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Sample records for 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton

  1. Systems Pharmacology Models Can Be Used to Understand Complex Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Behavior: An Example Using 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Demin, O; Karelina, T; Svetlichniy, D; Metelkin, E; Speshilov, G; Demin Jr, O; Fairman, D; van der Graaf, P H; Agoram, B M

    2013-01-01

    Zileuton, a 5-lipoxygenase (5LO) inhibitor, displays complex pharmaokinetic (PK)-pharmacodynamic (PD) behavior. Available clinical data indicate a lack of dose–bronchodilatory response during initial treatment, with a dose response developing after ~1–2 weeks. We developed a quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP) model to understand the mechanism behind this phenomenon. The model described the release, maturation, and trafficking of eosinophils into the airways, leukotriene synthesis by the 5LO enzyme, leukotriene signaling and bronchodilation, and the PK of zileuton. The model provided a plausible explanation for the two-phase bronchodilatory effect of zileuton–the short-term bronchodilation was due to leukotriene inhibition and the long-term bronchodilation was due to inflammatory cell infiltration blockade. The model also indicated that the theoretical maximum bronchodilation of both 5LO inhibition and leukotriene receptor blockade is likely similar. QSP modeling provided interesting insights into the effects of leukotriene modulation. PMID:24026253

  2. Design, synthesis and evaluation of semi-synthetic triazole-containing caffeic acid analogues as 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    De Lucia, Daniela; Lucio, Oscar Méndez; Musio, Biagia; Bender, Andreas; Listing, Monika; Dennhardt, Sophie; Koeberle, Andreas; Garscha, Ulrike; Rizzo, Roberta; Manfredini, Stefano; Werz, Oliver; Ley, Steven V

    2015-08-28

    In this work the synthesis, structure-activity relationship (SAR) and biological evaluation of a novel series of triazole-containing 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors are described. The use of structure-guided drug design techniques provided compounds that demonstrated excellent 5-LO inhibition with IC50 of 0.2 and 3.2 μm in cell-based and cell-free assays, respectively. Optimization of binding and functional potencies resulted in the identification of compound 13d, which showed an enhanced activity compared to the parent bioactive compound caffeic acid 5 and the clinically approved zileuton 3. Compounds 15 and 16 were identified as lead compounds in inhibiting 5-LO products formation in neutrophils. Their interference with other targets on the arachidonic acid pathway was also assessed. Cytotoxicity tests were performed to exclude a relationship between cytotoxicity and the increased activity observed after structure optimization.

  3. Zileuton

    MedlinePlus

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  4. Effect of the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZD2138 on aspirin-induced asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, S. M.; Bell, G. S.; Foster, S.; Spruce, K. E.; MacMillan, R.; Williams, A. J.; Lee, T. H.; Arm, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The cysteinyl leukotrienes may play a central part in the mechanisms of aspirin-sensitive asthma. Previous work has shown that individuals with aspirin-sensitive asthma have high basal urinary LTE4 levels which increase further upon aspirin ingestion, and that sulphidopeptide leukotriene receptor antagonists attenuate aspirin-induced airflow obstruction. If the cysteinyl leukotrienes cause aspirin-induced asthmatic reactions, inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway should prevent aspirin-induced bronchospasm. This hypothesis has been tested with ZD2138, a specific non-redox 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor. METHODS--Seven subjects (four men) with aspirin-sensitive asthma with baseline FEV1 values > 67% were studied. ZD2138 (350 mg) or placebo was given on two separate occasions two weeks apart in a randomised double blind fashion. A single dose of aspirin was administered four hours after dosing and FEV1 was measured for six hours. Inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway by ZD2138 was assessed by measurements of urinary LTE4 levels and ex vivo calcium ionophore stimulated LTB4 generation in whole blood, before administration of drug or placebo and at regular time intervals after dosing and aspirin administration. RESULTS--ZD2138 protected against the aspirin-induced reduction in FEV1 with a 20.3 (4.9)% fall in FEV1 following placebo compared with 4.9 (2.9)% following ZD2138. This was associated with 72% inhibition of ex vivo LTB4 generation in whole blood at 12 hours and a 74% inhibition of the rise in urinary LTE4 excretion at six hours after aspirin ingestion. CONCLUSIONS--In aspirin-sensitive asthma the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZD2138 inhibits the fall in FEV1 induced by aspirin and this is associated with substantial inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase. PMID:8091318

  5. Expression, purification and crystallization of human 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein with leukotriene-biosynthesis inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shihua; McKeever, Brian M.; Wisniewski, Douglas; Miller, Douglas K.; Spencer, Robert H.; Chu, Lin; Ujjainwalla, Feroze; Yamin, Ting-Ting; Evans, Jilly F.; Becker, Joseph W.; Ferguson, Andrew D.

    2007-12-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of human 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein in complex with two leukotriene-biosynthesis inhibitors is decribed. The processes that were used to generate diffraction quality crystals are presented in detail. The nuclear membrane protein 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) plays an essential role in leukotriene synthesis. Recombinant full-length human FLAP with a C-terminal hexahistidine tag has been expressed and purified from the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli. Diffraction-quality crystals of FLAP in complex with leukotriene-synthesis inhibitor MK-591 and with an iodinated analogue of MK-591 have been grown using the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method. The crystals exhibit tetragonal symmetry (P42{sub 1}2) and diffracted to a resolution limit of 4 Å.

  6. 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitors Attenuate TNF-α-Induced Inflammation in Human Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Han-Ching; Lin, Tzu-Hung; Wu, Ming-Yueh; Chiu, Yung-Cheng; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Hour, Mann-Jen; Liou, Houng-Chi; Tu, Huang-Ju; Yang, Rong-Sen; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2014-01-01

    The lipoxygenase isoform of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is reported to be overexpressed in human rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue and involved in the progress of inflammatory arthritis. However, the detailed mechanism of how 5-lipoxygenase regulates the inflammatory response in arthritis synovial tissue is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of lipoxygenase pathways in TNF-α-induced production of cytokines and chemokines. Human synovial fibroblasts from rheumatoid patients were used in this study. 5-LOX inhibitors and shRNA were used to examine the involvement of 5-LOX in TNF-α-induced cytokines and chemokines expression. The signaling pathways were examined by Western Blotting or immunofluorescence staining. The effect of 5-LOX inhibitor on TNF-α-induced chemokine expression and paw edema was also explored in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. Treatment with 5-LOX inhibitors significantly decreased TNF-α-induced pro-inflammatory mediators including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in human synovial fibroblasts. Knockdown of 5-LOX using shRNA exerted similar inhibitory effects. The abrogation of NF-κB activation was involved in the antagonizing effects of these inhibitors. Furthermore, 5-LOX inhibitor decreased TNF-α-induced up-regulation of serum MCP-1 level and paw edema in mouse model. Our results provide the evidence that the administration of 5-LOX inhibitors is able to ameliorate TNF-α-induced cytokine/chemokine release and paw edema, indicating that 5-LOX inhibitors may be developed for therapeutic treatment of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:25229347

  7. Chemoprevention of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis by a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, garcinol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Zhang, Xinyan; Lu, Ye; Shim, Joong-Youn; Sang, Shengmin; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that aberrant arachidonic acid metabolism, especially the 5-lipoxygenase (5-Lox) pathway, is involved in oral carcinogenesis and can be targeted for cancer prevention. To develop potent topical agents for oral cancer chemoprevention, 5 known 5-Lox inhibitors from dietary and synthetic sources (Zileuton, ABT-761, licofelone, curcumin, and garcinol) were evaluated in silico for their potential efficacy. Garcinol, a polyisoprenylated benzophenone from the fruit rind of Garcinia spp., was found to be a promising agent based on the calculation of a theoretical activity index. Computer modeling showed that garcinol well fit the active site of 5-Lox, and potentially inhibited enzyme activity through interactions between the phenolic hydroxyl groups and the non-heme catalytic iron. In a short-term study on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-treated hamster cheek pouch, topical garcinol suppressed leukotriene B4 (LTB4) biosynthesis and inhibited inflammation and cell proliferation in the oral epithelium. In a long-term carcinogenesis study, topical garcinol significantly reduced the size of visible tumors, the number of cancer lesions, cell proliferation, and LTB4 biosynthesis. These results demonstrated that topical application of a 5-Lox inhibitor, garcinol, had chemopreventive effect on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis. PMID:23137051

  8. A new 5-lipoxygenase selective inhibitor derived from Artocarpus communis strongly inhibits arachidonic acid-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Koshihara, Y; Fujimoto, Y; Inoue, H

    1988-06-01

    Natural compounds isolated from the Indonesian plant, Artocarpus communis, inhibit 5-lipoxygenase of cultured mastocytoma cells. One of five compounds, AC-5-1, strongly inhibits 5-lipoxygenase with a half-inhibition dose of 5 +/- 0.12 X 10(-8) M. However, prostaglandin synthesizing activity is not inhibited until 10(-5) M. AC-5-1 is a highly selective inhibitor for 5-lipoxygenase. The AC-5-1 at 10(-5) M inhibits 96% of leukotriene C4 synthesis of mouse peritoneal cells facilitated by calcium-ionophore. Arachidonic acid-induced ear edema of mice, an in vivo inflammatory model, involving leukotriene induction, is strongly inhibited by AC-5-1 in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition is the strongest of any inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase reported previously. Since the natural compound AC-5-1 can selectively inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and affect in vivo inflammation, it will be interesting to investigate the role of leukotrienes on inflammation and other physiological processes.

  9. 5-Lipoxygenase inhibitors suppress RANKL-induced osteoclast formation via NFATc1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ju-Hee; Ting, Zheng; Moon, Mi-ran; Sim, Jung-Seon; Lee, Jung-Min; Doh, Kyung-Eun; Hong, Sunhye; Cui, Minghua; Choi, Sun; Chang, Hyeun Wook; Park Choo, Hea-Young; Yim, Mijung

    2015-11-01

    5-Lipoxygenase synthesizes leukotrienes from arachidonic acid. We developed three novel 5-LO inhibitors having a benzoxazole scaffold as a potential anti-osteoclastogenics. They significantly suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Furthermore, one compound, K7, inhibited the bone resorptive activity of osteoclasts. The anti-osteoclastogenic effect of K7 was mainly attributable to reduction in the expression of NFATc1, an essential transcription factor for osteoclast differentiation. K7 inhibited osteoclast formation via ERK and p38 MAPK, as well as NF-κB signaling pathways. K7 reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteoclast formation in vivo, corroborating the in vitro data. Thus, K7 exerted an inhibitory effect on osteoclast formation in vitro and in vivo, properties that make it a potential candidate for the treatment of bone diseases associated with excessive bone resorption.

  10. Synthesis and Evaluation of 5-Lipoxygenase Translocation Inhibitors from Acylnitroso Hetero-Diels-Alder Cycloadducts†

    PubMed Central

    Bolger, Joshua K.; Tian, Wen; Wolter, William R.; Cho, Wonhwa; Suckow, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Acylnitroso cycloadducts have proven to be valuable intermediates in the syntheses of a plethora of biologically active molecules. Recently, organometallic reagents were shown to open bicyclic acylnitroso cycloadducts and, more interestingly, the prospect of highly regioselective openings was raised. This transformation was employed in the synthesis of a compound with excellent inhibitory activity against 5-lipoxygenase ((±)-4a, IC50 51 nM), an important mediator of inflammation intimately involved in a number of disease states including asthma and cancer. Optimization of the copper-mediated organometallic ring opening reaction was accomplished allowing the further exploration of the biological activity. Synthesis of a number of derivatives with varying affinity for metal binding as well as pendant groups in a range of sizes was accomplished. Analogues were tested in a whole cell assay which revealed a subset of the compounds to be inhibitors of enzyme translocation, a mode of action not previously known and, potentially, extremely important for better understanding of the enzyme and inhibitor development. Additionally, the lead compound was tested in vivo in an established colon cancer model and showed very encouraging anti-tumorogenic properties. PMID:21365098

  11. A dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase protects against kainic acid-induced brain injury.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Marini, Herbert; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Bitto, Alessandra; Irrera, Natasha; Pizzino, Gabriele; Pallio, Giovanni; Calò, Margherita; Adamo, Elena Bianca; Trichilo, Vincenzo; Interdonato, Monica; Galfo, Federica; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2015-06-01

    Systemic administration of kainic acid causes inflammation and apoptosis in the brain, resulting in neuronal loss. Dual cyclooxygenase/5-lipoxygenase (COX/5-LOX) inhibitors could represent a possible neuroprotective approach in preventing glutamate excitotoxicity. Consequently, we investigated the effects of a dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX following intraperitoneal administration of kainic acid (KA, 10 mg/kg) in rats. Animals were randomized to receive either the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX (flavocoxid, 20 mg/kg i.p.) or its vehicle (1 ml/kg i.p.) 30 min after KA administration. Sham brain injury rats were used as controls. We evaluated protein expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK1/2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as well as levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in the hippocampus. Animals were also observed for monitoring behavioral changes according to Racine Scale. Finally, histological analysis and brain edema evaluation were carried out. Treatment with the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX decreased protein expression of p-ERK1/2 and TNF-α in hippocampus, markedly reduced MDA, LTB4 and PGE2 hippocampal levels, and also ameliorated brain edema. Histological analysis showed a reduction in cell damage in rats treated with the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX, particularly in hippocampal subregion CA3c. Moreover, flavocoxid significantly improved behavioral signs following kainic acid administration. Our results suggest that dual inhibition of COX/5-LOX by flavocoxid has neuroprotective effects during kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity. PMID:25893744

  12. Pharmacophore modeling and virtual screening for designing potential 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aparoy, P; Kumar Reddy, K; Kalangi, Suresh K; Chandramohan Reddy, T; Reddanna, P

    2010-02-01

    Inhibitors of the 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) pathway have a therapeutic potential in a variety of inflammatory disorders such as asthma. In this study, chemical feature based pharmacophore models of inhibitors of 5-LOX have been developed with the aid of HipHop and HypoGen modules within Catalyst program package. The best quantitative pharmacophore model, Hypo1, which has the highest correlation coefficient (0.97), consists of two hydrogen-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic feature and one ring aromatic feature. Hypo1 was further validated by test set and cross validation method. The application of the model shows great success in predicting the activities of 65 known 5-LOX inhibitors in our test set with a correlation coefficient of 0.85 with a cross validation of 95% confidence level, proving that the model is reliable in identifying structurally diverse compounds for inhibitory activity against 5-LOX. Furthermore, Hypo1 was used as a 3D query for screening Maybridge and NCI databases within catalyst and also drug like compounds obtained from Enamine Ltd, which follow Lipinski's rule of five. The hit compounds were subsequently subjected to filtering by docking and visualization, to identify the potential lead molecules. Finally 5 potential lead compounds, identified in the above process, were evaluated for their inhibitory activities. These studies resulted in the identification of two compounds with potent inhibition of 5-LOX activity with IC(50) of 14 microM and 35 microM, respectively. These studies thus validate the pharmacophore model generated and suggest the usefulness of the model in screening of various small molecule libraries and identification of potential lead compounds for 5-LOX inhibition. PMID:20045317

  13. Pharmacophore modeling and virtual screening for designing potential 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aparoy, P; Kumar Reddy, K; Kalangi, Suresh K; Chandramohan Reddy, T; Reddanna, P

    2010-02-01

    Inhibitors of the 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) pathway have a therapeutic potential in a variety of inflammatory disorders such as asthma. In this study, chemical feature based pharmacophore models of inhibitors of 5-LOX have been developed with the aid of HipHop and HypoGen modules within Catalyst program package. The best quantitative pharmacophore model, Hypo1, which has the highest correlation coefficient (0.97), consists of two hydrogen-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic feature and one ring aromatic feature. Hypo1 was further validated by test set and cross validation method. The application of the model shows great success in predicting the activities of 65 known 5-LOX inhibitors in our test set with a correlation coefficient of 0.85 with a cross validation of 95% confidence level, proving that the model is reliable in identifying structurally diverse compounds for inhibitory activity against 5-LOX. Furthermore, Hypo1 was used as a 3D query for screening Maybridge and NCI databases within catalyst and also drug like compounds obtained from Enamine Ltd, which follow Lipinski's rule of five. The hit compounds were subsequently subjected to filtering by docking and visualization, to identify the potential lead molecules. Finally 5 potential lead compounds, identified in the above process, were evaluated for their inhibitory activities. These studies resulted in the identification of two compounds with potent inhibition of 5-LOX activity with IC(50) of 14 microM and 35 microM, respectively. These studies thus validate the pharmacophore model generated and suggest the usefulness of the model in screening of various small molecule libraries and identification of potential lead compounds for 5-LOX inhibition.

  14. Effects of flavocoxid, a dual inhibitor of COX and 5-lipoxygenase enzymes, on benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Altavilla, D; Minutoli, L; Polito, F; Irrera, N; Arena, S; Magno, C; Rinaldi, M; Burnett, BP; Squadrito, F; Bitto, A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Inflammation plays a key role in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Eicosanoids derived from the COX and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) pathways are elevated in the enlarging prostate. Flavocoxid is a novel flavonoid–based ‘dual inhibitor’ of the COX and 5-LOX enzymes. This study evaluated the effects of flavocoxid in experimental BPH. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Rats were treated daily with testosterone propionate (3 mg·kg−1 s.c.) or its vehicle for 14 days to induce BPH. Animals receiving testosterone were randomized to receive vehicle (1 mL·kg−1, i.p.) or flavocoxid (20 mg·kg−1, i.p.) for 14 days. Histological changes, eicosanoid content and mRNA and protein levels for apoptosis-related proteins and growth factors were assayed in prostate tissue. The effects of flavocoxid were also tested on human prostate carcinoma PC3 cells. KEY RESULTS Flavocoxid reduced prostate weight and hyperplasia, blunted inducible expression of COX-2 and 5-LOX as well as the increased production of PGE2 and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), enhanced pro-apoptotic Bax and caspase-9 and decreased the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 mRNA. Flavocoxid also reduced EGF and VEGF expression. In PC3 cells, flavocoxid stimulated apoptosis and inhibited growth factor expression. Flavocoxid-mediated induction of apoptosis was inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, in PC3 cells, suggesting an essential role of caspases in flavocoxid-mediated apoptosis during prostatic growth. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Our results show that a ‘dual inhibitor’ of the COX and 5-LOX enzymes, such as flavocoxid, might represent a rational approach to reduce BPH through modulation of eicosanoid production and a caspase-induced apoptotic mechanism. PMID:22471974

  15. The selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, A63162 reduces PC3 proliferation and initiates morphologic changes consistent with secretion.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K. M.; Seed, T.; Ondrey, F.; Harris, J. E.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Rush Medical Coll.; Univ. of Minnesota

    1994-09-01

    We examined the effect of A63162 (Abbott), a selective inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase on human prostate (PC3) cell proliferation. Within 5 min DNA synthesis was reversibly inhibited by 40 {micro}M A63162, without altered cellular attachment or uptake of trypan blue. After 72 Hr, cells continues to be attached and exclude dye, were reduced in number and their histology was altered. Many treated cells were larger, more pleomorphic, with nuclear and cytoplasmic ultrastructural changes consistent with preparation for secretion. Some cells contained moderately swollen, distorted mitochondria. ETYA, a less selective inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase that also inhibits cell replication, acutely reduced O2 uptake by 40%, but A63162 did not. The retention of the supravital mitochondrial dye, rhodamine 123 was increased by ETYA at 4 hr, but not after 24 hr; retention was not altered by A63162. Although the mechanism by which A63162 reversibly inhibits PC3 proliferation and initiates preparation for secretion is not identified, additional studies should further define its role in these events

  16. MK-886, an inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein, inhibits cyclooxygenase-1 activity and suppresses platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Koeberle, Andreas; Siemoneit, Ulf; Northoff, Hinnak; Hofmann, Bettina; Schneider, Gisbert; Werz, Oliver

    2009-04-17

    MK-886, an inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP), potently suppresses leukotriene biosynthesis in intact cells and is frequently used to define a role of the 5-lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34) pathway in cellular or animal models of inflammation, allergy, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Here we show that MK-886 also interferes with the activities of cyclooxygenases (COX, EC 1.14.99.1). MK-886 inhibited isolated COX-1 (IC(50)=8 microM) and blocked the formation of the COX-1-derived products 12(S)-hydroxy-5-cis-8,10-trans-heptadecatrienoic acid (12-HHT) and thromboxane B(2) in washed human platelets in response to collagen as well as from exogenous arachidonic acid (IC(50)=13-15 microM). Isolated COX-2 was less affected (IC(50)=58 microM), and in A549 cells, MK-886 (33 microM) failed to suppress COX-2-dependent 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F(1alpha) formation. The distinct susceptibility of MK-886 towards COX-1 and -2 is apparent in automated molecular docking studies that indicate a preferred binding of MK-886 to COX-1 into the active site. MK-886 (10 microM) inhibited COX-1-mediated platelet aggregation induced by collagen or arachidonic acid whereas thrombin- or U-46619-induced (COX-independent) aggregation was not affected. Since leukotrienes and prostaglandins share (patho)physiological properties in the development and regulation of carcinogenesis, inflammation, and vascular functions, caution should be used when interpreting data where MK-886 is used as tool to determine the involvement of FLAP and/or the 5-lipoxygenase pathway in respective experimental models.

  17. One-step semisynthesis of oleacein and the determination as a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Vougogiannopoulou, Konstantina; Lemus, Christelle; Halabalaki, Maria; Pergola, Carlo; Werz, Oliver; Smith, Amos B; Michel, Sylvie; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Deguin, Brigitte

    2014-03-28

    The dialdehydes oleacein (2) and oleocanthal (4) are closely related to oleuropein (1) and ligstroside (3), the two latter compounds being abundant iridoids of Olea europaea. By exploiting oleuropein isolated from the plant leaf extract, an efficient procedure has been developed for a one-step semisynthesis of oleacein under Krapcho decarbomethoxylation conditions. Highlighted is the fact that 5-lipoxygenase is a direct target for oleacein with an inhibitory potential (IC50: 2 μM) more potent than oleocanthal (4) and oleuropein (1). This enzyme catalyzes the initial steps in the biosynthesis of pro-inflammatory leukotrienes. Taken together, the methodology presented here offers an alternative solution to isolation or total synthesis for the procurement of oleacein, thus facilitating the further development as a potential anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:24568174

  18. Syntheses and evaluation of novel isoliquiritigenin derivatives as potential dual inhibitors for amyloid-beta aggregation and 5-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Zi-Ying; Li, Yan-Ping; Li, Ding; Huang, Shi-Liang; Gu, Lian-Quan; Xu, Jun; Huang, Zhi-Shu

    2013-08-01

    A series of new isoliquiritigenin (ISL) derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as dual inhibitors for amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregation and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). It was found that all these synthetic compounds inhibited Aβ (1-42) aggregation effectively with their IC₅₀ values ranged from 2.2 ± 1.5 μM to 23.8 ± 2.0 μM. These derivatives also showed inhibitory activity to 5-LO with their IC50 values ranged from 6.1 ± 0.1 μM to 35.9 ± 0.3 μM. Their structure-activity relationships (SAR) and mechanisms of inhibitions were studied. This study provided potentially important information for further development of ISL derivatives as multifunctional agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment.

  19. 5-Lipoxygenase facilitates healing after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Blömer, Nadja; Pachel, Christina; Hofmann, Ulrich; Nordbeck, Peter; Bauer, Wolfgang; Mathes, Denise; Frey, Anna; Bayer, Barbara; Vogel, Benjamin; Ertl, Georg; Bauersachs, Johann; Frantz, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    Early healing after myocardial infarction (MI) is characterized by a strong inflammatory reaction. Most leukotrienes are pro-inflammatory and are therefore potential mediators of healing and remodeling after myocardial ischemia. The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) has a key role in the transformation of arachidonic acid in leukotrienes. Thus, we tested the effect of 5-LOX on healing after MI. After chronic coronary artery ligation, early mortality was significantly increased in 5-LOX(-/-) when compared to matching wildtype (WT) mice due to left ventricular rupture. This effect could be reproduced in mice treated with the 5-LOX inhibitor Zileuton. A perfusion mismatch due to the vasoactive potential of leukotrienes is not responsible for left ventricular rupture since local blood flow assessed by magnetic resonance perfusion measurements was not different. However, after MI, there was an accentuation of the inflammatory reaction with an increase of pro-inflammatory macrophages. Yet, mortality was not changed in chimeric mice (WT vs. 5-LOX(-/-) bone marrow in 5-LOX(-/-) animals), indicating that an altered function of 5-LOX(-/-) inflammatory cells is not responsible for the phenotype. Collagen production and accumulation of fibroblasts were significantly reduced in 5-LOX(-/-) mice in vivo after MI. This might be due to an impaired migration of 5-LOX(-/-) fibroblasts, as shown in vitro to serum. In conclusion, a lack or inhibition of 5-LOX increases mortality after MI because of healing defects. This is not mediated by a change in local blood flow, but through an altered inflammation and/or fibroblast function.

  20. Structural optimization and biological evaluation of 1,5-disubstituted pyrazole-3-carboxamines as potent inhibitors of human 5-lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Mingyue; Zheng, Shuli; Jiang, Chunyi; Zhou, Xiaomei; Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Jihui; Ye, Deju; Zheng, Mingfang; Jiang, Hualiang; Liu, Dongxiang; Cheng, Jian; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is a well-validated drug target and its inhibitors are potential drugs for treating leukotriene-related disorders. Our previous work on structural optimization of the hit compound 2 from our in-house collection identified two lead compounds, 3a and 3b, exhibiting a potent inhibitory profile against 5-LOX with IC50 values less than 1 µmol/L in cell-based assays. Here, we further optimized these compounds to prepare a class of novel pyrazole derivatives by opening the fused-ring system. Several new compounds exhibited more potent inhibitory activity than the lead compounds against 5-LOX. In particular, compound 4e not only suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in brain inflammatory cells and protected neurons from oxidative toxicity, but also significantly decreased infarct damage in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia. Molecular docking analysis further confirmed the consistency of our theoretical results and experimental data. In conclusion, the excellent in vitro and in vivo inhibitory activities of these compounds against 5-LOX suggested that these novel chemical structures have a promising therapeutic potential to treat leukotriene-related disorders. PMID:26904397

  1. Active site characterization and structure based 3D-QSAR studies on non-redox type 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Khan, Naveed; Zafar, Syed Kashif; Moin, Syed Tarique

    2016-06-10

    Structure-based 3D-QSAR study was performed on a class of 5-benzylidene-2-phenylthiazolinones non-redox type 5-LOX inhibitors. In this study, binding pocket of 5-Lipoxygenase (pdb id 3o8y) was identified by manual docking using 15-LOX (pdb id 2p0m) as a reference structure. Additionally, most of the binding site residues were found conserved in both structures. These non-redox inhibitors were then docked into the binding site of 5-LOX. To generate reliable CoMFA and CoMSIA models, atom fit data base alignment method using docked conformation of the most active compound was employed. The q(2)cv and r(2)ncv values for CoMFA model were found to be 0.549 and 0.702, respectively. The q(2)cv and r(2)ncv values for the selected CoMSIA model comprised four descriptors steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydrogen bond donor fields were found to be 0.535 and 0.951, respectively. Obtained results showed that our generated model was statistically reliable. Furthermore, an external test set validates the reliability of the predicted model by calculating r(2)pred i.e.0.787 and 0.571 for CoMFA and CoMSIA model, respectively. 3D contour maps generated from CoMFA and CoMSIA models were utilized to determine the key structural features of ligands responsible for biological activities. The applied protocol will be helpful to design more potent and selective inhibitors of 5-LOX. PMID:27044904

  2. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester, a 5-lipoxygenase enzyme inhibitor, alleviates diabetic atherosclerotic manifestations: effect on vascular reactivity and stiffness.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Noura Ahmed; El-Bassossy, Hany M; Mahmoud, Mona Fouad; Fahmy, Ahmed

    2014-04-25

    Atherosclerosis is a major macrovascular complication of diabetes that increases the risks for myocardial infarction, stroke, and other vascular diseases. The effect of a selective 5-lipoxygenase enzyme inhibitor; caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on diabetes-induced atherosclerotic manifestations was investigated. Insulin deficiency or resistance was induced by STZ or fructose respectively. Atherosclerosis developed when rats were left for 8 or 12 weeks subsequent STZ or fructose administration respectively. CAPE (30 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was given in the last 6 weeks. Afterwards, blood pressure (BP) was recorded. Then, isolated aorta reactivity to KCl and phenylephrine (PE) was studied. Blood glucose level, serum levels of insulin, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) as well as advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were determined. Moreover aortic haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression and collagen deposition were also assessed. Insulin deficiency and resistance were accompanied with elevated BP, exaggerated response to KCl and PE, elevated serum TNF-α and AGEs levels. Both models showed marked increase in collagen deposition. However, CAPE alleviated systolic and diastolic BP elevations and the exaggerated vascular contractility to both PE and KCl in both models without affecting AGEs level. CAPE inhibited TNF-α serum level elevation, induced aortic HO-1 expression and reduced collagen deposition. CAPE prevented development of hyperinsulinemia in insulin resistance model without any impact on the developed hyperglycemia in insulin deficiency model. In conclusion, CAPE offsets the atherosclerotic changes associated with diabetes via amelioration of the significant functional and structural derangements in the vessels in addition to its antihyperinsulinemic effect in insulin resistant model.

  3. Regulation of tumorigenic Wnt signaling by cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase and their pharmacological inhibitors: A basis for novel drugs targeting cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Roos, Jessica; Grösch, Sabine; Werz, Oliver; Schröder, Peter; Ziegler, Slava; Fulda, Simone; Paulus, Patrick; Urbschat, Anja; Kühn, Benjamin; Maucher, Isabelle; Fettel, Jasmin; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Piesche, Matthias; Matrone, Carmela; Steinhilber, Dieter; Parnham, Michael J; Maier, Thorsten J

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is a highly conserved pathway with a prominent role in embryogenic development, adult tissue homeostasis, cell polarization, stem cell biology, cell differentiation, and proliferation. Furthermore, canonical Wnt signaling is of pivotal importance in the pathogenesis of a number of cancer types and crucially affects tumor initiation, cancer cell proliferation, cancer cell apoptosis, and metastasis. Reports over the last decade have provided strong evidence for a pathophysiological role of Wnt signaling in non-malignant classical inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Although, several agents suppressing the Wnt pathway at different levels have been identified, the development of clinically relevant Wnt-inhibiting agents remains challenging due to selectivity and toxicity issues. Several studies have shown that long-term administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs protects against colon cancer and potentially other tumor types by interfering both with the COX and the Wnt pathway. Our own studies have shown that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs suppress Wnt signaling by targeting the pro-inflammatory enzyme 5-lipoxygenase which is the key enzyme pathophysiologically involved in the synthesis of leukotrienes. Furthermore, we found a direct link between the 5-lipoxygenase and Wnt signaling pathways, which is essential for the maintenance of leukemic stem cells. Accordingly, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase led to an impairment of Wnt-dependent acute and chronic myeloid leukemic stem cells. We believe that 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors might represent a novel type of Wnt inhibitor activating a potentially naturally occurring novel mechanism of suppression of Wnt signaling that is non-toxic, at least in mice, and is potentially well tolerated in patients.

  4. Morphologic changes of apoptosis induced in human chronic myelogenous leukemia "blast" cells by SC41661A (SEARLE), a selective inhibitor of 5-Lipoxygenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K. M.; Seed, T. M.; Jajeh, A.; Jia, P.; Harris, J. E.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Rush Medical Coll.; Cook County Hospital

    1994-01-01

    Several inhibitors of the arachidonic acid-metabolizing enzyme, 5-lipoxygenase reduce proliferation of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells and cell lines and some cells undergo limited differentiation. Cells were cultured from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in 'blast' crisis with the selective inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase, SC41661A[3-(3,5-bis(1,1-dimethyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl)hiol]-N-me thyl-N-[2-(2- phridinyl-propanamide)]. Cells cultured for 3 to 5 days with 40 {micro}M SC41661A exhibited reduced cellular numbers along with ultrastructural changes and DNA laddering characteristic of apoptosis. Similar culture conditions reduced proliferation of U937 monoblastoid cells. In U937 cells, the ultrastructural features of apoptosis were not observed at 72 hours, when DNA laddering was present and cell numbers were reduced, but was present after 144 hours of culture. Dissociation between certain morphologic and biochemical sequelae of apoptosis has been described in other systems. These observations are of interest since the induction of apoptosis in dividing chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells by a non-cytotoxic agent suggests paradigmatically new sites for therapeutic intervention.

  5. 4,5-Diarylisoxazol-3-carboxylic acids: A new class of leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitors potentially targeting 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP).

    PubMed

    Banoglu, Erden; Çelikoğlu, Erşan; Völker, Susanna; Olgaç, Abdurrahman; Gerstmeier, Jana; Garscha, Ulrike; Çalışkan, Burcu; Schubert, Ulrich S; Carotti, Andrea; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Werz, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we report novel leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis inhibitors that may target 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) based on the previously identified isoxazole derivative (8). The design and synthesis was directed towards a subset of 4,5-diaryl-isoxazole-3-carboxylic acid derivatives as LT biosynthesis inhibitors. Biological evaluation disclosed a new skeleton of potential anti-inflammatory agents, exemplified by 39 and 40, which potently inhibit cellular 5-LO product synthesis (IC50 = 0.24 μM, each) seemingly by targeting FLAP with weak inhibition on 5-LO (IC50 ≥ 8 μM). Docking studies and molecular dynamic simulations with 5-LO and FLAP provide valuable insights into potential binding modes of the inhibitors. Together, these diaryl-isoxazol-3-carboxylic acids may possess potential as leads for development of effective anti-inflammatory drugs through inhibition of LT biosynthesis. PMID:26922224

  6. Exploring the roles of UGT1A1 and UGT1A3 in oral clearance of GSK2190915, a 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Mosteller, Michael; Condreay, Lynn D; Harris, Elizabeth C; Ambery, Claire; Beerahee, Misba; Ghosh, Soumitra

    2014-12-01

    Pharmacokinetic variability in drug exposure is a concern for all compounds in development including those for the treatment of asthma and other respiratory disorders. Substantial variability in the oral clearance of GSK2190915, a 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein inhibitor that attenuates the production of leukotriene B4 and cysteinyl leukotrienes, is largely unaccounted for by clinical variables. A study of 41 patients, 78% (32/41) of whom were non-Hispanic whites, with mild to moderate asthma identified an association of UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A3*2 with the oral clearance of GSK2190915 (P=3.8×10⁻⁴ and 1.2×10⁻⁵, respectively). However, in a subsequent replication study of 403 non-Hispanic white patients with asthma, we failed to observe a statistically significant association between oral clearance of GSK2190915 and either UGT1A1*28 or UGT1A3*2 (P>0.05). Therefore, genetic effects that could explain the systemic exposure level variability of GSK2190915 were not identified. PMID:25192553

  7. A Single Amino Acid Difference between Mouse and Human 5-Lipoxygenase Activating Protein (FLAP) Explains the Speciation and Differential Pharmacology of Novel FLAP Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Blevitt, Jonathan M; Hack, Michael D; Herman, Krystal; Chang, Leon; Keith, John M; Mirzadegan, Tara; Rao, Navin L; Lebsack, Alec D; Milla, Marcos E

    2016-06-10

    5-Lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) plays a critical role in the metabolism of arachidonic acid to leukotriene A4, the precursor to the potent pro-inflammatory mediators leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4 Studies with small molecule inhibitors of FLAP have led to the discovery of a drug binding pocket on the protein surface, and several pharmaceutical companies have developed compounds and performed clinical trials. Crystallographic studies and mutational analyses have contributed to a general understanding of compound binding modes. During our own efforts, we identified two unique chemical series. One series demonstrated strong inhibition of human FLAP but differential pharmacology across species and was completely inactive in assays with mouse or rat FLAP. The other series was active across rodent FLAP, as well as human and dog FLAP. Comparison of rodent and human FLAP amino acid sequences together with an analysis of a published crystal structure led to the identification of amino acid residue 24 in the floor of the putative binding pocket as a likely candidate for the observed speciation. On that basis, we tested compounds for binding to human G24A and mouse A24G FLAP mutant variants and compared the data to that generated for wild type human and mouse FLAP. These studies confirmed that a single amino acid mutation was sufficient to reverse the speciation observed in wild type FLAP. In addition, a PK/PD method was established in canines to enable preclinical profiling of mouse-inactive compounds. PMID:27129215

  8. A Single Amino Acid Difference between Mouse and Human 5-Lipoxygenase Activating Protein (FLAP) Explains the Speciation and Differential Pharmacology of Novel FLAP Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Blevitt, Jonathan M; Hack, Michael D; Herman, Krystal; Chang, Leon; Keith, John M; Mirzadegan, Tara; Rao, Navin L; Lebsack, Alec D; Milla, Marcos E

    2016-06-10

    5-Lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) plays a critical role in the metabolism of arachidonic acid to leukotriene A4, the precursor to the potent pro-inflammatory mediators leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4 Studies with small molecule inhibitors of FLAP have led to the discovery of a drug binding pocket on the protein surface, and several pharmaceutical companies have developed compounds and performed clinical trials. Crystallographic studies and mutational analyses have contributed to a general understanding of compound binding modes. During our own efforts, we identified two unique chemical series. One series demonstrated strong inhibition of human FLAP but differential pharmacology across species and was completely inactive in assays with mouse or rat FLAP. The other series was active across rodent FLAP, as well as human and dog FLAP. Comparison of rodent and human FLAP amino acid sequences together with an analysis of a published crystal structure led to the identification of amino acid residue 24 in the floor of the putative binding pocket as a likely candidate for the observed speciation. On that basis, we tested compounds for binding to human G24A and mouse A24G FLAP mutant variants and compared the data to that generated for wild type human and mouse FLAP. These studies confirmed that a single amino acid mutation was sufficient to reverse the speciation observed in wild type FLAP. In addition, a PK/PD method was established in canines to enable preclinical profiling of mouse-inactive compounds.

  9. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase enhances the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin and 5-lipoxygenase activation protein inhibitor in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Yan; Yang, Jun; Inceoglu, Bora; Qiu, Hong; Ulu, Arzu; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D

    2010-03-15

    Inflammation is a multi-staged process whose expansive phase is thought to be driven by acutely released arachidonic acid (AA) and its metabolites. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), or soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is known to be anti-inflammatory. Inhibition of sEH stabilizes the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) products epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Here we used a non-selective COX inhibitor aspirin, a 5-lipoxygenase activation protein (FLAP) inhibitor MK886, and a sEH inhibitor t-AUCB to selectively modulate the branches of AA metabolism in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine model. We used metabolomic profiling to simultaneously monitor representative AA metabolites of each branch. In addition to the significant crosstalk among branches of the AA cascade during selective modulation of COX, LOX, or sEH, we demonstrated that co-administration of t-AUCB enhanced the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin or MK886, which was evidenced by the observations that co-administration resulted in favorable eicosanoid profiles and better control of LPS-mediated hypotension as well as hepatic protein expression of COX-2 and 5-LOX. Targeted disruption of the sEH gene displayed a parallel profile to that produced by t-AUCB. These observations demonstrate a significant level of crosstalk among the three major branches of the AA cascade and that they are not simply parallel pathways. These data illustrate that inhibition of sEH by both pharmacological intervention and gene knockout enhances the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin and MK886, suggesting the possibility of modulating multiple branches to achieve better therapeutic effects. PMID:19896470

  10. Regulation of rotenone-induced microglial activation by 5-lipoxygenase and cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Lu; Yang, Yi; Xu, Dong-Min; Zhang, Si-Ran; Li, Chen-Tan; Zheng, Wei; Yu, Shu-Ying; Wei, Er-Qing; Zhang, Li-Hui

    2014-07-14

    The 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) products cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) are potent pro-inflammatory mediators. CysLTs mediate their biological actions through activating CysLT receptors (CysLT(1)R and CysLT(2)R). We have recently reported that 5-LOX and CysLT(1)R mediated PC12 cell injury induced by high concentrations of rotenone (0.3-10 μM), which was reduced by the selective 5-LOX inhibitor zileuton and CysLT(1)R antagonist montelukast. The purpose of this study was to examine the regulatory roles of the 5-LOX/CysLT(1)R pathway in microglial activation induced by low concentration rotenone. After mouse microglial BV2 cells were stimulated with rotenone (0.3-3 nM), phagocytosis and release of pro-inflammatory cytokine were assayed as indicators of microglial activation. We found that rotenone (1 and 3 nM) increased BV2 microglial phagocytosis and the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Zileuton and montelukast prevented rotenone (3 nM)-induced phagocytosis and cytokine release. Furthermore, rotenone significantly up-regulated 5-LOX expression, induced 5-LOX translocation to the nuclear envelope, and increased the production of CysLTs. These responses were inhibited by zileuton. Rotenone also increased CysLT(1)R expression and induced nuclear translocation of CysLT(1)R. In primary rat microglia, rotenone (10 nM) increased release of IL-1β and TNF-α, whereas zileuton (0.1 μΜ) and montelukast (0.01 μΜ) significantly inhibited this response. These results indicated that 5-LOX and CysLT(1)R might be key regulators of microglial activation induced by low concentration of rotenone. Interference of 5-LOX/CysLT(1)R pathway may be an effective therapeutic strategy for microglial inflammation.

  11. Novel di-tertiary-butyl phenylhydrazones as dual cyclooxygenase-2/5-lipoxygenase inhibitors: synthesis, COX/LOX inhibition, molecular modeling, and insights into their cytotoxicities.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Shibnath; Vyas, Alok; Misra, Suniti; O'Brien, Paul; Zambre, Ajit; Fresco, Victor M; Markwald, Roger R; Swamy, K Venkateshwara; Afrasiabi, Zahra; Choudhury, Amitava; Khetmalas, Madhukar; Padhye, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Although dual inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) enzymes is highly effective than targeting COX or LOX alone, there are only a few reports of examining such compounds in case of colorectal cancers (CRC). In the present work we report that the novel di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors DTPSAL, DTPBHZ, DTPINH, and DTPNHZ exhibit significant cytotoxicity against human CRC cell lines. Molecular docking studies revealed a good fit of these compounds in the COX-2 and 5-LOX protein cavities. The inhibitors show significant inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and are effective against a panel of human colon cancer cell lines including HCA-7, HT-29, SW480 and intestinal Apc10.1 cells as well as the hyaluronan synthase-2 (Has2) enzyme over-expressing colon cancer cells, through inhibition of the Hyaluronan/CD44v6 cell survival pathway. Western blot analysis and qRT-PCR analyses indicated that the di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors reduce the expression of COX-2, 5-LOX, and CD44v6 in human colon cancer HCA-7 cells, while the combination of CD44v6shRNA and DTPSAL has an additional inhibitory effect on CD44v6 mRNA expression. The synergistic inhibitory effect of Celecoxib and Licofelone on CD44v6 mRNA expression suggests that the present dual inhibitors down-regulate cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes through CD44v6. The compounds also exhibited enhanced antiproliferative potency compared to standard dual COX/LOX inhibitor, viz. Licofelone. Importantly, the HA/CD44v6 antagonist CD44v6shRNA in combination with synthetic compounds had a sensitizing effect on the cancer cells which enhanced their antiproliferative potency, a finding which is crucial for the anti-proliferative potency of the novel synthetic di-tert-butyl phenol based dual COX-LOX inhibitors in colon cancer cells.

  12. Novel di-tertiary-butyl phenylhydrazones as dual cyclooxygenase-2/5-lipoxygenase inhibitors: synthesis, COX/LOX inhibition, molecular modeling, and insights into their cytotoxicities.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Shibnath; Vyas, Alok; Misra, Suniti; O'Brien, Paul; Zambre, Ajit; Fresco, Victor M; Markwald, Roger R; Swamy, K Venkateshwara; Afrasiabi, Zahra; Choudhury, Amitava; Khetmalas, Madhukar; Padhye, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Although dual inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) enzymes is highly effective than targeting COX or LOX alone, there are only a few reports of examining such compounds in case of colorectal cancers (CRC). In the present work we report that the novel di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors DTPSAL, DTPBHZ, DTPINH, and DTPNHZ exhibit significant cytotoxicity against human CRC cell lines. Molecular docking studies revealed a good fit of these compounds in the COX-2 and 5-LOX protein cavities. The inhibitors show significant inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and are effective against a panel of human colon cancer cell lines including HCA-7, HT-29, SW480 and intestinal Apc10.1 cells as well as the hyaluronan synthase-2 (Has2) enzyme over-expressing colon cancer cells, through inhibition of the Hyaluronan/CD44v6 cell survival pathway. Western blot analysis and qRT-PCR analyses indicated that the di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors reduce the expression of COX-2, 5-LOX, and CD44v6 in human colon cancer HCA-7 cells, while the combination of CD44v6shRNA and DTPSAL has an additional inhibitory effect on CD44v6 mRNA expression. The synergistic inhibitory effect of Celecoxib and Licofelone on CD44v6 mRNA expression suggests that the present dual inhibitors down-regulate cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes through CD44v6. The compounds also exhibited enhanced antiproliferative potency compared to standard dual COX/LOX inhibitor, viz. Licofelone. Importantly, the HA/CD44v6 antagonist CD44v6shRNA in combination with synthetic compounds had a sensitizing effect on the cancer cells which enhanced their antiproliferative potency, a finding which is crucial for the anti-proliferative potency of the novel synthetic di-tert-butyl phenol based dual COX-LOX inhibitors in colon cancer cells. PMID:24295787

  13. The metabolic effects of inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase and of cyclooxygenase 1 and 2 are an advancement in the efficacy and safety of anti-inflammatory therapy.

    PubMed

    Celotti, Fabio; Durand, Thierry

    2003-07-01

    Chronic treatment of inflammatory diseases with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is effective but not always devoid of serious side effects. In particular, the use of traditional non-steroidal aspirin-like drugs has been associated with a high incidence of gastrointestinal bleedings. The development of a new class of drugs, the selective cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2) inhibitors, has generated much expectation on the possibility to have safer compounds. After the initial enthusiasm of the scientific community, a re-evaluation of some large, randomized double-blind clinical studies performed with two of these compounds, has disclosed that the late serious gastrointestinal complications are not significantly reduced in comparison with non-selective inhibitors and that cardiovascular concerns might arise particularly if theses drugs are utilized in patients with underlying heart diseases. A new promising class of drugs to control inflammatory diseases is in advanced clinical development. The balanced inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and of cyclooxygenase (both types 1 and 2) block the formation of all the enzymatically arachidonic acid-derived metabolites, both prostaglandins (like COX inhibitors) and leukotrienes (LT); these drugs have been shown to possess a very good anti-inflammatory efficacy without serious side effects. Licofelone, previously known as ML3000, is the molecule in the most advanced phase of clinical development (phase III) among this class of compounds; it is a potent, competitive, and well balanced inhibitor of 5-LOX and COX pathways. The drug has been shown to possess analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic antibronchocostrictory and antiplatelet properties at doses which are safe for the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, the newly performed preclinical studies, here briefly reviewed, appear to indicate that the compound seems particularly suitable to protect the articular cartilage and the synovial space in degenerative joint disease

  14. A Novel Inhibitor of 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) Prevents Oxidative Stress–Induced Cell Death of Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Preeti; Mendez, Emily F.; Becerra, S. Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) oxygenates arachidonic acid to form 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, which is further converted into biologically detrimental leukotrienes, such as leukotriene B4 (LTB4). The RPE and retina express the PNPLA2 gene for pigment epithelium–derived factor receptor (PEDF-R), a lipase involved in cell survival. The purpose here was to investigate the role of PEDF-R on the 5-LOX pathway in oxidative stress of RPE. Methods Lipoxygenase activity assays were performed with soybean and potato lipoxygenase. Binding was evaluated by peptide-affinity chromatography and pull-down assays with PEDF-R–derived synthetic peptides or recombinant protein. Oxidative stress was induced in human ARPE-19 and primary pig RPE cells with indicated concentrations of H2O2/TNF-α. Reverse transcription–PCR of ALOX5 and PNPLA2 genes was performed. Cell viability and death rates were determined using respective biomarkers. Leukotriene B4 levels were measured by ELISA. Results Among five peptides spanning between positions Leu159 and Met325 of human PEDF-R polypeptide, only two overlapping peptides, E5b and P1, bound and inhibited lipoxygenase activity. Human recombinant 5-LOX bound specifically to peptide P1 and to His6/Xpress-tagged PEDF-R via ionic interactions. The two inhibitor peptides E5b and P1 promoted cell viability and decreased cell death of RPE cells undergoing oxidative stress. Oxidative stress decreased the levels of PNPLA2 transcripts with no effect on ALOX5 expression. Exogenous additions of P1 peptide or overexpression of the PNPLA2 gene decreased both LTB4 levels and death of RPE cells undergoing oxidative stress. Conclusions A novel peptide region of PEDF-R inhibits 5-LOX, which intersects with RPE cell death pathways induced by oxidative stress. PMID:27635633

  15. Substituted (pyridylmethoxy)naphthalenes as potent and orally active 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors; synthesis, biological profile, and pharmacokinetics of L-739,010.

    PubMed

    Hamel, P; Riendeau, D; Brideau, C; Chan, C C; Desmarais, S; Delorme, D; Dubé, D; Ducharme, Y; Ethier, D; Grimm, E; Falgueyret, J P; Guay, J; Jones, T R; Kwong, E; McAuliffe, M; McFarlane, C S; Piechuta, H; Roumi, M; Tagari, P; Young, R N; Girard, Y

    1997-08-29

    Dioxabicyclooctanyl naphthalenenitriles have been reported as a class of potent and nonredox 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors. These bicyclo derivatives were shown to be metabolically more stable than their tetrahydropyranyl counterparts but were not well orally absorbed. Replacement of the phenyl ring in the naphthalenenitrile 1 by a pyridine ring leads to the potent and orally absorbed inhibitor 3g (L-739,010, 2-cyano-4-(3-furyl)-7-[[6-[3-(3-hydroxy-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1] octanyl)]-2-pyridyl]methoxy]naphthalene). Compound 3g inhibits 5-HPETE production by human 5-LO and LTB4 biosynthesis by human PMN leukocytes and human whole blood (IC50S of 20, 1.6, and 42 nM, respectively). Derivative 3g is orally active in the rat pleurisy model (inhibition of LTB4, ED50 = 0.3 mg/kg) and in the anesthetized dog model (inhibition of ex vivo whole blood LTB4 and urinary LTE4, ED50 = 0.45 and 0.23 microgram/kg/min, respectively, i.v. infusion). In addition, 3g shows excellent functional activity against ovalbumin-induced dyspnea in rats (60% inhibition at 0.5 mg/kg, 4 h pretreatment) and Ascaris-induced bronchoconstriction in conscious sheep (50% and > 85% inhibition in early and late phases, respectively at 2.5 micrograms/kg/min, i.v. infusion) and, more particularly in the conscious antigen sensitive squirrel monkey model (53% inhibition of the increase in RL and 76% in the decrease of Cdyn, at 0.1 mg/kg, po). In rats and dogs, 3g presents excellent pharmacokinetics (estimated half-lives of 5 and 16 h, respectively) and bioavailabilities (26% and 73% when dosed as its hydrochloride salt at doses of 20 and 10 mg/kg, respectively, in methocel suspension). Based on its overall biological profile, compound 3g has been selected for preclinical animal toxicity studies.

