76-5.22 mg/mL, respectively, when testing their inhibitory effects on phospholipase A2 in vitro. The results demonstrated that the possible anti-inflammatory mechanisms might be attributed to inhibit the hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids, production on both COX-2 and 5-LOX, and then finally inhibit the release of prostaglandins (PGs), which suggested that EJL had a non-selective inhibitory effect on the release or actions of these mediators, and might be a dual LOX-COX inhibitor for the treatment of inflammation from the natural resource. The studies on the animals and the inflammatory mediators, along with the bioactive compounds presumed that the existences of iridoids and lignanoids could be response for their bioactivities of the whole plants. PMID:26055344

  5. Failure of the inhibition of rat gastric mucosal 5-lipoxygenase by novel acetohydroxamic acids to prevent ethanol-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Boughton-Smith, N K; Whittle, B J

    1988-09-01

    1. The role of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and LTC4 as mediators of gastric mucosal damage following ethanol challenge in vivo has been investigated using two selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors, BW A4C and BW A137C. 2. Oral administration of ethanol to rats in vivo, induced macroscopic damage to the gastric mucosa and markedly increased the formation of the 5-lipoxygenase products, LTB4 and LTC4, from the mucosa ex vivo. 3. Pretreatment with the acetohydroxamic acids BW A4C and BW A137C (5-50 mg kg-1 p.o.) dose-dependently reduced ethanol-stimulated LTB4 and LTC4 formation by the gastric mucosa, with an ID50 of approximately 5 mg kg-1 p.o. 4. A single oral dose of BW A4C (20 mg kg-1) induced near-maximal inhibition of mucosal LTB4 formation within 30 min, which was well maintained for 5 h, whereas BW A137C (20 mg kg-1 p.o.) induced maximal inhibition between 30 and 60 min after administration, which then diminished over the subsequent 5 h. 5. The mucosal formation of the cyclo-oxygenase product, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha, which was unaltered following ethanol challenge, was not inhibited by the acetohydroxamic acids. Likewise, the small increase in mucosal thromboxane B2 formation following challenge was not inhibited by BW A4C. 6. Neither BW A4C nor BW A137C, at doses that almost completely inhibited the mucosal synthesis of LTB4 or LTC4, reduced the macroscopic gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol. 7. Pretreatment with the lipoxygenase inhibitor BW 755C (5-50 mg kg-1 p.o.) did reduce mucosal damage, but there was a dissociation between the degree of protection and the inhibition of leukotriene biosynthesis. 8. Oral administration of high doses of either BW A4C or BW A137C (300mgkg-1) did not induce macroscopic gastric damage over a 3 h period. 9. These findings suggest that the leukotrienes, LTB4 and LTC4 are not the primary mediators of ethanol-induced acute mucosal damage, but do not exclude their role in more chronic gastric damage and inflammation. PMID

  6. Development of a new colorimetric assay for lipoxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weiqiang; Zhao, Xue; Xu, Zhongyu; Dong, Ningning; Zou, Shien; Shen, Xu; Huang, Jin

    2013-10-15

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) are a family of non-heme iron-containing dioxygenases that catalyze the hydroperoxidation of lipids, containing a cis,cis-1,4-pentadiene structure. A rapid and reliable colorimetric assay for determination of the activity of three human functional lipoxygenase isoforms (5-lipoxygenase, platelet 12-lipoxygenase, and 15-lipoxygenase-1) is developed in this article. In the new assay, LOX-derived lipid hydroperoxides oxidize the ferrous ion (Fe²⁺) to the ferric ion (Fe³⁺), the latter of which binds with thiocyanate (SCN⁻) to generate a red ferrithiocyanate (FTC) complex. The absorbance of the FTC complex can be easily measured at 480 nm. Because 5-LOX can be stimulated by many cofactors, the effects of its cofactors (Ca²⁺, ATP, dithiothreitol, glutathione, L-α-phosphatidylcholine, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) on the color development of the FTC complex are also determined. The assay is adaptive for purified LOXs and cell lysates containing active LOXs. We use the new colorimetric assay in a 96-well format to evaluate several well-known LOX inhibitors, the IC₅₀ values of which are in good agreement with previously reported data. The reliability and reproducibility of the assay make it useful for in vitro screening for inhibitors of LOXs and, therefore, should accelerate drug discovery for clinical application. PMID:23811155

  7. Deletion of 5-Lipoxygenase in the Tumor Microenvironment Promotes Lung Cancer Progression and Metastasis through Regulating T Cell Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Poczobutt, Joanna M; Nguyen, Teresa T; Hanson, Dwight; Li, Howard; Sippel, Trisha R; Weiser-Evans, Mary C M; Gijon, Miguel; Murphy, Robert C; Nemenoff, Raphael A

    2016-01-15

    Eicosanoids, including PGs, produced by cyclooxygenases (COX), and leukotrienes, produced by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) have been implicated in cancer progression. These molecules are produced by both cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME). We previously reported that both COX and 5-LO metabolites increase during progression in an orthotopic immunocompetent model of lung cancer. Although PGs in the TME have been well studied, less is known regarding 5-LO products produced by the TME. We examined the role of 5-LO in the TME using a model in which Lewis lung carcinoma cells are directly implanted into the lungs of syngeneic WT mice or mice globally deficient in 5-LO (5-LO-KO). Unexpectedly, primary tumor volume and liver metastases were increased in 5-LO-KO mice. This was associated with an ablation of leukotriene (LT) production, consistent with production mainly mediated by the microenvironment. Increased tumor progression was partially reproduced in global LTC4 synthase KO or mice transplanted with LTA4 hydrolase-deficient bone marrow. Tumor-bearing lungs of 5-LO-KO had decreased numbers of CD4 and CD8 T cells compared with WT controls, as well as fewer dendritic cells. This was associated with lower levels of CCL20 and CXL9, which have been implicated in dendritic and T cell recruitment. Depletion of CD8 cells increased tumor growth and eliminated the differences between WT and 5-LO mice. These data reveal an antitumorigenic role for 5-LO products in the microenvironment during lung cancer progression through regulation of T cells and suggest that caution should be used in targeting this pathway in lung cancer. PMID:26663781

  8. Deletion of 5-Lipoxygenase in the Tumor Microenvironment Promotes Lung Cancer Progression and Metastasis through Regulating T Cell Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Poczobutt, Joanna M.; Nguyen, Teresa T.; Hanson, Dwight; Li, Howard; Sippel, Trisha R.; Weiser-Evans, Mary C. M.; Gijon, Miguel; Murphy, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids, including PGs, produced by cyclooxygenases (COX), and leukotrienes, produced by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) have been implicated in cancer progression. These molecules are produced by both cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME). We previously reported that both COX and 5-LO metabolites increase during progression in an orthotopic immunocompetent model of lung cancer. Although PGs in the TME have been well studied, less is known regarding 5-LO products produced by the TME. We examined the role of 5-LO in the TME using a model in which Lewis lung carcinoma cells are directly implanted into the lungs of syngeneic WT mice or mice globally deficient in 5-LO (5-LO-KO). Unexpectedly, primary tumor volume and liver metastases were increased in 5-LO-KO mice. This was associated with an ablation of leukotriene (LT) production, consistent with production mainly mediated by the microenvironment. Increased tumor progression was partially reproduced in global LTC4 synthase KO or mice transplanted with LTA4 hydrolase-deficient bone marrow. Tumor-bearing lungs of 5-LO-KO had decreased numbers of CD4 and CD8 T cells compared with WT controls, as well as fewer dendritic cells. This was associated with lower levels of CCL20 and CXL9, which have been implicated in dendritic and T cell recruitment. Depletion of CD8 cells increased tumor growth and eliminated the differences between WT and 5-LO mice. These data reveal an antitumorigenic role for 5-LO products in the microenvironment during lung cancer progression through regulation of T cells and suggest that caution should be used in targeting this pathway in lung cancer. PMID:26663781

  9. Increased PUFA Content and 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway Expression Are Associated with Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Obese Women with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Heemskerk, Mattijs M.; Giera, Martin; el Bouazzaoui, Fatiha; Lips, Mirjam A.; Pijl, Hanno; Willems van Dijk, Ko; van Harmelen, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Obese women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have more inflammation in their subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT) than age-and-BMI similar obese women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). We aimed to investigate whether WAT fatty acids and/or oxylipins are associated with the enhanced inflammatory state in WAT of the T2DM women. Fatty acid profiles were measured in both subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue (vWAT) of 19 obese women with NGT and 16 age-and-BMI similar women with T2DM. Oxylipin levels were measured in sWAT of all women. Arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) percentages were higher in sWAT, but not vWAT of the T2DM women, and AA correlated positively to the gene expression of macrophage marker CD68. We found tendencies for higher oxylipin concentrations of the 5-LOX leukotrienes in sWAT of T2DM women. Gene expression of the 5-LOX leukotriene biosynthesis pathway was significantly higher in sWAT of T2DM women. In conclusion, AA and DHA content were higher in sWAT of T2DM women and AA correlated to the increased inflammatory state in sWAT. Increased AA content was accompanied by an upregulation of the 5-LOX pathway and seems to have led to an increase in the conversion of AA into proinflammatory leukotrienes in sWAT. PMID:26378572

  10. Simultaneous targeting of 5-LOX-COX and ODC block NNK-induced lung adenoma progression to adenocarcinoma in A/J mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gaurav; Patlolla, Jagan Mohan R; Madka, Venkateshwar; Mohammed, Altaf; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yuting; Biddick, Laura; Singh, Anil; Gillaspy, Allison; Lightfoot, Stanley; Steele, Vernon E; Kopelovich, Levy; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Targeting complementary pathways will achieve better treatment efficacy than a single agent high-dose strategy that could increase risk of side effects and tumor resistance. To target COX-2, 5-LOX, and ODC simultaneously, we tested the effects of a dual 5-LOX-COX inhibitor, licofelone, and an ODC inhibitor, DFMO, alone and in combination, on NNK-induced lung tumors in female A/J mice. Seven-week-old mice were treated with NNK (10 μmol/mouse, single dose, i.p.) and randomized to different treatment groups. Three weeks after injection, mice were fed control or experimental diets (DFMO 1500/3000 ppm, licofelone 200/400 ppm, or a low-dose combination of 1500 ppm DFMO and 200 ppm licofelone) for 17 or 34 weeks. Both agents significantly inhibited tumor formation in a dose-dependent manner. As anticipated more adenomas and adenocarcinomas were observed at 17 and 34 weeks, respectively. Importantly, low dose combination of DFMO and licofelone showed more pronounced effects at 17 or 34 weeks in inhibiting the total tumor formation (~60%, p < 0.0001) and adenocarcinoma (~65%, p < 0.0001) compared to individual high dose of DFMO (~44% and 46%, p < 0.0001) and licofelone (~48% and 55%, p < 0.0001). DFMO and combination-treated mice lung tumors exhibited modulated ODC pathway components (Oat, Oaz, SRM, SMS, and SAT, p < 0.05) along with decreased proliferation (PCNA, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin A) and increased expression of p53, p21 and p27 compared to mice fed control diet. Both DFMO and licofelone significantly inhibited tumor inflammatory markers. Our findings suggest that a low-dose combined treatment targeting inflammation and polyamine synthesis may provide effective chemoprevention. PMID:27293987

  11. Simultaneous targeting of 5-LOX-COX and ODC block NNK-induced lung adenoma progression to adenocarcinoma in A/J mice

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gaurav; Patlolla, Jagan Mohan R; Madka, Venkateshwar; Mohammed, Altaf; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yuting; Biddick, Laura; Singh, Anil; Gillaspy, Allison; Lightfoot, Stanley; Steele, Vernon E; Kopelovich, Levy; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Targeting complementary pathways will achieve better treatment efficacy than a single agent high-dose strategy that could increase risk of side effects and tumor resistance. To target COX-2, 5-LOX, and ODC simultaneously, we tested the effects of a dual 5-LOX-COX inhibitor, licofelone, and an ODC inhibitor, DFMO, alone and in combination, on NNK-induced lung tumors in female A/J mice. Seven-week-old mice were treated with NNK (10 μmol/mouse, single dose, i.p.) and randomized to different treatment groups. Three weeks after injection, mice were fed control or experimental diets (DFMO 1500/3000 ppm, licofelone 200/400 ppm, or a low-dose combination of 1500 ppm DFMO and 200 ppm licofelone) for 17 or 34 weeks. Both agents significantly inhibited tumor formation in a dose-dependent manner. As anticipated more adenomas and adenocarcinomas were observed at 17 and 34 weeks, respectively. Importantly, low dose combination of DFMO and licofelone showed more pronounced effects at 17 or 34 weeks in inhibiting the total tumor formation (~60%, p < 0.0001) and adenocarcinoma (~65%, p < 0.0001) compared to individual high dose of DFMO (~44% and 46%, p < 0.0001) and licofelone (~48% and 55%, p < 0.0001). DFMO and combination-treated mice lung tumors exhibited modulated ODC pathway components (Oat, Oaz, SRM, SMS, and SAT, p < 0.05) along with decreased proliferation (PCNA, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin A) and increased expression of p53, p21 and p27 compared to mice fed control diet. Both DFMO and licofelone significantly inhibited tumor inflammatory markers. Our findings suggest that a low-dose combined treatment targeting inflammation and polyamine synthesis may provide effective chemoprevention. PMID:27293987

  12. Chemical composition of the essential oils of variegated pink-fleshed lemon (Citrus x limon L. Burm. f.) and their anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Dalia; Ashour, Mohamed L; Mulyaningsih, Sri; El-Shazly, Assem; Wink, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The volatile secondary metabolites of essential oils from fruit peel and leaves of variegated pink-fleshed lemon (Citrus x limon) were investigated using GLC and GLC-MS (gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy). Altogether 141 compounds were identified and quantified, accounting for 99.59% and 96.33% of the total hydrodistilled peel and leaf oil, respectively. Limonene occurred in higher amounts in fruit peel (52.73%) than in leaf oil (29.13%). Neral (12.72%), neryl acetate (8.53%), p-menth-1-en-7-al (4.63%), beta-pinene (6.35%), and nerol (4.42%) were the most abundant constituents in leaf oil, whereas gamma-terpinene (9.88%), beta-pinene (7.67%), geranial (4.44%), and neral (3.64%) dominated in the fruit peel oil. The antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antitrypanosomal, and antimicrobial activities of the fruit peel essential oil were evaluated. The oil had a low antioxidant activity with an IC50 value of (26.66 +/- 2.07) mg/ml as compared to the efficient antioxidant ascorbic acid [IC50 (16.32 +/- 0.16) microg/ml]. The oil moderately inhibited soybean 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) with an IC50 value of (32.05 +/- 3.91) microg/ml and had moderate antitrypanosomal activity [IC50 (60.90 +/- 0.91) microg/ml]. In addition, moderate antimicrobial activities were detected against Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus capitis, Micrococcus luteus), one Gram-negative bacterium (Pseudomonas fluorescens), and yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida parapsilosis). PMID:24066512

  13. Pre-treatment of HT-29 cells with 5-LOX inhibitor (MK-886) induces changes in cell cycle and increases apoptosis after photodynamic therapy with hypericin.

    PubMed

    Kleban, Ján; Szilárdiová, Beáta; Mikes, Jaromír; Horváth, Viktor; Sacková, Veronika; Brezáni, Peter; Hofmanová, Jirina; Kozubík, Alois; Fedorocko, Peter

    2006-08-01

    It may be hypothesized that the lipoxygenase (LOX) metabolic pathway plays an important role in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignant tumours, and modification of this pathway may result in administration of lower doses of photodynamic active agents accompanied by reduced side effects. In this study, we examine in more detail the cytokinetic parameters of human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells pre-treated for 48 or 24h with LOX inhibitor MK-886, followed by PDT induced by hypericin. Based on MTT assay the concentrations of both agents (MK-886 and hypericin) with relatively slight (non-significant) cytotoxic effects were selected. These concentrations were used for combined treatment, where MTT response, total cell number, floating cells quantification, viability, cell cycle progression and DNA synthesis were detected. Hoechst/PI staining, PARP fragmentation and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were evaluated to determine the extent of apoptosis. While MK-886 alone caused mainly necrosis, 48h pre-treatment of cells with MK-886 followed by PDT with hypericin clearly shifted the type of cell death to apoptosis. PDT with hypericin alone caused apoptosis in 19% of the cell population. Some combined modalities significantly potentiated the apoptotic effect (31% of apoptotic cells; 2.5microM MK-886/0.1microM hypericin), i.e., by 60% more than after single treatment with hypericin. Increased apoptosis was confirmed by PARP (116kDa) cleavage to characteristic 89kDa fragments and changes in MMP. Increasing concentration of MK-886 was accompanied by massive changes in the cell cycle progression. Combined treatment with lower concentrations of MK-886 and hypericin increased accumulation of cells in the S phase, accompanied by inhibition of DNA synthesis. Increasing concentration of MK-886 in this combination caused the opposite effect, manifesting significant accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. More pronounced effects were observed after the 48h pre

  14. Investigation for the amorphous state of ER-34122, a dual 5-lipoxygenase/cyclooxygenase inhibitor with poor aqueous solubility, in HPMC solid dispersion prepared by the solvent evaporation method.

    PubMed

    Kushida, Ikuo; Gotoda, Masaharu

    2013-10-01

    ER-34122, a poorly water-soluble dual 5-lipoxygenase/cyclooxygenase inhibitor, exists as a crystalline form. According to an Oak Ridge thermal ellipsoid plot drawing, carbonyl oxygen O (5) makes an intermolecular hydrogen bond with the hydrogen bonded to N (3) in the crystal structure. The FTIR and the solid-state ¹³C NMR spectra suggest that the network is spread out in the amorphous state and the hydrogen bonding gets weaker than that in the crystalline phase, because the carbonyl signals significantly shift in both spectra. When amorphous ER-34122 was heated, crystallization occurred at around 140°C. Similar crystallization happened in the solid dispersion; however, the degree of crystallization was much lower than that observed in the pure amorphous material. Also, the DSC thermogram of the solid dispersion did not show any exothermic peaks implying crystallization. The heat of fusion (ΔHf) determined in the pure amorphous material was nearly equal to that for the crystalline form, whereas the ΔHf value obtained in the solid dispersion was less than a third of them. These data prove that crystallization of the amorphous form is dramatically restrained in the solid dispersion system. The carbonyl wavenumber shifts in the FTIR spectra indicate that the average hydrogen bond in the solid dispersion is lower than that in the pure amorphous material. Therefore, HPMC will suppress formation of the intermolecular network observed in ER-34122 crystal and preserve the amorphous state, which is thermodynamically less stable, in the solid dispersed system. PMID:22519663

  15. Inhibition of inflammatory mediators contributes to the anti-inflammatory activity of KYKZL-1 via MAPK and NF-κB pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Guang-Lin; Du, Yi-Fang; Cheng, Jing; Huan, Lin; Chen, Shi-Cui; Wei, Shao-Hua; Gong, Zhu-Nan; Cai, Jie; Qiu, Ting; Wu, Hao; Sun, Ting; Ao, Gui-Zhen

    2013-10-01

    KYKZL-1, a newly synthesized compound with COX/5-LOX dual inhibition, was subjected to the anti-inflammatory activity test focusing on its modulation of inflammatory mediators as well as intracellular MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. In acute ear edema model, pretreatment with KYKZL-1 (p.o.) dose-dependently inhibited the xylene-induced ear edema in mice with a higher inhibition than diclofenac. In a three-day TPA-induced inflammation, KYKZL-1 also showed significant anti-inflammatory activity with inhibition ranging between 20% and 64%. In gastric lesion test, KYKZL-1 elicited markedly fewer stomach lesions with a low index of ulcer as compared to diclofenac in rats. In further studies, KYKZL-1 was found to significantly inhibit the production of NO, PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4} in LPS challenged RAW264.7, which is parallel to its attenuation of the expression of iNOS, COX-2, 5-LOX mRNAs or proteins and inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAPKs and activation of NF-κB. Taken together, our data indicate that KYKZL-1 comprises dual inhibition of COX and 5-LOX and exerts an obvious anti-inflammatory activity with an enhanced gastric safety profile via simultaneous inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAPKs and activation of NF-κB. - Highlights: • KYKZL-1 is designed to exhibit COX/5-LOX dual inhibition. • KYKZL-1 inhibits NO, PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4} and iNOS, COX-2 and 5-LOX mRNAs and MAPKs. • KYKZL-1 inhibits phosphorylation of MAPKs. • KYKZL-1 inactivates NF-κB pathway.

  16. Synthesis of new isoxazoline derivatives from harmine and evaluation of their anti-Alzheimer, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Filali, Insaf; Bouajila, Jalloul; Znati, Mansour; Bousejra-El Garah, Fatima; Ben Jannet, Hichem

    2015-06-01

    In our study, a series of new harmine derivatives has been prepared by cycloaddition reaction using various arylnitrile oxides and evaluated in vitro against acetylcholinesterase and 5-lipoxygenase enzymes, MCF7 and HCT116 cancer cell lines. Some of these molecules have been shown to be potent inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and MCF7 cell line. The greatest activity against acetylcholinesterase (IC50 = 10.4 µM) was obtained for harmine 1 and cytotoxic activities (IC50 = 0.2 µM) for compound 3a. Two derivatives 3e and 3f with the thiophene and furan systems, respectively, showed good activity against 5- lipoxygenase enzyme (IC50 = 29.2 and 55.5 µM, respectively). PMID:25068731

  17. MK591, a second generation leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor, prevents invasion and induces apoptosis in the bone-invading C4-2B human prostate cancer cells: implications for the treatment of castration-resistant, bone-metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sarveswaran, Sivalokanathan; Ghosh, Ritisha; Morisetty, Shravan; Ghosh, Jagadananda

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a major clinical challenge for which no cure is currently available primarily because of the lack of proper understanding about appropriate molecular target(s). Previously we observed that inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-Lox) activity induces apoptosis in some types of prostate cancer cells, suggesting an important role of 5-Lox in the viability of prostate cancer cells. However, nothing is known about the role of 5-Lox in the survival of castration-resistant, metastatic prostate cancer cells. Thus, we tested the effects of MK591, a second-generation, specific inhibitor of 5-Lox activity, on the viability and metastatic characteristics of CRPC cells. We observed that MK591 effectively kills the bone-invading C4-2B human prostate cancer cells (which bear characteristics of CRPC), but does not affect normal, non-cancer fibroblasts (which do not express 5-Lox) in the same experimental conditions. We also observed that MK591 dramatically inhibits the in vitro invasion and soft-agar colony formation of C4-2B cells. Interestingly, we found that treatment with MK591 dramatically down-regulates the expression of c-Myc and its targets at sub-lethal doses. In light of frequent over-activation of c-Myc in a spectrum of aggressive cancers (including CRPC), and the challenges associated with inhibition of c-Myc (because of its non-enzymatic nature), our novel findings of selective killing, and blockade of invasive and soft-agar colony-forming abilities of the castration-resistant, bone-metastatic C4-2B prostate cancer cells by MK591, open up a new avenue to attack CRPC cells for better management of advanced prostate cancer while sparing normal, non-cancer body cells. PMID:25875826

  18. Targeting pancreatitis blocks tumor-initiating stem cells and pancreatic cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B; Madka, Venkateshwar; Brewer, Misty; Ritchie, Rebekah L; Lightfoot, Stan; Kumar, Gaurav; Sadeghi, Michael; Patlolla, Jagan Mohan R; Yamada, Hiroshi Y; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; May, Randal; Houchen, Courtney W; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2015-06-20

    Recent development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMs) for pancreatic cancer (PC) that recapitulates human disease progression has helped to identify new strategies to delay/inhibit PC development. We first found that expression of the pancreatic tumor-initiating/cancer stem cells (CSC) marker DclK1 occurs in early stage PC and in both early and late pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and that it increases as disease progresses in GEM and also in human PC. Genome-wide next generation sequencing of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) from GEM mice revealed significantly increased DclK1 along with inflammatory genes. Genetic ablation of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) decreased DclK1 in GEM. Induction of inflammation/pancreatitis with cerulein in GEM mice increased DclK1, and the novel dual COX/5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitor licofelone reduced it. Dietary licofelone significantly inhibited the incidence of PDAC and carcinoma in situ with significant inhibition of pancreatic CSCs. Licofelone suppressed pancreatic tumor COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and modulated miRNAs characteristic of CSC and inflammation in correlation with PDAC inhibition. These results offer a preclinical proof of concept to target the inflammation initiation to inhibit cancer stem cells early for improving the treatment of pancreatic cancers, with immediate clinical implications for repositioning dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors in human trials for high risk patients. PMID:25906749

  19. Synthesis and biological activity of arylspiroborate salts derived from caffeic Acid phenethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Martin J G; Flewelling, Andrew J; Clark, Trevor N; Levesque, Natalie A; Jean-François, Jacques; Surette, Marc E; Gray, Christopher A; Vogels, Christopher M; Touaibia, Mohamed; Westcott, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Two novel boron compounds containing caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) derivatives have been prepared and characterized fully. These new compounds and CAPE have been investigated for potential antioxidant and antimicrobial properties and their ability to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and whether chelation to boron improves their biological activity. Sodium salt 4 was generally more active than ammonium salt 5 in the biological assays and surpassed the radical scavenging ability of CAPE. Compounds 4 and 5 were more active than CAPE and Zileuton in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. These results clearly show the effectiveness of the synthesized salts as transporter of CAPE. PMID:25834744

  20. Synthesis and Biological Activity of Arylspiroborate Salts Derived from Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester

    PubMed Central

    Hébert, Martin J. G.; Flewelling, Andrew J.; Clark, Trevor N.; Jean-François, Jacques; Surette, Marc E.; Gray, Christopher A.; Vogels, Christopher M.; Touaibia, Mohamed; Westcott, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Two novel boron compounds containing caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) derivatives have been prepared and characterized fully. These new compounds and CAPE have been investigated for potential antioxidant and antimicrobial properties and their ability to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and whether chelation to boron improves their biological activity. Sodium salt 4 was generally more active than ammonium salt 5 in the biological assays and surpassed the radical scavenging ability of CAPE. Compounds 4 and 5 were more active than CAPE and Zileuton in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. These results clearly show the effectiveness of the synthesized salts as transporter of CAPE. PMID:25834744

  1. Biological activities of xanthatin from Xanthium strumarium leaves.

    PubMed

    Nibret, Endalkachew; Youns, Mahamoud; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Wink, Michael

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the biological activities of the major bioactive compound, xanthatin, and other compounds from Xanthium strumarium (Asteraceae) leaves. Inhibition of bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei brucei and leukaemia HL-60 cell proliferation was assessed using resazurin as a vital stain. Xanthatin was found to be the major and most active compound against T. b. brucei with an IC(50) value of 2.63 µg/mL and a selectivity index of 20. The possible mode of action of xanthatin was further evaluated. Xanthatin showed antiinflammatory activity by inhibiting both PGE(2) synthesis (24% inhibition) and 5-lipoxygenase activity (92% inhibition) at concentrations of 100 µg/mL and 97 µg/mL, respectively. Xanthatin exhibited weak irreversible inhibition of parasite specific trypanothione reductase. Unlike xanthatin, diminazene aceturate and ethidium bromide showed strong DNA intercalation with IC(50) values of 26.04 µg/mL and 44.70 µg/mL, respectively. Substantial induction of caspase 3/7 activity in MIA PaCa-2 cells was observed after 6 h of treatment with 100 µg/mL of xanthatin. All these data taken together suggest that xanthatin exerts its biological activity by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting both PGE(2) synthesis and 5-lipoxygenase activity thereby avoiding unwanted inflammation commonly observed in diseases such as trypanosomiasis. PMID:21953905

  2. Flavocoxid, a Nutraceutical Approach to Blunt Inflammatory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Squadrito, Francesco; Mecchio, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids, from Scutellaria baicalensis (Chinese skullcap) and Acacia catechu (black catechu), have been shown to exert a variety of therapeutic effects, including anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, and anticancer activities. Flavocoxid is a mixed extract containing baicalin and catechin and it acts as a dual balanced inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and COX-2 peroxidase enzyme activities with a significant inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) enzyme activity in vitro. Flavocoxid downregulates gene or protein expression of several inflammatory markers and exerts also strong antioxidant activity in several experimental models. Controlled clinical trials and a postmarketing study have clearly shown that flavocoxid is as effective as naproxen in managing the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis of the knee and it has better upper gastrointestinal, renal, and respiratory safety profile than naproxen. Flavocoxid may therefore provide a potential therapeutic approach to the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:25242871

  3. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Some Novel Pyrrolizine Derivatives as COX Inhibitors with Anti-Inflammatory/Analgesic Activities and Low Ulcerogenic Liability.

    PubMed

    Gouda, Ahmed M; Ali, Hamed I; Almalki, Waleed H; Azim, Mohamed A; Abourehab, Mohammed A S; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory and pain relief medications. However, their use is associated with many drawbacks, including mainly serious gastric and renal complications. In an attempt to circumvent these risks, a set of N-(4-bromophenyl)-7-cyano-6-substituted-H-pyrrolizine-5-carboxamide derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated as dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors. The structural elucidation, in vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities using a carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model and hot plate assay, were performed, respectively. From the results obtained, it was found that the newly synthesized pyrrolizines exhibited IC50 values in the range of 2.45-5.69 µM and 0.85-3.44 µM for COX-1 and COX-2, respectively. Interestingly, compounds 12, 13, 16 and 17 showed higher anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities compared to ibuprofen. Among these derivatives, compounds 16 and 19 displayed better safety profile than ibuprofen in acute ulcerogenicity and histopathological studies. Furthermore, the docking studies revealed that compound 17 fits nicely into COX-1 and COX-2 binding sites with the highest binding affinity, while compound 16 exerted the highest binding affinity for 5-LOX. In light of these findings, these novel pyrrolizine-5-carboxamide derivatives represent a promising scaffold for further development into potential dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors with safer gastric profile. PMID:26867188

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of erycristagallin, a pterocarpene from Erythrina mildbraedii.

    PubMed

    Njamen, Dieudonné; Talla, Emmanuel; Mbafor, Joseph Tanyi; Fomum, Zacharias Tanee; Kamanyi, Albert; Mbanya, Jean-Claude; Cerdá-Nicolás, Miguel; Giner, Rosa M; Recio, M Carmen; Ríos, José Luis

    2003-05-01

    Erycristagallin, a pterocarpene isolated from Erythrina mildbraedii, was tested in vitro for its antioxidant properties on the stable 2,2-diphenyl-1-pycryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical and on the arachidonic acid metabolism. In addition, erycristagallin was tested on different experimental models of inflammation, such as the acute and chronic inflammation induced by the application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) on mice and the phospholipase A(2)-induced mouse paw oedema test. In the carrageenan-induced mouse paw oedema test, the ethyl acetate extract obtained from E. mildbraedii showed anti-inflammatory activity, and erycristagallin was isolated as the active principle. In vivo, erycristagallin significantly inhibited the phospholipase A(2)-induced mouse paw oedema as well as the mouse ear oedema induced by TPA (ID(50)<10 microg/ear). Moreover, it significantly reduced the chronic inflammation and leukocyte infiltration induced by repeated application of TPA. In vitro, erycristagallin inhibited the arachidonic acid metabolism via the 5-lipoxygenase pathway in rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (IC(50)=23.4 microM), but had no effect on cyclooxygenase-1 metabolism in human platelets, while showing antioxidant activity in the DPPH test. As with other phenolics, the anti-inflammatory activity of erycristagallin may be based on its capacity to inhibit the arachidonic acid metabolism via the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. PMID:12729844

  5. Synthesis and characterization of novel 1,2-oxazine-based small molecules that targets acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Sukhorukov, Alexey Yu; Nirvanappa, Anilkumar C; Swamy, Jagadish; Ioffe, Sema L; Nanjunda Swamy, Shivananju; Basappa; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S

    2014-08-01

    Thirteen 2-oxazine-based small molecules were synthesized targeting 5-lipoxygenase (LOX), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The test revealed that the newly synthesized compounds had potent inhibition towards both 5-LOX and AChE in lower micro molar concentration. Among the tested compounds, the most active compound, 2-[(2-acetyl-6,6-dimethyl-4-phenyl-5,6-dihydro-2H-1,2-oxazin-3-yl)methyl]-1H-isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione (2a) showed inhibitory activity towards 5-LOX and AChE with an IC50 values of 1.88, and 2.5 μM, respectively. Further, the in silico molecular docking studies revealed that the compound 2a bound to the catalytic domain of AChE strongly with a highest CDOCKER score of -1.18 kcal/mol when compared to other compounds of the same series. Additionally, 2a showed a good lipophilicity (logP=2.66), suggesting a potential ability to penetrate the blood-brain-barrier. These initial pharmacological data revealed that the compound 2a could serve as a drug-seed in developing anti-Alzheimer's agents. PMID:24909082

  6. Gastroprotective Effect of Cochinchina momordica Seed Extract in Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Acute Gastric Damage in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji Hwan; Kim, Joo-Hyun; Lee, Byoung Hwan; Seo, Pyoung Ju; Kang, Jung Mook; Jo, So Young; Park, Ji Hyun; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Chang, Hyun; Kwon, Jin-Won; Lee, Dong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The major compounds of Cochinchina momordica seed extract (SK-MS10) include momordica saponins. We report that the gastroprotective effect of SK-MS10 in an ethanol-induced gastric damage rat model is mediated by suppressing proinflammatory cytokines and downregulating cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), and the activation of calcitonin gene-related peptide. In this study, we evaluated the gastroprotective effects of SK-MS10 in the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastric damage rat model. Methods The pretreatment effect of SK-MS10 was evaluated in the NSAID-induced gastric damage rat model using aspirin, indomethacin, and diclofenac in 7-week-old rats. Gastric damage was evaluated based on the gross ulcer index by gastroenterologists, and the damage area (%) was measured using the MetaMorph 7.0 video image analysis system. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blotting was used to analyze the levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, COX-2, cPLA2, and 5-LOX. Results All NSAIDs induced gastric damage based on the gross ulcer index and damage area (p<0.05). Gastric damage was significantly attenuated by SK-MS10 pretreatment compared with NSAID treatment alone (p<0.05). The SK-MS10 pretreatment group exhibited lower MPO levels than the diclofenac group. The expression of cPLA2 and 5-LOX was decreased by SK-MS10 pretreatment in each of the three NSAID treatment groups. Conclusions SK-MS10 exhibited a gastroprotective effect against NSAID-induced acute gastric damage in rats. However, its protective mechanism may be different across the three types of NSAID-induced gastric damage models in rats. PMID:24516701

  7. EXCESSIVE LEUKOTRIENE B4 IN NUCLEUS TRACTUS SOLITARII IS PROHYPERTENSIVE IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Waki, Hidefumi; Hendy, Emma B.; Hindmarch, Charles C.T.; Gouraud, Sabine; Toward, Marie; Kasparov, Sergey; Murphy, David; Paton, Julian F.R.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation within the brainstem microvasculature has been associated with chronic cardiovascular diseases. We found that the expression of several enzymes involved in arachidonic acid (AA) - leukotriene B4 (LTB4) production was altered in NTS of SHR. LTB4 produced from AA by 5-lipoxygenase (5LOX) is a potent chemoattractant of leukocytes. Leukotriene B4-12-hydroxydehydrogenase (LTB4-12-HD), which degrades leukotriene B4 (LTB4), was down-regulated compared to Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that LTB4-12-HD was reduced by 63 and 58% in the NTS of adult SHR and pre-hypertensive (PH) SHR respectively, compared to age-matched WKY rats (n=6). 5LOX gene expression was up-regulated in the NTS of SHR (~50%; n=6). LTB4 levels were increased in the NTS of the SHR (17%; n=10, p<0.05). LTB4 receptors BLT1 (but not BLT2), were expressed on astroglia in the NTS but not neurons or vessels. Microinjection of LTB4 into the NTS of WKY rats increased both leukocyte adherence and arterial pressure for over 4 days (peak: +15 mmHg; P<0.01). In contrast, blockade of NTS BLT1 receptors lowered blood pressure in the SHR (peak: -13 mmHg; P<0.05) but not WKY rats. Thus, excessive amounts of LTB4 in NTS of SHR possibly as a result of up-regulation of 5LOX and down regulation of LTB412-HD, can induce inflammation. Since blockade of NTS BLT1 receptors lowered arterial pressure in the SHR their endogenous activity may contribute to the hypertensive state of this rodent model. Thus, inflammatory reactions in the brainstem are causally associated with neurogenic hypertension. PMID:23172924

  8. Biological activities of Fructus arctii fermented with the basidiomycete Grifola frondosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Hwa; Bae, Jun-Tae; Song, Min-Hyeon; Lee, Geun-Su; Choe, Soo-Young; Pyo, Hyeong-Bae

    2010-12-01

    Fructus arctii extract containing phenolic glycosides was cultured with Grifola frondosa mycelia to produce β-glucosidase and its biological activities were studied. This β-glucosidase converted the glycosides (arctiin and caffeic acid derivatives) into aglycones (arctigenin and caffeic acid). Fermented Fructus arctii extract (G-FAE) with G. frondosa had antioxidant and 5-lipoxygenase inhibitory activities. The photoprotective potential of G-FAE was tested in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) exposed to ultra-violet A (UVA). It was revealed that G-FAE had an inhibitory effect on human interstitial collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase, MMP-1) expression in UVA-irradiated HDF. The treatment of UVA-irradiated HDF with G-FAE resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the expression level of MMP-1 mRNA. G-FAE also showed notable stimulation of collagen biosynthetic activity for fibroblasts. These diverse functionalities suggest that G-FAE could be a promising cosmetic ingredient. PMID:21191759

  9. Macelignan inhibits histamine release and inflammatory mediator production in activated rat basophilic leukemia mast cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Young Sun; Kim, Myung-Suk; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2012-10-01

    Type I allergy is characterized by the release of granule-associated mediators, lipid-derived substances, cytokines, and chemokines by activated mast cells. To evaluate the anti-allergic effects of macelignan isolated from Myristica fragrans Houtt., we determined its ability to inhibit calcium (Ca(2+)) influx, degranulation, and inflammatory mediator production in RBL-2 H3 cells stimulated with A23187 and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macelignan inhibited Ca(2+) influx and the secretion of β-hexosaminidase, histamine, prostaglandin E(2), and leukotriene C(4); decreased mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α; and attenuated phosphorylation of Akt and the mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. These results indicate the potential of macelignan as a type I allergy treatment. PMID:22729280

  10. Modulation of COX, LOX and NFκB activities by Xanthium spinosum L. root extract and ziniolide.

    PubMed

    Bader, Ammar; Giner, Rosa M; Martini, Francesca; Schinella, Guillermo R; Ríos, José L; Braca, Alessandra; Prieto, José M

    2013-12-01

    Xanthium spinosum L. (Asteraceae) is a medicinal weed distributed worldwide. Many of its diverse ethnopharmacological uses - namely diarrhoea, inflammation, liver disorders, snake bite and fever - are linked - at least in part - to an uncontrolled release of arachidonic acid metabolites. The crude extract of X. spinosum roots from Jordanian origin dose-dependently inhibited the 5-LOX (IC50 is approximately equal to 10 μg/mL), COX-1(IC50 is approximately equal to 50 μg/mL), and 12-LOX (IC50 is approximately equal to 170 μg/mL) enzymatic pathways in intact pro-inflammatory cells. A direct activity at the level of PLA2 is not probable, but the extract induced the synthesis of the anti-inflammatory eicosanoid 15(S)-HETE, which may in turn inhibit this enzyme. 5-LOX bioguided fractionation of the crude extract led to the isolation of ziniolide, a known 12,8-guaianolide sesquiterpene lactone, from the hydro-alcoholic fraction of the n-hexane extract (IC50=69 μM). Both the plant extract and ziniolide are in vitro inhibitors of the phorbol-induced NFκB activation, a key regulator of the arachidonic pathway. PMID:24090994

  11. Comparative study on anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of Caesalpinia crista and Centella asiatica leaf extracts

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, B. N.; Girish, T. K.; Raghavendra, R. H.; Naidu, K. Akhilender; Rao, U. J. S. Prasada; Rao, K. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Amyloidosis, oxidative stress and inflammation have been strongly implicated in neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease. Traditionally, Caesalpinia crista and Centella asiatica leaf extracts are used to treat brain related diseases in India. C. crista is used as a mental relaxant drink as well as to treat inflammatory diseases, whereas C. asiatica is reported to be used to enhance memory and to treat dementia. Objective: The present study is aimed to understand the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of C. asiatica and C. crista leaf extracts. Materials and Methods: Phenolic acid composition of the aqueous extracts of C. crista and C. asiatica were separated on a reverse phase C18 column (4.6 x 250 mm) using HPLC system. Antioxidant properties of the leaf extracts were determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay and the reducing potential assay. The anti-inflammatory activities of aqueous extracts of C. crista and C. asiatica were studied using 5-lipoxygenase assay. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) were isolated from blood by Ficoll-Histopaque density gradient followed by hypotonic lysis of erythrocytes. Results: Gallic, protocatechuic, gentisic, chlorogenic, caffeic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids were the phenolic acids identified in C. crista and C. asiatica leaf aqueous extracts. However, gallic acid and ferulic acid contents were much higher in C. crista compared to C. asiatica. Leaf extracts of C. asiatica and C. crista exhibited antioxidant properties and inhibited 5-lipoxygenase (anti-inflammatory) in a dose dependent manner. However, leaf extracts of C. crista had better antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity compared to that of C. asiatica. The better activity of C. crista is attributed to high gallic acid and ferulic acid compared to C. asiatica. Conclusions: Thus, the leaf extract of C. crista can be a potential therapeutic role for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24741275

  12. Evaluating the inhibitory potential of Withania somnifera on platelet aggregation and inflammation enzymes: An in vitro and in silico study.