  16. Zileuton restores memory impairments and reverses amyloid and tau pathology in aged AD mice

    PubMed Central

    Di Meco, Antonio; Lauretti, Elisabetta; Vagnozzi, Alana N.; Praticò, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5LO) is up-regulated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and its pharmacological blockade with zileuton slows down the development of the AD-like phenotype in young AD mice. However, its efficacy after the AD pathology is established is unknown. To this end, starting at 12-months of age triple transgenic mice (3xTg) received zileuton, a selective 5LO inhibitor, or placebo for 3 months, and then the effect of this treatment on behavior, amyloid and tau pathology assessed. While mice on placebo showed worsening of their memory, treated mice performed even better than at baseline. Compared with placebo, treated mice had significant less Aβ deposits and tau phosphorylation secondary to reduced γ-secretase and CDK-5 activation, respectively. Our data provide novel insights into the disease-modifying action of pharmacologically inhibiting 5LO as a viable AD therapeutic approach. They represent the successful completion of preclinical studies for the development of this class of drug as clinically applicable therapy for the disease. PMID:24973121

  17. Preclinical toxicity evaluation of tepoxalin, a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase, in Sprague-Dawley rats and beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Knight, E V; Kimball, J P; Keenan, C M; Smith, I L; Wong, F A; Barrett, D S; Dempster, A M; Lieuallen, W G; Panigrahi, D; Powers, W J; Szot, R J

    1996-09-01

    Tepoxalin [5- (4-chlorophenyl)-N-hydroxy-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-methyl-1H-pyrazole -3-propanamide] is an orally active anti-inflammatory agent, which inhibits both cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase activities. The oral toxicity of tepoxalin was evaluated in 1- and 6-month rat (up to 50 mg/kg/day) and dog (up to 150 mg/kg bid) studies. In rats, increased liver weight, centrilobular hypertrophy, and hepatic necrosis were observed at dosages >/=20 mg/kg/day. Renal changes indicative of analgesic nephropathy syndrome (i.e., papillary edema or necrosis, cortical tubular dilatation) were seen at >/=15 mg/kg. In rats treated for 1 month, these hepatic and renal effects were largely reversible after a 1-month recovery period. Gastrointestinal erosions and ulcers were seen in female rats given 40 mg/kg/day for 6 months. Changes in clinical pathology parameters included decreases in red blood cell count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit mean values; elevation in platelet counts; and an increase in prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times. Mild increases in alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and cholesterol were also noted in rats. Decreased erythrocyte parameters, increased leukocyte counts, and decreased total protein, albumin, and/or calcium were noted in some dogs in the 300 mg/kg/day group following 6 months of dosing. Small pyloric ulcerations were seen at 100 and 300 mg/kg/day dosages for up to 6 months. In both rats and dogs, no accumulation of tepoxalin or its carboxylic acid metabolite was detected in plasma following multiple dosing over a range of 5 to 50 mg/kg/day for rats and 20 to 300 mg/kg/day for dogs. Plasma concentrations of the carboxylic acid metabolite were severalfold higher than those of the parent compound. The no-effect dosages in rats (5 mg/kg/day) and dogs (20 mg/kg/day) were approximately one and six times the ED50 (3.5 mg/kg), respectively, for inhibition of inflammatory effects in the adjuvant arthritic rat without

  18. Modulation of coronary flow rate and cardiac contractility by the divalent cation ionophore A23187 and inhibitors of the cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase pathways: development of heterogeneous patterns of myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Björnsson, O G; Kobayashi, K; Williamson, J R

    1988-02-01

    In the present studies, we demonstrate in buffer-perfused isolated working guinea pig hearts that indometacin reduces coronary flow rate in a dose-dependent manner (max 56.7 +/- 5.5%, SEM, n = 6, of control at 5 x 10(-6) mol/l of indometacin, P less than 0.01), and that this leads to a development of heterogeneous patterns of myocardial ischemia (elevated myocardial levels of reduced pyridine nucleotide, NADH) and depressed cardiac work (64.7 +/- 11.7%, SEM, of control at 5 x 10(-6) mol/l of indometacin, P less than 0.05). The effect of indometacin on coronary flow rate and consequently on myocardial tissue oxygenation was completely prevented by the preferential 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) (1 x 10(-6) mol/l), or the sulfidopeptide leukotriene receptor antagonist FPL 55712 (2 x 10(-5) mol/l), indicating that the isolated working guinea pig heart, even when deprived of blood, is able to produce vasoactive sulfidopeptide leukotrienes at significant levels. At higher concentrations of indometacin (5 x 10(-5) mol/l, 1 x 10(-4) mol/l), coronary flow rate returned to initial levels while cardiac work became further depressed despite normoxic levels of NADH. These data support that indometacin also has a direct suppressive effect on the myocardium independent of its coronary vascular effect. This conclusion is supported by the observation that addition of sodium arachidonate (6 x 10(-5) mol/l) completely inhibited the vascular effect of indometacin, but not the depressive effect on the myocardium. The divalent cation ionophore A23187 (6 x 10(-6) mol/l) had a strong positive chronotropic effect on the heart and a biphasic effect on coronary flow rate. After a brief period of increased coronary flow rate, presumably due to coronary vasodilatation, the ionophore caused a sustained reduction in coronary flow, and this was accompanied by high myocardial levels of NADH fluorescence of characteristically heterogeneous pattern. This is presumably

  19. Inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase by vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Reddanna, P; Rao, M K; Reddy, C C

    1985-11-25

    Purified 5-lipoxygenase from potato tubers was inhibited strongly by vitamin E and its analogs. The inhibition by d-alpha-tocopherol was found to be irreversible and non-competitive with respect to arachidonic acid. An IC50 of 5 microM was calculated for d-alpha-tocopherol. The inhibition appears to be unrelated to its antioxidant function. Binding studies with 14C-labelled d-alpha-tocopherol revealed that there is a strong interaction between vitamin E and 5-lipoxygenase. Tryptic digestion and peptide mapping of 5-lipoxygenase-vitamin E complex indicate that vitamin E binds strongly to a single peptide. These studies suggest that cellular vitamin E levels may have profound influence on the formation of leukotrienes. PMID:3934003

  20. Tepoxalin: a dual cyclooxygenase/5-lipoxygenase inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism with potent anti-inflammatory activity and a favorable gastrointestinal profile.

    PubMed

    Argentieri, D C; Ritchie, D M; Ferro, M P; Kirchner, T; Wachter, M P; Anderson, D W; Rosenthale, M E; Capetola, R J

    1994-12-01

    Tepoxalin [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-hydroxy-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-methyl-1H- pyrazole-3-propanamide] is a potent inhibitor of sheep seminal vesicle cyclooxygenase (CO) (IC50 = 4.6 microM), rat basophilic leukemia cell (RBL-1) lysate CO (IC50 = 2.85 microM) and CO from intact RBL-1 cells (IC50 = 4.2 microM). The compound inhibits the production of thromboxane B2 (TxB2) in Ca++ ionophore A-23187-stimulated human peripheral blood leukocytes (HPBL; IC50 = 0.01 microM) and human whole blood (IC50 = 0.08 microM) and is a potent inhibitor of epinephrine-induced human platelet aggregation (IC50 = 0.045 microM). Tepoxalin inhibits lipoxygenase (LO) in RBL-1 lysates (IC50 = 0.15 microM) and intact RBL-1 cells (IC50 = 1.7 microM) and inhibits the generation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in calcium ionophore A-23187-stimulated HPBL (IC50 = 0.07 microM) and human whole blood (IC50 = 1.57 microM). Human platelet 12-LO (IC50 = 3.0 microM) is inhibited, but 15-LO is only weakly so (IC50 = 157 microM). In vivo, tepoxalin, administered orally, demonstrated potent anti-inflammatory activity in the established adjuvant arthritic rat (ED50 = 3.5 mg/kg) and potent analgesic activity in the acetic acid abdominal construction assay in mice (ED50 = 0.45 mg/kg). In an ex vivo whole blood eicosanoid production assay, tepoxalin produces a dose-related inhibition of prostaglandin (PG) and LT production in dogs (PGF2 alpha - ED50 = 0.015 mg/kg; LTB4 - ED50 = 2.37 mg/kg) and adjuvant arthritic rats following oral administration. In adjuvant arthritic rats, tepoxalin is devoid of ulcerogenic activity within its anti-inflammatory therapeutic range (1-33 mg/kg p.o.) and does not exhibit ulcerogenic activity in normal rats at doses lower than 100 mg/kg (UD50 = 173 mg/kg p.o.). Tepoxalin represents a new class of anti-inflammatory drugs which may exhibit less gastrointestinal toxicity and may be efficacious in immunoinflammatory disease states where excessive PG and LT production has been implicated and may

  1. 5-Lipoxygenase metabolite 4-HDHA is a mediator of the antiangiogenic effect of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Stahl, Andreas; Chen, Jing; Seaward, Molly R; Willett, Keirnan L; Krah, Nathan M; Dennison, Roberta J; Connor, Kip M; Aderman, Christopher M; Liclican, Elvira; Carughi, Arianna; Perelman, Dalia; Kanaoka, Yoshihide; Sangiovanni, John Paul; Gronert, Karsten; Smith, Lois E H

    2011-02-01

    Lipid signaling is dysregulated in many diseases with vascular pathology, including cancer, diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, and age-related macular degeneration. We have previously demonstrated that diets enriched in ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) effectively reduce pathological retinal neovascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy, in part through metabolic products that suppress microglial-derived tumor necrosis factor-α. To better understand the protective effects of ω-3 PUFAs, we examined the relative importance of major lipid metabolic pathways and their products in contributing to this effect. ω-3 PUFA diets were fed to four lines of mice deficient in each key lipid-processing enzyme (cyclooxygenase 1 or 2, or lipoxygenase 5 or 12/15), retinopathy was induced by oxygen exposure; only loss of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) abrogated the protection against retinopathy of dietary ω-3 PUFAs. This protective effect was due to 5-LOX oxidation of the ω-3 PUFA lipid docosahexaenoic acid to 4-hydroxy-docosahexaenoic acid (4-HDHA). 4-HDHA directly inhibited endothelial cell proliferation and sprouting angiogenesis via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), independent of 4-HDHA's anti-inflammatory effects. Our study suggests that ω-3 PUFAs may be profitably used as an alternative or supplement to current anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment for proliferative retinopathy and points to the therapeutic potential of ω-3 PUFAs and metabolites in other diseases of vasoproliferation. It also suggests that cyclooxygenase inhibitors such as aspirin and ibuprofen (but not lipoxygenase inhibitors such as zileuton) might be used without losing the beneficial effect of dietary ω-3 PUFA. PMID:21307302

  2. Exogenous action of 5-lipoxygenase by its metabolites on luteinizing hormone release in rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Przylipiak, A; Kiesel, L; Habenicht, A J; Przylipiak, M; Runnebaum, B

    1990-02-12

    The stimulatory effect of exogenously administered potato 5-lipoxygenase (0.1-0.3 U/2 ml) on luteinizing hormone (LH) release was demonstrated in rat anterior pituitary cells in a superfusion system. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), an inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase, abolished the effect of the enzyme on LH secretion. The secretory effect on LH after 5-lipoxygenase administration was biphasic and dependent on Ca2+ indicating that 5-lipoxygenase affects LH release through its oxygenation reaction. Another series of experiments demonstrated that activation of 5-lipoxygenase, expressed as production of leukotriene (LT) B4 and C4 (728 +/- 127 pg/10(6) cells and 178 +/- 23 pg/10(6) cells, respectively) occurs in rat pituitary cells after addition of Ca2+ ionophore A23187. However, LTB4 and LTC4 were not formed by pituitary cells that had previously been desensitized by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), the physiological ligand of LH release. These results are consistent with a role of 5-lipoxygenase metabolites in the mechanism of GnRH-induced LH secretion. PMID:2157615

  3. Stress-induced nuclear export of 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hanaka, Hiromi; Shimizu, Takao; Izumi, Takashi . E-mail: takizumi@med.gunma-u.ac.jp

    2005-12-09

    A key enzyme for leukotriene biosynthesis is 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), which we found is exported from the nucleus when p38 MAPK is activated. CHO-K1 cells stably express green fluorescent protein-5-lipoxygenase fusion protein (GFP-5LO), which is located predominantly in the nucleus, and is exported by anisomycin, hydrogen peroxide, and sorbitol, with activation of p38 MAPK. SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, and Leptomycin B, an inhibitor of the nuclear export, blocked the anisomycin-induced export of GFP-5LO. When HEK293 cells were transformed with plasmids for wild-type GFP-5LO, GFP-5LO-S271A or GFP-5LO-S271E mutants, most wild-type GFP-5LO and GFP-5LO-S271A localized in the nucleus, but GFP-5LO-S271E localized in the cytosol. Thus, phosphorylation at Ser-271 of 5-LO is important for its export. Endogenous 5-LO in RBL cells stimulated with anisomycin was also exported from the nucleus. These results suggest that the nuclear export of 5-LO depends on the stress-induced activation of the p38 MAPK pathway.

  4. Synthesis and biological evaluation of salicylic acid and N-acetyl-2-carboxybenzenesulfonamide regioisomers possessing a N-difluoromethyl-1,2-dihydropyrid-2-one pharmacophore: dual inhibitors of cyclooxygenases and 5-lipoxygenase with anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Morshed A; Abdellatif, Khaled R A; Dong, Ying; Das, Dipankar; Yu, Gang; Velázquez, Carlos A; Suresh, Mavanur R; Knaus, Edward E

    2009-12-15

    A novel class of salicylic acid and N-acetyl-2-carboxybenzenesulfonamide regioisomers possessing a N-difluoromethyl-1,2-dihydropyrid-2-one pharmacophore attached to its C-4 or C-5 position was designed for evaluation as anti-inflammatory (AI) agents. Replacement of the 2,4-difluorophenyl ring in diflunisal by the N-difluoromethyl-1,2-dihydropyrid-2-one moiety provided compounds showing dual selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitory activities. AI structure-activity studies showed that the C-4 (14a) and C-5 (14b) salicylate regioisomers were 1.4- and 1.6-fold more potent than aspirin, and the C-5 N-acetyl-2-carboxybenzenesulfonamide regioisomer (22b) was 1.3- and 2.8-fold more potent than ibuprofen and aspirin, respectively. In vivo ulcer index (UI) studies showed that the 4- and 5-(N-difluoromethyl-1,2-dihydropyrid-2-one-4-yl)salicylic acids (14a and 14b) were completely non-ulcerogenic since no gastric lesions were present (UI=0) relative to aspirin (UI=57) at an equivalent mumol/kg oral dose. The N-difluoromethyl-1,2-dihydropyridin-2-one moiety provides a novel 5-LOX pharmacophore for the design of cyclic hydroxamic mimetics for exploitation in the development of dual COX-2/5-LOX inhibitory AI drugs.

  5. Synthesis, SAR, and series evolution of novel oxadiazole-containing 5-lipoxygenase activating protein inhibitors: discovery of 2-[4-(3-{(r)-1-[4-(2-amino-pyrimidin-5-yl)-phenyl]-1-cyclopropyl-ethyl}-[1,2,4]oxadiazol-5-yl)-pyrazol-1-yl]-N,N-dimethyl-acetamide (BI 665915).

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidenori; Riether, Doris; Bartolozzi, Alessandra; Bosanac, Todd; Berger, Valentina; Binetti, Ralph; Broadwater, John; Chen, Zhidong; Crux, Rebecca; De Lombaert, Stéphane; Dave, Rajvee; Dines, Jonathon A; Fadra-Khan, Tazmeen; Flegg, Adam; Garrigou, Michael; Hao, Ming-Hong; Huber, John; Hutzler, J Matthew; Kerr, Steven; Kotey, Adrian; Liu, Weimin; Lo, Ho Yin; Loke, Pui Leng; Mahaney, Paige E; Morwick, Tina M; Napier, Spencer; Olague, Alan; Pack, Edward; Padyana, Anil K; Thomson, David S; Tye, Heather; Wu, Lifen; Zindell, Renee M; Abeywardane, Asitha; Simpson, Thomas

    2015-02-26

    The synthesis, structure-activity relationship (SAR), and evolution of a novel series of oxadiazole-containing 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) inhibitors are described. The use of structure-guided drug design techniques provided compounds that demonstrated excellent FLAP binding potency (IC50 < 10 nM) and potent inhibition of LTB4 synthesis in human whole blood (IC50 < 100 nM). Optimization of binding and functional potencies, as well as physicochemical properties resulted in the identification of compound 69 (BI 665915) that demonstrated an excellent cross-species drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) profile and was predicted to have low human clearance. In addition, 69 was predicted to have a low risk for potential drug-drug interactions due to its cytochrome P450 3A4 profile. In a murine ex vivo whole blood study, 69 demonstrated a linear dose-exposure relationship and a dose-dependent inhibition of LTB4 production. PMID:25671290

  6. Maximum Time of the Effect of Antileukotriene - Zileuton in Treatment of Patients with Bronchial Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Morina, Naim; Boçari, Gëzim; Iljazi, Ali; Hyseini, Kadir; Halac, Gunay

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Maximum time of the effect of antileukotriene substances - Zileuton in the treatment of patients with bronchial asthma and increased bronchial reactivity and of the salbutamol as agonist of the beta2 adrenergic receptor studied in this work. Methods: Parameters of the lung function are determined with Body plethysmography. Raw and ITGV were registered and specific resistance (SRaw) was calculated. Zileuton (Zyflo, tbl. 600 mg), producer Cornerstone Therapeutics, USA was used in the research. Results: Results of this research, in patients with bronchial asthma, indicate that antileukotriene substances–Zileuton administered in a dose of 600 mg first day (oral route of administration 4 × 1 tbl.) has not caused significant decrease of the specific resistance of the airways (SRaw) (p value 0.1 > Alpha 0.05), whereas Zileuton administered two days in a row, in a dose of 600 mg (4 × 1 tbl. a day), has caused significant decrease of the specific resistance of the airways (SRaw) (P value 0.03 < Alpha 0.05). Effect of the control with salbutamol (beta2-adrenergic receptor agonist) is efficient in the removal of the increased bronchomotor tone, causing significant decrease of the resistance (Raw), respectively of the specific resistance (SRaw), (p value 0.05 = Alpha 0.05). Conclusion: Formation of leukotrienes depends on the lypoxygenation of the arachidonic acid by 5-lypoxygenase. Zileuton is an active and powerful inhibitor of the activity of 5- lypoxygenase and as such inhibits generation of its products. Consequently, besides inhibition of cys-LTs’, zileuton also inhibits the formation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), which is a powerful chemotactic of other eicosanoids too, which depend on the synthesis of lekotriene A4 (LTA4). This suggests that the effect of antileukotrienes (Zileuton) is not immediate after oral administration, but the powerful effect of the Zileuton seen only after two days of inhibition of cys-LTs’, and inhibition of leukotriene B4 (LTB4

  7. Phospholipid Ozonation Products Activate the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zemski Berry, Karin A; Murphy, Robert C

    2016-08-15

    Ozone is a highly reactive environmental toxicant that can react with the double bonds of lipids in pulmonary surfactant. This study was undertaken to investigate the proinflammatory properties of the major lipid-ozone product in pulmonary surfactant, 1-palmitoyl-2-(9'-oxo-nonanoyl)-glycerophosphocholine (16:0/9al-PC), with respect to eicosanoid production. A dose-dependent increase in the formation of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products was observed in murine resident peritoneal macrophages (RPM) and alveolar macrophages (AM) upon treatment with 16:0/9al-PC. In contrast, the production of cyclooxygenase (COX) derived eicosanoids did not change from basal levels in the presence of 16:0/9al-PC. When 16:0/9al-PC and the TLR2 ligand, zymosan, were added to RPM or AM, an enhancement of 5-LO product formation along with a concomitant decrease in COX product formation was observed. Neither intracellular calcium levels nor arachidonic acid release was influenced by the addition of 16:0/9al-PC to RPM. Results from mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor studies and direct measurement of phosphorylation of MAPKs revealed that 16:0/9al-PC activates the p38 MAPK pathway in RPM, which results in the activation of 5-LO. Our results indicate that 16:0/9al-PC has a profound effect on the eicosanoid pathway, which may have implications in inflammatory pulmonary disease states where eicosanoids have been shown to play a role. PMID:27448436

  8. Expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) in T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cook-Moreau, Jeanne M; El-Makhour Hojeij, Yola; Barrière, Guislaine; Rabinovitch-Chable, Hélène C; Faucher, Karine S; Sturtz, Franck G; Rigaud, Michel A

    2007-01-01

    5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is the key enzyme responsible for the synthesis of the biologically active leukotrienes. Its presence has been reported in cells of the myeloid lineage and B lymphocytes but has not been formally defined in T lymphocytes. In this study, we provide evidence for 5-LOX expression on both transcriptional and translational levels in highly purified peripheral blood T cells as well as in human T lymphoblastoid cell lines (MOLT4 and Jurkat). Messenger RNA (mRNA) of 5-LOX was amplified by conventional reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR; MOLT4 and Jurkat cells) and by in situ RT-PCR (T lymphocytes). 5-LOX protein expression was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence studies. 5-LOX was present primarily in the cytoplasm with some nuclear localization and was translocated to the nuclear periphery after culture in a mitosis-supporting medium. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis of different T-lymphocyte populations, including CD4, CD8, CD45RO, CD45RA, T helper type 2, and T-cell receptor-αβ and -γδ expressing cells, did not identify a differential distribution of the enzyme. Purified peripheral blood T lymphocytes were incapable of synthesizing leukotrienes in the absence of exogenous arachidonic acid. Jurkat cells produced leukotriene C4 and a small amount of leukotriene B4 in response to CD3–CD28 cross-linking. This synthesis was abolished by two inhibitors of leukotriene synthesis, MK-886 and AA-861. The presence of 5-LOX in T lymphocytes but the absence of endogenous lipoxygenase metabolite production compared to Jurkat cells may constitute a fundamental difference between resting peripheral lymphocytes and leukaemic cells. PMID:17484769

  9. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  10. Use of a balanced dual cyclooxygenase-1/2 and 5-lypoxygenase inhibitor in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Pallio, Giovanni; Bitto, Alessandra; Pizzino, Gabriele; Galfo, Federica; Irrera, Natasha; Minutoli, Letteria; Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Squadrito, Giovanni; Macrì, Antonio; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2016-10-15

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) play an important role in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). We investigated the effects of flavocoxid, a dual COX/LOX inhibitor, in experimental colitis induced with either dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS) or dextrane sulphate sodium (DSS) In the first model, colitis was induced in rats by a single intra-colonic instillation (25mg in 0.8ml 50% ethanol) of DNBS; after 24h animals were randomized to receive orally twice a day, flavocoxid (10mg/kg), zileuton (50mg/kg), or celecoxib (5mg/kg). Sham animals received 0.8ml of saline by a single intra-colonic instillation. Rats were killed 4 days after induction and samples were collected for analysis. In the second model, colitis was induced in rats by the administration of 8% DSS dissolved in drinking water; after 24h animals were randomized to the same above reported treatments. Sham animals received standard drinking water. Rats were killed 5 days after induction and samples were collected for analysis. Flavocoxid, zileuton and celecoxib improved weight loss, reduced colonic myeloperoxydase activity, macroscopic and microscopic damage, and TNF-α serum levels. Flavocoxid and celecoxib also reduced malondialdheyde, 6-keto PGF1α and PGE-2 levels while flavocoxid and zileuton decreased LTB-4 levels. In addition, flavocoxid treatment improved histological features and apoptosis as compared to zileuton and celecoxib; moreover only flavocoxid reduced TXB2, thus avoiding an imbalance in eicosanoids production. Our results show that flavocoxid has protective effect in IBDs and may represents a future safe treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases.

  11. 5-lipoxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein gene polymorphisms, dietary linoleic acid, and risk for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2008-10-01

    The n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid 5-lipoxygenase pathway has been shown to play a role in the carcinogenesis of breast cancer. We conducted a population-based case-control study among Latina, African-American, and White women from the San Francisco Bay area to examine the association of the 5-lipoxygenase gene (ALOX5) and 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein gene (ALOX5AP) with breast cancer risk. Three ALOX5AP polymorphisms [poly(A) microsatellite, -4900 A>G (rs4076128), and -3472 A>G (rs4073259)] and three ALOX5 polymorphisms [Sp1-binding site (-GGGCGG-) variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism, -1279 G>T (rs6593482), and 760 G>A (rs2228065)] were genotyped in 802 cases and 888 controls. We did not find significant main effects of ALOX5 and ALOX5AP genotypes on breast cancer risk that were consistent across race or ethnicity; however, there was a significant interaction between the ALOX5AP -4900 A>G polymorphism and dietary linoleic acid intake (P=0.03). Among women consuming a diet high in linoleic acid (top quartile of intake, >17.4 g/d), carrying the AA genotype was associated with higher breast cancer risk (age- and race-adjusted odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.9) compared with carrying genotypes AG or GG. Among women consuming

  12. Distinct parts of leukotriene C{sub 4} synthase interact with 5-lipoxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase activating protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strid, Tobias; Svartz, Jesper; Franck, Niclas; Hallin, Elisabeth; Ingelsson, Bjoern; Soederstroem, Mats; Hammarstroem, Sven

    2009-04-17

    Leukotriene C{sub 4} is a potent inflammatory mediator formed from arachidonic acid and glutathione. 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO), 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) and leukotriene C{sub 4} synthase (LTC{sub 4}S) participate in its biosynthesis. We report evidence that LTC{sub 4}S interacts in vitro with both FLAP and 5-LO and that these interactions involve distinct parts of LTC{sub 4}S. FLAP bound to the N-terminal part/first hydrophobic region of LTC{sub 4}S. This part did not bind 5-LO which bound to the second hydrophilic loop of LTC{sub 4}S. Fluorescent FLAP- and LTC{sub 4}S-fusion proteins co-localized at the nuclear envelope. Furthermore, GFP-FLAP and GFP-LTC{sub 4}S co-localized with a fluorescent ER marker. In resting HEK293/T or COS-7 cells GFP-5-LO was found mainly in the nuclear matrix. Upon stimulation with calcium ionophore, GFP-5-LO translocated to the nuclear envelope allowing it to interact with FLAP and LTC{sub 4}S. Direct interaction of 5-LO and LTC{sub 4}S in ionophore-stimulated (but not un-stimulated) cells was demonstrated by BRET using GFP-5-LO and Rluc-LTC{sub 4}S.

  13. Identification of the substrate access portal of 5-Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sunayana; Bartlett, Sue G.

    2016-01-01

    The overproduction of inflammatory lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid contributes to asthma and cardiovascular diseases, among other pathologies. Consequently, the enzyme that initiates the synthesis of pro-inflammatory leukotrienes, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), is a target for drug design. The crystal structure of 5-LOX revealed a fully encapsulated active site, thus the point of substrate entry is not known. We asked whether a structural motif, a “cork” present in 5-LOX but absent in other mammalian lipoxygenases, might be ejected to allow substrate access. Our results indicate that reduction of cork volume facilitates access to the active site. However, if cork entry into the site is obstructed, enzyme activity is significantly compromised. The results support a model in which the “cork” that shields the active site in the absence of substrate serves as the active site portal, but the “corking” amino acid Phe-177 plays a critical role in providing a fully functional active site. Thus the more appropriate metaphor for this structural motif is a “twist-and-pour” cap. Additional mutagenesis data are consistent with a role for His-600, deep in the elongated cavity, in positioning the substrate for catalysis. PMID:26427761

  14. Acrolein increases 5-lipoxygenase expression in murine macrophages through activation of ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chae E.; Lee, Seung J.; Seo, Kyo W.; Park, Hye M.; Yun, Jung W.; Bae, Jin U.; Bae, Sun S.; Kim, Chi D.

    2010-05-15

    Episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants has been linked to acute myocardial infarction, and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is involved in the production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which destabilizes atherosclerotic plaques. Thus, the present study determined the effect of acrolein on 5-LO/leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) production in murine macrophages. Stimulation of J774A.1 cells with acrolein led to increased LTB{sub 4} production in association with increased 5-LO expression. Acrolein-evoked 5-LO expression was blocked by pharmacological inhibition of the ERK pathway, but not by inhibitors for JNK and p38 MAPK pathways. In line with these results, acrolein exclusively increased the phosphorylation of ERK among these MAPK, suggesting a role for the ERK pathway in acrolein-induced 5-LO expression with subsequent production of LTB{sub 4}. Among the receptor tyrosine kinases including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), acrolein-evoked ERK phosphorylation was attenuated by AG1478, an EGFR inhibitor, but not by AG1295, a PDGFR inhibitor. In addition, acrolein-evoked 5-LO expression was also inhibited by inhibition of EGFR pathway, but not by inhibition of PDGFR pathway. These observations suggest that acrolein has a profound effect on the 5-LO pathway via an EGFR-mediated activation of ERK pathway, leading to acute ischemic syndromes through the generation of LTB{sub 4}, subsequent MMP-9 production and plaque rupture.

  15. Kinetic investigation of human 5-lipoxygenase with arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Monica; Kumar, Ramakrishnan B; Balagunaseelan, Navisraj; Hamberg, Mats; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Rådmark, Olof; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2016-08-01

    Human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is responsible for the formation of leukotriene (LT)A4, a pivotal intermediate in the biosynthesis of the leukotrienes, a family of proinflammatory lipid mediators. 5-LOX has thus gained attention as a potential drug target. However, details of the kinetic mechanism of 5-LOX are still obscure. In this Letter, we investigated the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 5-LOX with its physiological substrate, arachidonic acid (AA). The observed KIE is 20±4 on kcat and 17±2 on kcat/KM at 25°C indicating a non-classical reaction mechanism. The observed rates show slight temperature dependence at ambient temperatures ranging from 4 to 35°C. Also, we observed low Arrhenius prefactor ratio (AH/AD=0.21) and a small change in activation energy (Ea(D)-Ea(H)=3.6J/mol) which suggests that 5-LOX catalysis involves tunneling as a mechanism of H-transfer. The measured KIE for 5-LOX involves a change in regioselectivity in response to deuteration at position C7, resulting in H-abstraction form C10 and formation of 8-HETE. The viscosity experiments influence the (H)kcat, but not (D)kcat. However the overall kcat/KM is not affected for labeled or unlabeled AA, suggesting that either the product release or conformational rearrangement might be involved in dictating kinetics of 5-LOX at saturating conditions. Investigation of available crystal structures suggests the role of active site residues (F421, Q363 and L368) in regulating the donor-acceptor distances, thus affecting H-transfer as well as regiospecificity. In summary, our study shows that that the H-abstraction is the rate limiting step for 5-LOX and that the observed KIE of 5-LOX is masked by a change in regioselectivity. PMID:27363940

  16. 5-Lipoxygenase Deficiency Reduces Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity and Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Miriam S. N.; Cardoso, Renato D. R.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Crespigio, Jefferson; Cunha, Thiago M.; Alves-Filho, José C.; da Silva, Rosiane V.; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2013-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) converts arachidonic acid into leukotrienes (LTs) and is involved in inflammation. At present, the participation of 5-LO in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity and liver damage has not been addressed. 5-LO deficient (5-LO−/−) mice and background wild type mice were challenged with APAP (0.3–6 g/kg) or saline. The lethality, liver damage, neutrophil and macrophage recruitment, LTB4, cytokine production, and oxidative stress were assessed. APAP induced a dose-dependent mortality, and the dose of 3 g/kg was selected for next experiments. APAP induced LTB4 production in the liver, the primary target organ in APAP toxicity. Histopathological analysis revealed that 5-LO−/− mice presented reduced APAP-induced liver necrosis and inflammation compared with WT mice. APAP-induced lethality, increase of plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, liver cytokine (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-10), superoxide anion, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production, myeloperoxidase and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity, Nrf2 and gp91phox mRNA expression, and decrease of reduced glutathione and antioxidant capacity measured by 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline 6-sulfonate) assay were prevented in 5-LO−/− mice compared to WT mice. Therefore, 5-LO deficiency resulted in reduced mortality due to reduced liver inflammatory and oxidative damage, suggesting 5-LO is a promising target to reduce APAP-induced lethality and liver inflammatory/oxidative damage. PMID:24288682

  17. Arachidonate 5 Lipoxygenase Expression in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Promotes Invasion via MMP-9 Induction

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Nicolas T.; Nowicki, Theodore S; Azzi, Jean Paul; Reyes, Ismael; Iacob, Codrin; Xie, Suqing; Swati, Ismatun; Suslina, Nina; Schantz, Stimson; Tiwari, Raj K.; Geliebter, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) expression and activity has been implicated in tumor pathogenesis, yet its role in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has not been characterized. ALOX5 protein and mRNA were upregulated in PTC compared to matched, normal thyroid tissue, and ALOX5 expression correlated with invasive tumor histopathology. Evidence suggests that PTC invasion is mediated through the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that can degrade and remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM). A correlation between MMP-9 and ALOX5 protein expression was established by immunohistochemical analysis of PTC and normal thyroid tissues using a tissue array. Transfection of ALOX5 into a PTC cell line (BCPAP) increased MMP-9 secretion and cell invasion across an ECM barrier. The ALOX5 product, 5(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid also increased MMP-9 protein expression by BCPAP in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibitors of MMP-9 and ALOX5 reversed ALOX5-enhanced invasion. Here we describe a new role for ALOX5 as a mediator of invasion via MMP-9 induction; this ALOX5/MMP9 pathway represents a new avenue in the search for functional biomarkers and/or potential therapeutic targets for aggressive PTC. PMID:22253131

  18. On the inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase product formation by tryptanthrin: mechanistic studies and efficacy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pergola, C; Jazzar, B; Rossi, A; Northoff, H; Hamburger, M; Sautebin, L; Werz, O

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Leukotrienes (LTs) are pro-inflammatory mediators produced by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). Currently available 5-LO inhibitors either lack efficacy or are toxic and novel approaches are required to establish a successful anti-LT therapy. Here we provide a detailed evaluation of the effectiveness of the plant-derived alkaloid tryptanthrin as an inhibitor of LT biosynthesis. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We analysed LT formation and performed mechanistic studies in human neutrophils stimulated with pathophysiologically relevant stimuli (LPS and formyl peptide), as well as in cell-free assays (neutrophil homogenates or recombinant human 5-LO) and in human whole blood. The in vivo effectiveness of tryptanthrin was evaluated in the rat model of carrageenan-induced pleurisy. KEY RESULTS Tryptanthrin potently reduced LT-formation in human neutrophils (IC50 = 0.6 µM). However, tryptanthrin is not a redox-active compound and did not directly interfere with 5-LO activity in cell-free assays. Similarly, tryptanthrin did not inhibit the release of arachidonic acid, the activation of MAPKs, or the increase in [Ca2+]i, but it modified the subcellular localization of 5-LO. Moreover, tryptanthrin potently suppressed LT formation in human whole blood (IC50 = 10 µM) and reduced LTB4 levels in the rat pleurisy model after a single oral dose of 10 mg·kg−1. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our data reveal that tryptanthrin is a potent natural inhibitor of cellular LT biosynthesis with proven efficacy in whole blood and is effective in vivo after oral administration. Its unique pharmacological profile supports further analysis to exploit its pharmacological potential. PMID:21797843

  19. Effects of Zileuton on the Development of Autoimmune Myocarditis in an Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Odemis, Ender; Turkay, Sadi; Koca, Cemile; Kiyici, Halil; Karadag, Ahmet; Bayrak, Reyhan; Mete, Emin; Catal, Ferhat; Yigitoglu, Ramazan

    2007-01-01

    Background: Myocarditis is associated with high morbidity and mortality in childhood, but the pathogenesis of this disease is still unclear. Current knowledge indicates that complex immunopathogenic mechanisms are involved. It is understood that leukotrienes play an important role in the inflammation associated with asthma, and recent reports indicate that leukotrienes participate in immune processes and in autoimmunity. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the role of leukotriene synthesis in the development of myocardial inflammation and necrosis during myocarditis. Methods: The effect of zileuton, a leukotriene synthesis inhibitor, was assessed in an experimental model of autoimmune myocarditis in rats. Healthy adult (10-week-old) male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into 3 groups. Groups A and B received injections of 1.0 mg porcine cardiac myosin to induce autoimmune myocarditis and group C (the control group) received phosphate-buffered saline. Group B also received zileuton by oral gavage at 100 mg/kg · d−1. Myocardial inflammation was assessed biochemically via serum concentrations of creatine kinase MB subunit (CK-MB) and troponin T. Cardiac tissue was assessed macroscopically (0 = no inflammation; 1 = a small discolored focus; 2 = diffuse discolored areas covering less than half of the cardiac surface; 3 = diffuse discolored areas covering more than half of the cardiac surface) and microscopically (0 = no inflammation; 1 = ⪯5% infiltration; 2 = 5% to <10% infiltration; 3 = 10% to < 20% infiltration; 4 = >20% infiltration). Results: Twenty-four rats were divided equally into 3 groups. All rats survived the duration of the study. After 21 days, all rats were euthanized. No significant differences were found between groups A and B in terms of serum concentrations of CK-MB or troponin T. The microscopic pathology score was significantly lower in group B (myosin + zileuton) than in group A (myosin only) (0.12 [0.35] vs 1.25 [1.03]; P

  20. On the interference of boswellic acids with 5-lipoxygenase: mechanistic studies in vitro and pharmacological relevance.

    PubMed

    Siemoneit, Ulf; Pergola, Carlo; Jazzar, Bianca; Northoff, Hinnak; Skarke, Carsten; Jauch, Johann; Werz, Oliver

    2009-03-15

    Boswellic acids are pharmacologically active ingredients of frankincense with anti-inflammatory properties. It was shown that in vitro 11-keto-boswellic acids inhibit 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO, EC 1.13.11.34), the key enzyme in leukotriene biosynthesis, which may account for their anti-inflammatory effectiveness. However, whether 11-keto-boswellic acids interfere with 5-LO under physiologically relevant conditions (i.e., in whole blood assays) and whether they inhibit 5-LO in vivo is unknown. Inhibition of human 5-LO by the major naturally occurring boswellic acids was analyzed in cell-free and cell-based activity assays. Moreover, interference of boswellic acids with 5-LO in neutrophil incubations in the presence of albumin and in human whole blood was assessed, and plasma leukotriene B(4) of frankincense-treated healthy volunteers was determined. Factors influencing 5-LO activity (i.e., Ca(2+), phospholipids, substrate concentration) significantly modulate the potency of 11-keto-boswellic acids to inhibit 5-LO. Moreover, 11-keto-boswellic acids efficiently suppressed 5-LO product formation in isolated neutrophils (IC(50)=2.8 to 8.8 muM) but failed to inhibit 5-LO product formation in human whole blood. In the presence of albumin (10 mg/ml), 5-LO inhibition by 11-keto-boswellic acids (up to 30 muM) in neutrophils was abolished, apparently due to strong albumin-binding (>95%) of 11-keto-boswellic acids. Finally, single dose (800 mg) oral administration of frankincense extracts to human healthy volunteers failed to suppress leukotriene B(4) plasma levels. Our data show that boswellic acids are direct 5-LO inhibitors that efficiently suppress 5-LO product synthesis in common in vitro test models, however, the pharmacological relevance of such interference in vivo seems questionable.

  1. Aspirin and Zileuton and Biomarker Expression in Nasal Tissue of Current Smokers | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase II trial studies the effects of aspirin and zileuton on genes related to tobacco use in current smokers. Smokers are at increased risk for developing lung and other cancers. Aspirin and zileuton may interfere with genes related to tobacco use and may be useful in preventing lung cancer in current smokers. |

  2. Sulphatides trigger polymorphonuclear granulocyte spreading on collagen-coated surfaces and inhibit subsequent activation of 5-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Sud'ina, G F; Brock, T G; Pushkareva, M A; Galkina, S I; Turutin, D V; Peters-Golden, M; Ullrich, V

    2001-01-01

    Sulphatides are sulphate esters of galactocerebrosides that are present on the surfaces of many cell types and act as specific ligands to selectins. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of sulphatides on polymorphonuclear granulocyte (PMN) attachment, spreading and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) metabolism. Sulphatides, but not non-sulphated galactocerebrosides, dose-dependently enhanced attachment to collagen, as measured by the myeloperoxidase assay. Studies with blocking antibodies indicated that the increased attachment was mediated by CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) beta 2 integrin. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that sulphatides also greatly enhanced the degree of cell spreading. In PMNs treated in suspension, sulphatides had no effect on the ionophore A23187-stimulated release of arachidonic acid and the synthesis of 5-LO metabolites. In contrast, in PMNs attached to collagen, the enzymic conversion of arachidonic acid by 5-LO was inhibited by sulphatides. Inhibition of 5-LO metabolism by sulphatides was observed even in the presence of exogenous substrate, suggesting that sulphatides directly inhibited 5-LO action. Consistent with this, sulphatides interfered with ionophore-induced translocation of the 5-LO to the nuclear envelope. Substances competing with sulphatide binding to cells, like dextran sulphate, or a strong inhibitor of cell spreading, like the actin-polymerizing agent jasplakinolide, prevented the effects of sulphatides on PMN attachment and spreading and leukotriene synthesis. We conclude that shape changes occurring in response to sulphatides specifically impair PMN leukotriene synthesis by inhibiting translocation of 5-LO. PMID:11672437

  3. 5-Lipoxygenase gene transfer worsens memory, amyloid and tau brain pathologies in a mouse model of AD

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jin; Giannopoulos, Phillip F.; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Golde, Todd E.; Pratico, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Objective The 5-lipoxygenase (5LO) enzyme is up-regulated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and its genetic absence reduces Aβ levels in APP mice. However, its functional role in modulating tau neuropathology remains to be elucidated. Methods To this end, we generated triple transgenic mice (3xTg-AD) over-expressing neuronal 5LO and investigated their phenotype. Results Compared with controls, 3xTg-AD mice over-expressing 5LO manifested an exacerbation of memory deficits, plaques and tangles pathologies. The elevation in Aβ was secondary to an up-regulation of γ-secretase pathway, whereas tau hyperphosphorylation resulted from an activation of the Cdk5 kinase. In vitro study confirmed the involvement of this kinase in the 5-LO-dependent tau phosphorylation, which was independent of the effect on Aβ. Interpretation Our findings highlight the novel functional role that neuronal 5LO plays in exacerbating AD-related tau pathologies. They provide critical preclinical evidence to justify testing selective 5LO inhibitors for AD treatment. PMID:23034916

  4. Integrin-dependent homotypic adhesion of neutrophils. Arachidonic acid activates Raf-1/Mek/Erk via a 5-lipoxygenase- dependent pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Capodici, C; Pillinger, M H; Han, G; Philips, M R; Weissmann, G

    1998-01-01

    AA stimulates integrin-dependent neutrophil adhesion, a critical early step in acute inflammation. However, neither the signaling pathway(s) of AA-stimulated adhesion, nor whether AA acts directly or through the generation of active metabolites, has been elucidated. Previously, we have observed a tight association between neutrophil Erk activation and homotypic adhesion in response to chemoattractants acting through G protein-linked receptors. We now report a similar association between homotypic adhesion and Erk activation in response to AA. Erk activation was cyclooxygenase independent and required AA metabolism to 5(S)- hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HpETE) via 5-lipoxygenase, but not the further lipoxygenase-dependent metabolism of 5-HpETE to leukotrienes. AA stimulation of Erk was accompanied by Raf-1 activation and was sensitive to inhibitors of Raf-1 and Mek. Whereas activation of Erk by AA was pertussis toxin sensitive, [3H]-AA binding to neutrophils was not saturable, suggesting that an AA metabolite activates a G protein. Consistent with this hypothesis, Erk activation by 5(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE; lipoxygenase-independent metabolite of 5-HpETE) was also pertussis toxin sensitive. These data suggest that a 5-lipoxygenase metabolite of AA, e.g., 5-HETE, is released from AA-treated cells to engage a plasma membrane-associated, pertussis toxin-sensitive, G protein-linked receptor, leading to activation of Erk and adhesion via the Raf-1/Mek signal transduction pathway. PMID:9649570

  5. Suppression of oxidative stress and 5-lipoxygenase activation by edaravone improves depressive-like behavior after concussion.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Youichirou; Hoshijima, Michihiro; Yawata, Toshio; Nobumoto, Atsuya; Tsuda, Masayuki; Shimizu, Takahiro; Saito, Motoaki; Ueba, Tetuya

    2014-10-15

    Brain concussions are a serious public concern and are associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as depression. Patients with concussion who suffer from depression often experience distress. Nevertheless, few pre-clinical studies have examined concussion-induced depression, and there is little information regarding its pharmacological management. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, can exert neuroprotective effects in several animal models of neurological disorders. However, the effectiveness of edaravone in animal models of concussion-induced depression remains unclear. In this study, we examined whether edaravone could prevent concussion-induced depression. Mice were subjected to a weight-drop injury and intravenously administered edaravone (3.0 mg/kg) or vehicle immediately after impact. Serial magnetic resonance imaging showed no abnormalities of the cerebrum on diffusion T1- and T2-weighted images. We found that edaravone suppressed concussion-induced depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test, which was accompanied by inhibition of increased hippocampal and cortical oxidative stress (OS) and suppression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) translocation to the nuclear envelope in hippocampal astrocytes. Hippocampal OS in concussed mice was also prevented by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor, apocynin, and administration of BWB70C, a 5-LOX inhibitor, immediately and 24 h after injury prevented depressive-like behaviors in concussed mice. Further, antidepressant effects of edaravone were observed in mice receiving 1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg of edaravone immediately after impact, but not at a lower dose of 0.1 mg/kg. This antidepressant effect persisted up to 1 h after impact, whereas edaravone treatment at 3 h after impact had no effect on concussion-induced depressive-like behavior. These results suggest that edaravone protects against concussion-induced depression, and this protection is mediated by suppression of OS and 5

  6. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel myrtucommulones and structural analogues that target mPGES-1 and 5-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Wiechmann, Katja; Müller, Hans; Huch, Volker; Hartmann, David; Werz, Oliver; Jauch, Johann

    2015-08-28

    The natural acylphloroglucinol myrtucommulone A (1) inhibits microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase (mPGES)-1 and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), and induces apoptosis of cancer cells. Starting from 1 as lead, 28 analogues were synthesized following a straightforward modular strategy with high yielding convergent steps. Major structural variations concerned (I) replacement of the syncarpic acid moieties by dimedone or indandione, (II) cyclization of the syncarpic acid with the acylphloroglucinol core, and (III) substitution of the methine bridges and the acyl residue with isopropyl, isobutyl, n-pentyl or phenyl groups, each. The potency for mPGES-1 inhibition was improved by 12.5-fold for 43 (2-(1-(3-hexanoyl-2,4,6-trihydroxy-5-(1-(3-hydroxy-1-oxo-1H-inden-2-yl)-2-methylpropyl)phenyl)-2-methylpropyl)-3-hydroxy-1H-inden-1-one) with IC50 = 0.08 μM, and 5-LO inhibition was improved 33-fold by 47 (2-((3-hexanoyl-2,4,6-trihydroxy-5-((3-hydroxy-1-oxo-1H-inden-2-yl) (phenyl)methyl)phenyl) (phenyl)methyl)-3-hydroxy-1H-inden-1-one) with IC50 = 0.46 μM. SAR studies revealed divergent structural determinants for induction of cell death and mPGES-1/5-LO inhibition, revealing 43 and 47 as non-cytotoxic mPGES-1 and 5-LO inhibitors that warrant further preclinical assessment as anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:26123643

  7. Gene expression of 5-lipoxygenase and LTA4 hydrolase in renal tissue of nephrotic syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Menegatti, E; Roccatello, D; Fadden, K; Piccoli, G; De Rosa, G; Sena, L M; Rifai, A

    1999-01-01

    Leukotrienes (LT) of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway constitute a class of potent biological lipid mediators of inflammation implicated in the pathogenesis of different models of experimental glomerulonephritis. The key enzyme, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), catalyses oxygenation of arachidonic acid to generate the primary leukotriene LTA4. This LT, in turn, serves as a substrate for either LTA4 hydrolase, to form the potent chemoattractant LTB4, or LTC4 synthase, to produce the powerful vasoconstrictor LTC4. To investigate the potential role of LT in the pathogenesis of human glomerulonephritis with nephrotic syndrome, we examined the gene expression of 5-LO and LTA4 hydrolase in renal tissue of 21 adult patients with nephrotic syndrome and 11 controls. The patients consisted of 11 cases of membranous nephropathy (MN), seven focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), two non-IgA mesangial glomerulonephritis and one minimal change disease. Total RNA purified from renal tissue was reverse transcribed into cDNA and amplified with specific primers in a polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Eight patients' renal tissue, four MN and four FSGS, co-expressed 5-LO and LTA4 hydrolase. In situ hybridization analysis revealed 5-LO expression and distribution limited to the interstitial cells surrounding the peritubular capillaries. Comparative clinical and immunohistological data showed that these eight patients had impaired renal function and interstitial changes that significantly correlated with 5-LO expression. These findings suggest that leukotrienes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of MN and FSGS. These results are also relevant to elucidating the pathophysiologic mechanisms which underlie progression to renal failure in these diseases. PMID:10337029

  8. Arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) gene polymorphism is associated with Alzheimer's disease and body mass index.

    PubMed

    Šerý, Omar; Hlinecká, Lýdia; Povová, Jana; Bonczek, Ondřej; Zeman, Tomáš; Janout, Vladimír; Ambroz, Petr; Khan, Naim A; Balcar, Vladimir J

    2016-03-15

    Dementias of old age, in particular Alzheimer's disease (AD), pose a growing threat to the longevity and quality of life of individuals as well as whole societies world-wide. The risk factors are both genetic and environmental (life-style) and there is an overlap with similar factors predisposing to cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Using a case-control genetic approach, we have identified a SNP (rs10507391) in ALOX5 gene, previously associated with an increased risk of stroke, as a novel genetic risk factor for AD. ALOX5 gene encodes a 5'-lipoxygenase (5'-LO) activating protein (FLAP), a crucial component of the arachidonic acid/leukotriene inflammatory cascade. A-allele of rs4769874 polymorphism increases the risk of AD 1.41-fold (p<0.0001), while AA genotype does so 1.79-fold (p<0.0001). In addition, GG genotype of rs4769874 polymorphism is associated with a modest increase in body mass index (BMI). We discuss potential biochemical mechanisms linking the SNP to AD and suggest possible preventive pharmacotherapies some of which are based on commonly available natural products. Finally, we set the newly identified AD risk factors into a broader context of similar CVD risk factors to generate a more comprehensive picture of interacting genetics and life-style habits potentially leading to the deteriorating mental health in the old age. PMID:26944113

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel pyrazolopyrimidines derivatives as anticancer and anti-5-lipoxygenase agents.

    PubMed

    Rahmouni, Ameur; Souiei, Sawssen; Belkacem, Mohamed Amine; Romdhane, Anis; Bouajila, Jalloul; Ben Jannet, Hichem

    2016-06-01

    A novel series of 6-aryl-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4(5H)-ones 3a-h were synthesized in a single step via condensation of carboxamide 2 with some aromatic aldehydes (presence of iodine). Treatment of aminopyrazole 1a with acetic anhydride afforded pyrazolopyrimidines 4 which on treatment with ethyl chloroacetate in refluxing dry DMF furnished a single product identified as ethyl 2-(3,6-dimethyl-4-oxo-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-5(4H)-yl) acetate 5. On the other hand, esterification of compound 6 with different alcohol, led to the formation of new esters linked pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidinones hybrids 7a-f. The reaction of compound 2 with 3-propargyl bromide gave the compound 8 used as a dipolarophile to access to triazoles (4- and 5-regioisomers (9a-e) and (10a-e), respectively) via the 1,3-dipoar cycloaddition reaction. Finally, condensation reaction of aminopyrazole 1b with α-cyanocinnamonitiles gave the new pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-3,6-dicarbonitriles 11a-e. Structures of compounds were established on the basis of (1)H/(13)C NMR and ESI-HRMS. Compounds were screened for their cytotoxic (HCT-116 and MCF-7) and 5-lipoxygenase inhibition activities. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) was discussed.

  10. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel pyrazolopyrimidines derivatives as anticancer and anti-5-lipoxygenase agents.

    PubMed

    Rahmouni, Ameur; Souiei, Sawssen; Belkacem, Mohamed Amine; Romdhane, Anis; Bouajila, Jalloul; Ben Jannet, Hichem

    2016-06-01

    A novel series of 6-aryl-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4(5H)-ones 3a-h were synthesized in a single step via condensation of carboxamide 2 with some aromatic aldehydes (presence of iodine). Treatment of aminopyrazole 1a with acetic anhydride afforded pyrazolopyrimidines 4 which on treatment with ethyl chloroacetate in refluxing dry DMF furnished a single product identified as ethyl 2-(3,6-dimethyl-4-oxo-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-5(4H)-yl) acetate 5. On the other hand, esterification of compound 6 with different alcohol, led to the formation of new esters linked pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidinones hybrids 7a-f. The reaction of compound 2 with 3-propargyl bromide gave the compound 8 used as a dipolarophile to access to triazoles (4- and 5-regioisomers (9a-e) and (10a-e), respectively) via the 1,3-dipoar cycloaddition reaction. Finally, condensation reaction of aminopyrazole 1b with α-cyanocinnamonitiles gave the new pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-3,6-dicarbonitriles 11a-e. Structures of compounds were established on the basis of (1)H/(13)C NMR and ESI-HRMS. Compounds were screened for their cytotoxic (HCT-116 and MCF-7) and 5-lipoxygenase inhibition activities. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) was discussed. PMID:27179178

  11. Age-dependent relevance of endogenous 5-lipoxygenase derivatives in anxiety-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Leo, Luciana M; Almeida-Corrêa, Suellen; Canetti, Claudio A; Amaral, Olavo B; Bozza, Fernando A; Pamplona, Fabricio A

    2014-01-01

    When 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is inhibited, roughly half of the CNS effect of the prototypic endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) is lost. Therefore, we decided to investigate whether inhibiting this enzyme would influence physiological functions classically described as being under control of the endocannabinoid system. Although 5-LO inhibition by MK-886 reduced lipoxin A4 levels in the brain, no effect was found in the elevated plus maze (EPM), even at the highest possible doses, via i.p. (10 mg/kg,) or i.c.v. (500 pmol/2 µl) routes. Accordingly, no alterations in anxiety-like behavior in the EPM test were observed in 5-LO KO mice. Interestingly, aged mice, which show reduced circulating lipoxin A4 levels, were sensitive to MK-886, displaying an anxiogenic-like state in response to treatment. Moreover, exogenous lipoxin A4 induced an anxiolytic-like profile in the EPM test. Our findings are in line with other reports showing no difference between FLAP KO or 5-LO KO and their control strains in adult mice, but increased anxiety-like behavior in aged mice. We also show for the first time that lipoxin A4 affects mouse behavior. In conclusion, we propose an age-dependent relevancy of endogenous 5-LO derivatives in the modulation of anxiety-like behavior, in addition to a potential for exogenous lipoxin A4 in producing an anxiolytic-like state.

  12. Structural and Functional Analysis of Calcium Ion Mediated Binding of 5-Lipoxygenase to Nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramakrishnan B.; Zhu, Lin; Idborg, Helena; Rådmark, Olof; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes; Hebert, Hans; Jegerschöld, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    An important step in the production of inflammatory mediators of the leukotriene family is the Ca2+ mediated recruitment of 5 Lipoxygenase (5LO) to nuclear membranes. To study this reaction in vitro, the natural membrane mimicking environment of nanodiscs was used. Nanodiscs with 10.5 nm inner diameter were made with the lipid POPC and membrane scaffolding protein MSP1E3D1. Monomeric and dimeric 5LO were investigated. Monomeric 5LO mixed with Ca2+ and nanodiscs are shown to form stable complexes that 1) produce the expected leukotriene products from arachidonic acid and 2) can be, for the first time, visualised by native gel electrophoresis and negative stain transmission electron microscopy and 3) show a highest ratio of two 5LO per nanodisc. We interpret this as one 5LO on each side of the disc. The dimer of 5LO is visualised by negative stain transmission electron microscopy and is shown to not bind to nanodiscs. This study shows the advantages of nanodiscs to obtain basic structural information as well as functional information of a complex between a monotopic membrane protein and the membrane. PMID:27010627

  13. The 5-lipoxygenase pathway: oxidative and inflammatory contributions to the Alzheimer’s disease phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Yash B.; Praticò, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common, and, arguably, one of the most-well studied, neurodegenerative conditions. Several decades of investigation have revealed that amyloid-β and tau proteins are critical pathological players in this condition. Genetic analyses have revealed specific mutations in the cellular machinery that produces amyloid-β, but these mutations are found in only a small fraction of patients with the early-onset variant of AD. In addition to development of amyloid-β and tau pathology, oxidative damage and inflammation are consistently found in the brains of these patients. The 5-lipoxygenase protein enzyme (5LO) and its downstream leukotriene metabolites have long been known to be important modulators of oxidation and inflammation in other disease states. Recent in vivo evidence using murine knock-out models has implicated the 5LO pathway, which also requires the 5LO activating protein (FLAP), in the molecular pathology of AD, including the metabolism of amyloid-β and tau. In this manuscript, we will provide an overview of 5LO and FLAP, discussing their involvement in biochemical pathways relevant to AD pathogenesis. We will also discuss how the 5LO pathway contributes to the molecular and behavioral insults seen in AD and provide an assessment of how targeting these proteins could lead to therapeutics relevant not only for AD, but also other related neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:25642165

  14. 5-Lipoxygenase is a direct p53 target gene in humans.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Bianca; Ahmad, Khalil; Roos, Jessica; Lehmann, Christoph; Chiba, Tomohiro; Ulrich-Rückert, Sandra; Smeenk, Leonie; van Heeringen, Simon; Maier, Thorsten J; Groner, Bernd; Steinhilber, Dieter

    2015-08-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a critical role in cancer, and more than 50% of human tumors contain mutations or deletions of the TP53 gene. p53 can transactivate or repress target genes in response to diverse stress signals, such as transient growth arrest, DNA repair, cellular differentiation, senescence and apoptosis. Through an unbiased genome-wide ChIP-seq analysis, we have found that 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5, 5-LO) which is a key enzyme of leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis, is a direct target gene of p53 and its expression is induced by genotoxic stress via actinomycin D (Act.D) or etoposide (Eto) treatment. 5-LO and LTs play a role in immunological diseases as well as in tumorigenesis and tumor growth. p53 binds to a specific binding site consisting of a complete p53 consensus-binding motif in ALOX5 intron G which is located about 64kbp downstream of the transcriptional start site. We confirmed the strong binding of p53 to the 5-LO target site in ChIP-qPCR experiments. Expression analyses by qRT-PCR and immunoblot further revealed that genotoxic stress induces the ALOX5 mRNA and protein expression in a p53-dependent manner. Knockdown of p53 in U2OS cells leads to a downregulation of 5-LO mRNA and protein expression. In addition, immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation assays indicate the direct binding of 5-LO to p53 protein. Furthermore, we found that 5-LO can inhibit the transcriptional activity of p53 suggesting that 5-LO acts in a negative feedback loop to limit induction of p53 target genes.

  15. 5-Lipoxygenase Negatively Regulates Th1 Response during Brucella abortus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fahel, Júlia Silveira; de Souza, Mariana Bueno; Gomes, Marco Túlio Ribeiro; Corsetti, Patricia P.; Carvalho, Natalia B.; Marinho, Fabio A. V.; de Almeida, Leonardo A.; Caliari, Marcelo V.; Machado, Fabiana Simão

    2015-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects humans and cattle, causing a chronic inflammatory disease known as brucellosis. A Th1-mediated immune response plays a critical role in host control of this pathogen. Recent findings indicate contrasting roles for lipid mediators in host responses against infections. 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) is an enzyme required for the production of the lipid mediators leukotrienes and lipoxins. To determine the involvement of 5-LO in host responses to B. abortus infection, we intraperitoneally infected wild-type and 5-LO-deficient mice and evaluated the progression of infection and concomitant expression of immune mediators. Here, we demonstrate that B. abortus induced the upregulation of 5-LO mRNA in wild-type mice. Moreover, this pathogen upregulated the production of the lipid mediators leukotriene B4 and lipoxin A4 in a 5-LO-dependent manner. 5-LO-deficient mice displayed lower bacterial burdens in the spleen and liver and less severe liver pathology, demonstrating an enhanced resistance to infection. Host resistance paralleled an increased expression of the proinflammatory mediators interleukin-12 (IL-12), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) during the course of infection. Moreover, we demonstrated that 5-LO downregulated the expression of IL-12 in macrophages during B. abortus infection. Our results suggest that 5-LO has a major involvement in B. abortus infection, by functioning as a negative regulator of the protective Th1 immune responses against this pathogen. PMID:25583526

  16. Electrophilic Fatty Acid Species Inhibit 5-Lipoxygenase and Attenuate Sepsis-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Khader; Steinbrink, Svenja D.; Frömel, Timo; Lill, Nicole; Isaak, Johann; Häfner, Ann-Kathrin; Roos, Jessica; Hofmann, Bettina; Heide, Heinrich; Geisslinger, Gerd; Steinhilber, Dieter; Freeman, Bruce A.; Maier, Thorsten J.; Fleming, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The reaction of nitric oxide and nitrite-derived species with polyunsaturated fatty acids yields electrophilic fatty acid nitroalkene derivatives (NO2-FA), which display anti-inflammatory properties. Given that the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO, ALOX5) possesses critical nucleophilic amino acids, which are potentially sensitive to electrophilic modifications, we determined the consequences of NO2-FA on 5-LO activity in vitro and on 5-LO-mediated inflammation in vivo. Results: Stimulation of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) with nitro-oleic (NO2-OA) or nitro-linoleic acid (NO2-LA) (but not the parent lipids) resulted in the concentration-dependent and irreversible inhibition of 5-LO activity. Similar effects were observed in cell lysates and using the recombinant human protein, indicating a direct reaction with 5-LO. NO2-FAs did not affect the activity of the platelet-type 12-LO (ALOX12) or 15-LO-1 (ALOX15) in intact cells or the recombinant protein. The NO2-FA-induced inhibition of 5-LO was attributed to the alkylation of Cys418, and the exchange of Cys418 to serine rendered 5-LO insensitive to NO2-FA. In vivo, the systemic administration of NO2-OA to mice decreased neutrophil and monocyte mobilization in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), attenuated the formation of the 5-LO product 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), and inhibited lung injury. The administration of NO2-OA to 5-LO knockout mice had no effect on LPS-induced neutrophil or monocyte mobilization as well as on lung injury. Innovation: Prophylactic administration of NO2-OA to septic mice inhibits inflammation and promotes its resolution by interfering in 5-LO-mediated inflammatory processes. Conclusion: NO2-FAs directly and irreversibly inhibit 5-LO and attenuate downstream acute inflammatory responses. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2667–2680. PMID:24206143

  17. Possible role for interactions between 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and AMPA GluR1 receptors in depression and in antidepressant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manev, Radmila; Mrazovac, Danijela; Manev, Hari

    2009-01-01

    Summary Emerging evidence suggests that 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) plays a role in central nervous system functioning. It has been shown that 5-LOX metabolic products can decrease the phosphorylation of the glutamate reseptor subunit GluR1, and that this effect can be antagonized by 5-LOX inhibitors. Recent concepts about the pathobiological mechanisms of depression and the molecular mechanisms of antidepressant activity postulate a significant role for glutamatergic neurotransmission and the GluR1 receptor. Regulation of GluR1 phosphorylation, i.e., enhancement of this phosphorylation, may be a part of antidepressant activity. On the other hand, reduced GluR1 phosphorylation may be a pathobiological mechanism contributing to depression. Since 5-LOX inhibitors, along with antidepressants share the capacity to increase GluR1 phosphorylation, we hypothesize that they may also have antidepressant properties. Furthermore, we postulate that increased brain 5-LOX expression may lead to decreased GluR1 phosphorylation and favor the development of depression. For example, brain 5-LOX expression is stimulated by stress hormone glucocorticoids, and stress is a known as a contributing factor to depression. PMID:17449191

  18. Gene Knockout of 5-Lipoxygenase Rescues Synaptic Dysfunction and Improves Memory in the Triple-Transgenic Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Phillip F.; Chu, Jin; Joshi, Yash B.; Sperow, Margaret; Li, Jin-Luo; Kirby, Lynn G.; Praticò, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    The 5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) is upregulated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and in vivo modulates the amyloidotic phenotype of APP transgenic mice. However, no data are available on the effects that 5LO has on synaptic function, integrity and cognition. To address this issue we used a genetic and a pharmacologic approach by generating 3xTg mice deficient for 5LO, and administering 3xTg mice which a 5LO inhibitor. Compared with controls, we found that even before the development of overt neuropathology, both animals manifested significant memory improvement, rescue of their synaptic dysfunction and amelioration of synaptic integrity. In addition, later in life these mice had a significant reduction of Aβ and tau pathology. Our findings support a novel functional role for 5LO in regulating synaptic plasticity and memory. They establish this proetin as a pleiotropic contributor to the development of the full spectrum of the AD phenotype, making it a valid therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:23478745

  19. 5-Lipoxygenase Activating Protein Reduction Ameliorates Cognitive Deficit, Synaptic Dysfunction, and Neuropathology in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Phillip F.; Chu, Jin; Joshi, Yash B.; Sperow, Margaret; Li, Jin-Guo; Kirby, Lynn G.; Praticò, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Background 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) is abundantly present in the central nervous system. Although its function has been extensively interrogated in the context of peripheral inflammation, novel roles for this protein are emerging in the central nervous system. The objective of our study was to investigate the functional role that FLAP plays in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with plaques and tangles (i.e., 3×Tg mice). Methods By implementing a genetic knockout of FLAP and pharmacologic inhibition with a FLAP inhibitor (MK-591), we evaluated the effect on the AD-like neuropathology, cognition, and synaptic plasticity in the 3×Tg mice. Results We show that reduction of FLAP leads to amelioration of cognition and memory along with the rescuing of synaptic dysfunction at an early age before the development of overt neuropathology. Genetic knockout and pharmacologic inhibition of FLAP also yielded an improvement in AD pathology through a reduction in Aβ via the γ-secretase pathway and a decrease in tau phosphorylation through the cdk5 pathway. Conclusions Our studies identify a novel functional role for FLAP in regulating memory and synaptic plasticity. They establish this protein at the crossroad of multiple pathways that ultimately contribute to the development of the entire AD-like phenotype, making it a viable therapeutic target with disease-modifying capacity for the treatment of this disease. PMID:23683389

  20. 4-Hydroxynonenal enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages via 5-lipoxygenase-mediated activation of ERK and p38 MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung J.; Kim, Chae E.; Yun, Mi R.; Seo, Kyo W.; Park, Hye M.; Yun, Jung W.; Shin, Hwa K.; Bae, Sun S.; Kim, Chi D.

    2010-01-15

    Exaggerated levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) co-exist in macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions, and activated macrophages produce MMP-9 that degrades atherosclerotic plaque constituents. This study investigated the effects of HNE on MMP-9 production, and the potential role for 5-LO derivatives in MMP-9 production in murine macrophages. Stimulation of J774A.1 cells with HNE led to activation of 5-LO, as measured by leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) production. This was associated with an increased production of MMP-9, which was blunted by inhibition of 5-LO with MK886, a 5-LO inhibitor or with 5-LO siRNA. A cysteinyl-LT{sub 1} (cysLT{sub 1}) receptor antagonist, REV-5901 as well as a BLT{sub 1} receptor antagonist, U-75302, also attenuated MMP-9 production induced by HNE. Furthermore, LTB{sub 4} and cysLT (LTC{sub 4} and LTD{sub 4}) enhanced MMP-9 production in macrophages, suggesting a pivotal role for 5-LO in HNE-mediated production of MMP-9. Among the MAPK pathways, LTB{sub 4} and cysLT enhanced phosphorylation of ERK and p38 MAPK, but not JNK. Linked to these results, a p38 MAPK inhibitor as well as an ERK inhibitor blunted MMP-9 production induced by LT. Collectively, these data suggest that 5-LO-derived LT mediates HNE-induced MMP-9 production via activation of ERK and p38 MAPK pathways, consequently leading to plaque instability in atherosclerosis.

  1. Chronic adventitial inflammation, vasa vasorum expansion, and 5-lipoxygenase up-regulation in irradiated arteries from cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Halle, Martin; Christersdottir, Tinna; Bäck, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced cardiovascular disease is an emerging problem in a steadily increasing population of survivors of cancer. However, the underlying biology is poorly described, and the late onset, which occurs several years after exposure, precludes adequate investigations in animal and cell culture models. We investigated the role of the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO)/leukotriene pathway in radiation-induced vascular changes. Use of paired samples of irradiated arteries and nonirradiated internal control arteries from the same patient that were harvested during surgery for cancer reconstruction ≤10 yr after radiotherapy provides a unique human model of chronic radiation–induced vascular changes. Immunohistochemical stainings and perioperative inspection revealed an adventitial inflammatory response, with vasa vasorum expansion and chronic infiltration of CD68+ macrophages. These macrophages stained positive for the leukotriene-forming enzyme 5-LO. Messenger RNA levels of 5-LO and leukotriene B4 receptor 1 were increased in irradiated arterial segments compared with control vessels. These results point to targeting the 5-LO/leukotriene pathway as a therapeutic adjunct to prevent late adverse vascular effects of radiotherapy.—Halle, M., Christersdottir, T., Bäck, M. Chronic adventitial inflammation, vasa vasorum expansion, and 5-lipoxygenase up-regulation in irradiated arteries from cancer survivors. PMID:27530979

  2. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates the expression of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of leukotrienes in human blood neutrophils chiefly relies on the activity of two enzymes, phospholipase A2 and 5-lipoxygenase (5- LO). In turn, the activation of the 5-LO requires the participation of a recently characterized membrane-bound protein, the 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP). In this study, we have investigated conditions under which FLAP expression in neutrophils may be modulated. Of several cytokines tested, only granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (and to a lesser extent tumor necrosis factor alpha) significantly increased expression of FLAP. GM-CSF increased FLAP mRNA steady-state levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The stimulatory effect of GM-CSF on FLAP mRNA was inhibited by prior treatment of the cells with the transcription inhibitor, actinomycin D, and pretreatment of the cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, failed to prevent the increase in FLAP mRNA induced by GM-CSF. The accumulation of newly synthesized FLAP, as determined by immunoprecipitation after incorporation of 35S-labeled amino acids, was also increased after incubation of neutrophils with GM-CSF. In addition, the total level of FLAP protein was increased in GM-CSF- treated neutrophils, as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by Western blot. GM-CSF did not alter the stability of the FLAP protein, indicating that the effect of GM-CSF on FLAP accumulation was the consequence of increased de novo synthesis as opposed to decreased degradation of FLAP. Finally, incubation of neutrophils with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone directly stimulated the upregulation of FLAP mRNA and protein, and enhanced the effect of GM-CSF. Taken together, these data demonstrate that FLAP expression may be upmodulated after appropriate stimulation of neutrophils. The increase in FLAP expression induced by GM-CSF in inflammatory conditions could confer upon neutrophils a prolonged capacity to synthesize

  3. Regulation of gamma-secretase activating protein by the 5Lipoxygenase: in vitro and in vivo evidence

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jin; Li, Jian-Guo; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Stough, Alexandra M.; Madesh, Muniswamy; Praticò, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    The formation of Aβ is directly controlled by the γ-secretase complex and its activator, γ-secretase activating protein (GSAP). GSAP derives from a C-terminal fragment of a larger precursor protein via a caspase-3 mediated cleavage. However, the mechanism regulating this process remains unknown. Here we provide in vitro experimental evidence that 5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) is as an endogenous regulator for GSAP formation, but not for other known γ-secretase modulators, by directly and specifically activating caspase-3. These results were confirmed in vivo by using transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease in which 5LO level and activity were modulated genetically or pharmacologically. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that GSAP cleavage via caspase-3 is regulated and depend upon the availability of 5LO further establishing this protein as an attractive and viable therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26076991

  4. 5-lipoxygenase pathway is essential for the control of granuloma extension induced by Schistosoma mansoni eggs in lung.

    PubMed

    Toffoli da Silva, Gabriel; Espíndola, Milena Sobral; Fontanari, Caroline; Rosada, Rogerio Silva; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Frantz, Fabiani Gai

    2016-08-01

    According to WHO, it is estimated that approximately 2 billion people are infected with intestinal helminths worldwide and the number of people who are cured of these diseases is relatively low, resulting in a large percentage of chronically infected individuals. Schistosomiasis is one of the most important parasitic diseases present in developing countries configuring it as a serious public health problem, directly related to poverty and social disadvantage. Once the parasite infection is established, Schistosoma mansoni eggs fall into the bloodstream and are trapped in the liver microcirculation where a strong granulomatous response and fibrosis formation occurs. In the experimental model, granulomas develop in the mouse lung after intravenous injection of purified eggs. Here we aim to understand how leukotrienes are involved in the granuloma formation. Leukotrienes are lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid metabolites via 5-lipoxygenase (5LO) enzyme. They are potent proinflammatory agents and induce recruitment, cell activation, regulation of microbicidal activity of polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells. In this study, 5LO deficient mice (5LO(-/-)) were inoculated with S. mansoni eggs for evaluation of immunopathological parameters involved in the induction of type 2 granulomas. We showed that in the absence of leukotrienes, the size of granulomas were decreased comparing to the wild type mice and the inflammatory compromised areas had a lower extension. In 5LO(-/-) mice granulomas presented extensive areas of fibrosis, detected by α-SMA expression along the lesions, indicating remodeling in attempt to reestablish the normal tissue. Also, comparing to WT mice we detected decrease of IL-4 and IL-13 and increase of TGF-β in the lung of 5LO(-/-), but these mice failed to produce protective IFN-γ and IL-12. These results evidenced 5-Lipoxygenase as an important pathway during lung injury due to Schistosoma-eggs injection. PMID:27262746

  5. Structural insights into human 5-lipoxygenase inhibition: combined ligand-based and target-based approach.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Caroline; Hénichart, Jean-Pierre; Durant, François; Wouters, Johan

    2006-01-12

    The human 5-LOX enzyme and its interaction with competitive inhibitors were investigated by means of a combined ligand-based and target-based approach. First, a pharmacophore model was generated for 16 non redox 5-LOX inhibitors with Catalyst (HipHop module). It includes two hydrophobic groups, an aromatic ring, and two hydrogen bond acceptors. The 3D structure of human 5-LOX was then modeled based on the crystal structure of rabbit 15-LOX, and the binding modes of representative ligands were studied by molecular docking. Confrontation of the docking results with the pharmacophore model allowed the weighting of the pharmacophoric features and the integration of structural information. This led to the proposal of an interaction model inside the 5-LOX active site, consisting of four major and two secondary interaction points: on one hand, two hydrophobic groups, an aromatic ring, and a hydrogen bond acceptor, and, on the other hand, an acidic moiety and an additional hydrogen bond acceptor. PMID:16392803

  6. Structural insights into human 5-lipoxygenase inhibition: combined ligand-based and target-based approach.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Caroline; Hénichart, Jean-Pierre; Durant, François; Wouters, Johan

    2006-01-12

    The human 5-LOX enzyme and its interaction with competitive inhibitors were investigated by means of a combined ligand-based and target-based approach. First, a pharmacophore model was generated for 16 non redox 5-LOX inhibitors with Catalyst (HipHop module). It includes two hydrophobic groups, an aromatic ring, and two hydrogen bond acceptors. The 3D structure of human 5-LOX was then modeled based on the crystal structure of rabbit 15-LOX, and the binding modes of representative ligands were studied by molecular docking. Confrontation of the docking results with the pharmacophore model allowed the weighting of the pharmacophoric features and the integration of structural information. This led to the proposal of an interaction model inside the 5-LOX active site, consisting of four major and two secondary interaction points: on one hand, two hydrophobic groups, an aromatic ring, and a hydrogen bond acceptor, and, on the other hand, an acidic moiety and an additional hydrogen bond acceptor.

  7. The Dual Cyclooxygenase/5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor Licofelone Attenuates P-Glycoprotein-Mediated Drug Resistance in the Injured Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Dulin, Jennifer N.; Moore, Meredith L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract There are currently no proven effective treatments that can improve recovery of function in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Many therapeutic compounds have shown promise in pre-clinical studies, but clinical trials have been largely unsuccessful. P-glycoprotein (Pgp, Abcb1b) is a drug efflux transporter of the blood–spinal cord barrier that limits spinal cord penetration of blood-borne xenobiotics. Pathological Pgp upregulation in diseases such as cancer causes heightened resistance to a broad variety of therapeutic drugs. Importantly, several drugs that have been evaluated for the treatment of SCI, such as riluzole, are known substrates of Pgp. We therefore examined whether Pgp-mediated pharmacoresistance diminishes delivery of riluzole to the injured spinal cord. Following moderate contusion injury at T10 in male Sprague–Dawley rats, we observed a progressive, spatial spread of increased Pgp expression from 3 days to 10 months post-SCI. Spinal cord uptake of i.p.-delivered riluzole was significantly reduced following SCI in wild type but not Abcb1a-knockout rats, highlighting a critical role for Pgp in mediating drug resistance following SCI. Because inflammation can drive Pgp upregulation, we evaluated the ability of the new generation dual anti-inflammatory drug licofelone to promote spinal cord delivery of riluzole following SCI. We found that licofelone both reduced Pgp expression and enhanced riluzole bioavailability within the lesion site at 72 h post-SCI. This work highlights Pgp-mediated drug resistance as an important obstacle to therapeutic drug delivery for SCI, and suggests licofelone as a novel combinatorial treatment strategy to enhance therapeutic drug delivery to the injured spinal cord. PMID:22947335

  8. Discovery of a novel activator of 5-lipoxygenase from an anacardic acid derived compound collection

    PubMed Central

    Wisastra, Rosalina; Kok, Petra A.M; Eleftheriadis, Nikolaos; Baumgartner, Matthew P.; Camacho, Carlos J.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Dekker, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) and cyclooxygenases (COXs) metabolize poly-unsaturated fatty acids into inflammatory signaling molecules. Modulation of the activity of these enzymes may provide new approaches for therapy of inflammatory diseases. In this study, we screened novel anacardic acid derivatives as modulators of human 5-LOX and COX-2 activity. Interestingly, a novel salicylate derivative 23a was identified as a surprisingly potent activator of human 5-LOX. This compound showed both non-competitive activation towards the human 5-LOX activator adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and non-essential mixed type activation against the substrate linoleic acid, while having no effect on the conversion of the substrate arachidonic acid. The kinetic analysis demonstrated a non-essential activation of the linoleic acid conversion with a KA of 8.65 μM, αKA of 0.38 μM and a β value of 1.76. It is also of interest that a comparable derivative 23d showed a mixed type inhibition for linoleic acid conversion. These observations indicate the presence of an allosteric binding site in human 5-LOX distinct from the ATP binding site. The activatory and inhibitory behavior of 23a and 23d on the conversion of linoleic compared to arachidonic acid are rationalized by docking studies, which suggest that the activator 23a stabilizes linoleic acid, whereas the larger inhibitor 23d blocks the enzyme active site. PMID:24231650

  9. 5-Lipoxygenase-dependent apoptosis of human lymphocytes in the International Space Station: data from the ROALD experiment.

    PubMed

    Battista, Natalia; Meloni, Maria A; Bari, Monica; Mastrangelo, Nicolina; Galleri, Grazia; Rapino, Cinzia; Dainese, Enrico; Agrò, Alessandro Finazzi; Pippia, Proto; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2012-05-01

    The functional adaptation of the immune system to the surrounding environment is also a fundamental issue in space. It has been suggested that a decreased number of lymphocytes might be a cause of immunosuppression, possibly due to the induction of apoptosis. Early activation of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) might play a central role in the initiation of the apoptotic program. The goal of the role of apoptosis in lymphocyte depression (ROALD) experiment, flown on the International Space Station as part of the BIO-4 mission of the European Space Agency, was to ascertain the induction of apoptosis in human lymphocytes under authentic microgravity, and to elucidate the possible involvement of 5-LOX. Our results demonstrate that exposure of human lymphocytes to microgravity for 48 h onboard the ISS remarkably increased apoptotic hallmarks such as DNA fragmentation (∼3-fold compared to ground-based controls) and cleaved-poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein expression (∼3-fold), as well as mRNA levels of apoptosis-related markers such as p53 (∼3-fold) and calpain (∼4-fold); these changes were paralleled by an early increase of 5-LOX activity (∼2-fold). Our findings provide a molecular background for the immune dysfunction observed in astronauts during space missions, and reveal potential new markers to monitor health status of ISS crew members.

  10. Naturally occurring biflavonoid, ochnaflavone, inhibits cyclooxygenases-2 and 5-lipoxygenase in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    Son, Min Jung; Moon, Tae Chul; Lee, Eun Kyung; Son, Kun Ho; Kim, Hyun Pyo; Kang, Sam Sik; Son, Jong Keun; Lee, Seung Ho; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2006-04-01

    Ochnaflavone is a medicinal herbal product isolated from Lonicera japonica that inhibits cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) dependent phases of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) generation in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 0.6 microM. Western blotting probed with specific anti-COX-2 antibodies showed that the decrease in quantity of the PGD2 product was accompanied by a decrease in the COX-2 protein level. In addition, this compound consistently inhibited the production of leukotriene C4 (LTC4) in a dose dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 6.56 microM. These results demonstrate that ochnaflavone has a dual cyclooxygenase-2/5-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity. Furthermore, this compound strongly inhibited degranulation reaction in a dose dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 3.01 microM. Therefore, this compound might provide a basis for novel anti-inflammatory drugs.

  11. Eugenol--the active principle from cloves inhibits 5-lipoxygenase activity and leukotriene-C4 in human PMNL cells.

    PubMed

    Raghavenra, H; Diwakr, B T; Lokesh, B R; Naidu, K A

    2006-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) play an important role in the modulation of inflammatory conditions in humans. PMNL cells recruited at the site of inflammation, release inflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes, proteolytic enzymes and reactive oxygen species. Among these, leukotrienes are implicated in pathophysiology of allergic and inflammatory disorders like asthma, allergic rhinitis, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the key enzyme in biosynthetic pathway of leukotrienes. Our earlier studies showed that spice phenolic active principles significantly inhibit 5-LO enzyme in human PMNLs. In this study we have further characterized the inhibitory mechanism of eugenol, the active principle of spice-clove on 5-LO enzyme and also its effect on leukotriene C((4)) (LTC(4)). Substrate dependent enzyme kinetics showed that the inhibitory effect of eugenol on 5-LO was of a non-competitive nature. Further, eugenol was found to significantly inhibit the formation of LTC(4) in calcium ionophore A23187 and arachidonic acid (AA) stimulated PMNL cells. These data clearly suggest that eugenol inhibits 5-LO by non-competitive mechanism and also inhibits formation of LTC(4) in human PMNL cells and thus may have beneficial role in modulating 5-LO pathway in human PMNL cells. PMID:16216483

  12. Conversion of human 5-lipoxygenase to a 15-lipoxygenase by a point mutation to mimic phosphorylation at Serine-663

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Nathaniel C.; Rui, Zhe; Neau, David B.; Waight, Maria T.; Bartlett, Sue G.; Boeglin, William E.; Brash, Alan R.; Newcomer, Marcia E.

    2012-08-31

    The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) initiates biosynthesis of the proinflammatory leukotriene lipid mediators and, together with 15-LOX, is also required for synthesis of the anti-inflammatory lipoxins. The catalytic activity of 5-LOX is regulated through multiple mechanisms, including Ca{sup 2+}-targeted membrane binding and phosphorylation at specific serine residues. To investigate the consequences of phosphorylation at S663, we mutated the residue to the phosphorylation mimic Asp, providing a homogenous preparation suitable for catalytic and structural studies. The S663D enzyme exhibits robust 15-LOX activity, as determined by spectrophotometric and HPLC analyses, with only traces of 5-LOX activity remaining; synthesis of the anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4 from arachidonic acid is also detected. The crystal structure of the S663D mutant in the absence and presence of arachidonic acid (in the context of the previously reported Stable-5-LOX) reveals substantial remodeling of helices that define the active site so that the once fully encapsulated catalytic machinery is solvent accessible. Our results suggest that phosphorylation of 5-LOX at S663 could not only down-regulate leukotriene synthesis but also stimulate lipoxin production in inflammatory cells that do not express 15-LOX, thus redirecting lipid mediator biosynthesis to the production of proresolving mediators of inflammation.

  13. Repeated allergen exposure reduce early phase airway response and leukotriene release despite upregulation of 5-lipoxygenase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergen induced early phase airway response and airway plasma exudation are predominantly mediated by inflammatory mast cell mediators including histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated allergen exposure affects early phase airway response to allergen challenge. Methods A trimellitic anhydride (TMA) sensitized guinea pig model was used to investigate the effects of low dose repeated allergen exposure on cholinergic airway responsiveness, early phase airway response and plasma exudation, as well as local airway production of mast cell derived cysteinyl leukotrienes and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) after allergen challenge. Results Repeated low dose allergen exposure increased cholinergic airway responsiveness. In contrast, early phase airway response and plasma exudation in response to a high-dose allergen challenge were strongly attenuated after repeated low dose allergen exposure. Inhibition of the airway response was unspecific to exposed allergen and independent of histamine receptor blocking. Furthermore, a significant reduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2 was found in the airways of animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen. However, in vitro stimulation of airway tissue from animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen with arachidonic acid and calcium ionophore (A23187) induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2, suggesting enhanced activity of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Conclusions The inhibition of the early phase airway response, cysteinyl leukotriene and TXB2 production after repeated allergen exposure may result from unresponsive effector cells. PMID:22439792

  14. Eugenol--the active principle from cloves inhibits 5-lipoxygenase activity and leukotriene-C4 in human PMNL cells.

    PubMed

    Raghavenra, H; Diwakr, B T; Lokesh, B R; Naidu, K A

    2006-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) play an important role in the modulation of inflammatory conditions in humans. PMNL cells recruited at the site of inflammation, release inflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes, proteolytic enzymes and reactive oxygen species. Among these, leukotrienes are implicated in pathophysiology of allergic and inflammatory disorders like asthma, allergic rhinitis, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the key enzyme in biosynthetic pathway of leukotrienes. Our earlier studies showed that spice phenolic active principles significantly inhibit 5-LO enzyme in human PMNLs. In this study we have further characterized the inhibitory mechanism of eugenol, the active principle of spice-clove on 5-LO enzyme and also its effect on leukotriene C((4)) (LTC(4)). Substrate dependent enzyme kinetics showed that the inhibitory effect of eugenol on 5-LO was of a non-competitive nature. Further, eugenol was found to significantly inhibit the formation of LTC(4) in calcium ionophore A23187 and arachidonic acid (AA) stimulated PMNL cells. These data clearly suggest that eugenol inhibits 5-LO by non-competitive mechanism and also inhibits formation of LTC(4) in human PMNL cells and thus may have beneficial role in modulating 5-LO pathway in human PMNL cells.

  15. Development and Validation of a Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Method for the Determination of Zileuton in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Katakam; Adiki, Shanta K; Kalakuntla, Rama Rao

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A selective and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method (LC-MS/MS) has been developed and validated for the quantification of zileuton in human plasma. Deuterated internal standard (zileuton D4) was used as the internal standard (ISTD). Zileuton was extracted by liquid-liquid extraction using methyl tert-butyl ether and separated by isocratic elution on a C18 column (100 × 4.6 mm, 5 μm, Discovery C18) with the mobile phase consisting of 1 mM ammonium acetate buffer and methanol in the ratio of 10:90. A flow rate of 1.0 ml/min was used with isocratic elution. Multiple reaction monitoring transitions in positive mode for zileuton and the internal standard were 237.3/161.2 and 241.2/161.1, respectively. The method was validated within the linearity range of 50.5–10,012.7 ng/ml for the bioanalytical method validation parameters like selectivity, accuracy, precision, recovery, stability, and matrix effect. PMID:25853069

  16. Ethanol Promotes Chemically Induced Oral Cancer in Mice through Activation of the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway of Arachidonic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yizhu; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Xinyan; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol drinking is a known risk factor for oral cancer in humans. However, previous animal studies on the promoting effect of ethanol on oral carcinogenesis were inconclusive. It is necessary to develop an animal model with which the molecular mechanism of ethanol-related oral carcinogenesis may be elucidated in order to develop effective prevention strategies. In this study, mice were first treated with 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO, 100μg/ml in drinking water) for 8 weeks, and then given water or ethanol (8%) as the sole drink for another 16 weeks. During the experiment, 8% ethanol was well tolerated by mice. The incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) increased from 20% (8/41) to 43% (17/40; p<0.05). Expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-Lox) and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) was increased in dysplasia and SCC of 4NQO-treated tongues, and further enhanced by ethanol. Using this mouse model, we further demonstrated that fewer cancers were induced in Alox5−/− mice, as were cell proliferation, inflammation, and angiogenesis in the tongue, as compared with Alox5+/+ mice. Interestingly, Cox-2 expression was induced by ethanol in knockout mice, while 5-Lox and leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) expression and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) biosynthesis were dramatically reduced. Moreover, ethanol enhanced expression and nuclear localization of 5-Lox and stimulated LTB4 biosynthesis in human tongue SCC cells (SCC-15 and SCC-4) in vitro. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrated that ethanol promoted 4NQO-induced oral carcinogenesis, at least in part, through further activation of the 5-Lox pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism. PMID:21881027

  17. Deletion of 5-Lipoxygenase in the Tumor Microenvironment Promotes Lung Cancer Progression and Metastasis through Regulating T Cell Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Poczobutt, Joanna M.; Nguyen, Teresa T.; Hanson, Dwight; Li, Howard; Sippel, Trisha R.; Weiser-Evans, Mary C. M.; Gijon, Miguel; Murphy, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids, including PGs, produced by cyclooxygenases (COX), and leukotrienes, produced by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) have been implicated in cancer progression. These molecules are produced by both cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME). We previously reported that both COX and 5-LO metabolites increase during progression in an orthotopic immunocompetent model of lung cancer. Although PGs in the TME have been well studied, less is known regarding 5-LO products produced by the TME. We examined the role of 5-LO in the TME using a model in which Lewis lung carcinoma cells are directly implanted into the lungs of syngeneic WT mice or mice globally deficient in 5-LO (5-LO-KO). Unexpectedly, primary tumor volume and liver metastases were increased in 5-LO-KO mice. This was associated with an ablation of leukotriene (LT) production, consistent with production mainly mediated by the microenvironment. Increased tumor progression was partially reproduced in global LTC4 synthase KO or mice transplanted with LTA4 hydrolase-deficient bone marrow. Tumor-bearing lungs of 5-LO-KO had decreased numbers of CD4 and CD8 T cells compared with WT controls, as well as fewer dendritic cells. This was associated with lower levels of CCL20 and CXL9, which have been implicated in dendritic and T cell recruitment. Depletion of CD8 cells increased tumor growth and eliminated the differences between WT and 5-LO mice. These data reveal an antitumorigenic role for 5-LO products in the microenvironment during lung cancer progression through regulation of T cells and suggest that caution should be used in targeting this pathway in lung cancer. PMID:26663781

  18. Analysis of a nucleotide-binding site of 5-lipoxygenase by affinity labelling: binding characteristics and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Y; Hammarberg, T; Radmark, O; Samuelsson, B; Ng, C F; Funk, C D; Loscalzo, J

    2000-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) catalyses the first two steps in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, which are inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid. 5LO activity is stimulated by ATP; however, a consensus ATP-binding site or nucleotide-binding site has not been found in its protein sequence. In the present study, affinity and photoaffinity labelling of 5LO with 5'-p-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine (FSBA) and 2-azido-ATP showed that 5LO bound to the ATP analogues quantitatively and specifically and that the incorporation of either analogue inhibited ATP stimulation of 5LO activity. The stoichiometry of the labelling was 1.4 mol of FSBA/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 1 mol/mol) or 0.94 mol of 2-azido-ATP/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 0.77 mol/mol). Labelling with FSBA prevented further labelling with 2-azido-ATP, indicating that the same binding site was occupied by both analogues. Other nucleotides (ADP, AMP, GTP, CTP and UTP) also competed with 2-azido-ATP labelling, suggesting that the site was a general nucleotide-binding site rather than a strict ATP-binding site. Ca(2+), which also stimulates 5LO activity, had no effect on the labelling of the nucleotide-binding site. Digestion with trypsin and peptide sequencing showed that two fragments of 5LO were labelled by 2-azido-ATP. These fragments correspond to residues 73-83 (KYWLNDDWYLK, in single-letter amino acid code) and 193-209 (FMHMFQSSWNDFADFEK) in the 5LO sequence. Trp-75 and Trp-201 in these peptides were modified by the labelling, suggesting that they were immediately adjacent to the C-2 position of the adenine ring of ATP. Given the stoichiometry of the labelling, the two peptide sequences of 5LO were probably near each other in the enzyme's tertiary structure, composing or surrounding the ATP-binding site of 5LO. PMID:11042125

  19. Roles of 5-lipoxygenase and cysteinyl-leukotriene type 1 receptors in the hematological response to allergen challenge and its prevention by diethylcarbamazine in a murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Masid-de-Brito, Daniela; Queto, Túlio; Gaspar-Elsas, Maria Ignez C; Xavier-Elsas, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Diethylcarbamazine (DEC), which blocks leukotriene production, abolishes the challenge-induced increase in eosinopoiesis in bone-marrow from ovalbumin- (OVA-) sensitized mice, suggesting that 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products contribute to the hematological responses in experimental asthma models. We explored the relationship between 5-LO, central and peripheral eosinophilia, and effectiveness of DEC, using PAS or BALB/c mice and 5-LO-deficient mutants. We quantified eosinophil numbers in freshly harvested or cultured bone-marrow, peritoneal lavage fluid, and spleen, with or without administration of leukotriene generation inhibitors (DEC and MK886) and cisteinyl-leukotriene type I receptor antagonist (montelukast). The increase in eosinophil numbers in bone-marrow, observed in sensitized/challenged wild-type mice, was abolished by MK886 and DEC pretreatment. In ALOX mutants, by contrast, there was no increase in bone-marrow eosinophil counts, nor in eosinophil production in culture, in response to sensitization/challenge. In sensitized/challenged ALOX mice, challenge-induced migration of eosinophils to the peritoneal cavity was significantly reduced relative to the wild-type PAS controls. DEC was ineffective in ALOX mice, as expected from a mechanism of action dependent on 5-LO. In BALB/c mice, challenge significantly increased spleen eosinophil numbers and DEC treatment prevented this increase. Overall, 5-LO appears as indispensable to the systemic hematological response to allergen challenge, as well as to the effectiveness of DEC. PMID:25477712

  20. Meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid isolated from Saururus chinensis inhibits cyclooxygenase-2 and 5-lipoxygenase in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Tae Chul; Seo, Chang Seob; Haa, Kyungmi; Kim, Jin Cheul; Hwang, Nam Kyung; Hong, Tae Gyun; Kim, Jee Hyeun; Kim, Do Hun; Son, Jong Keun; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2008-05-01

    Meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (MDGA) is a medicinal herbal product isolated from the aerial parts of Saururus chinensis that inhibits the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-dependent phase of prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) generation in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) (IC(50) 9.8 microM). However, this compound did not inhibit COX-2 protein expression in BMMC at concentrations up to 30 microM, indicating that MDGA directly inhibits COX-2 activity. In addition, this compound consistently inhibited the production of leukotriene C(4) (IC(50) 1.3 microM). These results demonstrate that MDGA inhibits both COX-2 and 5-lipoxygenase. Furthermore, this compound strongly inhibited the degranulation reaction in BMMC (IC(50) 11.4 microM). Therefore, this compound might provide a basis for novel anti-inflammatory drug development.

  1. Comparison of oral montelukast with oral zileuton in acute asthma: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Magazine, Rahul; Shahul, Hameed Aboobackar; Chogtu, Bharti; Kamath, Asha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leukotriene modifiers have an established role in the management of chronic asthma but their role in acute asthma is still under evaluation. Objective: To study and compare the effects of oral montelukast with oral zileuton in acute asthma. Materials and Methods: This study included 120 asthmatics and was conducted from September 2012 to March 2014. Patients were randomized into three different groups to receive montelukast or zileuton or placebo in addition to standard treatment for asthma exacerbation. Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) values, details of rescue medication and vital signs were recorded at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h of drug or placebo administration and at discharge. Additional recording was done in the morning (8–10 am) following admission. The primary endpoint was the mean PEFR of each group at these time points; the secondary end point being the need for rescue medications. Results: The mean PEFR recordings of the three study groups – placebo, montelukast, and zileuton – respectively, at various time points were as follows: at 6 h (223.25 ± 90.40, 199.00 ± 82.52, 233.75 ± 84.05; P = 0.240); at 12 h (271.00 ± 109.38, 251.50 ± 101.44, 309.50 ± 129.63; P = 0.048); at 24 h (288.25 ± 114.26, 269.00 ± 107.51, 324.50 ± 127.88; P = 0.080); and at 48 h (295.00 ± 114.80, 293.50 ± 113.24, 344.75 ± 119.91; P = 0.015); discharge (305.00 ± 118.56, 305.25 ± 119.51, 361.25 ± 119.70; P = 0.010). The mean PEFR for the three study groups at 8–10 am on the morning following admission was 268.75 ± 111.43, 252.50 ± 99.99, 306.75 ± 114.44; P = 0.047. Total rescue doses needed were 10, 1, and 0, respectively (P = 0.049). Conclusion: Zileuton is better than montelukast as an additional drug in acute asthma and results in significant improvement in lung function, and reduction in the need for rescue medications. PMID:27185992

  2. Computational insight into the catalytic implication of head/tail-first orientation of arachidonic acid in human 5-lipoxygenase: consequences for the positional specificity of oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Saura, Patricia; Maréchal, Jean-Didier; Masgrau, Laura; Lluch, José M; González-Lafont, Àngels

    2016-08-17

    In the present work we have combined homology modeling, protein-ligand dockings, quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations and molecular dynamics simulations to generate human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX):arachidonic acid (AA) complexes consistent with the 5-lipoxygenating activity (which implies hydrogen abstraction at the C7 position). Our results suggest that both the holo and the apo forms of human Stable 5-LOX could accommodate AA in a productive form for 5-lipoxygenation. The former, in a tail-first orientation, with the AA carboxylate end interacting with Lys409, gives the desired structures with C7 close to the Fe-OH(-) cofactor and suitable barrier heights for H7 abstraction. Only when using the apo form structure, a head-first orientation with the AA carboxylate close to His600 (a residue recently proposed as essential for AA positioning) is obtained in the docking calculations. However, the calculated barrier heights for this head-first orientation are in principle consistent with 5-LOX specificity, but also with 12/8 regioselectivity. Finally, long MD simulations give support to the recent hypothesis that the Phe177 + Tyr181 pair needs to close the active site access during the chemical reaction, and suggest that in the case of a head-first orientation Phe177 may be the residue interacting with the AA carboxylate. PMID:27489112

  3. Modulation of LPS-induced memory insult, γ-secretase and neuroinflammation in 3xTg mice by 5-Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Yash B.; Giannopoulos, Phillip F.; Chu, Jin; Praticò, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Besides amyloid and tau pathology, a constant feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an intense inflammatory response, which is considered an active player in its pathogenesis. The 5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) is a proinflammatory enzyme and an endogenous modulator of AD-like phenotype in mouse models of the disease. To further understand the role of 5LO in AD pathogenesis, we exposed the 3xTg and 3xTg/5LO knockout mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a known inducer of neuroinflammation, and evaluated its effect on their AD-like phenotype. 3xTg mice treated with LPS manifested a worsening of behavior, γ-secretase up-regulation, and increased neuroinflammatory responses. These effects were completely prevented in 3xTg mice genetically deficient for 5LO. By contrast, the absence of 5LO did not protect against increase in tau phosphorylation at specific epitopes that were mediated by the activation of the cyclin-dependent kinase 5. Our data demonstrate that the 5LO pathway affects key neuropathological features of the AD-like phenotype (behavior, Abeta, microgliosis, astrocytosis) but not others (tau pathology) in the LPS-dependent neuroinflammation model. The opposite ways whereby 5LO influences the LPS-dependent effects in vivo supports the complex nature of the neuroinflammatory response in AD and its differential role in modulating amyloid and tau neuropathology. PMID:24332986

  4. Natural Product Total Synthesis in the Organic Laboratory: Total Synthesis of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE), a Potent 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor from Honeybee Hives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touaibia, Mohamed; Guay, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Natural products play a critical role in modern organic synthesis and learning synthetic techniques is an important component of the organic laboratory experience. In addition to traditional one-step organic synthesis laboratories, a multistep natural product synthesis is an interesting experiment to challenge students. The proposed three-step…

  5. Novel in vitro inhibitory functions of potato tuber proteinaceous inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias; Kuckenberg, Markus; Kastilan, Robin; Muth, Jost; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2015-02-01

    Plant protease inhibitors are a structurally highly diverse and ubiquitous class of small proteins, which play various roles in plant development and defense against pests and pathogens. Particular isoforms inhibit in vitro proteases and other enzymes that are not their natural substrates, for example proteases that have roles in human diseases. Mature potato tubers are a rich source of several protease inhibitor families. Different cultivars have different inhibitor profiles. With the objective to explore the functional diversity of the natural diversity of potato protease inhibitors, we randomly selected and sequenced 9,600 cDNA clones originated from mature tubers of ten potato cultivars. Among these, 120 unique inhibitor cDNA clones were identified by homology searches. Eighty-eight inhibitors represented novel sequence variants of known plant protease inhibitor families. Most frequent were Kunitz-type inhibitors (KTI), potato protease inhibitors I and II (PIN), pectin methylesterase inhibitors, metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitors and defensins. Twenty-three inhibitors were functionally characterized after heterologous expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The purified recombinant proteins were tested for inhibitory activity on trypsin, eleven pharmacological relevant proteases and the non-proteolytic enzyme 5-lipoxygenase. Members of the KTI and PIN families inhibited pig pancreas elastase, β-Secretase, Cathepsin K, HIV-1 protease and potato 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate in vitro inhibitory diversity of small potato tuber proteins commonly known as protease inhibitors, which might have biotechnological or medical applications.

  6. Novel in vitro inhibitory functions of potato tuber proteinaceous inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias; Kuckenberg, Markus; Kastilan, Robin; Muth, Jost; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2015-02-01

    Plant protease inhibitors are a structurally highly diverse and ubiquitous class of small proteins, which play various roles in plant development and defense against pests and pathogens. Particular isoforms inhibit in vitro proteases and other enzymes that are not their natural substrates, for example proteases that have roles in human diseases. Mature potato tubers are a rich source of several protease inhibitor families. Different cultivars have different inhibitor profiles. With the objective to explore the functional diversity of the natural diversity of potato protease inhibitors, we randomly selected and sequenced 9,600 cDNA clones originated from mature tubers of ten potato cultivars. Among these, 120 unique inhibitor cDNA clones were identified by homology searches. Eighty-eight inhibitors represented novel sequence variants of known plant protease inhibitor families. Most frequent were Kunitz-type inhibitors (KTI), potato protease inhibitors I and II (PIN), pectin methylesterase inhibitors, metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitors and defensins. Twenty-three inhibitors were functionally characterized after heterologous expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The purified recombinant proteins were tested for inhibitory activity on trypsin, eleven pharmacological relevant proteases and the non-proteolytic enzyme 5-lipoxygenase. Members of the KTI and PIN families inhibited pig pancreas elastase, β-Secretase, Cathepsin K, HIV-1 protease and potato 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate in vitro inhibitory diversity of small potato tuber proteins commonly known as protease inhibitors, which might have biotechnological or medical applications. PMID:25260821

  7. Effects of exogenous arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic acids on the generation of 5-lipoxygenase pathway products by ionophore-activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T H; Mencia-Huerta, J M; Shih, C; Corey, E J; Lewis, R A; Austen, K F

    1984-01-01

    Exogenous eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DCHA) have been compared with exogenous arachidonic acid for their capacity to modulate the oxidative metabolism of membrane-derived arachidonic acid by the 5-lipoxygenase pathway in ionophore-activated human neutrophils and for their suitability as parallel substrates in this pathway. The products from specific 14C- or 3H-labeled substrates were isolated by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and were identified by elution of radiolabel at the retention times of the appropriate synthetic standards. Each product was also characterized by its ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectrum, and 7-hydroxy-DCHA was defined in addition by analysis of its mass spectrum. The metabolites, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 6-trans-LTB4 diastereoisomers, 5-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid, 6-trans-leukotriene B5 diastereoisomers, leukotriene B5 (LTB5), and 7-hydroxy-DCHA were quantitated by integrated UV absorbance during resolution by RP-HPLC. LTB4 and LTB5 were also quantitated by radioimmunoassay of the eluate fractions, and leukotrienes C4 and C5 (LTC4 and LTC5, respectively) were quantitated by radioimmunoassay alone. None of the unlabeled exogenous fatty acids (5-40 micrograms/ml) altered the release of radioactivity from [14C]arachidonic acid-labeled, ionophore-activated neutrophils. The metabolism of 5 and 10 micrograms/ml of exogenous EPA by ionophore-activated, [14C]arachidonic acid-labeled neutrophils not only generated 5-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid, 6-trans-LTB5, LTB5, and LTC5, but also stimulated the formation of 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 6-trans-LTB4 diastereoisomers, and LTC4 from membrane-derived arachidonic acid. In contrast, LTB4 production was diminished throughout the EPA dose-response, beginning at 5 micrograms/ml EPA and reaching 50% suppression at 10 micrograms/ml and 84% suppression at 40 micrograms/ml. The selective decrease in extracellular LTB4

  8. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  9. Western blot expression of 5-lipoxygenase in the brain from striped dolphins (stenella coeruleoalba) and bottlenose dolphins (tursiops truncatus) with or without encephalitis/meningo-encephalitis of infectious nature.