    PubMed

    M, Madhusudan; Zameer, Farhan; Naidu, Akhilender; M N, Nagendra Prasad; Dhananjaya, Bhadrapura Lakkappa; Hegdekatte, Raghavendra

    2016-09-01

    Context Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal is traditionally used for treating various ailments, but lacks scientific evaluation. Objective This study evaluates Withania somnifera (WS) for its effect on platelet activity and inflammatory enzymes. Materials and methods Aqueous and ethanolic (1:1) leaf extracts were subjected to in vitro indirect haemolytic activity using Naja naja venom, human platelet aggregation was quantified for lipid peroxidation using arachidonic acid (AA) as agonist and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) levels were determined using standard spectrometric assays. Further, molecular docking was performed by the ligand fit method using molegro software package (Molegro ApS, Aarhus, Denmark). Results The study found that aqueous and ethanol extracts have very negligible effect (15%) with an IC50 value of 13.8 mg/mL on PLA2 from Naja naja venom. Further, extracts of WS also had very little effect (18%) with an IC50 value of 16.6 mg/mL on malondialdehyde (MDA) formation. However, a 65% inhibition of 5-LOX with an IC50 value of 0.92 mg/mL was observed in 1:1 ethanol extracts. The same was evident from SAR model with the active ingredient withaferin A binding predominantly on Phe 77, Tyr 98, Arg 99, Asp 164, Leu 168, Ser 382, Arg 395, Tyr 396 and Tyr 614 with an atomic contact energy value of -128.96 compared to standard phenidone (-103.61). Thus, the current study validates the application of WS for inflammatory diseases. Conclusion This study reveals the inhibitory potential of W. somnifera on inflammatory enzymes and platelet aggregation. Thus, WS can serve as a newer, safer and affordable medicine for inflammatory diseases. PMID:26704448

  13. The Rhizomes of Acorus gramineus and the Constituents Inhibit Allergic Response In vitro and In vivo.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun; Lee, Seung Young; Lee, Kang Ro; Kim, Yeong Shik; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2012-09-01

    The rhizomes of Acorus gramineus have frequently been used in traditional medicine mainly for sedation as well as enhancing brain function. In this study, the anti-allergic activity of A. gramineus was investigated. The 70% ethanol extract of the rhizomes of A. gramineus was found to inhibit the allergic response against 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX)-catalyzed leukotriene (LT) production from rat basophilic leukemia (RBL)-1 cells and β-hexosaminidase release from RBL-2H3 cells with IC50's of 48.9 and >200 μg/ml, respectively. Among the 9 major constituents isolated, β-asarone, (2R,3R,4S,5S)-2,4-dimethyl-1,3-bis (2',4',5'-trimethoxyphenyl)tetrahydrofuran (AF) and 2,3-dihydro-4,5,7-trimethoxy-1-ethyl-2-methyl-3-(2,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)indene (AI) strongly inhibited 5-LOX-catalyzed LT production in A23187-treated RBL-1 cells, AI being the most potent (IC50=6.7 μM). Against β-hexosaminidase release by antigen-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells, only AI exhibited strong inhibition (IC50=7.3 μM) while β-asarone and AF showed 26.0% and 39.9% inhibition at 50 μM, respectively. In addition, the ethanol extract of A. gramineus showed significant inhibitory action against the hapten-induced delayed hypersensitivity reaction in mice by oral administration at 200 mg/kg. Therefore, it is suggested that A. gramineus possesses anti-allergic activity and the constituents including β-asarone and AI certainly contribute to the anti-allergic activity of the rhizomes of A. gramineus. PMID:24009837

  14. Leukotriene D4-induced Caco-2 cell proliferation is mediated by prostaglandin E2 synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Marisol; Martín-Venegas, Raquel; Moreno, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Leukotriene D4 (LTD4) is a pro-inflammatory mediator formed from arachidonic acid through the action of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX). Its biological effects are mediated by at least two G-coupled plasmatic cysteinyl LT receptors (CysLT1-2R). It has been reported an upregulation of the 5-LOX pathway in tumor tissue unlike in normal colon mucosa. Colon tumors generally have an increased expression of CysLT1R and colon cancer patients with high expression levels of CysLT1R have poor prognosis. We previously observed that the cyclooxygenase pathway is involved in the control of intestinal epithelial cancer cell growth through PGE2 production. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the effect of LTD4 binding with CysLT1R on Caco-2 cell growth. We note a number of key findings from this research. We observed that at a concentration similar to that found under inflammatory conditions, LTD4 was able to induce Caco-2 cell proliferation and DNA synthesis. Moreover, with the use of a specific receptor antagonist this study has demonstrated that the effect of LTD4 is a result of its interaction with CystLT1R. We also note the possible participation of the PLC-IP3-Ca2+/DAG-PKC signaling pathways in cytosolic PLA2 and [3H]AA release induced by LTD4-CystLT1R interaction. Finally, we found that the resulting activation of the AA cascade and the production of PGE2 eicosanoid could be related to the activation of cell signaling pathways such as ERK and CREB. These findings will help facilitate our understanding of how inflammatory mediators can affect the survival and dissemination of intestinal carcinoma cells. PMID:26216432

  15. Leukotriene activity modulation in asthma.

    PubMed

    Spector, S L

    1997-09-01

    Leukotrienes constitute a class of inflammatory mediators synthesised from arachidonic acid, a product of cell membrane metabolism. Synthesis occurs in the 5-lipoxygenase enzyme pathway, which produces several species of leukotrienes, each with characteristic biological activities. With regard to asthma, the leukotrienes are particularly important because of their ability to directly and potently mediate bronchoconstriction; in addition, they specifically stimulate the secretion of mucus into the airways and the extravasation of fluids and proteins into the airway tissues, both of which contribute to airway obstruction. A number of antileukotriene agents have been developed with the goal of modulating the inflammatory process in various disease states. These agents fall into 2 general classes: leukotriene receptor antagonists and leukotriene synthesis inhibitors. Results of antileukotriene agents in preclinical and clinical trials indicate that antileukotriene agents attenuate the response to challenges with inhaled leukotrienes, cold air, exercise, aspirin and allergen; in addition, they have shown efficacy in clinical asthma and have not been associated with serious adverse effects. Although results to date indicate that these medications are well tolerated and effective in the treatment of asthma, the recent approval by the FDA of 2 antileukotriene agents will give physicians further insight into how patients with asthma respond to them. PMID:9279501

  16. Cerumen of Australian stingless bees ( Tetragonula carbonaria): gas chromatography-mass spectrometry fingerprints and potential anti-inflammatory properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, Flavia Carmelina; Brooks, Peter Richard; Wallace, Helen Margaret; Russell, Fraser Donald

    2011-04-01

    Cerumen, or propolis, is a mixture of plant resins enriched with bee secretions. In Australia, stingless bees are important pollinators that use cerumen for nest construction and possibly for colony's health. While extensive research attests to the therapeutic properties of honeybee ( Apis mellifera) propolis, the biological and medicinal properties of Australian stingless bee cerumen are largely unknown. In this study, the chemical and biological properties of polar extracts of cerumen from Tetragonula carbonaria in South East Queensland, Australia were investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses and in vitro 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) cell-free assays. Extracts were tested against comparative (commercial tincture of A. mellifera propolis) and positive controls (Trolox and gallic acid). Distinct GC-MS fingerprints of a mixed diterpenic profile typical of native bee cerumen were obtained with pimaric acid (6.31 ± 0.97%, w/w), isopimaric acid (12.23 ± 3.03%, w/w), and gallic acid (5.79 ± 0.81%, w/w) tentatively identified as useful chemical markers. Characteristic flavonoids and prenylated phenolics found in honeybee propolis were absent. Cerumen extracts from T. carbonaria inhibited activity of 5-LOX, an enzyme known to catalyse production of proinflammatory mediators (IC50 19.97 ± 2.67 μg/ml, mean ± SEM, n = 4). Extracts had similar potency to Trolox (IC50 12.78 ± 1.82 μg/ml), but were less potent than honeybee propolis (IC50 5.90 ± 0.62 μg/ml) or gallic acid (IC50 5.62 ± 0.35 μg/ml, P < 0.001). These findings warrant further investigation of the ecological and medicinal properties of this stingless bee cerumen, which may herald a commercial potential for the Australian beekeeping industry.

  17. Role of MAP kinases in regulating expression of antioxidants and inflammatory mediators in mouse keratinocytes following exposure to the half mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Adrienne T.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Casillas, Robert P.; Heck, Diane E.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-06-15

    Dermal exposure to sulfur mustard causes inflammation and tissue injury. This is associated with changes in expression of antioxidants and eicosanoids which contribute to oxidative stress and toxicity. In the present studies we analyzed mechanisms regulating expression of these mediators using an in vitro skin construct model in which mouse keratinocytes were grown at an air-liquid interface and exposed directly to 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a model sulfur mustard vesicant. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) was found to cause marked increases in keratinocyte protein carbonyls, a marker of oxidative stress. This was correlated with increases in expression of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, thioredoxin reductase and the glutathione S-transferases, GSTA1-2, GSTP1 and mGST2. CEES also upregulated several enzymes important in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-2 (mPGES-2), prostaglandin D synthase (PGDS), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), leukotriene A{sub 4} (LTA{sub 4}) hydrolase and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) synthase. CEES readily activated keratinocyte JNK and p38 MAP kinases, signaling pathways which are known to regulate expression of antioxidants, as well as prostaglandin and leukotriene synthases. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase suppressed CEES-induced expression of GSTA1-2, COX-2, mPGES-2, PGDS, 5-LOX, LTA{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase, while JNK inhibition blocked PGDS and GSTP1. These data indicate that CEES modulates expression of antioxidants and enzymes producing inflammatory mediators by distinct mechanisms. Increases in antioxidants may be an adaptive process to limit tissue damage. Inhibiting the capacity of keratinocytes to generate eicosanoids may be important in limiting inflammation and protecting the skin from vesicant-induced oxidative stress and injury.

  18. Vitamin E metabolite 13'-carboxychromanols inhibit pro-inflammatory enzymes, induce apoptosis and autophagy in human cancer cells by modulating sphingolipids and suppress colon tumor development in mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yumi; Park, Na-Young; Rostgaard-Hansen, Agnetha Linn; Huang, Jianjie; Jiang, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin E forms are substantially metabolized to various carboxychromanols including 13'-carboxychromanols (13'-COOHs) that are found at high levels in feces. However, there is limited knowledge about functions of these metabolites. Here we studied δT-13'-COOH and δTE-13'-COOH, which are metabolites of δ-tocopherol and δ-tocotrienol, respectively. δTE-13'-COOH is also a natural constituent of a traditional medicine Garcinia Kola. Both 13'-COOHs are much stronger than tocopherols in inhibition of pro-inflammatory and cancer promoting cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), and in induction of apoptosis and autophagy in colon cancer cells. The anticancer effects by 13'-COOHs appeared to be partially independent of inhibition of COX-2/5-LOX. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we found that 13'-COOHs increased intracellular dihydrosphingosine and dihydroceramides after short-time incubation in HCT-116 cells, and enhanced ceramides while decreased sphingomyelins during prolonged treatment. Modulation of sphingolipids by 13'-COOHs was observed prior to or coinciding with biochemical manifestation of cell death. Pharmaceutically blocking the increase of these sphingolipids partially counteracted 13'-COOH-induced cell death. Further, 13'-COOH inhibited dihydroceramide desaturase without affecting the protein expression. In agreement with these mechanistic findings, δTE-13'-COOH significantly suppressed the growth and multiplicity of colon tumor in mice. Our study demonstrates that 13'-COOHs have anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities, may contribute to in vivo anticancer effect of vitamin E forms and are promising novel cancer prevention agents. PMID:27016075

  19. ROS-Mediated Autophagy Induced by Dysregulation of Lipid Metabolism Plays a Protective Role in Colorectal Cancer Cells Treated with Gambogic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Lei, Yunlong; Yuan, Ping; Li, Lingjun; Luo, Chao; Gao, Rui; Tian, Jun; Feng, Zuohua; Nice, Edouard C.; Sun, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Gambogic acid (GA), the main active component of gamboge resin, has potent antitumor activity both in vivo and in vitro. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we found that GA could initiate autophagy in colorectal cancer cells, and inhibition of the autophagy process accelerated the effect of proliferative inhibition and apoptotic cell death induced by GA, implying a protective role of autophagy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis-based proteomics showed that GA treatment altered the expression of multiple proteins involved in redox signaling and lipid metabolism. Functional studies revealed that GA-induced dysregulation of lipid metabolism could activate 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), resulting in intracellular ROS accumulation, followed by inhibition of Akt-mTOR signaling and autophagy initiation. Finally, results using a xenograft model suggested ROS-induced autophagy protect against the antitumor effect of GA. Taken together, these data showed new biological activities of GA against colorectal cancer underlying the protective role of ROS-induced autophagy. This study will provide valuable insights for future studies regarding the anticancer mechanisms of GA. PMID:24810758

  20. The Cell Nucleus Serves as a Mechanotransducer of Tissue Damage-Induced Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Enyedi, Balázs; Jelcic, Mark; Niethammer, Philipp

    2016-05-19

    Tissue damage activates cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), releasing arachidonic acid (AA), which is oxidized to proinflammatory eicosanoids by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) on the nuclear envelope. How tissue damage is sensed to activate cPLA2 is unknown. We investigated this by live imaging in wounded zebrafish larvae, where damage of the fin tissue causes osmotic cell swelling at the wound margin and the generation of a chemotactic eicosanoid signal. Osmotic swelling of cells and their nuclei activates cPla2 by translocating it from the nucleoplasm to the nuclear envelope. Elevated cytosolic Ca(2+) was necessary but not sufficient for cPla2 translocation, and nuclear swelling was required in parallel. cPla2 translocation upon nuclear swelling was reconstituted in isolated nuclei and appears to be a simple physical process mediated by tension in the nuclear envelope. Our data suggest that the nucleus plays a mechanosensory role in inflammation by transducing cell swelling and lysis into proinflammatory eicosanoid signaling. PMID:27203112

  1. Genotyping the GGGCGG Tandem Repeat Promoter Polymorphism in the 5-Lipoxygenase Enzyme Gene (ALOX5) by Pyrosequencing Assay

    PubMed Central

    Schentrup, Anzeela M.; Allayee, Hooman; Lima, John J.; Johnson, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Efficient genotyping methods for many biologically significant repeat genetic polymorphisms, particularly in GC-rich regions of the genome, are limited. In particular, a short tandem repeat polymorphism [GGCGGG] in the promoter region of ALOX5 has been implicated as an important marker for inflammatory diseases. We developed a pyrosequencing assay to genotype the ALOX5 short tandem repeat polymorphism using pyrosequencing technology that will make assessing this important genetic marker in large, diverse populations more accessible than using current methods. Materials and Methods: We used a nested polymerase chain reaction approach to amplify DNA for pyrosequencing. Population allele frequencies were assessed in two cohorts of previously collected human DNA samples with 188 and 1032 samples, respectively. Sixteen genetic samples with known genotypes were used to confirm the accuracy of the method. Results and Discussion: Genotypes were 100% concordant with samples of known genotype. Genotype frequencies in European American, Hispanic, and African American agreed with previously published results (wild-type homozygotes 66%, 64%, and 19%, respectively). The method presented here will facilitate both genetic association and pharmacogenomic research on this polymorphism in large samples that are ethnically and/or racially admixed. PMID:19473080

  2. The Dual Cyclooxygenase/5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor Licofelone Attenuates P-Glycoprotein-Mediated Drug Resistance in the Injured Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Dulin, Jennifer N.; Moore, Meredith L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract There are currently no proven effective treatments that can improve recovery of function in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Many therapeutic compounds have shown promise in pre-clinical studies, but clinical trials have been largely unsuccessful. P-glycoprotein (Pgp, Abcb1b) is a drug efflux transporter of the blood–spinal cord barrier that limits spinal cord penetration of blood-borne xenobiotics. Pathological Pgp upregulation in diseases such as cancer causes heightened resistance to a broad variety of therapeutic drugs. Importantly, several drugs that have been evaluated for the treatment of SCI, such as riluzole, are known substrates of Pgp. We therefore examined whether Pgp-mediated pharmacoresistance diminishes delivery of riluzole to the injured spinal cord. Following moderate contusion injury at T10 in male Sprague–Dawley rats, we observed a progressive, spatial spread of increased Pgp expression from 3 days to 10 months post-SCI. Spinal cord uptake of i.p.-delivered riluzole was significantly reduced following SCI in wild type but not Abcb1a-knockout rats, highlighting a critical role for Pgp in mediating drug resistance following SCI. Because inflammation can drive Pgp upregulation, we evaluated the ability of the new generation dual anti-inflammatory drug licofelone to promote spinal cord delivery of riluzole following SCI. We found that licofelone both reduced Pgp expression and enhanced riluzole bioavailability within the lesion site at 72 h post-SCI. This work highlights Pgp-mediated drug resistance as an important obstacle to therapeutic drug delivery for SCI, and suggests licofelone as a novel combinatorial treatment strategy to enhance therapeutic drug delivery to the injured spinal cord. PMID:22947335

  3. Microsporols A-C from the Plant Endophytic Fungus Pestalotiopsis microspore.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianfu; Wang, Yadan; Liu, Shuchun; Liu, Xinzhong; Guo, Liangdong

    2015-10-01

    Three new ambuic acid derivatives, microsporols A-C (1-3) and the known compound ambuic acid (4), were isolated from the solid-substrate fermentation cultures of the plant endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis microspora. Their structures were elucidated primarily by NMR experiments. The absolute configurations of the 6,7-diol moiety in 1 and 2 were assigned using the Snatzke's method, whereas that of 3 was deduced by circular dichroism (CD) exciton chirality method. Compounds 1, 3, and 4 showed moderate 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitory effects. PMID:26669093

  4. Anti-allergic activity of sesquiterpenes from the rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jeong Ho; Lee, Dong-Ung; Kim, Yeong Shik; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2011-02-01

    From the 70% ethanol extract of the rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus (CRE), several major constituents including the sesquiterpene derivatives (valencene, nootkatone, and caryophyllene α-oxide), monoterpenes (β-pinene, 1,8-cineole, and limonene) and 4-cymene were isolated and examined for their anti-allergic activity in vitro and in vivo. In rat basophilic leukemia (RBL)-1 cells, the sesquiterpenes strongly inhibited 5-lipoxygenase-catalyzed leukotrienes production. In addition, they inhibited β-hexosaminidase release by antigen-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells, with valencene having the highest inhibitory effect. CRE inhibited leukotrienes production and β-hexosaminidase release at 300 μg/mL. It was also found that the most active sesquiterpene (valencene) and CRE inhibited β-hexosaminidase degranulation by inhibiting the initial activation reaction, Lyn phosphorylation, in IgE-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells. Moreover, CRE, valencene and nootkatone significantly inhibited the delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in mice when administered orally at 50-300 mg/kg. In conclusion, C. rotundus and its constituents, valencene, nootkatone, and caryophyllene α-oxide, exert anti-allergic activity in vitro and in vivo. These sesquiterpenes, but not monoterpenes, certainly contribute to the anti-allergic activity of the rhizomes of C. rotundus. PMID:21380805

  5. Activated polymorphonuclear cells increase sickle red blood cell retention in lung: role of phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Johnson; Obiako, Boniface

    2002-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the activated polymorphonuclear cell (APMN) products on sickle red blood cell (SRBC) retention/adherence in the pulmonary circulation. Isolated rat lungs were perfused with (51)Cr-labeled normal RBCs (NRBC) or SRBCs (10% hematocrit) suspensions +/- PMNs. Specific activities of lung and perfusate were measured and retention (the number of SRBC/g lung) was calculated. SRBC retention was 3.5 times greater than NRBC retention. PMN activation was required to increase SRBC retention. Supernatants from APMN increased SRBC retention, which suggested soluble products such as oxidants, PAF, and/or leukotriene (LTB(4)) are involved. Heat inactivation of PMN NADPH oxidase had no effect on retention. Whereas neither platelet-activating factor (PAF) nor LTB(4) (secreted by APMN) increased SRBC retention, PAF+LTB(4) did. The PAF antagonist, WEB-2170, attenuated SRBC retention mediated by PAF+LTB(4) and APMNs. Similarly, zileuton (5-lipoxygenase inhibitor) attenuated APMN-mediated SRBC retention. We conclude the concomitant release of PAF and LTB(4) from APMN is involved in the initiation of microvascular occlusion by SRBCs in the perfused rat lung. PMID:11748055

  6. P2X7 receptor activation in rat brain cultured astrocytes increases the biosynthetic release of cysteinyl leukotrienes.

    PubMed

    Ballerini, P; Ciccarelli, R; Caciagli, F; Rathbone, M P; Werstiuk, E S; Traversa, U; Buccella, S; Giuliani, P; Jang, S; Nargi, E; Visini, D; Santavenere, C; Di Iorio, P

    2005-01-01

    Astrocytes have been recognized as important elements in controlling inflammatory as well as immune processes in the central nervous system (CNS). Recently, glial cells have been shown to produce cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) which are known lipid mediators of inflammation and whose extracellular concentrations rise under different pathological conditions in the brain. In the same conditions also extracellular concentrations of ATP dramatically increase reaching levels able to activate P2X7 ionotropic receptors for which an emerging role in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration has been claimed. RTPCR analysis showed that primary cultures of rat brain astrocytes express P2X7 receptors. Application of the selective P2X7 agonist benzoyl benzoly ATP (BzATP) markedly increased [Ca2+]i which was mediated by a calcium influx from the extracellular milieu. The P2X7 antagonist, oATP, suppressed the BzATP-induced calcium increase. Consistent with the evidence that increased calcium levels activate the leukotriene biosynthetic pathway, challenge of astrocytes with either the calcium ionophore A23187 or BzATP significantly increased CysLT production and the cell pre-treatment with EGTA abolished these effects. Again the P2X7 antagonist prevented the BzATP-mediated CysLT efflux, whereas the astrocyte pretreatment with MK-571, a CysLT1 receptor antagonist, was ineffective. The astrocyte pre-treatment with a cocktail of inhibitors of ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins reduced the BzATP-mediated CysLT production confirming that ABC transporters are involved in the release of CysLTs. The astrocyte P2X7- evoked rise of CysLT efflux was abolished in the presence of MK-886, an inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) whose expression, along with that of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) was reported by Northern Blot analysis. The stimulation of P2X7 induced an up-regulation of FLAPmRNA that was reduced by the antagonist oATP. These data suggest that in rat brain cultured

  7. 5,7-dihydroxy-2-(3-hydroxy-4, 5-dimethoxy-phenyl)-chromen-4-one-a flavone from Bruguiera gymnorrhiza displaying anti-inflammatory properties

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Rajib; Sarkar, Ratul; Biswas, Prova; Bera, Rammohan; Sharma, Soma; Nath, Suvadeep; Karmakar, Sanmoy; Sen, Tuhinadri

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (BRG) (L.) Lamk (Rhizophoraceae), a mangrove species, is widely distributed in the Pacific region, eastern Africa, Indian subcontinent, and subtropical Australia. The leaves of this plant are traditionally used for treating burns and inflammatory lesions. This study isolates the bioactive compound from the methanol extract of BRG leaves and evaluates the possible mechanisms of anti-inflammatory activity involved. Materials and Methods: Bioassay-guided fractionation of BRG was performed to identify the bioactive fraction (displaying inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 [COX2] - 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activities and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production at the tested concentrations of 100 and 10 μg/ml). The fractionation was performed by solvent extraction and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography. The bioactive compound was characterized by ultraviolet–visible, liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The antioxidant potential was evaluated by electron spin resonance spectrum of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical at 250 μM. The effect of the compound was also studied on TNF-α converting enzyme and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activities at the concentrations 100, 10 and 1 μg/ml. Results: Bioassay-guided purification of BRG revealed the presence of a flavone (5,7-dihydroxy-2- [3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethoxy-phenyl]-chromen-4-one) of molecular weight 330Da. It demonstrated more than 80% inhibition against COX2, 5-LOX activities and TNF-α production at 100 μg/ml. It also displayed 40% inhibition against DPPH radical at the tested concentration along with 23.1% inhibition of NF-κB activity at 100 μg/ml. Conclusions: The isolated methoxy-flavone may play a predominant role in the anti-inflammatory properties displayed by BRG leaves. Such activity may involve multiple mechanisms, namely (a) modulation of oxidative stress (b) inhibition of arachidonic acid

  8. Isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating arachidonic acid metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Wang, Yuzhong; Zheng, Hao; Yu, Wei; Chai, Hongyan; Zhang, Jing; Falck, John R.; Guo, Austin M.; Yue, Jiang; Peng, Renxiu; Yang, Jing

    2013-10-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA)-derived eicosanoids and its downstream pathways have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in growth control of breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate that isoliquiritigenin, a flavonoid phytoestrogen from licorice, induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating multiple key enzymes in AA metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer. Isoliquiritigenin diminished cell viability, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, and clonogenic ability in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231cells, and induced apoptosis as evidenced by an analysis of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry and hoechst staining. Furthermore, isoliquiritigenin inhibited mRNA expression of multiple forms of AA-metabolizing enzymes, including phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenases (COX)-2 and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A, and decreased secretion of their products, including prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), without affecting COX-1, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP), and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}). In addition, it downregulated the levels of phospho-PI3K, phospho-PDK (Ser{sup 241}), phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}), phospho-Bad (Ser{sup 136}), and Bcl-x{sub L} expression, thereby activating caspase cascades and eventually cleaving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Conversely, the addition of exogenous eicosanoids, including PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4} and a 20-HETE analog (WIT003), and caspase inhibitors, or overexpression of constitutively active Akt reversed isoliquiritigenin-induced apoptosis. Notably, isoliquiritigenin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice, together with decreased intratumoral levels of eicosanoids and phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}). Collectively, these data suggest that isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating AA metabolic

  9. Imperatorin Suppresses Degranulation and Eicosanoid Generation in Activated Bone Marrow-Derived Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Eujin; Park, Na-Young; Kim, Sun-Gun; Park, Hyo-Hyun; Lee, Jiean; Lee, Youn Ju; Lee, Eunkyung

    2015-01-01

    Imperatorin has been known to exert many biological functions including anti-inflammatory activity. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of imperatorin on the production of inflammatory mediators in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC). Imperatorin inhibited degranulation and the generation of eicosanoids (leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2)) in IgE/antigen (Ag)-stimulated BMMC. To elucidate the molecular mechanism involved in this process, we investigated the effect of imperatorin on intracellular signaling in BMMC. Biochemical analyses of the IgE/Ag-mediated signaling pathway demonstrated that imperatorin dramatically attenuated degranulation and the production of 5-lipoxygenase-dependent LTC4 and cyclooxygenase-2-dependent PGD2 through the inhibition of intracellular calcium influx/phospholipase Cγ1, cytosolic phospholipase A2/mitogen-activated protein kinases and/or nuclear factor-κB pathways in BMMC. These results suggest that the effects of imperatorin on inhibition of degranulation and eicosanoid generation through the suppression of multiple steps of IgE/Ag-mediated signaling pathways would be beneficial for the prevention of allergic inflammation. PMID:26336581

  10. Recent advances in researches on physiologically active substances in holothurians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashi, Hirata; Nobuhiro, Zaima; Kyoko, Yamashita; Ryoko, Noguchi; Xue, Changhu; Tatsuya, Sugawara

    2005-07-01

    In this report, we reviewed recent literature on physiologically active substances from sea cucumbers (SCs) and their activities together with results obtained from our study. Preventive properties against lipid metabolism were reported in rats using a whole SC preparation with no particular constituent specified. Administration of the preparation lowered serum and hepatic cholesterol levels and improved the HDL/LDL ratio. These functions may be attributed to the stimulatory effect of the extract on the secretion of cholesterol in feces. Novel fucosylated chondroitin sulfates (FCSs) from Ludwigothurea grisea significantly induced fibroblast growth factor 2-dependent angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HU-VECs). The proangiogenetic activity seemed attributable to the action of the sulfated fucose branches on the polysaccharide. SCs contain mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) that are capable of absorbing UV. A biogenetic precursor of MAAs was first reported in SCs. The anti-proliferative effects of a branched chain fatty acid from a sea cucumber on prostate cancer cells was reported with the activity of 5-lipoxygenase. Glycosphingolipid constituents in SCs have been systematically analyzed over the past ten years. The results showed that the gangliosides in several SCs differed from those of mammals in that a sialic acid of SC gangliosides directly binded to glucose of cerebroside. Neuritogenic activity of the glycosphingolipids was demonstrated in vitro experiments and may lead to the development of therapeutic products for neurological disorders. Our study also showed that sphingoid bases, the hydrolyzed products of glycosphingolipids from SCs, induced significant apoptosis in several tumor cell lines.

  11. Endogenous n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Delay Progression of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma in Fat-1-p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ Mice12

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B; Brewer, Misty; Duff, Ashley; Lightfoot, Stan; Brush, Richard S; Anderson, Robert E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical studies suggest that diets rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) may be beneficial for prevention of pancreatic cancer. Nutritional intervention studies are often complex, and there is no clear evidence, without potential confounding factors, on whether conversion of n-6 PUFAs to n-3 PUFAs in pancreatic tissues would provide protection. Experiments were designed using n-3 fatty acid desaturase (Fat-1) transgenic mice, which can convert n-6 PUFA to n-3 FAs endogenously, to determine the impact of n-3 PUFAs on pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs) and their progression to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Six-weekold female p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ andcompoundFat-1-p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ mice were fed (AIN-76A) diets containing 10% safflower oil for 35 weeks. Pancreata were evaluated histopathologically for PanINs and PDAC. Results showed a dramatic reduction in incidence of PDAC (84%; P < .02) in Fat-1-p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ mice compared to p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ mice. Importantly, significant reductions of pancreatic ducts with carcinoma (90%; P < .0001) and PanIN 3 (∼50%; P < .001) lesions were observed in the compound transgenic mice. The levels of n-3 PUFA were much higher (>85%; P < .05–0.01) in pancreas of compound transgenic mice than in those of p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ mice. Molecular analysis of the pancreas showed a significant down-regulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), 5-LOX-activating protein, Bcl-2, and cyclin D1 expression levels in Fat-1-p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ mice compared to p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ mice. These data highlight the promise of dietary n-3 FAs for chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer in high-risk individuals. PMID:23308056

  12. Endogenous n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids delay progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in Fat-1-p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B; Brewer, Misty; Duff, Ashley; Lightfoot, Stan; Brush, Richard S; Anderson, Robert E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2012-12-01

    Preclinical studies suggest that diets rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) may be beneficial for prevention of pancreatic cancer. Nutritional intervention studies are often complex, and there is no clear evidence, without potential confounding factors, on whether conversion of n-6 PUFAs to n-3 PUFAs in pancreatic tissues would provide protection. Experiments were designed using n-3 fatty acid desaturase (Fat-1) transgenic mice, which can convert n-6 PUFA to n-3 FAs endogenously, to determine the impact of n-3 PUFAs on pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs) and their progression to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Six-week-old female p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) and compound Fat-1-p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) mice were fed (AIN-76A) diets containing 10% safflower oil for 35 weeks. Pancreata were evaluated histopathologically for PanINs and PDAC. Results showed a dramatic reduction in incidence of PDAC (84%; P < .02) in Fat-1-p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) mice compared to p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) mice. Importantly, significant reductions of pancreatic ducts with carcinoma (90%; P < .0001) and PanIN 3 (~50%; P < .001) lesions were observed in the compound transgenic mice. The levels of n-3 PUFA were much higher (>85%; P < .05-0.01) in pancreas of compound transgenic mice than in those of p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) mice. Molecular analysis of the pancreas showed a significant down-regulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), 5-LOX-activating protein, Bcl-2, and cyclin D1 expression levels in Fat-1-p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) mice compared to p48(Cre/+)-LSL-Kras(G12D/+) mice. These data highlight the promise of dietary n-3 FAs for chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer in high-risk individuals. PMID:23308056

  13. Phospholipase A2 regulates eicosanoid class switching during inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Norris, Paul C; Gosselin, David; Reichart, Donna; Glass, Christopher K; Dennis, Edward A

    2014-09-01

    Initiation and resolution of inflammation are considered to be tightly connected processes. Lipoxins (LX) are proresolution lipid mediators that inhibit phlogistic neutrophil recruitment and promote wound-healing macrophage recruitment in humans via potent and specific signaling through the LXA4 receptor (ALX). One model of lipoxin biosynthesis involves sequential metabolism of arachidonic acid by two cell types expressing a combined transcellular metabolon. It is currently unclear how lipoxins are efficiently formed from precursors or if they are directly generated after receptor-mediated inflammatory commitment. Here, we provide evidence for a pathway by which lipoxins are generated in macrophages as a consequence of sequential activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a receptor for endotoxin, and P2X7, a purinergic receptor for extracellular ATP. Initial activation of TLR4 results in accumulation of the cyclooxygenase-2-derived lipoxin precursor 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) in esterified form within membrane phospholipids, which can be enhanced by aspirin (ASA) treatment. Subsequent activation of P2X7 results in efficient hydrolysis of 15-HETE from membrane phospholipids by group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2, and its conversion to bioactive lipoxins by 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate how a single immune cell can store a proresolving lipid precursor and then release it for bioactive maturation and secretion, conceptually similar to the production and inflammasome-dependent maturation of the proinflammatory IL-1 family cytokines. These findings provide evidence for receptor-specific and combinatorial control of pro- and anti-inflammatory eicosanoid biosynthesis, and potential avenues to modulate inflammatory indices without inhibiting downstream eicosanoid pathways. PMID:25139986

  14. Morin modulates the oxidative stress-induced NF-kappaB pathway through its anti-oxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Min; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Park, Gwangli; Kim, Mi Kyung; Yokozawa, Takako; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2010-04-01

    Morin is a flavone that has anti-inflammatory effects through a mechanism that is not well understood. Based on the extreme sensitive nature of the transcription factor, NF-kB to redox change, it is postulated that morin's anti-NF-kappaB activation likely depends on its ability to scavenge excessive reactive species [RS]. The present study assessed the extent of morin's ability to modulate RS-induced NF-kappaB activation through its scavenging activity. Results indicate that morin neutralized RS in vitro and inhibited t-BHP-induced RS generation. It also examined morin for suppressed redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-kappaB activation via reduced DNA binding activity, I kappaB alpha phosphorylation and p65/p50 nuclear translocation. The more important finding was that suppression of the NF-kappaB cascade by morin was modulated through the ERK and p38 MAPKs signal transduction pathways in endothelial cells. As a consequence, morin's anti-oxidant effect extended expression level of NF-kappaB dependent pro-inflammatory genes, thereby reducing COX-2, iNOS and 5-LOX. The data indicate that morin has strong anti-oxidative power against RS-induced NF-kappaB modulation through the ERK and p38 MAPKs signalling pathways by its RS scavenging activity. The significance of the current study is the new revelation that morin may have potential as an effective anti-inflammatory therapeutic agent. PMID:20187708

  15. Suppression of leukotriene B4 generation by ex-vivo neutrophils isolated from asthma patients on dietary supplementation with gammalinolenic acid-containing borage oil: possible implication in asthma.

    PubMed

    Ziboh, Vincent A; Naguwa, Stanley; Vang, Kao; Wineinger, Julie; Morrissey, Brian M; Watnik, Mitchell; Gershwin, M Eric

    2004-03-01

    Dietary gammalinolenic acid (GLA), a potent inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and suppressor of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), can attenuate the clinical course of rheumatoid arthritics, with negligible side effects. Since Zileuton, also an inhibitor of 5-LOX, attenuates asthma but with an undesirable side effect, we investigated whether dietary GLA would suppress biosynthesis of PMN-LTB4 isolated from asthma patients and attenuate asthma. Twenty-four mild-moderate asthma patients (16-75 years) were randomized to receive either 2.0 g daily GLA (borage oil) or corn oil (placebo) for 12 months. Blood drawn at 3 months intervals was used to prepare sera for fatty acid analysis, PMNs for determining phospholipid fatty acids and for LTB4 generation. Patients were monitored by daily asthma scores, pulmonary function, and exhaled NO. Ingestion of daily GLA (i) increased DGLA (GLA metabolite) in PMN-phospholipids; (ii) increased generation of PMN-15-HETrE (5-LOX metabolite of DGLA). Increased PMN-DGLA/15-HETrE paralleled the decreased PMN generation of proinflammatory LTB4. However, the suppression of PMN-LTB4 did not reveal statistically significant suppression of the asthma scores evaluated. Nonetheless, the study demonstrated dietary fatty acid modulation of endogenous inflammatory mediators without side effects and thus warrant further explorations into the roles of GLA at higher doses, leukotrienes and asthma. PMID:15154607

  16. Spice active principles as the inhibitors of human platelet aggregation and thromboxane biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, R H; Naidu, K Akhilender

    2009-07-01

    Spice active principles are reported to have anti-diabetic, anti-hypercholesterolemic, antilithogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anti-cancer properties. In our previous report we have shown that spices and their active principles inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and also formation of leukotriene C4. In this study, we report the modulatory effect of spice active principles viz., eugenol, capsaicin, piperine, quercetin, curcumin, cinnamaldehyde and allyl sulphide on in vitro human platelet aggregation. We have demonstrated that spice active principles inhibit platelet aggregation induced by different agonists, namely ADP (50microM), collagen (500microg/ml), arachidonic acid (AA) (1.0mM) and calcium ionophore A-23187 (20microM). Spice active principles showed preferential inhibition of arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation compared to other agonists. Among the spice active principles tested, eugenol and capsaicin are found to be most potent inhibitors of AA-induced platelet aggregation with IC50 values of 0.5 and 14.6microM, respectively. The order of potency of spice principles in inhibiting AA-induced platelet aggregation is eugenol>capsaicin>curcumin>cinnamaldehyde>piperine>allyl sulphide>quercetin. Eugenol is found to be 29-fold more potent than aspirin in inhibiting AA-induced human platelet aggregation. Eugenol and capsaicin inhibited thromboxane B2 (TXB2) formation in platelets in a dose-dependent manner challenged with AA apparently by the inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX-1). Eugenol-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation is further confirmed by dose-dependent decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA) in platelets. Further, eugenol and capsaicin inhibited platelet aggregation induced by agonists-collagen, ADP and calcium ionophore but to a lesser degree compared to AA. These results clearly suggest that spice principles have beneficial effects in modulating human platelet aggregation. PMID:19501497

  17. Platelet-activating factor induces phospholipid turnover, calcium flux, arachidonic acid liberation, eicosanoid generation, and oncogene expression in a human B cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Schulam, P.G.; Kuruvilla, A.; Putcha, G.; Mangus, L.; Franklin-Johnson, J.; Shearer, W.T. )

    1991-03-01

    Platelet-activating factor is a potent mediator of the inflammatory response. Studies of the actions of platelet-activating factor have centered mainly around neutrophils, monocytes, and platelets. In this report we begin to uncover the influence of platelet-activating factor on B lymphocytes. Employing the EBV-transformed human B cell line SKW6.4, we demonstrate that platelet-activating factor significantly alters membrane phospholipid metabolism indicated by the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid but not significantly into phosphatidylethanolamine at concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M. The inactive precursor, lyso-platelet-activating factor, at a concentration as high as 10(-7) M had no effect on any of the membrane phospholipids. We also show that platelet-activating factor from 10(-12) to 10(-6) M induced rapid and significant elevation in intracellular calcium levels, whereas lyso-platelet-activating factor was again ineffective. We further demonstrate the impact of platelet-activating factor binding to B cells by measuring platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid production. Moreover, platelet-activating factor was capable of inducing transcription of the nuclear proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun. Finally we explored the possible role of 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid as a regulator of arachidonic acid liberation demonstrating that endogenous 5-lipoxygenase activity modulates platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release perhaps acting at the level of phospholipase A2. In summary, platelet-activating factor is shown here to have a direct and profound effect on a pure B cell line.