    PubMed

    Di Guardo, G; Falconi, A; Di Francesco, A; Mazzariol, S; Centelleghe, C; Casalone, C; Pautasso, A; Cocumelli, C; Eleni, C; Petrella, A; Di Francesco, C E; Sabatucci, A; Leonardi, L; Serroni, A; Marsili, L; Storelli, M M; Giacominelli-Stuffler, R

    2015-01-01

    Dolphin Morbillivirus (DMV), Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella ceti are pathogens of major concern for wild cetaceans. Although a more or less severe encephalitis/meningo-encephalitis may occur in striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) infected by the aforementioned agents, almost no information is available on the neuropathogenesis of brain lesions, including the neuronal and non-neuronal cells targeted during infection, along with the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. We analyzed 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) expression in the brain of 11 striped dolphins and 5 bottlenose dolphins, affected or not by encephalitic lesions of various degrees associated with DMV, T. gondii and B. ceti. All the 8 striped dolphins with encephalitis showed a more consistent 5-LOX expression than that observed in the 3 striped dolphins showing no morphologic evidence of brain lesions, with the most prominent band intensity being detected in a B. ceti-infected animal. Similar results were not obtained in T. gondii-infected vs T. gondii-uninfected bottlenose dolphins. Overall, the higher 5-LOX expression found in the brain of the 8 striped dolphins with infectious neuroinflammation is of interest, given that 5-LOX is a putative marker for neurodegeneration in human patients and in experimental animal models. Therefore, further investigation on this challenging issue is also needed in stranded cetaceans affected by central neuropathies.

  10. Western blot expression of 5-lipoxygenase in the brain from striped dolphins (stenella coeruleoalba) and bottlenose dolphins (tursiops truncatus) with or without encephalitis/meningo-encephalitis of infectious nature.

    PubMed

    Di Guardo, G; Falconi, A; Di Francesco, A; Mazzariol, S; Centelleghe, C; Casalone, C; Pautasso, A; Cocumelli, C; Eleni, C; Petrella, A; Di Francesco, C E; Sabatucci, A; Leonardi, L; Serroni, A; Marsili, L; Storelli, M M; Giacominelli-Stuffler, R

    2015-01-01

    Dolphin Morbillivirus (DMV), Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella ceti are pathogens of major concern for wild cetaceans. Although a more or less severe encephalitis/meningo-encephalitis may occur in striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) infected by the aforementioned agents, almost no information is available on the neuropathogenesis of brain lesions, including the neuronal and non-neuronal cells targeted during infection, along with the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. We analyzed 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) expression in the brain of 11 striped dolphins and 5 bottlenose dolphins, affected or not by encephalitic lesions of various degrees associated with DMV, T. gondii and B. ceti. All the 8 striped dolphins with encephalitis showed a more consistent 5-LOX expression than that observed in the 3 striped dolphins showing no morphologic evidence of brain lesions, with the most prominent band intensity being detected in a B. ceti-infected animal. Similar results were not obtained in T. gondii-infected vs T. gondii-uninfected bottlenose dolphins. Overall, the higher 5-LOX expression found in the brain of the 8 striped dolphins with infectious neuroinflammation is of interest, given that 5-LOX is a putative marker for neurodegeneration in human patients and in experimental animal models. Therefore, further investigation on this challenging issue is also needed in stranded cetaceans affected by central neuropathies. PMID:25864766

  11. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5), and its expression in response to the ratio of linolenic acid to linoleic acid in diets of large yellow croaker (Larmichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianjiao; Zuo, Rantao; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Ai, Qinghui

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to clone and functionally characterize a full-length cDNA encoding arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5) from large yellow croaker (Larmichthys crocea) and investigate its gene expression in response to graded dietary ratio of linolenic acid (ALA) to linoleic acid (LNA) (0.03, 0.06, 0.45, 0.90 and 1.51). An isolated 2372bp cDNA clone of Alox5 contained an open reading frame spanning 2025bp encoding a protein with the ability to modify arachidonate acid (AA) to 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic (5-HETE). In the liver, the Alox5 mRNA expression levels significantly increased to the maximum when the dietary ALA/LNA increased from 0.03 to 0.06, and then significantly decreased with dietary ALA/LNA increased to 1.51 (P<0.05). In the kidney, the expression levels of Alox5 of fish fed diets with low dietary ALA/LNA (0.03-0.06) were significantly higher than those of fish fed diets with high dietary ALA/LNA (0.45-1.51) (P<0.05). The dual-luciferase reporter assays showed that the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) could act on cognate cis-acting elements in the promoter of Alox5 and increased the transcription of Alox5. Results of the present study suggested that the expression of Alox5 is higher in croakers fed high concentrations of LNA compared to those fed high concentrations of ALA, which might be regulated by NF-κB and contribute to the inflammation process by catalyzing the dioxygenation of AA. PMID:27378407

  12. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5), and its expression in response to the ratio of linolenic acid to linoleic acid in diets of large yellow croaker (Larmichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianjiao; Zuo, Rantao; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Ai, Qinghui

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to clone and functionally characterize a full-length cDNA encoding arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (Alox5) from large yellow croaker (Larmichthys crocea) and investigate its gene expression in response to graded dietary ratio of linolenic acid (ALA) to linoleic acid (LNA) (0.03, 0.06, 0.45, 0.90 and 1.51). An isolated 2372bp cDNA clone of Alox5 contained an open reading frame spanning 2025bp encoding a protein with the ability to modify arachidonate acid (AA) to 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic (5-HETE). In the liver, the Alox5 mRNA expression levels significantly increased to the maximum when the dietary ALA/LNA increased from 0.03 to 0.06, and then significantly decreased with dietary ALA/LNA increased to 1.51 (P<0.05). In the kidney, the expression levels of Alox5 of fish fed diets with low dietary ALA/LNA (0.03-0.06) were significantly higher than those of fish fed diets with high dietary ALA/LNA (0.45-1.51) (P<0.05). The dual-luciferase reporter assays showed that the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) could act on cognate cis-acting elements in the promoter of Alox5 and increased the transcription of Alox5. Results of the present study suggested that the expression of Alox5 is higher in croakers fed high concentrations of LNA compared to those fed high concentrations of ALA, which might be regulated by NF-κB and contribute to the inflammation process by catalyzing the dioxygenation of AA.

  13. Placenta growth factor augments airway hyperresponsiveness via leukotrienes and IL-13.

    PubMed

    Eiymo Mwa Mpollo, Marthe-Sandrine; Brandt, Eric B; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Arumugam, Paritha I; Tiwari, Swati; Loberg, Anastacia; Pillis, Devin; Rizvi, Tilat; Lindsey, Mark; Jonck, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter; Kalra, Vijay K; Le Cras, Timothy D; Ratner, Nancy; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Hershey, Gurjit K Khurana; Malik, Punam

    2016-02-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) affects 55%-77% of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and occurs even in the absence of asthma. While asthma increases SCD morbidity and mortality, the mechanisms underlying the high AHR prevalence in a hemoglobinopathy remain unknown. We hypothesized that placenta growth factor (PlGF), an erythroblast-secreted factor that is elevated in SCD, mediates AHR. In allergen-exposed mice, loss of Plgf dampened AHR, reduced inflammation and eosinophilia, and decreased expression of the Th2 cytokine IL-13 and the leukotriene-synthesizing enzymes 5-lipoxygenase and leukotriene-C4-synthase. Plgf-/- mice treated with leukotrienes phenocopied the WT response to allergen exposure; conversely, anti-PlGF Ab administration in WT animals blunted the AHR. Notably, Th2-mediated STAT6 activation further increased PlGF expression from lung epithelium, eosinophils, and macrophages, creating a PlGF/leukotriene/Th2-response positive feedback loop. Similarly, we found that the Th2 response in asthma patients is associated with increased expression of PlGF and its downstream genes in respiratory epithelial cells. In an SCD mouse model, we observed increased AHR and higher leukotriene levels that were abrogated by anti-PlGF Ab or the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton. Overall, our findings indicate that PlGF exacerbates AHR and uniquely links the leukotriene and Th2 pathways in asthma. These data also suggest that zileuton and anti-PlGF Ab could be promising therapies to reduce pulmonary morbidity in SCD.

  14. Investigations on the role of leukotrienes in remote hind limb preconditioning-induced cardioprotection in rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Baljeet; Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2016-05-01

    The cardioprotective effects of remote hind limb preconditioning (RIPC) are well established, but its mechanisms still remain to be explored. Therefore, the present study was aimed to explore the possible involvement of 5-lipoxygenase-derived leukotrienes in RIPC. The hind limb was tied by a pressure cuff and was subjected to four episodes of inflation and deflation (5min each) to induce remote hind-limb preconditioning. Thereafter, the hearts were isolated and were subjected to global ischemia (30min) followed by reperfusion (120min) on the Langendorff apparatus. The extent of myocardial injury was assessed by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) levels in the coronary effluent; the infarct size using TTC staining, and the hemodynamic parameters including LVDP, dp/dtmax and dp/dtmin. RIPC significantly decreased ischemia and reperfusion-induced increase in LDH, CK release, infarct size and improved LVDP, dp/dtmax and dp/dtmin. Administration of montelukast, leukotriene receptor antagonist (10 and 20mg/kg) and zileuton, 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, (2.5 and 5mg/kg) abolished RIPC-induced cardioprotection. It may be concluded that hind limb ischemia stimulates 5-lipoxygenase to release leukotrienes which may elicit cardioprotection by humoral or neurogenic pathway. PMID:27058978

  15. Membrane and inhibitor interactions of intracellular phospholipases A2.

    PubMed

    Mouchlis, Varnavas D; Dennis, Edward A

    2016-05-01

    Studying phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) is a challenging task since they act on membrane-like aggregated substrates and not on monomeric phospholipids. Multidisciplinary approaches that include hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) and computational techniques have been employed with great success in order to address important questions about the mode of interactions of PLA2 enzymes with membranes, phospholipid substrates and inhibitors. Understanding the interactions of PLA2s is crucial since these enzymes are the upstream regulators of the eicosanoid pathway liberating free arachidonic acid (AA) and other polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The liberation of AA by PLA2 enzymes sets off a cascade of molecular events that involves downstream regulators such as cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) metabolites leading to inflammation. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) work by inhibiting COX, while Zileuton inhibits LOX and both rely on PLA2 enzymes to provide them with AA. That means PLA2 enzymes can potentially also be targeted to diminish inflammation at an earlier point in the process. In this review we describe extensive efforts reported in the past to define the interactions of PLA2 enzymes with membranes, substrate phospholipids and inhibitors using DXMS, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. PMID:26774606

  16. Cell Death Inducing Microbial Protein Phosphatase Inhibitors--Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Kleppe, Rune; Herfindal, Lars; Døskeland, Stein Ove

    2015-10-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and microcystin (MC) as well as several other microbial toxins like nodularin and calyculinA are known as tumor promoters as well as inducers of apoptotic cell death. Their intracellular targets are the major serine/threonine protein phosphatases. This review summarizes mechanisms believed to be responsible for the death induction and tumor promotion with focus on the interdependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II (CaM-KII). New data are presented using inhibitors of specific ROS producing enzymes to curb nodularin/MC-induced liver cell (hepatocyte) death. They indicate that enzymes of the arachidonic acid pathway, notably phospholipase A2, 5-lipoxygenase, and cyclooxygenases, may be required for nodularin/MC-induced (and presumably OA-induced) cell death, suggesting new ways to overcome at least some aspects of OA and MC toxicity. PMID:26506362

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of C(5)-substituted derivatives of leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor BRP-7.

    PubMed

    Levent, Serkan; Gerstmeier, Jana; Olgaç, Abdurrahman; Nikels, Felix; Garscha, Ulrike; Carotti, Andrea; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Werz, Oliver; Banoglu, Erden; Çalışkan, Burcu

    2016-10-21

    Pharmacological intervention with 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway leading to suppression of leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis is a clinically validated strategy for treatment of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases such as asthma and atherosclerosis. Here we describe the synthesis of a series of C(5)-substituted analogues of the previously described 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP) inhibitor BRP-7 (IC50 = 0.31 μM) to explore the effects of substitution at the C(5)-benzimidazole (BI) ring as a strategy to increase the potency against FLAP-mediated 5-LO product formation. Incorporation of polar substituents on the C(5) position of the BI core, exemplified by compound 11 with a C(5)-nitrile substituent, significantly enhances the potency for suppression of 5-LO product synthesis in human neutrophils (IC50 = 0.07 μM) and monocytes (IC50 = 0.026 μM). PMID:27423639

  18. Arachidonate 12-lipoxygenases with reference to their selective inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Shozo . E-mail: yamamosh@kyoto-wu.ac.jp; Katsukawa, Michiko; Nakano, Ayumi; Hiraki, Emi; Nishimura, Kohji; Jisaka, Mitsuo; Yokota, Kazushige; Ueda, Natsuo

    2005-12-09

    Lipoxygenase is a dioxygenase recognizing a 1-cis,4-cis-pentadiene of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The enzyme oxygenates various carbon atoms of arachidonic acid as a substrate and produces 5-, 8-, 12- or 15-hydroperoxy eicosatetraenoic acid with a conjugated diene chromophore. The enzyme is referred to as 5-, 8-, 12- or 15-lipoxygenase, respectively. Earlier we found two isoforms of 12-lipoxygenase, leukocyte- and platelet-type enzymes, which were distinguished by substrate specificity, catalytic activity, primary structure, gene intron size, and antigenicity. Recently, the epidermis-type enzyme was found as the third isoform. Attempts have been made to find isozyme-specific inhibitors of 12-lipoxygenase, and earlier we found hinokitol, a tropolone, as a potent inhibitor selective for the platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase. More recently, we tested various catechins of tea leaves and found that (-)-geotechnical gallate was a potent and selective inhibitor of human platelet 12-lipoxygenase with an IC{sub 5} of 0.14 {mu}M. The compound was much less active with 12-lipoxygenase of leukocyte-type, 15-, 8-, and 5-lipoxygenases, and cyclo oxygenases-1 and -2.

  19. Structure and Ligand Based Drug Design Strategies in the Development of Novel 5-LOX Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Aparoy, Polamarasetty; Kumar Reddy, Kakularam; Reddanna, Pallu

    2012-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) are non-heme iron containing dioxygenases involved in the oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) such as arachidonic acid (AA). Depending on the position of insertion of oxygen, LOXs are classified into 5-, 8-, 9-, 12- and 15-LOX. Among these, 5-LOX is the most predominant isoform associated with the formation of 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HpETE), the precursor of non-peptido (LTB4) and peptido (LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4) leukotrienes. LTs are involved in inflammatory and allergic diseases like asthma, ulcerative colitis, rhinitis and also in cancer. Consequently 5-LOX has become target for the development of therapeutic molecules for treatment of various inflammatory disorders. Zileuton is one such inhibitor of 5-LOX approved for the treatment of asthma. In the recent times, computer aided drug design (CADD) strategies have been applied successfully in drug development processes. A comprehensive review on structure based drug design strategies in the development of novel 5-LOX inhibitors is presented in this article. Since the crystal structure of 5-LOX has been recently solved, efforts to develop 5-LOX inhibitors have mostly relied on ligand based rational approaches. The present review provides a comprehensive survey on these strategies in the development of 5-LOX inhibitors. PMID:22680930

  20. Leukotriene B4 mediates macrophage influx and pulmonary hypertension in bleomycin-induced chronic neonatal lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ee, Mong Tieng; Kantores, Crystal; Ivanovska, Julijana; Wong, Mathew J; Jain, Amish; Jankov, Robert P

    2016-08-01

    Systemically-administered bleomycin causes inflammation, arrested lung growth, and pulmonary hypertension (PHT) in the neonatal rat, similar to human infants with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Leukotrienes (LTs) are inflammatory lipid mediators produced by multiple cell types in the lung. The major LTs, LTB4 and cysteinyl LTs, are suggested to contribute to BPD, but their specific roles remain largely unexplored in experimental models. We hypothesized that LTs are increased in bleomycin-induced BPD-like injury, and that inhibition of LT production would prevent inflammatory cell influx and thereby ameliorate lung injury. Rat pups were exposed to bleomycin (1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) ip) or vehicle (control) from postnatal days 1-14 and were treated with either zileuton (5-lipoxygenase inhibitor), montelukast (cysteinyl LT1 receptor antagonist), or SC57461A (LTA4 hydrolase inhibitor) 10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) ip. Bleomycin led to increased lung content of LTB4, but not cysteinyl LTs. Bleomycin-induced increases in tissue neutrophils and macrophages and lung contents of LTB4 and tumor necrosis factor-α were all prevented by treatment with zileuton. Treatment with zileuton or SC57461A also prevented the hemodynamic and structural markers of chronic PHT, including raised pulmonary vascular resistance, increased Fulton index, and arterial wall remodeling. However, neither treatment prevented impaired alveolarization or vascular hypoplasia secondary to bleomycin. Treatment with montelukast had no effect on macrophage influx, PHT, or on abnormal lung structure. We conclude that LTB4 plays a crucial role in lung inflammation and PHT in experimental BPD. Agents targeting LTB4 or LTB4-mediated signaling may have utility in infants at risk of developing BPD-associated PHT. PMID:27317685

  1. Placenta growth factor augments airway hyperresponsiveness via leukotrienes and IL-13

    PubMed Central

    Eiymo Mwa Mpollo, Marthe-Sandrine; Brandt, Eric B.; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Arumugam, Paritha I.; Tiwari, Swati; Loberg, Anastacia; Pillis, Devin; Rizvi, Tilat; Lindsey, Mark; Jonck, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter; Kalra, Vijay K.; Le Cras, Timothy D.; Ratner, Nancy; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Hershey, Gurjit K. Khurana; Malik, Punam

    2015-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) affects 55%–77% of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and occurs even in the absence of asthma. While asthma increases SCD morbidity and mortality, the mechanisms underlying the high AHR prevalence in a hemoglobinopathy remain unknown. We hypothesized that placenta growth factor (PlGF), an erythroblast-secreted factor that is elevated in SCD, mediates AHR. In allergen-exposed mice, loss of Plgf dampened AHR, reduced inflammation and eosinophilia, and decreased expression of the Th2 cytokine IL-13 and the leukotriene-synthesizing enzymes 5-lipoxygenase and leukotriene-C4-synthase. Plgf–/– mice treated with leukotrienes phenocopied the WT response to allergen exposure; conversely, anti-PlGF Ab administration in WT animals blunted the AHR. Notably, Th2-mediated STAT6 activation further increased PlGF expression from lung epithelium, eosinophils, and macrophages, creating a PlGF/leukotriene/Th2-response positive feedback loop. Similarly, we found that the Th2 response in asthma patients is associated with increased expression of PlGF and its downstream genes in respiratory epithelial cells. In an SCD mouse model, we observed increased AHR and higher leukotriene levels that were abrogated by anti-PlGF Ab or the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton. Overall, our findings indicate that PlGF exacerbates AHR and uniquely links the leukotriene and Th2 pathways in asthma. These data also suggest that zileuton and anti-PlGF Ab could be promising therapies to reduce pulmonary morbidity in SCD. PMID:26690703

  2. Potentiation of antinociceptive effect of NSAIDs by a specific lipooxygenase inhibitor, acetyl 11-keto-beta boswellic acid.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Mahendra; Patil, Chandrashekar S; Kumar, Anil; Kulkarni, Shrinivas K

    2006-02-01

    The present study was aimed to assess the combined effects of cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase (COX/5-LOX) inhibitors in different animal models of nociception. Naproxen, nimesulide and rofecoxib are well-established antinociceptive agents acting via COX inhibition. AKBA (acetyl-keto-beta-boswellic acid) is a 5-LOX inhibitor. AKBA (50-200 mg/kg) produced a dose dependent and significant antinociceptive effect in different animal models of nociception. Based on the earlier reports from our laboratory, sub effective doses of all the three COX Inhibitors were selected and they were administered (naproxen, 5 mg/kg; nimesulide, 1 mg/kg; and rofecoxib, 1 mg/kg) with AKBA (100 mg/kg). This produced a more significant antinociceptive effect as compared to per se effect observed in all the three models of nociception. However, the effect of combination of nimesulide with AKBA was more pronounced as compared to naproxen and rofecoxib and their combination with AKBA. The present finding provided an evidence for the potentiation of antinociceptive effect of NSAIDs with AKBA. Such a combination may help to reduce the therapeutic doses of conventional NSAIDs and also reduce side effects (gastric, cardiac and renal) that are popularly associated with the NSAIDs.

  3. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  4. Platelet Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, Megan M; Widmar, S Brian

    2016-03-01

    Antithrombotic medications have become standard of care for management of acute coronary syndrome. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are essential components of platelet function; platelet-inhibiting medications interfere with these components and reduce incidence of thrombosis. Active bleeding is a contraindication for administration of platelet inhibitors. There is currently no reversal agent for platelet inhibitors, although platelet transfusion may be used to correct active bleeding after administration of platelet inhibitors. PMID:26897422

  5. Involvement of lipoxygenase in lysophosphatidic acid-stimulated hydrogen peroxide release in human HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sekharam, M; Cunnick, J M; Wu, J

    2000-01-01

    Although it is now recognized that low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are required for the mitogenic response, mitogen-induced signalling pathways that regulate ROS generation in non-phagocytic cells remain largely uncharacterized. Using a real-time assay for measuring hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) formation, we analysed H(2)O(2) release in human HaCaT keratinocytes in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a mitogen for keratinocytes. LPA rapidly increased H(2)O(2) release in HaCaT cells. Unlike LPA-induced mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation, LPA-stimulated H(2)O(2) release was independent of the tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Calcium chelators, phospholipase A(2) inhibitors, and lipoxygenase inhibitors effectively blocked LPA-stimulated H(2)O(2) release, whereas cyclooxygenase inhibitors were without effect. Addition of 5-lipoxygenase products 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE) and leukotriene B(4), but not 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE) and leukotriene C(4), restored LPA-stimulated H(2)O(2) release in cells treated with the lipoxygenase inhibitors nordihydroguaiaretic acid and Zileuton. These results suggest that the lipoxygenase products 5-HPETE and leukotriene B(4) are required for LPA-stimulated H(2)O(2) release in HaCaT cells. PMID:10698703

  6. Comparison of antioxidant and nonantioxidant lipoxygenase inhibitors on neutrophil function. Implications for pathogenesis of myocardial reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Shappell, S B; Taylor, A A; Hughes, H; Mitchell, J R; Anderson, D C; Smith, C W

    1990-02-01

    The activation and accumulation of leukocytes during inflammatory processes such as that initiated by myocardial ischemia and reflow appear to be major determinants of irreversible tissue injury. Myocardial salvage by dual cyclooxygenase/lipoxygenase inhibitors and selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors has suggested a role for lipoxygenase (LOX) products, such as the potent chemotactic factor leukotriene B4, in ischemia-reflow injury. However, many LOX inhibitors are antioxidants and several have been shown to directly inhibit neutrophil function in vitro, thereby questioning the role of LOX products in reperfusion injury. To clarify further the protective mechanism of lipoxygenase inhibitors, we have examined the effects of two nonantioxidant inhibitors, SK&F 86002 and REV-5901, on human neutrophil activation and function in vitro. The antioxidant LOX inhibitor nordihydroguiaretic acid, which served as a positive control, exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibition of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and recombinant C5a-induced neutrophil bipolarization, fMLP-induced upregulation of the adherence glycoprotein Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18), fMLP-induced aggregation and neutrophil adherence to and migration through interleukin-1-stimulated human endothelial monolayers. In contrast, neither SK&F 86002 nor REV-5901 (in concentrations up to 50 microM) had any effect on these functions, nor did they inhibit neutrophil oxidative metabolism (phorbol myristate acetate-induced chemiluminescence). Inasmuch as both of these agents have been observed to reduce myocardial ischemia-reflow injury in vivo, their failure to directly inhibit neutrophil function further supports an important role for chemotactic LOX products in the pathogenesis of reperfusion injury. PMID:2156049

  7. Modulation of haem oxygenase-1 expression by nitric oxide and leukotrienes in zymosan-activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Ana María; Guillén, María Isabel; Alcaraz, María José

    2001-01-01

    Phagocytosis of unopsonized zymosan by RAW 264.7 macrophages upregulated protein expression of haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of zymosan, exogenous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) did not exert significant effects on the expression of these three enzymes. In contrast, exogenous leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and LTC4 in the nanomolar range inhibited HO-1 and iNOS expression, as well as nitrite accumulation. The COX inhibitors indomethacin and NS398 weakly inhibited HO-1 expression but had no effect on iNOS and COX-2 expression or nitrite. In contrast, the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitor ZM 230,487 significantly decreased HO-1, iNOS and nitrite, which were not affected by zileuton. Dexamethasone showed an inhibitory effect on HO-1 expression induced by zymosan. ZM 230,487 but not zileuton, inhibited the shift due to nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), whereas they did not modify activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding. Our results suggest that inhibition of NF-κB binding could mediate the effects of ZM 230,487 on the modulation of HO-1 and iNOS protein expression. NOS inhibition by L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 1400 W abolished nitrite production and strongly reduced HO-1 expression. These results show an induction of HO-1 protein expression by zymosan phagocytosis in macrophages, with a positive modulatory role for endogenous NO and a negative regulation by exogenous LTs, likely dependent on the reduction of iNOS expression and NO production. PMID:11454666

  8. Antileukotrienes in upper airway inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Cingi, Cemal; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Ipci, Kagan; Şahin, Ethem

    2015-11-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are a family of inflammatory mediators including LTA4, LTB4, LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4. By competitive binding to the cysteinyl LT1 (CysLT1) receptor, LT receptor antagonist drugs, such as montelukast, zafirlukast, and pranlukast, block the effects of CysLTs, improving the symptoms of some chronic respiratory diseases, particularly bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. We reviewed the efficacy of antileukotrienes in upper airway inflammatory diseases. An update on the use of antileukotrienes in upper airway diseases in children and adults is presented with a detailed literature survey. Data on LTs, antileukotrienes, and antileukotrienes in chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyps, asthma, and allergic rhinitis are presented. Antileukotriene drugs are classified into two groups: CysLT receptor antagonists (zafirlukast, pranlukast, and montelukast) and LT synthesis inhibitors (5-lipoxygenase inhibitors such as zileuton, ZD2138, Bay X 1005, and MK-0591). CysLTs have important proinflammatory and profibrotic effects that contribute to the extensive hyperplastic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis (NP) that characterise these disorders. Patients who receive zafirlukast or zileuton tend to show objective improvements in, or at least stabilisation of, NP. Montelukast treatment may lead to clinical subjective improvement in NP. Montelukast treatment after sinus surgery can lead to a significant reduction in eosinophilic cationic protein levels in serum, with a beneficial effect on nasal and pulmonary symptoms and less impact in NP. Combined inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β-agonists treatments are most effective for preventing exacerbations among paediatric asthma patients. Treatments with medium- or high-dose inhaled corticosteroids, combined inhaled corticosteroids and LT receptor antagonists, and low-dose inhaled corticosteroids have been reported to be equally effective. Antileukotrienes have also been reported to be effective for allergic

  9. Corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Metro, S.J.

    1989-10-31

    A corrosion inhibitor for use in synthetic ester lubricating oils is disclosed. It comprises an effective amount of: at least one aromatic amide; and at least one hydroxy substituted aromatic compound. The corrosion inhibitor thus formed is particularly useful in synthetic ester turbo lubricating oils.

  10. Pharmacophore Modeling and Virtual Screening for Novel Acidic Inhibitors of Microsomal Prostaglandin E2 Synthase-1 (mPGES-1)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1) catalyzes prostaglandin E2 formation and is considered as a potential anti-inflammatory pharmacological target. To identify novel chemical scaffolds active on this enzyme, two pharmacophore models for acidic mPGES-1 inhibitors were developed and theoretically validated using information on mPGES-1 inhibitors from literature. The models were used to screen chemical databases supplied from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Specs. Out of 29 compounds selected for biological evaluation, nine chemically diverse compounds caused concentration-dependent inhibition of mPGES-1 activity in a cell-free assay with IC50 values between 0.4 and 7.9 μM, respectively. Further pharmacological characterization revealed that also 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) was inhibited by most of these active compounds in cell-free and cell-based assays with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. Together, nine novel chemical scaffolds inhibiting mPGES-1 are presented that may possess anti-inflammatory properties based on the interference with eicosanoid biosynthesis. PMID:21466167

  11. Isoorientin, a Selective Inhibitor of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) from the Tubers of Pueraria tuberosa.

    PubMed

    Sumalatha, Manne; Munikishore, Rachakunta; Rammohan, Aluru; Gunasekar, Duvvuru; Kumar, Kotha Anil; Reddy, Kakularam Kumar; Azad, Rajaram; Reddanna, Pallu; Bodo, Bernard

    2015-10-01

    Bioassay-guided fraction of the methanol extract of the roots of Pueraria tuberose DC yielded puerarin, an isoflavone C-glycoside (PT-1), isoorientin, a flavone C-glycoside (PT-2) and mangiferin, a xanthone C-glycoside (PT-3). The extracts and the isolated compounds were screened for potent anti-inflammatory components inhibiting the cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), the target enzymes of inflammation, by employing spectroscopic/polorographic methods. Among these, isoorientin was found to be a potent inhibitor of COX-2with an IC50 value of 39 μM. Docking studies were carried out to understand the interactions of isorientin (PT-2) with COX-2.The structures of the isolates were determined by mass spectrometry and 2D-NMR techniques including HSQC, HMBC, NOESY and 1H-1H COSY experiments. Although isoorientin and mangiferin have been reported from several plant sources, this is the first report of their isolation from a Pueraria species. PMID:26669106

  12. Virtual screening using the ligand ZINC database for novel lipoxygenase-3 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Monika; Kour, Janmeet; Singh, Kulwinder

    2013-01-01

    The leukotrienes constitute a group of arachidonic acid-derived compounds with biologic activities suggesting important roles in inflammation and immediate hypersensitivity. Epidermis-type lipoxygenase-3 (ALOXE3), a distinct subclass within the multigene family of mammalian lipoxygenases, is a novel isoenzyme involved in the metabolism of leukotrienes and plays a very important role in skin barrier functions. Lipoxygenase selective inhibitors such as azelastine and zileuton are currently used to reduce inflammatory response. Nausea, pharyngolaryngeal pain, headache, nasal burning and somnolence are the most frequently reported adverse effects of these drugs. Therefore, there is still a need to develop more potent lipoxygenase inhibitors. In this paper, we report the screening of various compounds from the ZINC database (contains over 21 million compounds) using the Molegro Virtual Docker software against the ALOXE3 protein. Screening was performed using molecular constraints tool to filter compounds with physico-chemical properties similar to the 1N8Q bound ligand protocatechuic acid. The analysis resulted in 4319 Lipinski compliant hits which are docked and scored to identify structurally novel ligands that make similar interactions to those of known ligands or may have different interactions with other parts of the binding site. Our screening approach identified four molecules ZINC84299674; ZINC76643455; ZINC84299122 & ZINC75626957 with MolDock score of -128.901, -120.22, -116.873 & - 102.116 kcal/mol, respectively. Their energy scores were better than the 1N8Q bound co-crystallized ligand protocatechuic acid (with MolDock score of -77.225 kcal/mol). All the ligands were docked within the binding pocket forming interactions with amino acid residues.

  13. Virtual screening using the ligand ZINC database for novel lipoxygenase-3 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Monika; Kour, Janmeet; Singh, Kulwinder

    2013-01-01

    The leukotrienes constitute a group of arachidonic acid-derived compounds with biologic activities suggesting important roles in inflammation and immediate hypersensitivity. Epidermis-type lipoxygenase-3 (ALOXE3), a distinct subclass within the multigene family of mammalian lipoxygenases, is a novel isoenzyme involved in the metabolism of leukotrienes and plays a very important role in skin barrier functions. Lipoxygenase selective inhibitors such as azelastine and zileuton are currently used to reduce inflammatory response. Nausea, pharyngolaryngeal pain, headache, nasal burning and somnolence are the most frequently reported adverse effects of these drugs. Therefore, there is still a need to develop more potent lipoxygenase inhibitors. In this paper, we report the screening of various compounds from the ZINC database (contains over 21 million compounds) using the Molegro Virtual Docker software against the ALOXE3 protein. Screening was performed using molecular constraints tool to filter compounds with physico-chemical properties similar to the 1N8Q bound ligand protocatechuic acid. The analysis resulted in 4319 Lipinski compliant hits which are docked and scored to identify structurally novel ligands that make similar interactions to those of known ligands or may have different interactions with other parts of the binding site. Our screening approach identified four molecules ZINC84299674; ZINC76643455; ZINC84299122 & ZINC75626957 with MolDock score of -128.901, -120.22, -116.873 & - 102.116 kcal/mol, respectively. Their energy scores were better than the 1N8Q bound co-crystallized ligand protocatechuic acid (with MolDock score of -77.225 kcal/mol). All the ligands were docked within the binding pocket forming interactions with amino acid residues. PMID:23888100

  14. Suppression of leukotriene B4 generation by ex-vivo neutrophils isolated from asthma patients on dietary supplementation with gammalinolenic acid-containing borage oil: possible implication in asthma.

    PubMed

    Ziboh, Vincent A; Naguwa, Stanley; Vang, Kao; Wineinger, Julie; Morrissey, Brian M; Watnik, Mitchell; Gershwin, M Eric

    2004-03-01

    Dietary gammalinolenic acid (GLA), a potent inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and suppressor of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), can attenuate the clinical course of rheumatoid arthritics, with negligible side effects. Since Zileuton, also an inhibitor of 5-LOX, attenuates asthma but with an undesirable side effect, we investigated whether dietary GLA would suppress biosynthesis of PMN-LTB4 isolated from asthma patients and attenuate asthma. Twenty-four mild-moderate asthma patients (16-75 years) were randomized to receive either 2.0 g daily GLA (borage oil) or corn oil (placebo) for 12 months. Blood drawn at 3 months intervals was used to prepare sera for fatty acid analysis, PMNs for determining phospholipid fatty acids and for LTB4 generation. Patients were monitored by daily asthma scores, pulmonary function, and exhaled NO. Ingestion of daily GLA (i) increased DGLA (GLA metabolite) in PMN-phospholipids; (ii) increased generation of PMN-15-HETrE (5-LOX metabolite of DGLA). Increased PMN-DGLA/15-HETrE paralleled the decreased PMN generation of proinflammatory LTB4. However, the suppression of PMN-LTB4 did not reveal statistically significant suppression of the asthma scores evaluated. Nonetheless, the study demonstrated dietary fatty acid modulation of endogenous inflammatory mediators without side effects and thus warrant further explorations into the roles of GLA at higher doses, leukotrienes and asthma. PMID:15154607

  15. Suppression of leukotriene B4 generation by ex-vivo neutrophils isolated from asthma patients on dietary supplementation with gammalinolenic acid-containing borage oil: possible implication in asthma.

    PubMed

    Ziboh, Vincent A; Naguwa, Stanley; Vang, Kao; Wineinger, Julie; Morrissey, Brian M; Watnik, Mitchell; Gershwin, M Eric

    2004-03-01

    Dietary gammalinolenic acid (GLA), a potent inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and suppressor of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), can attenuate the clinical course of rheumatoid arthritics, with negligible side effects. Since Zileuton, also an inhibitor of 5-LOX, attenuates asthma but with an undesirable side effect, we investigated whether dietary GLA would suppress biosynthesis of PMN-LTB4 isolated from asthma patients and attenuate asthma. Twenty-four mild-moderate asthma patients (16-75 years) were randomized to receive either 2.0 g daily GLA (borage oil) or corn oil (placebo) for 12 months. Blood drawn at 3 months intervals was used to prepare sera for fatty acid analysis, PMNs for determining phospholipid fatty acids and for LTB4 generation. Patients were monitored by daily asthma scores, pulmonary function, and exhaled NO. Ingestion of daily GLA (i) increased DGLA (GLA metabolite) in PMN-phospholipids; (ii) increased generation of PMN-15-HETrE (5-LOX metabolite of DGLA). Increased PMN-DGLA/15-HETrE paralleled the decreased PMN generation of proinflammatory LTB4. However, the suppression of PMN-LTB4 did not reveal statistically significant suppression of the asthma scores evaluated. Nonetheless, the study demonstrated dietary fatty acid modulation of endogenous inflammatory mediators without side effects and thus warrant further explorations into the roles of GLA at higher doses, leukotrienes and asthma.

  16. Benefit-risk assessment of antileukotrienes in the management of asthma.

    PubMed

    García-Marcos, Luis; Schuster, Antje; Pérez-Yarza, Eduardo G

    2003-01-01

    Antileukotrienes are a relatively new class of anti-asthma drugs that either block leukotriene synthesis (5-lipoxygenase inhibitors) like zileuton, or antagonise the most relevant of their receptors (the cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptor [CysLT1]) like montelukast, zafirlukast or pranlukast. Hence, their major effect is an anti-inflammatory one. With the exception of pranlukast, the other antileukotrienes have been studied and marketed in the US and Europe for long enough to establish that they are useful drugs in the management of asthma. Their effects, significantly better than placebo, seem more pronounced in subjective measurements (i.e. symptoms scores or quality-of-life tests) than in objective parameters (i.e. forced expiratory volume in 1 second or peak expiratory flow rate). Also, there is some evidence that these drugs work better in some subsets of patients with certain genetic polymorphisms - probably related to their leukotriene metabolism - or patients with certain asthma characteristics. There are a small number of comparative studies only, and with regard to long-term asthma control differences between the agents have not been evaluated. Nevertheless, their overall effect appears comparable with sodium cromoglycate (cromolyn sodium) or theophylline, but significantly less than low-dose inhaled corticosteroids. Antileukotrienes have been shown to have a degree of corticosteroid-sparing effect, but salmeterol appears to perform better as an add-on drug. Montelukast is probably the most useful antileukotriene for continuous treatment of exercise-induced asthma, performing as well as salmeterol without inducing any tolerance. All antileukotrienes are taken orally; their frequency of administration is quite different ranging from four times daily (zileuton) to once daily (montelukast). Antileukotrienes are well tolerated drugs, even though zileuton intake has been related to transitional liver enzyme elevations in some cases. Also Churg-Strauss syndrome

  17. Predictive Bioinformatic Assignment of Methyl-Bearing Stereocenters, Total Synthesis, and an Additional Molecular Target of Ajudazol B.

    PubMed

    Essig, Sebastian; Schmalzbauer, Björn; Bretzke, Sebastian; Scherer, Olga; Koeberle, Andreas; Werz, Oliver; Müller, Rolf; Menche, Dirk

    2016-02-19

    Full details on the evaluation and application of an easily feasible and generally useful method for configurational assignments of isolated methyl-bearing stereocenters are reported. The analytical tool relies on a bioinformatic gene cluster analysis and utilizes a predictive enoylreductase alignment, and its feasibility was demonstrated by the full stereochemical determination of the ajudazols, highly potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Furthermore, a full account of our strategies and tactics that culminated in the total synthesis of ajudazol B, the most potent and least abundant of these structurally unique class of myxobacterial natural products, is presented. Key features include an application of an asymmetric ortholithiation strategy for synthesis of the characteristic anti-configured hydroxyisochromanone core bearing three contiguous stereocenters, a modular oxazole formation, a flexible cross-metathesis approach for terminal allyl amide synthesis, and a late-stage Z,Z-selective Suzuki coupling. This total synthesis unambiguously proves the correct stereochemistry, which was further corroborated by comparison with reisolated natural material. Finally, 5-lipoxygenase was discovered as an additional molecular target of ajudazol B. Activities against this clinically validated key enzyme of the biosynthesis of proinflammatory leukotrienes were in the range of the approved drug zileuton, which further underlines the biological importance of this unique natural product.

  18. Predictive Bioinformatic Assignment of Methyl-Bearing Stereocenters, Total Synthesis, and an Additional Molecular Target of Ajudazol B.

    PubMed

    Essig, Sebastian; Schmalzbauer, Björn; Bretzke, Sebastian; Scherer, Olga; Koeberle, Andreas; Werz, Oliver; Müller, Rolf; Menche, Dirk

    2016-02-19

    Full details on the evaluation and application of an easily feasible and generally useful method for configurational assignments of isolated methyl-bearing stereocenters are reported. The analytical tool relies on a bioinformatic gene cluster analysis and utilizes a predictive enoylreductase alignment, and its feasibility was demonstrated by the full stereochemical determination of the ajudazols, highly potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Furthermore, a full account of our strategies and tactics that culminated in the total synthesis of ajudazol B, the most potent and least abundant of these structurally unique class of myxobacterial natural products, is presented. Key features include an application of an asymmetric ortholithiation strategy for synthesis of the characteristic anti-configured hydroxyisochromanone core bearing three contiguous stereocenters, a modular oxazole formation, a flexible cross-metathesis approach for terminal allyl amide synthesis, and a late-stage Z,Z-selective Suzuki coupling. This total synthesis unambiguously proves the correct stereochemistry, which was further corroborated by comparison with reisolated natural material. Finally, 5-lipoxygenase was discovered as an additional molecular target of ajudazol B. Activities against this clinically validated key enzyme of the biosynthesis of proinflammatory leukotrienes were in the range of the approved drug zileuton, which further underlines the biological importance of this unique natural product. PMID:26796481

  19. Management of severe acne.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, C C; Bettoli, V

    2015-07-01

    Acne is the most common skin disease, affecting up to 95% of adolescents. Severe episodes of acne can cause considerable physical and psychological scarring, and overexpression of transforming growth factor-β can lead to formation of hypertrophic scars and keloids. The severity of acne in adolescence is associated with a positive history of severe acne in first-degree relatives, especially the mother. In most cases acne is a chronic disease, and it is often a component of systemic diseases or syndromes. All forms of severe acne require systemic treatment. The available options include oral antibiotics, hormonal antiandrogens for female patients and oral isotretinoin, as well as other combination treatments. Oral isotretinoin is the only drug available that affects all four pathogenic factors of acne. However, due to possible serious side-effects, a European directive states that oral isotretinoin should be used only as a second-line therapy in cases of severe, nodular and conglobate acne. The pharmaceutical quality of generic isotretinoin products and the obtainability of isotretinoin through e-pharmacies without prescription raise new therapeutic problems. New anti-inflammatory compounds, such as the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton, may replace systemic antibiotics in the future, especially under the scope of antibiotic resistance prevention. This review looks into the various options and latest approaches, and factors to consider, when combating severe acne.

  20. HDAC Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Olzscha, Heidi; Bekheet, Mina E; Sheikh, Semira; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation in proteins is one of the most abundant posttranslational modifications in eukaryotic cells. The dynamic homeostasis of lysine acetylation and deacetylation is dictated by the action of histone acetyltransferases (HAT) and histone deacetylases (HDAC). Important substrates for HATs and HDACs are histones, where lysine acetylation generally leads to an open and transcriptionally active chromatin conformation. Histone deacetylation forces the compaction of the chromatin with subsequent inhibition of transcription and reduced gene expression. Unbalanced HAT and HDAC activity, and therefore aberrant histone acetylation, has been shown to be involved in tumorigenesis and progression of malignancy in different types of cancer. Therefore, the development of HDAC inhibitors (HDIs) as therapeutic agents against cancer is of great interest. However, treatment with HDIs can also affect the acetylation status of many other non-histone proteins which play a role in different pathways including angiogenesis, cell cycle progression, autophagy and apoptosis. These effects have led HDIs to become anticancer agents, which can initiate apoptosis in tumor cells. Hematological malignancies in particular are responsive to HDIs, and four HDIs have already been approved as anticancer agents. There is a strong interest in finding adequate biomarkers to predict the response to HDI treatment. This chapter provides information on how to assess HDAC activity in vitro and determine the potency of HDIs on different HDACs. It also gives information on how to analyze cellular markers following HDI treatment and to analyze tissue biopsies from HDI-treated patients. Finally, a protocol is provided on how to detect HDI sensitivity determinants in human cells, based on a pRetroSuper shRNA screen upon HDI treatment. PMID:27246222

  1. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  2. Synthesis and biological activity of arylspiroborate salts derived from caffeic Acid phenethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Martin J G; Flewelling, Andrew J; Clark, Trevor N; Levesque, Natalie A; Jean-François, Jacques; Surette, Marc E; Gray, Christopher A; Vogels, Christopher M; Touaibia, Mohamed; Westcott, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Two novel boron compounds containing caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) derivatives have been prepared and characterized fully. These new compounds and CAPE have been investigated for potential antioxidant and antimicrobial properties and their ability to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and whether chelation to boron improves their biological activity. Sodium salt 4 was generally more active than ammonium salt 5 in the biological assays and surpassed the radical scavenging ability of CAPE. Compounds 4 and 5 were more active than CAPE and Zileuton in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. These results clearly show the effectiveness of the synthesized salts as transporter of CAPE. PMID:25834744

  3. Synthesis and Biological Activity of Arylspiroborate Salts Derived from Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester

    PubMed Central

    Hébert, Martin J. G.; Flewelling, Andrew J.; Clark, Trevor N.; Jean-François, Jacques; Surette, Marc E.; Gray, Christopher A.; Vogels, Christopher M.; Touaibia, Mohamed; Westcott, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Two novel boron compounds containing caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) derivatives have been prepared and characterized fully. These new compounds and CAPE have been investigated for potential antioxidant and antimicrobial properties and their ability to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and whether chelation to boron improves their biological activity. Sodium salt 4 was generally more active than ammonium salt 5 in the biological assays and surpassed the radical scavenging ability of CAPE. Compounds 4 and 5 were more active than CAPE and Zileuton in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. These results clearly show the effectiveness of the synthesized salts as transporter of CAPE. PMID:25834744

  4. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  5. The selective 5-LOX inhibitor 11-keto-β-boswellic acid protects against myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury in rats: involvement of redox and inflammatory cascades.

    PubMed

    Elshazly, Shimaa M; Abd El Motteleb, Dalia M; Nassar, Noha N

    2013-09-01

    Myocardial ischemia induces 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) translocation and leukotriene production in the heart. Leukotrienes increase inflammatory responses aggravating, thereby, ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. This study aimed to investigate whether the selective 5-LOX inhibitor 11-keto-β-boswellic acid (11-keto BA), in three different dose levels, exert a protective effect on myocardial I/R injury in an in vivo rat heart model. Sixty male Wister rats were used in this study and divided into five equal groups (n=12): GP1, sham-operated receiving normal saline; Gp 2, rats were subjected to 45 min left anterior descending coronary artery ligation followed by 4 h reperfusion to serve as I/R group. Gps 3-5 received 11-keto BA in doses 250, 500, 1,000 mg/kg, respectively, via an oral gavage for 7 days then were exposed to I/R. I/R injury induced a significant elevation in myeloperoxidase activity and gene expression of intracellular adhesion molecules, cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipooxygenasae, nuclear factor kappa-beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, and hemeoxygenease-1 consequently with reduction in glutathione peroxidase in heart tissues. Furthermore, immunohistochemical examination of the heart tissues showed positive immuostaining for both 3-nitrotyrosine and caspase-3 with DNA-ladder formation in all diseased rats. 11-keto BA in three dose levels exerted dose dependent cardioprotective effect manifested by dose-dependent reduction in serum lactate dehydrogenase and infract size through mechanisms related to enhancement of antioxidant capacity and prevention of inflammatory cascades.

  6. Treatment heterogeneity in asthma: genetics of response to leukotriene modifiers.

    PubMed

    Lima, John J

    2007-01-01

    Despite advances in treatment, asthma continues to be a significant health and economic burden. Although asthma cannot be cured, several drugs, including beta2 agonists, corticosteroids, and leukotriene (LT) modifiers, are well tolerated and effective in minimizing symptoms, improving lung function, and preventing exacerbations. However, inter-patient variability in response to asthma drugs limits their effectiveness. It has been estimated that 60-80% of this inter-patient variability may be attributable to genetic variation. LT modifiers, in particular, have been associated with heterogeneity in response. These drugs exert their action by inhibiting the activity of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs), which are potent bronchoconstrictors and pro-inflammatory agents. Two classes of LT modifiers are 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) inhibitors (zileuton) and leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs) [montelukast, pranlukast, and zarfirlukast]. LT modifiers can be used as alternatives to low-dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in mild persistent asthma, as add-on therapy to low- to medium-dose ICS in moderate persistent asthma, and as add-on to high-dose ICS and a long-acting ss2 agonist in severe persistent asthma. At least six genes encode key proteins in the LT pathway: arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5), ALOX5 activating protein (ALOX5AP [FLAP]), leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H), LTC4 synthase (LTC4S), the ATP-binding cassette family member ABCC1 (multidrug resistance protein 1 [MRP1]), and cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CYSLTR1). Studies have reported that genetic variation in ALOX5, LTA4H, LTC4S, and ABCC1 influences response to LT modifiers. Plasma concentrations of LTRAs vary considerably among patients. Physio-chemical characteristics make it likely that membrane efflux and uptake transporters mediate the absorption of LTRAs into the systemic circulation following oral administration. Genes that encode efflux and uptake transport proteins harbor many variants that could

  7. The relevance of leukotrienes for bone resorption induced by mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Moura, A P; Taddei, S R A; Queiroz-Junior, C M; Madeira, M F M; Rodrigues, L F D; Garlet, G P; Souza, D G; Machado, F S; Andrade, I; Teixeira, M M; Silva, T A

    2014-12-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) metabolites are important pro-inflammatory lipid mediators. However, much still remains to be understood about the role of such mediators in bone remodeling. This study aimed to investigate the effect of 5-LO metabolites, LTB4 and CysLTs, in a model of mechanical loading-induced bone remodeling. Strain-induced tooth movement and consequently alveolar bone resorption/apposition was achieved by using a coil spring placed on molar and attached to incisors of C57BL6 (wild-type-WT), 5-LO deficient mice (5-LO(-/-)) and mice treated with 5-LO inhibitor (zileuton-ZN) or with antagonist of CysLTs receptor (montelukast-MT). The amount of bone resorption and the number of osteoclasts were determined morphometrically. The expression of inflammatory and bone remodeling markers in periodontium was analyzed by qPCR. Osteoclast differentiation and TNF-α production were evaluated in vitro using RAW 264.7 cells treated with LTB4 or LTD4. Bone resorption, TRAP(+) cells and expression of Tnfa, Il10 and Runx2 were significantly diminished in 5-LO(-/-), ZN- and MT-treated mice. The expression of Rank was also reduced in 5-LO(-/-) and MT-treated mice. Accordingly, LTB4 and LTD4 in association with RANKL promoted osteoclast differentiation and increased TNF-α release in vitro. These data demonstrate that the absence of 5-LO metabolites, LTB4 and CysLTs reduces osteoclast recruitment and differentiation, consequently diminishing bone resorption induced by mechanical loading. Thus, 5-LO might be a potential target for controlling bone resorption in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25270168

  8. Pathway modulators and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, John A

    2009-07-01

    Inhibitors of specific cellular pathways are useful for investigating the roles of proteins of unknown function, and for selectively inhibiting a protein in complex pathways to uncover its relationships to other proteins in this and other interacting pathways. This appendix provides links to Web sites that describe cellular processes and pathways along with the various classes of inhibitors, numerous references, downloadable diagrams, and technical tips.

  9. Update on TNF Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kerdel, Francisco A

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors dramatically improved the management of psoriasis. Some newer or investigational biologics with different mechanisms of action have demonstrated noninferiority or superiority to etanercept, the first self-injectable anti-TNF-α agent to become available in the United States. Nonetheless, TNF-α inhibitors are likely to remain a mainstay of therapy for many years.

  10. Synthetic inhibitors of elastase.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P D; Bernstein, P R

    1994-03-01

    For more than two decades investigators around the world, in both academic and industrial institutions, have been developing inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase. A number of very elegant and insightful strategies have been reported. In the case of reversible peptidic inhibitors, this has resulted in the identification of some extremely potent compounds with dissociation constants in the 10(-11) M range. This is quite an accomplishment considering that these low molecular-weight inhibitors are only tri- and tetrapeptides. In the case of the heterocyclic-based inhibitors, the challenge of balancing the heterocycle's inherent reactivity and aqueous stability with the stability of the enzyme-inhibitor adduct has been meet by either using a latent, reactive functionality which is only activated within the enzyme, or by incorporating features which selectively obstruct deacylation but have little effect on the enzyme acylation step. The underlying goal of this research has been the identification of agents to treat diseases associated with HNE. Several animal models have been developed for evaluating the in vivo activity of elastase inhibitors, and compounds have been shown to be effective in all of these models by the intravenous, intratrachael or oral routes of administration. However, only a very small percentage of compounds have possessed all the necessary properties, including lack of toxicity, for progression into the clinic. The peptidyl TFMK ICI 200,880 (25-12) has many of the desired characteristics of a drug to treat the diseases associated with HNE: chemical stability, in vitro and in vivo activity, a long duration of action, and adequate metabolic stability. Currently ICI 200,880 is the only low molecular-weight HNE inhibitor known to be undergoing clinical trials, and may be the compound which finally demonstrates the clinical utility of a synthetic HNE inhibitor. PMID:8189835

  11. Small-molecule caspase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenodarova, S. M.

    2010-02-01

    The review considers low-molecular weight inhibitors of caspases, cysteine proteases being key contributors to apoptosis (programmed cell death). The inhibitors with aspartic acid residues or various heterocyclic systems (both synthetic and natural) are covered. Their possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Data on inhibitor structure-activity relationship studies are systematically surveyed. The interactions of the non-peptide fragments of an inhibitor with the enzymes are examined. Examples of the use of some inhibitors for apoptosis suppression are provided.

  12. Natural inhibitors of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Huntington, James A

    2014-04-01

    The serine protease thrombin is the effector enzyme of blood coagulation. It has many activities critical for the formation of stable clots, including cleavage of fibrinogen to fibrin, activation of platelets and conversion of procofactors to active cofactors. Thrombin carries-out its multiple functions by utilising three special features: a deep active site cleft and two anion binding exosites (exosite I and II). Similarly, thrombin inhibitors have evolved to exploit the unique features of thrombin to achieve rapid and specific inactivation of thrombin. Exogenous thrombin inhibitors come from several different protein families and are generally found in the saliva of haematophagous animals (blood suckers) as part of an anticoagulant cocktail that allows them to feed. Crystal structures of several of these inhibitors reveal how peptides and proteins can be targeted to thrombin in different and interesting ways. Thrombin activity must also be regulated by endogenous inhibitors so that thrombi do not occlude blood flow and cause thrombosis. A single protein family, the serpins, provides all four of the endogenous thrombin inhibitors found in man. The crystal structures of these serpins bound to thrombin have been solved, revealing a similar exosite-dependence on complex formation. In addition to forming the recognition complex, serpins destroy the structure of thrombin, allowing them to be released from cofactors and substrates for clearance. This review examines how the special features of thrombin have been exploited by evolution to achieve inhibition of the ultimate coagulation protease.

  13. SGLT2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dardi, I; Kouvatsos, T; Jabbour, S A

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health issue and an economic burden, rising in epidemic proportions over the last few decades worldwide. Although several treatment options are available, only half of the global diabetic population achieves the recommended or individualized glycemic targets. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic agents with a novel insulin-independent action. SGLT2 is a transporter found in the proximal renal tubules, responsible for the reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibition of SGLT2 lowers the blood glucose level by promoting the urinary excretion of excess glucose. Due to their insulin-independent action, SGLT2 inhibitors can be used with any degree of beta-cell dysfunction or insulin resistance, related to a very low risk of hypoglycemia. In addition to improving glycemic control, SGLT2 inhibitors have been associated with a reduction in weight and blood pressure when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is usually well tolerated; however, they have been associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract and genital infections, although these infections are usually mild and easy to treat. SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new option in the armamentarium of drugs for patients with T2DM. PMID:26362302

  14. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P.; Ahmed, K. K. Mueen

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  15. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P; Ahmed, K K Mueen

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  16. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cockrill, Barbara A; Waxman, Aaron B

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling plays a key role in modulating vascular tone and remodeling in the pulmonary circulation. The guanylate cyclase/cyclic guanylate monophosphate-signaling pathway primarily mediates nitric oxide signaling. This pathway is critical in normal regulation of the pulmonary vasculature, and is an important target for therapy in patients with pulmonary hypertension. In the pulmonary vasculature, degradation of cGMP is primarily regulated by PDE-5, and inhibition of this enzyme has important effects on pulmonary vasculature smooth muscle tone. Large randomized placebo-controlled trials of PDE-5 inhibitors demonstrated improved exercise capacity, hemodynamics and quality of life in adult patients with PAH. This chapter will discuss the mechanisms of NO signaling in the vasculature, characteristics of the PDE5-inhibitors approved for treatment of PH, and review available data on the use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in PH. PMID:24092343

  17. MK591, a second generation leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor, prevents invasion and induces apoptosis in the bone-invading C4-2B human prostate cancer cells: implications for the treatment of castration-resistant, bone-metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sarveswaran, Sivalokanathan; Ghosh, Ritisha; Morisetty, Shravan; Ghosh, Jagadananda

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a major clinical challenge for which no cure is currently available primarily because of the lack of proper understanding about appropriate molecular target(s). Previously we observed that inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-Lox) activity induces apoptosis in some types of prostate cancer cells, suggesting an important role of 5-Lox in the viability of prostate cancer cells. However, nothing is known about the role of 5-Lox in the survival of castration-resistant, metastatic prostate cancer cells. Thus, we tested the effects of MK591, a second-generation, specific inhibitor of 5-Lox activity, on the viability and metastatic characteristics of CRPC cells. We observed that MK591 effectively kills the bone-invading C4-2B human prostate cancer cells (which bear characteristics of CRPC), but does not affect normal, non-cancer fibroblasts (which do not express 5-Lox) in the same experimental conditions. We also observed that MK591 dramatically inhibits the in vitro invasion and soft-agar colony formation of C4-2B cells. Interestingly, we found that treatment with MK591 dramatically down-regulates the expression of c-Myc and its targets at sub-lethal doses. In light of frequent over-activation of c-Myc in a spectrum of aggressive cancers (including CRPC), and the challenges associated with inhibition of c-Myc (because of its non-enzymatic nature), our novel findings of selective killing, and blockade of invasive and soft-agar colony-forming abilities of the castration-resistant, bone-metastatic C4-2B prostate cancer cells by MK591, open up a new avenue to attack CRPC cells for better management of advanced prostate cancer while sparing normal, non-cancer body cells.

  18. Pectin methylesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Giovane, A; Servillo, L; Balestrieri, C; Raiola, A; D'Avino, R; Tamburrini, M; Ciardiello, M A; Camardella, L

    2004-02-12

    Pectin methylesterase (PME) is the first enzyme acting on pectin, a major component of plant cell wall. PME action produces pectin with different structural and functional properties, having an important role in plant physiology. Regulation of plant PME activity is obtained by the differential expression of several isoforms in different tissues and developmental stages and by subtle modifications of cell wall local pH. Inhibitory activities from various plant sources have also been reported. A proteinaceous inhibitor of PME (PMEI) has been purified from kiwi fruit. The kiwi PMEI is active against plant PMEs, forming a 1:1 non-covalent complex. The polypeptide chain comprises 152 amino acid residues and contains five Cys residues, four of which are connected by disulfide bridges, first to second and third to fourth. The sequence shows significant similarity with the N-terminal pro-peptides of plant PME, and with plant invertase inhibitors. In particular, the four Cys residues involved in disulfide bridges are conserved. On the basis of amino acid sequence similarity and Cys residues conservation, a large protein family including PMEI, invertase inhibitors and related proteins of unknown function has been identified. The presence of at least two sequences in the Arabidopsis genome having high similarity with kiwi PMEI suggests the ubiquitous presence of this inhibitor. PMEI has an interest in food industry as inhibitor of endogenous PME, responsible for phase separation and cloud loss in fruit juice manufacturing. Affinity chromatography on resin-bound PMEI can also be used to concentrate and detect residual PME activity in fruit and vegetable products.

  19. Flavocoxid, a dual inhibitor of COX-2 and 5-LOX of natural origin, attenuates the inflammatory response and protects mice from sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) is an inflammatory condition that leads to multisystemic organ failure. Flavocoxid, a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), has been shown in vitro to possess antiinflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated rat macrophages by reducing nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity and COX-2, 5-LOX and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of flavocoxid in a murine model of CLP-induced polymicrobial sepsis. Methods C57BL/6J mice were subjected to CLP or sham operation. In a first set of experiments, an intraperitoneal injection of flavocoxid (20 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered 1 hour after surgery and repeated every 12 hours. Survival rate was monitored every 24 hours throughout 120 hours. Furthermore, additional groups of sham and CLP mice were killed 18 hours after surgical procedures for blood-sample collection and the lung and liver were collected for biomolecular, biochemical and histopathologic studies. Results COX-2, 5-LOX, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, extracellular-regulated-kinase 1/2 (ERK), JunN-terminal kinase (JNK), NF-κB, and β-arrestin 2 protein expression were evaluated in lung and liver with Western blot analysis. In addition, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), cytokines, and lipoxin A4 serum content were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Flavocoxid administration improved survival, reduced the expression of NF-κB, COX-2, 5-LOX, TNF-α and IL-6 and increased IL-10 production. Moreover, flavocoxid inhibited the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway, preserved β-arrestin 2 expression, reduced blood LTB4, PGE2, TNF-α and IL-6, and increased IL-10 and lipoxin A4 serum levels. The treatment with flavocoxid also protected against the histologic damage induced by CLP and reduced the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the lung

  20. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  1. [JAK2 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Hernández Boluda, Juan Carlos; Gómez, Montse; Pérez, Ariadna

    2016-07-15

    Pharmacological inhibition of the kinase activity of JAK proteins can interfere with the signaling of immunomodulatory cytokines and block the constitutive activation of the JAK-STAT pathway that characterizes certain malignancies, including chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. JAK inhibitors may, therefore, be useful to treat malignancies as well as inflammatory or immune disorders. Currently, the most significant advances have been made in the treatment of myelofibrosis, where these drugs may lead to a remarkable improvement in the control of hyperproliferative manifestations. However, available data suggest that this treatment is not curative of myelofibrosis. In general, JAK2 inhibition induces cytopaenias, with this being considered a class side-effect. By contrast, the extrahaematologic toxicity profile varies significantly among the different JAK inhibitors. At present, there are several clinical trials evaluating the combination of ruxolitinib with other drugs, in order to improve its therapeutic activity as well as reducing haematologic toxicity. PMID:27033437

  2. Coagulation inhibitors in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Esmon, C T

    2005-04-01

    Coagulation is triggered by inflammatory mediators in a number of ways. However, to prevent unwanted clot formation, several natural anticoagulant mechanisms exist, such as the antithrombin-heparin mechanism, the tissue factor pathway inhibitor mechanism and the protein C anticoagulant pathway. This review examines the ways in which these pathways are down-regulated by inflammation, thus limiting clot formation and decreasing the natural anti-inflammatory mechanisms that these pathways possess. PMID:15787615

  3. Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Groutas, William C.; Dou, Dengfeng; Alliston, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitutes a worldwide health problem. There is currently an urgent and unmet need for the development of small molecule therapeutics capable of blocking and/or reversing the progression of the disorder. Recent studies have greatly illuminated our understanding of the multiple pathogenic processes associated with COPD. Of paramount importance is the key role played by proteases, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Insights gained from these studies have made possible the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. Areas covered An overview of major developments in COPD research with emphasis on low molecular weight neutrophil elastase inhibitors is described in this review. Expert opinion Great strides have been made toward our understanding of the biochemical and cellular events associated with COPD. However, our knowledge regarding the inter-relationships among the multiple pathogenic mechanisms and their mediators involved is till limited. The problem is further compounded by the unavailability of suitable validated biomarkers for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. The complexity of COPD suggests that effective therapeutic interventions may require the administration of more than one agent such as, for instance, an HNE or MMP-12 inhibitor with an anti-inflammatory agent such as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, or a dual function agent capable of disrupting the cycle of proteolysis, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress PMID:21235378

  4. Protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Salaski, Edward J

    2002-05-01

    Specific mutations in the ras gene impair the guanosine triphophatase (GTPase) activity of Ras proteins, which play a fundamental role in the signaling cascade, leading to uninterrupted growth signals and to the transformation of normal cells into malignant phenotypes. It has been shown that normal cells transfected with mutant ras gene become cancerous and that unfarnesylated, cytosolic mutant Ras protein does not anchor onto cell membranes and cannot induce this transformation. Posttranslational modification and plasma membrane association of mutant Ras is necessary for this transforming activity. Since its identification, the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) that catalyzes the first and essential step of the three Ras-processing steps has emerged as the most promising target for therapeutic intervention. FTase has been implicated as a potential target in inhibiting the prenylation of a variety of proteins, thus in controlling varied disease states (e.g. cancer, neurofibromatosis, restenosis, viral hepatitis, bone resorption, parasitic infections, corneal inflammations, and diabetes) associated with prenyl modifications of Ras and other proteins. Furthermore, it has been suggested that FTase inhibitors indirectly help in inhibiting tumors via suppression of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. Major milestones have been achieved with small-molecule FTase inhibitors that show efficacy without toxicity in vitro, as well as in mouse models bearing ras-dependent tumors. With the determination of the crystal structure of mammalian FTase, existent leads have been fine-tuned and new potent molecules of diverse structural classes have been designed. A few of these molecules are currently in the clinic, with at least three drug candidates in Phase II studies and one in Phase III. This article will review the progress that has been reported with FTase inhibitors in drug discovery and in the clinic. PMID:12733981

  5. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  6. High performance oilfield scale inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Duccini, Y.; Dufour, A.; Hann, W.M.; Sanders, T.W.; Weinstein, B.

    1997-08-01

    Sea water often reacts with the formation water in offshore fields to produce barium, calcium and strontium sulfate deposits that hinder oil production. Newer fields often have more difficult to control scale problems than older ones, and current technology scale inhibitors are not able to control the deposits as well as needed. In addition, ever more stringent regulations designed to minimize the impact of inhibitors on the environment are being enacted. Three new inhibitors are presented that overcome many of the problems of older technology scale inhibitors.

  7. Osteocompatibility of Biofilm Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  8. Osteocompatibility of biofilm inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  9. Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-abatement uses a fungus to metabolize and remove fermentation inhibitors. To determine whether bio-abatement could alleviate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in biomass liquors after pretreatment, corn stover at 10% (w/v) solids was pretreated with either dilute acid or liquid hot water. The ...

  10. Anthranilamide inhibitors of factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Mendel, David; Marquart, Angela L; Joseph, Sajan; Waid, Philip; Yee, Ying K; Tebbe, Anne Louise; Ratz, Andrew M; Herron, David K; Goodson, Theodore; Masters, John J; Franciskovich, Jeffry B; Tinsley, Jennifer M; Wiley, Michael R; Weir, Leonard C; Kyle, Jeffrey A; Klimkowski, Valentine J; Smith, Gerald F; Towner, Richard D; Froelich, Larry L; Buben, John; Craft, Trelia J

    2007-09-01

    SAR about the B-ring of a series of N(2)-aroyl anthranilamide factor Xa (fXa) inhibitors is described. B-ring o-aminoalkylether and B-ring p-amine probes of the S1' and S4 sites, respectively, afforded picomolar fXa inhibitors that performed well in in vitro anticoagulation assays.

  11. Proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C

    2004-02-12

    Proteins that inhibit alpha-amylases have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. These inhibitors can have natural roles in the control of endogenous alpha-amylase activity or in defence against pathogens and pests; certain inhibitors are reported to be antinutritional factors. The alpha-amylase inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha-amylases in complex with inhibitors from five families. These structures indicate major diversity but also some similarity in the structural basis of alpha-amylase inhibition. Mutational analysis of the mechanism of inhibition was performed in a few cases and various protein engineering and biotechnological approaches have been outlined for exploitation of the inhibitory function. PMID:14871655

  12. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  13. Oxidized mucus proteinase inhibitor: a fairly potent neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    1994-01-01

    N-chlorosuccinimide oxidizes one of the methionine residues of mucus proteinase inhibitor with a second-order rate constant of 1.5 M-1.s-1. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and NH2-terminal sequencing show that the modified residue is methionine-73, the P'1 component of the inhibitor's active centre. Oxidation of the inhibitor decreases its neutrophil elastase inhibitory capacity but does not fully abolish it. The kinetic parameters describing the elastase-oxidized inhibitor interaction are: association rate constant kass. = 2.6 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, dissociation rate constant kdiss. = 2.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and equilibrium dissociation constant Ki = 1.1 x 10(-8) M. Comparison with the native inhibitor indicates that oxidation decreases kass. by a factor of 18.8 and increases kdiss. by a factor of 6.4, and therefore leads to a 120-fold increase in Ki. Yet, the oxidized inhibitor may still act as a potent elastase inhibitor in the upper respiratory tract where its concentration is 500-fold higher than Ki, i.e. where the elastase inhibition is pseudo-irreversible. Experiments in vitro with fibrous human lung elastin, the most important natural substrate of elastase, support this view: 1.35 microM elastase is fully inhibited by 5-6 microM oxidized inhibitor whether the enzyme-inhibitor complex is formed in the presence or absence of elastin and whether elastase is pre-adsorbed on elastin or not. PMID:7945266

  14. Flavivirus Entry Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Yin; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2015-09-11

    Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens that are transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks. Although effective vaccines are available for yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitic virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus, these and other flaviviruses still cause thousands of human deaths and millions of illnesses each year. No clinically approved antiviral therapy is available for flavivirus treatment. To meet this unmet medical need, industry and academia have taken multiple approaches to develop antiflavivirus therapy, among which targeting viral entry has been actively pursued in the past decade. Here we review the current knowledge of flavivirus entry and its use for small molecule drug discovery. Inhibitors of two major steps of flaviviral entry have been reported: (i) molecules that block virus-receptor interaction; (ii) compounds that prevent conformational change of viral envelope protein during virus-host membrane fusion. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of targeting viral entry for treatment of flavivirus infection as compared to targeting viral replication proteins. PMID:27617926

  15. Small molecules inhibitors of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 - an overview.

    PubMed

    Rouch, Anne; Vanucci-Bacqué, Corinne; Bedos-Belval, Florence; Baltas, Michel

    2015-03-01

    PAI-1, a glycoprotein from the serpin family and the main inhibitor of tPA and uPA, plays an essential role in the regulation of intra and extravascular fibrinolysis by inhibiting the formation of plasmin from plasminogen. PAI-1 is also involved in pathological processes such as thromboembolic diseases, atherosclerosis, fibrosis and cancer. The inhibition of PAI-1 activity by small organic molecules has been observed in vitro and with some in vivo models. Based on these findings, PAI-1 appears as a potential therapeutic target for several pathological conditions. Over the past decades, many efforts have therefore been devoted to developing PAI-1 inhibitors. This article provides an overview of the publishing activity on small organic molecules used as PAI-1 inhibitors. The chemical synthesis of the most potent inhibitors as well as their biological and biochemical evaluations is also presented.

  16. Synthetic conversion of ACAT inhibitor to acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Otoguro, K; Tomoda, H; Harigaya, Y; Omura, S

    2000-06-19

    Natural product acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor pyripyropene A was synthetically converted to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor via heterolitic cleavage of the 2-pyrone ring, followed by gamma-acylation/cyclization with several aroyl chlorides. The 4-pyridyl analogue selectively showed AChE inhibitory activity (IC50 7.9 microM) and no ACAT inhibitory activity IC50 = >1000 microM. PMID:10890154

  17. Glycosylasparaginase inhibition studies: competitive inhibitors, transition state mimics, noncompetitive inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Risley, J M; Huang, D H; Kaylor, J J; Malik, J J; Xia, Y Q

    2001-01-01

    Glycosylasparaginase catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosylic bond between asparagine and N-acetylglucosamine in the catabolism of N-linked glycoproteins. Previously only three competitive inhibitors, one noncompetitive inhibitor, and one irreversible inhibitor of glycosylasparaginase activity had been reported. Using human glycosylasparaginase from human amniotic fluid, L-aspartic acid and four of its analogues, where the alpha-amino group was substituted with a chloro, bromo, methyl or hydrogen, were competitive inhibitors having Ki values between 0.6-7.7 mM. These results provide supporting evidence for a proposed intramolecular autoproteolytic activation reaction. A proposed phosphono transition state mimic and a sulfo transition state mimic were competitive inhibitors with Ki values 0.9 mM and 1.4 mM, respectively. These results support a mechanism for the enzyme-catalyzed reaction involving formation of a tetrahedral high-energy intermediate. Three analogues of the natural substrate were noncompetitive inhibitors with Ki values between 0.56-0.75 mM, indicating the presence of a second binding site that may recognize (substituted)acetamido groups.

  18. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  19. Synthesis of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chunngai; Ye, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery. PMID:26258118

  20. [Pharmacology of bone resorption inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Menuki, Kunitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    Currently, bone resorption inhibitor is mainly used for osteoporosis. A number of these agents have been developed. These pharmacological action are various. Bisphosphonate inhibit functions of the osteoclasts by inducing apoptosis. On the one hand, RANK-ligand inhibitor and selective estrogen receptor modulator inhibit formation of osteoclasts. It is important to understand these pharmacological action for the selection of the appropriate medicine. PMID:26529923

  1. Peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Randolph, John T; DeGoey, David A

    2004-01-01

    There are currently (July, 2002) six protease inhibitors approved for the treatment of HIV infection, each of which can be classified as peptidomimetic in structure. These agents, when used in combination with other antiretroviral agents, produce a sustained decrease in viral load, often to levels below the limits of quantifiable detection, and a significant reconstitution of the immune system. Therapeutic regimens containing one or more HIV protease inhibitors thus provide a highly effective method for disease management. The important role of protease inhibitors in HIV therapy, combined with numerous challenges remaining in HIV treatment, have resulted in a continued effort both to optimize regimens using the existing agents and to identify new protease inhibitors that may provide unique properties. This review will provide an overview of the discovery and clinical trials of the currently approved HIV protease inhibitors, followed by an examination of important aspects of therapy, such as pharmacokinetic enhancement, resistance and side effects. A description of new peptidomimetic compounds currently being investigated in the clinic and in preclinical discovery will follow. PMID:15193140

  2. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  3. Evolutionary families of peptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D; Tolle, Dominic P; Barrett, Alan J

    2004-01-01

    The proteins that inhibit peptidases are of great importance in medicine and biotechnology, but there has never been a comprehensive system of classification for them. Some of the terminology currently in use is potentially confusing. In the hope of facilitating the exchange, storage and retrieval of information about this important group of proteins, we now describe a system wherein the inhibitor units of the peptidase inhibitors are assigned to 48 families on the basis of similarities detectable at the level of amino acid sequence. Then, on the basis of three-dimensional structures, 31 of the families are assigned to 26 clans. A simple system of nomenclature is introduced for reference to each clan, family and inhibitor. We briefly discuss the specificities and mechanisms of the interactions of the inhibitors in the various families with their target enzymes. The system of families and clans of inhibitors described has been implemented in the MEROPS peptidase database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), and this will provide a mechanism for updating it as new information becomes available. PMID:14705960

  4. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted.

  5. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  6. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  7. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  8. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  9. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%.

  10. An environmentally friendly scale inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, J.B.; Brown, J.M.

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes a method of inhibiting the formation of scales such as barium and strontium sulfate in low pH aqueous systems, and calcium carbonate in systems containing high concentrations of dissolved iron. The solution, chemically, involves treating the aqueous system with an inhibitor designed to replace organic-phosphonates. Typical low pH aqueous systems where the inhibitor is particularly useful are oilfield produced-water, resin bed water softeners that form scale during low pH, acid regeneration operations. Downhole applications are recommended where high concentrations of dissolved iron are present in the produced water. This new approach to inhibition replaces typical organic phosphonates and polymers with a non-toxic, biodegradable scale inhibitor that performs in harsh environments.

  11. Diverse inhibitors of aflatoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Robert A; Boston, Rebecca S; Payne, Gary A

    2008-03-01

    Pre-harvest and post-harvest contamination of maize, peanuts, cotton, and tree nuts by members of the genus Aspergillus and subsequent contamination with the mycotoxin aflatoxin pose a widespread food safety problem for which effective and inexpensive control strategies are lacking. Since the discovery of aflatoxin as a potently carcinogenic food contaminant, extensive research has been focused on identifying compounds that inhibit its biosynthesis. Numerous diverse compounds and extracts containing activity inhibitory to aflatoxin biosynthesis have been reported. Only recently, however, have tools been available to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which these inhibitors affect aflatoxin biosynthesis. Many inhibitors are plant-derived and a few may be amenable to pathway engineering for tissue-specific expression in susceptible host plants as a defense against aflatoxin contamination. Other compounds show promise as protectants during crop storage. Finally, inhibitors with different modes of action could be used in comparative transcriptional and metabolomic profiling experiments to identify regulatory networks controlling aflatoxin biosynthesis.

  12. Nonnucleoside inhibitors of adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2004-01-01

    Adenosine (ADO) is an endogenous inhibitory neuromodulator that increases nociceptive thresholds in response to tissue trauma and inflammation. Adenosine kinase (AK) is a key intracellular enzyme regulating intra- and extracellular concentrations of ADO. AK inhibition selectively amplifies extracellular ADO levels at cell and tissue sites where accelerated release of ADO occurs. AK inhibitors have been shown to provide effective antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and anticonvulsant activity in animal models, thus suggesting their potential therapeutic utility for pain, inflammation, epilepsy and possibly other central and peripheral nervous system diseases associated with cellular trauma and inflammation. This beneficial outcome may potentially lack nonspecific effects associated with the systemic administration of ADO receptor agonists. Until recently all of the reported AK inhibitors contained adenosine-like structural motif. The present review will discuss design, synthesis and analgesic and antiinflammatory properties of the novel nonnucleoside AK inhibitors that do not have close structural resemblance with the natural substrate ADO. Two classes of the nonnucleoside AK inhibitors are built on pyridopyrimidine and alkynylpyrimidine cores.

  13. C1-inhibitor and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, Michael

    2002-09-01

    Excessive activation of the protein cascade systems has been associated with post-transplantation inflammatory disorders. There is increasing evidence that complement not only significantly contributes to ischemia/reperfusion injury upon cold storage of the organ but also, although to a different degree, to allograft rejection. Complement activation is most fulminant in hyperacute rejection but seems also to contribute to acute transplant rejection. Therapeutic substitution of appropriate regulators, therefore, appears to be a reasonable approach to reduce undesirable inflammatory reactions in the grafted organ. C1-inhibitor, a multifunctional regulator of the various kinin-generating cascade systems (for review see: E. Hack, chapter in this issue), is frequently reduced in patients suffering from severe inflammatory disorders. Studies applying pathophysiologically relevant animal models of allo- and xenotransplantation as well as promising first clinical results from successful allotransplantation now provide evidence that C1-inhibitor may also serve as an effective means to protect the grafted organ against inflammatory tissue injury. In xenotransplantation, complement inhibition by specific regulators such as C1-inhibitor may help to overcome hyperacute graft rejection. After a brief introduction on the significance of complement to allo- and xenotransplantation the following review will focus on the impact of C1-inhibitor treatment on transplantation-associated inflammatory disorders, where complement contributes to the pathogenesis.

  14. Bivalent Inhibitors of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gower, Carrie M.; Chang, Matthew E. K.; Maly, Dustin J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases are key players in a large number of cellular signaling pathways. Dysregulated kinase activity has been implicated in a number of diseases, and members of this enzyme family are of therapeutic interest. However, due to the fact that most inhibitors interact with the highly conserved ATP-binding sites of kinases, it is a significant challenge to develop pharmacological agents that target only one of the greater than 500 kinases present in humans. A potential solution to this problem is the development of bisubstrate and bivalent kinase inhibitors, in which an active site-directed moiety is tethered to another ligand that targets a location outside of the ATP-binding cleft. Because kinase signaling specificity is modulated by regions outside of the ATP-binding site, strategies that exploit these interactions have the potential to provide reagents with high target selectivity. This review highlights examples of kinase interaction sites that can potentially be exploited by bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors. Furthermore, an overview of efforts to target these interactions with bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors is provided. Finally, several examples of the successful application of these reagents in a cellular setting are described. PMID:24564382

  15. PDE-5 inhibitors: clinical points.

    PubMed

    Doumas, Michael; Lazaridis, Antonios; Katsiki, Niki; Athyros, Vasilios

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is usually of vascular origin and is frequently encountered in men with cardiovascular disease. The introduction of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors has revolutionized the management of patients with erectile dysfunction. Currently available phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors have distinct pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, thus permitting for tailoring sexual therapy according to patient characteristics and needs. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors possess vasorelaxing properties and exert systemic hemodynamic effects, which need to be taken into account when other cardiovascular drugs are co-administered. Special caution is needed with alpha-blockers, while the co-administration with nitrates is contra-indicated due to the risk of life-threatening hypotension. This review presents the advent of sexual therapy, describes the mechanism of action and the specific characteristics of commercially available phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, summarizes the efficacy and safety of these drugs with special emphasis on the cardiovascular system, and discusses the clinical criteria used for the selection of each drug for the individual patient. PMID:25392015

  16. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Čolović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are applied as relevant drugs and toxins. This review presents an overview of toxicology and pharmacology of reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inactivating compounds. In the case of reversible inhibitors being commonly applied in neurodegenerative disorders treatment, special attention is paid to currently approved drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease, and toxic carbamates used as pesticides. Subsequently, mechanism of irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by organophosphorus compounds (insecticides and nerve agents), and their specific and nonspecific toxic effects are described, as well as irreversible inhibitors having pharmacological implementation. In addition, the pharmacological treatment of intoxication caused by organophosphates is presented, with emphasis on oxime reactivators of the inhibited enzyme activity administering as causal drugs after the poisoning. Besides, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides can be detoxified in mammals through enzymatic hydrolysis before they reach targets in the nervous system. Carboxylesterases most effectively decompose carbamates, whereas the most successful route of organophosphates detoxification is their degradation by corresponding phosphotriesterases. PMID:24179466

  17. Biocatalysts with enhanced inhibitor tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Shihui; Linger, Jeffrey; Franden, Mary Ann; Pienkos, Philip T.; Zhang, Min

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed herein are biocatalysts for the production of biofuels, including microorganisms that contain genetic modifications conferring tolerance to growth and fermentation inhibitors found in many cellulosic feedstocks. Methods of converting cellulose-containing materials to fuels and chemicals, as well as methods of fermenting sugars to fuels and chemicals, using these biocatalysts are also disclosed.

  18. Fuscoside: an anti-inflammatory marine natural product which selectively inhibits 5-lipoxygenase. Part I: Physiological and biochemical studies in murine inflammatory models.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, P B; Jacobs, R S

    1992-08-01

    The biological and biochemical pharmacology of fuscoside, a novel anti-inflammatory marine natural product isolated from the Caribbean gorgonian Eunicea fusca, has recently been characterized using murine (part I) and human (part II) models of inflammation. Topically applied fuscoside (FSD) effectively inhibits phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced edema in mouse ears at levels comparable with indomethacin over a 3.3-hr exposure period, and is significantly more efficacious than indomethacin over 24 hr in the PMA model. Histological preparations and quantification of the neutrophil-specific marker, myeloperoxidase, demonstrate that FSD inhibits neutrophil infiltration into PMA-induced regions of edema and inflammation. In systemic studies, where FSD is injected i.p. before the topical application of PMA, negligible effects on ear inflammation are observed. FSD does not inhibit bee venom or human synovial fluid phospholipase A2 up to concentrations of 500 microM. In calcium ionophore-activated cultures of mouse peritoneal macrophages, FSD selectively and irreversibly inhibits leukotriene C4 biosynthesis (IC50 = 8 microM), yet has negligible effects on prostaglandin E2 production. FSD is also without effect on the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandin E2 by ram seminal vesicle cyclooxygenase. Chromatographic and spectroscopic studies suggest that FSD is not metabolized, and that drug uptake/binding by macrophages is time dependent, saturable and independent of active transport mechanisms. These studies represent the first report of an anti-inflammatory marine natural product that selectively inhibits leukotriene biosynthesis.

  19. Inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway with piriprost (U-60,257) protects normal primates from ozone-induced methacholine hyperresponsive small airways

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.G.; Stout, B.K.; Ruppel, P.L.

    1988-03-01

    Weekly exposure to ozone in seven normal Rhesus monkeys led to induction of methacholine hypersensitive airways (RL increases 242 +/- 60% and Cdyn decreases 68 +/- 13% of baseline methacholine responses). It took 19 weeks to establish this hyperresponse that persisted for greater than 15 weeks once ozone was stopped. A second exposure led to similar response peaks in 6 weeks. At the peak of the second response, weekly 1% piriprost exposure before ozone led to a return to baseline that was not different between placebo and piriprost treated animals (9.4 +/- 1.0 and 4.3 +/- 2.9 weeks, placebo and treated, respectively P = 0.09 NS). A statistical difference in the mecholyl response in placebo and piriprost treated groups while on ozone was shown only in the Cdyn measurement (Cdyn% change 68 +/- 13 vs 24 +/- 14, placebo and piriprost, respectively P = 0.03). Off ozone (or return to baseline), a statistical difference could be detected both in RL and Cdyn (RL% changed 151 +/- 41 vs 31.1 +/- 49, P = 0.03, and for Cdyn 62.7 +/- 8 vs 9 +/- 10, P = 0.0006, placebo and piriprost, respectively). We conclude tha the primate provides a chronic model of airways reactivity in which the role of lipoxygenase is implicated because of the beneficial role of piriprost, and further that the ozone lesion is primarily in the smaller airways (possibly and alveolitis).

  20. Increased PUFA Content and 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway Expression Are Associated with Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Obese Women with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Heemskerk, Mattijs M.; Giera, Martin; el Bouazzaoui, Fatiha; Lips, Mirjam A.; Pijl, Hanno; Willems van Dijk, Ko; van Harmelen, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Obese women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have more inflammation in their subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT) than age-and-BMI similar obese women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). We aimed to investigate whether WAT fatty acids and/or oxylipins are associated with the enhanced inflammatory state in WAT of the T2DM women. Fatty acid profiles were measured in both subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue (vWAT) of 19 obese women with NGT and 16 age-and-BMI similar women with T2DM. Oxylipin levels were measured in sWAT of all women. Arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) percentages were higher in sWAT, but not vWAT of the T2DM women, and AA correlated positively to the gene expression of macrophage marker CD68. We found tendencies for higher oxylipin concentrations of the 5-LOX leukotrienes in sWAT of T2DM women. Gene expression of the 5-LOX leukotriene biosynthesis pathway was significantly higher in sWAT of T2DM women. In conclusion, AA and DHA content were higher in sWAT of T2DM women and AA correlated to the increased inflammatory state in sWAT. Increased AA content was accompanied by an upregulation of the 5-LOX pathway and seems to have led to an increase in the conversion of AA into proinflammatory leukotrienes in sWAT. PMID:26378572

  1. Proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors are the one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism has been reported with different proton pump inhibitors with prolonged oral use. We report the first reported case of possible such effect with intravenous preparation of proton pump inhibitor. This case report raises awareness among physicians worldwide of this often unknown association, as life-threatening cardiac and neuromuscular complications can arise with unrecognized hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia with proton pump inhibitors.

  2. KID, a Kinase Inhibitor Database project.

    PubMed

    Collin, O; Meijer, L

    1999-01-01

    The Kinase Inhibitor Database is a small specialized database dedicated to the gathering of information on protein kinase inhibitors. The database is accessible through the World Wide Web system and gives access to structural and bibliographic information on protein kinase inhibitors. The data in the database will be collected and submitted by researchers working in the kinase inhibitor field. The submitted data will be checked by the curator of the database before entry.

  3. [ROLE OF THROMBOXANE AND LEUKOTRIENES IN MECHANISMS OF CONTRACTILE REACTIONS OF PORTAL VEIN, INDUCED BY ACETYLCHLINE AND PHENYLEPHRINE].

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, O O; Yanchuk, P I; Pasichnichenko, O M

    2015-01-01

    Effects of picotamide and zileuton on tonic contractile activity of the rat portal vein preparations, induced by acetylcholine (2.10(-5) mol/1) and phenylephrine (5.10(-7) mol/1) were investigated. Conversion of arachidonic acid products (prostaglandins, leukotrienes) synthesized by endothelial cells, plays an important role in the local regulation of vascular tone. The compounds formed in a cascade of enzymatic transformations can modulate the effect of other vasoactive factors. Picotamide (6,5.10(-5) mol/1) - thromboxane receptor and thromboxane -synthase blocker - depress acetylcholine-induction tonic contraction of isolated segments of portal vein with intact endothelium by 29% and norepinephrine-induction reduction of 45% relative to the control values. The obtained results indicate a participation of thromboxane and/or endoperoxide H2 in this reaction. Partial inhibition of the contractions by 5-lipoxygenase blocker zileuton(4,2.10(-5) mol/1) at 23% relative to control values suggests, that products of lipoxigenase pathways of arachidonic acid conversion are involved in mechanisms of specified reactions. These data indicate complex mechanisms of regulation of vascular tone of the portal vein, which play an important role eicosanoids. Further study of these mechanisms is necessary for the formation of basic knowledge, as well as to elucidate the mechanisms of occurrence and development of pathological conditions of vessels and the development of methods of their correction.

  4. Salicylanilide inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P; Ferreira, Leandra R; Hickman, Mark R; Lee, Patricia J; Leed, Susan E; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Welsh, William J; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-10-11

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose antiapicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles.

  5. Salicylanilide Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D.; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P.; Ferriera, Leandra R.; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patricia J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Welsh, William J.; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii(T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose anti-apicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles. PMID:22970937

  6. Macrocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Quraishi, M.A.; Rawat, J.; Ajmal, M.

    1998-12-01

    The influence of three macrocyclic compounds on corrosion of mild steel (MS) in hydrochloric acid (HCl) was investigated using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, alternating current (AC) impedance, and hydrogen permeation techniques. All the investigated compounds showed significant efficiencies and reduced permeation of hydrogen through MS in HCl. Inhibition efficiency (IE) varied with the nature and concentrations of the inhibitors, temperature, and concentrations of the acid solutions. The addition of iodide ions (I{sup {minus}}) increased IE of all the tested compounds as a result of the synergistic effect. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that macrocyclic compounds acted as mixed inhibitors in 1 M HCl to 5 M HCl. Adsorption on the metal surface obeyed Temkin`s adsorption isotherm. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) of the polished MS surface, exposed with tetraphenyldithia-octaazacyclotetradeca-hexaene (PTAT) proved adsorption of this compound on the surface through nitrogen and sulfur atoms.

  7. [Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Wioletta; Ołdziej, Agnieszka Ewa; Zińczuk, Justyna; Kłoczko, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are multisubunit enzyme complexes. They contain three enzymatic active sites which are termed chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like. The elementary function of the proteasomes is degradation of damaged proteins. Proteasome inhibition leads to accumulation of damaged protein, which leads to caspase activation and cell death. This relationship is used in cancer therapy. Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib belongs to the second generation of drugs, which was approved by the US FDA in 2012. Currently in the study phase there are four new inhibitors: ixazomib (MLN9780/MLN2238), delanzomib (CEP-18770), oprozomib (ONX0912/PR-047) and marizomib (NPI-0052). PMID:27259216

  8. Aromatase Inhibitors and Other Compounds for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Aromatase inhibitors and other compounds for lowering breast cancer risk Aromatase inhibitors (drugs that lower estrogen levels) ... day. Can aromatase inhibitors lower the risk of breast cancer? Aromatase inhibitors are used mainly to treat hormone ...

  9. Conformation-specific inhibitors of Raf kinases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolun; Schleicher, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery linking B-Raf mutations to human tumors in 2002, significant advances in the development of Raf inhibitors have been made, leading to the recent approval of two Raf inhibitor drugs. This chapter includes a brief introduction to B-Raf as a validated target and focuses on the three different binding modes observed with Raf small-molecule inhibitors. These various binding modes lock the Raf kinase in different conformations that impact the toxicity profiles of the inhibitors. Possible solutions to mitigate the side effects caused by inhibitor-induced dimerization are also discussed.

  10. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  11. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors drug design.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, antiobesity, and anticancer agents but is also emerging for designing anti-infectives (antifungal and antibacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. As a consequence, the drug design of CA inhibitors (CAIs) is a very dynamic field. Sulfonamides and their isosteres (sulfamates/sulfamides) constitute the main class of CAIs which bind to the metal ion in the enzyme active site. Recently the dithiocarbamates, possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. Other families of CAIs possess a distinct mechanism of action: phenols, polyamines, some carboxylates, and sulfocoumarins anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule. Coumarins and five/six-membered lactones are prodrug inhibitors, binding in hydrolyzed form at the entrance of the active site cavity. Novel drug design strategies have been reported principally based on the tail approach for obtaining all these types of CAIs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Sugar-based tails as well as click chemistry were the most fruitful developments of the tail approach. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the dithiocarbamate, phenol and carboxylate types have also been reported. PMID:24146385

  12. ANTIDEPRESSANT ACTIONS OF HDAC INHIBITORS

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Herbert E.; Maze, Ian; LaPlant, Quincey C.; Vialou, Vincent F.; Yoshinori, Ohnishi N.; Berton, Olivier; Fass, Dan M.; Renthal, William; Rush, Augustus J.; Wu, Emma Y.; Ghose, Subroto; Krishnan, Vaishnav; Russo, Scott J.; Tamminga, Carol; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Persistent symptoms of depression suggest the involvement of stable molecular adaptations in brain, which may be reflected at the level of chromatin remodeling. We find that chronic social defeat stress in mice causes a transient decrease, followed by a persistent increase, in levels of acetylated histone H3 in the nucleus accumbens, an important limbic brain region. This persistent increase in H3 acetylation is associated with decreased levels of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in the nucleus accumbens. Similar effects were observed in the nucleus accumbens of depressed humans studied postmortem. These changes in H3 acetylation and HDAC2 expression mediate long-lasting positive neuronal adaptations, since infusion of HDAC inhibitors into the nucleus accumbens, which increases histone acetylation, exerts robust antidepressant-like effects in the social defeat paradigm and other behavioral assays. HDAC inhibitor (MS-275) infusion also reverses the effects of chronic defeat stress on global patterns of gene expression in the nucleus accumbens, as determined by microarray analysis, with striking similarities to the effects of the standard antidepressant, fluoxetine. Stress-regulated genes whose expression is normalized selectively by MS-275 may provide promising targets for the future development of novel antidepressant treatments. Together, these findings provide new insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of depression and antidepressant action, and support the antidepressant potential of HDAC inhibitors and perhaps other agents that act at the level of chromatin structure. PMID:19759294

  13. Investigating the selectivity of metalloenzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Day, Joshua A; Cohen, Seth M

    2013-10-24

    The inhibitory activity of a broad group of known metalloenzyme inhibitors against a panel of metalloenzymes was evaluated. Clinically approved inhibitors were selected as well as several other reported metalloprotein inhibitors in order to represent a broad range of metal binding groups (MBGs), including hydroxamic acid, carboxylate, hydroxypyridinonate, thiol, and N-hydroxyurea functional groups. A panel of metalloenzymes, including carbonic anhydrase (hCAII), several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), histone deacetylase (HDAC-2), and tyrosinase (TY), was selected based on their clinical importance for a range of pathologies. In addition, each inhibitor was evaluated for its ability to remove Fe(3+) from holo-transferrin to gauge the ability of the inhibitors to access Fe(3+) from a primary transport protein. The results show that the metalloenzyme inhibitors are quite selective for their intended targets, suggesting that despite their ability to bind metal ions, metalloprotein inhibitors are not prone to widespread off-target enzyme inhibition activity.

  14. The burden of inhibitors in haemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Christopher E; Jiménez-Yuste, Víctor; Auerswald, Guenter; Grancha, Salvador

    2016-08-31

    The burden of disease in haemophilia patients has wide ranging implications for the family and to society. There is evidence that having a current inhibitor increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. Morbidity is increased by the inability to treat adequately and its consequent disabilities, which then equates to a poor quality of life compared with non-inhibitor patients. The societal cost of care, or `burden of inhibitors', increases with the ongoing presence of an inhibitor. Therefore, it is clear that successful eradication of inhibitors by immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the single most important milestone one can achieve in an inhibitor patient. The type of factor VIII (FVIII) product used in ITI regimens varies worldwide. Despite ongoing debate, there is in vitro and retrospective clinical evidence to support the use of plasma-derived VWF-containing FVIII concentrates in ITI regimens in order to achieve early and high inhibitor eradication success rates. PMID:27528280

  15. Investigating the Selectivity of Metalloenzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Day, Joshua A.; Cohen, Seth M.

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory activity of a broad group of known metalloenzyme inhibitors against a panel of metalloenzymes was evaluated. Clinically approved inhibitors were selected as well as several other reported metalloprotein inhibitors, in order to represent a broad range of metal binding groups (MBGs), including hydroxamic acid, carboxylate, hydroxypyridinonate, thiol, and N-hydroxyurea functional groups. A panel of metalloenzymes, including carbonic anhydrase (hCAII), several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), histone deacetylase (HDAC-2), and tyrosinase (TY) was selected based on their clinical importance for a range of pathologies. In addition, each inhibitor was evaluated for its ability to remove Fe3+ from holo-transferrin to gauge the ability of the inhibitors to access Fe3+ from a primary transport protein. The results show that the metalloenzyme inhibitors are quite selective for their intended targets, suggesting that despite their ability to bind metal ions, metalloprotein inhibitors are not prone to widespread off-target enzyme inhibition activity. PMID:24074025

  16. Non-ATP competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garuti, L; Roberti, M; Bottegoni, G

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases represent an attractive target in oncology drug discovery. Most of kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive and are called type I inhibitors. The ATP-binding pocket is highly conserved among members of the kinase family and it is difficult to find selective agents. Moreover, the ATP-competitive inhibitors must compete with high intracellular ATP levels leading to a discrepancy between IC50s measured by biochemical versus cellular assays. The non-ATP competitive inhibitors, called type II and type III inhibitors, offer the possibility to overcome these problems. These inhibitors act by inducing a conformational shift in the target enzyme such that the kinase is no longer able to function. In the DFG-out form, the phenylalanine side chain moves to a new position. This movement creates a hydrophobic pocket available for occupation by the inhibitor. Some common features are present in these inhibitors. They contain a heterocyclic system that forms one or two hydrogen bonds with the kinase hinge residue. They also contain a hydrophobic moiety that occupies the pocket formed by the shift of phenylalanine from the DFG motif. Moreover, all the inhibitors bear a hydrogen bond donor-acceptor pair, usually urea or amide, that links the hinge-binding portion to the hydrophobic moiety and interacts with the allosteric site. Examples of non ATP-competitive inhibitors are available for various kinases. In this review small molecules capable of inducing the DFG-out conformation are reported, especially focusing on structural feature, SAR and biological properties.

  17. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  18. Techniques for Screening Translation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, Ilya A.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Dontsova, Olga A.; Sergiev, Petr V.

    2016-01-01

    The machinery of translation is one of the most common targets of antibiotics. The development and screening of new antibiotics usually proceeds by testing antimicrobial activity followed by laborious studies of the mechanism of action. High-throughput methods for new antibiotic screening based on antimicrobial activity have become routine; however, identification of molecular targets is usually a challenge. Therefore, it is highly beneficial to combine primary screening with the identification of the mechanism of action. In this review, we describe a collection of methods for screening translation inhibitors, with a special emphasis on methods which can be performed in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27348012

  19. Oligopeptide cyclophilin inhibitors: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Michael; Jahreis, Günther; Kahlert, Viktoria; Lücke, Christian; Fischer, Gunter

    2011-11-01

    Potent cyclophilin A (CypA) inhibitors such as non-immunosuppressive cyclosporin A (CsA) derivatives have been already used in clinical trials in patients with viral infections. CypA is a peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) that catalyzes slow prolyl bond cis/trans interconversions of the backbone of substrate peptides and proteins. In this study we investigate whether the notoriously low affinity inhibitory interaction of linear proline-containing peptides with the active site of CypA can be increased through a combination of a high cis/trans ratio and a negatively charged C-terminus as has been recently reported for Trp-Gly-Pro. Surprisingly, isothermal titration calorimetry did not reveal formation of an inhibitory CypA/Trp-Gly-Pro complex previously described within a complex stability range similar to CsA, a nanomolar CypA inhibitor. Moreover, despite of cis content of 41% at pH 7.5 Trp-Gly-Pro cannot inhibit CypA-catalyzed standard substrate isomerization up to high micromolar concentrations. However, in the context of the CsA framework a net charge of -7 clustered at the amino acid side chain of position 1 resulted in slightly improved CypA inhibition.

  20. Carborane-based carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brynda, Jiří; Mader, Pavel; Šícha, Václav; Fábry, Milan; Poncová, Kristýna; Bakardiev, Mario; Grüner, Bohumír; Cígler, Petr; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2013-12-16

    CA inhibitors: Human carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Various carborane cages are shown to act as active-site-directed inhibitors, and substitution with a sulfamide group and other substituents leads to compounds with high selectivity towards the cancer-specific isozyme IX. Crystal structures of the carboranes in the active site provide information that can be applied to the structure-based design of specific inhibitors. PMID:24307504

  1. KH-30 Parafin Inhibitor Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rochelle, J.

    2001-09-30

    United Energy Corporation (UNRG) and the U.S. Department of Energy personnel tested KH-30 at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) outside Casper, Wyoming on two separate occasions. KH-30 is a non-toxic, non-hazardous product, which combines the functions of a solvent dispersant, crystal modifier and inhibitor into a single solution. The first test was held in March of 2001, wherein five wells were treated with a mixture of KH-30 and brine water, heated to 180 degrees F. No increase in production was attained in these tests. In June, 2001, three shallow, low pressure RMOTC wells with 30 years of production were treated with a mixture of 40% KH-30 and 60% diesel. Increases were seen in three wells. The wells then returned to their original rates.

  2. Natural Products as Aromatase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Su, Bin; Brueggemeier, Robert W.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    With the clinical success of several synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in the treatment of postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, researchers have also been investigating also the potential of natural products as AIs. Natural products from terrestrial and marine organisms provide a chemically diverse array of compounds not always available through current synthetic chemistry techniques. Natural products that have been used traditionally for nutritional or medicinal purposes (e.g., botanical dietary supplements) may also afford AIs with reduced side effects. A thorough review of the literature regarding natural product extracts and secondary metabolites of plant, microbial, and marine origin that have been shown to exhibit aromatase inhibitory activity is presented herein. PMID:18690828

  3. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Trawinska, Malgorzata Monika; Perrotti, Alessio Pio; De Fabritiis, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) during pregnancy has become recently a matter of continuous debate. The introduction of the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs) in clinical practice has dramatically changed the prognosis of CML patients; in fact, patients diagnosed in chronic phase can reasonably expect many years of excellent disease control and good quality of life, as well as a normal life expectancy, including the necessity to address issues relating to fertility and pregnancy. Physicians are frequently being asked for advice regarding the need for, and/or the appropriateness of, stopping treatment in order to conceive. In this report, we will review the data published in terms of fertility, conception, pregnancy, pregnancy outcome and illness control for TKI treated CML patients, as well as how to manage a planned and/or unplanned pregnancy. PMID:24804001

  4. Glycine Transporters and Their Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfillan, Robert; Kerr, Jennifer; Walker, Glenn; Wishart, Grant

    Glycine plays a ubiquitous role in many biological processes. In the central nervous system it serves as an important neurotransmitter acting as an agonist at strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and as an essential co-agonist with glutamate at the NMDA receptor complex. Control of glycine concentrations in the vicinity of these receptors is mediated by the specific glycine transporters, GlyT1 and GlyT2. Inhibition of these transporters has been postulated to be of potential benefit in several therapeutic indications including schizophrenia and pain. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of glycine transporters and focus on recent advances in the medicinal chemistry of GlyT1 and GlyT2 inhibitors.