  18. Non-antioxidant activities of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Zingg, Jean-Marc; Azzi, Angelo

    2004-05-01

    Molecules in biological systems often can perform more than one function. In particular, many molecules have the ability to chemically scavenge free radicals and thus act in the test tube as antioxidant, but their main biological function is by acting as hormones, ligands for transcription factors, modulators of enzymatic activities or as structural components. In fact, oxidation of these molecules may impair their biological function, and cellular defense systems exist which protect these molecules from oxidation. Vitamin E is present in plants in 8 different forms with more or less equal antioxidant potential (alpha-, beta-, gamma-, delta-tocopherol/tocotrienols); nevertheless, in higher organisms only alpha-tocopherol is preferentially retained suggesting a specific mechanism for the uptake for this analogue. In the last 20 years, the route of tocopherol from the diet into the body has been clarified and the proteins involved in the uptake and selective retention of alpha-tocopherol discovered. Precise cellular functions of alpha-tocopherol that are independent of its antioxidant/radical scavenging ability have been characterized in recent years. At the posttranslational level, alpha-tocopherol inhibits protein kinase C, 5-lipoxygenase and phospholipase A2 and activates protein phosphatase 2A and diacylglycerol kinase. Some genes (e. g. scavenger receptors, alpha-TTP, alpha-tropomyosin, matrix metalloproteinase-19 and collagenase) are modulated by alpha-tocopherol at the transcriptional level. alpha-Tocopherol also inhibits cell proliferation, platelet aggregation and monocyte adhesion. These effects are unrelated to the antioxidant activity of vitamin E, and possibly reflect specific interactions of alpha-tocopherol with enzymes, structural proteins, lipids and transcription factors. Recently, several novel tocopherol binding proteins have been cloned, that may mediate the non-antioxidant signaling and cellular functions of vitamin E and its correct

  19. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 activation constricts the human bronchus via the release of cysteinyl leukotrienes.

    PubMed

    McAlexander, M Allen; Luttmann, Mark A; Hunsberger, Gerald E; Undem, Bradley J

    2014-04-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated that the ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is functionally expressed in airway smooth muscle cells and that TRPV4 single nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with airflow obstruction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We sought to use isometric tension measurements in ex vivo airways to determine whether short-term pharmacological activation of TRPV4 with the potent agonist GSK1016790 [N-((1S)-1-{[4-((2S)-2-{[(2,4-dichlorophenyl)sulfonyl]amino}-3-hydroxypropanoyl)-1-piperazinyl]carbonyl}-3-methylbutyl)-1-benzothiophene-2-carboxamide] would constrict human bronchial tissue. As predicted, transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 activation in the human airway produces contractions that are blocked by the nonselective transient receptor potential channel blocker ruthenium red. Moreover, the novel TRPV4-selective blocker GSK2334775 [(R)-6-(methylsulfonyl)-3-((4-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)piperindin-1-yl)methyl)-N-(2,2,2,-trifluoro-1-phenylethyl)-2-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)quinoline-4-carboxamide] inhibited these contractions over a concentration range consistent with its in vitro potency against recombinant and native TRPV4-containing channels. Surprisingly, TRPV4-dependent contractions were also blocked by a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor and two structurally distinct cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptor antagonists. In aggregate, our results fail to support the hypothesis that TRPV4 in airway smooth muscle cells regulates airway contractility short term. Rather, we provide pharmacological evidence that TRPV4 activation causes human airway constriction that is entirely dependent upon the production of cysteinyl leukotrienes. Together, these data identify a novel mechanism by which TRPV4 activation may contribute to pathologic remodeling and inflammation, in addition to airflow obstruction, in the diseased human respiratory tract. PMID:24504097

  20. A taurine-supplemented vegan diet may blunt the contribution of neutrophil activation to acute coronary events.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2004-01-01

    Neutrophils are activated in the coronary circulation during acute coronary events (unstable angina and myocardial infarction), often prior to the onset of ischemic damage. Moreover, neutrophils infiltrate coronary plaque in these circumstances, and may contribute to the rupture or erosion of this plaque, triggering thrombosis. Activated neutrophils secrete proteolytic enzymes in latent forms which are activated by the hypochlorous acid (HOCl) generated by myeloperoxidase. These phenomena may help to explain why an elevated white cell count has been found to be an independent coronary risk factor. Low-fat vegan diets can decrease circulating leukocytes--neutrophils and monocytes--possibly owing to down-regulation of systemic IGF-I activity. Thus, a relative neutropenia may contribute to the coronary protection afforded by such diets. However, vegetarian diets are devoid of taurine - the physiological antagonist of HOCl--and tissue levels of this nutrient are relatively low in vegetarians. Taurine has anti-atherosclerotic activity in animal models, possibly reflecting a role for macrophage-derived myeloperoxidase in the atherogenic process. Taurine also has platelet-stabilizing and anti-hypertensive effects that presumably could reduce coronary risk. Thus, it is proposed that a taurine-supplemented low-fat vegan diet represents a rational strategy for diminishing the contribution of activated neutrophils to acute coronary events; moreover, such a regimen would work in a number of other complementary ways to promote cardiovascular health. Moderate alcohol consumption, the well-tolerated drug pentoxifylline, and 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors--zileuton, boswellic acids, fish oil--may also have potential in this regard. PMID:15288360

  1. Autocrine enhancement of leukotriene synthesis by endogenous leukotriene B4 and platelet-activating factor in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, P. P.; McColl, S. R.; Braquet, P.; Borgeat, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), two potent lipid mediators synthesized by activated neutrophils, are known to stimulate several neutrophil functional responses. In this study, we have determined that endogenous LTB4 and PAF exert autocrine effects on LT synthesis, as well as the underlying mechanism involved. 2. Pretreatment of neutrophils with either pertussis toxin (PT), or with receptor antagonists for LTB4 and PAF, resulted in an inhibition of LT synthesis induced by calcium ionophore, A23187. This inhibition was most marked at submaximal (100-300 nM) A23187 concentrations, whilst it was least at ionophore concentrations which induce maximal LT synthesis (1-3 microM). Thus newly-synthesized PAF and LTB4 can enhance LT synthesis induced by A23187 under conditions where the LT-generating system is not fully activated. 3. In recombinant human (rh) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-primed neutrophils, LT synthesis in response to chemoattractants (fMet-Leu-Phe or rhC5a) was also significantly inhibited by the LTB4 receptor antagonist, and to a lesser extent by PAF receptor antagonists. 4. Further investigation revealed that LTB4 and/or PAF exert their effects on LT synthesis via an effect on arachidonic acid (AA) availability, as opposed to 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) activation. Indeed, the receptor antagonists, as well as PT, inhibited LT synthesis and AA release to a similar extent, whereas 5-LO activation (assessed with an exogenous 5-LO substrate) was virtually unaffected under the same conditions. Accordingly, we showed that addition of exogenous LTB4 could enhance AA availability in response to chemoattractant challenge in rhGM-CSF-primed cells, without significantly affecting the 5-LO activation status.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8019762

  2. Implications of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligand clofibrate in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sudeshna

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory and invasive breast cancers are aggressive and require better understanding for the development of new treatments and more accurate prognosis. Here, we detected high expression of PPARα in human primary inflammatory (SUM149PT) and highly invasive (SUM1315MO2) breast cancer cells, and tissue sections of human breast cancer. PPARα ligands are clinically used to treat dyslipidemia. Among lipid lowering drugs clofibrate, fenofibrate and WY14643, clofibrate showed high chemo-sensitivity towards breast cancer cells. Clofibrate treatment significantly induced PPARα DNA binding activity, and remarkably reduced cyclooxygenase-2/PGE2 and 5-lipoxygenase/LTB4 inflammatory pathways. Clofibrate treatment reduced the proliferation of breast cancer cells probably by inhibiting NF-κB and ERK1/2 activation, reducing cyclinD1, cyclinA, cyclinE, and inducing pro-apoptotic P21 levels. Surprisingly, the expression of lipogenic pathway genes including SREBP-1c (sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c), HMG-CoA synthase, SPTLC1 (serine palmitoyltransferase long-chain), and Acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) decreased with a concurrent increase in fatty acid oxidation genes such as CPT-1a (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a) and SREBP-2 (Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2). Clofibrate treatment induced secretion of free fatty acids and effectively decreased the level of phosphorylated active form of fatty acid synthase (FASN), an enzyme catalyzing de novo synthesis of fatty acids. High level of coactivators steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and histone acetylase CBP-300 (CREB binding protein-300) were observed in the nuclear complexes of clofibrate treated breast cancer cells. These findings implicate that stimulating PPARα by safe, well-tolerated, and clinically approved clofibrate may provide a safer and more effective strategy to target the signaling, lipogenic, and inflammatory pathways in aggressive forms of breast cancer. PMID:26621841

  3. Implications of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligand clofibrate in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Karthic; Goswami, Sudeshna; Sharma-Walia, Neelam

    2016-03-29

    Inflammatory and invasive breast cancers are aggressive and require better understanding for the development of new treatments and more accurate prognosis. Here, we detected high expression of PPARα in human primary inflammatory (SUM149PT) and highly invasive (SUM1315MO2) breast cancer cells, and tissue sections of human breast cancer. PPARα ligands are clinically used to treat dyslipidemia. Among lipid lowering drugs clofibrate, fenofibrate and WY14643, clofibrate showed high chemo-sensitivity towards breast cancer cells. Clofibrate treatment significantly induced PPARα DNA binding activity, and remarkably reduced cyclooxygenase-2/PGE2 and 5-lipoxygenase/LTB4 inflammatory pathways. Clofibrate treatment reduced the proliferation of breast cancer cells probably by inhibiting NF-κB and ERK1/2 activation, reducing cyclinD1, cyclinA, cyclinE, and inducing pro-apoptotic P21 levels. Surprisingly, the expression of lipogenic pathway genes including SREBP-1c (sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c), HMG-CoA synthase, SPTLC1 (serine palmitoyltransferase long-chain), and Acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) decreased with a concurrent increase in fatty acid oxidation genes such as CPT-1a (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a) and SREBP-2 (Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2). Clofibrate treatment induced secretion of free fatty acids and effectively decreased the level of phosphorylated active form of fatty acid synthase (FASN), an enzyme catalyzing de novo synthesis of fatty acids. High level of coactivators steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and histone acetylase CBP-300 (CREB binding protein-300) were observed in the nuclear complexes of clofibrate treated breast cancer cells. These findings implicate that stimulating PPARα by safe, well-tolerated, and clinically approved clofibrate may provide a safer and more effective strategy to target the signaling, lipogenic, and inflammatory pathways in aggressive forms of breast cancer. PMID:26621841

  4. Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents three activities: (1) investigating succession in a schoolground; (2) investigating oak galls; and (3) making sun prints (photographs made without camera or darkroom). Each activity includes a list of materials needed and procedures used. (JN)

  5. Enzymatic Studies of Isoflavonoids as Selective and Potent Inhibitors of Human Leukocyte 5-Lipo-Oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Mascayano, Carolina; Espinosa, Victoria; Sepúlveda-Boza, Silvia; Hoobler, Eric K; Perry, Steve; Diaz, Giovanni; Holman, Theodore R

    2015-07-01

    Continuing our search to find more potent and selective 5-LOX inhibitors, we present now the enzymatic evaluation of seventeen isoflavones (IR) and nine isoflavans (HIR), and their in vitro and in cellulo potency against human leukocyte 5-LOX. Of the 26 compounds tested, 10 isoflavones and 9 isoflavans possessed micromolar potency, but only three were selective against 5-LOX (IR-2, HIR-303, and HIR-309), with IC50 values at least 10 times lower than those of 12-LOX, 15-LOX-1, and 15-LOX-2. Of these three, IR-2 (6,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-isoflavone, known as texasin) was the most selective 5-LOX inhibitor, with over 80-fold potency difference compared with other isozymes; Steered Molecular Dynamics (SMD) studies supported these findings. The presence of the catechol group on ring A (6,7-dihydroxy versus 7,8-dihydroxy) correlated with their biological activity, but the reduction of ring C, converting the isoflavones to isoflavans, and the substituent positions on ring B did not affect their potency against 5-LOX. Two of the most potent/selective inhibitors (HIR-303 and HIR-309) were reductive inhibitors and were potent against 5-LOX in human whole blood, indicating that isoflavans can be potent and selective inhibitors against human leukocyte 5-LOX in vitro and in cellulo. PMID:25359714

  6. Impact of 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors on the spatiotemporal distribution of inflammatory cells and neuronal COX-2 expression following experimental traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Härtig, Wolfgang; Michalski, Dominik; Seeger, Gudrun; Voigt, Cornelia; Donat, Cornelius K; Dulin, Julia; Kacza, Johannes; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Arendt, Thomas; Schuhmann, Martin U

    2013-03-01

    The inflammatory response following traumatic brain injury (TBI) contributes to neuronal death with poor outcome. Although anti-inflammatory strategies were beneficial in the experimental TBI, clinical translations mostly failed, probably caused by the complexity of involved cells and mediators. We recently showed in a rat model of controlled cortical impact (CCI) that leukotriene inhibitors (LIs) attenuate contusion growth and improve neuronal survival. This study focuses on spatiotemporal characteristics of macrophages and granulocytes, typically involved in inflammatory processes, and neuronal COX-2 expression. Effects of treatment with LIs (Boscari/MK-886), started prior trauma, were evaluated by quantifying CD68(+), CD43(+) and COX-2(+) cells 24h and 72 h post-CCI in the parietal cortex (PC), CA3 region, dentate gyrus (DG) and visual/auditory cortex (v/aC). Correlations were applied to identify intercellular relationships. At 24h, untreated animals showed granulocyte invasion in all regions, decreasing towards 72 h. Macrophages increased from 24h to 72 h post-CCI in PC and v/aC. COX-2(+) neurones showed no temporal changes, except of an increase in the CA3 region at 72 h. Treatment reduced granulocytes at 24h in the pericontusional zone and hippocampus, and macrophages at 72 h in the PC and v/aC. COX-2 expression remained unaffected by LIs, except of time-specific changes in the DG (increase/decrease at 24/72 h). Interrelations confirmed concomitant cellular reactions beyond the initial trauma site. In conclusion, LIs attenuated the cellular inflammatory response following CCI. Future studies have to clarify region-specific effects and explore the potential of a clinically more relevant therapeutic approach applying LIs after CCI. PMID:23268351

  7. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Specific Cyclooxygenase 2,5-Lipoxygenase, and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors on Experimental Autoimmune Anterior Uveitis (EAAU)

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Nalini S.; Sohn, Jeong-Hyeon; Bora, Puran S.; Kaplan, Henry J.; Kulkarni, Prasad

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Inflammation, in general, causes the release of a variety of inflammatory mediators that in turn induce cyclooxygenase (COX) 2, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 5-lipoxygense (LP) synthesis, producing large amounts of inflammatory prostaglandins (PG), nitric oxide (NO), and leukotriene (LT) B4. Therefore, inhibition of these enzymes may abrogate intraocular inflammation in experimental autoimmune anterior uveitis (EAAU). Methods Lewis rats were immunized with melanin-associated antigen (MAA) isolated from bovine iris and ciliary body. These animals were divided into three groups. The first group of rats received subcutaneous injection of COX 2 inhibitor CS 236 at different time points. The second and third groups of animals received subcutaneous aminoguanidine (AG), an iNOS inhibitor, and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a 5-LP inhibitor, respectively. Control animals received vehicle. Rat eyes were examined daily by slit-lamp biomicroscopy from Day 7 to 30 post injection for uveitis. Animals were also sacrificed at various time points for histologic analysis. Results Control animals developed severe EAAU in both eyes. The disease started in these animals on Day 12 post immunization and lasted for ten days. Interestingly, CS 236, a potent COX 2 inhibitor, completely abrogated EAAU when the animals were treated daily from the Day 0 to 14 or Day 0 to 20 after MAA injection. Furthermore, daily CS 236 treatment after the onset of EAAU (Day 14–20) significantly reduced the severity (both clinical and histologic) of EAAU and shortened the duration of disease. iNOS inhibitor (AG) and 5-LP inhibitor (NDGA) partially attenuated EAAU. Conclusions Our results show that EAAU was partially attenuated by AG and NDGA. Interestingly, CS 236, a potent COX 2 inhibitor, completely inhibited EAAU in male Lewis rats most likely by inhibiting the initial phase and onset of the disease. PMID:16019677

  8. Natural Product Total Synthesis in the Organic Laboratory: Total Synthesis of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE), a Potent 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor from Honeybee Hives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touaibia, Mohamed; Guay, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Natural products play a critical role in modern organic synthesis and learning synthetic techniques is an important component of the organic laboratory experience. In addition to traditional one-step organic synthesis laboratories, a multistep natural product synthesis is an interesting experiment to challenge students. The proposed three-step…

  9. Inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway with piriprost (U-60,257) protects normal primates from ozone-induced methacholine hyperresponsive small airways

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.G.; Stout, B.K.; Ruppel, P.L.

    1988-03-01

    Weekly exposure to ozone in seven normal Rhesus monkeys led to induction of methacholine hypersensitive airways (RL increases 242 +/- 60% and Cdyn decreases 68 +/- 13% of baseline methacholine responses). It took 19 weeks to establish this hyperresponse that persisted for greater than 15 weeks once ozone was stopped. A second exposure led to similar response peaks in 6 weeks. At the peak of the second response, weekly 1% piriprost exposure before ozone led to a return to baseline that was not different between placebo and piriprost treated animals (9.4 +/- 1.0 and 4.3 +/- 2.9 weeks, placebo and treated, respectively P = 0.09 NS). A statistical difference in the mecholyl response in placebo and piriprost treated groups while on ozone was shown only in the Cdyn measurement (Cdyn% change 68 +/- 13 vs 24 +/- 14, placebo and piriprost, respectively P = 0.03). Off ozone (or return to baseline), a statistical difference could be detected both in RL and Cdyn (RL% changed 151 +/- 41 vs 31.1 +/- 49, P = 0.03, and for Cdyn 62.7 +/- 8 vs 9 +/- 10, P = 0.0006, placebo and piriprost, respectively). We conclude tha the primate provides a chronic model of airways reactivity in which the role of lipoxygenase is implicated because of the beneficial role of piriprost, and further that the ozone lesion is primarily in the smaller airways (possibly and alveolitis).

  10. Leukotriene E4 activates human Th2 cells for exaggerated proinflammatory cytokine production in response to prostaglandin D2.

    PubMed

    Xue, Luzheng; Barrow, Anna; Fleming, Vicki M; Hunter, Michael G; Ogg, Graham; Klenerman, Paul; Pettipher, Roy

    2012-01-15

    PGD(2) exerts a number of proinflammatory responses through a high-affinity interaction with chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells (CRTH2) and has been detected at high concentrations at sites of allergic inflammation. Because cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) are also produced during the allergic response, we investigated the possibility that cysLTs may modulate the response of human Th2 cells to PGD(2). PGD(2) induced concentration-dependent Th2 cytokine production in the absence of TCR stimulation. Leukotrienes D(4) and E(4) (LTE(4)) also stimulated the cytokine production but were much less active than PGD(2). However, when combined with PGD(2), cysLTs caused a greater than additive enhancement of the response, with LTE(4) being most effective in activating Th2 cells. LTE(4) enhanced calcium mobilization in response to PGD(2) in Th2 cells without affecting endogenous PGD(2) production or CRTH2 receptor expression. The effect of LTE(4) was inhibited by montelukast but not by the P2Y(12) antagonist methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate. The enhancing effect was also evident with endogenous cysLTs produced from immunologically activated mast cells because inhibition of cysLT action by montelukast or cysLT synthesis by MK886, an inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein, reduced the response of Th2 cells to the levels produced by PGD(2) alone. These findings reveal that cysLTs, in particular LTE(4), have a significant proinflammatory impact on T cells and demonstrate their effects on Th2 cells are mediated by a montelukast-sensitive receptor. PMID:22174450

  11. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Mally

    1992-01-01

    A series of four activities are presented to enhance students' abilities to appreciate and use trigonometry as a tool in problem solving. Activities cover problems applying the law of sines, the law of cosines, and matching equivalent trigonometric expressions. A teacher's guide, worksheets, and answers are provided. (MDH)

  12. Chebulagic acid (CA) attenuates LPS-induced inflammation by suppressing NF-{kappa}B and MAPK activation in RAW 264.7 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, D. Bharat; Reddanna, Pallu

    2009-03-27

    Chebulagic acid (CA), a natural anti-oxidant, showed potent anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7, a mouse macrophage cell line. These effects were exerted via inhibition of NO and PGE{sub 2} production and down-regulation of iNOS, COX-2, 5-LOX, TNF-{alpha} and IL-6. CA inhibited NF-{kappa}B activation by LPS, and this was associated with the abrogation of I{kappa}B-{alpha} phosphorylation and subsequent decreases in nuclear p50 and p65 protein levels. Further, the phosphorylation of p38, ERK 1/2 and JNK in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells was suppressed by CA in a concentration-dependent manner. LPS-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was also effectively inhibited by CA. These results suggest that CA exerts anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages by inhibition of NF-{kappa}B activation and MAP kinase phosphorylation.

  13. Evidence that M1 muscarinic receptors enhance noradrenaline release in mouse atria by activating protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, M.; Barrington, M.; Majewski, H.

    1993-01-01

    1. The M1 selective muscarinic agonist, McNeil A 343, enhanced the electrically evoked release of noradrenaline from postganglionic sympathetic nerves in mouse atria. This has been found previously to be due to activation of muscarinic receptors of the M1 subtype, probably located on sympathetic nerve terminals. The present study investigated the signal transduction mechanisms involved in the release-enhancing effects of McNeil A 343. The release of noradrenaline from mouse atria was assessed by measuring the electrically-induced (3 Hz, 60 s) outflow of radioactivity from atria which had been pre-incubated with [3H]-noradrenaline. 2. 8-Bromo cyclic AMP in the presence of IBMX was used to enhance maximally S-I noradrenaline release through cyclic AMP-dependent mechanisms. However, the facilitatory effect of McNeil A 343 (10 microM) was not different from the effect in the absence of these drugs, suggesting that McNeil A 343 enhances noradrenaline release independently of the cyclic AMP system. Furthermore, the release-enhancing effect of McNeil A 343 (10 microM) on noradrenaline release was also not altered by the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, BW A4C. 3. The facilitatory effect of McNeil A 343 was not altered in the presence of drugs (trifluoperazine, W7, and calmidazolium) which inhibit calmodulin-dependent processes, suggesting that the mechanisms of action of McNeil A 343 does not depend on calmodulin. 4. It was considered likely that the facilitatory effect of McNeil A 343 on noradrenaline release may be due to activation of protein kinase C, since activators of protein kinase C enhance noradrenaline release.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7694761

  14. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, Charlene; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students collect and organize data from a real-world simulation of the scientific concept of half life. Students collect data using a marble sifter, analyze the data using a graphing calculator, and determine an appropriate mathematical model. Includes reproducible worksheets. (MDH)

  15. Pharmacological inhibition of eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor signaling impairs zymosan-induced release of IL-23 by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mario; Márquez, Saioa; Montero, Olimpio; Alonso, Sara; Frade, Javier García; Crespo, Mariano Sánchez; Fernández, Nieves

    2016-02-15

    The engagement of the receptors for fungal patterns induces the expression of cytokines, the release of arachidonic acid, and the production of PGE2 in human dendritic cells (DC), but few data are available about other lipid mediators that may modulate DC function. The combined antagonism of leukotriene (LT) B4, cysteinyl-LT, and platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) inhibited IL23A mRNA expression in response to the fungal surrogate zymosan and to a lower extent TNFA (tumor necrosis factor-α) and CSF2 (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) mRNA. The combination of lipid mediators and the lipid extract of zymosan-conditioned medium increased the induction of IL23A by LPS (bacterial lipopolysaccharide), thus suggesting that unlike LPS, zymosan elicits the production of mediators at a concentration enough for optimal response. Zymosan induced the release of LTB4, LTE4, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), and PAF C16:0. DC showed a high expression and detectable Ser663 phosphorylation of 5-lipoxygenase in response to zymosan, and a high expression and activity of LPCAT1/2 (lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 and 2), the enzymes that incorporate acetate from acetyl-CoA into choline-containing lysophospholipids to produce PAF. Pharmacological modulation of the arachidonic acid cascade and the PAF receptor inhibited the binding of P-71Thr-ATF2 (activating transcription factor 2) to the IL23A promoter, thus mirroring their effects on the expression of IL23A mRNA and IL-23 protein. These results indicate that LTB4, cysteinyl-LT, and PAF, acting through their cognate G protein-coupled receptors, contribute to the phosphorylation of ATF2 and play a central role in IL23A promoter trans-activation and the cytokine signature induced by fungal patterns. PMID:26673542

  16. EETs Attenuate Ox-LDL-Induced LTB4 Production and Activity by Inhibiting p38 MAPK Phosphorylation and 5-LO/BLT1 Receptor Expression in Rat Pulmonary Arterial Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yao-kang; Jia, Yong-liang; Sun, Yan-hong; Lin, Xi-xi; Shen, Hui-juan; Xie, Qiang-min; Yan, Xiao-feng

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 epoxygenase (EPOX)-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), the product of 5-LO, all play a pivotal role in the vascular inflammatory process. We have previously shown that EETs can alleviate oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced endothelial inflammation in primary rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells (RPAECs). Here, we investigated whether ox-LDL can promote LTB4 production through the 5-LO pathway. We further explored how exogenous EETs influence ox-LDL-induced LTB4 production and activity. We found that treatment with ox-LDL increased the production of LTB4 and further led to the expression and release of both monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). All of the above ox-LDL-induced changes were attenuated by the presence of 11,12-EET and 14,15-EET, as these molecules inhibited the 5-LO pathway. Furthermore, the LTB4 receptor 1 (BLT1 receptor) antagonist U75302 attenuated ox-LDL-induced ICAM-1 and MCP-1/CCL2 expression and production, whereas LY255283, a LTB4 receptor 2 (BLT2 receptor) antagonist, produced no such effects. Moreover, in RPAECs, we demonstrated that the increased expression of 5-LO and BLT1 following ox-LDL treatment resulted from the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) via the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Our results indicated that EETs suppress ox-LDL-induced LTB4 production and subsequent inflammatory responses by downregulating the 5-LO/BLT1 receptor pathway, in which p38 MAPK phosphorylation activates NF-κB. These results suggest that the metabolism of arachidonic acid via the 5-LO and EPOX pathways may present a mutual constraint on the physiological regulation of vascular endothelial cells. PMID:26035589

  17. A novel enhancing effect of platelet activating factor (PAF) on glucose oxidation in uteri from pregnant rats. Participation of prostaglandins and leukotrienes.

    PubMed

    González, E; Gimeno, A L; Gimeno, M A

    1990-05-01

    The effects of platelet activating factor (PAF) on glucose oxidation in uterine strips isolated from rats in the 4 th and 5 th day of pregnancy, were explored. PAF, at a concentration of 10(-10) and 10(-8) M, augmented significantly the generation of 14CO2 from labelled glucose in uteri from pregnant rats in the 4 th day of pregnancy. When the tissue was obtained from 5 days pregnant rats, the addition of PAF at 10(-8) increased significantly more than PAF at 10(-10) M the metabolism of glucose. On the other hand, PAF at 10(-8) M failed to alter the uterine basal production of 14CO2 from labelled glucose in animals at estrus. BN52021, a specific PAF antagonist employed at 10(-5) M, blocked completely the action of PAF in the pregnant rat uterus. PGE1, PGE2 and PGF2 alpha enhanced significantly the formation of 14CO2 from labelled glucose in uteri from 5 days pregnant rats. Indomethacin, a well known inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, did not alter the basal glucose metabolism in uteri from 5 days pregnant rats, but antagonized completely the stimulating action of PAF on 14CO2 production from labelled glucose an effect that was partially reverted by the addition of PGE1, PGE2 or PGF2 alpha (10(-7) M). Furthermore, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDHGA), a specific inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase at 10(-5) M, as well as FPL-55712, an antagonist of leukotrienes (LTs), at the same concentration, blocked the action of PAF on the metabolism of glucose. The action of NDHGA was partially counteracted by the addition of LTC4 at 10(-7) M.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2399270

  18. Mechanisms involved in the cell cycle and apoptosis of HT-29 cells pre-treated with MK-886 prior to photodynamic therapy with hypericin.

    PubMed

    Kleban, Ján; Mikes, Jaromír; Horváth, Viktor; Sacková, Veronika; Hofmanová, Jirina; Kozubík, Alois; Fedorocko, Peter

    2008-11-13

    In our previous study we have proved that colon cancer cells HT-29 pre-treated with specific 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor MK-886 became more susceptible to photodynamic therapy (PDT) with hypericin and we also found that this mutual combination induced cell cycle arrest and stimulated onset of apoptosis (Kleban et al., 2007. J. Photochem. Photobiol. B 84, 2). To further explain events associated with MK-886 mediated sensitization of tumor cells toward PDT with hypericin, more detailed study of signaling pathways leading to increase in apoptosis as well as cell cycle perturbations was performed and is presented herein. Intensive accumulation of HT-29 cells in G0/G1 phase of cell cycle led to expression analyses of several G0/G1 checkpoint molecules (cyclin A, cyclin E, cdk-2, pRb). Similarly, accumulation of apoptotic cells invoked analyses of key molecules involved in apoptotic signaling (caspase-3, -8, -9; PARP; Lamin B; Mcl-1; Bax) by Western blotting and caspase activity assay. Long term survival of cells was examined by clonogenicity test. As the effect of PDT is mediated by ROS production, levels of hydrogen peroxides and superoxide anion were monitored by flow cytometric analyses. In addition, an impact of MK-886 on LTB4 production and expression of 5-LOX was monitored. Massive G0/G1 arrest in the cell cycle accompanied by increase in cyclin E level and decrease/absention of cyclin A, cdk-2 and pRb expression indicated incapability for G1/S transition. Minimal changes in cleavage of procaspases observed in cells treated with non-toxic concentrations of either agent alone or their mutual combination were not quite in line with their activity (caspase-3, -8, -9) which was significantly increased mainly in combinations. Treatment with non-toxic concentration of MK-886 had minimal influence over ROS production compared to control cells. In contrast, hypericin alone markedly increased the level of ROS, but no additional effect of MK-886 pre-treatment was detected

  19. Cysteinyl-leukotrienes are released from astrocytes and increase astrocyte proliferation and glial fibrillary acidic protein via cys-LT1 receptors and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, Renata; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Santavenere, Clara; D'Auro, Mariagrazia; Ballerini, Patrizia; Nargi, Eleonora; Buccella, Silvana; Nicosia, Simonetta; Folco, Giancarlo; Caciagli, Francesco; Di Iorio, Patrizia

    2004-09-01

    Cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs), potent mediators in inflammatory diseases, are produced by nervous tissue, but their cellular source and role in the brain are not very well known. In this report we have demonstrated that rat cultured astrocytes express the enzymes (5'-lipoxygenase and LTC(4) synthase) required for cys-LT production, and release cys-LTs in resting condition and, to a greater extent, in response to calcium ionophore A23187, 1 h combined oxygen-glucose deprivation or 2-methyl-thioATP, a selective P2Y(1)/ATP receptor agonist. MK-886, a LT synthesis inhibitor, prevented basal and evoked cys-LT release. In addition, 2-methyl-thioATP-induced cys-LT release was abolished by suramin, a P2 receptor antagonist, or by inhibitors of ATP binding cassette proteins involved in cys-LT release. We also showed that astrocytes express cys-LT(1) and not cys-LT(2) receptors. The stimulation of these receptors by LTD(4) activated the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. This effect was: (i) insensitive to inhibitors of receptor-coupled Gi protein (pertussis toxin) or tyrosine kinase receptors (genistein); (ii) abolished by MK-571, a cys-LT(1) selective receptor antagonist, or PD98059, a MAPK inhibitor; (iii) reduced by inhibitors of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (KN-93), Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent (GF102903X) or Ca(2+)-dependent (Gö6976) protein kinase C isoforms. LTD(4) also increased astrocyte proliferation and glial fibrillary acidic protein content, which are considered hallmarks of reactive astrogliosis. Both effects were counteracted by cell pretreatment with MK-571 or PD98059. Thus, cys-LTs released from astrocytes might play an autocrine role in the induction of reactive astrogliosis that, in brain injuries, contributes to the formation of a reparative glial scar. PMID:15355318

  20. INHIBITORY AND MECHANISTIC INVESTIGATIONS OF OXO-LIPIDS WITH HUMAN LIPOXYGENASE ISOZYMES

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Michelle M.; Diaz, Giovanni; Kenyon, Victor; Holman, Theodore R.

    2014-01-01

    Oxo-lipids, a large family of oxidized human lipoxygenase (hLOX) products, are of increasing interest to researchers due to their involvement in different inflammatory responses in the cell. Oxo-lipids are unique because they contain electrophilic sites that can potentially form covalent bonds through a Michael addition mechanism with nucleophilic residues in protein active sites and thus increase inhibitor potency. Due to the resemblance of oxo-lipids to LOX substrates, the inhibitor potency of 4 different oxo-lipids; 5-oxo-6,8,11,14-(E,Z,Z,Z)-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-oxo-ETE), 15-oxo-5,8,11,13-(Z,Z,Z,E)-eicosatetraenoic acid (15-oxo-ETE), 12-oxo-5,8,10,14-(Z,Z,E,Z)-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-oxo-ETE), and 13-oxo-9,11-(Z,E)-octadecadienoic acid (13-oxo-ODE) were determined against a library of LOX isozymes; leukocyte 5-lipoxygenase (h5-LOX), human reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LOX-1), human platelet 12-lipoxygenase (h12-LOX), human epithelial 15-lipoxygenase-2 (h15-LOX-2), soybean 15-lipoxygenase-1 (s15-LOX-1), and rabbit reticulocyte 15-LOX (r15-LOX). 15-oxo-ETE exhibited the highest potency against h12-LOX, with an IC50 = 1 ± 0.1 μM and was highly selective. Steady state inhibition kinetic experiments determined 15-oxo-ETE to be a mixed inhibitor against h12-LOX, with a Kic value of 0.087 ± 0.008 μM and a Kiu value of 2.10 ± 0.8 μM. Time-dependent studies demonstrated irreversible inhibition with 12-oxo-ETE and h15-LOX-1, however, the concentration of 12-oxo-ETE required (Ki = 36.8 ± 13.2 μM) and the time frame (k2 = 0.0019 ± .00032 s−1) were not biologically relevant. These data are the first observations that oxo-lipids can inhibit LOX isozymes and may be another mechanism in which LOX products regulate LOX activity. PMID:24924423

  1. Structural requirements for activation of the 5-oxo-6E,8Z, 11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-oxo-ETE) receptor: identification of a mead acid metabolite with potent agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pranav; Cossette, Chantal; Anumolu, Jaganmohan R; Gravel, Sylvie; Lesimple, Alain; Mamer, Orval A; Rokach, Joshua; Powell, William S

    2008-05-01

    The 5-lipoxygenase product 5-oxo-6E,8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-oxo-ETE) is a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils and eosinophils, and its actions are mediated by the oxoeicosanoid (OXE) receptor, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family. To define the requirements for activation of the OXE receptor, we have synthesized a series of 5-oxo-6E,8Z-dienoic acids with chain lengths between 12 and 20 carbons, as well as a series of 20-carbon 5-oxo fatty acids, either fully saturated or containing between one and five double bonds. The effects of these compounds on neutrophils (calcium mobilization, CD11b expression, and cell migration) and eosinophils (actin polymerization) were compared with those of 5-oxo-ETE. The C12 and C14 analogs were without appreciable activity, whereas the C16 5-oxo-dienoic acid was a weak partial agonist. In contrast, the corresponding C18 analog (5-oxo-18:2) was nearly as potent as 5-oxo-ETE. Among the C20 analogs, the fully saturated compound had virtually no activity, whereas 5-oxo-6E-eicosenoic acid had only weak agonist activity. In contrast, 5-oxo-6E,8Z,11Z-eicosatrienoic acid (5-oxo-20:3) and its 8-trans isomer were approximately equipotent with 5-oxo-ETE in activating granulocytes. Because of the potent effects of 5-oxo-20:3, we investigated its formation from Mead acid (5Z,8Z,11Z-eicosatrienoic acid), which accumulates in dietary essential fatty acid deficiency, by neutrophils. The main Mead acid metabolite identified was 5-hydroxy-6,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid, followed by 5-oxo-20:3 and two 6-trans isomers of leukotriene B(3). We conclude that optimal activation of the OXE receptor is achieved with 5-oxo-ETE, 5-oxo-18:2, and 5-oxo-20:3, and that the latter compound could potentially be formed under conditions of essential fatty acid deficiency. PMID:18292294

  2. Synthesis and bioactivity of novel caffeic acid esters from Zuccagnia punctata.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, M S; Subbaraju, G V

    2006-12-01

    Synthesis of novel caffeic acid esters (1 and 2) was accomplished starting from appropriately substituted benzaldehydes (3 and 9). While compound 2 exhibited potent anti-oxidative activity in both the nitroblue tetrazolium and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging models, compound 1 showed moderate 5-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity. PMID:17145655

  3. Substance P primes lipoteichoic acid- and Pam3CysSerLys4-mediated activation of human mast cells by up-regulating Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Tancowny, Brian P; Karpov, Victor; Schleimer, Robert P; Kulka, Marianna

    2010-10-01

    Substance P (SP) is a neuropeptide with neuroimmunoregulatory activity that may play a role in susceptibility to infection. Human mast cells, which are important in innate immune responses, were analysed for their responses to pathogen-associated molecules via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the presence of SP. Human cultured mast cells (LAD2) were activated by SP and TLR ligands including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Pam3CysSerLys4 (Pam3CSK4) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and mast cell leukotriene and chemokine production was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and gene expression by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Mast cell degranulation was determined using a β-hexosaminidase (β-hex) assay. SP treatment of LAD2 up-regulated mRNA for TLR2, TLR4, TLR8 and TLR9 while anti-immunoglobulin E (IgE) stimulation up-regulated expression of TLR4 only. Flow cytometry and western blot confirmed up-regulation of TLR2 and TLR8. Pretreatment of LAD2 with SP followed by stimulation with Pam3CSK4 or LTA increased production of leukotriene C4 (LTC(4) ) and interleukin (IL)-8 compared with treatment with Pam3CSK4 or LTA alone (>2-fold; P<0·01). SP alone activated 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) nuclear translocation but also augmented Pam3CSK4 and LTA-mediated 5-LO translocation. Pam3CSK4, LPS and LTA did not induce LAD2 degranulation. SP primed LTA and Pam3CSK4-mediated activation of JNK, p38 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and activated the nuclear translocation of c-Jun, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) and cyclic-AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) transcription factors. Pretreatment with SP followed by LTA stimulation synergistically induced production of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8)/IL-8, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)/monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-6 protein. SP primes TLR2-mediated activation of human mast cells by up-regulating TLR expression and

  4. Inhibition of in vitro prostaglandin and leukotriene biosyntheses by cinnamoyl-beta-phenethylamine and N-acyldopamine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tseng, C F; Iwakami, S; Mikajiri, A; Shibuya, M; Hanaoka, F; Ebizuka, Y; Padmawinata, K; Sankawa, U

    1992-02-01

    N-trans- and N-cis-Feruloyltyramines were isolated as the inhibitors of in vitro prostaglandin (PG) synthesis from an Indonesian medicinal plant, Ipomoea aquatica (Convolvulaceae). In order to clarify structure activity relationships, cinnamoyl-beta-phenethylamines with possible combinations of naturally occurring cinnamic acids and beta-phenethylamines were synthesized and tested for their inhibitory activities against PG synthetase and arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase. The compounds containing catechol groups such as N-caffeoyl-beta-phenethylamine (CaP) showed higher inhibitory effects on PG synthetase. The catechol group was found to be essential for the inhibition of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase. The investigation of concentration dependent effects on PG biosynthesis revealed that CaP enhanced PG biosynthesis at a lower concentration range, whereas it inhibited the reaction at a higher concentration. The effects of CaP on each reaction step were investigated with purified PG endoperoxide synthase and microsomal PG synthetase. CaP inhibited the cyclooxygenase reaction, while it enhanced the hydroperoxidase reaction. N-Acyldopamines which contain catechol and lipophylic group were synthesized from dopamine and fatty acids to test their inhibitory effects on arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase. N-Linoleoyldopamine was the most active compound and its IC50 value was 2.3 nM in our assay system, in which an IC50 value of AA 861, a specific inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase, was 8 nM. PMID:1606635

  5. Co-administration of 3-Acetyl-11-Keto-Beta-Boswellic Acid Potentiates the Protective Effect of Celecoxib in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Cognitive Impairment in Mice: Possible Implication of Anti-inflammatory and Antiglutamatergic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Aya Shoukry; El Sayed, Nesrine Salah El Dine

    2016-05-01

    Neuro-inflammation is known to initiate the underlying pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders which may progress to cognitive, behavioral, and functional impairment. Boswellia serrata is a well-known powerful anti-inflammatory agent used to treat several inflammatory diseases. The aim of the current study is to investigate the effect of the combination therapy of 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA), a 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitor and celecoxib, and a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor as dual enzyme inhibitors compared to monotherapies with celecoxib and AKBA. Cognitive dysfunction is induced by intraperational injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice. Radial maze, Y maze, and novel object recognition (NOR) were performed to evaluate the possible behavioral changes. Moreover, estimation of glutamate and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), as well as an immunohistochemical investigation of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) was performed to evaluate the molecular changes that followed the LPS or drug treatment. The results showed that the combination therapy of AKBA and celecoxib reversed the behavioral and molecular changes caused by LPS cognitive dysfunction model that predispose cognitive dysfunction in mice. This study showed the effectiveness of the dual therapy with AKBA and celecoxib as anti-inflammatory, antiglutamatergic, and anti-amyloidogenic agents in the management of cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26984336

  6. Isoorientin, a Selective Inhibitor of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) from the Tubers of Pueraria tuberosa.