  5. Enzyme-Inhibitor Association Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Resat, Haluk; Marrone, Tami J.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Studying the thermodynamics of biochemical association reactions at the microscopic level requires efficient sampling of the configurations of the reactants and solvent as a function of the reaction pathways. In most cases, the associating ligand and receptor have complementary interlocking shapes. Upon association, loosely connected or disconnected solvent cavities at and around the binding site are formed. Disconnected solvent regions lead to severe statistical sampling problems when simulations are performed with explicit solvent. It was recently proposed that, when such limitations are encountered, they might be overcome by the use of the grand canonical ensemble. Here we investigate one such case and report the association free energy profile (potential of mean force) between trypsin and benzamidine along a chosen reaction coordinate as calculated using the grand canonical Monte Carlo method. The free energy profile is also calculated for a continuum solvent model using the Poisson equation, and the results are compared to the explicit water simulations. The comparison shows that the continuum solvent approach is surprisingly successful in reproducing the explicit solvent simulation results. The Monte Carlo results are analyzed in detail with respect to solvation structure. In the binding site channel there are waters bridging the carbonyl oxygen groups of Asp189 with the NH2 groups of benzamidine, which are displaced upon inhibitor binding. A similar solvent-bridging configuration has been seen in the crystal structure of trypsin complexed with bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. The predicted locations of other internal waters are in very good agreement with the positions found in the crystal structures, which supports the accuracy of the simulations. ImagesFIGURE 5 PMID:9017183

  6. Pyridopyrimidine analogues as novel adenosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G Z; Lee, C; Pratt, J K; Perner, R J; Jiang, M Q; Gomtsyan, A; Matulenko, M A; Mao, Y; Koenig, J R; Kim, K H; Muchmore, S; Yu, H; Kohlhaas, K; Alexander, K M; McGaraughty, S; Chu, K L; Wismer, C T; Mikusa, J; Jarvis, M F; Marsh, K; Kowaluk, E A; Bhagwat, S S; Stewart, A O

    2001-08-20

    A novel series of pyridopyrimidine analogues 9 was identified as potent adenosine kinase inhibitors based on the SAR and computational studies. Substitution of the C7 position of the pyridopyrimidino core with C2' substituted pyridino moiety increased the in vivo potency and enhanced oral bioavailability of these adenosine kinase inhibitors.

  7. Rust inhibitor and oil composition containing same

    SciTech Connect

    Bialy, J.J.; Cullen, W.P.; Dorn, P.; Nebzydoski, J.W.; Sung, R.L.

    1981-04-21

    A rust inhibitor comprising the reaction product of a hydrocarbylsuccinic anhydride in which the hydrocarbyl radical has from about 6 to 30 carbon atoms and an aminotriazole is provided. The rust inhibitor is effective in motor fuel and lubricating oil compositions.

  8. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26466763

  9. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  10. Computer simulation of inhibitor application -- A review

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, G.; Vasanth, K.L.

    1997-12-01

    The rapid development of powerful software as well as hardware in computer technology has changed the traditional approach to all areas of science and technology. In the field of corrosion inhibitors, computers are used to model, simulate, analyze and monitor inhibitor applications in both laboratory and industrial environments. This paper will present an up-to-date critical review of such simulation studies.

  11. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26466763

  12. Aminofurazans as potent inhibitors of AKT kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, Meagan B.; Seefeld, Mark A.; Leber, Jack D.; McNulty, Kenneth C.; Sun, Lihui; Miller, William H.; Zhang, ShuYun; Minthorn, Elisabeth A.; Concha, Nestor O.; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Schaber, Michael D.; Heerding, Dirk A.

    2009-06-24

    AKT inhibitors containing an imidazopyridine aminofurazan scaffold have been optimized. We have previously disclosed identification of the AKT inhibitor GSK690693, which has been evaluated in clinical trials in cancer patients. Herein we describe recent efforts focusing on investigating a distinct region of this scaffold that have afforded compounds (30 and 32) with comparable activity profiles to that of GSK690693.

  13. Trypsin inhibitors of buffalo seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, N; Ramesh, V

    1992-03-01

    Two trypsin inhibitors from acid-treated buffalo seminal plasma were purified by gel filtration and affinity chromatography. These acid-stable trypsin inhibitors having charge heterogeneity were homogeneous with respect to size as revealed by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE. Gel filtration data suggest molecular weight value of 9,900 Da for inhibitor I and 10,900 Da for inhibitor II. Molecular weight estimated by SDS-PAGE was found to be 10,600 Da and 11,200 Da for inhibitors I and II, respectively. The hydrodynamic properties such as Stokes radii (1.58 nm and 1.62 nm); intrinsic viscosity (2.5725 ml/g and 2.5025 ml/g) and diffusion coefficient (13.499 x 10(-11) m2/sec. and 13.166X10(-11) m2/sec) respectively for inhibitor I and II were determined by analytical gel filtration. These inhibitors were fairly thermostable and could not be stained by PAS reagent. Both the inhibitors were found to inhibit buffalo acrosin but not bovine chymotrypsin.

  14. MAO inhibitors: risks, benefits, and lore.

    PubMed

    Wimbiscus, Molly; Kostenko, Olga; Malone, Donald

    2010-12-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors were the first antidepressants introduced, but their use has dwindled because of their reported side effects, their food and drug interactions, and the introduction of other classes of agents. However, interest in MAO inhibitors is reviving. Here, we discuss their use, risks, and benefits in clinical medicine.

  15. Exploring the scaffold universe of kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The scaffold concept was applied to systematically determine, analyze, and compare core structures of kinase inhibitors. From publicly available inhibitors of the human kinome, scaffolds and cyclic skeletons were systematically extracted and organized taking activity data, structural relationships, and retrosynthetic criteria into account. Scaffold coverage varied greatly across the kinome, and many scaffolds representing compounds with different activity profiles were identified. The majority of kinase inhibitor scaffolds were involved in well-defined yet distinct structural relationships, which had different consequences on compound activity. Scaffolds exclusively representing highly potent compounds were identified as well as structurally analogous scaffolds with very different degrees of promiscuity. Scaffold relationships presented herein suggest a variety of hypotheses for inhibitor design. Our detailed organization of the kinase inhibitor scaffold universe with respect to different activity and structural criteria, all scaffolds, and the original compound data assembled for our analysis are made freely available.

  16. MUC5AC mucin release from human airways in vitro: effects of indomethacin and Bay X1005.

    PubMed Central

    Roger, P; Gascard, J P; Bara, J; de Montpreville, V T; Brink, C

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased secretion of mucus is a hallmark of many respiratory diseases and contributes significantly to the airflow limitation experienced by many patients. While the current pharmacological approach to reducing mucus and sputum production in patients is limited, clinical studies have suggested that drugs which inhibit the cyclooxygenase and/or 5-lipoxygenase enzymatic pathways may reduce secretory activity in patients with airway disease. AIM: This study was performed to investigate the effects of indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and Bay x 1005 (5-lipoxygenase inhibitor) on MUC5AC release from human airways in vitro. METHODS: An immunoradiometric assay was used to determine the quantities of MUC5AC present in the biological fluids derived from human airways in vitro. The measurements were made with a mixture of eight monoclonal antibodies (MAbs; PM8) of which the 21 M1 MAb recognized a recombinant M1 mucin partially encoded by the MUC5AC gene. RESULTS: The quantities of MUC5AC detected in the biological fluids derived from human bronchial preparations were not modified after treatment with indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and/or an inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase metabolic pathway (BAY x 1005). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase metabolic pathways play little or no role in the release of MUC5AC from human airways. PMID:11324902

  17. A Spider-Derived Kunitz-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor That Acts as a Plasmin Inhibitor and an Elastase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hu; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Zou, Feng Ming; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Je, Yeon Ho; Li, Jianhong; Jin, Byung Rae

    2013-01-01

    Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors are involved in various physiological processes, such as ion channel blocking, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. While spider-derived Kunitz-type proteins show activity in trypsin or chymotrypsin inhibition and K+ channel blocking, no additional role for these proteins has been elucidated. In this study, we identified the first spider (Araneus ventricosus) Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (AvKTI) that acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor. AvKTI possesses a Kunitz domain consisting of a 57-amino-acid mature peptide that displays features consistent with Kunitz-type inhibitors, including six conserved cysteine residues and a P1 lysine residue. Recombinant AvKTI, expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells, showed a dual inhibitory activity against trypsin (Ki 7.34 nM) and chymotrypsin (Ki 37.75 nM), defining a role for AvKTI as a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. Additionally, AvKTI showed no detectable inhibitory effects on factor Xa, thrombin, or tissue plasminogen activator; however, AvKTI inhibited plasmin (Ki 4.89 nM) and neutrophil elastase (Ki 169.07 nM), indicating that it acts as an antifibrinolytic factor and an antielastolytic factor. These findings constitute molecular evidence that AvKTI acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor and also provide a novel view of the functions of a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. PMID:23308198

  18. Designing Inhibitors of Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Present-day rational drug design approaches are based on exploiting unique features of the target biomolecules, small- or macromolecule drug candidates, and physical forces that govern their interactions. The 2013 Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded “for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems” once again demonstrated the importance of the tailored drug discovery that reduces the role of the trial and error approach to a minimum. The “rational drug design” term is rather comprehensive as it includes all contemporary methods of drug discovery where serendipity and screening are substituted by the information-guided search for new and existing compounds. Successful implementation of these innovative drug discovery approaches is inevitably preceded by learning the physics, chemistry, and physiology of functioning of biological structures under normal and pathological conditions. Areas covered This article provides an overview of the recent rational drug design approaches to discover inhibitors of anthrax toxin. Some of the examples include small-molecule and peptide-based post-exposure therapeutic agents as well as several polyvalent compounds. The review also directs the reader to the vast literature on the recognized advances and future possibilities in the field. Expert opinion Existing options to combat anthrax toxin lethality are limited. With the only anthrax toxin inhibiting therapy (PA-targeting with a monoclonal antibody, raxibacumab) approved to treat inhalational anthrax, in our view, the situation is still insecure. The FDA’s animal rule for drug approval, which clears compounds without validated efficacy studies on humans, creates a high level of uncertainty, especially when a well-characterized animal model does not exist. Besides, unlike PA, which is known to be unstable, LF remains active in cells and in animal tissues for days. Therefore, the effectiveness of the post-exposure treatment of the individuals

  19. High-affinity Cyclic Peptide Matriptase Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Quimbar, Pedro; Malik, Uru; Sommerhoff, Christian P.; Kaas, Quentin; Chan, Lai Y.; Huang, Yen-Hua; Grundhuber, Maresa; Dunse, Kerry; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase is a key activator of multiple signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and modification of the extracellular matrix. Deregulated matriptase activity correlates with a number of diseases, including cancer and hence highly selective matriptase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. The plant-derived cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), is a promising drug scaffold with potent matriptase inhibitory activity. In the current study we have analyzed the structure-activity relationships of SFTI-1 and Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II), a structurally divergent trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis that also contains a cyclic backbone. We show that MCoTI-II is a significantly more potent matriptase inhibitor than SFTI-1 and that all alanine mutants of both peptides, generated using positional scanning mutagenesis, have decreased trypsin affinity, whereas several mutations either maintain or result in enhanced matriptase inhibitory activity. These intriguing results were used to design one of the most potent matriptase inhibitors known to date with a 290 pm equilibrium dissociation constant, and provide the first indication on how to modulate affinity for matriptase over trypsin in cyclic peptides. This information might be useful for the design of more selective and therapeutically relevant inhibitors of matriptase. PMID:23548907

  20. Leflunomide, a Reversible Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél

    2016-01-01

    A screening study aimed at identifying inhibitors of the enzyme, monoamine oxidase (MAO), among clinically used drugs have indicated that the antirheumatic drug, leflunomide, is an inhibitor of both MAO isoforms. Leflunomide inhibits human MAO-A and MAO-B and exhibits IC50 values of 19.1 μM and 13.7 μM, respectively. The corresponding Ki values are 17.7 μM (MAO-A) and 10.1 μM (MAO-B). Dialyses of mixtures of the MAO enzymes and leflunomide show that inhibition of the MAOs by leflunomide is reversible. The principal metabolite of leflunomide, teriflunomide (A77 1726), in contrast is not an MAO inhibitor. This study concludes that, although leflunomide is only moderately potent as an MAO inhibitor, isoxazole derivatives may represent a general class of MAO inhibitors and this heterocycle may find application in MAO inhibitor design. In this respect, MAO inhibitors are used in the clinic for the treatment of depressive illness and Parkinson's disease, and are under investigation as therapy for certain types of cancer, Alzheimer's disease and age-related impairment of cardiac function. PMID:26299850

  1. SGLT2 Inhibitors May Predispose to Ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Jenny E.; Rother, Kristina I.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are antidiabetic drugs that increase urinary excretion of glucose, thereby improving glycemic control and promoting weight loss. Since approval of the first-in-class drug in 2013, data have emerged suggesting that these drugs increase the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. In May 2015, the Food and Drug Administration issued a warning that SGLT2 inhibitors may lead to ketoacidosis. Evidence Acquisition: Using PubMed and Google, we conducted Boolean searches including terms related to ketone bodies or ketoacidosis with terms for SGLT2 inhibitors or phlorizin. Priority was assigned to publications that shed light on molecular mechanisms whereby SGLT2 inhibitors could affect ketone body metabolism. Evidence Synthesis: SGLT2 inhibitors trigger multiple mechanisms that could predispose to diabetic ketoacidosis. When SGLT2 inhibitors are combined with insulin, it is often necessary to decrease the insulin dose to avoid hypoglycemia. The lower dose of insulin may be insufficient to suppress lipolysis and ketogenesis. Furthermore, SGLT2 is expressed in pancreatic α-cells, and SGLT2 inhibitors promote glucagon secretion. Finally, phlorizin, a nonselective inhibitor of SGLT family transporters decreases urinary excretion of ketone bodies. A decrease in the renal clearance of ketone bodies could also increase the plasma ketone body levels. Conclusions: Based on the physiology of SGLT2 and the pharmacology of SGLT2 inhibitors, there are several biologically plausible mechanisms whereby this class of drugs has the potential to increase the risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. Future research should be directed toward identifying which patients are at greatest risk for this side effect and also to optimizing pharmacotherapy to minimize the risk to patients. PMID:26086329

  2. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Marx, Pauline F

    2004-09-01

    The coagulation system is a potent mechanism that prevents blood loss after vascular injury. It consists of a number of linked enzymatic reactions resulting in thrombin generation. Thrombin converts soluble fibrinogen into a fibrin clot. The clot is subsequently removed by the fibrinolytic system upon wound healing. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), which is identical to the previously identified proteins procarboxypeptidase B, R, and U, forms a link between blood coagulation and fibrinolysis. TAFI circulates as an inactive proenzyme in the bloodstream, and becomes activated during blood clotting. The active form, TAFIa, inhibits fibrinolysis by cleaving off C-terminal lysine residues from partially degraded fibrin that stimulates the tissue-type plasminogen activator-mediated conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. Consequently, removal of these lysines leads to less plasmin formation and subsequently to protection of the fibrin clot from break down. Moreover, TAFI may also play a role in other processes such as, inflammation and tissue repair. In this review, recent developments in TAFI research are discussed. PMID:15379716

  3. HIV Protease Inhibitors and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Anuurad, Erdembileg; Bremer, Andrew; Berglund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the current scientific literature and recent clinical trials on HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) and their potential role in the pathogenesis of lipodystrophy and metabolic disorders. Recent findings HIV PI treatment may affect the normal stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose and fat storage. Further, chronic inflammation from HIV infection and PI treatment trigger cellular homeostatic stress responses with adverse effects on intermediary metabolism. The physiologic outcome is such that total adipocyte storage capacity is decreased, and the remaining adipocytes resist further fat storage. This process leads to a pathologic cycle of lipodystrophy and lipotoxicity, a pro-atherogenic lipid profile, and a clinical phenotype of increased central body fat distribution similar to the metabolic syndrome. Summary PIs are a key component of antiretroviral therapy and have dramatically improved the life expectancy of HIV-infected individuals. However, they are also associated with abnormalities in glucose/lipid metabolism and body fat distribution. Further studies are needed to better define the pathogenesis of PI-associated metabolic and body fat changes and their potential treatment. PMID:20717021

  4. MMP Inhibitors: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Cathcart, Jillian M; Cao, Jian

    2015-01-01

      Development of inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) has been fraught with challenges. Early compounds largely failed due to poor selectivity and bioavailability. Dose-limiting side effects, off-target interactions, and improperly designed clinical trials significantly impeded clinical success. As information becomes available and technology evolves, tools to combat these obstacles have been developed. Improved methods for high throughput screening and drug design have led to identification of compounds exhibiting high potency, binding affinity, and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. Current research into MMP inhibitors employs innovative approaches for drug delivery methods and allosteric inhibitors. Such innovation is key for development of clinically successful compounds.

  5. An updated review of tyrosinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chang, Te-Sheng

    2009-06-01

    Tyrosinase is a multifunctional, glycosylated, and copper-containing oxidase, which catalyzes the first two steps in mammalian melanogenesis and is responsible for enzymatic browning reactions in damaged fruits during post-harvest handling and processing. Neither hyperpigmentation in human skin nor enzymatic browning in fruits are desirable. These phenomena have encouraged researchers to seek new potent tyrosinase inhibitors for use in foods and cosmetics. This article surveys tyrosinase inhibitors newly discovered from natural and synthetic sources. The inhibitory strength is compared with that of a standard inhibitor, kojic acid, and their inhibitory mechanisms are discussed. PMID:19582213

  6. An Updated Review of Tyrosinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Te-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a multifunctional, glycosylated, and copper-containing oxidase, which catalyzes the first two steps in mammalian melanogenesis and is responsible for enzymatic browning reactions in damaged fruits during post-harvest handling and processing. Neither hyperpigmentation in human skin nor enzymatic browning in fruits are desirable. These phenomena have encouraged researchers to seek new potent tyrosinase inhibitors for use in foods and cosmetics. This article surveys tyrosinase inhibitors newly discovered from natural and synthetic sources. The inhibitory strength is compared with that of a standard inhibitor, kojic acid, and their inhibitory mechanisms are discussed. PMID:19582213

  7. Musical Hallucinations Treated with Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Jan Dirk; Coebergh, Jan Adriaan F.; Lauw, René; Sommer, Iris E. C.

    2015-01-01

    Musical hallucinations are relatively rare auditory percepts which, due to their intrusive nature and the accompanying fear of impending mental decline, tend to cause significant distress and impairment. Although their etiology and pathophysiology appear to be heterogeneous and no evidence-based treatment methods are available, case reports indicate that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors may yield positive results in patients with comorbid hearing loss. We present two female patients (aged 76 and 78 years) both of whom suffered from hearing impairment and practically incessant musical hallucinations. Both patients were successfully treated with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine. Based on these two case descriptions and an overview of studies describing the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in similar patients, we discuss possible mechanisms and propose further research on the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for musical hallucinations experienced in concordance with hearing loss. PMID:25904872

  8. A tyrosinase inhibitor from Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Vasantha, K Y; Murugesh, C S; Sattur, A P

    2014-10-01

    Tyrosinase, in the presence of oxygen, is the main culprit in post harvest browning of food products, resulting in the drop in its commercial value. In an effort to seek natural tyrosinase inhibitors for food applications, a screening programme was undertaken. Of the 26 fungal cultures isolated from soil samples of Agumbe forest, India, one isolate S16, identified as Aspergillus niger, gave an inhibition of 84 % against the enzyme. The inhibitor was isolated by following an enzyme inhibition assay guided purification protocol. The structure of the inhibitor was elucidated and found to be kojic acid. The IC50 of the Competitive inhibitor was found to be 8.8 μg with a Ki of 0.085 mM.

  9. Inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase meet immunity.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2014-06-02

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. More recent use is for myasthenia gravis. Many of these inhibitors interact with the second known cholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Further, evidence shows that acetylcholine plays a role in suppression of cytokine release through a "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" which raises questions about the role of these inhibitors in the immune system. This review covers research and discussion of the role of the inhibitors in modulating the immune response using as examples the commonly available drugs, donepezil, galantamine, huperzine, neostigmine and pyridostigmine. Major attention is given to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a well-described link between the central nervous system and terminal effector cells in the immune system.

  10. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted using cINahl®, Pubmed, and cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms: ocular toxicities, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ophthalmology, adverse events, eye, and vision. Data Synthesis Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity. Conclusions Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems. Implications for Nursing Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity. PMID:26906134

  11. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Urea Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Esteva-Font, Cristina; Cil, Onur; Anderson, Marc O.; Li, Fei; Li, Min; Lei, Tianluo; Ren, Huiwen; Yang, Baoxue

    2015-01-01

    Urea transporter (UT) proteins, which include isoforms of UT-A in kidney tubule epithelia and UT-B in vasa recta endothelia and erythrocytes, facilitate urinary concentrating function. Inhibitors of urea transporter function have potential clinical applications as sodium-sparing diuretics, or ‘urearetics,’ in edema from different etiologies, such as congestive heart failure and cirrhosis, as well as in syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). High-throughput screening of drug-like small molecules has identified UT-A and UT-B inhibitors with nanomolar potency. Inhibitors have been identified with different UT-A versus UT-B selectivity profiles and putative binding sites on UT proteins. Studies in rodent models support the utility of UT inhibitors in reducing urinary concentration, though testing in clinically relevant animal models of edema has not yet been done. PMID:25298345

  12. Small-molecule inhibitors of myosin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Tumbarello, David A; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2014-01-01

    Advances in screening and computational methods have enhanced recent efforts to discover/design small-molecule protein inhibitors. One attractive target for inhibition is the myosin family of motor proteins. Myosins function in a wide variety of cellular processes, from intracellular trafficking to cell motility, and are implicated in several human diseases (e.g., cancer, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, deafness and many neurological disorders). Potent and selective myosin inhibitors are, therefore, not only a tool for understanding myosin function, but are also a resource for developing treatments for diseases involving myosin dysfunction or overactivity. This review will provide a brief overview of the characteristics and scientific/therapeutic applications of the presently identified small-molecule myosin inhibitors before discussing the future of myosin inhibitor and activator design. PMID:23256812

  13. Polyaspartate scale inhibitors -- Biodegradable alternatives to polyacrylates

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, R.J.; Low, K.C.; Shannon, J.E.

    1997-04-01

    Polyaspartates are highly biodegradable alternatives to polyacrylate-based scale inhibitors. This article presents laboratory testing data on polyaspartate inhibitors of calcium and barium mineral scales. The optimum molecular weight (Mw) for polyaspartate inhibitors of calcium carbonate, calcium sulfate, and barium sulfate mineral scales was determined to be between 1,000 Mw and 4,000 Mw. For inhibition of calcium carbonate and barium sulfate, polyaspartates in the range of 3,000 Mw to 4,000 Mw were most effective. For calcium sulfate inhibition, the optimum Mw lies in the 1,000 Mw to 2,000 Mw range. Biodegradability data (OECD 301B Ready Biodegradability) on polyaspartates of a variety of Mw is also presented, which demonstrates the high biodegradability of this class of mineral scale inhibitors.

  14. Drug design from the cryptic inhibitor envelope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Qinglin; Najeeb, Javaria; Zhao, Jinshi; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Titecat, Marie; Sebbane, Florent; Lemaitre, Nadine; Toone, Eric J.; Zhou, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Conformational dynamics plays an important role in enzyme catalysis, allosteric regulation of protein functions and assembly of macromolecular complexes. Despite these well-established roles, such information has yet to be exploited for drug design. Here we show by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that inhibitors of LpxC—an essential enzyme of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria and a validated novel antibiotic target—access alternative, minor population states in solution in addition to the ligand conformation observed in crystal structures. These conformations collectively delineate an inhibitor envelope that is invisible to crystallography, but is dynamically accessible by small molecules in solution. Drug design exploiting such a hidden inhibitor envelope has led to the development of potent antibiotics with inhibition constants in the single-digit picomolar range. The principle of the cryptic inhibitor envelope approach may be broadly applicable to other lead optimization campaigns to yield improved therapeutics. PMID:26912110

  15. Inhibitors of Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase Meet Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. More recent use is for myasthenia gravis. Many of these inhibitors interact with the second known cholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Further, evidence shows that acetylcholine plays a role in suppression of cytokine release through a “cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway” which raises questions about the role of these inhibitors in the immune system. This review covers research and discussion of the role of the inhibitors in modulating the immune response using as examples the commonly available drugs, donepezil, galantamine, huperzine, neostigmine and pyridostigmine. Major attention is given to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a well-described link between the central nervous system and terminal effector cells in the immune system. PMID:24893223

  16. Selective Phosphodiesterase 4B Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Tripuraneni, Naga Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) is a member of the phosphodiesterase family of proteins that plays a critical role in regulating intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) by controlling its rate of degradation. It has been demonstrated that this isoform is involved in the orchestra of events which includes inflammation, schizophrenia, cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, contractility of the myocardium, and psoriatic arthritis. Phosphodiesterase 4B has constituted an interesting target for drug development. In recent years, a number of PDE4B inhibitors have been developed for their use as therapeutic agents. In this review, an up-to-date status of the inhibitors investigated for the inhibition of PDE4B has been given so that this rich source of structural information of presently known PDE4B inhibitors could be helpful in generating a selective and potent inhibitor of PDE4B. PMID:25853062

  17. Inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase meet immunity.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. More recent use is for myasthenia gravis. Many of these inhibitors interact with the second known cholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Further, evidence shows that acetylcholine plays a role in suppression of cytokine release through a "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" which raises questions about the role of these inhibitors in the immune system. This review covers research and discussion of the role of the inhibitors in modulating the immune response using as examples the commonly available drugs, donepezil, galantamine, huperzine, neostigmine and pyridostigmine. Major attention is given to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a well-described link between the central nervous system and terminal effector cells in the immune system. PMID:24893223

  18. Update on TNF Inhibitors in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Sobell, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-01

    Emerging data describe new potential indications for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors in dermatology, including pediatric psoriasis and hidradenitis suppurativa. New biosimilar TNF agents are in late stages of development and may be available in the United States in the near future. Biosimilar agents are similar but not identical to available TNF inhibitors, and approval requires extensive analytic, toxicity, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and clinical testing. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp6):S104-S106. PMID:27537073

  19. Heterocyclics as corrosion inhibitors for acid media

    SciTech Connect

    Ajmal, M.; Khan, M.A.W.; Ahmad, S.; Quraishi, M.A.

    1996-12-01

    The available literature on the use of heterocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors in acid media has been reviewed. It has been noted that the workers in this field have either used sulfur or nitrogen containing heterocyclic compounds for studying inhibition action. The authors have synthesized compounds containing sulfur and nitrogen both in the same ring and studied their inhibition action in acid media. These compounds were found to be better inhibitors than those containing either atoms alone.

  20. 2,4-Diaminopyrimidine MK2 inhibitors. Part I: Observation of an unexpected inhibitor binding mode

    SciTech Connect

    Argiriadi, Maria A.; Ericsson, Anna M.; Harris, Christopher M.; Banach, David L.; Borhani, David W.; Calderwood, David J.; Demers, Megan D.; DiMauro, Jennifer; Dixon, Richard W.; Hardman, Jennifer; Kwak, Silvia; Li, Biqin; Mankovich, John A.; Marcotte, Douglas; Mullen, Kelly D.; Ni, Baofu; Pietras, M.; Sadhukhan, Ramkrishna; Sousa, Silvino; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Wang, L.; Xiang, T.; Talanian, R.V.

    2010-09-17

    MK2 is a Ser/Thr kinase of significant interest as an anti-inflammatory drug discovery target. Here we describe the development of in vitro tools for the identification and characterization of MK2 inhibitors, including validation of inhibitor interactions with the crystallography construct and determination of the unique binding mode of 2,4-diaminopyrimidine inhibitors in the MK2 active site.

  1. Aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Męczekalski, Błażej

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory condition in which foci of endometrial tissue grow outside of the uterine cavity. Endometriosis was estimated to affect 176 million women of childbearing potential all over the world in 2010. The presence of extrauterine endometrial tissue is associated with pain and infertility. Typical symptoms of endometriosis include dysmenorrhoea, dyspareunia, heavy menstrual periods (menorrhagia), pelvic pain that is not related to menstrual cycles, dysuria, and chronic fatigue. Medical treatments for endometriosis include combined oral contraceptive pills, danazol, gestrinone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (aGnRHs). A new class of medications called aromatase inhibitors has been identified in recent years as potential therapeutic agents for endometriosis. This article provides general information about aromatase inhibitors, their use in gynaecology, and their adverse effects. In particular, the paper discusses the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis in postmenopausal women. Unlike oral contraceptives, gestagens, aGnRHs, and danazol, which suppress ovarian oestrogen synthesis, aromatase inhibitors inhibit mainly extra-ovarian synthesis of oestrogens. Therefore, the use of aromatase inhibitors seems to be particularly relevant in older patients, as most of the body's oestrogen is produced outside the ovaries after menopause. The paper discusses also the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of pain associated with endometriosis and infertility caused by endometriosis. PMID:27095958

  2. CHK1 Inhibitors in Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dent, Paul; Tang, Yong; Yacoub, Adly; Dai, Yun; Fisher, Paul B.; Grant, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Cellular sensing of DNA damage, along with concomitant cell cycle arrest, is mediated by a great many proteins and enzymes. One focus of pharmaceutical development has been the inhibition of DNA damage signaling, and checkpoint kinases (Chks) in particular, as a means to sensitize proliferating tumor cells to chemotherapies that damage DNA. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine, or UCN-01, is a clinically relevant and well-studied kinase activity inhibitor that exerts chemosensitizing effects by inhibition of Chk1, and a multitude of Chk1 inhibitors have entered development. Clinical development of UCN-01 has overcome many initial obstacles, but the drug has nevertheless failed to show a high level of clinical activity when combined with chemotherapeutic agents. One very likely reason for the lack of clinical efficacy of Chk1 inhibitors may be that the inhibition of Chk1 causes the compensatory activation of ATM and ERK1/2 pathways. Indeed, inhibition of many enzyme activities, not necessarily components of cell cycle regulation, may block Chk1 inhibitor–induced ERK1/2 activation and enhance the toxicity of Chk1 inhibitors. This review examines the rationally hypothesized actions of Chk1 inhibitors as cell cycle modulatory drugs as well as the impact of Chk1 inhibition upon other cell survival signaling pathways. An understanding of Chk1 inhibition in multiple signaling contexts will be essential to the therapeutic development of Chk1 inhibitors. PMID:21540473

  3. Novel inhibitors of advanced glycation endproducts.

    PubMed

    Rahbar, Samuel; Figarola, James L

    2003-11-01

    A number of natural or synthetic compounds as AGE inhibitors have been proposed, discovered or currently being advanced by others and us. We have identified two new classes of aromatic compounds; aryl- (and heterocyclic) ureido and aryl (and heterocyclic) carboxamido phenoxyisobutyric acids, and benzoic acid derivatives and related compounds, as potential inhibitors of glycation and AGE formation. Some of these novel compounds also showed "AGE-breaking" activities in vitro. Current evidence is that chelation of transition metals and/or trapping or indirect inhibition of formation of reactive carbonyl compounds are involved in the mechanisms of action of these novel AGE inhibitors and breakers. Here, we review the inhibitors of glycation and AGE-breakers published to date and present the results of our in vitro and in vivo investigations on a number of these novel AGE inhibitors. These AGE-inhibitors and AGE-breakers may find therapeutic use in the treatment of diseases that AGE formation and accumulation may be responsible for their pathogenesis such as diabetes, Alzheimer's, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. PMID:14568010

  4. Aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Słopień, Radosław; Męczekalski, Błażej

    2016-03-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory condition in which foci of endometrial tissue grow outside of the uterine cavity. Endometriosis was estimated to affect 176 million women of childbearing potential all over the world in 2010. The presence of extrauterine endometrial tissue is associated with pain and infertility. Typical symptoms of endometriosis include dysmenorrhoea, dyspareunia, heavy menstrual periods (menorrhagia), pelvic pain that is not related to menstrual cycles, dysuria, and chronic fatigue. Medical treatments for endometriosis include combined oral contraceptive pills, danazol, gestrinone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (aGnRHs). A new class of medications called aromatase inhibitors has been identified in recent years as potential therapeutic agents for endometriosis. This article provides general information about aromatase inhibitors, their use in gynaecology, and their adverse effects. In particular, the paper discusses the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis in postmenopausal women. Unlike oral contraceptives, gestagens, aGnRHs, and danazol, which suppress ovarian oestrogen synthesis, aromatase inhibitors inhibit mainly extra-ovarian synthesis of oestrogens. Therefore, the use of aromatase inhibitors seems to be particularly relevant in older patients, as most of the body's oestrogen is produced outside the ovaries after menopause. The paper discusses also the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of pain associated with endometriosis and infertility caused by endometriosis. PMID:27095958

  5. Discovery of Novel Haloalkane Dehalogenase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Buryska, Tomas; Daniel, Lukas; Kunka, Antonin; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenases (HLDs) have recently been discovered in a number of bacteria, including symbionts and pathogens of both plants and humans. However, the biological roles of HLDs in these organisms are unclear. The development of efficient HLD inhibitors serving as molecular probes to explore their function would represent an important step toward a better understanding of these interesting enzymes. Here we report the identification of inhibitors for this enzyme family using two different approaches. The first builds on the structures of the enzymes' known substrates and led to the discovery of less potent nonspecific HLD inhibitors. The second approach involved the virtual screening of 150,000 potential inhibitors against the crystal structure of an HLD from the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The best inhibitor exhibited high specificity for the target structure, with an inhibition constant of 3 μM and a molecular architecture that clearly differs from those of all known HLD substrates. The new inhibitors will be used to study the natural functions of HLDs in bacteria, to probe their mechanisms, and to achieve their stabilization. PMID:26773086

  6. Discovering Anti-platelet Drug Combinations with an Integrated Model of Activator-Inhibitor Relationships, Activator-Activator Synergies and Inhibitor-Inhibitor Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Federica; Golla, Kalyan; Fitzpatrick, Darren J.; Casey, Fergal P.; Moran, Niamh; Shields, Denis C.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying effective therapeutic drug combinations that modulate complex signaling pathways in platelets is central to the advancement of effective anti-thrombotic therapies. However, there is no systems model of the platelet that predicts responses to different inhibitor combinations. We developed an approach which goes beyond current inhibitor-inhibitor combination screening to efficiently consider other signaling aspects that may give insights into the behaviour of the platelet as a system. We investigated combinations of platelet inhibitors and activators. We evaluated three distinct strands of information, namely: activator-inhibitor combination screens (testing a panel of inhibitors against a panel of activators); inhibitor-inhibitor synergy screens; and activator-activator synergy screens. We demonstrated how these analyses may be efficiently performed, both experimentally and computationally, to identify particular combinations of most interest. Robust tests of activator-activator synergy and of inhibitor-inhibitor synergy required combinations to show significant excesses over the double doses of each component. Modeling identified multiple effects of an inhibitor of the P2Y12 ADP receptor, and complementarity between inhibitor-inhibitor synergy effects and activator-inhibitor combination effects. This approach accelerates the mapping of combination effects of compounds to develop combinations that may be therapeutically beneficial. We integrated the three information sources into a unified model that predicted the benefits of a triple drug combination targeting ADP, thromboxane and thrombin signaling. PMID:25875950

  7. Corrosion inhibitors for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1978-01-01

    Inhibitors which appeared promising in previous tests and additional inhibitors including several proprietary products were evaluated. Evaluation of the inhibitors was based on corrosion protection afforded an aluminum-mild steel-copper-stainless steel assembly in a hot corrosive water. Of the inhibitors tested two were found to be effective and show promise for protecting multimetallic solar heating systems.

  8. Potent pyrrolidine- and piperidine-based BACE-1 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Iserloh, U.; Wu, Y.; Cumming, J.N.; Pan, J.; Wang, L.Y.; Stamford, A.W.; Kennedy, M.E.; Kuvelkar, R.; Chen, X.; Parker, E.M.; Strickland, C.; Voigt, J.

    2008-08-18

    Based on lead compound 1 identified from the patent literature, we developed novel patentable BACE-1 inhibitors by introducing a cyclic amine scaffold. Extensive SAR studies on both pyrrolidines and piperidines ultimately led to inhibitor 2f, one of the most potent inhibitors synthesized to date. The discovery and development of novel BACE-1 inhibitors incorporating a cyclic amine scaffold is described.

  9. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Many antidepressants inhibit serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake or both to achieve their clinical effect. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants (SSRIs) includes citalopram, escitalopram (active enantiomer of citalopram), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. The SSRIs are as effective as tricyclic antidepressants in treatment of major depression with less significant side effects. As a result, they have become the largest class of medications prescribed to humans for depression. They are also used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorders, alcoholism, obesity, migraines, and chronic pain. An SSRI (fluoxetine) has been approved for veterinary use in treatment of canine separation anxiety. SSRIs act specifically on synaptic serotonin concentrations by blocking its reuptake in the presynapse and increasing levels in the presynaptic membrane. Clinical signs of SSRI overdose result from excessive amounts of serotonin in the central nervous system. These signs include nausea, vomiting, mydriasis, hypersalivation, and hyperthermia. Clinical signs are dose dependent and higher dosages may result in the serotonin syndrome that manifests itself as ataxia, tremors, muscle rigidity, hyperthermia, diarrhea, and seizures. Current studies reveal no increase in appearance of any specific clinical signs of serotonin toxicity with regard to any SSRI medication. In people, citalopram has been reported to have an increased risk of electrocardiographic abnormalities. Diagnosis of SSRI poisoning is based on history, clinical signs, and response to therapy. No single clinical test is currently available to confirm SSRI toxicosis. The goals of treatment in this intoxication are to support the animal, prevent further absorption of the drug, support the central nervous system, control hyperthermia, and halt any seizure activity. The relative safety of the SSRIs in overdose despite the occurrence of serotonin syndrome makes them

  10. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Many antidepressants inhibit serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake or both to achieve their clinical effect. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants (SSRIs) includes citalopram, escitalopram (active enantiomer of citalopram), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. The SSRIs are as effective as tricyclic antidepressants in treatment of major depression with less significant side effects. As a result, they have become the largest class of medications prescribed to humans for depression. They are also used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorders, alcoholism, obesity, migraines, and chronic pain. An SSRI (fluoxetine) has been approved for veterinary use in treatment of canine separation anxiety. SSRIs act specifically on synaptic serotonin concentrations by blocking its reuptake in the presynapse and increasing levels in the presynaptic membrane. Clinical signs of SSRI overdose result from excessive amounts of serotonin in the central nervous system. These signs include nausea, vomiting, mydriasis, hypersalivation, and hyperthermia. Clinical signs are dose dependent and higher dosages may result in the serotonin syndrome that manifests itself as ataxia, tremors, muscle rigidity, hyperthermia, diarrhea, and seizures. Current studies reveal no increase in appearance of any specific clinical signs of serotonin toxicity with regard to any SSRI medication. In people, citalopram has been reported to have an increased risk of electrocardiographic abnormalities. Diagnosis of SSRI poisoning is based on history, clinical signs, and response to therapy. No single clinical test is currently available to confirm SSRI toxicosis. The goals of treatment in this intoxication are to support the animal, prevent further absorption of the drug, support the central nervous system, control hyperthermia, and halt any seizure activity. The relative safety of the SSRIs in overdose despite the occurrence of serotonin syndrome makes them

  11. Combined effects of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and vATPase inhibitors in NSCLC cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Bora; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun; Park, In-Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2015-08-15

    Despite excellent initial clinical responses of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), many patients eventually develop resistance. According to a recent report, vacuolar H + ATPase (vATPase) is overexpressed and is associated with chemotherapy drug resistance in NSCLC. We investigated the combined effects of EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors and their underlying mechanisms in the regulation of NSCLC cell death. We found that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib, or lapatinib) and vATPase inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A) enhanced synergistic cell death compared to treatments with each drug alone. Treatment with bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A led to the induction of Bnip3 expression in an Hif-1α dependent manner. Knock-down of Hif-1α or Bnip3 by siRNA further enhanced cell death induced by bafilomycin A1, suggesting that Hif-1α/Bnip3 induction promoted resistance to cell death induced by the vATPase inhibitors. EGFR TKIs suppressed Hif-1α and Bnip3 expression induced by the vATPase inhibitors, suggesting that they enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to these inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. Taken together, we conclude that EGFR TKIs enhance the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to vATPase inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. We suggest that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC. - Highlights: • Co-treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors induces synergistic cell death • EGFR TKIs enhance cell sensitivity to vATPase inhibitors via Hif-1α downregulation • Co-treatment of these inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC.

  12. Three Decades of β-Lactamase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Sarah M.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Since the introduction of penicillin, β-lactam antibiotics have been the antimicrobial agents of choice. Unfortunately, the efficacy of these life-saving antibiotics is significantly threatened by bacterial β-lactamases. β-Lactamases are now responsible for resistance to penicillins, extended-spectrum cephalosporins, monobactams, and carbapenems. In order to overcome β-lactamase-mediated resistance, β-lactamase inhibitors (clavulanate, sulbactam, and tazobactam) were introduced into clinical practice. These inhibitors greatly enhance the efficacy of their partner β-lactams (amoxicillin, ampicillin, piperacillin, and ticarcillin) in the treatment of serious Enterobacteriaceae and penicillin-resistant staphylococcal infections. However, selective pressure from excess antibiotic use accelerated the emergence of resistance to β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitor combinations. Furthermore, the prevalence of clinically relevant β-lactamases from other classes that are resistant to inhibition is rapidly increasing. There is an urgent need for effective inhibitors that can restore the activity of β-lactams. Here, we review the catalytic mechanisms of each β-lactamase class. We then discuss approaches for circumventing β-lactamase-mediated resistance, including properties and characteristics of mechanism-based inactivators. We next highlight the mechanisms of action and salient clinical and microbiological features of β-lactamase inhibitors. We also emphasize their therapeutic applications. We close by focusing on novel compounds and the chemical features of these agents that may contribute to a “second generation” of inhibitors. The goal for the next 3 decades will be to design inhibitors that will be effective for more than a single class of β-lactamases. PMID:20065329

  13. Cardiovascular effects of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Krum, Henry; Liew, Danny; Aw, Juan; Haas, Steven

    2004-03-01

    Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors represent a significant advance in the management of inflammatory disorders. They have similar efficacy to nonselective 'conventional' nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but a superior gastrointestinal safety profile. However, a significant caveat is the perceived potential of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors to cause adverse cardiovascular effects, an issue first raised by the Vioxx Gastrointestinal Outcomes Research (VIGOR) study of rofecoxib (Vioxx, Merck & Co. Inc.). Mechanisms by which cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors may increase cardiovascular risk are selective inhibition of prostaglandin I2 over thromboxane A2 within the eicosanoid pathway, which promotes thrombosis, and inhibition of prostaglandins E2 and I2 within the kidney, which leads to sodium and water retention and blood pressure elevation. In spite of this, the cardiovascular findings from VIGOR are not firmly supported by observations from large cohort studies and other clinical trials of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, including the Celecoxib Long-term Arthritis Safety Study. The two main theories that explain the VIGOR findings are that the comparator used (naproxen; Naprosyn, Roche) is cardioprotective and that very high doses of rofecoxib were used, but at present neither is backed by firm evidence. Indeed, there is now early evidence that selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition with celecoxib may even protect against the progression of cardiovascular disease, on the basis that cyclooxygenase-2 mediates key processes in atherothrombosis. Currently, it is not clear what the net cardiovascular effects of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors are. The data are inconsistent and at best, speculative. It may be also that celecoxib and rofecoxib differ in their cardiovascular effects. Clarification of these issues is of vital importance given the vast number of patients presently taking both types of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. Therefore, what is clear in this situation is

  14. Versatile templates for the development of novel kinase inhibitors: Discovery of novel CDK inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Michael P.; Paruch, Kamil; Alvarez, Carmen; Doll, Ronald J.; Keertikar, Kerry; Duca, Jose; Fischmann, Thierry O.; Hruza, Alan; Madison, Vincent; Lees, Emma; Parry, David; Seghezzi, Wolfgang; Sgambellone, Nicole; Shanahan, Frances; Wiswell, Derek; Guzi, Timothy J.

    2008-06-30

    A series of four bicyclic cores were prepared and evaluated as cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) inhibitors. From the in-vitro and cell-based analysis, the pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core (represented by 9) emerged as the superior core for further elaboration in the identification of novel CDK2 inhibitors.

  15. Polyphenol oxidase inhibitor(s) from German cockroach (Blattella germanica) extract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An extract from German cockroach appears effective in inhibiting browning on apples and potatoes. Successful identification of inhibitor(s) of PPO from German cockroach would be useful to the fruit and vegetable segments of the food industry, due to the losses they incur from enzymatic browning. Ide...

  16. Epidemiological aspects of inhibitor development redefine the clinical importance of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, H M

    2014-05-01

    Inhibitor development is a serious complication of treatment with coagulation products. Presently, 25-30% of all newly diagnosed patients with severe haemophilia A are diagnosed with inhibitors. An increasing number of genetic and non-genetic risk factors have been reported to be involved, although the impact of them in understanding the aetiology is still limited. Much attention has been focused on factor VIII products, but more recent studies show very little, if any, difference between class plasma and recombinant factor VIII products. More intensive treatment and higher dosing are probably more important factors. More than 10% of the inhibitors diagnosed in the last decade are of low titre. A first goal should be to understand their importance. It is argued that the impact of different risk factors should be studied in high-titre inhibitors to prevent dilution by non-significant low-titre inhibitors.

  17. Inhibitors Selective for Mycobacterial Versus Human Proteasomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.; Li, D; Sorio de Carvalho, L; Deng, H; Tao, H; Vogt, G; Wu, K; Schneider, J; Chidawanyika, T; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Many anti-infectives inhibit the synthesis of bacterial proteins, but none selectively inhibits their degradation. Most anti-infectives kill replicating pathogens, but few preferentially kill pathogens that have been forced into a non-replicating state by conditions in the host. To explore these alternative approaches we sought selective inhibitors of the proteasome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Given that the proteasome structure is extensively conserved, it is not surprising that inhibitors of all chemical classes tested have blocked both eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteasomes, and no inhibitor has proved substantially more potent on proteasomes of pathogens than of their hosts. Here we show that certain oxathiazol-2-one compounds kill non-replicating M.?tuberculosis and act as selective suicide-substrate inhibitors of the M.?tuberculosis proteasome by cyclocarbonylating its active site threonine. Major conformational changes protect the inhibitor-enzyme intermediate from hydrolysis, allowing formation of an oxazolidin-2-one and preventing regeneration of active protease. Residues outside the active site whose hydrogen bonds stabilize the critical loop before and after it moves are extensively non-conserved. This may account for the ability of oxathiazol-2-one compounds to inhibit the mycobacterial proteasome potently and irreversibly while largely sparing the human homologue.

  18. Inhibitors in LPE growth of garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roode, W. H.; Robertson, J. M.

    1983-09-01

    The growth rate of LPE growth garnets can be reduced considerably by the addition of small amounts of group II oxides. This effect can be helpful for the controlled growth of very thin garnet films for sub-micron bubbles and optical devices. The largest effect was found with the addition of Mg 2+ and Ca 2+, resulting in a maximum decrease of the growth rate of approximately 70%. A semi-empirical formula was used to describe the growth rate as a function of the dipping temperature. The change in the growth rate on the addition of the inhibitor ion at constant temperature was found to be proportional to ( aMO)/( aMO+2 Ln 2O 3), where M is a group II element, Ln 2O 2 is the sum of the yttrium and RE oxides in the melt, and a is the inhibitor factor. The value of the inhibitor factor depends on both the inhibitor ion as well as the composition of the garnet. The lowering of the growth rate on the addition of an inhibitor ion is explained by the introduction of an extra growth resistance due to the charge compensation mechanism of the divalent ions. The influence of the different charge compensation possibilities in the garnet system is examined and the relative importance of these possibilities for charge compensation is discussed.

  19. Inhibitors of the Metalloproteinase Anthrax Lethal Factor.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Allison B; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, a rod shaped, spore forming, gram positive bacteria, is the etiological agent of anthrax. B. anthracis virulence is partly attributable to two secreted bipartite protein toxins, which act inside host cells to disrupt signaling pathways important for host defense against infection. These toxins may also directly contribute to mortality in late stage infection. The zinc-dependent metalloproteinase anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a critical component of one of these protein toxins and a prime target for inhibitor development to produce anthrax therapeutics. Here, we describe recent efforts to identify specific and potent LF inhibitors. Derivatization of peptide substrate analogs bearing zinc-binding groups has produced potent and specific LF inhibitors, and X-ray crystallography of LFinhibitor complexes has provided insight into features required for high affinity binding. Novel inhibitor scaffolds have been identified through several approaches, including fragment-based drug discovery, virtual screening, and highthroughput screening of diverse compound libraries. Lastly, efforts to discover LF inhibitors have led to the development of new screening strategies, such as the use of full-length proteins as substrates, that may prove useful for other proteases as well. Overall, these efforts have led to a collection of chemically and mechanistically diverse molecules capable of inhibiting LF activity in vitro and in cells, as well as in animal models of anthrax infection. PMID:27072692

  20. Inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Fesen, M R; Kohn, K W; Leteurtre, F; Pommier, Y

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to further extend the number of targets for development of antiretroviral agents, we have used an in vitro integrase assay to investigate a variety of chemicals, including topoisomerase inhibitors, antimalarial agents, DNA binders, naphthoquinones, the flavone quercetin, and caffeic acid phenethyl ester as potential human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibitors. Our results show that although several topoisomerase inhibitors--including doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, ellipticines, and quercetin--are potent integrase inhibitors, other topoisomerase inhibitors--such as amsacrine, etoposide, teniposide, and camptothecin--are inactive. Other intercalators, such as chloroquine and the bifunctional intercalator ditercalinium, are also active. However, DNA binding does not correlate closely with integrase inhibition. The intercalator 9-aminoacridine and the polyamine DNA minor-groove binders spermine, spermidine, and distamycin have no effect, whereas the non-DNA binders primaquine, 5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, and caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibit the integrase. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester was the only compound that inhibited the integration step to a substantially greater degree than the initial cleavage step of the enzyme. A model of 5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone interaction with the zinc finger region of the retroviral integrase protein is proposed. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8460151

  1. Resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides: current understanding.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-09-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) inhibitor herbicides currently comprise the largest site-of-action group (with 54 active ingredients across five chemical groups) and have been widely used in world agriculture since they were first introduced in 1982. Resistance evolution in weeds to AHAS inhibitors has been rapid and identified in populations of many weed species. Often, evolved resistance is associated with point mutations in the target AHAS gene; however non-target-site enhanced herbicide metabolism occurs as well. Many AHAS gene resistance mutations can occur and be rapidly enriched owing to a high initial resistance gene frequency, simple and dominant genetic inheritance and lack of major fitness cost of the resistance alleles. Major advances in the elucidation of the crystal structure of the AHAS (Arabidopsis thaliana) catalytic subunit in complex with various AHAS inhibitor herbicides have greatly improved current understanding of the detailed molecular interactions between AHAS, cofactors and herbicides. Compared with target-site resistance, non-target-site resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides is less studied and hence less understood. In a few well-studied cases, non-target-site resistance is due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism (metabolic resistance), mimicking that occurring in tolerant crop species and often involving cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. However, the specific herbicide-metabolising, resistance-endowing genes are yet to be identified in resistant weed species. The current state of mechanistic understanding of AHAS inhibitor herbicide resistance is reviewed, and outstanding research issues are outlined.