    PubMed

    Sumalatha, Manne; Munikishore, Rachakunta; Rammohan, Aluru; Gunasekar, Duvvuru; Kumar, Kotha Anil; Reddy, Kakularam Kumar; Azad, Rajaram; Reddanna, Pallu; Bodo, Bernard

    2015-10-01

    Bioassay-guided fraction of the methanol extract of the roots of Pueraria tuberose DC yielded puerarin, an isoflavone C-glycoside (PT-1), isoorientin, a flavone C-glycoside (PT-2) and mangiferin, a xanthone C-glycoside (PT-3). The extracts and the isolated compounds were screened for potent anti-inflammatory components inhibiting the cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), the target enzymes of inflammation, by employing spectroscopic/polorographic methods. Among these, isoorientin was found to be a potent inhibitor of COX-2with an IC50 value of 39 μM. Docking studies were carried out to understand the interactions of isorientin (PT-2) with COX-2.The structures of the isolates were determined by mass spectrometry and 2D-NMR techniques including HSQC, HMBC, NOESY and 1H-1H COSY experiments. Although isoorientin and mangiferin have been reported from several plant sources, this is the first report of their isolation from a Pueraria species. PMID:26669106

  7. [Pyridazino(3,4-c)quinolines and pyridazino(4,5-c)quinolines--synthesis and investigation of lipoxygenase inhibition].

    PubMed

    Görlitzer, K; Fabian, J; Jones, P G; Frohberg, P; Drutkowski, G

    2002-06-01

    The cyclic hemiketone acetal 6 reacts with hydrazine in tert-butanol to yield the 1-amino-2,3-dihydro-2-hydroxy-pyrrole 7, while in acetic acid a mixture of the 1-amino-pyrrole 8 and the 1,4-dihydropyridazine 9 is obtained. The X-ray crystal structure of 9 shows a boat conformation flattened about N-1 with respect to nifedipine. Removing the boc-group of 9 gives the tautomeric 2,5-dihydropyridazine 13. The lactams 15 and 17 and the cyclic hydroxamic acids 16 and 18, respectively, are synthesized from 13 or from its oxidation product 14 using reductive conditions. The cyclic hemiacetal 21 reacts with hydrazine in a different manner from 6. In acetic acid the 1-aminopyrrole 22 is formed, while ethanol yields the 1,4-dihydropyridazine 23. The pyridazine 24, obtained by dehydrogenation of 23, gives the lactam 25 and the hydroxamic acid 26, respectively, when the nitro-group is reduced. The dihydropyridazines 9, 11 and 23 are transformed photochemically to give the nitrosophenyl-pyridazines 19, 20 and 27. The chloro-substituted hydroxamic acid 28 is isolated after treatment of 27 with hydrochloric acid. The stability of the partially saturated pyridazine compounds is discussed on the basis of half wave potentials measured by anodic oxidation by means of differential pulse voltammetry. The tricyclic hydroxamic acids 18 and 28 show only a weak inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX). PMID:12116871

  8. Maternal transcription of non-protein coding RNAs from the PWS-critical region rescues growth retardation in mice.

    PubMed

    Rozhdestvensky, Timofey S; Robeck, Thomas; Galiveti, Chenna R; Raabe, Carsten A; Seeger, Birte; Wolters, Anna; Gubar, Leonid V; Brosius, Jürgen; Skryabin, Boris V

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by loss of paternally expressed genes on chromosome 15q11-q13. The PWS-critical region (PWScr) contains an array of non-protein coding IPW-A exons hosting intronic SNORD116 snoRNA genes. Deletion of PWScr is associated with PWS in humans and growth retardation in mice exhibiting ~15% postnatal lethality in C57BL/6 background. Here we analysed a knock-in mouse containing a 5'HPRT-LoxP-Neo(R) cassette (5'LoxP) inserted upstream of the PWScr. When the insertion was inherited maternally in a paternal PWScr-deletion mouse model (PWScr(p-/m5'LoxP)), we observed compensation of growth retardation and postnatal lethality. Genomic methylation pattern and expression of protein-coding genes remained unaltered at the PWS-locus of PWScr(p-/m5'LoxP) mice. Interestingly, ubiquitous Snord116 and IPW-A exon transcription from the originally silent maternal chromosome was detected. In situ hybridization indicated that PWScr(p-/m5'LoxP) mice expressed Snord116 in brain areas similar to wild type animals. Our results suggest that the lack of PWScr RNA expression in certain brain areas could be a primary cause of the growth retardation phenotype in mice. We propose that activation of disease-associated genes on imprinted regions could lead to general therapeutic strategies in associated diseases. PMID:26848093

  9. Mechanism of antiinflammatory actions of curcumine and boswellic acids.

    PubMed

    Ammon, H P; Safayhi, H; Mack, T; Sabieraj, J

    1993-03-01

    Curcumine from Curcuma longa and the gum resin of Boswellia serrata, which were demonstrated to act as anti-inflammatories in in vivo animal models, were studied in a set of in vitro experiments in order to elucidate the mechanism of their beneficial effects. Curcumine inhibited the 5-lipoxygenase activity in rat peritoneal neutrophils as well as the 12-lipoxygenase and the cyclooxygenase activities in human platelets. In a cell free peroxidation system curcumine exerted strong antioxidative activity. Thus, its effects on the dioxygenases are probably due to its reducing capacity. Boswellic acids were isolated from the gum resin of Boswellia serrata and identified as the active principles. Boswellic acids inhibited the leukotriene synthesis via 5-lipoxygenase, but did not affect the 12-lipoxygenase and the cyclooxygenase activities. Additionally, boswellic acids did not impair the peroxidation of arachidonic acid by iron and ascorbate. The data suggest that boswellic acids are specific, non-redox inhibitors of leukotriene synthesis either interacting directly with 5-lipoxygenase or blocking its translocation. PMID:8510458

  10. Active-R filter

    DOEpatents

    Soderstrand, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational amplifier-type active filter in which the only capacitor in the circuit is the compensating capacitance of the operational amplifiers, the various feedback and coupling elements being essentially solely resistive.

  11. Research Article Flavocoxid Protects Against Cadmium-Induced Disruption of the Blood-Testis Barrier and Improves Testicular Damage and Germ Cell Impairment in Mice.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Micali, Antonio; Pisani, Antonina; Puzzolo, Domenico; Bitto, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Pizzino, Gabriele; Irrera, Natasha; Galfo, Federica; Arena, Salvatore; Pallio, Giovanni; Mecchio, Anna; Germanà, Antonino; Bruschetta, Daniele; Laurà, Rosaria; Magno, Carlo; Marini, Herbert; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) causes male infertility. There is the need to identify safe treatments counteracting this toxicity. Flavocoxid is a flavonoid that induces a balanced inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 peroxidase moieties and of 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) and has efficacy in the male genitourinary system. We investigated flavocoxid effects on Cd-induced testicular toxicity in mice. Swiss mice were divided into 4 groups: 2 control groups received 0.9% NaCl (vehicle; 1 ml/kg/day) or flavocoxid (20 mg/kg/day ip); 2 groups were challenged with cadmium chloride (CdCl2; 2 mg/kg/day ip) and administered with vehicle or flavocoxid. The treatment lasted for 1 or 2 weeks. The testes were processed for biochemical and morphological studies. CdCl2 increased phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) 1/2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, COX-2, 5-LOX, malondialdehyde (MDA), B-cell-lymphoma (Bcl)-2-associated X protein (Bax), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), transforming growth factor (TGF) -β3, decreased Bcl-2, testosterone, inhibin-B, occludin, N-Cadherin, induced structural damages in the testis and disrupted the blood-testis barrier. Many TUNEL-positive germ cells and changes in claudin-11, occludin, and N-cadherin localization were present. Flavocoxid administration reduced, in a time-dependent way, p-ERK 1/2, TNF-α, COX-2, 5-LOX, MDA, Bax, FSH, LH, TGF-β3, augmented Bcl-2, testosterone, inhibin B, occludin, N-Cadherin, and improved the structural organization of the testis and the blood-testis barrier. Few TUNEL-positive germ cells were present and a morphological retrieval of the intercellular junctions was observed. In conclusion, flavocoxid has a protective anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiapoptotic function against Cd-induced toxicity in mice testis. We suggest that flavocoxid may play a relevant positive role against environmental levels of Cd, otherwise deleterious to gametogenesis and tubular integrity. PMID

  12. Growth inhibitory effect of KYKZL-1 on Hep G{sub 2} cells via inhibition of AA metabolites and caspase-3 pathway and cell cycle arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jing; Du, Yi-Fang; Xiao, Zhi-Yi; Pan, Li-Li; Li, Wei; Huan, Lin; Gong, Zhu-Nan; Wei, Shao-Hua; Huang, Shi-Qian; Xun, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Chang, Lei-Lei; Xie, Meng-Yu; Ao, Gui-Zhen; Cai, Jie; Qiu, Ting; Wu, Hao; Sun, Ting; Xu, Guang-Lin

    2014-01-01

    KYKZL-1, a newly synthesized compound with COX/5-LOX dual inhibition, was subjected to the inhibitory activity test on Hep G{sub 2} growth. We found that KYKZL-1 inhibited the growth of Hep G{sub 2} cells via inducing apoptosis. Further studies showed that KYKZL-1 activated caspase-3 through cytochrome c release from mitochondria and down regulation of Bcl-2/Bax ratio and reduced the high level of COX-2 and 5-LOX. As shown in its anti-inflammatory effect, KYKZL-1 also exhibited inhibitory effect on the PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4} production in Hep G{sub 2} cells. Accordingly, exogenous addition of PGE{sub 2} or LTB{sub 4} reversed the decreases in cell viability. In addition, KYKZL-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the S–G{sub 2} checkpoint via the activation of p21{sup CIP1} protein and down-regulation of cyclin A expression. These data indicate that the growth inhibitory effect of KYKZL-1 is associated with inhibition of AA metabolites and caspase-3 pathway and cell cycle arrest. Combined with our previous findings, KYKZL-1 exhibiting COX/5-LOX inhibition may be a promising potential agent not only for inflammation control but also for cancer prevention/therapy with an enhanced gastric safety profile. - Highlights: • KYKZL-1 is designed to exhibit COX/5-LOX dual inhibition. • KYKZL-1 resulted in apoptosis of Hep G{sub 2} cells. • KYKZL-1 activated caspase-3 through cytochrome c and bcl-2/bax ratio. • KYKZL-1 caused cell cycle arrest via modulation of p21{sup CIP1} and cyclin A level.

  13. Triblock Conjugates: Identification of a Highly Potent Antiinflammatory Agent.

    PubMed

    Singh, Palwinder; Kaur, Jagroop; Singh, Gurjit; Bhatti, Rajbir

    2015-08-13

    Rationally designed conjugates of chrysin, indole, and barbituric acid were synthesized and screened for their antiinflammatory activities through in vitro and in vivo experiments. Improved over the previously reported chrysin-indole-pyrazole conjugates and also in comparison to the chrysin, indole, and barbituric acid based COX-2 inhibitors, the new compounds have displayed significantly better IC50 for COX-2 and some of them also exhibited inhibition of 5-LOX enzyme. For one of the test compounds, IC50 for COX-2 and 5-LOX was 1 and 1.5 nM, respectively. Investigations of Swiss Albino mice through capsaicin induced paw lickings and dextran induced inflammation showed that these compounds possess appreciable analgesic and antiinflammatory activities. Ki, Ka, and ΔG for the enzyme-compound interaction were calculated and found to be in agreement with the biological data. The experimental results were supported by the molecular docking studies of the compounds in the active site of COX-2 and 5-LOX. Overall, a highly promising antiinflammatory agent was identified. PMID:26204057

  14. Physical activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001941.htm Physical activity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Physical activity -- which includes an active lifestyle and routine exercise -- ...

  15. Activation detector

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane William [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material lacking a photoluminescent material and generating a by-product of a radioactive decay due to the activator impinging the reeptor material. The method further including, generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect and identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the light.

  16. D-002 (Beeswax Alcohols): Concurrent Joint Health Benefits and Gastroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Vivian; Mas, R.; Carbajal, D.

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs include the traditional drugs and more selective COX-2 inhibitors. Traditional nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use is hampered by their gastrotoxicity, while COX-2-inhibitors increase the cardiovascular risk. The search of safer substances for managing inflammatory conditions is updated, a challenge wherein dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors have a place. This review summarizes the benefits of D-002, a mixture of higher aliphatic beeswax alcohols, on joint health and gastric mucosa. D-002 elicits gastroprotection through a multiple mechanism that involves the increased secretion and improved quality of the gastric mucus, the reduction of hydroxyl radical, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, neutrophil infiltration and the increase of antioxidant enzymes on the gastric mucosa. Consistently, D-002 inhibits NSAIDs, ethanol, pylorus-ligation and acetic acid-induced gastric ulceration in rats, and has reduced gastrointestinal symptoms in clinical studies. Early results found that D-002 was effective in the cotton pellet-induced granuloma and carrageenan-induced pleurisy model in rats, lowering pleural leukotriene B4 levels without causing gastrointestinal ulceration. However, D-002 effects on inflammation received little attention for years. Recent data have shown that D-002 inhibited both COX and 5-LOX activities with a greater affinity for 5-LOX and could act as a dual COX/5-LOX inhibitor. This mechanism might explain efficacy in experimental inflammatory and osteoarthritic models as well as clinical efficacy in osteoarthritic patients while supporting the lack of D-002 gastrotoxicity, but not the gastroprotective effects, which appear to be due to multiple mechanisms. In summary oral D-002 intake could help manage inflammatory conditions that impair joint health, while offering gastroprotection. PMID:26009643

  17. Isolation from Cussonia barteri of 1'-O-chlorogenoylchlorogenic acid and 1'-O-chlorogenoylneochlorogenic acid, a new type of quinic acid esters.

    PubMed

    Papajewski, S; Vogler, B; Conrad, J; Klaiber, I; Roos, G; Walter, C U; Süssmuth, R; Kraus, W

    2001-11-01

    1'-O-Chlorogenoylchlorogenic acid and 1'-O-chlorogenoylneochlorogenic acid, a new type of quinic acid esters, have been isolated, in addition to six known quinic acid esters, rutin, and a mixture of saponins, from the methanol extract of Cussonia barteri Seemann (Araliaceae) leaves collected in Cameroon. Structure determination was achieved by NMR, mass, IR, and UV spectroscopy. All compounds were tested for inhibitory activity on 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase-1, for antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Cladosporium cucumerinum, and for haemolytic activity. PMID:11731915

  18. Active turbulence in active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, S. P.; Yeomans, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Dense, active systems show active turbulence, a state characterised by flow fields that are chaotic, with continually changing velocity jets and swirls. Here we review our current understanding of active turbulence. The development is primarily based on the theory and simulations of active liquid crystals, but with accompanying summaries of related literature.

  19. Physical activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... time they spend watching TV and using a computer and other electronic devices. All of these activities ... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans: Recommendation ... Page last updated: ...

  20. Activity Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerpelman, Larry C.; Weiner, Michael J.

    This twenty-four item scale assesses students' actual and desired political-social activism in terms of physical participation, communication activities, and information-gathering activities. About ten minutes are required to complete the instrument. The scale is divided into two subscales. The first twelve items (ACT-A) question respondents on…

  1. Specificity of an HPETE peroxidase from rat PMN

    SciTech Connect

    Skoog, M.T.; Nichols, J.S.; Harrison, B.L.; Wiseman, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    The 15,000xg supernatant of sonicated rat PMN contains 5-lipoxygenase that converts arachidonic acid to 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE) and leukotriene A4 and an HPETE peroxidase that catalyzes reduction of the 5-HPETE. The specificity of this HPETE peroxidase for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors has been characterized to distinguish this enzyme from other peroxidase activities. In addition to 5-HPETE, the HPETE peroxidase will catalyze reduction of 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid, and 15-hydroperoxy-8,11,13-eicosatrienoic acid, but not cumene or t-butylhydroperoxides. The HPETE peroxidase accepted 5 of 11 thiols tested as reducing agents. However, glutathione is greater than 15 times more effective than any other thiol tested. Other reducing agents, ascorbate, NADH, NADPH, phenol, p-cresol, and homovanillic acid, were not accepted by HPETE peroxidase. This enzyme is not inhibited by 10 mM KCN, 2 mM aspirin, 2 mM salicylic acid, or 0.5 mM indomethacin. When 5-(14C)HPETE is generated from (14C)arachidonic acid in the presence of unlabeled 5-HPETE and the HPETE peroxidase, the 5-(14C)HETE produced is of much lower specific activity than the (14C)arachidonic acid. This indicates that the 5-(14C)HPETE leaves the active site of 5-lipoxygenase and mixes with the unlabeled 5-HPETE in solution prior to reduction and is a kinetic demonstration that 5-lipoxygenase has no peroxidase activity. Specificity for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors differentiates HPETE peroxidase from glutathione peroxidase, phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase, a 12-HPETE peroxidase, and heme peroxidases. The HPETE peroxidase could be a glutathione S-transferase selective for fatty acid hydroperoxides.

  2. Active ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, L.; Costanzo, A.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze self-propelling organisms, or active particles, in a periodic asymmetric potential. Unlike standard ratchet effect for Brownian particles requiring external forcing, in the case of active particles asymmetric potential alone produces a net drift speed (active ratchet effect). By using theoretical models and numerical simulations we demonstrate the emergence of the rectification process in the presence of an asymmetric piecewise periodic potential. The broken spatial symmetry (external potential) and time symmetry (active particles) are sufficient ingredients to sustain unidirectional transport. Our findings open the way to new mechanisms to move in directional manner motile organisms by using external periodic static fields.

  3. Faculty Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academe, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Blending scholarship and activism, whether domestic or international, takes some real work. Two scholar-activists reflect on why and how activism can be more than academic labor in this feature of the "Academe" journal. This feature includes the following brief reflections on political work, both local and global that demonstrates how on campus…

  4. Indoor Activities

    MedlinePlus

    ... so you can do some lifting while you watch TV. Walk around the house when you talk on the phone. Make an extra trip up and down the stairs when you do the laundry. Download the Tip Sheet Indoor Activities (PDF, 739.53 KB) You Might Also Like Sun Safety Have Fun. Be Active with Your Dog! ...

  5. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  6. Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Independent School District 275, Minn.

    Twenty-four activities suitable for outdoor use by elementary school children are outlined. Activities designed to make children aware of their environment include soil painting, burr collecting, insect and pond water collecting, studies of insect galls and field mice, succession studies, and a model of natural selection using dyed toothpicks. A…

  7. Astronomy Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid

    This document consists of activities and references for teaching astronomy. The activities (which include objectives, list of materials needed, and procedures) focus on: observing the Big Dipper and locating the North Star; examining the Big Dipper's stars; making and using an astrolabe; examining retograde motion of Mars; measuring the Sun's…

  8. Activated Charcoal

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACTIVATED CHARCOAL are as follows:Trapping chemicals to stop some types of poisoning when used as a ... Charbon Végétal, Charbon Végétal Activé, Charcoal, Gas Black, Lamp Black, Medicinal Charcoal, Noir de Gaz, Noir de ...

  9. Activated Charcoal

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat poisonings, reduce intestinal gas (flatulence), lower cholesterol levels, prevent hangover, and treat bile ... lower cholesterol levels in the blood. Decreasing gas (flatulence). Some studies show that activated charcoal is effective ...

  10. Activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alfassi, Z.B. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains 16 chapters on the application of activation analysis in the fields of life sciences, biological materials, coal and its effluents, environmental samples, archaeology, material science, and forensics. Each chapter is processed separately for the data base.

  11. Get Active

    MedlinePlus

    ... section Health Conditions 4 of 10 sections Take Action! Take Action: How Active Are You? First, think about your ... section Learn More 5 of 10 sections Take Action: Get Started I’m just getting started. Start ...

  12. Arachidonic acid metabolism in silica-stimulated bovine alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Englen, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro production of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites in adherent bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) incubated with silica was investigated. BAM were pre-labelled with {sup 3}H-AA, and lipid metabolites released into the culture medium were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was simultaneously assayed to provide an indication of cell injury. Increasing doses of silica selectively stimulated the 5-lipoxygenase pathway of AA metabolism, while cyclooxygenase metabolite output was suppressed. LDH release increased in a linear, dose-dependent fashion over the range of silica doses used. Moreover, within 15 min following addition of a high silica dose, a shift to the production of 5-lipoxygenase metabolites occurred, accompanied by a reduction in cyclooxygenase products. This rapid alteration in AA metabolism preceded cell injury. To examine the relationship between cytotoxicity and AA metabolite release by BAM exposed to silicas with different cytotoxic and fibrogenic activities, BAM were exposed to different doses of DQ-12, Minusil-5, and Sigma silicas, and carbonyl iron beads. The median effective dose (ED{sub 50}) of each particulate to stimulate the release of AA metabolites and LDH was calculated. The ED{sub 50} values for DQ-12, Minusil-5, and Sigma silica showed that the relative cytotoxicities of the different silicas for BAM corresponded to the relative potencies of the silicas to elicit 5-lipoxygenase metabolites from BAM. These results indicate that the cytotoxic, and presumed fibrogenic potential, of a silica is correlated with the potency to stimulate the release of leukotrienes from AM.

  13. Lipoxygenation of arachidonic acid by subcellular preparations from murine keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ziboh, V.A.; Casebolt, T.L.; Marcelo, C.L.; Voorhees, J.J.

    1984-10-01

    In these studies, we examined the possibility that cell-free preparations from murine keratinocytes possess 5-lipoxygenase activity in addition to the well-established cyclooxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid (AA) in these cells. Our data demonstrated that the high-speed (105,000 g) supernatant preparations of the murine keratinocytes metabolized (14C)AA into labeled lipoxygenase products. Portions of these radioactive metabolites cochromatographed and comigrated with 12-HETE (a marker for 12-lipoxygenase pathway) and with authentic LTB4 (a marker for 5-lipoxygenase pathway) on silicic acid column chromatography and by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) in two solvent systems respectively. Identity of the novel 14C which comigrated with LTB4 on both TLC and column chromatography was verified further by cochromatography of the free acid with authentic LTB4 on a reverse phase (RP) and the methyl esters on a straight phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. Incubation of the cell-free preparations with (14C)AA in the presence of ETYA, NDGA (inhibitors of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways) as well as with 15-HETE (an inhibitor of lipoxygenase pathway) resulted in decreased formation of (14C) 12-HETE and the (14C)LTB4-like metabolite. On the contrary, incubations of the cell-free extracts with (14C) AA in the presence of indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor) resulted in increased biosynthesis of the labeled lipoxygenase metabolites. These data indicate the existence of enzymes in soluble fraction of murine keratinocyte which can catalyze the transformation of (14C) AA into products of both the 12- and 5-lipoxygenase pathways.

  14. Integrin activation

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion is important for development, immune responses, hemostasis and wound healing. Integrins also function as signal transducing receptors that can control intracellular pathways that regulate cell survival, proliferation, and cell fate. Conversely, cells can modulate the affinity of integrins for their ligands a process operationally defined as integrin activation. Analysis of activation of integrins has now provided a detailed molecular understanding of this unique form of “inside-out” signal transduction and revealed new paradigms of how transmembrane domains (TMD) can transmit long range allosteric changes in transmembrane proteins. Here, we will review how talin and mediates integrin activation and how the integrin TMD can transmit these inside out signals. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(12): 655-659] PMID:25388208

  15. Active Cytokinins

    PubMed Central

    Mornet, René; Theiler, Jane B.; Leonard, Nelson J.; Schmitz, Ruth Y.; Moore, F. Hardy; Skoog, Folke

    1979-01-01

    Four series of azidopurines have been synthesized and tested for cytokinin activity in the tobacco callus bioassay: 2- and 8-azido-N6-benzyladenines, -N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenines, and -zeatins, and N6-(2- and 4-azidobenzyl)adenines. The compounds having 2-azido substitution on the adenine ring are as active as the corresponding parent compounds, while those with 8-azido substitution are about 10 or more times as active. The 8-azidozeatin, which is the most active cytokinin observed, exhibited higher than minimal detectable activity at 1.2 × 10−5 micromolar, the lowest concentration tested. The shape of the growth curve indicates that even a concentration as low as 5 × 10−6 micromolar would probably be effective. By comparison, the lowest active concentration ever reported for zeatin has been 5 × 10−5 micromolar, representing a sensitivity rarely attained. All of the azido compounds have been submitted to photolysis in aqueous ethanol, and the photoproducts have been detected and identified by low and high resolution mass spectrometry. They are rationalized as products of abstraction and insertion reactions of the intermediate nitrenes. The potential of the major released products as cytokinins was also assessed by bioassay. 2-Azido-N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenine competed with [14C]kinetin for the cytokinin-binding protein isolated from wheat germ. When the azido compound was photolysed in the presence of this protein, its attachment effectively blocked the binding of [14C]kinetin. PMID:16661017

  16. Get Active

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lifting small weights – you can even use bottled water or cans of food as weights Watch these videos for muscle strengthening exercises to do at home or at the gym. If you do muscle-strengthening activities with weights, check out the do’s and don’ ...

  17. Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Tom, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a flow chart for naming inorganic compounds. Although it is not necessary for students to memorize rules, preliminary skills needed before using the chart are outlined. Also presents an activity in which the mass of an imaginary atom is determined using lead shot, Petri dishes, and a platform balance. (JN)

  18. Activated Sludge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, F. Michael

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. This review covers: (1) activated sludge process; (2) process control; (3) oxygen uptake and transfer; (4) phosphorus removal; (5) nitrification; (6) industrial wastewater; and (7) aerobic digestion. A list of 136 references is also presented. (HM)

  19. Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  20. Laboratory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  1. Hepatoprotective Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The liver performs a vital role in metabolism, secretion, storage, and detoxification of endogenous and exogenous substances. Oxidative stress and free radicals enhance the severity of hepatic damage, which can be overcome by the antioxidant mechanism. Plant extracts can be the best source of such antioxidants and mediate hepatoprotective activity. In this chapter, high-dose paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity in rat model is discussed with explanations of biochemical and histopathological studies. PMID:26939279

  2. Analgesic Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Analgesics are agents which selectively relieve pain by acting in the CNS and peripheral pain mediators without changing consciousness. Analgesics may be narcotic or non-narcotic. The study of pain in animals raises ethical, philosophical, and technical problems. Both peripheral and central pain models are included to make the test more evident for the analgesic property of the plant. This chapter highlights methods such as hot plate and formalin and acetic acid-induced pain models to check the analgesic activity of medicinal plants. PMID:26939272

  3. Active Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Edmund J.

    An active sonar system is one in which pulses of acoustic energy are launched into the water for the purpose of producing echoes. By examining the echoes of transmitted pulses, it affords the capability of both detecting the presence of and estimating the range, and in certain cases, the bearing, of an underwater target. In its most common arrangement, the transmitter (or projector) and the receiver are colocated. This is known as the monostatic configuration and is depicted in Figure 1. When this is not so, it is known as a bistatic or multistatic configuration.

  4. Active packaging with antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van Long, N; Joly, Catherine; Dantigny, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    There have been many reviews concerned with antimicrobial food packaging, and with the use of antifungal compounds, but none provided an exhaustive picture of the applications of active packaging to control fungal spoilage. Very recently, many studies have been done in these fields, therefore it is timely to review this topic. This article examines the effects of essential oils, preservatives, natural products, chemical fungicides, nanoparticles coated to different films, and chitosan in vitro on the growth of moulds, but also in vivo on the mould free shelf-life of bread, cheese, and fresh fruits and vegetables. A short section is also dedicated to yeasts. All the applications are described from a microbiological point of view, and these were sorted depending on the name of the species. Methods and results obtained are discussed. Essential oils and preservatives were ranked by increased efficacy on mould growth. For all the tested molecules, Penicillium species were shown more sensitive than Aspergillus species. However, comparison between the results was difficult because it appeared that the efficiency of active packaging depended greatly on the environmental factors of food such as water activity, pH, temperature, NaCl concentration, the nature, the size, and the mode of application of the films, in addition to the fact that the amount of released antifungal compounds was not constant with time. PMID:26803804

  5. Active tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This study is part of a series of Studies in Geophysics that have been undertaken for the Geophysics Research Forum by the Geophysics Study Committee. One purpose of each study is to provide assessments from the scientific community to aid policymakers in decisions on societal problems that involve geophysics. An important part of such assessments is an evaluation of the adequacy of current geophysical knowledge and the appropriateness of current research programs as a source of information required for those decisions. The study addresses our current scientific understanding of active tectonics --- particularly the patterns and rates of ongoing tectonic processes. Many of these processes cannot be described reasonably using the limited instrumental or historical records; however, most can be described adequately for practical purposes using the geologic record of the past 500,000 years. A program of fundamental research focusing especially on Quaternary tectonic geology and geomorphology, paleoseismology, neotectonics, and geodesy is recommended to better understand ongoing, active tectonic processes. This volume contains 16 papers. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Database.

  6. Amelioration of inflammation by phenolic rich methanolic extract of Ocimum sanctum Linn. leaves in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, S; John, Febi; Indira, M

    2015-10-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Oxidative stress and inflammation play vital role in the development of MI. The Indian basil or Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum Linn.), owing to its antioxidant potential, is used in the traditional system of Indian medicine to treat various disorders. We evaluated methanolic extract of O. sanctum (Tulsi) leaves on inflammation in isoproterenol (ISP) induced MI in rats. ISP-induced MI increased the levels of cardiac markers, phospholipases and phospholipid content. However, the same were reduced on pre-treatment with methanolic extract of O. sanctum leaves. The activities of 5-lipoxygenase and cycloxygenase-2 and levels of leukotriene B4 and thromboxane B2 were also elevated in ISP-treated rats, which were significantly decreased (P < 0.001) in extract pre-treated rats. The enhanced mRNA expressions of nuclear factor kappa-B, 5-lipoxygenase activating protein and receptor for leukotriene B4 on MI induction, were considerably reduced (P < 0.001) on extract pre-treatment. Histopathological analysis also confirmed the findings. The results also revealed the high phenolic content of methanolic extract of O. sanctum leaves. The study demonstrated that methanolic extract of Tulsi leaves can decrease inflammation in the cardiac tissue of ISP-induced MI in rats and its effect may be through downregulation of oxidative stress and arachidonic acid pathway. This cardioprotective effect may be due to the high phenolic content of methanolic extract of O. sanctum leaves. PMID:26665293

  7. DAVIC activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    1995-12-01

    DAVIC (Digital Audio Visual Council) is the defacto standardization organization established in Mar. 1994, based on international consensus for digital audio visual services. After completion of MPEG2 standardization, the broadcasting industry, the communication industry, the computer industry, and consumer electronics industry have started development of concrete services and products. Especially the interactive digital audio visual services, such as Video On Demand (VOD) or Near Video On Demand (NVOD), have become hot topics all over the world. Such interactive digital audio visual services are combined technologies of multi-media coding, digital transmission and computer networking. Therefore more than 150 organizations from all industry sectors have participated in DAVIC and are contributing from their own industrial contexts. DAVIC's basic policy is to use the available technologies specified by the other standards bodies as much as possible. So DAVIC's standardization activities have close relationship with ISO IEC/JTC1/SC29, ITU-T SG 9, ATM-Forum, IETF, IMA, DVB, etc. DAVIC is trying to specify Applications, Reference Models, Security, Usage Information Control, and the interfaces and protocols among the Content Provider, the Server, the core network, the access network, and the Set Top Unit. DAVIC's first goal is to specify DAVIC1.0 based on CFP1 (Call for Proposal) and CFP2 by Dec. 1995, and the next direction is under preparation for further progress based on CFP3 and CFP4.

  8. Activities update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gerald A.

    1994-07-01

    The present report is an update on activities for the second year of funding. Research leading to a detailed characterization of antiproton annihilation in nuclei has resulted in a published analysis of fast deuteron production from carbon and uranium targets. This follows previously reported work and publications by our group on gamma-ray, neutral and charged pion, proton, and neutron production. The deuteron measurements are important to our SHIVA Star antiproton- catalyzed microfission experiment at the Phillips Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, in that they help constrain theoretical models of light nuclei production and subsequent energy deposition in the target. Work continues at SHIVA Star on working fluid formation and target compression for the microfission experiment. Excellent progress has been made, both theoretically and experimentally, on these important aspects of the experiment. The Penn State group, working in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory physicists, trapped and held up to 721,000 antiprotons per beam injection pulse from the LEAR accelerator during July, 1993. This was a crucial step to the ultimate goal of transferring large numbers of antiprotons to the Phillips Laboratory for the antiproton-catalyzed microfission experiment.

  9. Active Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ajay; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2009-01-01

    The human visual system observes and understands a scene/image by making a series of fixations. Every fixation point lies inside a particular region of arbitrary shape and size in the scene which can either be an object or just a part of it. We define as a basic segmentation problem the task of segmenting that region containing the fixation point. Segmenting the region containing the fixation is equivalent to finding the enclosing contour- a connected set of boundary edge fragments in the edge map of the scene - around the fixation. This enclosing contour should be a depth boundary. We present here a novel algorithm that finds this bounding contour and achieves the segmentation of one object, given the fixation. The proposed segmentation framework combines monocular cues (color/intensity/texture) with stereo and/or motion, in a cue independent manner. The semantic robots of the immediate future will be able to use this algorithm to automatically find objects in any environment. The capability of automatically segmenting objects in their visual field can bring the visual processing to the next level. Our approach is different from current approaches. While existing work attempts to segment the whole scene at once into many areas, we segment only one image region, specifically the one containing the fixation point. Experiments with real imagery collected by our active robot and from the known databases 1 demonstrate the promise of the approach. PMID:20686671

  10. IASS Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojaev, Alisher S.; Ibragimova, Elvira M.

    2015-08-01

    It’s well known, astronomy in Uzbekistan has ancient roots and traditions (e.g., Mirzo Ulugh Beg, Abū al-Rayhān al-Bīrūnī, Abū ‘Abdallāh al-Khwārizmī) and astronomical heritage carefully preserved. Nowadays uzbek astronomers play a key role in scientific research but also in OAD and Decadal Plan activity in the Central Asia region. International Aerospace School (IASS) is an amazing and wonderful event held annually about 30 years. IASS is unique project in the region, and at the beginning we spent the Summer and Winter Schools. At present in the summer camp we gather about 50 teenage and undergraduate students over the country and abroad (France, Malaysia, Turkey, Azerbaijan, Pakistan, Russia, etc.). They are selected on the basis of tests of astronomy and space issues. During two weeks of IASS camp the invited scientists, cosmonauts and astronauts as well as other specialists give lectures and engage in practical exercises with IASS students in astronomy, including daily observations of the Sun and night sky observations with meniscus telescope, space research and exploration, aerospace modelling, preparation and presentation of original projects. This is important that IASS gives not theoretical grounds only but also practically train the students and the hands-on training is the major aims of IASS. Lectures and practice in the field of astronomy carried out with the direct involvement and generous assistance of Uranoscope Association (Paris, France). The current 26-th IASS is planned to held in July 2015.

  11. ALOX5AP Overexpression in Adipose Tissue Leads to LXA4 Production and Protection Against Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ivet; Ferré, Tura; Vilà, Laia; Muñoz, Sergio; Casellas, Alba; Garcia, Miquel; Molas, Maria; Agudo, Judith; Roca, Carles; Ruberte, Jesús; Bosch, Fatima; Franckhauser, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Eicosanoids, such as leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and lipoxin A4 (LXA4), may play a key role during obesity. While LTB4 is involved in adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance, LXA4 may exert anti-inflammatory effects and alleviate hepatic steatosis. Both lipid mediators derive from the same pathway, in which arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) and its partner, arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (ALOX5AP), are involved. ALOX5 and ALOX5AP expression is increased in humans and rodents with obesity and insulin resistance. We found that transgenic mice overexpressing ALOX5AP in adipose tissue had higher LXA4 rather than higher LTB4 levels, were leaner, and showed increased energy expenditure, partly due to browning of white adipose tissue (WAT). Upregulation of hepatic LXR and Cyp7a1 led to higher bile acid synthesis, which may have contributed to increased thermogenesis. In addition, transgenic mice were protected against diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and inflammation. Finally, treatment of C57BL/6J mice with LXA4, which showed browning of WAT, strongly suggests that LXA4 is responsible for the transgenic mice phenotype. Thus, our data support that LXA4 may hold great potential for the future development of therapeutic strategies for obesity and related diseases. PMID:27207555

  12. Novel in vitro inhibitory functions of potato tuber proteinaceous inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias; Kuckenberg, Markus; Kastilan, Robin; Muth, Jost; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2015-02-01

    Plant protease inhibitors are a structurally highly diverse and ubiquitous class of small proteins, which play various roles in plant development and defense against pests and pathogens. Particular isoforms inhibit in vitro proteases and other enzymes that are not their natural substrates, for example proteases that have roles in human diseases. Mature potato tubers are a rich source of several protease inhibitor families. Different cultivars have different inhibitor profiles. With the objective to explore the functional diversity of the natural diversity of potato protease inhibitors, we randomly selected and sequenced 9,600 cDNA clones originated from mature tubers of ten potato cultivars. Among these, 120 unique inhibitor cDNA clones were identified by homology searches. Eighty-eight inhibitors represented novel sequence variants of known plant protease inhibitor families. Most frequent were Kunitz-type inhibitors (KTI), potato protease inhibitors I and II (PIN), pectin methylesterase inhibitors, metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitors and defensins. Twenty-three inhibitors were functionally characterized after heterologous expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The purified recombinant proteins were tested for inhibitory activity on trypsin, eleven pharmacological relevant proteases and the non-proteolytic enzyme 5-lipoxygenase. Members of the KTI and PIN families inhibited pig pancreas elastase, β-Secretase, Cathepsin K, HIV-1 protease and potato 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate in vitro inhibitory diversity of small potato tuber proteins commonly known as protease inhibitors, which might have biotechnological or medical applications. PMID:25260821

  13. Activation Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadeken, Owen

    2002-01-01

    Teaming is so common in today's project management environment that most of us assume it comes naturally. We further assume that when presented with meaningful and challenging work, project teams will naturally engage in productive activity to complete their tasks. This assumption is expressed in the simple (but false) equation: Team + Work = Teamwork. Although this equation appears simple and straightforward, it is far from true for most project organizations whose reality is a complex web of institutional norms based on individual achievement and rewards. This is illustrated by the very first successful team experience from my early Air Force career. As a young lieutenant, I was sent to Squadron Officer School, which was the first in the series of Air Force professional military education courses I was required to complete during my career. We were immediately formed into teams of twelve officers. Much of the course featured competition between these teams. As the most junior member of my team, I quickly observed the tremendous pressure to show individual leadership capability. At one point early in the course, almost everyone in our group was vying to become the team leader. This conflict was so intense that it caused us to fail miserably in our first outdoor team building exercise. We spent so much time fighting over leadership that we were unable to complete any of the events on the outdoor obstacle course. This complete lack of success was so disheartening to me that I gave our team little hope for future success. What followed was a very intense period of bickering, conflict, and even shouting matches as our dysfunctional team tried to cope with our early failures and find some way to succeed. British physician and researcher Wilfred Bion (Experiences in Groups, 1961) discovered that there are powerful psychological forces inherent in all groups that divert from accomplishing their primary tasks. To overcome these restraining forces and use the potential

  14. Differential Contribution of Lipoxygenase Isozymes to Nigrostriatal Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Vivian P.; Holman, Theodore R.

    2012-01-01

    The 5- and 12/15- lipoxygenase (LOX) isozymes have been implicated to contribute to disease development in CNS disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. These LOX isozymes are distinct in function, with differential effects on neuroinflammation, and the impact of the distinct isozymes in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has not as yet been evaluated. To determine whether the isozymes contribute differently to nigrostriatal vulnerability, the effects of 5- and 12/15-LOX deficiency on dopaminergic tone under na ve and toxicant-challenged conditions were tested. In na ve mice deficient in 5-LOX expression, a modest but significant reduction (18.0% reduction vs. wildtype (WT)) in striatal dopamine (DA) was detected (n=6-8 per genotype). A concomitant decline in striatal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) enzyme was also revealed in null 5-LOX vs. WT mice (26.2%); however, no changes in levels of DA or TH immunoreactivity were observed in null 12/15-LOX vs. WT mice. When challenged with the selective dopaminergic toxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), WT mice showed marked reduction in DA (31.9%) and robust astrocytic and microglial activation as compared to saline-treated animals. In contrast, null 5-LOX littermates demonstrated no significant striatal DA depletion or astrogliosis (as noted by Western blot analyses for GFAP immunoreactivity). In na ve null 12/15-LOX mice, no significant change in striatal DA values was observed compared to WT, and following MPTP treatment, the transgenics revealed striatal DA reduction similar to the challenged WT mice. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that: (i) LOX isozymes are involved in the maintenance of normal dopaminergic function in the striatum, and (ii) the 5- and 12/15-LOX isozymes contribute differentially to striatal vulnerability in response to neurotoxicant challenge. PMID:23079635

  15. Physical Activity (Exercise)

    MedlinePlus

    ... fitness. Your fitness routine should include aerobic and strength-training activities, and may also include stretching activities. Aerobic ... Examples include walking, jogging, bicycling, swimming, and tennis. Strength-training activities These activities increase the strength and endurance ...

  16. A Metabolomic Approach to Target Compounds from the Asteraceae Family for Dual COX and LOX Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chagas-Paula, Daniela A.; Zhang, Tong; Da Costa, Fernando B.; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie

    2015-01-01

    The application of metabolomics in phytochemical analysis is an innovative strategy for targeting active compounds from a complex plant extract. Species of the Asteraceae family are well-known to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory (AI) activity. Dual inhibition of the enzymes COX-1 and 5-LOX is essential for the treatment of several inflammatory diseases, but there is not much investigation reported in the literature for natural products. In this study, 57 leaf extracts (EtOH-H2O 7:3, v/v) from different genera and species of the Asteraceae family were tested against COX-1 and 5-LOX while HPLC-ESI-HRMS analysis of the extracts indicated high diversity in their chemical compositions. Using O2PLS-DA (R2 > 0.92; VIP > 1 and positive Y-correlation values), dual inhibition potential of low-abundance metabolites was determined. The O2PLS-DA results exhibited good validation values (cross-validation = Q2 > 0.7 and external validation = P2 > 0.6) with 0% of false positive predictions. The metabolomic approach determined biomarkers for the required biological activity and detected active compounds in the extracts displaying unique mechanisms of action. In addition, the PCA data also gave insights on the chemotaxonomy of the family Asteraceae across its diverse range of genera and tribes. PMID:26184333

  17. [Adapting physical activities for an active retirement].

    PubMed

    Renaudie, François

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of doing adapted physical exercise for elderly people have been proven. For more than thirty years, the French Federation for an Active Retirement has been striving to help people age well by proposing multiple activities to remain in good health after the age of 50. Doctors, activity leaders and federal instructors are attentive to each individual's capacities. PMID:27449307

  18. Learning as Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H.

    2002-01-01

    Integrates contemporary theories of learning into a theory of learning as activity. Explains ecological psychology, changes in understanding of learning, activity systems and activity theory (including the integration of consciousness and activity), and activity structure; and discusses learning as a cognitive and social process. (LRW)

  19. Coagulant Activity of Leukocytes. TISSUE FACTOR ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Niemetz, J.

    1972-01-01

    Peritoneal leukocytes harvested from rabbits which have received two spaced doses of endotoxin have significantly greater (10-fold) coagulant activity than leukocytes from control rabbits. The coagulant activity accelerates the clotting of normal plasma and activates factor X in the presence of factor VII and calcium and is therefore regarded as tissue factor. A total of 40-80 mg tissue factor activity was obtained from the peritoneal cavity of single endotoxin-treated rabbits. In leukocyte subcellular fractions, separated by centrifugation, the specific tissue factor activity sedimented mainly at 14,500 g and above. The procoagulant activity was destroyed after heating for 10 min at 65°C but was preserved at lower temperatures. Polymyxin B, when given with the first dose of endotoxin, reduced both the number of peritoneal leukocytes and their tissue factor activity by two-thirds. When given immediately before the second dose of endotoxin, polymyxin B had no inhibitory effect. PMID:4333021

  20. Facts about Physical Activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Facts about Physical Activity ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How ...

  1. Physical Activity Assessment

    Cancer.gov

    Current evidence convincingly indicates that physical activity reduces the risk of colon and breast cancer. Physical activity may also reduce risk of prostate cancer. Scientists are also evaluating potential relationships between physical activity and other cancers.

  2. Phytochemical and biological studies of bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Yoshinori; Ludwiczuk, Agnieszka; Nagashima, Fumihiro

    2013-07-01

    The bryophytes contain the Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses) and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). Of these, the Marchantiophyta have a cellular oil body which produce a number of mono-, sesqui- and di-terpenoids, aromatic compounds like bibenzyl, bis-bibenzyls and acetogenins. Most sesqui- and di-terpenoids obtained from liverworts are enantiomers of those found in higher plants. Many of these compounds display a characteristic odor, and can have interesting biological activities. These include: allergenic contact dermatitis, antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral, cytotoxic, insecticidal, insect antifeedant, superoxide anion radical release, 5-lipoxygenase, calmodulin, hyaluronidase, cyclooxygenase, DNA polymerase β, and α-glucosidase and NO production inhibitory, antioxidant, piscicidal, neurotrophic and muscle relaxing activities among others. Each liverwort biosynthesizes unique components, which are valuable for their chemotaxonomic classification. Typical chemical structures and biological activity of the selected liverwort constituents as well as the hemi- and total synthesis of some biologically active compounds are summarized. PMID:22652242

  3. Active commuting to school

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Declines in physical activity levels have coincided with increasing rates of obesity in children. This is problematic because physical activity has been shown to attenuate weight gain in children. Active commuting to school is one way of increasing children's physical activity. However, given the hi...

  4. Civil Law: 12 Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresbach, Debra

    These learning activities on civil law are intended to supplement the secondary level Scholastic materials "Living Law." Case studies, simulations, and role-play activities are included. Information provided for each activity includes a brief overview, background information, teacher instructions and a description of each activity. Activities…

  5. Increasing Youth Physical Activity with Activity Calendars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckler, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Physical educators often struggle with ways to get their students to be active beyond the school day. One strategy to accomplish this is the use of physical activity calendars (PACs). The purpose of this article is to support the use of PACs and give practical advice for creating effective PACs.

  6. Persistent active longitudes in sunspot activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, S.; Usoskin, I.

    It has been recently shown that spot activity of cool stars including solar analogues, is grouped in two clearly distinguished active longitudes which are persistent within at least one starspot cycle. Solar data including positional information of individual sunspots / groups extends back for about 130 years covering 12 solar cycles. Here we present the results of our research of longitudinal distribution of sunspot activity using an analysis similar to that applied to the stars. First, we synthesized, from the actual sunspot data, the sun's light curve as if it was defined only by spots. Then solar images were calculated from this light curve, giving a natural smoothing of the spot pattern. For each Carrington rotation, longitudinal position of these smoothed spot regions was calculated. The analysis reveals the following main features: - Sunspot activity is grouped in two active longitudes (with the differential rotation taken into account) 180o apart from each other which are persistent through the entire studied period of 12 cycles, similarly to stars. - The longitude migration is determined by changing the mean latitude of sunspot activity (the Maunder butterfly) and differential rotation. - The two longitudes periodically alternate the dominant activity with about 3.7 year period implying for the existence of the Sflip-flopT phenomenon known in - starspot activity.

  7. Hepatoprotective potential of extracts from seeds of Areca catechu and nutgalls of Quercus infectoria.

    PubMed

    Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Nithitanakool, Saruth; Bavovada, Rapepol

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous extracts from seeds of Areca catechu L. (Arecaceae) (AC) and nutgalls of Quercus infectoria Oliv. (Fagaceae) (QI) were investigated for their hepatoprotective potential by studying their antioxidant capacity using four different methods, by determining their in vitro anti-inflammatory activity against 5-lipoxygenase, and by evaluating their hepatoprotective potential against liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) in rats. AC and QI extracts exhibited potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Treatment of rats with AC and QI extracts reversed oxidative damage in hepatic tissues induced by CCl(4). It is suggested that extracts rich in either condensed or hydrolysable tannins and known for their potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, may potentially confer protection against oxidative stress-induced liver injury. These data should contribute to evidence-based traditional medicines for anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective effects of both extracts. PMID:20032872

  8. Antifeedant activity of quassinoids.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, V; Polonsky, J; Bhatnagar, S

    1984-10-01

    The antifeedant activity of 13 quassinoids of different structural types has been studied against the Mexican bean beetle (Epilachna varivestis Mulsant) 4th instar larvae and the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania Crawer) 5th instar larvae. All quassinoids tested displayed significant activity against the Mexican bean beetle and, thus, do not reveal a simple structure-activity relationship. Five quassinoids were active against the southern armyworm. Interestingly, four of these-bruceantin (I), glaucarubinone (VI), isobruceine A (VIII), and simalikalactone D (XI)-possess the required structural features for antineoplastic activity. The noncytotoxic quassin (X) is an exception; it is active against both pests. PMID:24318349

  9. CATALASE ACTIVITY IN LEPTOSPIRA

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P. J.; Larson, A. D.; Cox, C. D.

    1964-01-01

    Rao, P. J. (University of Illinois, Urbana), A. D. Larson, and C. D. Cox. Catalase activity in Leptospira. J. Bacteriol. 88:1045–1048. 1964.—A number of serotypes of Leptospira were found to possess catalase activity, although considerable variation in activity existed among various serotypes. Catalase activity of L. pomona was reduced by inhibitors commonly employed for arresting catalase activity in other biological systems. Catalase activity was increased three to five times by growing cultures under conditions of oxygen availability; however, aeration had no beneficial effect on total viable cell crop. The relationship of oxygen to metabolism and future studies on virulence of the leptospirae is discussed. PMID:14219017

  10. Inhibition of lyso-PAF: acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase by salicylates and other compounds.

    PubMed

    White, H L; Faison, L D

    1988-06-01

    Diflunisal and benoxaprofen (20-100 microM) produced dose-dependent inhibitions of lyso-platelet activating factor: acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase in a lysate of rat pleural neutrophils. Salicylate and aspirin were inhibitory at concentrations of 1 mM and above. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid was a relatively potent inhibitor (I50 = 6 microM). Other compounds, including anti-inflammatory steroids, cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors, appeared ineffective at relevant concentrations. Inhibitions by diflunisal and salicylate occurred at concentrations similar to expected plasma levels in humans at therapeutic doses. An inhibition of platelet-activating factor synthesis may contribute to the antiinflammatory, analgesic, or antipyretic actions of these compounds. PMID:2903520

  11. Active Fire Mapping Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS ... Data Web Services Latest Detected Fire Activity Other MODIS Products Frequently Asked Questions About Active Fire Maps ...

  12. Preschoolers’ Physical Activity Behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Jennifer D.; He, Meizi; Bouck, L. Michelle Sangster; Tucker, Patricia; Pollett, Graham L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To understand parents’ perspectives of their preschoolers’ physical activity behaviours. Methods A maximum variation sample of 71 parents explored their preschoolers’ physical activity behaviours through 10 semi-structured focus group discussions. Results Parents perceived Canada’s Physical Activity Guidelines for Children as inadequate; that their preschoolers get and need more than 30–90 minutes of activity daily; and that physical activity habits must be established during the preschool years. Nine barriers against and facilitators toward adequate physical activity were proposed: child’s age, weather, daycare, siblings, finances, time, society and safety, parents’ impact, and child’s activity preferences. Discussion The need for education and interventions that address current barriers are essential for establishing physical activity as a lifestyle behaviour during early childhood and, consequently, helping to prevent both childhood and adulthood obesity. PMID:16625802

  13. Balance Food and Activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Health Professionals Tools and Resources Promotional Materials Programming Materials Weight Management Nutrition Physical Activity Reduce Screen ... Training For Health Professionals Tools & Resources Promotional ... Programming Materials Weight Management Nutrition Physical Activity Reduce Screen ...

  14. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Steyert, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  15. Exercise and Physical Activity

    MedlinePlus

    Alzheimer ’s Caregiving Tips Exercise and Physical Activity Being active and getting exercise helps people with Alzheimer’s disease feel better. Exercise helps keep their muscles, joints, and heart in ...

  16. Antimicrobial activity of isopteropodine.

    PubMed

    García, Rubén; Cayunao, Cesia; Bocic, Ronny; Backhouse, Nadine; Delporte, Carle; Zaldivar, Mercedes; Erazo, Silvia

    2005-01-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation for the determination of antimicrobial activity of Uncaria tomentosa, has led to the isolation of isopteropodine (0.3%), a known Uncaria pentacyclic oxindol alkaloid that exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria. PMID:16042336

  17. Population Education. Awareness Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouse, Deborah E.

    1990-01-01

    Described are awareness activities that deal with human population growth, resources, and the environment. Activities include simulations, mathematical exercises, and discussions of the topic. Specific examples of what individuals can do to help are listed. (KR)

  18. Major operations and activities

    SciTech Connect

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the major operations and activities on the site. These operations and activities include site management, waste management, environmental restoration and corrective actions, and research and technology development.

  19. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  20. Active at Any Size

    MedlinePlus

    ... beginners. Daily life activities Lifestyle activities, such as gardening or washing the car, are great ways to ... bags. Doing chores like lawn mowing, raking leaves, gardening, and housework also count. What questions should I ...

  1. WASTE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was made at pilot scale of a variety of processes for dewatering and stabilization of waste activated sludge from a pure oxygen activated sludge system. Processes evaluated included gravity thickening, dissolved air flotation thickening, basket centrifugation, scroll cent...

  2. Green Schools Activity Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacramento Tree Foundation, CA.

    This collection of interdisciplinary hands-on activities covers a variety of topics related to trees and conservation. Twenty-four activities integrate the subjects of social studies, fine arts, science, language arts, math, geography, and music. Although activity instructions are not consistent they usually contain details on objectives and…

  3. Technology Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Ray; And Others

    This guide contains 43 modules of laboratory activities for technology education courses. Each module includes an instructor's resource sheet and the student laboratory activity. Instructor's resource sheets include some or all of the following elements: module number, course title, activity topic, estimated time, essential elements, objectives,…

  4. Climate Change: An Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Garry

    1995-01-01

    Presents a segment of the Geoscience Education booklet, Climate Change, that contains information and activities that enable students to gain a better appreciation of the possible effects human activity has on the Earth's climate. Describes the Terrace Temperatures activity that leads students through an investigation using foraminifera data to…

  5. Bonus Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Provides on-task activities to fill in unexpected extra moments in elementary classes. The activities require little preparation and take 5-15 minutes to complete. There are activities for math, language arts, social science, science, critical thinking, and computer. An outer space board game is also included. (SM)

  6. Activity Sheets. Draft Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke Power Company, Educational Services Dept., Charlotte, NC.

    This document consists of energy vocabulary activities, three games, worksheets, laboratory activities/exercises, and an introductory classroom exercise designed to introduce energy concepts to students. Vocabulary activities focus on coal and energy consumption. The three games (with instructions) focus on various aspects of energy and energy…

  7. Hepatitis and activity

    PubMed Central

    Krikler, Dennis M.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of physical activity during an attack of infectious hepatitis are discussed. There is no evidence that activity during convalescence produces any ill-effects. On the other hand, strenuous physical activity in the acute stage may be dangerous, possibly because hepatic blood-flow is reduced. PMID:5560143

  8. Measurement of Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.; Washburn, Richard A.; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2001-01-01

    Valid assessment of physical activity must be unobtrusive, practical to administer, and specific about physical activity type, frequency, duration, and intensity. Assessment methods can be categorized according to whether they provide direct or indirect (e.g., self-report) observation of physical activity, body motion, physiological response…

  9. Activity Theory and Ontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peim, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This paper seeks to re-examine Yrio Engestrom's activity theory as a technology of knowledge designed to enable positive transformations of specific practices. The paper focuses on a key paper where Engestrom defines the nature and present state of activity theory. Beginning with a brief account of the relations between activity theory and…

  10. Technology Learning Activities I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Technology Education Association, Reston, VA.

    This guide contains 30 technology learning activities. Activities may contain all or some of the following: an introduction, objectives, materials and equipment, challenges, limitations, notes and investigations, resources and references used, and evaluation ideas. Activity titles are: (1) Occupations in Construction Technology; (2) Designing a…

  11. Woodsy Owl Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This guide offers teachers and after-school group leaders 12 fun and engaging activities. Activities feature lessons on trees, water, wind, the earth, food, and waste. The activities are designed to help children aged 5-8 become more aware of the natural environment and fundamental conservation principles. Titles of children's books are embedded…

  12. FLES Games and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irujo, Suzanne, Ed.

    A number of activities for teaching foreign language in the elementary school (FLES) are presented. The activities were developed by participants in a FLES teacher training workshop, Project INTERACT, in the Boston area. The first section contains games, thematic units, and other activities specifically related to French language instruction,…

  13. FL Activities & Festivals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY.

    A collection of student, class, and school foreign language activities suggests a variety of projects and describes three specific school efforts. The suggested activities include: (1) individual student efforts such as writing to pen-pals; (2) group activities such as a foreign language auction or sing-along; (3) group projects for the school…

  14. Highlights of 1981 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The highlights of NASA's 1981 activities are presented, including the results of the two flights of the space shuttle Columbia and the Voyager 2 encounter with Saturn. Accomplishments in the areas of space transportation operations; space science; aeronautical, energy, and space research and development; as well as space tracking, international activities, and 1981 launch activities are discussed.

  15. Anticancer activity of ferrocenylthiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Sandra, Cortez-Maya; Elena, Klimova; Marcos, Flores-Alamo; Elena, Martínez-Klimova; Arturo, Ramírez-Ramírez; Teresa, Ramírez Apan; Marcos, Martínez-García

    2014-03-01

    Aliphatic and aromatic ferrocenylthiosemicarbazones were synthesized. The characterization of the new ferrocenylthiosemicarbazones was done by IR, (1)H-NMR and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction studies. The biological activity of the obtained compounds was assessed in terms of anticancer activity. Their activity against U251 (human glyoblastoma), PC-3 (human prostatic adenocarcinoma), K562 (human chronic myelogenous leukemia), HCT-15 (human colorectal adenocarcinoma), MCF-7 (human mammary adenocarcinoma) and SKLU-1 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cell lines was studied and compared with cisplatin. All tested compounds showed good activity and the aryl-chloro substituted ferrocenylthiosemicarbazones showed the best anticancer activity. PMID:24144199

  16. Effects of dietary fish oil on leukocyte leukotriene and PAF generation and on neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Sperling, R I

    1991-01-01

    The studies of dietary fish oil supplementation in healthy volunteers demonstrate: (1) suppression of PMN LTB4 synthesis after a minimum of 4 weeks of dietary fish oil consumption at a level of 4-6 g omega 3 fatty acids daily; concomitant suppression of the other arachidonate-derived 5-lipoxygenase pathway products and decreased [3H]-arachidonic acid release may be observed under certain conditions, (2) suppression of PMN chemotactic responsiveness to LTB4 and FMLP, (3) delayed kinetics of inhibition of chemotaxis and AA metabolism relative to that of cellular lipid alteration, and (4) dietary EPA is more active than DHA in eliciting these effects. The effects of dietary EPA on monocyte function in healthy volunteers include: (1) suppression of LTB4 synthesis concomitantly with that of the other 5-lipoxygenase pathway products and decreased [3H]-arachidonic acid release, (2) suppression of PAF synthesis, and (3) delayed kinetics of inhibition of PAF generation and AA metabolism relative to that of cellular lipid alteration. The effects of dietary fish oil in RA patients include: (1) decreased arachidonate content of cellular lipids with an augmented EPA content, (2) decreased LTB4 generation by PMN as an isolated effect, indicating inhibition of the epoxide hydrolase enzyme. The decrease in LTB4 generation by PMN correlated with improvement of tender joint count in one study, (3) augmentation of depressed PMN chemotaxis to LTB4 and FMLP, and (4) suppression of monocyte PAF generation. From these studies one may conclude that: (1) omega 3 fatty acids are incorporated into leukocyte cellular phospholipids with a concomitant loss in arachidonic acid, (2) the incorporation of omega 3 fatty acids into leukocyte cellular lipids suppresses two pathways of inflammatory mediator synthesis: the 5-lipoxygenase and the PAF synthesis pathways, (3) receptor-mediated PMN functions are altered by dietary omega 3 fatty acid consumption, and (4) these functional changes may be

  17. Transcriptional activators in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcription activation domains (ADs) are not well defined on the proteome scale. We systematicallly tested ∼6000 yeast proteins for transcriptional activity using a yeast one-hybrid system and identified 451 transcriptional activators. We then determined their transcription activation strength using fusions to the Gal4 DNA-binding domain and a His3 reporter gene which contained a promoter with a Gal4-binding site. Among the 132 strongest activators 32 are known transcription factors while another 35 have no known function. Although zinc fingers, helix–loop–helix domains and several other domains are highly overrepresented among the activators, only few contain characterized ADs. We also found some striking correlations: the stronger the activation activity, the more acidic, glutamine-rich, proline-rich or asparagine-rich the activators were. About 29% of the activators have been found previously to specifically interact with the transcription machinery, while 10% are known to be components of transcription regulatory complexes. Based on their transcriptional activity, localization and interaction patterns, at least six previously uncharacterized proteins are suggested to be bona fide transcriptional regulators (namely YFL049W, YJR070C, YDR520C, YGL066W/Sgf73, YKR064W and YCR082W/Ahc2). PMID:16464826

  18. Vestibular activation of sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The vestibulosympathetic reflex refers to sympathetic nerve activation by the vestibular system. Animal studies indicate that the vestibular system assists in blood pressure regulation during orthostasis. Although human studies clearly demonstrate activation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during engagement of the otolith organs, the role of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in maintaining blood pressure during orthostasis is not well-established. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes indicates that it is a powerful and independent reflex. Ageing, which is associated with an increased risk for orthostatic hypotension, attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex. The attenuated reflex is associated with a reduction in arterial pressure. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the vestibulosympathetic reflex assists in blood pressure regulation in humans, but future studies examining this reflex in other orthostatically intolerant populations are necessary to address this hypothesis.

  19. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  20. Marine Biology Activities. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  1. Patterns in Active Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeomans, Julia M.

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to cellular monolayers, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements and exhibit turbulent-like, chaotic patterns. We describe how active systems can be stabilised by tuning a physical feature of the system, friction. We demonstrate how the crossover between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened, can be achieved by using friction as a control parameter and demonstrate vortex ordering at the wet-dry crossover. We show that the self organisation of vortices into lattices is accompanied by the spatial ordering of topological defects leading to active crystal-like structures. The emergence of vortex lattices which leads to the positional ordering of topological defects may be a useful step towards the design and control of active materials.

  2. Cell Death Inducing Microbial Protein Phosphatase Inhibitors--Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Kleppe, Rune; Herfindal, Lars; Døskeland, Stein Ove

    2015-10-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and microcystin (MC) as well as several other microbial toxins like nodularin and calyculinA are known as tumor promoters as well as inducers of apoptotic cell death. Their intracellular targets are the major serine/threonine protein phosphatases. This review summarizes mechanisms believed to be responsible for the death induction and tumor promotion with focus on the interdependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II (CaM-KII). New data are presented using inhibitors of specific ROS producing enzymes to curb nodularin/MC-induced liver cell (hepatocyte) death. They indicate that enzymes of the arachidonic acid pathway, notably phospholipase A2, 5-lipoxygenase, and cyclooxygenases, may be required for nodularin/MC-induced (and presumably OA-induced) cell death, suggesting new ways to overcome at least some aspects of OA and MC toxicity. PMID:26506362

  3. Cell Death Inducing Microbial Protein Phosphatase Inhibitors—Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Kleppe, Rune; Herfindal, Lars; Døskeland, Stein Ove

    2015-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and microcystin (MC) as well as several other microbial toxins like nodularin and calyculinA are known as tumor promoters as well as inducers of apoptotic cell death. Their intracellular targets are the major serine/threonine protein phosphatases. This review summarizes mechanisms believed to be responsible for the death induction and tumor promotion with focus on the interdependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II (CaM-KII). New data are presented using inhibitors of specific ROS producing enzymes to curb nodularin/MC-induced liver cell (hepatocyte) death. They indicate that enzymes of the arachidonic acid pathway, notably phospholipase A2, 5-lipoxygenase, and cyclooxygenases, may be required for nodularin/MC-induced (and presumably OA-induced) cell death, suggesting new ways to overcome at least some aspects of OA and MC toxicity. PMID:26506362

  4. Role of Leukotrienes on Protozoan and Helminth Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rogerio, Alexandre P.; Anibal, Fernanda F.

    2012-01-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs), formed by the 5-lipoxygenase-(5-LO-) catalyzed oxidation of arachidonic acid, are lipid mediators that have potent proinflammatory activities. Pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of 5-LO biosynthesis in animals is associated with increased mortality and impaired clearance of bacteria, fungi, and parasites. LTs play a role in the control of helminth and protozoan infections by modulating the immune system and/or through direct cytotoxicity to parasites; however, LTs may also be associated with pathogenesis, such as in cerebral malaria and schistosomal granuloma. Interestingly, some proteins from the saliva of insect vectors that transmit protozoans and secreted protein from helminth could bind LTs and may consequently modulate the course of infection or pathogenesis. In addition, the decreased production of LTs in immunocompromised individuals might modulate the pathophysiology of helminth and protozoan infections. Herein, in this paper, we showed the immunomodulatory and pathogenic roles of LTs during the helminth and protozoan infections. PMID:22577251

  5. Humudifucol and Bioactive Prenylated Polyphenols from Hops (Humulus lupulus cv. "Cascade").

    PubMed

    Forino, Martino; Pace, Simona; Chianese, Giuseppina; Santagostini, Laura; Werner, Markus; Weinigel, Christina; Rummler, Silke; Fico, Gelsomina; Werz, Oliver; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

    2016-03-25

    Humulus lupulus (hop plant) has long been used in traditional medicine as a sedative and antimicrobial agent. More recently, attention has been devoted to the phytoestrogenic activity of the plant extracts as well as to the anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties of the prenylated chalcones present. In this study, an Italian sample of H. lupulus cv. "Cascade" has been investigated and three new compounds [4-hydroxycolupulone (6), humudifucol (7) and cascadone (8)] have been purified and identified by means of NMR spectroscopy along with four known metabolites. Notably, humudifucol (7) is the first prenylated dimeric phlorotannin discovered in nature. Because structurally related phloroglucinols from natural sources were found previously to inhibit microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase (mPGES)-1 and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), the isolated compounds were evaluated for their bioactivity against these pro-inflammatory target proteins. The prenylated chalcone xanthohumol inhibited both enzymes at low μM concentrations. PMID:26918635

  6. Synthesis and biological evaluation of C(5)-substituted derivatives of leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor BRP-7.

    PubMed

    Levent, Serkan; Gerstmeier, Jana; Olgaç, Abdurrahman; Nikels, Felix; Garscha, Ulrike; Carotti, Andrea; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Werz, Oliver; Banoglu, Erden; Çalışkan, Burcu

    2016-10-21

    Pharmacological intervention with 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway leading to suppression of leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis is a clinically validated strategy for treatment of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases such as asthma and atherosclerosis. Here we describe the synthesis of a series of C(5)-substituted analogues of the previously described 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP) inhibitor BRP-7 (IC50 = 0.31 μM) to explore the effects of substitution at the C(5)-benzimidazole (BI) ring as a strategy to increase the potency against FLAP-mediated 5-LO product formation. Incorporation of polar substituents on the C(5) position of the BI core, exemplified by compound 11 with a C(5)-nitrile substituent, significantly enhances the potency for suppression of 5-LO product synthesis in human neutrophils (IC50 = 0.07 μM) and monocytes (IC50 = 0.026 μM). PMID:27423639

  7. Thermally Activated Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, William H.; Murray, Robert C.; Walsh, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    Space-qualified, precise, large-force, thermally activated driver (TAD) developed for use in space on astro-physics experiment to measure abundance of rare actinide-group elements in cosmic rays. Actinide cosmic rays detected using thermally activated driver as heart of event-thermometer (ET) system. Thermal expansion and contraction of silicone oil activates driver. Potential applications in fluid-control systems where precise valve controls are needed.

  8. Activity in distant comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, Jane X.

    1992-01-01

    Activity in distant comets remains a mystery in the sense that we still have no complete theory to explain the various types of activity exhibited by different comets at large distances. This paper explores the factors that should play a role in determining activity in a distant comet, especially in the cases of comet P/Tempel 2, comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, and 2060 Chiron.

  9. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  10. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  11. Physical Activity and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of scientists, ranging from experts in basic biological science to those with expertise in community behavioral interventions to increase physical activity. This combination of scientists and expertise will ...

  12. NASA metrication activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlannes, P. N.

    1978-01-01

    NASA's organization and policy for metrification, history from 1964, NASA participation in Federal agency activities, interaction with nongovernmental metrication organizations, and the proposed metrication assessment study are reviewed.

  13. Active material based active sealing technology: Part 1. Active seal requirements vs. active material actuator properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Christopher P.; Carter, William; Herrera, Guillermo A.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.; Browne, Alan L.; Johnson, Nancy L.; Bazzi, Imad F.

    2010-04-01

    Current seals used for vehicle closures/swing panels are essentially flexible, frequently hollow structures whose designs are constrained by numerous requirements, many of them competing, including door closing effort (both air bind and seal compression), sound isolation, prevention of water leaks, and accommodation of variations in vehicle build. This paper documents the first portion of a collaborative research study/exploration of the feasibility of and approaches for using active materials with shape and stiffness changing attributes to produce active seal technologies, seals with improved performance. An important design advantage of an active material approach compared to previous active seal technologies is the distribution of active material regions throughout the seal length, which would enable continued active function even with localized failure. Included as a major focus of this study was the assessment of polymeric active materials because of their potential ease of integration into the current seal manufacturing process. In Part 1 of this study, which is documented in this paper, potential materials were evaluated in terms of their cost, activation mechanisms, and mechanical and actuation properties. Based on these properties, simple designs were proposed and utilized to help determine which materials are best suited for active seals. Shape memory alloys (SMA) and electroactive polymers (EAP) were judged to be the most promising.

  14. Active Flow Control Activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Sellers, William L., III; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley continues to aggressively investigate the potential advantages of active flow control over more traditional aerodynamic techniques. This paper provides an update to a previous paper and describes both the progress in the various research areas and the significant changes in the NASA research programs. The goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids as well as to address engineering challenges. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several projects is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research are to be demonstrated either in bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight as part of the fundamental NASA R&D program and then transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD, and U.S. industry.

  15. Activating Event Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world events, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized events that they denote or…

  16. Endonuclease activity in lipocalins.

    PubMed Central

    Yusifov, T N; Abduragimov, A R; Gasymov, O K; Glasgow, B J

    2000-01-01

    Several lipocalins contain conserved amino acid sequences similar to the phosphodiester bond cleavage domain of sugar non-specific magnesium-dependent nucleases of the Serratia marcescens type. His-89 and Glu-127 of the S. marcescens endonuclease are believed to have a role in the active catalytic site by the attack of a water molecule at the phosphorus atom of the bridging phosphate. Tear lipocalin contains both amino acids in analogous regions, and is active as a nuclease. Two forms of beta-lactoglobulin contain only Glu-134 (analogous to Glu-127 of the Serratia nuclease) yet retain nuclease activity equal to or greater than that of tear lipocalin. However, retinol-binding protein lacks both of these motifs and shows no detectable activity. DNA-nicking activity is decreased by 80% in the mutant of tear lipocalin that replaces Glu-128 but is unchanged by mutations of His-84. The endonuclease activity of tear lipocalin is dependent on the bivalent cations Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) but is decreased at high concentrations of NaCl. These findings indicate that some lipocalins have non-specific endonuclease activity similar in characteristics to the Mg(2+)-dependent nucleases and related to the conserved sequence LEDFXR (where 'X' denotes 'any other residue'), in which the glutamic residue seems to be important for activity. PMID:10769187

  17. Endonuclease activity in lipocalins.

    PubMed

    Yusifov, T N; Abduragimov, A R; Gasymov, O K; Glasgow, B J

    2000-05-01

    Several lipocalins contain conserved amino acid sequences similar to the phosphodiester bond cleavage domain of sugar non-specific magnesium-dependent nucleases of the Serratia marcescens type. His-89 and Glu-127 of the S. marcescens endonuclease are believed to have a role in the active catalytic site by the attack of a water molecule at the phosphorus atom of the bridging phosphate. Tear lipocalin contains both amino acids in analogous regions, and is active as a nuclease. Two forms of beta-lactoglobulin contain only Glu-134 (analogous to Glu-127 of the Serratia nuclease) yet retain nuclease activity equal to or greater than that of tear lipocalin. However, retinol-binding protein lacks both of these motifs and shows no detectable activity. DNA-nicking activity is decreased by 80% in the mutant of tear lipocalin that replaces Glu-128 but is unchanged by mutations of His-84. The endonuclease activity of tear lipocalin is dependent on the bivalent cations Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) but is decreased at high concentrations of NaCl. These findings indicate that some lipocalins have non-specific endonuclease activity similar in characteristics to the Mg(2+)-dependent nucleases and related to the conserved sequence LEDFXR (where 'X' denotes 'any other residue'), in which the glutamic residue seems to be important for activity. PMID:10769187

  18. Activity Book: Ocean Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents a collection of activities to help elementary students study ocean ecology. The activities have students investigate ocean inhabitants, analyze animal adaptations, examine how temperature and saltiness affect ocean creatures, and learn about safeguarding the sea. Student pages offer reproducible learning sheets. (SM)

  19. Activity Book. Celebrating Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angell, Pat; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This activity book presents elementary level multicultural books designed to foster self-esteem, understanding, and critical reading skills. It includes a resource list and general discussion boosters for analyzing characters and setting, class activities related to the books, and a student page on character study. (SM)

  20. Active Students in Webinars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolås, Line; Nordseth, Hugo; Yri, Jørgen Sørlie

    2015-01-01

    To ensure student activity in webinars we have defined 10 learning tasks focusing on production and communication e.g. collaborative writing, discussion and polling, and investigated how the technology supports the learning activities. The three project partners in the VisPed-project use different video-conferencing systems, and we analyzed how it…

  1. PM ACTIVITY PATTERN RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity/uptake rate data are necessary to estimate potential human exposure and intake dose to environmental pollutants and to refine human exposure models. Personal exposure monitoring studies have demonstrated the critical role that activities play in explaining and pre...

  2. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, David R.; Velenyi, Louis J.; Pepera, Marc A.; Dolhyj, Serge R.

    1986-01-01

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  3. Laboratory Activities in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Barnea, Nitza

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory activities have long had a distinctive and central role in the science curriculum, and science educators have suggested that many benefits accrue from engaging students in science laboratory activities. Many research studies have been conducted to investigate the educational effectiveness of laboratory work in science education in…

  4. Active Healthy Summer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Eloise

    2005-01-01

    Summer break is almost here for most elementary teachers and students. Warmer weather and additional free time to make choices create more opportunities to be physically active, whether home alone or out with friends and family. This article describes ways by which physical education specialists can encourage students' physical activity by…

  5. Ecological Structure Activity Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological Structure Activity Relationships, v1.00a, February 2009
    ECOSAR (Ecological Structure Activity Relationships) is a personal computer software program that is used to estimate the toxicity of chemicals used in industry and discharged into water. The program predicts...