  2. Protease Inhibitors from Plants with Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Young; Park, Seong-Cheol; Hwang, Indeok; Cheong, Hyeonsook; Nah, Jae-Woon; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Park, Yoonkyung

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial proteins (peptides) are known to play important roles in the innate host defense mechanisms of most living organisms, including plants, insects, amphibians and mammals. They are also known to possess potent antibiotic activity against bacteria, fungi, and even certain viruses. Recently, the rapid emergence of microbial pathogens that are resistant to currently available antibiotics has triggered considerable interest in the isolation and investigation of the mode of action of antimicrobial proteins (peptides). Plants produce a variety of proteins (peptides) that are involved in the defense against pathogens and invading organisms, including ribosome-inactivating proteins, lectins, protease inhibitors and antifungal peptides (proteins). Specially, the protease inhibitors can inhibit aspartic, serine and cysteine proteinases. Increased levels of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors correlated with the plants resistance to the pathogen. Usually, the purification of antimicrobial proteins (peptides) with protease inhibitor activity was accomplished by salt-extraction, ultrafiltration and C18 reverse phase chromatography, successfully. We discuss the relation between antimicrobial and anti-protease activity in this review. Protease inhibitors from plants potently inhibited the growth of a variety of pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains and are therefore excellent candidates for use as the lead compounds for the development of novel antimicrobial agents. PMID:19582234

  3. Monoamine Reuptake Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huot, Philippe; Fox, Susan H.; Brotchie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) are secondary to a dopamine deficiency in the striatum. However, the degenerative process in PD is not limited to the dopaminergic system and also affects serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons. Because they can increase monoamine levels throughout the brain, monoamine reuptake inhibitors (MAUIs) represent potential therapeutic agents in PD. However, they are seldom used in clinical practice other than as antidepressants and wake-promoting agents. This review article summarises all of the available literature on use of 50 MAUIs in PD. The compounds are divided according to their relative potency for each of the monoamine transporters. Despite wide discrepancy in the methodology of the studies reviewed, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) selective serotonin transporter (SERT), selective noradrenaline transporter (NET), and dual SERT/NET inhibitors are effective against PD depression; (2) selective dopamine transporter (DAT) and dual DAT/NET inhibitors exert an anti-Parkinsonian effect when administered as monotherapy but do not enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA); (3) dual DAT/SERT inhibitors might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-DOPA without worsening dyskinesia; (4) triple DAT/NET/SERT inhibitors might exert an anti-Parkinsonian action as monotherapy and might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA, though at the expense of worsening dyskinesia. PMID:25810948

  4. SHH inhibitors for the treatment of medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Samkari, Ayman; White, Jason; Packer, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. It is currently stratified into four molecular variants through the advances in transcriptional profiling. They include: wingless, sonic hedgehog (SHH), Group III, and Group IV. The SHH group is characterized by constitutive activation of the SHH signaling pathway, and genetically characterized by mutations in patched homolog 1 (PTCH1) or other downstream pathway mutations. SHH inhibitors have become of great clinical interest in treating SHH-driven medulloblastoma. Many inhibitors are currently in different stages of development, some already approved for other SHH-driven cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma. In vitro and in vivo medulloblastoma studies have shown efficacy and these findings have been translated into Phase I and II clinical trials. In this review, we present an overview of SHH medulloblastoma, as well as a discussion of currently available SHH inhibitors, and the challenges associated with their use. PMID:26027634

  5. LDL Cholesterol, Statins And PCSK 9 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjiv

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) is of vital importance for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Statin is the most effective therapy today to lower LDLc by inhibiting HMG-CoA-reductase. However despite intensive statin therapy, there remains a residual risk of recurrent myocardial infarction in about 20–30% cases. Moreover a few patients develop statin intolerance. For severe hypercholesterolemia, statins alone or in combination of ezetimibe, niacin and fenofibrate have been advocated. For homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HOFH), a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein MTP inhibitor (Lopitamide) and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) (Mipomersen) have recently been approved by FDA, USA through ‘Risk evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS)’. Possible future therapies include PCSK-9 inhibitors which have excellent lipid lowering properties. Three monoclonal antibodies (PCSK 9 Inhibitors) alirocumab, evolocumab and Bococizumab are under advanced clinical stage IV trials and awaiting approval by FDA and European Medicines Agency. PMID:26432726

  6. LDL cholesterol, statins and PCSK 9 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjiv

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) is of vital importance for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Statin is the most effective therapy today to lower LDLc by inhibiting HMG-CoA-reductase. However despite intensive statin therapy, there remains a residual risk of recurrent myocardial infarction in about 20-30% cases. Moreover a few patients develop statin intolerance. For severe hypercholesterolemia, statins alone or in combination of ezetimibe, niacin and fenofibrate have been advocated. For homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HOFH), a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein MTP inhibitor (Lopitamide) and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) (Mipomersen) have recently been approved by FDA, USA through 'Risk evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS)'. Possible future therapies include PCSK-9 inhibitors which have excellent lipid lowering properties. Three monoclonal antibodies (PCSK 9 Inhibitors) alirocumab, evolocumab and Bococizumab are under advanced clinical stage IV trials and awaiting approval by FDA and European Medicines Agency. PMID:26432726

  7. Calcification inhibitors in human ligamentum flavum.

    PubMed

    Maruta, K; Ichimura, K; Matsui, H; Yamagami, T; Sano, A; Tsuji, H

    1993-01-01

    To examine the presence of substances which inhibit calcification in human ligamentum flavum, the inhibitory effect of an Na2HPO4 extract of the flavum was determined in terms of the in vitro calcium uptake of the ligamentum flavum matrix. Additionally, grafts of extracted and non-extracted dry ligamentum flavum matrices were transplanted into the dorsal muscles of rats, and calcification in the grafts was examined radiologically and histochemically. In order to determine if component cells of human ligamentum flavum produce calcification inhibitors, ligamentum flavum cells were cultured, and the crystal inhibitor activity of the culture medium was measured by a seed test which used hydroxyapatite as the nucleus of precipitation. The calcification reaction system demonstrated that the ligamentum flavum extract contains an inhibitory factor for calcium uptake by the ligamentum flavum matrix. The seed test revealed that human ligamentum flavum cells produce calcification inhibitor activity.

  8. Orally Bioavailable Potent Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung Hee; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Liu, Jun-Yan; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    A series of N,N′-disubstituted ureas having a conformationally restricted cis- or trans-1,4-cyclohexane α to the urea were prepared and tested as soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors. This series of compounds showed low nanomolar to picomolar activities against recombinant human sEH. Both isomers showed similar potencies, but the trans isomers were more metabolically stable in human hepatic microsomes. Furthermore, these new potent inhibitors show a greater metabolic stability in vivo than previously described sEH inhibitors. We demonstrated that trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-ylureido)cyclohexyloxy]benzoic acid 13g (t-AUCB, IC50 = 1.3 ± 0.05 nM) had excellent oral bioavailability (98%, n = 2) and blood area under the curve in dogs and was effective in vivo to treat hypotension in lipopolysaccharide challenged murine models. PMID:17616115

  9. Serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors: a pharmacological comparison.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2014-03-01

    The serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are a family of antidepressants that inhibit the reuptake of both serotonin and norepinephrine. While these drugs are traditionally considered a group of inter-related antidepressants based upon reuptake inhibition, they generally display different chemical structures as well as different pharmacological properties. In this article, we discuss these and other differences among the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, including the year of approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration, generic availability, approved clinical indications, half-lives, metabolism and excretion, presence or not of active metabolites, dosing schedules, proportionate effects on serotonin and norepinephrine, and the timing of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake (i.e., sequential or simultaneous). Again, while serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are grouped as a family of antidepressants, they exhibit a surprising number of differences- differences that may ultimately relate to clinical nuances in patient care. PMID:24800132

  10. Novel hemagglutinin-based influenza virus inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xintian; Zhang, Xuanxuan

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus has caused seasonal epidemics and worldwide pandemics, which caused tremendous loss of human lives and socioeconomics. Nowadays, only two classes of anti-influenza drugs, M2 ion channel inhibitors and neuraminidase inhibitors respectively, are used for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza virus infection. Unfortunately, influenza virus strains resistant to one or all of those drugs emerge frequently. Hemagglutinin (HA), the glycoprotein in influenza virus envelope, plays a critical role in viral binding, fusion and entry processes. Therefore, HA is a promising target for developing anti-influenza drugs, which block the initial entry step of viral life cycle. Here we reviewed recent understanding of conformational changes of HA in protein folding and fusion processes, and the discovery of HA-based influenza entry inhibitors, which may provide more choices for preventing and controlling potential pandemics caused by multi-resistant influenza viruses. PMID:23977436

  11. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors: promise or peril?

    PubMed Central

    Mengle-Gaw, Laurel J; Schwartz, Benjamin D

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of two isoforms of the cyclooxygenase enzyme, COX-1 and COX-2, and the development of COX-2-specific inhibitors as anti-inflammatories and analgesics have offered great promise that the therapeutic benefits of NSAIDs could be optimized through inhibition of COX-2, while minimizing their adverse side effect profile associated with inhibition of COX-1. While COX-2 specific inhibitors have proven to be efficacious in a variety of inflammatory conditions, exposure of large numbers of patients to these drugs in postmarketing studies have uncovered potential safety concerns that raise questions about the benefit/risk ratio of COX-2-specific NSAIDs compared to conventional NSAIDs. This article reviews the efficacy and safety profiles of COX-2-specific inhibitors, comparing them with conventional NSDAIDs. PMID:12467519

  12. Transgenic inhibitors of RNA interference in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yu-ting; Tam, Bergin; Linay, Fabien; Lai, Eric C

    2007-01-01

    RNA silencing functions as an adaptive antiviral defense in both plants and animals. In turn, viruses commonly encode suppressors of RNA silencing, which enable them to mount productive infection. These inhibitor proteins may be exploited as reagents with which to probe mechanisms and functions of RNA silencing pathways. In this report, we describe transgenic Drosophila strains that allow inducible expression of the viral RNA silencing inhibitors Flock House virus-B2, Nodamura virus-B2, vaccinia virus-E3L, influenza A virus-NS1 and tombusvirus P19. Some of these, especially the B2 proteins, are effective transgenic inhibitors of double strand RNA-induced gene silencing in flies. On the other hand, none of them is effective against the Drosophila microRNA pathway. Their functional selectivity makes these viral silencing proteins useful reagents with which to study biological functions of the Drosophila RNA interference pathway.

  13. Current and Novel Inhibitors of HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    Pokorná, Jana; Machala, Ladislav; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The design, development and clinical success of HIV protease inhibitors represent one of the most remarkable achievements of molecular medicine. This review describes all nine currently available FDA-approved protease inhibitors, discusses their pharmacokinetic properties, off-target activities, side-effects, and resistance profiles. The compounds in the various stages of clinical development are also introduced, as well as alternative approaches, aiming at other functional domains of HIV PR. The potential of these novel compounds to open new way to the rational drug design of human viruses is critically assessed. PMID:21994591

  14. Identification of potent, selective KDM5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gehling, Victor S; Bellon, Steven F; Harmange, Jean-Christophe; LeBlanc, Yves; Poy, Florence; Odate, Shobu; Buker, Shane; Lan, Fei; Arora, Shilpi; Williamson, Kaylyn E; Sandy, Peter; Cummings, Richard T; Bailey, Christopher M; Bergeron, Louise; Mao, Weifeng; Gustafson, Amy; Liu, Yichin; VanderPorten, Erica; Audia, James E; Trojer, Patrick; Albrecht, Brian K

    2016-09-01

    This communication describes the identification and optimization of a series of pan-KDM5 inhibitors derived from compound 1, a hit initially identified against KDM4C. Compound 1 was optimized to afford compound 20, a 10nM inhibitor of KDM5A. Compound 20 is highly selective for the KDM5 enzymes versus other histone lysine demethylases and demonstrates activity in a cellular assay measuring the increase in global histone 3 lysine 4 tri-methylation (H3K4me3). In addition compound 20 has good ADME properties, excellent mouse PK, and is a suitable starting point for further optimization. PMID:27476424

  15. Presence of aromatase inhibitors in cycads.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, M T; Itzhak, Y; Puett, D

    1995-07-28

    Cycads, the most primitive of the living gymnosperms, have been used and continue to be used for food and medicinal purposes by many cultures, although toxins must be removed before ingestion. In our quest to identify tropical plants that contain inhibitors of the cytochrome P-450 aromatase and thus may be efficacious in treating estrogen-dependent tumors, we have screened extracts from 5 species of cycad folia encompassing 3 genera: Cycas cairnsiana F. Muell., Cycas revoluta Thunb., Cycas rumphii Miq., Dioon spinulosum Dyer and Encephalartos ferox Bertol. All extracts were found to contain inhibitors of the human enzyme.

  16. Inhibition of elastase by a synthetic cotton-bound serine protease inhibitor: in vitro kinetics and inhibitor release.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J V; Bopp, A F; Batiste, S; Ullah, A J; Cohen, I K; Diegelmann, R F; Montante, S J

    1999-01-01

    A cotton-bound serine protease inhibitor of elastase (fiber-inhibitor) has been formulated for in vitro evaluation in chronic wound fluid. As a model to understand the properties of the inhibitor in wound dressings, the kinetic profile and in vitro release of the fiber-inhibitor formulation have been examined. The elastase inhibitor N-Methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethylketone was modified onto cotton cellulose fibers and assayed as a colloidal system. Amino acid analysis and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography were compared as semiquantitative methods to assess elastase inhibitor release from the cotton fibers. The kinetics of inhibition was assessed on treated fibers of synthetic dressings such that a colloidal suspension of the fiber-inhibitor and elastase was employed as an assay. A dose-response relationship was observed in the kinetics of substrate hydrolysis catalyzed by three elastases: porcine pancreatic elastase, which was employed to model this approach; human leukocyte elastase; and elastase in human chronic wound fluid. Both freely dissolved and fiber-bound inhibitors were studied. The initial rates of substrate hydrolysis were inversely linear with freely dissolved inhibitor dose. The apparent first order rate constants, kobs, for the elastase-inhibitor complex were calculated from the kinetic profiles. The kobs for inhibitor bound enzyme varied as a function of inhibitor vs. enzyme concentration and based on the order of mixing of substrate, inhibitor and enzyme in the assay. Enzyme inhibition by the fiber-inhibitor was measured as inhibitor concentration at 50% inhibition (I50). I50 values measured from the colloidal assay with fiber-released inhibitor were within the same range to those for freely dissolved inhibitor. Inhibition of elastase activity in chronic wound fluid was observed with 1-5 mg of fiber-inhibitor formulation. This approach constitutes an in vitro assessment of synthetic serine protease inhibitors on

  17. Cyclic amidine sugars as transition-state analogue inhibitors of glycosidases: potent competitive inhibitors of mannosidases.

    PubMed

    Heck, Marie-Pierre; Vincent, Stéphane P; Murray, Brion W; Bellamy, François; Wong, Chi-Huey; Mioskowski, Charles

    2004-02-25

    A series of monocyclic glycoamidines bearing different exocyclic amine, alcohol, or alkyl functionalities and bicyclic amidines derived from D-glucose and D-mannose were synthesized and tested as inhibitors of various glycosidases. All the prepared compounds demonstrated good to excellent inhibition toward glycosidases. In particular, the biscationic D-mannoamidine 9b bearing an exocyclic ethylamine moiety proved to be a selective competitive inhibitor of alpha- and beta-mannosidases (K(i) = 6 nM) making it the most potent inhibitor of these glycosidases reported to date. A favorable B(2,5) boat conformation might explain the selectivity of mannosidase inhibition compared to other glycosidases.

  18. Effect of Chirality of Small Molecule Organofluorine Inhibitors of Amyloid Self-Assembly on Inhibitor Potency

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Abha; Abid, Mohammed; Hailemichael, Samson; Foster, Michelle; Török, Béla

    2009-01-01

    The effect of enantiomeric trifluromethyl-indolyl-acetic acid ethyl esters on the fibrillogenesis of Alzheimer's amyloid β (Aβ) peptide is described. These compounds have been previously identified as effective inhibitors of the Aβ self-assembly in their racemic form. Thioflavin-T Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy were applied to assess the potency of the chiral target compounds. Both enantiomers showed significant inhibition in the in vitro assays. The potency of the enantiomeric inhibitors appeared to be very similar to each other suggesting the lack of the stereospecific binding interactions between these small molecule inhibitors and the Aβ peptide. PMID:19880318

  19. Polyphenolic Compounds as Pancreatic Lipase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Tina; Melzig, Matthias F

    2015-07-01

    Obesity and its associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus and coronary heart diseases are a major challenge for our society. An important target for the treatment of obesity includes the development of inhibitors of nutrient digestion and absorption. Inhibition of pancreatic lipase and the associated reduction of lipid absorption is an attractive approach for the discovery of potent agents. Currently, the only clinically approved pharmacologic agent as pancreatic lipase inhibitor is Orlistat. However, its usage is compromised by unpleasant gastrointestinal adverse reactions (oily stools, oily spotting, flatulence). The use of botanical materials as a potential source of new drugs is of increasing importance and application. Natural products that are interesting for obesity treatment are generally considered to have less toxic and side effects than totally synthetic drugs. One of the most important sources of potential pancreatic lipase inhibitors represents the class of polyphenols. This article summarizes most studied subclasses of polyphenols including flavonoids, hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids and lignans with pancreatic lipase inhibitory effects. A structural comparison of potent inhibitors shows an increased inhibitory effect depending on number and position of phenolic hydroxyl groups, degree of polymerization and elimination of glycosylation during digestion. PMID:26132857

  20. Small Molecule Inhibitor of AICAR Transformylase Homodimerization

    PubMed Central

    Spurr, Ian B.; Birts, Charles N.; Cuda, Francesco; Benkovic, Stephen J; Blaydes, Jeremy P.; Tavassoli, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide transformylase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (ATIC) is a bifunctional homodimeric enzyme that catalyses the last two steps of de novo purine biosynthesis. Homodimerization of ATIC, a protein-protein interaction with an interface of over 5000 Å2, is required for its aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) transformylase activity, with the active sites forming at the interface of the interacting proteins. Here, we report the development of a small-molecule inhibitor of AICAR transformylase that functions by preventing the homodimerization of ATIC. The compound is derived from a previously reported cyclic hexa-peptide inhibitor of AICAR transformylase (with a Ki of 17 μM), identified by high-throughput screening. The active motif of the cyclic peptide is identified as an arginine-tyrosine dipeptide, a capped analogue of which inhibits AICAR transformylase with a Ki of 84 μM. A library of non-natural analogues of this dipeptide was designed, synthesized, and assayed. The most potent compound inhibits AICAR transformylase with a Ki of 685 nM, a 25-fold improvement in activity from the parent cyclic peptide. The potential for this AICAR transformylase inhibitor in cancer therapy is assessed by studying its effect on the proliferation of a model breast cancer cell line. Using a non-radioactive proliferation assay and live cell imaging, a dose-dependent reduction in cell numbers and cell division rates was observed in cells treated with our ATIC dimerization inhibitor. PMID:22764122

  1. Alcalase rapeseed inhibitors: purification and partial characterization.

    PubMed

    Vioque, J; Sánchez-Vioque, R; Clemente, A; Pedroche, J; Mar Yust, M; Millán, F

    2001-01-01

    Extensive rapeseed protein hydrolysate obtained sequentially with Alcalase and Flavourzyme showed inhibitory activity towards Alcalase. Inhibitory activity decreased as the hydrolytic process progressed probably by heat denaturation and/or partial protease degradation. Alcalase rapeseed inhibitors were purified by gel filtration and subsequent ion exchange chromatography. They are composed of peptides of 8.4 and 6.1 kDa linked by interchain disulphide bonds, as observed by reducing SDS-PAGE, with a native molecular weight of 18 kDa. Aminoacid composition of the inhibitors was characterized by the high proportion of methionine (4.2%) and cysteine (4.6%). Alcalase inhibitors were partially resistant to heat treatment; after heating at 70 degrees C for 45 minutes more than 50% of the original inhibitory activity remained in the purified protein but after heating at 90 degrees C for 5 minutes, inhibitory activity decreased very fast to a basal level. The possible relation of these protease inhibitors with the 2S albumin storage proteins is discussed.

  2. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  3. Therapeutic potential of peptide deformylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Yuan, Z

    2005-09-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is an attractive target for antibacterial drug discovery. Progress in the biological characterisation of the enzyme, coupled with newly obtained mechanistic and structural insight, enabled the pharmaceutical industry to discover potent PDF inhibitors that can be considered as clinical development candidates for this new class of antibacterial agents. The in vitro and in vivo data for several lead PDF inhibitors suggest that the current PDF inhibitors are most suitable for the treatment of respiratory tract infections and they are not cross-resistant to the current clinically used antibiotics. Two PDF inhibitors, BB-83698 and VIC-104959, have progressed to Phase I clinical trials by intravenous and oral administration, respectively. Both of these compounds show promising in vitro and in vivo efficacy and an excellent safety profile. The pharmacokinetics in humans for both of the compounds suggest the possibility of a twice-daily dosing regimen for clinical use. Thus far, all of the data suggest a promising future for this new class of antibacterial agents.

  4. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors - a multifunctional toolbox.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Mizuki; Brabham, Chad; DeBolt, Seth

    2016-01-01

    In the current review, we examine the growing number of existing Cellulose Biosynthesis Inhibitors (CBIs) and based on those that have been studied with live cell imaging we group their mechanism of action. Attention is paid to the use of CBIs as tools to ask fundamental questions about cellulose biosynthesis.

  5. Novel proteinase inhibitor promotes resistance to insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) and its protein are identified in response to insect feeding on B. vulgaris seedlings. BvSTI is cloned into an expression vector with constitutive promoter and transformed into Nicotiana benthamiana plants to assess BvSTI’s ability to ...

  6. Resistant mechanisms to BRAF inhibitors in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Layos, Laura; Bugés, Cristina; de los Llanos Gil, María; Vila, Laia; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva; Martínez-Cardús, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced melanoma have traditionally had very poor prognosis. However, since 2011 better understanding of the biology and epidemiology of this disease has revolutionized its treatment, with newer therapies becoming available. These newer therapies can be classified into immunotherapy and targeted therapy. The immunotherapy arsenal includes inhibitors of CTLA4, PD-1 and PDL-1, while targeted therapy focuses on BRAF and MEK. BRAF inhibitors (vemurafenib, dabrafenib) have shown benefit in terms of overall survival (OS) compared to chemotherapy, and their combination with MEK inhibitors has recently been shown to improve progression-free survival (PFS), compared with monotherapy with BRAF inhibitors. However, almost 20% of patients initially do not respond, due to intrinsic resistance to therapy and, of those who do, most eventually develop mechanisms of acquired resistance, including reactivation of the MAP kinase pathway, persistent activation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTKS) receptor, activation of phosphatidyinositol-3OH kinase, overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and interactions with the tumor microenvironment. Herein we comment in detail on mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy and discuss the strategies to overcome them. PMID:27429963

  7. FAAH inhibitors in the limelight, but regrettably

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Christophe; Dubray, Claude; Dualé, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. This short review focuses on the recent drug development of FAAH inhibitors, as recent serious adverse events have been reported in a phase I study with a compound of this class. The authors overview the potential interest in targeting FAAH inhibition, the current programs, and the available information on the recent dramatic events. PMID:27191771

  8. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors - a multifunctional toolbox.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Mizuki; Brabham, Chad; DeBolt, Seth

    2016-01-01

    In the current review, we examine the growing number of existing Cellulose Biosynthesis Inhibitors (CBIs) and based on those that have been studied with live cell imaging we group their mechanism of action. Attention is paid to the use of CBIs as tools to ask fundamental questions about cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:26590309

  9. Novel Cytoprotective Inhibitors for Apoptotic Endonuclease G

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dae Song; Penthala, Narsimha R.; Apostolov, Eugene O.; Wang, Xiaoying; Crooks, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Apoptotic endonuclease G (EndoG) is responsible for DNA fragmentation both during and after cell death. Previous studies demonstrated that genetic inactivation of EndoG is cytoprotective against various pro-apoptotic stimuli; however, specific inhibitors for EndoG are not available. In this study, we have developed a high-throughput screening assay for EndoG and have used it to screen a chemical library. The screening resulted in the identification of two potent EndoG inhibitors, PNR-3-80 and PNR-3-82, which are thiobarbiturate analogs. As determined by their IC50s, the inhibitors are more potent than ZnCl2 or EDTA. They inhibit EndoG at one or two orders of magnitude greater than another apoptotic endonuclease, DNase I, and do not inhibit the other five tested cell death-related enzymes: DNase II, RNase A, proteinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase 1. Exposure of natural EndoG-expressing 22Rv1 or EndoG-overexpressing PC3 cells rendered them significantly resistant to Cisplatin and Docetaxel, respectively. These novel EndoG inhibitors have the potential to be utilized for amelioration of cell injuries in which participation of EndoG is essential. PMID:25401220

  10. Tetra- versus Pentavalent Inhibitors of Cholera Toxin**

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ou; Pukin, Aliaksei V; van Ufford, H C Quarles; Branson, Thomas R; Thies-Weesie, Dominique M E; Turnbull, W Bruce; Visser, Gerben M; Pieters, Roland J

    2015-01-01

    The five B-subunits (CTB5) of the Vibrio cholerae (cholera) toxin can bind to the intestinal cell surface so the entire AB5 toxin can enter the cell. Simultaneous binding can occur on more than one of the monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1) units present on the cell surface. Such simultaneous binding arising from the toxins multivalency is believed to enhance its affinity. Thus, blocking the initial attachment of the toxin to the cell surface using inhibitors with GM1 subunits has the potential to stop the disease. Previously we showed that tetravalent GM1 molecules were sub-nanomolar inhibitors of CTB5. In this study, we synthesized a pentavalent version and compared the binding and potency of penta- and tetravalent cholera toxin inhibitors, based on the same scaffold, for the first time. The pentavalent geometry did not yield major benefits over the tetravalent species, but it was still a strong inhibitor, and no major steric clashes occurred when binding the toxin. Thus, systems which can adopt more geometries, such as those described here, can be equally potent, and this may possibly be due to their ability to form higher-order structures or simply due to more statistical options for binding. PMID:26478842

  11. Haemophilia pseudotumours in patients with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Caviglia, H; Candela, M; Landro, M E; Douglas Price, A L; Neme, D; Galatro, G A

    2015-09-01

    Development of inhibitors against factor VIII (FVIII) or FIX is the most serious complication of replacement therapy in patients with haemophilia. Haemophilic pseudotumours in a patient with inhibitors can lead to devastating consequences. The aim of this study is to show our experience in the treatment of 10 pseudotumours in 7 patients with inhibitors who were treated by the same multidisciplinary team in the period between January 2000 and March 2013. Seven severe haemophilia A patients were treated at the Haemophilia Foundation in Buenos Aires, Argentina, for 10 pseudotumours. Eight were bone pseudotumours and two soft tissue. All patients underwent imaging studies at baseline to assess the size and content of the lesion. The patients received Buenos Aires protocol as conservative treatment of their pseudotumours for 6 weeks, after which they were evaluated. Only one patient responded to conservative treatment. Surgery was performed on the others six patients, since their pseudotumours did not shrink to less than half their original size. Any bleeding in the musculoskeletal system must be treated promptly in order to prevent pseudotumours. When pseudotumours do appear in inhibitor patients, they can be surgically removed when patients received proper haemostatic coverage, improving the quality of life of these patients.

  12. Synthesis and Assays of Inhibitors of Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Cai, X-C; Kapilashrami, K; Luo, M

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation requires site-specific modification of the genome and is involved in multiple physiological processes and disease etiology. Methyltransferases, which catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to various substrates, are critical components of the epigenetic machinery. This group of enzymes can methylate diverse substrates including DNA, RNA, proteins, and small-molecule metabolites. Their dysregulation has also been implicated in multiple disease states such as cancer, neurological, and cardiovascular disorders. Developing potent and selective small-molecule inhibitors of methyltransferases is valuable not only for therapeutic intervention but also for investigating the roles of these enzymes in disease progression. In this chapter, we will discuss the strategies of designing and synthesizing methyltransferases inhibitors based on the SAM scaffold. Following the section of inhibitor design, we will briefly review representative assays that are available to evaluate the potency of these inhibitors along with a detailed description of the most commonly used radiometric assay. PMID:27423865

  13. [Cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Bernardeau-Mozer, Marianne; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2004-05-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox2) is an inductible isoenzyme of cyclooxygenase undetectable in normal colonic mucosa and overexpressed in 80% colonic tumor. Several works in vitro and in vivo showed that Cox2 plays a key role in the multistep process of colorectal tumorigenesis such apoptosis inhibition of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis induction. So that Cox2 represent a potential molecular target in colorectal management and specific Cox2 inhibitors may be useful as chemopreventive as well as therapeutic agent in humans. In animals study Cox2 inhibitors was shown to be effective and in humans Cox2 inhibitors are approved by the Food and Drug Administration as an adjunct to endoscopic surveillance and surgery in patients with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP). The purpose of this article is to review the relationship between Cox2/Cox2 inhibitors and differents signaling pathways of colorectal carcinogenesis and to precise their possible molecular mechanisms of action. This work although review clinicals data of their efficacy as chemopreventive agent as well as therapeutic in the differents group at risk for colorectal cancer. PMID:15239336

  14. DNA Methyltransferases Inhibitors from Natural Sources.

    PubMed

    Zwergel, Clemens; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) catalyze the methylation at cytosine-C5 mainly in a CpG dinucleotide context. Although DNA methylation is essential for fundamental processes like embryonic development or differentiation, aberrant expression and/or activities of DNMTs are involved in several pathologies, from neurodegeneration to cancer. DNMTs inhibition can arrest tumor growth, cells invasiveness and induce differentiation, whereas their increased expression is shown in numerous cancer types. Moreover, hypermethylated promoters of tumor suppressor genes lead to their silencing. Hence, the use of specific inhibitors of DNMT might reactivate those genes and stop or even reverse the aberrant cell processes. To date, the only approved DNMTs inhibitors for therapy belong to the nucleoside-based family of drugs, but they display relevant side effects as well as high chemical instability. Thus, there is a keen interest actually exists to develop novel, potent and safe inhibitors possessing a nonnucleoside structure. Increasing literature evidence is highlighting that natural sources could help the researchers to achieve this goal. Indeed, several polyphenols, flavonoids, antraquinones, and others are described able to inhibit DNMTs activity and/or expression, thus decreasing the methylation/silencing of different genes involved in tumorigenesis. These events can lead to re-expression of such genes and to cell death in diverse cancer cell lines. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (1) and laccaic acid A (11) resulted the most effective DNMT1 inhibitors with submicromolar IC50 values, acting as competitive inhibitors. Compound 1 and 11 both displayed gene demethylation and re-activation in several cancers. However, all of the natural compounds described in this review showed important results, from gene reactivation to cell growth inhibition. Moreover, some of them displayed interesting activity even in rodent cancer models and very recently entered clinical trials. PMID:26303417

  15. Cost of care of haemophilia with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Di Minno, M N D; Di Minno, G; Di Capua, M; Cerbone, A M; Coppola, A

    2010-01-01

    In Western countries, the treatment of patients with inhibitors is presently the most challenging and serious issue in haemophilia management, direct costs of clotting factor concentrates accounting for >98% of the highest economic burden absorbed for the healthcare of patients in this setting. Being designed to address questions of resource allocation and effectiveness, decision models are the golden standard to reliably assess the overall economic implications of haemophilia with inhibitors in terms of mortality, bleeding-related morbidity, and severity of arthropathy. However, presently, most data analyses stem from retrospective short-term evaluations, that only allow for the analysis of direct health costs. In the setting of chronic diseases, the cost-utility analysis, that takes into account the beneficial effects of a given treatment/healthcare intervention in terms of health-related quality of life, is likely to be the most appropriate approach. To calculate net benefits, the quality adjusted life year, that significantly reflects such health gain, has to be compared with specific economic impacts. Differences in data sources, in medical practice and/or in healthcare systems and costs, imply that most current pharmacoeconomic analyses are confined to a narrow healthcare payer perspective. Long-term/lifetime prospective or observational studies, devoted to a careful definition of when to start a treatment; of regimens (dose and type of product) to employ, and of inhibitor population (children/adults, low-responding/high responding inhibitors) to study, are thus urgently needed to allow for newer insights, based on reliable data sources into resource allocation, effectiveness and cost-utility analysis in the treatment of haemophiliacs with inhibitors.

  16. Peptidyl cyclopropenones: Reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors, or substrates of cysteine proteases?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Meital; Bretler, Uriel; Albeck, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Peptidyl cyclopropenones were previously introduced as selective cysteine protease reversible inhibitors. In the present study we synthesized one such peptidyl cyclopropenone and investigated its interaction with papain, a prototype cysteine protease. A set of kinetics, biochemical, HPLC, MS, and 13C-NMR experiments revealed that the peptidyl cyclopropenone was an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme, alkylating the catalytic cysteine. In parallel, this cyclopropenone also behaved as an alternative substrate of the enzyme, providing a product that was tentatively suggested to be either a spiroepoxy cyclopropanone or a gamma-lactone. Thus, a single family of compounds exhibits an unusual variety of activities, being reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors and alternative substrates towards enzymes of the same family. PMID:23553793

  17. Therapeutic substitution post-patent expiry: the cases of ACE inhibitors and proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vandoros, Sotiris

    2014-05-01

    This paper examines whether there is a switch in total (originator and generic) consumption after generic entry from molecules that face generic competition towards other molecules of the same class, which are still in-patent. Data from six European countries for the time period 1991 to 2006 are used to study the cases of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and proton pump inhibitors. Empirical evidence shows that patent expiry of captopril and enalapril led to a switch in total (off-patent originator and generic) consumption towards other in-patent angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, whereas patent expiry of omeprazole led to a switch in consumption towards other proton pump inhibitors. This phenomenon makes generic policies ineffective and results in an increase in pharmaceutical expenditure due to the absence of generic alternatives in the market of in-patent molecules.

  18. Neuroprotective Tri- and Tetracyclic BChE Inhibitors Releasing Reversible Inhibitors upon Carbamate Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tri- and tetracyclic nitrogen-bridgehead compounds were designed and synthesized to yield micromolar cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors. Structure–activity relationships identified potent compounds with butyrylcholinesterase selectivity. These compounds were selected as starting points for the design and synthesis of carbamate-based (pseudo)irreversible inhibitors. Compounds with superior inhibitory activity and selectivity were obtained and kinetically characterized also with regard to the velocity of enzyme carbamoylation. Structural elements were identified and introduced that additionally showed neuroprotective properties on a hippocampal neuronal cell line (HT-22) after glutamate-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. We have identified potent and selective pseudoirreversible butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors that release reversible inhibitors with neuroprotective properties after carbamate transfer to the active site of cholinesterases. PMID:24900407

  19. Dermatologic adverse events to chemotherapeutic agents, Part 2: BRAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors, and ipilimumab.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jennifer Nam

    2014-03-01

    The advent of novel targeted chemotherapeutic agents and immunotherapies has dramatically changed the arena of cancer treatment in recent years. BRAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors, and ipilimumab are among the newer chemotherapy drugs that are being used at an increasing rate. Dermatologic adverse events to these medications are common, and it is important for dermatologists and oncologists alike to learn to recognize and treat such side effects in order to maintain both patients' quality of life and their anticancer treatment. This review describes the cutaneous side effects seen with BRAF inhibitors (eg, maculopapular eruption, photosensitivity, squamoproliferative growths, melanocytic proliferations), MEK inhibitors (eg, papulopustular eruption), and ipilimumab (eg, maculopapular eruption, vitiligo), with a mention of vismodegib and anti-PD-1 agents.

  20. Development of covalent inhibitors that can overcome resistance to first-generation FGFR kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Wang, Jun; Tanizaki, Junko; Huang, Zhifeng; Aref, Amir R.; Rusan, Maria; Zhu, Su-Jie; Zhang, Yiyun; Ercan, Dalia; Liao, Rachel G.; Capelletti, Marzia; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Kim, NamDoo; Sim, Taebo; Gaudet, Suzanne; Barbie, David A.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Yun, Cai-Hong; Hammerman, Peter S.; Mohammadi, Moosa; Jänne, Pasi A.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2014-01-01

    The human FGF receptors (FGFRs) play critical roles in various human cancers, and several FGFR inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. Resistance usually results from selection for mutant kinases that are impervious to the action of the drug or from up-regulation of compensatory signaling pathways. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that resistance to FGFR inhibitors can be acquired through mutations in the FGFR gatekeeper residue, as clinically observed for FGFR4 in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroendocrine breast carcinomas. Here we report on the use of a structure-based drug design to develop two selective, next-generation covalent FGFR inhibitors, the FGFR irreversible inhibitors 2 (FIIN-2) and 3 (FIIN-3). To our knowledge, FIIN-2 and FIIN-3 are the first inhibitors that can potently inhibit the proliferation of cells dependent upon the gatekeeper mutants of FGFR1 or FGFR2, which confer resistance to first-generation clinical FGFR inhibitors such as NVP-BGJ398 and AZD4547. Because of the conformational flexibility of the reactive acrylamide substituent, FIIN-3 has the unprecedented ability to inhibit both the EGF receptor (EGFR) and FGFR covalently by targeting two distinct cysteine residues. We report the cocrystal structure of FGFR4 with FIIN-2, which unexpectedly exhibits a “DFG-out” covalent binding mode. The structural basis for dual FGFR and EGFR targeting by FIIN3 also is illustrated by crystal structures of FIIN-3 bound with FGFR4 V550L and EGFR L858R. These results have important implications for the design of covalent FGFR inhibitors that can overcome clinical resistance and provide the first example, to our knowledge, of a kinase inhibitor that covalently targets cysteines located in different positions within the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:25349422

  1. Inhibitor analysis for a solar heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabony, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    A study of potential corrosion inhibitors for the NASA solar heating and cooling system which uses aluminum solar panels is provided. Research consisted of testing using a dynamic corrosion system, along with an economic analysis of proposed corrosion inhibitors. Very good progress was made in finding a suitable inhibitor for the system.

  2. Controlled-release scale inhibitor for use in fracturing treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.J.; Gdanski, R.D.; McCabe, M.A.; Buster, D.C.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes results of laboratory and field testing of a solid, controlled-release scale inhibitor for use in fracturing treatments. Laboratory testing with a continuous flow apparatus has yielded inhibitor release rates under dynamic conditions. The inhibitor was tested to determine the minimum inhibitor concentration required to inhibit the formation of CaCO{sub 3}, CaSO{sub 4}, and BaSO{sub 4} scales in a brine. A model to predict the long-term release rate of the inhibitor was developed from data collected on the continuous flow apparatus. Data from treated wells will be compared with predictions of the model. Inhibitor release-rate testing in a continuous-flow apparatus shows that a solid, calcium-magnesium polyphosphate inhibitor has a sustained release profile. Release-rate testing shows that the inhibitor can be used up to 175 F. The inhibitor is compatible with both borate and zirconium crosslinked fracturing fluids and foamed fluids. The effective lifetime of the scale treatment can be predicted based on a model developed from laboratory data. The input variables required for the prediction include: temperature, water production, amount of inhibitor, minimum effective concentration of inhibitor for the specific brine. The model can be used to aid in the design of the scale inhibitor treatment.

  3. Deletion Mutations Keep Kinase Inhibitors in the Loop

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Daniel M.; Park, Jin H.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Effective clinical application of conformationally selective kinase inhibitors requires tailoring drug choice to the tumor's activating mutation(s). In this issue of Cancer Cell, Foster et al. (2016) describe how activating deletions in BRAF, EGFR, and HER2 cause primary resistance to common inhibitors, suggesting strategies for improved inhibitor selection. PMID:27070691

  4. Serine protease inhibitors of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Molehin, Adebayo J; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P

    2012-05-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are a superfamily of structurally conserved proteins that inhibit serine proteases and play key physiological roles in numerous biological systems such as blood coagulation, complement activation and inflammation. A number of serpins have now been identified in parasitic helminths with putative involvement in immune regulation and in parasite survival through interference with the host immune response. This review describes the serpins and smapins (small serine protease inhibitors) that have been identified in Ascaris spp., Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum Onchocerca volvulus, Haemonchus contortus, Trichinella spiralis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Anisakis simplex, Trichuris suis, Schistosoma spp., Clonorchis sinensis, Paragonimus westermani and Echinococcus spp. and discusses their possible biological functions, including roles in host-parasite interplay and their evolutionary relationships. PMID:22310379

  5. Penicillin inhibitors of purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Faridoon; Hussein, Waleed M; Ul Islam, Nazar; Guddat, Luke W; Schenk, Gerhard; McGeary, Ross P

    2012-04-01

    Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) are binuclear metallohydrolases that have a multitude of biological functions and are found in fungi, bacteria, plants and animals. In mammals, PAP activity is linked with bone resorption and over-expression can lead to bone disorders such as osteoporosis. PAP is therefore an attractive target for the development of drugs to treat this disease. A series of penicillin conjugates, in which 6-aminopenicillanic acid was acylated with aromatic acid chlorides, has been prepared and assayed against pig PAP. The binding mode of most of these conjugates is purely competitive, and some members of this class have potencies comparable to the best PAP inhibitors yet reported. The structurally related penicillin G was shown to be neither an inhibitor nor a substrate for pig PAP. Molecular modelling has been used to examine the binding modes of these compounds in the active site of the enzyme and to rationalise their activities.

  6. mTOR inhibitors in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jianling; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR, plays key roles in cell growth and proliferation, acting at the catalytic subunit of two protein kinase complexes: mTOR complexes 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2). mTORC1 signaling is switched on by several oncogenic signaling pathways and is accordingly hyperactive in the majority of cancers. Inhibiting mTORC1 signaling has therefore attracted great attention as an anti-cancer therapy. However, progress in using inhibitors of mTOR signaling as therapeutic agents in oncology has been limited by a number of factors, including the fact that the classic mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibits only some of the effects of mTOR; the existence of several feedback loops; and the crucial importance of mTOR in normal physiology.

  7. Replacing sulfa drugs with novel DHPS inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hammoudeh, Dalia I; Zhao, Ying; White, Stephen W; Lee, Richard E

    2013-07-01

    More research effort needs to be invested in antimicrobial drug development to address the increasing threat of multidrug-resistant organisms. The enzyme DHPS has been a validated drug target for over 70 years as the target for the highly successful sulfa drugs. The use of sulfa drugs has been compromised by the widespread presence of resistant organisms and the adverse side effects associated with their use. Despite the large amount of structural information available for DHPS, few recent publications address the possibility of using this knowledge for novel drug design. This article reviews the relevant papers and patents that report promising new small-molecule inhibitors of DHPS, and discuss these data in light of new insights into the DHPS catalytic mechanism and recently determined crystal structures of DHPS bound to potent small-molecule inhibitors. This new functional understanding confirms that DHPS deserves further consideration as an antimicrobial drug target. PMID:23859210

  8. New tyrosinase inhibitors, (+)-catechin-aldehyde polycondensates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jin; Chung, Joo Eun; Kurisawa, Motoichi; Uyama, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Shiro

    2004-01-01

    In this study, new tyrosinase inhibitors, (+)-catechin-aldehyde polycondensates, have been developed. Tyrosinase is a copper-containing enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of a monophenol (monophenolase activity) and the oxidation of an o-diphenol (diphenolase activity). In the measurement of tyrosinase inhibition activity, (+)-catechin acted as substrate and cofactor of tyrosinase. On the other hand, the polycondensates inhibited the tyrosine hydroxylation and L-DOPA oxidation by chelation to the active site of tyrosinase. The UV-visible spectrum of a mixture of tyrosinase and the polycondensate exhibited a characteristic shoulder peak ascribed to the chelation of the polycondensate to the active site of tyrosinase. Furthermore, circular dichroism measurement showed a small red shift of the band due to the interaction between tyrosinase and the polycondensate. These data support that the polycondensate acts as an inhibitor of tyrosinase. PMID:15003008

  9. mTOR inhibitors in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jianling; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR, plays key roles in cell growth and proliferation, acting at the catalytic subunit of two protein kinase complexes: mTOR complexes 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2). mTORC1 signaling is switched on by several oncogenic signaling pathways and is accordingly hyperactive in the majority of cancers. Inhibiting mTORC1 signaling has therefore attracted great attention as an anti-cancer therapy. However, progress in using inhibitors of mTOR signaling as therapeutic agents in oncology has been limited by a number of factors, including the fact that the classic mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibits only some of the effects of mTOR; the existence of several feedback loops; and the crucial importance of mTOR in normal physiology. PMID:27635236

  10. Automated colorimetric screen for apyrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Windsor, J B; Thomas, C; Hurley, L; Roux, S J; Lloyd, A M

    2002-11-01

    Apyrases are enzymes that efficiently hydrolyze ATP and ADP and may operate both inside and outside the cell. Although apyrases are important to a variety of cellular mechanisms and uses in industry, there are no available apyrase-specific inhibitors. Colorimetric assays based on the Fiske-Subbarow method for measuring inorganic phosphate are able to detect the release of inorganic phosphate from ATP and other nucleotides. We found that this type of assay could be automated and used to screen for apyrase-inhibiting compounds by assaying for a reduction in released phosphate in the presence of potential inhibitors. The automation of this assay allowed for the successful screening of a commercially available compound library. Several low molecular weight compounds were identified that, when used at micromolar concentrations, effectively inhibited apyrase activity.

  11. Replacing sulfa drugs with novel DHPS inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hammoudeh, Dalia I; Zhao, Ying; White, Stephen W; Lee, Richard E

    2013-07-01

    More research effort needs to be invested in antimicrobial drug development to address the increasing threat of multidrug-resistant organisms. The enzyme DHPS has been a validated drug target for over 70 years as the target for the highly successful sulfa drugs. The use of sulfa drugs has been compromised by the widespread presence of resistant organisms and the adverse side effects associated with their use. Despite the large amount of structural information available for DHPS, few recent publications address the possibility of using this knowledge for novel drug design. This article reviews the relevant papers and patents that report promising new small-molecule inhibitors of DHPS, and discuss these data in light of new insights into the DHPS catalytic mechanism and recently determined crystal structures of DHPS bound to potent small-molecule inhibitors. This new functional understanding confirms that DHPS deserves further consideration as an antimicrobial drug target.

  12. SGLT2 Inhibitors: Benefit/Risk Balance.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2016-10-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) reduce hyperglycemia by increasing urinary glucose excretion. They have been evaluated in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with diet/exercise, metformin, dual oral therapy or insulin. Three agents are available in Europe and the USA (canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, empagliflozin) and others are commercialized in Japan or in clinical development. SGLT2 inhibitors reduce glycated hemoglobin, with a minimal risk of hypoglycemia. They exert favorable effects beyond glucose control with consistent body weight, blood pressure, and serum uric acid reductions. Empagliflozin showed remarkable reductions in cardiovascular/all-cause mortality and in hospitalization for heart failure in patients with previous cardiovascular disease. Positive renal outcomes were also shown with empagliflozin. Mostly reported adverse events are genital mycotic infections, while urinary tract infections and events linked to volume depletion are rather rare. Concern about a risk of ketoacidosis and bone fractures has been recently raised, which deserves caution and further evaluation.

  13. Proteasome Inhibitors Block Development of Plasmodium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Soren M.; Myung, Joon Mo; Briones, Marcelo R. S.; Li, Wei Dong; Corey, E. J.; Omura, Satoshi; Nussenzweig, Victor; Sinnis, Photini

    1998-01-01

    Proteasomes degrade most of the proteins inside eukaryotic cells, including transcription factors and regulators of cell cycle progression. Here we show that nanomolar concentrations of lactacystin, a specific irreversible inhibitor of the 20S proteasome, inhibit development of the exoerythrocytic and erythrocytic stages of the malaria parasite. Although lactacystin-treated Plasmodium berghei sporozoites are still invasive, their development into exoerythrocytic forms (EEF) is inhibited in vitro and in vivo. Erythrocytic schizogony of P. falciparum in vitro is also profoundly inhibited when drug treatment of the synchronized parasites is prior, but not subsequent, to the initiation of DNA synthesis, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of lactacystin is cell cycle specific. Lactacystin reduces P. berghei parasitemia in rats, but the therapeutic index is very low. Along with other studies showing that lactacystin inhibits stage-specific transformation in Trypanosoma and Entamoeba spp., these findings highlight the potential of proteasome inhibitors as drugs for the treatment of diseases caused by protozoan parasites. PMID:9756786

  14. Prospective therapeutic applications of p53 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gudkov, Andrei V. . E-mail: gudkov@ccf.org; Komarova, Elena A.

    2005-06-10

    p53, in addition to being a key cancer preventive factor, is also a determinant of cancer treatment side effects causing excessive apoptotic death in several normal tissues during cancer therapy. p53 inhibitory strategy has been suggested to protect normal tissues from chemo- and radiotherapy, and to treat other pathologies associated with stress-mediated activation of p53. This strategy was validated by isolation and testing of small molecule p53 inhibitor pifithrin-{alpha} that demonstrated broad tissue protecting capacity. However, in some normal tissues and tumors p53 plays protective role by inducing growth arrest and preventing cells from premature entrance into mitosis and death from mitotic catastrophe. Inhibition of this function of p53 can sensitize tumor cells to chemo- and radiotherapy, thus opening new potential application of p53 inhibitors and justifying the need in pharmacological agents targeting specifically either pro-apoptotic or growth arrest functions of p53.

  15. Protein synthesis inhibitor from potato tuber

    SciTech Connect

    Romaen, R. )

    1989-04-01

    A protein fraction capable of inhibit in vitro protein synthesis was found in potato tubers in fresh and wounded tissue. Inhibitor activity from fresh tissue decays with wounding. Inhibition activity was detected absorbed to ribsomal fraction and cytosol of potato tuber tissue by a partially reconstituted in vitro system from potato tuber and wheat germ. Adsorbed ribosomal fraction was more suitable of purification. This fraction was washed from ribosomes with 0.3M KCl, concentrated with ammonium sulfate precipitation and purified through sephadex G100 and sephadex G-75 columns chromatography. After 61 fold purification adsorbed protein fraction can inhibit germination of maize, wheat and sesame seeds, as well as {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into protein by imbibed maize embryos. Inhibition activity was lost by temperature, alkali and protease-K hydrolysis. Preliminar analysis could not show presence of reductor sugars. Physiological role of this inhibitor in relation to rest and active tissue remains to be studied.

  16. mTOR inhibitors in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianling; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR, plays key roles in cell growth and proliferation, acting at the catalytic subunit of two protein kinase complexes: mTOR complexes 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2). mTORC1 signaling is switched on by several oncogenic signaling pathways and is accordingly hyperactive in the majority of cancers. Inhibiting mTORC1 signaling has therefore attracted great attention as an anti-cancer therapy. However, progress in using inhibitors of mTOR signaling as therapeutic agents in oncology has been limited by a number of factors, including the fact that the classic mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibits only some of the effects of mTOR; the existence of several feedback loops; and the crucial importance of mTOR in normal physiology. PMID:27635236

  17. Replacing sulfa drugs with novel DHPS inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hammoudeh, Dalia I; Zhao, Ying; White, Stephen W; Lee, Richard E

    2013-01-01

    More research effort needs to be invested in antimicrobial drug development to address the increasing threat of multidrug-resistant organisms. The enzyme DHPS has been a validated drug target for over 70 years as the target for the highly successful sulfa drugs. The use of sulfa drugs has been compromised by the widespread presence of resistant organisms and the adverse side effects associated with their use. Despite the large amount of structural information available for DHPS, few recent publications address the possibility of using this knowledge for novel drug design. This article reviews the relevant papers and patents that report promising new small-molecule inhibitors of DHPS, and discuss these data in light of new insights into the DHPS catalytic mechanism and recently determined crystal structures of DHPS bound to potent small-molecule inhibitors. This new functional understanding confirms that DHPS deserves further consideration as an antimicrobial drug target. PMID:23859210

  18. Inhibitor prevents corrosion, scale in Chinese waterflood

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, W.; Jianhua, W. )

    1994-03-14

    An imidazoline derivative-based series inhibitor has prevented both corrosion and scale formation in produced-water treatment and water-injection equipment in China National Petroleum Co.'s (CNPC) Shengli oil field. Development of the inhibitor started in 1986, and after successful field trials the chemical is now being extensively applied. To increase oil recovery, water injection is widely used in China's onshore oil fields. Oil production in the Shengli oil field, for example, requires injection of about 4 bbl of water/1 bbl of oil produced. The large volumes of produced formation water contain many substances that can cause serious corrosion and scale. Also, the makeup water from other sources, subsurface or surface, complicates water handling. The paper discusses the following: corrosion and scale, oxygen, carbon dioxide, H[sub 2]S and sulfur reducing bacteria, temperature, inhibition, field tests, applications, and economics.