  6. The Activity of Trypsin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Salvatore F.; Holzman, Tom

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that illustrates the following points concerning the experimental determination of trypsin activity: (1) there is a difference in basing enzyme concentration on weight, absorbance, or active sites; and (2) the method of expressing enzyme concentration determines the value of specific, molecular, and catalytic center…

  7. Obesity, Physical Activity - Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Thomas B.

    Childhood obesity starts at a very early age, and preventive measures taken early enough may retard the development of fat cells. It appears that physical activity plays an important role in reducing obesity. The activity program must start early, in preschool days. It is felt that screening children for obesity when they first enter school and…

  8. Warm-Up Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingguang, Yang

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how warm-up activities can help to make the English-as-a-foreign-language classroom a lively and interesting place. Warm-up activities are games carried out at the beginning of each class to motivate students to make good use of class time. (Author/VWL)

  9. Directory of Development Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Control Data Corp., Minneapolis, Minn.

    Assembled in a loose leaf notebook, this collection of independent on-the-job activities is designed to facilitate employee development and intended to help improve an organization's performance appraisal system. The on-the-job development activities described derive from job descriptions, performance appraisal forms, and discussions with job…

  10. Active and Healthy Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen; Kovarik, Jessica; Leidy, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The Active and Healthy School Program (AHS) can be used to alter the culture and environment of a school to help children make healthier choices. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of AHS to increase physical activity while decreasing total screen time, increase healthy food choices, and improve knowledge about physical…

  11. Chemical Activities. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgford, Christie L.; Summerlin, Lee R.

    This sourcebook for chemical activities is designed to be used as a student laboratory book for both junior and senior high school students. The student's role as a knowledgeable consumer and informed citizen is stressed. Each activity includes a list of needed materials, procedures, reactions, questions, and notes for the teacher which include…

  12. Rainy Day Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Experienced caregivers plan ahead for rainy days. This article describes specific rainy day activities for young children, such as books and crafts to learn about rain (rain in a jar, making a rainbow), simple cooking activities (taffy pull, cinnamon candy tea), and games (mummy wrap, hunt the thimble, rain lotto). (EV)

  13. Reflections on Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhurst, David

    2009-01-01

    It is sometimes suggested that activity theory represents the most important legacy of Soviet philosophy and psychology. But what exactly "is" activity theory? The canonical account in the West is given by Engestrom, who identifies three stages in the theory's development: from Vygotsky's insights, through Leontiev's articulation of the…

  14. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-01-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of…

  15. Activities: More Calculator Capers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmalz, Rosemary

    1983-01-01

    Provided is an activity designed to give grades 7-12 students opportunities to discover numerical patterns and to derive general conclusions from observing data. The activity focuses attention on patterns in products such as 33x34, 333x334, and 3333x3334. Three worksheets and answers are included. (JN)

  16. Vegetable Soup Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Mary; Shepard, Ray

    Vegetable Soup is a new children's television series whose purpose is to counter the negative and destructive effects of racial isolation. This manual gives detailed instructions for discussion of activities that are presented during the television series such as: crafts, games, recipes, language activities, and children's questions. A list of…

  17. ZOOMsci Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Meredith

    This activity guide is based on the Public Broadcasting System's (PBS) program "ZOOM." It is designed for educators with activities that are categorized into three themes: (1) Things That Go, which includes "Air" which explores air pressure, "Rubber Bands" which discovers the potential energy of rubber bands, "Baking Soda and Vinegar" which…

  18. Science World Activities Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, Madison.

    This document consists of three sections. Section I contains 19 activities developed by master teachers for the Science World '84 summer science program. These activities focus on studies involving airplane controls, trash bag kites, computers, meteorology, compass orienteering, soils, aquatic ecosystems, bogs, and others. Objectives, materials…

  19. HUMAN EXPOSURE ACTIVITY PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity/uptake rate data are necessary to estimate potential human exposure and intake dose to environmental pollutants and to refine human exposure models. Personal exposure monitoring studies have demonstrated the critical role that activities play in explaining and pre...

  20. Coordinating Shared Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley

    2004-01-01

    Shared Activity Coordination (ShAC) is a computer program for planning and scheduling the activities of an autonomous team of interacting spacecraft and exploratory robots. ShAC could also be adapted to such terrestrial uses as helping multiple factory managers work toward competing goals while sharing such common resources as floor space, raw materials, and transports. ShAC iteratively invokes the Continuous Activity Scheduling Planning Execution and Replanning (CASPER) program to replan and propagate changes to other planning programs in an effort to resolve conflicts. A domain-expert specifies which activities and parameters thereof are shared and reports the expected conditions and effects of these activities on the environment. By specifying these conditions and effects differently for each planning program, the domain-expert subprogram defines roles that each spacecraft plays in a coordinated activity. The domain-expert subprogram also specifies which planning program has scheduling control over each shared activity. ShAC enables sharing of information, consensus over the scheduling of collaborative activities, and distributed conflict resolution. As the other planning programs incorporate new goals and alter their schedules in the changing environment, ShAC continually coordinates to respond to unexpected events.

  1. Elementary Environmental Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Robert J.

    This guide presents suggestions for field trips, out-of-doors activities, material for centers, and individualized activities in the teaching of elementary school science and particularly environmental education at the elementary level. The guide includes a section on preparation and procedures for conducting field trips, including sample…

  2. Ten Minute Writing Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markus, Sharyn

    Designed with junior high school students in mind, the activities in this booklet are offered as ways to stimulate interest in writing using as little as ten minutes of class time. The activities are arranged in six sections: (1) developing observation skills and paying attention to details; (2) word play, descriptive words, and word collections…

  3. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  4. Peak Longevity Physical Activity

    Cancer.gov

    People who engage in three to five times the recommended minimum level of leisure-time physical activity derive the greatest benefit in terms of mortality reduction when compared with people who do not engage in leisure-time physical activity.

  5. Student Activities. Managing Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Barbara; And Others

    This monograph suggests ways that college or university administrations can undertake a systematic and careful review of the risks posed by students' activities. Its purpose is to provide guidance in integrating the risk management process into a school's existing approaches to managing student organizations and activities. It is noted that no…

  6. Curriculum Activities on Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmall, Vicki L.; Benge, Nancy

    This paper contains learning activities on aging for use with elementary, high school, and university students in health, family relationships, social studies, and art courses. The activities are intended to help youth develop a more realistic understanding of the aging process and to become aware of both the problems and benefits associated with…

  7. Aging and Semantic Activation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Darlene V.

    Three studies tested the theory that long term memory consists of a semantically organized network of concept nodes interconnected by leveled associations or relations, and that when a stimulus is processed, the corresponding concept node is assumed to be temporarily activated and this activation spreads to nearby semantically related nodes. In…

  8. [Field Learning Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolde Forest Environmental Education Center, Reading, PA.

    Seventy field activities, pertinent to outdoor, environmental studies, are described in this compilation. Designed for elementary and junior high school students, the activities cover many discipline areas--science, social studies, language arts, health, history, mathematics, and art--and many are multidisciplinary in use. Topics range from soil…

  9. Active galactic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Andrew C.

    1999-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei are the most powerful, long-lived objects in the Universe. Recent data confirm the theoretical idea that the power source is accretion into a massive black hole. The common occurrence of obscuration and outflows probably means that the contribution of active galactic nuclei to the power density of the Universe has been generally underestimated. PMID:10220363

  10. Immunohistochemical Localization of Key Arachidonic Acid Metabolism Enzymes during Fracture Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsuan-Ni; O’Connor, J. Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the localization of critical enzymes involved in arachidonic acid metabolism during the initial and regenerative phases of mouse femur fracture healing. Previous studies found that loss of cyclooxygenase-2 activity impairs fracture healing while loss of 5-lipoxygenase activity accelerates healing. These diametric results show that arachidonic acid metabolism has an essential function during fracture healing. To better understand the function of arachidonic acid metabolism during fracture healing, expression of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase -2 (COX-2), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), and leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) was localized by immunohistochemistry in time-staged fracture callus specimens. All four enzymes were detected in leukocytes present in the bone marrow and attending inflammatory response that accompanied the fracture. In the tissues surrounding the fracture site, the proportion of leukocytes expressing COX-1, COX-2, or LTA4H decreased while those expressing 5-LO remained high at 4 and 7 days after fracture. This may indicate an inflammation resolution function for 5-LO during fracture healing. Only COX-1 was consistently detected in fracture callus osteoblasts during the later stages of healing (day 14 after fracture). In contrast, callus chondrocytes expressed all four enzymes, though 5-LO appeared to be preferentially expressed in newly differentiated chondrocytes. Most interestingly, osteoclasts consistently and strongly expressed COX-2. In addition to bone surfaces and the growth plate, COX-2 expressing osteoclasts were localized at the chondro-osseous junction of the fracture callus. These observations suggest that arachidonic acid mediated signaling from callus chondrocytes or from callus osteoclasts at the chondro-osseous junction regulate fracture healing. PMID:24516658

  11. Activity in F stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, Sidney C.; Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Simon, Theodore

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of He I 5876 A and IUE measurements of chromospheric and transition region lines in a large sample of F-type stars are presented. The data show that activity is detectable in nearly all early F-type stars and differs in several of its characteristics from that typically seen in cooler stars with slow rotation and fully developed convective zones. The onset of activity occurs near B-V = 0.28, which corresponds approximately to spectral type F0 and T(eff) = 7300 K. There is no correlation between the level of activity and the abundances of lithium and beryllium in F stars hotter than T(eff) = 6600 K. All but one of the stars in the 6600-7300 K temperature interval are active. The levels of activity in these stars are independent of Rossby number.

  12. Determinants of Physical Activity in Active and Low-Active, Sixth Grade African-American Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trost, Stewart G.; Pate, Russell R.; Ward, Dianne S.; Saunders, Ruth; Riner, William

    1999-01-01

    Compared determinants of physical activity in active and low-active African-American sixth graders, surveying students and making objective assessments of physical activity over seven days. Results indicated that physical activity self-efficacy, beliefs about physical activity outcomes, involvement in community-based physical activity, perception…

  13. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  14. Physical activity and cancer.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    1990-12-01

    Evidence that physical activity may protect against various forms of cancer is examined in relation to occupational demands, leisure activities and participation in sport while at university. The variety of forms of neoplasm and equally varied physical activity histories militate against finding any simple relationship between the risk of malignancy and the individual's physical activity history. Nevertheless, five of seven major occupational studies suggest that a physically active occupation offers some protection against colon cancer, and an application of Bradford Hill's criteria generally supports the causal nature of the relationship between physical inactivity and an increased risk of intestinal neoplasia. However, existing reports are by no means conclusive; there thus remains a need for well-designed epidemiological studies of this issue. Data from one laboratory also suggest that in women a history of active leisure is associated with a reduced prevalence of breast and reproductive system cancers. Physical activity potentially encourages a healthy lifestyle, and it could have more direct effects on certain forms of carcinogenesis (for instance, by a speeding of gastro-intestinal transit, or a moderation of sex hormone levels). However, there are also potential negative effects from some types of exercise, particularly an excessive exposure to ultra-violet light in certain water sports. Since moderate exercise elevates mood and helps to conserve lean tissue, it may finally be a helpful component of treatment after a neoplasm has been diagnosed. PMID:2286478

  15. Active touch sensing

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Tony J.; Diamond, Mathew E.; Wing, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Active sensing systems are purposive and information-seeking sensory systems. Active sensing usually entails sensor movement, but more fundamentally, it involves control of the sensor apparatus, in whatever manner best suits the task, so as to maximize information gain. In animals, active sensing is perhaps most evident in the modality of touch. In this theme issue, we look at active touch across a broad range of species from insects, terrestrial and marine mammals, through to humans. In addition to analysing natural touch, we also consider how engineering is beginning to exploit physical analogues of these biological systems so as to endow robots with rich tactile sensing capabilities. The different contributions show not only the varieties of active touch—antennae, whiskers and fingertips—but also their commonalities. They explore how active touch sensing has evolved in different animal lineages, how it serves to provide rapid and reliable cues for controlling ongoing behaviour, and even how it can disintegrate when our brains begin to fail. They demonstrate that research on active touch offers a means both to understand this essential and primary sensory modality, and to investigate how animals, including man, combine movement with sensing so as to make sense of, and act effectively in, the world. PMID:21969680

  16. Measuring Physical Activity Environments

    PubMed Central

    Sallis, James F.

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity is usually done in specific types of places, referred to as physical activity environments. These often include parks, trails, fitness centers, schools, and streets. In recent years, scientific interest has increased notably in measuring physical activity environments. The present paper provides an historical overview of the contributions of the health, planning, and leisure studies fields to the development of contemporary measures. The emphasis is on attributes of the built environment that can be affected by policies to contribute to the promotion of physical activity. Researchers from health fields assessed a wide variety of built environment variables expected to be related to recreational physical activity. Settings of interest were schools, workplaces, and recreation facilities, and most early measures used direct observation methods with demonstrated inter-observer reliability. Investigators from the city planning field evaluated aspects of community design expected to be related to people’s ability to walk from homes to destinations. GIS was used to assess walkability defined by the 3Ds of residential density, land-use diversity, and pedestrian-oriented designs. Evaluating measures for reliability or validity was rarely done in the planning-related fields. Researchers in the leisure studies and recreation fields studied mainly people’s use of leisure time rather than physical characteristics of parks and other recreation facilities. Although few measures of physical activity environments were developed, measures of aesthetic qualities are available. Each of these fields made unique contributions to the contemporary methods used to assess physical activity environments. PMID:19285214

  17. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-08-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of each lesson were analysed to identify individual student's emotions. Results from two representative students are presented as case studies. Using a theoretical perspective drawn from theories of emotions founded in sociology, two assertions emerged. First, during the demonstration activity, students experienced the emotions of wonder and surprise; second, during a laboratory activity, students experienced the intense positive emotions of happiness/joy. Characteristics of these activities that contributed to students' positive experiences are highlighted. The study found that choosing activities that evoked strong positive emotional experiences, focused students' attention on the phenomenon they were learning, and the activities were recalled positively. Furthermore, such positive experiences may contribute to students' interest and engagement in science and longer term memorability. Finally, implications for science teachers and pre-service teacher education are suggested.

  18. THE ACTIVE CENTAURS

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, David

    2009-05-15

    The Centaurs are recent escapees from the Kuiper Belt that are destined either to meet fiery oblivion in the hot inner regions of the solar system or to be ejected to the interstellar medium by gravitational scattering from the giant planets. Dynamically evolved Centaurs, when captured by Jupiter and close enough to the Sun for near-surface water ice to sublimate, are conventionally labeled as 'short-period' (specifically, Jupiter-family) comets. Remarkably, some Centaurs show comet-like activity even when far beyond the orbit of Jupiter, suggesting mass loss driven by a process other than the sublimation of water ice. We observed a sample of 23 Centaurs and found nine to be active, with mass-loss rates measured from several kg s{sup -1} to several tonnes s{sup -1}. Considered as a group, we find that the 'active Centaurs' in our sample have perihelia smaller than the inactive Centaurs (median 5.9 AU versus 8.7 AU), and smaller than the median perihelion distance computed for all known Centaurs (12.4 AU). This suggests that their activity is thermally driven. We consider several possibilities for the origin of the mass loss from the active Centaurs. Most are too cold for activity at the observed levels to originate via the sublimation of crystalline water ice. Solid carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide have the opposite problem: they are so volatile that they should drive activity in Centaurs at much larger distances than observed. We consider the possibility that activity in the Centaurs is triggered by the conversion of amorphous ice into the crystalline form accompanied by the release of trapped gases, including carbon monoxide. By imposing the condition that crystallization should occur when the crystallization time is shorter than the orbital period we find a qualitative match to the perihelion distribution of the active Centaurs and conclude that the data are consistent with the hypothesis that the Centaurs contain amorphous ice.

  19. Physics of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, Peter A.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the research activity was to increase our understanding of solar activity through data analysis, theoretical analysis, and computer modeling. Because the research subjects were diverse and many researchers were supported by this grant, a select few key areas of research are described in detail. Areas of research include: (1) energy storage and force-free magnetic field; (2) energy release and particle acceleration; (3) radiation by nonthermal electrons; (4) coronal loops; (5) flare classification; (6) longitude distributions of flares; (7) periodicities detected in the solar activity; (8) coronal heating and related problems; and (9) plasma processes.

  20. Extravehicular activity technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, Bruce W.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on extravehicular activity technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: extravehicular mobility unit; airlock and EMU support equipment; tools, mobility aids, and workstations; and telerobotic work aids interfaces.

  1. Microglial Activation & Chronic Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lull, Melinda E.; Block, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Microglia, the resident innate immune cells in the brain, have long been implicated in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Accumulating evidence points to activated microglia as a chronic source of multiple neurotoxic factors, including TNFα, NO, IL1-β, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), driving progressive neuron damage. Microglia can become chronically activated by either a single stimulus (ex. LPS or neuron damage) or multiple stimuli exposures to result in cumulative neuronal loss over time. While the mechanisms driving these phenomena are just beginning to be understood, reactive microgliosis (the microglial response to neuron damage) and ROS have been implicated as key mechanisms of chronic and neurotoxic microglial activation, particularly in the case of Parkinson’s Disease. Here, we review the mechanisms of neurotoxicity associated with chronic microglial activation and discuss the role of neuronal death and microglial ROS driving the chronic and toxic microglial phenotype. PMID:20880500

  2. Activities: Pick's Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Christian R.

    1974-01-01

    A series of activities are presented on worksheets marked off with lattice points (like a geoboard). Students are led to discover and apply Pick's Theorem for finding the area of a polygon whose vertices are lattice points. (JP)

  3. Finding Activities You Enjoy

    MedlinePlus

    ... choose physical activities that match your interests! Love music? Take dancing lessons. Sign up for an aerobics ... a Safe Environment Feel Down? Get Up—Emotional Benefits of Exercise STAY INFORMED Follow us on Twitter ...

  4. Exercise and activity - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... other organized sports (such as soccer, swimming, and dancing) Younger children cannot stick with the same activity ... in a water sprinkler, or splashing in puddles. Dance to music. Skate, ice-skate, skate-board, or ...

  5. French space activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanc, R.

    1982-01-01

    The four main points of research and development of space programs by France are explained. The National Center of Space Studies is discussed, listing the missions of the Center and describing the activities of the staff.

  6. Island Watershed Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Rod

    2003-01-01

    Describes a 90-minute "Island Watershed" activity to help earth science students understand the concept of the water cycle. Introduces a surface waters unit appropriate for students in grades 7-10. Includes watershed project guidelines. (Author/KHR)

  7. Algorithm-development activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, Kendall L.

    1994-01-01

    The task of algorithm-development activities at USF continues. The algorithm for determining chlorophyll alpha concentration, (Chl alpha) and gelbstoff absorption coefficient for SeaWiFS and MODIS-N radiance data is our current priority.

  8. A Big Gulp Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    Explains how to implement an activity in which students measure the volume of their oral cavities. Enables students to develop skills in estimation, measurement, connections, statistics, applying concepts and procedures, and communication. (DDR)

  9. Active terahertz metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate planar terahertz metamaterial devices enabling actively controllable transmission amplitude, phase, or frequency at room temperature via carrier depletion or photoexcitation in the semiconductor substrate or in semiconductor materials incorporated into the metamaterial structure.

  10. PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

  11. Intercreativity: Mapping Online Activism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meikle, Graham

    How do activists use the Internet? This article maps a wide range of activist practice and research by applying and developing Tim Berners-Lee's concept of ‘intercreativity' (1999). It identifies four dimensions of Net activism: intercreative texts, tactics, strategies and networks. It develops these through examples of manifestations of Net activism around one cluster of issues: support campaigns for refugees and asylum seekers.

  12. Tinnitus activities treatment.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Richard S; Gogel, Stephanie A; Gehringer, Anne K

    2007-01-01

    Tinnitus Activities Treatment includes counseling of the whole person, and considers individual differences and needs. We consider four areas: thoughts and emotions, hearing and communication, sleep, and concentration. We typically use Partial Masking Sound Therapy, with a noise or music set to the lowest level that provides relief. A picture-based approach facilitates engagement of the patient, and provides thorough and structured counseling. We engage the patient by including homework and activities to demonstrate understanding and facilitate progress. PMID:17956807

  13. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  14. RMS active damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Scott, Michael A.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: RMS active damping augmentation; potential space station assembly benefits to CSI; LaRC/JSC bridge program; control law design process; draper RMS simulator; MIMO acceleration control laws improve damping; potential load reduction benefit; DRS modified to model distributed accelerations; accelerometer location; Space Shuttle aft cockpit simulator; simulated shuttle video displays; SES test goals and objectives; and SES modifications to support RMS active damping augmentation.

  15. RAVEN Quality Assurance Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cogliati, Joshua Joseph

    2015-09-01

    This report discusses the quality assurance activities needed to raise the Quality Level of Risk Analysis in a Virtual Environment (RAVEN) from Quality Level 3 to Quality Level 2. This report also describes the general RAVEN quality assurance activities. For improving the quality, reviews of code changes have been instituted, more parts of testing have been automated, and improved packaging has been created. For upgrading the quality level, requirements have been created and the workflow has been improved.

  16. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  17. Placenta growth factor augments airway hyperresponsiveness via leukotrienes and IL-13

    PubMed Central

    Eiymo Mwa Mpollo, Marthe-Sandrine; Brandt, Eric B.; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Arumugam, Paritha I.; Tiwari, Swati; Loberg, Anastacia; Pillis, Devin; Rizvi, Tilat; Lindsey, Mark; Jonck, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter; Kalra, Vijay K.; Le Cras, Timothy D.; Ratner, Nancy; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Hershey, Gurjit K. Khurana; Malik, Punam

    2015-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) affects 55%–77% of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and occurs even in the absence of asthma. While asthma increases SCD morbidity and mortality, the mechanisms underlying the high AHR prevalence in a hemoglobinopathy remain unknown. We hypothesized that placenta growth factor (PlGF), an erythroblast-secreted factor that is elevated in SCD, mediates AHR. In allergen-exposed mice, loss of Plgf dampened AHR, reduced inflammation and eosinophilia, and decreased expression of the Th2 cytokine IL-13 and the leukotriene-synthesizing enzymes 5-lipoxygenase and leukotriene-C4-synthase. Plgf–/– mice treated with leukotrienes phenocopied the WT response to allergen exposure; conversely, anti-PlGF Ab administration in WT animals blunted the AHR. Notably, Th2-mediated STAT6 activation further increased PlGF expression from lung epithelium, eosinophils, and macrophages, creating a PlGF/leukotriene/Th2-response positive feedback loop. Similarly, we found that the Th2 response in asthma patients is associated with increased expression of PlGF and its downstream genes in respiratory epithelial cells. In an SCD mouse model, we observed increased AHR and higher leukotriene levels that were abrogated by anti-PlGF Ab or the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton. Overall, our findings indicate that PlGF exacerbates AHR and uniquely links the leukotriene and Th2 pathways in asthma. These data also suggest that zileuton and anti-PlGF Ab could be promising therapies to reduce pulmonary morbidity in SCD. PMID:26690703

  18. Bradykinin-induced contraction of guinea pig lung in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lach, E; Trifilieff, A; Mousli, M; Landry, Y; Gies, J P

    1994-08-01

    We have investigated the contractile effect of bradykinin (BK) in guinea pig lung in vitro. BK induces a dose-related contraction of lung parenchymal strips which is increased significantly in the presence of 10(-5) M captopril (an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor) or 10(-5) M DL-thiorphan (a neutral endopeptidase inhibitor). The kininase I inhibitor, DL-2-mercaptomethyl-3-guanidino-ethylthiopropionic acid (MGTPA), has no effect on the BK-induced contraction. BK is more potent in contracting parenchymal lung strips than other contractile agents (histamine, carbachol and substance P), however the BK-induced maximal contraction is lower than those obtained with histamine and carbachol. The B1 agonist, des-Arg9-BK, does not contract lung parenchymal strips. The new BK B2 receptor antagonists (Hoe 140, NPC 17731 and NPC 17761), which possess binding affinities in the nanomolar range, inhibit the BK-induced contractile response in a dose-dependent manner. The BK-induced contraction was unaffected by propranolol, atropine, tetrodotoxin, capsaicin pre-treatment, triprolidine, methysergide, Ro 19-3704 and N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME), excluding the involvement of nervous pathways, preformed mast cell mediators, platelet-activating factor and nitric oxide. However, indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, AA-861, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, and furegrelate, a thromboxane A2 synthase inhibitor, decreased the contractile response to BK, suggesting that both cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase products are involved in this contraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7990978

  19. Placenta growth factor augments airway hyperresponsiveness via leukotrienes and IL-13.

    PubMed

    Eiymo Mwa Mpollo, Marthe-Sandrine; Brandt, Eric B; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Arumugam, Paritha I; Tiwari, Swati; Loberg, Anastacia; Pillis, Devin; Rizvi, Tilat; Lindsey, Mark; Jonck, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter; Kalra, Vijay K; Le Cras, Timothy D; Ratner, Nancy; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Hershey, Gurjit K Khurana; Malik, Punam

    2016-02-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) affects 55%-77% of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and occurs even in the absence of asthma. While asthma increases SCD morbidity and mortality, the mechanisms underlying the high AHR prevalence in a hemoglobinopathy remain unknown. We hypothesized that placenta growth factor (PlGF), an erythroblast-secreted factor that is elevated in SCD, mediates AHR. In allergen-exposed mice, loss of Plgf dampened AHR, reduced inflammation and eosinophilia, and decreased expression of the Th2 cytokine IL-13 and the leukotriene-synthesizing enzymes 5-lipoxygenase and leukotriene-C4-synthase. Plgf-/- mice treated with leukotrienes phenocopied the WT response to allergen exposure; conversely, anti-PlGF Ab administration in WT animals blunted the AHR. Notably, Th2-mediated STAT6 activation further increased PlGF expression from lung epithelium, eosinophils, and macrophages, creating a PlGF/leukotriene/Th2-response positive feedback loop. Similarly, we found that the Th2 response in asthma patients is associated with increased expression of PlGF and its downstream genes in respiratory epithelial cells. In an SCD mouse model, we observed increased AHR and higher leukotriene levels that were abrogated by anti-PlGF Ab or the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton. Overall, our findings indicate that PlGF exacerbates AHR and uniquely links the leukotriene and Th2 pathways in asthma. These data also suggest that zileuton and anti-PlGF Ab could be promising therapies to reduce pulmonary morbidity in SCD. PMID:26690703

  20. Rheology of Active Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Active networks drive a diverse range of critical processes ranging from motility to division in living cells, yet a full picture of their rheological capabilities in non-cellular contexts is still emerging, e.g., How does the rheological response of a network capable of remodeling under internally-generated stresses differ from that of a passive biopolymer network? In order to address this and other basic questions, we have engineered an active gel composed of microtubules, bidirectional kinesin motors, and molecular depletant that self-organizes into a highly dynamic network of active bundles. The network continually remodels itself under ATP-tunable cycles of extension, buckling, fracturing, and self-healing. Using confocal rheometry we have simultaneously characterized the network's linear and non-linear rheological responses to shear deformation along with its dynamic morphology. We find several surprising and unique material properties for these active gels; most notably, rheological cloaking, the ability of the active gel to drive large-scale fluid mixing over several orders of flow magnitude while maintaining an invariant, solid-like rheological profile and spontaneous flow under confinement, the ability to exert micro-Newton forces to drive persistent directed motion of the rheometer tool. Taken together, these results and others to be discussed highlight the rich stress-structure-dynamics relationships in this class of biologically-derived active gels.

  1. ABB: active bandwidth broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kason; Law, Eddie

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we shall discuss a novel design on the policy-based management for the Internet. This design deploys the concept of active networking. As opposed to the traditional network design, active network empowers network node with the ability to manipulate data and program code in packets, and configure the network properties according to the needs of different applications. The policy-based management can control network routers in order to realize end-to-end Quality of Service (QoS), such as differentiated and integrated services, across the Internet. For the moment, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) has defined the framework of the policy-based management. It employs a simple client/server model that uses Common Open Policy Service (COPS) protocol to facilitate policy management and control. Our design of Active Bandwidth Broker (ABB) belongs to an active application. Our goals are to distribute centralized workload of the policy-based management over multiple active nodes in the active networks, introduce mobility of the bandwidth brokers, and allows load sharing to the policy-based management. This results a network-wide intelligent, highly available, and consistent QoS control that allows performance protection for voice, video and Internet business application while reducing costs for growing networks.

  2. Phytase activity in lichens.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Niall F; Crittenden, Peter D

    2015-10-01

    Phytase activity was investigated in 13 lichen species using a novel assay method. The work tested the hypothesis that phytase is a component of the suite of surface-bound lichen enzymes that hydrolyse simple organic forms of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) deposited onto the thallus surface. Hydrolysis of inositol hexaphosphate (InsP6 , the substrate for phytase) and appearance of lower-order inositol phosphates (InsP5 -InsP1 ), the hydrolysis products, were measured by ion chromatography. Phytase activity in Evernia prunastri was compared among locations with contrasting rates of N deposition. Phytase activity was readily measurable in epiphytic lichens (e.g. 11.3 μmol InsP6 hydrolysed g(-1)  h(-1) in Bryoria fuscescens) but low in two terricolous species tested (Cladonia portentosa and Peltigera membranacea). Phytase and phosphomonoesterase activities were positively correlated amongst species. In E. prunastri both enzyme activities were promoted by N enrichment and phytase activity was readily released into thallus washings. InsP6 was not detected in tree canopy throughfall but was present in pollen leachate. Capacity to hydrolyse InsP6 appears widespread amongst lichens potentially promoting P capture from atmospheric deposits and plant leachates, and P cycling in forest canopies. The enzyme assay used here might find wider application in studies on plant root-fungal-soil systems. PMID:25963718

  3. Boswellic acids extract attenuates pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin and oxidative stress from gamma irradiation in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by an altered cellular composition of the alveolar region with excessive deposition of collagen. Lung inflammation is also common in pulmonary fibrosis. This study aims to test the inhibition of 5-lipooxygenase (5-LOX) by boswellic acid (BA) extract in an experimental model of pulmonary fibrosis using bleomycin (BL). Methods Boswellic acid extract (1 g/kg) was force-fed to rats seven days prior to administration of BL or gamma irradiation or both. BL (0.15 U/rat) in 25 μl of 0.9% normal saline (NS) or 0.9% NS alone was administered intratracheally. Rats were exposed to two fractionated doses of gamma irradiation (0.5 Gy/dose/week) with a gamma cell-40 (Cesium-137 irradiation units, Canada) during the last two weeks of the experiment. BA was administered during BL or irradiation treatment or both. After the animals were sacrificed, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed; lungs were weighed and processed separately for biochemical and histological studies. Results In rats treated with BL, levels of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were significantly elevated (P = 0.05 and P = 0.005). Hydroxyproline was highly and extensively expressed. Immunoreactive compounds were abundantly expressed, represented in the levels of macrophages infiltrate, accumulation of eosinophils and neutrophils in the lung as well as the aggregation of fibroblasts in the fibrotic area. The levels of lipoxygenase enzyme activity were significantly increased (P = 0.005). Antioxidant activities measured in BL-treated rats deteriorated, coupled with the elevation of both levels of plasma lipid peroxide (LP) content and bronchoalveolar lavage lactate dehydrogenase activity. BA-treated rats had reduced number of macrophages, (P = 0.01), neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (P = 0.01) and protein (P = 0.0001). Moreover, the hydroxyproline content was significantly lowered in BA-treated rats (P = 0

  4. Youth Physical Activity Resources Use and Activity Measured by Accelerometry

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, Andréa L.; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether utilization of physical activity resources (eg, parks) was associated with daily physical activity measured by accelerometry. Methods 111 adolescents completed a travel diary with concurrent accelerometry. The main exposure was self-reported utilization of a physical activity resource (none/1+ resources). The main outcomes were total minutes spent in daily 1) moderate-vigorous physical activity and 2) vigorous physical activity. Results Utilizing a physical activity resource was significantly associated with total minutes in moderate-vigorous physical activity. African-Americans and males had significantly greater moderate-vigorous physical activity. Conclusions Results from this study support the development and use of physical activity resources. PMID:21204684

  5. Abrogation of fibroblast activation protein enzymatic activity attenuates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jonathan D; Valianou, Matthildi; Canutescu, Adrian A; Jaffe, Eileen K; Lee, Hyung-Ok; Wang, Hao; Lai, Jack H; Bachovchin, William W; Weiner, Louis M

    2005-03-01

    Tumor-associated fibroblasts are functionally and phenotypically distinct from normal fibroblasts that are not in the tumor microenvironment. Fibroblast activation protein is a 95 kDa cell surface glycoprotein expressed by tumor stromal fibroblasts, and has been shown to have dipeptidyl peptidase and collagenase activity. Site-directed mutagenesis at the catalytic site of fibroblast activation protein, Ser624 --> Ala624, resulted in an approximately 100,000-fold loss of fibroblast activation protein dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) activity. HEK293 cells transfected with wild-type fibroblast activation protein, enzymatic mutant (S624A) fibroblast activation protein, or vector alone, were inoculated subcutaneously into immunodeficient mouse to assess the contribution of fibroblast activation protein enzymatic activity to tumor growth. Overexpression of wild-type fibroblast activation protein showed growth potentiation and enhanced tumorigenicity compared with both fibroblast activation protein S624A and vector-transfected HEK293 xenografts. HEK293 cells transfected with fibroblast activation protein S624A showed tumor growth rates and tumorigenicity potential similar only to vector-transfected HEK293. In vivo assessment of fibroblast activation protein DPP activity of these tumors showed enhanced enzymatic activity of wild-type fibroblast activation protein, with only baseline levels of fibroblast activation protein DPP activity in either fibroblast activation protein S624A or vector-only xenografts. These results indicate that the enzymatic activity of fibroblast activation protein is necessary for fibroblast activation protein-driven tumor growth in the HEK293 xenograft model system. This establishes the proof-of-principle that the enzymatic activity of fibroblast activation protein plays an important role in the promotion of tumor growth, and provides an attractive target for therapeutics designed to alter fibroblast activation protein-induced tumor growth by targeting

  6. Photon-activation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) is a technique in which radiation dose to tumor is enhanced via introduction of stable /sup 127/I in the form of iodinated deoxyuridine (IdUrd). Stimulation of cytotoxic effects from IdUrd is accomplished by activation with external (or implanted) radiation sources. Thus, accumulations of this nucleoside in actively competing cellpools do not preclude therapy in so far as such tissues can be excluded from the radiation field. Calculations show that 5% replacement of thymidine (Tyd) in tumor DNA should enhance the biological effectiveness of a given photon radiotherapy dose by a factor of approx. 3. Proportionally higher gains would result from higher replacements of Tyd and IdUrd. In addition, biological response is enhanced by chemical sensitization with IdUrd. The data indicate that damage from photon activation as well as chemical sensitization does not repair. Thus, at low dose rates, a further increase in therapeutic gain should accrue as normal tissues are allowed to repair and regenerate. A samarium-145 source has been developed for PAT, with activating x-ray energies of from 38 to 45 keV. Favorable clinical results can be expected through the use of IdUrd and protracted irradiations with low energy x-rays. In particular, PAT may provide unique advantages at selected sites such as brain, or head and neck tumors. (ERB)

  7. [Inflammasome: activation mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Suárez, Raibel; Buelvas, Neudo

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation is a rapid biologic response of the immune system in vascular tissues, directed to eliminate stimuli capable of causing damage and begin the process of repair. The macromolecular complexes known as "inflammasomes" are formed by a receptor, either NOD (NLR) or ALR, the receptor absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2). In addition, the inflammasome is formed by the speck-like protein associated to apoptosis (ASC) and procaspase-1, that may be activated by variations in the ionic and intracellular and extracellular ATP concentrations; and the loss of stabilization of the fagolisosomme by internalization of insoluble crystals and redox mechanisms. As a result, there is activation of the molecular platform and the processing of inflammatory prointerleukins to their active forms. There are two modalities of activation of the inflammasome: canonical and non-canonical, both capable of generating effector responses. Recent data associate NLRP 3, IL-1β and IL-18 in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, hyperhomocysteinemia, gout, malaria and hypertension. The inflammasome cascade is emerging as a new chemotherapeutic target in these diseases. In this review we shall discuss the mechanisms of activation and regulation of the inflammasome that stimulate, modulate and resolve inflammation. PMID:25920188

  8. Mechanochemically Active Soft Robots.

    PubMed

    Gossweiler, Gregory R; Brown, Cameron L; Hewage, Gihan B; Sapiro-Gheiler, Eitan; Trautman, William J; Welshofer, Garrett W; Craig, Stephen L

    2015-10-14

    The functions of soft robotics are intimately tied to their form-channels and voids defined by an elastomeric superstructure that reversibly stores and releases mechanical energy to change shape, grip objects, and achieve complex motions. Here, we demonstrate that covalent polymer mechanochemistry provides a viable mechanism to convert the same mechanical potential energy used for actuation in soft robots into a mechanochromic, covalent chemical response. A bis-alkene functionalized spiropyran (SP) mechanophore is cured into a molded poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) soft robot walker and gripper. The stresses and strains necessary for SP activation are compatible with soft robot function. The color change associated with actuation suggests opportunities for not only new color changing or camouflaging strategies, but also the possibility for simultaneous activation of latent chemistry (e.g., release of small molecules, change in mechanical properties, activation of catalysts, etc.) in soft robots. In addition, mechanochromic stress mapping in a functional robotic device might provide a useful design and optimization tool, revealing spatial and temporal force evolution within the robot in a way that might be coupled to autonomous feedback loops that allow the robot to regulate its own activity. The demonstration motivates the simultaneous development of new combinations of mechanophores, materials, and soft, active devices for enhanced functionality. PMID:26390078

  9. Active imaging at DARPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricklin, J. C.; Tomlinson, P. G.

    2005-08-01

    Active systems, because they provide their own illumination, are capable of operating 24 hours a day and are not dependent upon the angle of the sun. Unlike passive systems, they can provide three-dimensional imaging. DARPA is currently developing systems, technologies, and signal processing to pioneer new or improve existing capabilities that employ active imaging capabilities. These involve both radar and ladar, ranging from a few MHz for foliage penetration to near-visible IR to achieve ultra-high resolution at long range. These capabilities would improve Battlefield Awareness (BA) and provide persistent Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) to perform target detection, recognition, and identification. This paper discusses two different approaches to active optical imaging. One is a coherent approach that uses synthetic aperture techniques with infrared laser radar, and another approach uses only the intensity of the speckle pattern in the aperture plane. Both are capable of producing ultra-high resolution at long range.

  10. Prenucleosomes and Active Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Khuong, Mai T.; Fei, Jia; Ishii, Haruhiko; Kadonaga, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin consists of nucleosomes as well as nonnucleosomal histone-containing particles. Here we describe the prenucleosome, which is a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome that associates with ~80 bp DNA. Prenucleosomes are formed rapidly upon the deposition of histones onto DNA and can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by an ATP-driven chromatin assembly factor such as ACF. Different lines of evidence reveal that there are prenucleosome-sized DNA-containing particles with histones in the upstream region of active promoters. Moreover, p300 acetylates histone H3K56 in prenucleosomes but not in nucleosomes, and H3K56 acetylation is found at active promoters and enhancers. These findings therefore suggest that there may be prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles in the upstream region of active promoters. More generally, we postulate that prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles are present at dynamic chromatin, whereas canonical nucleosomes are at static chromatin. PMID:26767995

  11. Flare Activity on Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskanian, V. S.

    A review of the existing flare data analyses indicates that most probably the flare phenomenon should be considered as one of the manifestation forms of solar-type chromospheric activity on stars and therefore has to be investigated in common with other phenomena specifying this activity. In order to estimate the reliability of such an approach different types of observational data are discussed. It could be shown that most of the phenomena specifying the solar chromospheric activity (BY Dra syndrome, indicating the spottedness of the stellar surface, long-term cyclic variations of emission line intensities, variable local magnetic fields, flares, coronal phenomena, etc.) are observable on a constantly growing number of stars of almost all spectral types and luminosity classes. This fact indicates that the proposed approach could be the right way to solve the problem of the flare phenomenon.

  12. Activity Cycles in Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Starspots and stellar activity can be detected in other stars using high precision photometric and spectrometric measurements. These observations have provided some surprises (starspots at the poles - sunspots are rarely seen poleward of 40 degrees) but more importantly they reveal behaviors that constrain our models of solar-stellar magnetic dynamos. The observations reveal variations in cycle characteristics that depend upon the stellar structure, convection zone dynamics, and rotation rate. In general, the more rapidly rotating stars are more active. However, for stars like the Sun, some are found to be inactive while nearly identical stars are found to be very active indicating that periods like the Sun's Maunder Minimum (an inactive period from 1645 to 1715) are characteristic of Sun-like stars.

  13. Active oxide nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicken, Matthew J.

    Materials that can be manipulated electrically or mechanically to induce a change in their intrinsic properties are highly relevant when suitably integrated with current technologies. These "active" materials, such as oxide-based ferroelectrics or materials with easily accessible changes of phase, find extensive use as mechanical resonators, solid-state memories, and optical modulators. Barium titanate, a tetragonal ferroelectric at room temperature, is a prime example of a material both mechanically and optically active. This thesis deals primarily with the deposition of active, oxide-based materials and their integration into device structures where either the mechanical or optical properties are exploited. The technologically interesting paradigms within which these active oxide materials have been investigated are microelectromechanical systems, plasmonics, and metamaterials. Microelectromechanical systems are devices that have been micromachined and rely on an applied voltage to induce a mechanical response. Mechanically active materials, such as piezoelectrics or ferroelectrics, can increase the response of these devices. Plasmonics deals with electromagnetic waves resonantly coupled into free electron oscillations at a metal-dielectric interface or metal nanoparticle. Coupling to these resonant modes allows surface plasmon polaritons to propagate along the metal with a nonlinear dispersion. Metamaterials are ordered, subwavelength, metal inclusions in a dielectric, which respond collectively to electromagnetic radiation. This response can yield a material permittivity or permeability not found in nature. The optical properties of metamaterials lead to effects such as negative index response and super lensing, and can be used to design optical cloaking structures. Here, devices utilizing these effects are investigated with an eye toward tuning or switching their resonant response using optically active oxide thin films. This manuscript follows the evolution

  14. Space construction activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Center for Space Construction at the University of Colorado at Boulder was established in 1988 as a University Space Engineering Research Center. The mission of the Center is to conduct interdisciplinary engineering research which is critical to the construction of future space structures and systems and to educate students who will have the vision and technical skills to successfully lead future space construction activities. The research activities are currently organized around two central projects: Orbital Construction and Lunar Construction. Summaries of the research projects are included.

  15. MCO Monitoring activity description

    SciTech Connect

    SEXTON, R.A.

    1998-11-09

    Spent Nuclear Fuel remaining from Hanford's N-Reactor operations in the 1970s has been stored under water in the K-Reactor Basins. This fuel will be repackaged, dried and stored in a new facility in the 200E Area. The safety basis for this process of retrieval, drying, and interim storage of the spent fuel has been established. The monitoring of MCOS in dry storage is a currently identified issue in the SNF Project. This plan outlines the key elements of the proposed monitoring activity. Other fuel stored in the K-Reactor Basins, including SPR fuel, will have other monitoring considerations and is not addressed by this activity description.

  16. Inflammasomes and Their Activation

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Sonal; Luc, Nancy; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The innate immune system relies on the recognition of pathogens by pattern recognition receptors as a first line of defense and to initiate the adaptive immune response. Substantial progress has been made in defining the role of Nod (nucleotide-binding oligimerization domain)-like receptors and AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2) as pattern recognition receptors that activate inflammasomes in macrophages. Inflammasomes are protein platforms essential for the activation of inflammatory caspases and subsequent maturation of their pro-inflammatory cytokine substrates and induction of pyroptosis. This paper summarizes recent developments regarding the function of Nod-like receptors in immunity and disease. PMID:21083527

  17. Active cleaning technique device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a laboratory demonstration model of an active cleaning technique (ACT) device. The principle of this device is based primarily on the technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces. This active cleaning technique involves exposing contaminated surfaces to a plasma containing atomic oxygen or combinations of other reactive gases. The ACT device laboratory demonstration model incorporates, in addition to plasma cleaning, the means to operate the device as an ion source for sputtering experiments. The overall ACT device includes a plasma generation tube, an ion accelerator, a gas supply system, a RF power supply and a high voltage dc power supply.

  18. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  19. Cryogenic activities at ESTEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, C. I.

    1989-05-01

    Although the main present cryogenic activity in ESTEC revolves around the preparation of ISO for launch in 1993, many other activities such as Meteosat second generation, FIRST, GRASP, QUASAT, and X-ray detection using bolometers all require some form of cooling to 80 K or less. ESTEC, in an effort to overcome the major constraint of lifetime when using the solution of cryogens is currently involved in the study and development of two mechanical coolers for work in the temperature ranges of 80 and 4 K are based on a Stirling cycle. This paper gives an overview of ESTEC cryogenic interests with an emphasis on the above mechanical coolers.

  20. Solar cell activation system

    SciTech Connect

    Apelian, L.

    1983-07-05

    A system for activating solar cells involves the use of phosphorescent paint, the light from which is amplified by a thin magnifying lens and used to activate solar cells. In a typical system, a member painted with phosphorescent paint is mounted adjacent a thin magnifying lens which focuses the light on a predetermined array of sensitive cells such as selenium, cadmium or silicon, mounted on a plastic board. A one-sided mirror is mounted adjacent the cells to reflect the light back onto said cells for purposes of further intensification. The cells may be coupled to rechargeable batteries or used to directly power a small radio or watch.

  1. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  2. Physical Activities for Preschool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkins, Dorothy C.; And Others

    The underlying premise of the University of Hawaii Physical Activities for Preschool curriculum is that important contributions to a positive self-concept are made by motor independence and a realistic body image. Program objectives include: (1) the development of strength, endurance, and flexibility in skills that involve the muscles,…

  3. The Puzzle Design Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Marc E.

    1983-01-01

    A sampling of puzzles and games produced by students at North Rockland High School (New York) are presented as an example of a way student-designed activities can be used to cover a specific unit within the health education curriculum. Produced by 9th and 10th graders, the unit on alcohol consists of puzzles and word games using related vocabulary…

  4. [Problem Solving Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ. - Stout, Menomonie. Center for Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    The teacher directed problem solving activities package contains 17 units: Future Community Design, Let's Build an Elevator, Let's Construct a Catapult, Let's Design a Recreational Game, Let's Make a Hand Fishing Reel, Let's Make a Wall Hanging, Let's Make a Yo-Yo, Marooned in the Past, Metrication, Mousetrap Vehicles, The Multi System…

  5. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  6. Elastolytic activity among staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Janda, J M

    1986-01-01

    A total of 161 isolates of the genus Staphylococcus were evaluated for the ability to produce elastase. Elastase activity was detected only in S. epidermidis strains (sensu stricto), being absent in S. aureus isolates and other coagulase-negative staphylococci tested. The elastase elaborated by S. epidermidis isolates appeared to be an inducible enzyme whose synthesis was medium dependent. PMID:3640774

  7. Activities: Preparing for Pythagoras.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laing, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Three worksheets are provided to help secondary students explore relationships among the areas of a variety of similar figures constructed on the sides of right triangles. The activity is extended to include the relationship among the lengths of the sides of the right triangle. Included are several student worksheets. (DC)

  8. Active-bridge oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2001-01-01

    An active bridge oscillator is formed from a differential amplifier where positive feedback is a function of the impedance of one of the gain elements and a relatively low value common emitter resistance. This use of the nonlinear transistor parameter h stabilizes the output and eliminates the need for ALC circuits common to other bridge oscillators.

  9. Regional Activities Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library network activities in Canada, the Third World, Japan, Malaysia, Brazil, and Sweden which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Canada: A Voluntary and Flexible Network," a review by Guy Sylvestre of the political, social, and economic structures affecting…

  10. Facilitating Active Learner Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Steven; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Project Participate has developed and implemented a model for making decisions about interventions that enhance the ability of a preschool child with severe motor disabilities to actively participate in educational programs. The effectiveness of the process in increasing child participation in play, communication, social interaction, and mobility…

  11. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  12. Evaluating Guidance Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanborn, Marshall P.

    This report discusses one of the consistent problems in school counseling and guidance-that of furnishing concrete evidence concerning the effects of counseling and guidance activities on the development of children. The following causal factors are discussed: (1) the difficulty of pinning down abstractly stated goals in an operational manner at…

  13. Activity: Computer Talk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students create a computer program capable of recording and projecting paper use at school. Includes instructional strategies and background information such as requirements for pounds of paper/tree, energy needs, water consumption, and paper value at the recycling center. A sample program is included. (DH)

  14. Educating for Political Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitty, Clyde

    2010-01-01

    The term "political activity" can be interpreted in a myriad of different ways, but in this paper, it is taken to mean involvement in a variety of campaigns around issues affecting the way we live and the sort of society we want to live in. At a time when support for the main political parties has never been weaker, it is essential that teachers…

  15. Conflict Activity Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Margo; Otero, George

    These action oriented activity cards dealing with conflict situations are for use with secondary students. The cards are intended to supplement any course dealing with conflict, including U.S. history, sociology, English, literature, economics, area studies, or political science. The cards are organized by color into certain broad categories which…

  16. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  17. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  18. Primary Guidance Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauck, Ruth, Comp.

    Designed for the primary grades, the guidance activities in this document cover thirty-three topical areas: capabilities, changes, cooperation, criticism, differences, family, feelings, free time, friends, following directions, handicaps, honesty, improving environment, kindness, patience, paying attention, problem solving, rejection,…

  19. Dissemination Activities Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Hanna; Batatia, Hudj; Bauters, Merja; Ben Ami, Zvi; Drachman, Raul; Flouris, Giorgos; Jadin, Tanja; Jalonen, Satu; Karlgren, Klas; Karpati, Andrea; Kotzinos, Dimitris; Lakkala, Minna; Lallimo, Jiri; Moen, Anne; Nygard, Kathrine; Paavola, Sami; Padiglia, Sheila; Scapolla, Marina; Sins, Patrick; Vasileva, Tania

    2008-01-01

    In the first 24 months of the project, KP-Lab members were highly dedicated to dissemination and were engaged in various dissemination activities that contributed to the prime objective of the KP-Lab dissemination efforts which is "to make the project widely known to a variety of prospective users and, at a later stage, to promote the…

  20. Rubisco Activase Activity Assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase functions as a mechano-chemical motor protein using the energy from ATP hydrolysis to contort the structure of its target protein, Rubisco. This action modulates the activation state of Rubisco by removing tightly-bound inhibitory s...

  1. Active Learning Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    Present generation students are primarily active learners with varied learning experiences and lecture courses may not suit all their learning needs. Effective learning involves providing students with a sense of progress and control over their own learning. This requires creating a situation where learners have a chance to try out or test their…

  2. Geology: The Active Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Geology: The Active Earth." Contents are organized into the following…

  3. Ocean Drilling Simulation Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telese, James A.; Jordan, Kathy

    The Ocean Drilling Project brings together scientists and governments from 20 countries to explore the earth's structure and history as it is revealed beneath the oceans' basins. Scientific expeditions examine rock and sediment cores obtained from the ocean floor to learn about the earth's basic processes. The series of activities in this…

  4. E-Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Joy

    2001-01-01

    Presents five technology-based activities to teach elementary students about the human body, including: creating a heartbeat graph; charting the benefits of exercise; playing a "sense"ational card game; reading online stories from three children living with various conditions or illnesses; and examining diagrams of the human body that have been…

  5. Highlights of 1976 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.

    1976-01-01

    Highlights of NASA's 1976 activities are summarized. Sixteen successful launches were made. Two landings of Viking spacecraft on Mars and rollout of the space shuttle orbiter are reviewed. Applications of aerospace science to education, health care, and community services are also discussed.

  6. Bonus Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Elementary level activity book presents suggestions for teaching students about endangered and threatened species worldwide. Students learn about what is causing the rapid extinction rate and what needs to be done. They also discover the value of rainforests and why conservationists are fighting to save them. (SM)

  7. Communication Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This communication systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 32 modules on the following topics: story…

  8. Open Space Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Clifford E.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a science activity in which students are given an opportunity to consider the values of open space. The program includes direct involvement as communicators of feelings and facts, leading students to a position of making wise decisions for land use in the future. (EB)

  9. Earthfest. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weilbacher, Mike

    1991-01-01

    An activity book to help elementary teachers and students explore the environment offers information and questions about spaceships; an ecology primer and poster with questions; information on animal adaptation with poster and questions; ecological and dramatic arts projects; a script for performance; and suggestions to make Earth Day celebrations…

  10. Forecasting geomagnetic activity indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, J.; Wing, S.; Johnson, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    Magnetically active times, e.g., Kp > 5, are notoriously difficult to predict, precisely the times when such predictions are crucial to the space weather users. Taking advantage of the routinely available solar wind measurements at Langrangian point (L1) and nowcast Kps, Kp and Dst forecast models based on neural networks were developed with the focus on improving the forecast for active times. To satisfy different needs and operational constraints, three models were developed: (1) a model that inputs nowcast Kp and solar wind parameters and predicts Kp 1 hr ahead; (2) a model with the same input as model 1 and predicts Kp 4 hr ahead; and (3) a model that inputs only solar wind parameters and predicts Kp 1 hr ahead (the exact prediction lead time depends on the solar wind speed and the location of the solar wind monitor.) Extensive evaluations of these models and other major operational Kp forecast models show that, while the new models can predict Kps more accurately for all activities, the most dramatic improvements occur for moderate and active times. Similar Dst models were developed. Information dynamics analysis of Kp, suggests that geospace is more dominated by internal dynamics near solar minimum than near solar maximum, when it is more directly driven by external inputs, namely solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF).

  11. Holidays & Festivals: Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Debbie

    There are many times throughout the year when change is celebrated. This elementary level, interdisciplinary resource gives background information and activities related to cross-cultural celebrations of change. Topics covered include: (1) "Charting Changes"; (2) "Special People"; (3) "Celebrating Light"; (4) "Planting and Harvesting"; and (5)…

  12. Environmental Chemistry Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackland, Thomas; And Others

    The authors of this curriculum supplement believe in a laboratory approach to chemistry and express the feeling that environmental chemistry provides the students an opportunity to apply theoretical chemistry to important practical problems. There are eighteen activities presented, each accompanied with behavioral objectives, one or more suggested…

  13. Energy assessment: physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity is an important component of total energy expenditure, contributing to energy intake needs; it also provides certain health benefits. This review chapter provides state-of-the-art information to researchers and clinicians who are interested in developing research studies or interv...

  14. TI-73 Calculator Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips-Bey, Carol K.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes TI-73 calculator activities appropriate for middle school students. It was found that the use of the calculator allowed for higher-level thinking and a richer exploration of mathematical ideas by students. [Included with this article are "Dice Roll Worksheet" and "Transforming Tree Worksheet".] (Contains 9 figures.)

  15. Creative Activity and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Flora E.

    1979-01-01

    This article compares three theories of the creative process taken from aesthetic philosophy: aesthetic enjoyment (D. W. Gotshalk), aesthetic experience (John Dewey), and aesthetic knowledge (Susanne Langer). Each shows different versions of the learning that accrues from creative activity. From this, curriculum planning and teaching suggestions…

  16. Shark Tagging Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current: The Journal of Marine Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    In this group activity, children learn about the purpose of tagging and how scientists tag a shark. Using a cut-out of a shark, students identify, measure, record data, read coordinates, and tag a shark. Includes introductory information about the purpose of tagging and the procedure, a data sheet showing original tagging data from Tampa Bay, and…

  17. Active rejector filter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchinskii, A.G.; Pirogov, S.G.; Savchenko, V.M.; Yakushev, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes an active rejector filter for suppressing noise signals in the frequency range 50-100 Hz and for extracting a vlf information signal. The filter has the following characteristics: a high input impedance, a resonant frequency of 75 Hz, a Q of 1.25, and an attenuation factor of 53 dB at resonant frequency.

  18. 85 Engaging Movement Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weikart, Phyllis S.; Carlton, Elizabeth B.

    This book presents activities to keep K-6 students moving in a variety of ways as they learn. The movement experiences are planned around key curriculum concepts in movement and music as well as in academic curriculum areas. The experiences develop students' basic timing, language abilities, vocabulary, concentration, planning skills, and…

  19. Highlights of 1978 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    General highlights of NASA's activities for 1978 are presented. The highlights are categorized into topics such as space science, space transportation systems, space and terrestrial applications, environment, technology utilization, aeronautics, space research and technology, energy programs, and international. A list of the 1978 launches including: (1) launch date; (2) payload designation; (3) launch vehicle; (4) launch site and (5) mission remarks is also presented.

  20. Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2012-04-01

    Commission 10 of the International Astronomical Union has more than 650 members who study a wide range of activity phenomena produced by our nearest star, the Sun. Solar activity is intrinsically related to solar magnetic fields and encompasses events from the smallest energy releases (nano- or even picoflares) to the largest eruptions in the Solar System, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which propagate into the Heliosphere reaching the Earth and beyond. Solar activity is manifested in the appearance of sunspot groups or active regions, which are the principal sources of activity phenomena from the emergence of their magnetic flux through their dispersion and decay. The period 2008-2009 saw an unanticipated extended solar cycle minimum and unprecedentedly weak polar-cap and heliospheric field. Associated with that was the 2009 historical maximum in galactic cosmic rays flux since measurements begun in the middle of the 20th Century. Since then Cycle 24 has re-started solar activity producing some spectacular eruptions observed with a fleet of spacecraft and ground-based facilities. In the last triennium major advances in our knowledge and understanding of solar activity were due to continuing success of space missions as SOHO, Hinode, RHESSI and the twin STEREO spacecraft, further enriched by the breathtaking images of the solar atmosphere produced by the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) launched on 11 February 2010 in the framework of NASA's Living with a Star program. In August 2012, at the time of the IAU General Assembly in Beijing when the mandate of this Commission ends, we will be in the unique position to have for the first time a full 3-D view of the Sun and solar activity phenomena provided by the twin STEREO missions about 120 degrees behind and ahead of Earth and other spacecraft around the Earth and ground-based observatories. These new observational insights are continuously posing new questions, inspiring and advancing theoretical analysis and

  1. Asteroseismic stellar activity relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, A.; Corsaro, E.; Karoff, C.

    2014-11-01

    Context. In asteroseismology an important diagnostic of the evolutionary status of a star is the small frequency separation which is sensitive to the gradient of the mean molecular weight in the stellar interior. It is thus interesting to discuss the classical age-activity relations in terms of this quantity. Moreover, as the photospheric magnetic field tends to suppress the amplitudes of acoustic oscillations, it is important to quantify the importance of this effect by considering various activity indicators. Aims: We propose a new class of age-activity relations that connects the Mt. Wilson S index and the average scatter in the light curve with the small frequency separation and the amplitude of the p-mode oscillations. Methods: We used a Bayesian inference to compute the posterior probability of various empirical laws for a sample of 19 solar-like active stars observed by the Kepler telescope. Results: We demonstrate the presence of a clear correlation between the Mt. Wilson S index and the relative age of the stars as indicated by the small frequency separation, as well as an anti-correlation between the S index and the oscillation amplitudes. We argue that the average activity level of the stars shows a stronger correlation with the small frequency separation than with the absolute age that is often considered in the literature. Conclusions: The phenomenological laws discovered in this paper have the potential to become new important diagnostics to link stellar evolution theory with the dynamics of global magnetic fields. In particular we argue that the relation between the Mt. Wilson S index and the oscillation amplitudes is in good agreement with the findings of direct numerical simulations of magneto-convection.

  2. Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerantzis, Nikolaos; Mitrouda, Aikaterini; Reizopoulou, Ioanna; Sidiropoulou, Eirini; Hatzidimitriou, Antonios

    2016-04-01

    On November 9th, 2015, three didactical hours were dedicated to Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities (http://wp.me/p6Hte2-1I). Our students and their teachers formed three groups and in rotation, were engaged with the following activities: (a) viewing unique images of the Cosmos in the mobile planetarium STARLAB (http://www.planitario.gr/tholos-starlab-classic-standard.html), (b) watching the following videos: Journey to the end of the universe (https://youtu.be/Ufl_Nwbl8xs), Rosetta update (https://youtu.be/nQ9ivd7wv30), The Solar System (https://youtu.be/d66dsagrTa0), Ambition the film (https://youtu.be/H08tGjXNHO4) in the school's library. Students and teachers were informed about our solar system, the Rosetta mission, the universe, etc. and (c) tactile activities such as Meet our home and Meet our neighbors (http://astroedu.iau.org, http://nuclio.org/astroneighbours/resources) and the creation of planets' 3D models (Geology-Geography A' Class Student's book, pg.15). With the activities above we had the pleasure to join the Cosmic Light Edu Kit / International Year of Light 2015 program. After our Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities, we did a "small" research: our students had to fill an evaluation about their educational gains and the results can be found here http://wp.me/p6Hte2-2q. Moreover, we discussed about Big Ideas of Science (http://wp.me/p3oRiZ-dm) and through the "big" impact of the Rosetta mission & the infinity of our universe, we print posters with relevant topics and place them to the classrooms. We thank Rosa Doran (Nuclio - President of the Executive Council) for her continuous assistance and support on innovative science teaching proposals. She is an inspiration.

  3. [Primary prevention: physical activity].

    PubMed

    Schuler, G

    2004-01-01

    Traditional risk factors such as smoking, hypertension and being overweight have received considerable attention in recent years, whereas physical activity as a preventive strategy does not enjoy the same public attention. In recent years the level of physical activity has decreased dramatically in children and adolescents in favor of time spent on the internet and in front of the TV. If this trend is allowed to develop along the same direction, a sharp increase in cardiovascular disease can be anticipated. The protective action of physical activity on the cardiovascular system has been well documented in large numbers of patients, and the basic physiological mechanisms have been elucidated. Metabolic changes comprise loss of weight, reduction in triglyceride and LDL levels, as well as an increase in HDL. Insulin sensitivity is enhanced in all tissues postponing the manifestation of diabetes mellitus. Shear forces created by physical activity induce ecNOS within the endothelial lining of the arteries. This enzyme is responsible for controlling vasomotion through the elaboration of NO which causes vasodilation in the smooth muscle within the vessel wall. Utilization of preformed collateral vessels has been postulated repeatedly; so far, however, it only could be documented in animals, not in humans. Nearly all studies concerned with primary prevention have shown a significant negative correlation between energy expenditure during exercise and cardiovascular mortality, even light and moderate exercise will result in a lower incidence. In order to eliminate a sedentary life style in children and adolescents, adequate programs should be initiated in all schools; they should aim for 60 min of physical activity on a daily basis. PMID:15021990

  4. Phloroglucinol and Terpenoid Derivatives from Hypericum cistifolium and H. galioides (Hypericaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Crockett, Sara L.; Kunert, Olaf; Pferschy-Wenzig, Eva-Maria; Jacob, Melissa; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Bauer, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    A new simple phloroglucinol derivative characterized as 1-(6-hydroxy-2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-methyl-1-propanone (1) was isolated from Hypericum cistifolium (Hypericaceae) as a major constituent of the non-polar plant extract. Minor amounts of this new compound, in addition to two known structurally related phloroglucinol derivatives (2 and 3), and two new terpenoid derivatives characterized, respectively, as 2-benzoyl-3,3-dimethyl-4R,6S-bis-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-cyclohexanone (4a) and 2-benzoyl-3,3-dimethyl-4S,6R-bis-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-cyclohexanone (4b), were isolated from a related species, H. galioides Lam. The chemical structures were established using 2D-NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. These compounds were evaluated in vitro for antimicrobial activity against a panel of pathogenic microorganisms and anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of COX-1, COX-2, and 5-LOX catalyzed LTB4 formation. PMID:27458464

  5. The Structure of Human 15-Lipoxygenase-2 with a Substrate Mimic*

    PubMed Central

    Kobe, Matthew J.; Neau, David B.; Mitchell, Caitlin E.; Bartlett, Sue G.; Newcomer, Marcia E.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is associated with chronic inflammation occurring over decades. The enzyme 15-lipoxygenase-2 (15-LOX-2) is highly expressed in large atherosclerotic plaques, and its activity has been linked to the progression of macrophages to the lipid-laden foam cells present in atherosclerotic plaques. We report here the crystal structure of human 15-LOX-2 in complex with an inhibitor that appears to bind as a substrate mimic. 15-LOX-2 contains a long loop, composed of hydrophobic amino acids, which projects from the amino-terminal membrane-binding domain. The loop is flanked by two Ca2+-binding sites that confer Ca2+-dependent membrane binding. A comparison of the human 15-LOX-2 and 5-LOX structures reveals similarities at the active sites, as well striking differences that can be exploited for design of isoform-selective inhibitors. PMID:24497644

  6. Critical Thinking: Inert Information, Activated Ignorance, and Activated Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Richard; Elder, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Suggests that there are three ways of taking in information: internalizing inert information, forming activated ignorance, or achieving activated knowledge. Explains that only activated knowledge leads the learner, by implication, to more knowledge, and that seeking the logic of things can lead to discovery of activated knowledge. (NB)

  7. Is Enhanced Physical Activity Possible Using Active Videogames?

    PubMed Central

    Baranowski, Janice; O'Connor, Teresia; Lu, Amy Shirong; Thompson, Debbe

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Our research indicated that 10–12-year-old children receiving two active Wii™ (Nintendo®; Nintendo of America, Inc., Redmond, WA) console videogames were no more physically active than children receiving two inactive videogames. Research is needed on how active videogames may increase physical activity. PMID:24416640

  8. 101 Environmental Education Activities. Booklet 6--Social Studies Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Helen, Comp.

    Based on the environment and directed at elementary and intermediate level students, 5 field trips are a significant part of the 12 social studies activities in the sixth booklet by the Upper Mississippi River ECO-Center outlining environmental and outdoor education activities. Most of the activities include objectives, activity description,…

  9. Integration of Active Video Games in Extracurricular Activity at Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jung Eun; Huang, Charles; Pope, Zachary; Gao, Zan

    2015-01-01

    Active video games require players to be physically active. Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) is an interactive dancing game that requires fast-foot movement coordinated with energetic music and visuals. The Wii and Xbox Kinect games have also become good active video games for the promotion of physical activity participation. These games are much more…

  10. Pulmonary Myeloperoxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ozment, Tammy Regena

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are considered one of the first responders of the innate immune response. Their primary activities are to migrate to sites of infection by chemotaxis and trans-migration across the endothelium (Gaines et al., 2005). Once at the site of infection, they phagocytize microbes and kill them. Critical to the neutrophil's ability to kill microbes are the multiple degradative enzymes contained within granules. The activity of these enzymes is non-specific, and therefore, neutrophils also contribute to tissue damage at the site of infection (Gaines and Berliner, 2005). Measurement of neutrophil infiltration into tissues is one way to gauge the severity of infection, inflammation, and tissue damage (Ayala et al., 2002). Myeloperoxidase is found in the primary granules of neutrophils and is an effective measure of neutrophil infiltration into tissues (Gaines and Berliner, 2005).

  11. Optimism in Active Learning

    PubMed Central

    Collet, Timothé; Pietquin, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Active learning is the problem of interactively constructing the training set used in classification in order to reduce its size. It would ideally successively add the instance-label pair that decreases the classification error most. However, the effect of the addition of a pair is not known in advance. It can still be estimated with the pairs already in the training set. The online minimization of the classification error involves a tradeoff between exploration and exploitation. This is a common problem in machine learning for which multiarmed bandit, using the approach of Optimism int the Face of Uncertainty, has proven very efficient these last years. This paper introduces three algorithms for the active learning problem in classification using Optimism in the Face of Uncertainty. Experiments lead on built-in problems and real world datasets demonstrate that they compare positively to state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26681934

  12. Apheresis activity in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, Christiane

    2005-07-01

    Interest for apheresis activity has been growing in Venezuela. In 1976 there were only a few devices; in 2003, 80 apheresis machines performed 27,675 donor apheresis procedures and 547 therapeutic procedures countrywide. We report the activity at the Metropolitan Blood Bank (the largest one of the country) in the period 1999-2003: 597 therapeutic procedures were performed in 171 patients, during 212 crisis episodes. The average age was 38 +/- 16 years, 65% male and 35% female. Most of the therapeutic procedures were therapeutic plasma exchange for hematology diseases (mainly thrombotic thrombocitopenic purpura and hemophilia inhibitors), including 184 therapeutic procedures with the Autopheresis-C (Baxter Healthcare Corp., Deerfield, IL). Most common adverse effects (3.9%) were hypotension and allergic reactions to the plasma. PMID:15880361

  13. Active region seismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, Tom; Braun, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    Active region seismology is concerned with the determination and interpretation of the interaction of the solar acoustic oscillations with near-surface target structures, such as magnetic flux concentration, sunspots, and plage. Recent observations made with a high spatial resolution and a long temporal duration enabled measurements of the scattering matrix for sunspots and solar active regions to be carried out as a function of the mode properties. Based on this information, the amount of p-mode absorption, partial-wave phase shift, and mode mixing introduced by the sunspot, could be determined. In addition, the possibility of detecting the presence of completely submerged magnetic fields was raised, and new procedures for performing acoustic holography of the solar interior are being developed. The accumulating evidence points to the mode conversion of p-modes to various magneto-atmospheric waves within the magnetic flux concentration as being the unifying physical mechanism responsible for these diverse phenomena.

  14. LANSCE Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Amy Robinson; Audrey Archuleta; Barbara Maes; Dan Strottman; Earl Hoffman; Garth Tietjen; Gene Farnum; Geoff Greene; Joyce Roberts; Ken Johnson; Paul Lewis; Roger Pynn; Stan Schriber; Steve Sterbenz; Steve Wender; Sue Harper

    1999-02-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Activity Report describes scientific and technological progress and achievements in LANSCE Division during the period of 1995 to 1998. This report includes a message from the Division Director, an overview of LANSCE, sponsor overviews, research highlights, advanced projects and facility upgrades achievements, experimental and user program accomplishments, news and events, and a list of publications. The research highlights cover the areas of condensed-matter science and engineering, accelerator science, nuclear science, and radiography. This report also contains a compact disk that includes an overview, the Activity Report itself, LANSCE operations progress reports for 1996 and 1997, experiment reports from LANSCE users, as well as a search capability.

  15. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  16. Active nanoplasmonic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, O.; Pendry, J. B.; Maier, S. A.; Oulton, R. F.; Hamm, J. M.; Tsakmakidis, K. L.

    2012-07-01

    Optical metamaterials and nanoplasmonics bridge the gap between conventional optics and the nanoworld. Exciting and technologically important capabilities range from subwavelength focusing and stopped light to invisibility cloaking, with applications across science and engineering from biophotonics to nanocircuitry. A problem that has hampered practical implementations have been dissipative metal losses, but the efficient use of optical gain has been shown to compensate these and to allow for loss-free operation, amplification and nanoscopic lasing. Here, we review recent and ongoing progress in the realm of active, gain-enhanced nanoplasmonic metamaterials. On introducing and expounding the underlying theoretical concepts of the complex interaction between plasmons and gain media, we examine the experimental efforts in areas such as nanoplasmonic and metamaterial lasers. We underscore important current trends that may lead to improved active imaging, ultrafast nonlinearities on the nanoscale or cavity-free lasing in the stopped-light regime.

  17. Modeling flexible active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Michael; Selinger, Robin

    We study active nematic phases of self-propelled flexible chains in two dimensions using computer simulation, to investigate effects of chain flexibility. In a ``dry'' phase of self-propelled flexible chains, we find that increasing chain stiffness enhances orientational order and correlation length, narrows the distribution of turning angles, increases persistence length, and increases the magnitude of giant density fluctuations. We further adapt the simulation model to describe behavior of microtubules driven by kinesin molecular motors in two different environments: on a rigid substrate with kinesin immobilized on the surface; and on a lipid membrane where kinesin is bonded to lipid head groups and can diffuse. Results are compared to experiments by L. Hirst and J. Xu. Lastly, we consider active nematics of flexible particles enclosed in soft, deformable encapsulation in two dimensions, and demonstrate novel mechanisms of pattern formation that are fundamentally different from those observed in bulk. Supported by NSF-DMR 1409658.

  18. Active Biological Materials

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Daniel A.; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2011-01-01

    Cells make use of dynamic internal structures to control shape and create movement. By consuming energy to assemble into highly organized systems of interacting parts, these structures can generate force and resist compression, as well as adaptively change in response to their environment. Recent progress in reconstituting cytoskeletal structures in vitro has provided an opportunity to characterize the mechanics and dynamics of filament networks formed from purified proteins. Results indicate that a complex interplay between length scales and timescales underlies the mechanical responses of these systems and that energy consumption, as manifested in molecular motor activity and cytoskeletal filament growth, can drive transitions between distinct material states. This review discusses the basic characteristics of these active biological materials that set them apart from conventional materials and that create a rich array of unique behaviors. PMID:18999991

  19. Endocrine activation in tachycardias.

    PubMed

    Lukac, P; Lukacova, S; Vigas, M; Hatala, R

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the complex character of neuroendocrine response to paroxysmal tachycardia. While the endocrine influences in arrhythmogenesis are well perceived by the cardiologists, less attention has been paid to influence of tachycardia on neuroendocrine activation. However, this may significantly alter the clinical course of tachycardias and its responses to pharmacotherapeutic interventions. Main characteristics of hormones with direct relationship to cardiovascular system (ANP, AVP, catecholamines, angiotensin and others) are listed with description of regulation of their secretion and main biological effects, especially with regard to regulation of circulation. Changes in hemodynamics during tachycardia with accompanying changes in ANP, AVP renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympatho-neural and sympatho-adrenal activation are reviewed. Further research and understanding require more complex approach and concentration on interrelationship of different regulatory hormones in tachycardia. (Fig. 2, Ref. 96.) PMID:11763674

  20. Mount Erebus activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An international team of scientists reports that unusually high seismic activity joggled Mount Erebus last fall. However, the Antarctic volcano showed no external signs of an eruption.When scientists from the United States, Japan, and New Zealand returned to the world's southernmost active volcano last November for their annual field expedition, they found that seismic stations recorded 650 small tremors on October 8; prior to that, the number of quakes had averaged between 20 and 80 per day. The October 8 maximum was followed by 140 on October 9 and 120 on October 10. Philip R. Kyle, assistant professor of geochemistry at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro and leader of the team studying Mount Erebus, noted that some of the strongest earthquakes recorded during the team's 3 years of observations occurred on October 8; these registered less than 2 on the Richter scale.

  1. Physical Activity Patterns during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Borodulin, Katja; Evenson, Kelly R; Wen, Fang; Herring, Amy H.; Benson, Aimee

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to describe the mode, frequency, duration, and intensity of physical activity among pregnant women, to explore whether these women reached the recommended levels of activity, and to explore how these patterns changed during pregnancy. Methods This study, as part of the third phase of the Pregnancy, Infection, and Nutrition Study, investigated physical activity among 1482 pregnant women. A recall of the different modes, frequency, duration, and intensity of physical activity during the past week was assessed in two telephone interviews at 17–22 and 27–30 weeks’ gestation. Results Most women reported some type of physical activity during both time periods. Child and adult care giving, indoor household, and recreational activities constituted the largest proportion of total reported activity. The overall physical activity level decreased during pregnancy, particularly in care giving, outdoor household, and recreational activity. Women who were active during the second and third trimesters reported higher levels of activity in all modes of activity than those who became active or inactive during pregnancy. The majority did not reach the recommended level of physical activity. Conclusion These data suggest that self-reported physical activity decreased from the second to third trimester and only a small proportion reached the recommended level of activity during pregnancy. Further research is needed to explore if physical activity rebounds during the postpartum period. PMID:18845974

  2. European Neutron Activation System.

    2013-01-11

    Version 03 EASY-2010 (European Activation System) consists of a wide range of codes, data and documentation all aimed at satisfying the objective of calculating the response of materials irradiated in a neutron flux. The main difference from the previous version is the upper energy limit, which has increased from 20 to 60 MeV. It is designed to investigate both fusion devices and accelerator based materials test facilities that will act as intense sources of high-energymore » neutrons causing significant activation of the surrounding materials. The very general nature of the calculational method and the data libraries means that it is applicable (with some reservations) to all situations (e.g. fission reactors or neutron sources) where materials are exposed to neutrons below 60 MeV. EASY can be divided into two parts: data and code development tools and user tools and data. The former are required to develop the latter, but EASY users only need to be able to use the inventory code FISPACT and be aware of the contents of the EAF library (the data source). The complete EASY package contains the FISPACT-2007 inventory code, the EAF-2003, EAF-2005, EAF-2007 and EAF-2010 libraries, and the EASY User Interface for the Window version. The activation package EASY-2010 is the result of significant development to extend the upper energy range from 20 to 60 MeV so that it is capable of being used for IFMIF calculations. The EAF-2010 library contains 66,256 reactions, almost five times more than in EAF-2003 (12,617). Deuteron-induced and proton-induced cross section libraries are also included, and can be used with EASY to enable calculations of the activation due to deuterons and proton [2].« less

  3. Ongoing Space Nuclear Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    Most ongoing US activities related to space nuclear power and propulsion are sponsored by NASA. NASA-spons0red space nuclear work is currently focused on evaluating potential fission surface power (FSP) systems and on radioisotope power systems (RPS). In addition, significant efforts related to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been completed and will provide a starting point for potential future NTP work.

  4. Active noise silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Jay, M.A.

    1995-02-01

    Many natural gas compressor stations which were previously located away from residential areas are now being encroached upon by surrounding building developments. An increased awareness of community noise issues has proved to be the impetus for investigating and developing more effective noise control methods and treatments for natural gas compressor facilities. This project investigates the feasibility of applying Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) to the exhaust of a large, internal combustion reciprocating type engine.

  5. Active Seismic Imaging Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Patricia A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Evans, John R.

    In September 1985 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will conduct an active seismic experiment in the Medicine Lake area of northern California. The work is supported by the Geothermal Research Program of USGS and by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. We invite interested organizations or individuals to record our explosions from Medicine Lake volcano and surrounding areas not covered by the USGS-LLNL array.

  6. Environmental health program activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergtholdt, C. P.

    1969-01-01

    Activities reported include studies on toxic air contaminants, excessive noise, poor lighting, food sanitation, water pollution, and exposure to nonionizing radiation as health hazards. Formulations for a radiological health manual provide guidance to personnel in the procurement and safe handling of radiation producing equipment and Apollo mission planning. A literature search and development of a water analysis laboratory are outlined to obtain information regarding microbiological problems involving potable water, waste management, and personal hygiene.

  7. Prebiotic activation processes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    Questions regarding the combination of amino acids and ribonucleotides to polypeptides and polynucleotides are investigated. Each of the reactions considered occurs in the solid state in plausible prebiotic conditions. Together they provide the basis for a unified scheme of amino acid and nucleotide activation. Urea, imidazole and Mg(++) are essential catalytic components of the reaction mixtures. However, these compounds could probably be replaced by other organic molecules.

  8. NASA spacecraft propulsion activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Tyburski, Timothy E.; Sankovic, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.; Reed, Brian D.; Schneider, Steven J.; Hamley, John A.; Patterson, Michael J.; Sovey, James S.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA's activities in the development of spacecraft propulsion systems are reviewed, with emphasis on program directions and recent progress made in this domain. The recent trends towards the use of smaller spacecraft and launch vehicles call for new onboard propulsion systems. The NASA's efforts are conducted within the framework of the onboard propulsion program. The research and development work carried out in relation to the different propulsion system technologies are considered: electromagnetic systems; electrostatic systems; electrothermal systems; bipropellant systems; and monopropellant systems.

  9. Proposed SOLCOST maintenance activities

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    This document provides a short description of work that has been accomplished to date and work in progress. A discussion of the program status as it is currently configured follows and finally proposed work by Solar Environmental Engineering Company (SEEC) in its most recently signed contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) is given. Early statements are designed to give the reader a good background so that the suggested SOLCOST maintenance activities will be more easily understood.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of antiproteinases.

    PubMed

    Sallenave, J M

    2002-04-01

    Low-molecular-mass neutrophil elastase inhibitors have been shown to be important in the control of lung inflammation. In addition to inhibiting the enzyme neutrophil elastase, these low-molecular-mass compounds (10 kDa) have been shown to have other activities. For example, secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) and elastase-specific inhibitor/SKALP (skin-derived antileucoproteinase)/elafin have also been shown to have "defensin"-like antimicrobial activities. Indeed, these inhibitors have antimicrobial properties in vitro against bacteria, fungi and, potentially, HIV. In addition, we have shown, using an adenovirus-mediated gene transfer overexpression strategy, that elafin is also active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in mice in vivo. The mechanism of action is currently under investigation. In addition to these direct or indirect effects on microbes, it has been shown that lipopolysaccharide is able to up-regulate SPLI production in macrophages in vitro, and that the addition of recombinant SLPI to human monocytes or the transfection of macrophages with SPLI can down-regulate pro-inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor, presumably to limit self-damaging excessive inflammation. Using viral gene transfer vectors, we are currently investigating the potential of these inhibitors in various models of inflammation in vivo. PMID:12023836

  11. Active inference and learning.

    PubMed

    Friston, Karl; FitzGerald, Thomas; Rigoli, Francesco; Schwartenbeck, Philipp; O'Doherty, John; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    This paper offers an active inference account of choice behaviour and learning. It focuses on the distinction between goal-directed and habitual behaviour and how they contextualise each other. We show that habits emerge naturally (and autodidactically) from sequential policy optimisation when agents are equipped with state-action policies. In active inference, behaviour has explorative (epistemic) and exploitative (pragmatic) aspects that are sensitive to ambiguity and risk respectively, where epistemic (ambiguity-resolving) behaviour enables pragmatic (reward-seeking) behaviour and the subsequent emergence of habits. Although goal-directed and habitual policies are usually associated with model-based and model-free schemes, we find the more important distinction is between belief-free and belief-based schemes. The underlying (variational) belief updating provides a comprehensive (if metaphorical) process theory for several phenomena, including the transfer of dopamine responses, reversal learning, habit formation and devaluation. Finally, we show that active inference reduces to a classical (Bellman) scheme, in the absence of ambiguity. PMID:27375276

  12. Sesterterpenoids with Anticancer Activity.

    PubMed

    Evidente, Antonio; Kornienko, Alexander; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Dasari, Ramesh; Evidente, Marco; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Terpenes have received a great deal of attention in the scientific literature due to complex, synthetically challenging structures and diverse biological activities associated with this class of natural products. Based on the number of C5 isoprene units they are generated from, terpenes are classified as hemi- (C5), mono- (C10), sesqui- (C15), di- (C20), sester- (C25), tri (C30), and tetraterpenes (C40). Among these, sesterterpenes and their derivatives known as sesterterpenoids, are ubiquitous secondary metabolites in fungi, marine organisms, and plants. Their structural diversity encompasses carbotricyclic ophiobolanes, polycyclic anthracenones, polycyclic furan-2-ones, polycyclic hydroquinones, among many other carbon skeletons. Furthermore, many of them possess promising biological activities including cytotoxicity and the associated potential as anticancer agents. This review discusses the natural sources that produce sesterterpenoids, provides sesterterpenoid names and their chemical structures, biological properties with the focus on anticancer activities and literature references associated with these metabolites. A critical summary of the potential of various sesterterpenoids as anticancer agents concludes the review. PMID:26295461

  13. Cooperative nonproliferation activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.; Furaus, J.; Lucero, R.

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under DOE sponsorship is engaged in nuclear nonproliferation activities with the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. From 1995 to the present SNL and PNC have been participating in a cooperative project to implement and assess the use of remote monitoring to achieve nuclear nonproliferation objectives. Implementation of remote monitoring at the PNC Joyo facility took place during 1996 and continues to date. An International Fellowship began in the Fall of 1995 and has complemented the nonproliferation study. Plans are underway to extend the Fellowship and to upgrade the existing Remote Monitoring System to include another area at the Joyo facility. SNL and PNC are currently exploring the possibility of exchanging experts with the objective of promoting regional confidence building in Northeast Asia, possibly using some of the same remote monitoring technologies. This paper will provide an overview of these activities and report on the status of cooperative nonproliferation activities being conducted by PNC and SNL.

  14. Active quantum plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K.; M. Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics. PMID:26824066

  15. THE ACTIVE ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, David

    2012-03-15

    Some asteroids eject dust, unexpectedly producing transient, comet-like comae and tails. First ascribed to the sublimation of near-surface water ice, mass-losing asteroids (also called 'main-belt comets') can in fact be driven by a surprising diversity of mechanisms. In this paper, we consider 11 dynamical asteroids losing mass, in nine of which the ejected material is spatially resolved. We address mechanisms for producing mass loss including rotational instability, impact ejection, electrostatic repulsion, radiation pressure sweeping, dehydration stresses, and thermal fracture, in addition to the sublimation of ice. In two objects (133P and 238P) the repetitive nature of the observed activity leaves ice sublimation as the only reasonable explanation, while in a third ((596) Scheila), a recent impact is the cause. Another impact may account for activity in P/2010 A2, but this tiny object can also be explained as having shed mass after reaching rotational instability. Mass loss from (3200) Phaethon is probably due to cracking or dehydration at extreme ({approx}1000 K) perihelion temperatures, perhaps aided by radiation pressure sweeping. For the other bodies, the mass-loss mechanisms remain unidentified, pending the acquisition of more and better data. While the active asteroid sample size remains small, the evidence for an astonishing diversity of mass-loss processes in these bodies is clear.

  16. Active quantum plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K; M Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G

    2015-12-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics. PMID:26824066

  17. Sesterterpenoids with Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Evidente, Antonio; Kornienko, Alexander; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Dasari, Ramesh; Evidente, Marco; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Terpenes have received a great deal of attention in the scientific literature due to complex, synthetically challenging structures and diverse biological activities associated with this class of natural products. Based on the number of C5 isoprene units they are generated from, terpenes are classified as hemi- (C5), mono- (C10), sesqui- (C15), di- (C20), sester- (C25), tri (C30), and tetraterpenes (C40). Among these, sesterterpenes and their derivatives known as sesterterpenoids, are ubiquitous secondary metabolites in fungi, marine organisms, and plants. Their structural diversity encompasses carbotricyclic ophiobolanes, polycyclic anthracenones, polycyclic furan-2-ones, polycyclic hydroquinones, among many other carbon skeletons. Furthermore, many of them possess promising biological activities including cytotoxicity and the associated potential as anticancer agents. This review discusses the natural sources that produce sesterterpenoids, provides sesterterpenoid names and their chemical structures, biological properties with the focus on anticancer activities and literature references associated with these metabolites. A critical summary of the potential of various sesterterpenoids as anticancer agents concludes the review. PMID:26295461

  18. Active polarization descattering.

    PubMed

    Treibitz, Tali; Schechner, Yoav Y

    2009-03-01

    Vision in scattering media is important but challenging. Images suffer from poor visibility due to backscattering and attenuation. Most prior methods for scene recovery use active illumination scanners (structured and gated), which can be slow and cumbersome, while natural illumination is inapplicable to dark environments. The current paper addresses the need for a non-scanning recovery method, that uses active scene irradiance. We study the formation of images under widefield artificial illumination. Based on the formation model, the paper presents an approach for recovering the object signal. It also yields rough information about the 3D scene structure. The approach can work with compact, simple hardware, having active widefield, polychromatic polarized illumination. The camera is fitted with a polarization analyzer. Two frames of the scene are taken, with different states of the analyzer or polarizer. A recovery algorithm follows the acquisition. It allows both the backscatter and the object reflection to be partially polarized. It thus unifies and generalizes prior polarization-based methods, which had assumed exclusive polarization of either of these components. The approach is limited to an effective range, due to image noise and illumination falloff. Thus, the limits and noise sensitivity are analyzed. We demonstrate the approach in underwater field experiments. PMID:19147870

  19. Active fluctuation symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christian; Salazar, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with the understanding of fluctuation symmetries for entropy production, similar ideas applied to the time-symmetric fluctuation sector have been less explored. Here we give detailed derivations of time-symmetric fluctuation symmetries in boundary-driven particle systems such as the open Kawasaki lattice gas and the zero-range model. As a measure of time-symmetric dynamical activity over time T we count the difference (Nℓ - Nr)/T between the number of particle jumps in or out at the left edge and those at the right edge of the system. We show that this quantity satisfies a fluctuation symmetry from which we derive a new Green-Kubo-type relation. It will follow then that the system is more active at the edge connected to the particle reservoir with the largest chemical potential. We also apply these exact relations derived for stochastic particle models to a deterministic case, the spinning Lorentz gas, where the symmetry relation for the activity is checked numerically.

  20. Evolution of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Green, Lucie May

    2015-09-01

    The evolution of active regions (AR) from their emergence through their long decay process is of fundamental importance in solar physics. Since large-scale flux is generated by the deep-seated dynamo, the observed characteristics of flux emergence and that of the subsequent decay provide vital clues as well as boundary conditions for dynamo models. Throughout their evolution, ARs are centres of magnetic activity, with the level and type of activity phenomena being dependent on the evolutionary stage of the AR. As new flux emerges into a pre-existing magnetic environment, its evolution leads to re-configuration of small-and large-scale magnetic connectivities. The decay process of ARs spreads the once-concentrated magnetic flux over an ever-increasing area. Though most of the flux disappears through small-scale cancellation processes, it is the remnant of large-scale AR fields that is able to reverse the polarity of the poles and build up new polar fields. In this Living Review the emphasis is put on what we have learned from observations, which is put in the context of modelling and simulation efforts when interpreting them. For another, modelling-focused Living Review on the sub-surface evolution and emergence of magnetic flux see Fan (2009). In this first version we focus on the evolution of dominantly bipolar ARs.

  1. [Fernbank Science Center Environmental Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Lewis

    This document is a compilation of environmental activities related directly to the environment in Georgia. A description of the physiographic characteristics of Georgia is presented upon which the activities that follow are based. These activities include soil, stream and forest investigations; meteorology activities; and plant and animal studies.…

  2. Changing Conceptions of Activation Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Philip D.

    1981-01-01

    Provides background material which relates to the concept of activation energy, fundamental in the study of chemical kinetics. Compares the related concepts of the Arrhenius activation energy, the activation energy at absolute zero, the enthalpy of activation, and the threshold energy. (CS)

  3. Metric Activities, Grades K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Bob, Comp.

    This pamphlet presents worksheets for use in fifteen activities or groups of activities designed for teaching the metric system to children in grades K through 6. The approach taken in several of the activities is one of conversion between metric and English units. The majority of the activities concern length, area, volume, and capacity. A…

  4. Science Activities in Energy: Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 14 activities relating to energy conservation. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades, which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a simple card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  5. Epsiodic Activity in Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, D.J.; Konar, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Machalski, J.; Gupta, Neeraj; Stawarz, L.; Mack, K.-H.; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-10-15

    One of the interesting issues in our understanding of active galactic nuclei is the duration of their active phase and whether such activity is episodic. In this paper we summarize our recent results on episodic activity in radio galaxies obtained with the GMRT and the VLA.

  6. Peptidase activities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, B; Becker, J M; Naider, F

    1979-01-01

    At least four distinct aminopeptidase activities and a single dipeptidase activity were found in cell extracts of a leucine-lysine auxotroph of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The assay for peptidase activity involved polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by an enzyme-coupled activity staining procedure. The aminopeptidases had largely overlapping specificities but could be distinguished from one another by their electrophoretic mobilities and activities toward different peptide substrates. Substrates tested included both free and blocked di- and tripeptides and amino acid derivatives. Images PMID:378955

  7. The active asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewitt, D.

    2014-07-01

    Active asteroids simultaneously possess the orbits of main-belt asteroids and the physical appearances of comets; they show transient dust comae and solar-radiation pressure-swept tails. Apart from the shear surprise at finding such strange objects in the asteroid belt, the active asteroids are scientifically interesting for several reasons. Although we are limited to scarcely more than a dozen examples, the active asteroids already reveal the distinct action of different physical processes, each previously unobserved and carrying big-picture importance for understanding the solar system. 1. IMPACT. An unambiguous asteroid-asteroid impact was observed in 2010, when a 30-m scale body struck 100-km diameter (596) Scheila. Direct observations of impacts hold scientific importance both by sampling this natural process at full scale (compared with laboratory impacts conducted at tiny scales) and because impact statistics will allow us to assess the erosion rate in the asteroid belt and the contribution of asteroid dust to the interplanetary medium. 2. CRITICAL ROTATION. Several objects have been observed in which the best explanation seems to lie with spin-up to critical periods, presumably (but not certainly) caused by YORP. Examples of both likely mass-shedding (P/2010 A2, P/2013 P5) and full break-up (P/2013 R3, shown below) exist. It has been suggested that, at sub-kilometer sizes, spin-up disruption rates may surpass impact disruption rates. Future observations will show whether or not this is true, and may ultimately lead to an improved understanding of the physics of break-up. 3. THERMAL DISINTEGRATION. Geminid parent (3200) Phaethon shows on-going mass-loss at perihelion, driven by the 1000-K surface temperatures found there. The mechanisms appear to be some combination of thermal fracture and desiccation stress. 4. SUBLIMATION. Two objects have shown repeated activity that appears to be correlated with position in the orbit. The best example is 133P, which has

  8. Asthma and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Oseid, S

    1982-01-01

    Physical activity regularly leads to a decline in lung function in children and adolescents with asthma. This decline is a consequence of what is known as exercise-induced asthma (EIA), and can be determined and graded with the help of lung function tests before and after submaximal workloads on the ergometer cycle or the treadmill. Typical EIA appears in asthmatic individuals with entirely normal lung function before the effort, but EIA may also become clinically manifest with exercise in patients who have a subclinical degree of obstruction. The grade of EIA is essentially dependent on the duration and intensity of effort but also on the type of exercise. For example, free running causes much greater bronchoconstriction than swimming. The temperature and humidity of the inspired air may partially explain this difference. At the Voksentoppen Allergy Institute we find that about 85% of children develop a fall in lung function of 15% or more after a six minute ergometer cycle test. With typical EIA the fall may be totally or partially abolished by prophylactic medication 10 minutes before the start of the test. Disodium cromoglycate (Intal) and/or beta-adrenergic drugs are regularly used before all physical activity. Training programmes must be based on the interval principle. Swimming, ball games, relay races and dancing are examples of useful activities in the training and rehabilitation of children and adolescents with asthma. Through prophylactic medication and physical training, the aerobic work capacity, muscle strength and lung function in asthmatic children is improved. Training also leads to a significant mobilisation of mental resources and an increase in social integration. PMID:6958045

  9. Active travel intervention and physical activity behaviour: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Patricia; Eberth, Barbara; Farrar, Shelley; Anable, Jillian; Ludbrook, Anne

    2014-07-01

    A physically active lifestyle is an important contributor to individual health and well-being. The evidence linking higher physical activity levels with better levels of morbidity and mortality is well understood. Despite this, physical inactivity remains a major global risk factor for mortality and, consequently, encouraging individuals to pursue physically active lifestyles has been an integral part of public health policy in many countries. Physical activity promotion and interventions are now firmly on national health policy agendas, including policies that promote active travel such as walking and cycling. This study evaluates one such active travel initiative, the Smarter Choices, Smarter Places programme in Scotland, intended to encourage uptake of walking, cycling and the use of public transport as more active forms of travel. House to house surveys were conducted before and after the programme intervention, in May/June 2009 and 2012 (12,411 surveys in 2009 and 9542 in 2012), for the evaluation of the programme. This paper analyses the physical activity data collected, focussing on what can be inferred from the initiative with regards to adult uptake of physical activity participation and whether, for those who participated in physical activity, the initiative impacted on meeting recommended physical activity guidelines. The results suggest that the initiative impacted positively on the likelihood of physical activity participation and meeting the recommended physical activity guidelines. Individuals in the intervention areas were on average 6% more likely to meet the physical activity guidelines compared to individuals in the non intervention areas. However, the absolute prevalence of physical activity participation declined in both intervention and control areas over time. Our evaluation of this active transport initiative indicates that similar programmes may aid in contributing to achieving physical activity targets and adds to the international

  10. ECLSS medical support activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crump, William J.; Kilgore, Melvin V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    During the period from April 10, 1990 to April 9, 1991, the Consortium for the Space Life Sciences provided technical assistance to the NASA/MSFC water recovery efforts. This assistance was in the form of literature reviews, technical recommendations, and presentations. This final report summarizes the activities completed during this period and identifies those areas requiring additional efforts. The tasks which the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) water recovery team addressed were either identified by MSFC technical representatives or chosen from those outlined in the subject statement of work.

  11. Reuse of activated alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Hobensack, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    Activated alumina is used as a trapping media to remove trace quantities of UF{sub 6} from process vent streams. The current uranium recovery method employs concentrated nitric acid which destroys the alumina pellets and forms a sludge which is a storage and disposal problem. A recently developed technique using a distilled water rinse followed by three dilute acid rinses removes on average 97% of the uranium, and leaves the pellets intact with crush strength and surface area values comparable with new material. Trapping tests confirm the effectiveness of the recycled alumina as UF{sub 6} trapping media.

  12. Metadata Activities in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Inigo, Gil San; HUTCHISON, VIVIAN; Frame, Mike; Palanisamy, Giri

    2010-01-01

    The National Biological Information Infrastructure program has advanced the biological sciences ability to standardize, share, integrate and synthesize data by making the metadata program a core of its activities. Through strategic partnerships, a series of crosswalks for the main biological metadata specifications have enabled data providers and international clearinghouses to aggregate and disseminate tens of thousands of metadata sets describing petabytes of data records. New efforts at the National Biological Information Infrastructure are focusing on better metadata creation and curation tools, semantic mediation for data discovery and other curious initiatives.

  13. Athena: Assessment Phase Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, David; Ayre, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The Athena mission concept has been proposed by the community in response to science themes of the Hot and Energetic Universe. Unlike other, competitive, mission selection exercises this "Large" class observatory mission has essentially been pre-selected. Nevertheless it has to be demonstrated that Athena meets the programmatic constraints of 1Bn euro cost cap, and a readiness level appropriate for formal mission adoption by the end 2019. This should be confirmed through a Phase A study conducted with two parallel industry activities. We describe the technical and programmatic content of these and latest progress in space and ground segment definition.

  14. FY 1996 activity summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety provides nuclear safety policy, independent technical evaluation, and technical support. A summary of these activities is provided in this report. These include: (1) changing the mission of the former production facilities to storage and waste management; (2) stabilizing nuclear materials not recycled due to production cessation or interruptions; (3) reformulating the authorization basis for existing facilities to convert to a standards based approach for operations consistent with modern expectations; and (4) implementing a modern regulatory framework for nuclear facilities. Enforcement of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act is also reported.

  15. Activation of solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P.J.; Migliuolo, S.; Hood, A.W.

    1984-11-01

    The physics of the activation of two-ribbon solar flares via the MHD instability of coronal arcades is presented. The destabilization of a preflare magnetic field is necessary for a rapid energy release, characteristic of the impulsive phase of the flare, to occur. The stability of a number of configurations are examined, and the physical consequences and relative importance of varying pressure profiles and different sets of boundary conditions (involving field-line tying) are discussed. Instability modes, driven unstable by pressure gradients, are candidates for instability. Shearless vs. sheared equilibria are also discussed. (ESA)

  16. Physical Activity in Elderly.

    PubMed

    Cvecka, Jan; Tirpakova, Veronika; Sedliak, Milan; Kern, Helmut; Mayr, Winfried; Hamar, Dušan

    2015-08-24

    Aging is a multifactorial irreversible process associated with significant decline in muscle mass and neuromuscular functions. One of the most efficient methods to counteract age-related changes in muscle mass and function is physical exercise. An alternative effective intervention to improve muscle structure and performance is electrical stimulation. In the present work we present the positive effects of physical activity in elderly and a study where the effects of a 8-week period of functional electrical stimulation and strength training with proprioceptive stimulation in elderly are compared. PMID:26913164

  17. Physical Activity in Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Tirpakova, Veronika; Sedliak, Milan; Kern, Helmut; Mayr, Winfried; Hamar, Dušan

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a multifactorial irreversible process associated with significant decline in muscle mass and neuromuscular functions. One of the most efficient methods to counteract age-related changes in muscle mass and function is physical exercise. An alternative effective intervention to improve muscle structure and performance is electrical stimulation. In the present work we present the positive effects of physical activity in elderly and a study where the effects of a 8-week period of functional electrical stimulation and strength training with proprioceptive stimulation in elderly are compared. PMID:26913164

  18. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  19. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  20. WFIRST Project Science Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The WFIRST Project is a joint effort between GSFC and JPL. The project scientists and engineers are working with the community Science Definition Team to define the requirements and initial design of the mission. The objective is to design an observatory that meets the WFIRST science goals of the Astr02010 Decadal Survey for minimum cost. This talk will be a report of recent project activities including requirements flowdown, detector array development, science simulations, mission costing and science outreach. Details of the interim mission design relevant to scientific capabilities will be presented.

  1. ASTP RBCC Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Karl W.; McArthur, Craig; Leopard, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This presentation reviews the activities of the Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) in the development of Rocket-Based Combined Cycle (RBCC)technology. The document consist of the presentation slides for a talk scheduled to be given to the World Aviation Congress and Exhibit of SAE. Included in the review is discussion of recent accomplishments in the area of Advanced Reusable technologies (ART), which includes work in flowpath testing, and system studies of the various vehicle/engine combinations including RBCC, Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) and Pulsed Detonation Engine (PDE). Pictures of the proposed RBCC Flowpaths are included. The next steps in the development process are reviewed.

  2. GPS Activities at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Behrend, Dirk

    2002-11-19

    The Alignment Engineering Group of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) started to use RTK (real-time kinematic) GPS equipment in order to perform structure mapping and GIS-related tasks on the SLAC campus. In a first step a continuously observing GPS station (SLAC M40) was set up. This station serves as master control station for all differential GPS activities on site and its coordinates have been determined in the well-defined global geodetic datum ITRF2000 at a given reference epoch. Some trials have been performed to test the RTK method. The tests have proven RTK to be very fast and efficient.

  3. Enceladus: Starting Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Johnson, T. V.; Lunine, J. I.; Davies, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a process for starting the hydrothermal activity in Enceladus' South Polar Region. The process takes advantage of fissures that reach the water table, about 1 kilometer below the surface. Filling these fissures with fresh ocean water initiates a flow of water up from an ocean that can be self-sustaining. In this hypothesis the heat to sustain the thermal anomalies and the plumes comes from a slightly warm ocean at depth. The heat is brought to the surface by water that circulates up, through the crust and then returns to the ocean.

  4. Rationales for regulatory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Perhac, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    The author provides an outline which touches on the types of concerns about risk evaluation which are addressed in the process of establishing regulatory guides. Broadly he says regulatory activity serves three broad constituents: (1) Paternalism (private risk); (2) Promotion of social welfare (public risks); (3) Protection of individual rights (public risks). He then discusses some of the major issues encountered in reaching a decision on what is an acceptable level of risk within each of these areas, and how one establishes such a level.

  5. Minor meteor shower activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendtel, J.

    2016-01-01

    Video meteor observations provide us with data to analyze structures in minor meteor showers or weak features in flux profiles. Samples obtained independently by other techniques allow to calibrate the data sets and to improve the confidence of results as demonstrated with a few results. Both, the confirmation of events predicted by model calculation and the input of observational data to improve the modelling results may help to better understand meteoroid stream evolution processes. Furthermore, calibrated data series can be used for studies of the long-term evolution of meteor shower activity.

  6. Active terahertz metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong; O' Hara, John F; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an overview of research in our group in terahertz (THz) metamaterials and their applications. We have developed a series of planar metamaterials operating at THz frequencies, all of which exhibit a strong resonant response. By incorporating natural materials, e.g. semiconductors, as the substrates or as critical regions of metamaterial elements, we are able to effectively control the metamaterial resonance by the application of external stimuli, e.g., photoexcitation and electrical bias. Such actively controllable metamaterials provide novel functionalities for solid-state device applications with unprecedented performance, such as THz spectroscopy, imaging, and many others.

  7. Crew Activity Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, James; Kirillov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The crew activity analyzer (CAA) is a system of electronic hardware and software for automatically identifying patterns of group activity among crew members working together in an office, cockpit, workshop, laboratory, or other enclosed space. The CAA synchronously records multiple streams of data from digital video cameras, wireless microphones, and position sensors, then plays back and processes the data to identify activity patterns specified by human analysts. The processing greatly reduces the amount of time that the analysts must spend in examining large amounts of data, enabling the analysts to concentrate on subsets of data that represent activities of interest. The CAA has potential for use in a variety of governmental and commercial applications, including planning for crews for future long space flights, designing facilities wherein humans must work in proximity for long times, improving crew training and measuring crew performance in military settings, human-factors and safety assessment, development of team procedures, and behavioral and ethnographic research. The data-acquisition hardware of the CAA (see figure) includes two video cameras: an overhead one aimed upward at a paraboloidal mirror on the ceiling and one mounted on a wall aimed in a downward slant toward the crew area. As many as four wireless microphones can be worn by crew members. The audio signals received from the microphones are digitized, then compressed in preparation for storage. Approximate locations of as many as four crew members are measured by use of a Cricket indoor location system. [The Cricket indoor location system includes ultrasonic/radio beacon and listener units. A Cricket beacon (in this case, worn by a crew member) simultaneously transmits a pulse of ultrasound and a radio signal that contains identifying information. Each Cricket listener unit measures the difference between the times of reception of the ultrasound and radio signals from an identified beacon

  8. Euphorbia supina inhibits inflammatory mediators in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chae, Hee-Sung; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Kim, Young-Mi; Lee, Hyeong-Kyu; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Chin, Young-Won

    2015-12-01

    Euphorbia supina has been traditionally used for the treatment of furuncle and bloody diarrhea relevant to the inflammatory process. It has been proven to have a variety of pharmacological efficacies including antiarthritic, detoxification, hemostatic, and diuretic activities. RAW 264.7 macrophages and bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were used to determine the anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects of E. supina (ES). NO production was assayed by measuring the nitrite content of the supernatants of cultured RAW 264.7 cells. β-hexosaminidase, a marker of mast cell degranulation, was quantitated by spectrophotometric analysis. ELISA was used for the analysis of interleukin-6 expression, and Western blotting was used to analyze 5-LOX, iNOS, and MAPK activation. The relevant gene expression upon ES treatment was measured by RT-PCR. ES inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in RAW 264.7 cells, and IL-6 and LTC4 production in PMA- and A23187-induced BMMCs along with the downregulation of 5-LOX gene expression. Furthermore, in the present study, a decrease in p-ERK, p-JNK, and p-P38 expression, as well as the suppression of degranulation, were observed by treatment with ES. Further in vivo study revealed that ES treatment also remarkably inhibited xylene-induced mouse ear edema and MPO levels in mice ears. This study demonstrates that ES has a potential regulatory effect on the expression of inflammatory mediators through the inhibition of both the phosphorylation of MAPK signaling and the activation of degranulation. PMID:26386544

  9. Microbiologically active nanocomposite media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petranovskii, Vitalii; Panina, Lyudmila; Bogomolova, Eugenia; Belostotskaya, Galina

    2003-07-01

    The most recent approach to the development of novel antimicrobial and antifungal agents is based on the application of synthetic and natural zeolites, because zeolites are known to be the carrier and slow releaser of the heavy metals with olygodynamic properties. The microbiological activity of the ion-exchanged zeolites is attributed to the ionic state of the metal sreleased from the zeolites by ion re-exchange. In the present work we used low cost natural clinoptilolite (Cli) as a substrate for copper and silver in different states. The state of oxidation of the exchanged metal in zeolite with supported Cu and Ag species (in the form of cations, small clusters, sub-coloidal particles, large particles) in order to fit them to fulfill the following criteria: to demonstrate their high protective abilities against fungi and long-term stability. The study of structure of samples with XRD, UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, their stability with temperature and during storage was carried out for obtaining the correct correlation with microbiological activity.

  10. The Active Solid Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinger, Cynthia

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic processes in Earth's crust, mantle and core shape Earth's surface and magnetic field over time scales of seconds to millennia, and even longer time scales as recorded in the ca. 4 Ga rock record. Our focus is the earthquake-volcano deformation cycles that occur over human time scales, and their comparison with time-averaged deformation studies, with emphasis on mantle plume provinces where magma and volatile release and vertical tectonics are readily detectable. Active deformation processes at continental and oceanic rift and back arc zones provide critical constraints on mantle dynamics, the role of fluids (volatiles, magma, water), and plate rheology. For example, recent studies of the East African rift zone, which formed above one of Earth's largest mantle upwellings reveal that magma production and volatile release rates are comparable to those of magmatic arcs, the archetypal zones of continental crustal creation. Finite-length faults achieve some plate deformation, but magma intrusion in the form of dikes accommodates extension in continental, back-arc, and oceanic rifts, and intrusion as sills causes permanent uplift that modulates the local time-space scales of earthquakes and volcanoes. Volatile release from magma intrusion may reduce fault friction and permeability, facilitating aseismic slip and creating magma pathways. We explore the implications of active deformation studies to models of the time-averaged structure of plume and extensional provinces in continental and oceanic plate settings.

  11. Tracking dynamic team activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tambe, M.

    1996-12-31

    AI researchers are striving to build complex multi-agent worlds with intended applications ranging from the RoboCup robotic soccer tournaments, to interactive virtual theatre, to large-scale real-world battlefield simulations. Agent tracking - monitoring other agent`s actions and inferring their higher-level goals and intentions - is a central requirement in such worlds. While previous work has mostly focused on tracking individual agents, this paper goes beyond by focusing on agent teams. Team tracking poses the challenge of tracking a team`s joint goals and plans. Dynamic, real-time environments add to the challenge, as ambiguities have to be resolved in real-time. The central hypothesis underlying the present work is that an explicit team-oriented perspective enables effective team tracking. This hypothesis is instantiated using the model tracing technology employed in tracking individual agents. Thus, to track team activities, team models are put to service. Team models are a concrete application of the joint intentions framework and enable an agent to track team activities, regardless of the agent`s being a collaborative participant or a non-participant in the team. To facilitate real-time ambiguity resolution with team models: (i) aspects of tracking are cast as constraint satisfaction problems to exploit constraint propagation techniques; and (ii) a cost minimality criterion is applied to constrain tracking search. Empirical results from two separate tasks in real-world, dynamic environments one collaborative and one competitive - are provided.

  12. Target activated frame capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, G. Marlon; Fitzgerald, James; McCormack, Michael; Steadman, Robert

    2008-04-01

    Over the past decade, technological advances have enabled the use of increasingly intelligent systems for battlefield surveillance. These systems are triggered by a combination of external devices including acoustic and seismic sensors. Such products are mainly used to detect vehicles and personnel. These systems often use infra-red imagery to record environmental information, but Textron Defense Systems' Terrain Commander is one of a small number of systems which analyze these images for the presence of targets. The Terrain Commander combines acoustic, infrared, magnetic, seismic, and visible spectrum sensors to detect nearby targets in military scenarios. When targets are detected by these sensors, the cameras are triggered and images are captured in the infrared and visible spectrum. In this paper we discuss a method through which such systems can perform target tracking in order to record and transmit only the most pertinent surveillance images. This saves bandwidth which is crucial because these systems often use communication systems with throughputs below 2400bps. This method is expected to be executable on low-power processors at frame rates exceeding 10HZ. We accomplish this by applying target activated frame capture algorithms to infra-red video data. The target activated frame capture algorithms combine edge detection and motion detection to determine the best frames to be transmitted to the end user. This keeps power consumption and bandwidth requirements low. Finally, the results of the algorithm are analyzed.

  13. Active Astronomy Roadshow Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, Silas; Oram, Kathleen; Alabre, Dayana; Douyon, Ralph; UMass Lowell Haiti Development Studies Center

    2016-01-01

    College-age Haitian students working with advisors and volunteers from UMass Lowell in 2015 developed and tested an activity-based K-8 curriculum in astronomy, space, and earth science. Our partner school is located in Les Cayes, Haiti a city where only 65% of children attend school, and only half of those will complete 6th grade. Astronomy provides an accessible and non-intimidating entry into science, and activity-based learning contrasts with the predominant traditional teaching techniques in use in Haiti, to reach and inspire a different cohort of learners. Teachers are predominantly women in Haiti, so part of the effort involves connecting them with scientists, engineers and teacher peers in the US. As a developing nation, it is vital for Haitian (as for all) children to grow up viewing women as leaders in science. Meanwhile in the US, few are aware of the reality of getting an education in a 3rd world nation (i.e. most of the world), so we also joined with teachers in Massachusetts to give US school children a peek at what daily life is like for their peers living in our vibrant but impoverished neighbor. Our Haitian partners are committed to helping their sister-schools with curriculum and educator workshops, so that the overall quality of education can rise, and not be limited to the very few schools with access to resources. We will describe the activites, motivation, and and the lessons learned from our first year of the project.

  14. Active region coronal evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.; Noci, G.; Poletto, G.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    Scaling relations between coronal base pressure and longitudinal photospheric magnetic field strength are tested for the case of a single active region observed for five solar rotations from Skylab. The evolution of measureable quantities, such as coronal thermal energy content, total longitudinal photospheric magnetic flux, region scale size, and peak energy density, is traced throughout the five rotations observed. The theoretically derived scaling law of Golub et al. (1980) is found to provide an acceptable fit to the data throughout the entire evolutionary history of the region from an age of about 3 days to the fully evolved state in which the mature active region merges into the general large-scale structure of the quiet corona. An alternative scaling law obtained by including the results of Galeev et al. (1981), however, is found to provide a somewhat better fit to the data. The study is seen as providing additional justification for the belief that magnetic field-related heating is the operative mechanism in the solar corona.

  15. Active Near Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Past activity from Near Earth Asteroids is recorded in the meteoroid streams that cause our meteor showers. Automated meteoroid orbit surveys by photographic, low-light video, specular radar, and head-echo radar reflections are providing the first maps of meteor shower activity at different particle sizes. There are distinct differences in particle size distributions among streams. The underlaying mechanisms that created these streams are illuminated: fragmentation from spin-up or thermal stresses, meteoroid ejection by water vapor drag, and ejection of icy particles by CO and CO2 sublimation. The distribution of the meteoroid orbital elements probe the subsequent evolution by planetary perturbations and sample the range of dynamical processes to which Near Earth Asteroids are exposed. The non-stream "sporadic" meteors probe early stages in the evolution from meteoroid streams into the zodiacal dust cloud. We see that the lifetime of large meteoroids is generally not limited by collisions. Results obtained by the CAMS video survey of meteoroid orbits are compared to those from other orbit surveys. Since October 2010, over 200,000 meteoroid orbits have been measured. First results from an expansion into the southern hemisphere are also presented, as are first results from the measurement of main element compositions. Among the many streams detected so far, the Geminid and Sextantid showers stand out by having a relatively high particle density and derive from parent bodies that appear to have originated in the main belt.

  16. Nematicidal activity of terpenoids.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Fawzia H; Alaniz, Nina M; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2013-01-01

    Thirty four phytoterpenoids were evaluated for their nematicidal effect using the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Nematicidal activities of the tested compounds at concentrations of 50 μg/mL showed wide variation in their effects ranging from no effect, weak, moderate and strong effects. Terpenoids exerting 50% or higher mortality at 50 μg/mL were further tested at five different concentrations to calculate the concentration that will kill 50% of the nematode population (LC(50)). Among the most effective terpenoids were carvacrol, thymol, nerolidol, α-terpinene, geraniol, citronellol, farnesol, limonene, pseudoionone and eugenol in a descending order. These compounds exhibited a dose-dependent effect. The results suggest that the selected monoterpenoids and essential oils with a high concentration of these compounds mayprovide potential natural nematicides and merit further study as botanical nematicides for the control of both plant and animal parasitic nematodes. In general, oxygenated terpenoids and phenolic terpenoids exhibited higher nematicidal activity than hydrocarbons terpenoids. PMID:23030436

  17. Regulation of inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Man, Si Ming; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2015-05-01

    Inflammasome biology is one of the most exciting and rapidly growing areas in immunology. Over the past 10 years, inflammasomes have been recognized for their roles in the host defense against invading pathogens and in the development of cancer, auto-inflammatory, metabolic, and neurodegenerative diseases. Assembly of an inflammasome complex requires cytosolic sensing of pathogen-associated molecular patterns or danger-associated molecular patterns by a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat receptor (NLR) or absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2)-like receptors (ALR). NLRs and ALRs engage caspase-1, in most cases requiring the adapter protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC), to catalyze proteolytic cleavage of pro-interleukin-1β (pro-IL-1β) and pro-IL-18 and drive pyroptosis. Recent studies indicate that caspase-8, caspase-11, IL-1R-associated kinases (IRAK), and receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinases contribute to inflammasome functions. In addition, post-translational modifications, including ubiquitination, deubiquitination, phosphorylation, and degradation control almost every aspect of inflammasome activities. Genetic studies indicate that mutations in NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRC4, and AIM2 are linked with the development of auto-inflammatory diseases, enterocolitis, and cancer. Overall, these findings transform our understanding of the basic biology and clinical relevance of inflammasomes. In this review, we provide an overview of the latest development of inflammasome research and discuss how inflammasome activities govern health and disease. PMID:25879280

  18. Regulation of inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Man, Si Ming; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Inflammasome biology is one of the most exciting and rapidly growing areas in immunology. Over the past 10 years, inflammasomes have been recognized for their roles in the host defense against invading pathogens and in the development of cancer, autoinflammatory, metabolic, and neurodegenerative diseases. Assembly of an inflammasome complex requires cytosolic sensing of pathogen-associated molecular patterns or danger-associated molecular patterns by a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat receptor (NLR) or absent in melanoma 2-like receptor (ALR). NLRs and ALRs engage caspase-1, in most cases requiring the adapter protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC), to catalyze proteolytic cleavage of pro-interleukin-1β (pro-IL-1β) and pro-IL-18 and drive pyroptosis. Recent studies indicate that caspase-8, caspase-11, IL-1R–associated kinases (IRAK), and receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinases contribute to inflammasome functions. In addition, post-translational modifications, including ubiquitination, deubiquitination, phosphorylation, and degradation, control almost every aspect of inflammasome activities. Genetic studies indicate that mutations in NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRC4, and AIM2 are linked to the development of autoinflammatory diseases, enterocolitis, and cancer. Overall, these findings transform our understanding of the basic biology and clinical relevance of inflammasomes. In this review, we provide an overview of the latest development of inflammasome research and discuss how inflammasome activities govern health and disease. PMID:25879280

  19. Osteoporosis and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, E L; Raab, D M

    1986-01-01

    Bone involution poses serious health risks for aging women. Bone mass is subject to both local (mechanical) and systemic (hormonal) homeostatic control mechanisms. The local forces acting on bone are due to gravity and muscular contraction. There are several theories concerning the mechanisms of local control. When bent, bone functions as a piezoelectric crystal with calcium accumulation on the negatively charged concave surface. Microfractures that occur in response to stress greater than normal levels stimulate osteoclastic activity to remove the damaged structure. Studies of astronauts and immobilized subjects have consistently found bone atrophy. The degree of bone loss is related to the difference in levels of stress normally applied and those at bedrest in the site studied. Correspondingly, athletes have greater bone mass than the sedentary population, with the greatest hypertrophy found in the areas most stressed. Exercise intervention also promotes bone hypertrophy. Both middle-aged and elderly women increase bone mass or reduce the rate of loss in response to physical activity intervention programs. PMID:3535406

  20. Neutron activation for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Loughlin, M.J.; Nishitani, Takeo

    1996-04-29

    There are three primary goals for the Neutron Activation system for ITER: maintain a robust relative measure of fusion power with stability and high dynamic range (7 orders of magnitude); allow an absolute calibration of fusion power (energy); and provide a flexible and reliable system for materials testing. The nature of the activation technique is such that stability and high dynamic range can be intrinsic properties of the system. It has also been the technique that demonstrated (on JET and TFTR) the highest accuracy neutron measurements in DT operation. Since the gamma-ray detectors are not located on the tokamak and are therefore amenable to accurate characterization, and if material foils are placed very close to the ITER plasma with minimum scattering or attenuation, high overall accuracy in the fusion energy production (7--10%) should be achievable on ITER. In the paper, a conceptual design is presented. A system is shown to be capable of meeting these three goals, also detailed design issues remain to be solved.