  19. A Bacterial Cell Shape-Determining Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjie; Frirdich, Emilisa; Taylor, Jennifer A; Chan, Anson C K; Blair, Kris M; Vermeulen, Jenny; Ha, Reuben; Murphy, Michael E P; Salama, Nina R; Gaynor, Erin C; Tanner, Martin E

    2016-04-15

    Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni are human pathogens and causative agents of gastric ulcers/cancer and gastroenteritis, respectively. Recent studies have uncovered a series of proteases that are responsible for maintaining the helical shape of these organisms. The H. pylori metalloprotease Csd4 and its C. jejuni homologue Pgp1 cleave the amide bond between meso-diaminopimelate and iso-d-glutamic acid in truncated peptidoglycan side chains. Deletion of either csd4 or pgp1 results in bacteria with a straight rod phenotype, a reduced ability to move in viscous media, and reduced pathogenicity. In this work, a phosphinic acid-based pseudodipeptide inhibitor was designed to act as a tetrahedral intermediate analog against the Csd4 enzyme. The phosphinic acid was shown to inhibit the cleavage of the alternate substrate, Ac-l-Ala-iso-d-Glu-meso-Dap, with a Ki value of 1.5 μM. Structural analysis of the Csd4-inhibitor complex shows that the phosphinic acid displaces the zinc-bound water and chelates the metal in a bidentate fashion. The phosphinate oxygens also interact with the key acid/base residue, Glu222, and the oxyanion-stabilizing residue, Arg86. The results are consistent with the "promoted-water pathway" mechanism for carboxypeptidase A catalysis. Studies on cultured bacteria showed that the inhibitor causes significant cell straightening when incubated with H. pylori at millimolar concentrations. A diminished, yet observable, effect on the morphology of C. jejuni was also apparent. Cell straightening was more pronounced with an acapsular C. jejuni mutant strain compared to the wild type, suggesting that the capsule impaired inhibitor accessibility. These studies demonstrate that a highly polar compound is capable of crossing the outer membrane and altering cell shape, presumably by inhibiting cell shape determinant proteases. Peptidoglycan proteases acting as cell shape determinants represent novel targets for the development of antimicrobials

  20. Inhibitors of the AAA+ Chaperone p97

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Eli; Maksim, Nick; de la Cruz, Fabian; La Clair, James J.

    2015-01-01

    It is remarkable that a pathway as ubiquitous as protein quality control can be targeted to treat cancer. Bortezomib, an inhibitor of the proteasome, was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) more than 10 years ago to treat refractory myeloma and later extended to lymphoma. Its use has increased the survival rate of myeloma patients by as much as three years. This success was followed with the recent accelerated approval of the natural product derived proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib (Kyprolis®), which is used to treat patients with bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma. The success of these two drugs has validated protein quality control as a viable target to fight select cancers, but begs the question why are proteasome inhibitors limited to lymphoma and myeloma? More recently, these limitations have encouraged the search for additional targets within the protein quality control system that might offer heightened cancer cell specificity, enhanced clinical utility, a lower rate of resistance, reduced toxicity, and mitigated side effects. One promising target is p97, an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) chaperone. p97 figures prominently in protein quality control as well as serving a variety of other cellular functions associated with cancer. More than a decade ago, it was determined that up-regulation of p97 in many forms of cancer correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Since these initial discoveries, a mechanistic explanation for this observation has been partially illuminated, but details are lacking. Understandably, given this clinical correlation, myriad roles within the cell, and its importance in protein quality control, p97 has emerged as a potential therapeutic target. This review provides an overview of efforts towards the discovery of small molecule inhibitors of p97, offering a synopsis of efforts that parallel the excellent reviews that currently exist on p97 structure, function, and physiology. PMID

  1. Corrosion protection with eco-friendly inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    Corrosion occurs as a result of the interaction of a metal with its environment. The extent of corrosion depends on the type of metal, the existing conditions in the environment and the type of aggressive ions present in the medium. For example, CO3‑2 and NO‑3 produce an insoluble deposit on the surface of iron, resulting in the isolation of metal and consequent decrease of corrosion. On the other hand, halide ions are adsorbed selectively on the metal surface and prevent formation of the oxide phase on the metal surface, resulting in continuous corrosion. Iron, aluminum and their alloys are widely used, both domestically and industrially. Linear alkylbenzene and linear alkylbenzene sulfonate are commonly used as detergents. They have also been found together in waste water. It is claimed that these chemicals act as inhibitors for stainless steel and aluminum. Release of toxic gases as a result of corrosion in pipelines may lead in certain cases to air pollution and possible health hazards. Therefore, there are two ways to look at the relationship between corrosion and pollution: (i) corrosion of metals and alloys due to environmental pollution and (ii) environmental pollution as a result of corrosion protection. This paper encompasses the two scenarios and possible remedies for various cases, using 'green' inhibitors obtained either from plant extracts or from pharmaceutical compounds. In the present study, the effect of piperacillin sodium as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel was investigated using a weight-loss method as well as a three-electrode dc electrochemical technique. It was found that the corrosion rate decreased as the concentration of the inhibitor increased up to 9×10‑4 M 93% efficiency was exhibited at this concentration.

  2. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors from Gentiana lutea.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yasumasa; Kabbash, Amal; Fujioka, Toshihiro; Ishizu, Takashi; Yagi, Akira

    2004-08-01

    Three monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors were isolated from Gentiana lutea. Their structures were elucidated to be 3-3''linked-(2'-hydroxy-4-O-isoprenylchalcone)-(2'''-hydroxy-4''-O-isoprenyldihydrochalcone) (1), 2-methoxy-3-(1,1'-dimethylallyl)-6a,10a-dihydrobenzo(1,2-c)chroman-6-one and 5-hydroxyflavanone. These compounds, and the hydrolysis product of 1, displayed competitive inhibitory properties against MAO-B which was more effective than MAO-A.

  3. Trial Watch: Proteasomal inhibitors for anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Obrist, Florine; Manic, Gwenola; Kroemer, Guido; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The so-called “ubiquitin-proteasome system” (UPS) is a multicomponent molecular apparatus that catalyzes the covalent attachment of several copies of the small protein ubiquitin to other proteins that are generally (but not always) destined to proteasomal degradation. This enzymatic cascade is crucial for the maintenance of intracellular protein homeostasis (both in physiological conditions and in the course of adaptive stress responses), and regulates a wide array of signaling pathways. In line with this notion, defects in the UPS have been associated with aging as well as with several pathological conditions including cardiac, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic disorders. As transformed cells often experience a constant state of stress (as a result of the hyperactivation of oncogenic signaling pathways and/or adverse microenvironmental conditions), their survival and proliferation are highly dependent on the integrity of the UPS. This rationale has driven an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation culminating in 2003 with the approval of the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in multiple myeloma patients. Another proteasomal inhibitor, carfilzomib, is now licensed by international regulatory agencies for use in multiple myeloma patients, and the approved indications for bortezomib have been extended to mantle cell lymphoma. This said, the clinical activity of bortezomib and carfilzomib is often limited by off-target effects, innate/acquired resistance, and the absence of validated predictive biomarkers. Moreover, the antineoplastic activity of proteasome inhibitors against solid tumors is poor. In this Trial Watch we discuss the contribution of the UPS to oncogenesis and tumor progression and summarize the design and/or results of recent clinical studies evaluating the therapeutic profile of proteasome inhibitors in cancer patients. PMID:27308423

  4. Quinoxaline derivatives: novel and selective butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Aurang; Hameed, Abdul; Khan, Latifullah; Khan, Imran; Dalvandi, Kourosh; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Basha, Fatima Z

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive brain disorder which occurs due to lower levels of acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmitters, and results in a gradual decline in memory and other cognitive processes. Acetycholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) are considered to be primary regulators of the ACh levels in the brain. Evidence shows that AChE activity decreases in AD, while activity of BChE does not change or even elevate in advanced AD, which suggests a key involvement of BChE in ACh hydrolysis during AD symptoms. Therefore, inhibiting the activity of BChE may be an effective way to control AD associated disorders. In this regard, a series of quinoxaline derivatives 1-17 was synthesized and biologically evaluated against cholinesterases (AChE and BChE) and as well as against α- chymotrypsin and urease. The compounds 1-17 were found to be selective inhibitors for BChE, as no activity was found against other enzymes. Among the series, compounds 6 (IC50 = 7.7 ± 1.0 µM) and 7 (IC50 = 9.7 ± 0.9 µM) were found to be the most active inhibitors against BChE. Their IC50 values are comparable to the standard, galantamine (IC50 = 6.6 ± 0.38 µM). Their considerable BChE inhibitory activity makes them selective candidates for the development of BChE inhibitors. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) of this new class of selective BChE inhibitors has been discussed.

  5. Serendipity in discovery of proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Derek; Iqbal, Mohamed; Husten, Jean; Ator, Mark A; Chatterjee, Sankar

    2012-05-15

    Among its various catalytic activities, the 'chymotrypsin-like' activity of the proteasome, a large multicatalytic proteinase complex has emerged as the focus of drug discovery efforts in cancer therapy. Herein, a series of first generation (2S, 3R)-2-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid derived proteasome inhibitors that were discovered serendipitously en route to original goal of generating a series of sterically constrained oxazoline derivatives has been reported. PMID:22503349

  6. Rust Inhibitor And Fungicide For Cooling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James F.; Greer, D. Clay

    1988-01-01

    Mixture of benzotriazole, benzoic acid, and fungicide prevents growth of rust and fungus. Water-based cooling mixture made from readily available materials prevents formation of metallic oxides and growth of fungi in metallic pipes. Coolant remains clear and does not develop thick sludge tending to collect in low points in cooling systems with many commercial rust inhibitors. Coolant compatible with iron, copper, aluminum, and stainless steel. Cannot be used with cadmium or cadmium-plated pipes.

  7. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Elias, Rawad; Morales, Joshua; Rehman, Yasser; Khurshid, Humera

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is primarily a disease of older adults. The treatment of advanced stage tumors usually involves the use of systemic agents that may be associated with significant risk of toxicity, especially in older patients. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are newcomers to the oncology world with improved efficacy and better safety profiles when compared to traditional cytotoxic drugs. This makes them an attractive treatment option. While there are no elderly specific trials, this review attempts to look at the current available data from a geriatric oncology perspective. We reviewed data from phase III studies that led to newly approved indications of checkpoint inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, and renal cell cancer. Data were reviewed with respect to response, survival, and toxicity according to three groups: <65 years, 65-75 years, and >75 years. Current literature does not allow one to draw definitive conclusions regarding the role of immune checkpoint inhibitors in older adults. However, they may offer a potentially less toxic but equally efficacious treatment option for the senior adult oncology patient. PMID:27287329

  8. PTEN inhibitors: an evaluation of current compounds.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Laura; Lindsay, Yvonne E; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of many classes of enzymes, including phosphatases, have widespread use as experimental tools and as therapeutics. Efforts to develop inhibitors against the lipid phosphatase and tumour suppressor, PTEN, was for some time limited by concerns that their use as therapy could result in increased risk of cancer. However, the accumulation of evidence that short term PTEN inhibition may be valuable in conditions such as nerve injury has raised interest. Here we investigate the inhibition of PTEN by four available PTEN inhibitors, bpV(phen), bpV(pic), VO-OHpic and SF1670 and compared this inhibition with that of only 3 other related enzymes, the tyrosine phosphatase SHP1 and the phosphoinositide phosphatases INPP4A and INPP4B. Even with this very small number of comparators, for all compounds, inhibition of multiple enzymes was observed and with all three vanadate compounds, this was similar or more potent than the inhibition of PTEN. In particular, the bisperoxovanadate compounds were found to inhibit PTEN poorly in the presence of reducing agents including the cellular redox buffer glutathione.

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitors as cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Clawson, Gary A

    2016-08-01

    Cancer cells contain significant alterations in their epigenomic landscape, which several enzyme families reversibly contribute to. One class of epigenetic modifying enzymes is that of histone deacetylases (HDAC), which are receiving considerable scrutiny clinically as a therapeutic target in many cancers. The underlying rationale is that inhibiting HDACs will reverse dysregulated target gene expression by modulating functional histone (or other) acetylation marks. This perspective will discuss a recent paper by Markozashvili and co-workers which appeared in Gene, which indicates that the mechanisms by which HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) alter the epigenetic landscape include widespread alternative effects beyond simply controlling regional epigenetic marks. HDACs are involved in many processes/diseases, and it is not surprising that HDACis have considerable off-target effects, and thus a major effort is being directed toward identification of inhibitors which are selective for HDAC isoforms often uniquely implicated in various cancers. This Perspective will also discuss some representative work with inhibitors targeting individual HDAC classes or isoforms. At present, it is not really clear that isoform-specific HDACis will avoid non-selective effects on other unrecognized activities of HDACs. PMID:27568481

  10. Optogenetic Inhibitor of the Transcription Factor CREB.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed M; Reis, Jakeb M; Xia, Yan; Rashid, Asim J; Mercaldo, Valentina; Walters, Brandon J; Brechun, Katherine E; Borisenko, Vitali; Josselyn, Sheena A; Karanicolas, John; Woolley, G Andrew

    2015-11-19

    Current approaches for optogenetic control of transcription do not mimic the activity of endogenous transcription factors, which act at numerous sites in the genome in a complex interplay with other factors. Optogenetic control of dominant negative versions of endogenous transcription factors provides a mechanism for mimicking the natural regulation of gene expression. Here we describe opto-DN-CREB, a blue-light-controlled inhibitor of the transcription factor CREB created by fusing the dominant negative inhibitor A-CREB to photoactive yellow protein (PYP). A light-driven conformational change in PYP prevents coiled-coil formation between A-CREB and CREB, thereby activating CREB. Optogenetic control of CREB function was characterized in vitro, in HEK293T cells, and in neurons where blue light enabled control of expression of the CREB targets NR4A2 and c-Fos. Dominant negative inhibitors exist for numerous transcription factors; linking these to optogenetic domains offers a general approach for spatiotemporal control of native transcriptional events. PMID:26590638

  11. Functional Stability of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    Kuru, Pinar; Toksoy Oner, Ebru; Agirbasli, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the main inhibitor of plasminogen activators, such as tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), and a major regulator of the fibrinolytic system. PAI-1 plays a pivotal role in acute thrombotic events such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and myocardial infarction (MI). The biological effects of PAI-1 extend far beyond thrombosis including its critical role in fibrotic disorders, atherosclerosis, renal and pulmonary fibrosis, type-2 diabetes, and cancer. The conversion of PAI-1 from the active to the latent conformation appears to be unique among serpins in that it occurs spontaneously at a relatively rapid rate. Latency transition is believed to represent a regulatory mechanism, reducing the risk of thrombosis from a prolonged antifibrinolytic action of PAI-1. Thus, relying solely on plasma concentrations of PAI-1 without assessing its function may be misleading in interpreting the role of PAI-1 in many complex diseases. Environmental conditions, interaction with other proteins, mutations, and glycosylation are the main factors that have a significant impact on the stability of the PAI-1 structure. This review provides an overview on the current knowledge on PAI-1 especially importance of PAI-1 level and stability and highlights the potential use of PAI-1 inhibitors for treating cardiovascular disease. PMID:25386620

  12. The hunt for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lataillade, Max; Kozal, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    Currently, there are three distinct mechanistic classes of antiretrovirals: inhibitors of the HIV- 1 reverse transcriptase and protease enzymes and inhibitors of HIV entry, including receptor and coreceptor binding and cell fusion. A new drug class that inhibits the HIV-1 integrase enzyme (IN) is in development and may soon be available in the clinic. IN is an attractive drug target because it is essential for a stable and productive HIV-1 infection and there is no mammalian homologue of IN. Inhibitors of integrase enzyme (INI) block the integration of viral double-stranded DNA into the host cell's chromosomal DNA. HIV-1 integration has many potential steps that can be inhibited and several new compounds that target specific integration steps have been identified by drug developers. Recently, two INIs, GS-9137 and MK-0518, demonstrated promising early clinical trial results and have been advanced into later stage trials. In this review, we describe how IN facilitates HIV-1 integration, the needed enzyme cofactors, and the resultant byproducts created during integration. Furthermore, we review the different INIs under development, their mechanism of actions, site of IN inhibition, potency, resistance patterns, and discuss the early clinical trial results.

  13. Histone deacetylase inhibitors as cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells contain significant alterations in their epigenomic landscape, which several enzyme families reversibly contribute to. One class of epigenetic modifying enzymes is that of histone deacetylases (HDAC), which are receiving considerable scrutiny clinically as a therapeutic target in many cancers. The underlying rationale is that inhibiting HDACs will reverse dysregulated target gene expression by modulating functional histone (or other) acetylation marks. This perspective will discuss a recent paper by Markozashvili and co-workers which appeared in Gene, which indicates that the mechanisms by which HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) alter the epigenetic landscape include widespread alternative effects beyond simply controlling regional epigenetic marks. HDACs are involved in many processes/diseases, and it is not surprising that HDACis have considerable off-target effects, and thus a major effort is being directed toward identification of inhibitors which are selective for HDAC isoforms often uniquely implicated in various cancers. This Perspective will also discuss some representative work with inhibitors targeting individual HDAC classes or isoforms. At present, it is not really clear that isoform-specific HDACis will avoid non-selective effects on other unrecognized activities of HDACs. PMID:27568481

  14. Selective Water-Soluble Gelatinase Inhibitor Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Gooyit, Major; Lee, Mijoon; Schroeder, Valerie A.; Ikejiri, Masahiro; Suckow, Mark A.; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2011-01-01

    SB-3CT (1), a selective and potent thiirane-based gelatinase inhibitor, is effective in animal models of cancer metastasis and stroke; however, it is limited by poor aqueous solubility and extensive metabolism. We addressed these issues by blocking the primary site of metabolism and capitalizing on a prodrug strategy to achieve >5000-fold increased solubility. The amide prodrugs were quantitatively hydrolyzed in human blood to a potent gelatinase inhibitor, ND-322 (3). The arginyl amide prodrug (ND-478, 5d) was metabolically stable in mouse, rat, and human liver microsomes. Both 5d and 3 were non-mutagenic in the Ames II mutagenicity assay. The prodrug 5d showed moderate clearance of 0.0582 L/min/kg, remained mostly in the extracellular fluid compartment (Vd = 0.0978 L/kg), and had a terminal half-life of >4 h. The prodrug 5d had superior pharmacokinetic properties than 3, making the thiirane class of selective gelatinase inhibitors suitable for intravenous administration in treatment of acute gelatinase-dependent diseases. PMID:21866961

  15. Salicylanilide diethyl phosphates as cholinesterases inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Krátký, Martin; Štěpánková, Šárka; Vorčáková, Katarína; Vinšová, Jarmila

    2015-02-01

    Based on the presence of dialkyl phosphate moiety, we evaluated twenty-seven salicylanilide diethyl phosphates (diethyl [2-(phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl] phosphates) for the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from electric eel (Electrophorus electricus L.) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) from equine serum. Ellman's spectrophotometric method was used. The inhibitory activity (expressed as IC50 values) was compared with that of the established drugs galantamine and rivastigmine. Salicylanilide diethyl phosphates showed significant activity against both cholinesterases with IC50 values from 0.903 to 86.3 μM. IC50s for BChE were comparatively lower than those obtained for AChE. All of the investigated compounds showed higher inhibition of AChE than rivastigmine, and six of them inhibited BChE more effectively than both rivastigmine and galantamine. In general, derivatives of 4-chlorosalicylic acid showed enhanced activity when compared to derivatives of 5-halogenated salicylic acids, especially against BChE. The most effective inhibitor of AChE was O-{5-chloro-2-[(3-bromophenyl)carbamoyl]phenyl} O,O-diethyl phosphate with IC50 of 35.4 μM, which is also one of the most potent inhibitors of BChE. O-{5-Chloro-2-[(3,4-dichlorophenyl)carbamoyl]phenyl} O,O-diethyl phosphate exhibited in vitro the strongest inhibition of BChE (0.90 μM). Salicylanilide diethyl phosphates act as pseudo-irreversible cholinesterases inhibitors. PMID:25462625

  16. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Elias, Rawad; Morales, Joshua; Rehman, Yasser; Khurshid, Humera

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is primarily a disease of older adults. The treatment of advanced stage tumors usually involves the use of systemic agents that may be associated with significant risk of toxicity, especially in older patients. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are newcomers to the oncology world with improved efficacy and better safety profiles when compared to traditional cytotoxic drugs. This makes them an attractive treatment option. While there are no elderly specific trials, this review attempts to look at the current available data from a geriatric oncology perspective. We reviewed data from phase III studies that led to newly approved indications of checkpoint inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, and renal cell cancer. Data were reviewed with respect to response, survival, and toxicity according to three groups: <65 years, 65-75 years, and >75 years. Current literature does not allow one to draw definitive conclusions regarding the role of immune checkpoint inhibitors in older adults. However, they may offer a potentially less toxic but equally efficacious treatment option for the senior adult oncology patient.

  17. Inhibitory spectrum of alpha 2-plasmin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Goldsmith, G H; Moroi, M; Aoki, N

    1979-04-01

    alpha 2-Plasmin inhibitor (alpha 2PI) has been recently characterized as a fast-reacting inhibitor of plasmin in human plasma and appears to play an important role in the regulation of fibrinolysis in vivo. We have studied the effect of purified alpha 2PI upon various proteases participating in human blood coagulation and kinin generation. At physiological concentration (50 microgram/ml), alpha 2PI inhibited the clot-promoting and prekallikrein-activating activity of Hageman factor fragments, the amidolytic, kininogenase, and clot-promoting activities of plasma kallikrein, and the clot-promoting properties of activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA, Factor XIa) and thrombin. alpha 2PI had minimal inhibitory effect on surface-bound activated PTA and activated Stuart factor (Factor Xa). alpha 2PI did not inhibit the activity of activated Christmas factor (Factor IXa) or urinary kallikrein. Heparin (1.5-2.0 units/ml) did not enhance the inhibitory function of alpha 2PI. These results suggest that, like other plasma protease inhibitors, alpha 2PI possesses a broad in vitro spectrum of inhibitory properties.

  18. Recent advances in designing substrate-competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Han, Ki-Cheol; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases play central roles in cellular signaling pathways and their abnormal phosphorylation activity is inseparably linked with various human diseases. Therefore, modulation of kinase activity using potent inhibitors is an attractive strategy for the treatment of human disease. While most protein kinase inhibitors in clinical development are mainly targeted to the highly conserved ATP-binding sites and thus likely promiscuously inhibit multiple kinases including kinases unrelated to diseases, protein substrate-competitive inhibitors are more selective and expected to be promising therapeutic agents. Most substrate-competitive inhibitors mimic peptides derived from substrate proteins, or from inhibitory domains within kinases or inhibitor proteins. In addition, bisubstrate inhibitors are generated by conjugating substrate-competitive peptide inhibitors to ATP-competitive inhibitors to improve affinity and selectivity. Although structural information on protein kinases provides invaluable guidance in designing substrate-competitive inhibitors, other strategies including bioinformatics, computational modeling, and high-throughput screening are often employed for developing specific substrate-competitive kinase inhibitors. This review focuses on recent advances in the design and discovery of substrate-competitive inhibitors of protein kinases.

  19. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors as Anticancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary E; Corsino, Patrick E; Narayan, Satya; Law, Brian K

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have been considered promising drug targets for a number of years, but most CDK inhibitors have failed rigorous clinical testing. Recent studies demonstrating clear anticancer efficacy and reduced toxicity of CDK4/6 inhibitors such as palbociclib and multi-CDK inhibitors such as dinaciclib have rejuvenated the field. Favorable results with palbociclib and its recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval demonstrate that CDK inhibitors with narrow selectivity profiles can have clinical utility for therapy based on individual tumor genetics. A brief overview of results obtained with ATP-competitive inhibitors such as palbociclib and dinaciclib is presented, followed by a compilation of new avenues that have been pursued toward the development of novel, non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors. These creative ways to develop CDK inhibitors are presented along with crystal structures of these agents complexed with CDK2 to highlight differences in their binding sites and mechanisms of action. The recent successes of CDK inhibitors in the clinic, combined with the potential for structure-based routes to the development of non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors, and evidence that CDK inhibitors may have use in suppressing chromosomal instability and in synthetic lethal drug combinations inspire optimism that CDK inhibitors will become important weapons in the fight against cancer.

  20. Solution structures of stromelysin complexed to thiadiazole inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Stockman, B. J.; Waldon, D. J.; Gates, J. A.; Scahill, T. A.; Kloosterman, D. A.; Mizsak, S. A.; Jacobsen, E. J.; Belonga, K. L.; Mitchell, M. A.; Mao, B.; Petke, J. D.; Goodman, L.; Powers, E. A.; Ledbetter, S. R.; Kaytes, P. S.; Vogeli, G.; Marshall, V. P.; Petzold, G. L.; Poorman, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    Unregulated or overexpressed matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including stromelysin, collagenase, and gelatinase. have been implicated in several pathological conditions including arthritis and cancer. Small-molecule MMP inhibitors may have therapeutic value in the treatment of these diseases. In this regard, the solution structures of two stromelysin/ inhibitor complexes have been investigated using 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR spectroscopy. Both-inhibitors are members of a novel class of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor that contain a thiadiazole group and that interact with stromelysin in a manner distinct from other classes of inhibitors. The inhibitors coordinate the catalytic zinc atom through their exocyclic sulfur atom, with the remainder of the ligand extending into the S1-S3 side of the active site. The binding of inhibitor containing a protonated or fluorinated aromatic ring was investigated using 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy. The fluorinated ring was found to have a reduced ring-flip rate compared to the protonated version. A strong, coplanar interaction between the fluorinated ring of the inhibitor and the aromatic ring of Tyr155 is proposed to account for the reduced ring-flip rate and for the increase in binding affinity observed for the fluorinated inhibitor compared to the protonated inhibitor. Binding interactions observed for the thiadiazole class of ligands have implications for the design of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors. PMID:9827994

  1. Molecular mechanism of respiratory syncytial virus fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Battles, Michael B; Langedijk, Johannes P; Furmanova-Hollenstein, Polina; Chaiwatpongsakorn, Supranee; Costello, Heather M; Kwanten, Leen; Vranckx, Luc; Vink, Paul; Jaensch, Steffen; Jonckers, Tim H M; Koul, Anil; Arnoult, Eric; Peeples, Mark E; Roymans, Dirk; McLellan, Jason S

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in young children and the elderly. Therapeutic small molecules have been developed that bind the RSV F glycoprotein and inhibit membrane fusion, yet their binding sites and molecular mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Here we show that these inhibitors bind to a three-fold-symmetric pocket within the central cavity of the metastable prefusion conformation of RSV F. Inhibitor binding stabilizes this conformation by tethering two regions that must undergo a structural rearrangement to facilitate membrane fusion. Inhibitor-escape mutations occur in residues that directly contact the inhibitors or are involved in the conformational rearrangements required to accommodate inhibitor binding. Resistant viruses do not propagate as well as wild-type RSV in vitro, indicating a fitness cost for inhibitor escape. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into class I viral fusion proteins and should facilitate development of optimal RSV fusion inhibitors.

  2. Advances in algal drug research with emphasis on enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Kannan R R; Kulkarni, Manoj G; Stirk, Wendy A; Van Staden, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Enzyme inhibitors are now included in all kinds of drugs essential to treat most of the human diseases including communicable, metabolic, cardiovascular, neurological diseases and cancer. Numerous marine algae have been reported to be a potential source of novel enzyme inhibitors with various pharmaceutical values. Thus, the purpose of this review is to brief the enzyme inhibitors from marine algae of therapeutic potential to treat common diseases. As per our knowledge this is the first review for the potential enzyme inhibitors from marine origin. This review contains 86 algal enzyme inhibitors reported during 1989-2013 and commercial enzyme inhibitors available in the market. Compounds in the review are grouped according to the disease conditions in which they are involved; diabetes, obesity, dementia, inflammation, melanogenesis, AIDS, hypertension and other viral diseases. The structure-activity relationship of most of the compounds are also discussed. In addition, the drug likeness properties of algal inhibitors were evaluated using Lipinski's 'Rule of Five'. PMID:25195189

  3. Evaluation of Encapsulated Inhibitor for Autonomous Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsey, M. N.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.; Pearman, B. P.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns the development of smart coating technologies based on microencapsulation for the autonomous control of corrosion. Microencapsulation allows the incorporation of corrosion inhibitors into coating which provides protection through corrosion-controlled release of these inhibitors.One critical aspect of a corrosion protective smart coating is the selection of corrosion inhibitor for encapsulation and comparison of the inhibitor function before and after encapsulation. For this purpose, a systematic approach is being used to evaluate free and encapsulated corrosion inhibitors by salt immersion. Visual, optical microscope, and Scanning Electron Microscope (with low-angle backscatter electron detector) are used to evaluate these inhibitors. It has been found that the combination of different characterization tools provide an effective method for evaluation of early stage localized corrosion and the effectiveness of corrosion inhibitors.

  4. Phosphorylation of protein phosphatase inhibitor-1 by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Bogachan; Shu, Hongjun; Fernandez, Joseph; El-Armouche, Ali; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Nairn, Angus C; Bibb, James A

    2006-08-25

    Inhibitor-1 becomes a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase at Thr(35). Moreover, Ser(67) of inhibitor-1 serves as a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the brain. Here, we report that dephosphoinhibitor-1 but not phospho-Ser(67) inhibitor-1 was efficiently phosphorylated by protein kinase C at Ser(65) in vitro. In contrast, Ser(67) phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 was unaffected by phospho-Ser(65). Protein kinase C activation in striatal tissue resulted in the concomitant phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser(65) and Ser(67), but not Ser(65) alone. Selective pharmacological inhibition of protein phosphatase activity suggested that phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 1 in the striatum. In vitro studies confirmed these findings and suggested that phospho-Ser(67) protects phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 from dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 1 in vivo. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors resulted in the up-regulation of diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 in this tissue. In contrast, the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptors opposed increases in striatal diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 levels. Phosphomimetic mutation of Ser(65) and/or Ser(67) did not convert inhibitor-1 into a protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 is a poor substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These observations extend earlier studies regarding the function of phospho-Ser(67) and underscore the possibility that phosphorylation in this region of inhibitor-1 by multiple protein kinases may serve as an integrative signaling mechanism that governs the responsiveness of inhibitor-1 to cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation.

  5. Studies on bacterial cell wall inhibitors. VI. Screening method for the specific inhibitors of peptidoglycan synthesis.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Tanaka, H; Oiwa, R; Nagai, T; Koyama, Y; Takahashi, Y

    1979-10-01

    A screening method was established for selecting new specific inhibitors of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan synthesis. In the primary test, culture broths of soil isolates were selected based on relative microbial activity. A culture, to be retained, must be active against Bacillus subtilis and lack activities against Acholeplasma laidawii. In the secondary test, inhibitors of bacterial cell wall synthesis were identified by their ability to prevent the incorporation of meso-[3H]diaminopimelic acid but not to prevent the incorporation of L-[4C]leucine into the acid-insoluble macromolecular fraction of growing cells of Bacillus sp. ATCC 21206 (Dpm-). As the tertiary test, inhibitors with molecular weights under 1,000 were selected by passage through a Diaflo UM-2 membrane. By this screening procedure, six known antibiotics and one new one were picked out from ten thousand soil isolates. PMID:528376

  6. The "SWOT" of BRAF inhibition in melanoma: RAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors or both?

    PubMed

    Nissan, Moriah H; Solit, David B

    2011-12-01

    Activating mutations in the BRAF gene are among the most prevalent kinase mutations in human cancer. BRAF mutations are most frequent in patients with melanoma where they occur in approximately 50% of patients with advanced disease. Remarkable clinical activity has recently been reported with highly selective RAF inhibitors in melanoma patients whose tumors harbor V600E BRAF mutations. The response rates of RAF inhibitors in patients with BRAF-mutant melanomas far exceed the activity level of any prior therapy studied in this disease. The results suggest that we have entered an era of personalized therapy for patients with metastatic melanoma in which treatment selection will be guided by BRAF mutational status. This review will discuss the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats ("SWOT") of developing RAF and MEK selective inhibitors as anti-cancer therapies, recent insights into the mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired resistance to these agents, and current efforts to develop mechanism-based combination therapies. PMID:21997758

  7. Designing Inhibitors Against Fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase: Exploring Natural Products for Novel Inhibitor Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Sabrina; Harris, Katharine M.; Kantrowitz, Evan R.

    2010-01-01

    Natural products often contain unusual scaffold structures that may be elaborated by combinatorial methods to develop new drug-like molecules. Visual inspection of more than 128 natural products with some type of anti-diabetic activity suggested that a subset might provide novel scaffolds for designing potent inhibitors against fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), an enzyme critical in the control of gluconeogenesis. Using in silico docking methodology, these were evaluated to determine those that exhibited affinity for the AMP binding site. Achyrofuran from the South American plant Achyrocline satureoides, was selected for further investigation. Using the achyrofuran scaffold, inhibitors against FBPase were developed. Compounds 15 and 16 inhibited human liver and pig kidney FBPases at IC50 values comparable to that of AMP, the natural allosteric inhibitor. PMID:20116906

  8. The "SWOT" of BRAF inhibition in melanoma: RAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors or both?

    PubMed

    Nissan, Moriah H; Solit, David B

    2011-12-01

    Activating mutations in the BRAF gene are among the most prevalent kinase mutations in human cancer. BRAF mutations are most frequent in patients with melanoma where they occur in approximately 50% of patients with advanced disease. Remarkable clinical activity has recently been reported with highly selective RAF inhibitors in melanoma patients whose tumors harbor V600E BRAF mutations. The response rates of RAF inhibitors in patients with BRAF-mutant melanomas far exceed the activity level of any prior therapy studied in this disease. The results suggest that we have entered an era of personalized therapy for patients with metastatic melanoma in which treatment selection will be guided by BRAF mutational status. This review will discuss the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats ("SWOT") of developing RAF and MEK selective inhibitors as anti-cancer therapies, recent insights into the mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired resistance to these agents, and current efforts to develop mechanism-based combination therapies.

  9. Structural analysis of Golgi alpha-mannosidase II inhibitors identified from a focused glycosidase inhibitor screen.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Douglas A; Tarling, Chris A; Withers, Stephen G; Rose, David R

    2008-09-23

    The N-glycosylation pathway is a target for pharmaceutical intervention in a number of pathological conditions including cancer. Golgi alpha-mannosidase II (GMII) is the final glycoside hydrolase in the pathway and has been the target for a number of synthetic efforts aimed at providing more selective and effective inhibitors. Drosophila GMII (dGMII) has been extensively studied due to the ease of obtaining high resolution structural data, allowing the observation of substrate distortion upon binding and after formation of a trapped covalent reaction intermediate. However, attempts to find new inhibitor leads by high-throughput screening of large commercial libraries or through in silico docking were unsuccessful. In this paper we provide a kinetic and structural analysis of five inhibitors derived from a small glycosidase-focused library. Surprisingly, four of these were known inhibitors of beta-glucosidases. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the dGMII:inhibitor complexes highlights the ability of the zinc-containing GMII active site to deform compounds, even ones designed as conformationally restricted transition-state mimics of beta-glucosidases, into binding entities that have inhibitory activity. Although these deformed conformations do not appear to be on the expected conformational itinerary of the enzyme, and are thus not transition-state mimics of GMII, they allow positioning of the three vicinal hydroxyls of the bound gluco-inhibitors into similar locations to those found with mannose-containing substrates, underlining the importance of these hydrogen bonds for binding. Further, these studies show the utility of targeting the acid-base catalyst using appropriately positioned positively charged nitrogen atoms, as well as the challenges associated with aglycon substitutions.

  10. F8 haplotype and inhibitor risk: results from the Hemophilia Inhibitor Genetics Study (HIGS) Combined Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, John; Astermark, Jan; Menius, Erika D.; Carrington, Mary; Donfield, Sharyne M.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Nelson, George W.; Oldenburg, Johannes; Pavlova, Anna; Shapiro, Amy D.; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Berntorp, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Ancestral background, specifically African descent, confers higher risk for development of inhibitory antibodies to factor VIII (FVIII) in hemophilia A. It has been suggested that differences in the distribution of factor VIII gene (F8) haplotypes, and mismatch between endogenous F8 haplotypes and those comprising products used for treatment could contribute to risk. Design and Methods Data from the HIGS Combined Cohort were used to determine the association between F8 haplotype 3 (H3) vs. haplotypes 1 and 2 (H1+H2) and inhibitor risk among individuals of genetically-determined African descent. Other variables known to affect inhibitor risk including type of F8 mutation and HLA were included in the analysis. A second research question regarding risk related to mismatch in endogenous F8 haplotype and recombinant FVIII products used for treatment was addressed. Results H3 was associated with higher inhibitor risk among those genetically-identified (N=49) as of African ancestry, but the association did not remain significant after adjustment for F8 mutation type and the HLA variables. Among subjects of all racial ancestries enrolled in HIGS who reported early use of recombinant products (N=223), mismatch in endogenous haplotype and the FVIII proteins constituting the products used did not confer greater risk for inhibitor development. Conclusion H3 was not an independent predictor of inhibitor risk. Further, our findings did not support a higher risk of inhibitors in the presence of a haplotype mismatch between the FVIII molecule infused and that of the individual. PMID:22958194

  11. Design and synthesis of conformationally restricted inhibitors of active thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa).

    PubMed

    Brink, Mikael; Dahlén, Anders; Olsson, Thomas; Polla, Magnus; Svensson, Tor

    2014-04-01

    A series of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-benzimidazole-5-carboxylic acid and 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-7-carboxylic acid derivatives designed as inhibitors of TAFIa has been prepared via a common hydrogenation-alkylation sequence starting from the appropriate benzimidazole and imidazopyridine system. We present a successful design strategy using a conformational restriction approach resulting in potent and selective inhibitors of TAFIa. The X-ray structure of compound 5 in complex with a H333Y/H335Q double mutant TAFI indicate that the conformational restriction is responsible for the observed potency increase. PMID:24588961

  12. Protocol for rational design of covalently interacting inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas C; Welker, Armin; Rieger, Max; Sahu, Prabhat K; Sotriffer, Christoph A; Schirmeister, Tanja; Engels, Bernd

    2014-10-20

    The inhibition potencies of covalent inhibitors mainly result from the formation of a covalent bond to the enzyme during the inhibition mechanism. This class of inhibitors has essentially been ignored in previous target-directed drug discovery projects because of concerns about possible side effects. However, their advantages, such as higher binding energies and longer drug-target residence times moved them into the focus of recent investigations. While the rational design of non-covalent inhibitors became standard the corresponding design of covalent inhibitors is still in its early stages. Potent covalent inhibitors can be retrieved from large compound libraries by covalent docking approaches but protocols are missing that can reliably predict the influence of variations in the substitution pattern on the affinity and/or reactivity of a given covalent inhibitor. Hence, the wanted property profile can only be obtained from trial-and-error proceedings. This paper presents an appropriate protocol which is able to predict improved covalent inhibitors. It uses hybrid approaches, which mix quantum mechanical (QM) and molecular mechanical (MM) methods to predict variations in the reactivity of the inhibitor. They are also used to compute the required information about the non-covalent enzyme-inhibitor complex. Docking tools are employed to improve the inhibitor with respect to the non-covalent interactions formed in the binding site. PMID:25251382

  13. Homologous inhibitors from potato tubers of serine endopeptidases and metallocarboxypeptidases.

    PubMed Central

    Hass, C M; Venkatakrishnan, R; Ryan, C A

    1976-01-01

    A potent polypeptide inhibitor of chymotrypsin has been purified from Russett Burbank potatoes. The inhibitor has no effect on bovine carboxypeptidases A or B but exhibits homology with a carboxypeptidase inhibitor that is also present in potato tubers. The chymotrypsin inhibitor has a molecular weight of approximately 5400 as estimated by gel filtration, amino acid analysis, and titration with chymotrypsin. The polypeptide chain consists of 49 amino acid residues, of which six are half-cystine, forming three disulfide bonds. Its size is similar to that of the carboxypeptidase inhibitor, which contains 39 amino acid residues and also has three disulfide bridges. In immunological double diffusion assays, the chymotrypsin inhibitor and the carboxypeptidase inhibitor do not crossreact; however, automatic Edman degradation of reduced and alkylated derivatives of the chymotrypsin inhibitor, yielding a partial sequence of 18 amino acid residues at the NH2-terminus, reveals a similarity in sequence to that of the carboxypeptidase inhibitor. Thus, inhibitors directed toward two distinct classes of proteases, the serine endopeptidases and the metallocarboxypeptidases, appear to have evolved from a common ancestor. Images PMID:1064864

  14. Inhibitor development in non-severe haemophilia across Europe.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kathelijn; Iorio, Alfonso; Lassila, Riitta; Peyvandi, Flora; Calizzani, Gabriele; Gatt, Alex; Lambert, Thierry; Windyga, Jerzy; Gilman, Estelle A; Hollingsworth, R; Makris, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Evidence about inhibitor formation in non-severe haemophilia and the potential role for clotting factor concentrate type is scant. It was the aim of this study to report inhibitor development in non-severe haemophilia patients enrolled in the European Haemophilia Safety Surveillance (EUHASS) study. Inhibitors are reported quarterly and total treated patients annually. Incidence rates and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated according to diagnosis and concentrate used. Between 1-10-2008 and 31-12-2012, 68 centres reported on 7,969 patients with non-severe haemophilia A and 1,863 patients with non-severe haemophilia B. For haemophilia A, 37 inhibitors occurred in 8,622 treatment years, resulting in an inhibitor rate of 0.43/100 treatment years (95% CI 0.30-0.59). Inhibitors occurred at a median age of 35 years, after a median of 38 exposure days (EDs; P25-P75: 20-80); with 72% occurring within the first 50 EDs. In haemophilia B, one inhibitor was detected in 2,149 treatment years, resulting in an inhibitor rate of 0.05/100 years (95% CI 0.001-0.26). This inhibitor developed at the age of six years, after six EDs. The rate of inhibitors appeared similar across recombinant and plasma derived factor VIII (FVIII) concentrates. Rates for individual concentrates could not be calculated at this stage due to low number of events. In conclusion, inhibitors in non-severe haemophilia occur three times more frequently than in previously treated patients with severe haemophilia at a rate of 0.43/100 patient years (haemophilia A) and 0.05/100 years (haemophilia B). Although the majority of inhibitors developed in the first 50 EDs, inhibitor development continued with increasing exposure to FVIII.

  15. Structural determinants of Tau aggregation inhibitor potency.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Kelsey N; Cisek, Katryna; Huseby, Carol J; Chang, Edward; Kuret, Jeff

    2013-11-01

    Small-molecule Tau aggregation inhibitors are under investigation as potential therapeutic agents against Alzheimer disease. Many such inhibitors have been identified in vitro, but their potency-driving features, and their molecular targets in the Tau aggregation pathway, have resisted identification. Previously we proposed ligand polarizability, a measure of electron delocalization, as a candidate descriptor of inhibitor potency. Here we tested this hypothesis by correlating the ground state polarizabilities of cyanine, phenothiazine, and arylmethine derivatives calculated using ab initio quantum methods with inhibitory potency values determined in the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer under reducing conditions. A series of rhodanine analogs was analyzed as well using potency values disclosed in the literature. Results showed that polarizability and inhibitory potency directly correlated within all four series. To identify putative binding targets, representative members of the four chemotypes were added to aggregation reactions, where they were found to stabilize soluble, but SDS-resistant Tau species at the expense of filamentous aggregates. Using SDS resistance as a secondary assay, and a library of Tau deletion and missense mutants as targets, interaction with cyanine was localized to the microtubule binding repeat region. Moreover, the SDS-resistant phenotype was completely dependent on the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer, but not intact PHF6/PH6* hexapeptide motifs, indicating that cyanine interacted with a species in the aggregation pathway prior to nucleus formation. Together the data suggest that flat, highly polarizable ligands inhibit Tau aggregation by interacting with folded species in the aggregation pathway and driving their assembly into soluble but highly stable Tau oligomers.

  16. Structural Determinants of Tau Aggregation Inhibitor Potency*

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Kelsey N.; Cisek, Katryna; Huseby, Carol J.; Chang, Edward; Kuret, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Small-molecule Tau aggregation inhibitors are under investigation as potential therapeutic agents against Alzheimer disease. Many such inhibitors have been identified in vitro, but their potency-driving features, and their molecular targets in the Tau aggregation pathway, have resisted identification. Previously we proposed ligand polarizability, a measure of electron delocalization, as a candidate descriptor of inhibitor potency. Here we tested this hypothesis by correlating the ground state polarizabilities of cyanine, phenothiazine, and arylmethine derivatives calculated using ab initio quantum methods with inhibitory potency values determined in the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer under reducing conditions. A series of rhodanine analogs was analyzed as well using potency values disclosed in the literature. Results showed that polarizability and inhibitory potency directly correlated within all four series. To identify putative binding targets, representative members of the four chemotypes were added to aggregation reactions, where they were found to stabilize soluble, but SDS-resistant Tau species at the expense of filamentous aggregates. Using SDS resistance as a secondary assay, and a library of Tau deletion and missense mutants as targets, interaction with cyanine was localized to the microtubule binding repeat region. Moreover, the SDS-resistant phenotype was completely dependent on the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer, but not intact PHF6/PH6* hexapeptide motifs, indicating that cyanine interacted with a species in the aggregation pathway prior to nucleus formation. Together the data suggest that flat, highly polarizable ligands inhibit Tau aggregation by interacting with folded species in the aggregation pathway and driving their assembly into soluble but highly stable Tau oligomers. PMID:24072703

  17. Sifuvirtide, a potent HIV fusion inhibitor peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Wang, Yun-Hua; Pang, Wei; Tam, Siu-Cheung; Tien, Po; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2009-05-08

    Enfuvirtide (ENF) is currently the only FDA approved HIV fusion inhibitor in clinical use. Searching for more drugs in this category with higher efficacy and lower toxicity seems to be a logical next step. In line with this objective, a synthetic peptide with 36 amino acid residues, called Sifuvirtide (SFT), was designed based on the crystal structure of gp41. In this study, we show that SFT is a potent anti-HIV agent with relatively low cytotoxicity. SFT was found to inhibit replication of all tested HIV strains. The effective concentrations that inhibited 50% viral replication (EC{sub 50}), as determined in all tested strains, were either comparable or lower than benchmark values derived from well-known anti-HIV drugs like ENF or AZT, while the cytotoxic concentrations causing 50% cell death (CC{sub 50}) were relatively high, rendering it an ideal anti-HIV agent. A GST-pull down assay was performed to confirm that SFT is a fusion inhibitor. Furthermore, the activity of SFT on other targets in the HIV life cycle was also investigated, and all assays showed negative results. To further understand the mechanism of action of HIV peptide inhibitors, resistant variants of HIV-1{sub IIIB} were derived by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of SFT or ENF. The results showed that there was cross-resistance between SFT and ENF. In conclusion, SFT is an ideal anti-HIV agent with high potency and low cytotoxicity, but may exhibit a certain extent of cross-resistance with ENF.

  18. Tools for Characterizing Bacterial Protein Synthesis Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Skylar; Kaushal, Bindiya; Almutairi, Mashal M.; Liu, Haipeng; Ochabowicz, Anna; Quan, Selwyn; Pham, Van Cuong; Squires, Catherine L.; Murphy, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Many antibiotics inhibit the growth of sensitive bacteria by interfering with ribosome function. However, discovery of new protein synthesis inhibitors is curbed by the lack of facile techniques capable of readily identifying antibiotic target sites and modes of action. Furthermore, the frequent rediscovery of known antibiotic scaffolds, especially in natural product extracts, is time-consuming and expensive and diverts resources that could be used toward the isolation of novel lead molecules. In order to avoid these pitfalls and improve the process of dereplication of chemically complex extracts, we designed a two-pronged approach for the characterization of inhibitors of protein synthesis (ChIPS) that is suitable for the rapid identification of the site and mode of action on the bacterial ribosome. First, we engineered antibiotic-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strains that contain only one rRNA operon. These strains are used for the rapid isolation of resistance mutants in which rRNA mutations identify the site of the antibiotic action. Second, we show that patterns of drug-induced ribosome stalling on mRNA, monitored by primer extension, can be used to elucidate the mode of antibiotic action. These analyses can be performed within a few days and provide a rapid and efficient approach for identifying the site and mode of action of translation inhibitors targeting the bacterial ribosome. Both techniques were validated using a bacterial strain whose culture extract, composed of unknown metabolites, exhibited protein synthesis inhibitory activity; we were able to rapidly detect the presence of the antibiotic chloramphenicol. PMID:24041905

  19. Kynurenine Aminotransferase Isozyme Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Nematollahi, Alireza; Sun, Guanchen; Jayawickrama, Gayan S.; Church, W. Bret

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase isozymes (KATs 1–4) are members of the pyridoxal-5’-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme family, which catalyse the permanent conversion of l-kynurenine (l-KYN) to kynurenic acid (KYNA), a known neuroactive agent. As KATs are found in the mammalian brain and have key roles in the kynurenine pathway, involved in different categories of central nervous system (CNS) diseases, the KATs are prominent targets in the quest to treat neurodegenerative and cognitive impairment disorders. Recent studies suggest that inhibiting these enzymes would produce effects beneficial to patients with these conditions, as abnormally high levels of KYNA are observed. KAT-1 and KAT-3 share the highest sequence similarity of the isozymes in this family, and their active site pockets are also similar. Importantly, KAT-2 has the major role of kynurenic acid production (70%) in the human brain, and it is considered therefore that suitable inhibition of this isozyme would be most effective in managing major aspects of CNS diseases. Human KAT-2 inhibitors have been developed, but the most potent of them, chosen for further investigations, did not proceed in clinical studies due to the cross toxicity caused by their irreversible interaction with PLP, the required cofactor of the KAT isozymes, and any other PLP-dependent enzymes. As a consequence of the possibility of extensive undesirable adverse effects, it is also important to pursue KAT inhibitors that reversibly inhibit KATs and to include a strategy that seeks compounds likely to achieve substantial interaction with regions of the active site other than the PLP. The main purpose of this treatise is to review the recent developments with the inhibitors of KAT isozymes. This treatise also includes analyses of their crystallographic structures in complex with this enzyme family, which provides further insight for researchers in this and related studies. PMID:27314340

  20. Sifuvirtide, a potent HIV fusion inhibitor peptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Wang, Yun-Hua; Pang, Wei; Tam, Siu-Cheung; Tien, Po; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2009-05-01

    Enfuvirtide (ENF) is currently the only FDA approved HIV fusion inhibitor in clinical use. Searching for more drugs in this category with higher efficacy and lower toxicity seems to be a logical next step. In line with this objective, a synthetic peptide with 36 amino acid residues, called Sifuvirtide (SFT), was designed based on the crystal structure of gp41. In this study, we show that SFT is a potent anti-HIV agent with relatively low cytotoxicity. SFT was found to inhibit replication of all tested HIV strains. The effective concentrations that inhibited 50% viral replication (EC(50)), as determined in all tested strains, were either comparable or lower than benchmark values derived from well-known anti-HIV drugs like ENF or AZT, while the cytotoxic concentrations causing 50% cell death (CC(50)) were relatively high, rendering it an ideal anti-HIV agent. A GST-pull down assay was performed to confirm that SFT is a fusion inhibitor. Furthermore, the activity of SFT on other targets in the HIV life cycle was also investigated, and all assays showed negative results. To further understand the mechanism of action of HIV peptide inhibitors, resistant variants of HIV-1(IIIB) were derived by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of SFT or ENF. The results showed that there was cross-resistance between SFT and ENF. In conclusion, SFT is an ideal anti-HIV agent with high potency and low cytotoxicity, but may exhibit a certain extent of cross-resistance with ENF.

  1. Nanomolar Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei RNA Triphosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul; Ho, C. Kiong; Takagi, Yuko; Djaballah, Hakim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eukaryal taxa differ with respect to the structure and mechanism of the RNA triphosphatase (RTPase) component of the mRNA capping apparatus. Protozoa, fungi, and certain DNA viruses have a metal-dependent RTPase that belongs to the triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme (TTM) superfamily. Because the structures, active sites, and chemical mechanisms of the TTM-type RTPases differ from those of mammalian RTPases, the TTM RTPases are potential targets for antiprotozoal, antifungal, and antiviral drug discovery. Here, we employed RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown methods to show that Trypanosoma brucei RTPase Cet1 (TbCet1) is necessary for proliferation of procyclic cells in culture. We then conducted a high-throughput biochemical screen for small-molecule inhibitors of the phosphohydrolase activity of TbCet1. We identified several classes of chemicals—including chlorogenic acids, phenolic glycopyranosides, flavonoids, and other phenolics—that inhibit TbCet1 with nanomolar to low-micromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s). We confirmed the activity of these compounds, and tested various analogs thereof, by direct manual assays of TbCet1 phosphohydrolase activity. The most potent nanomolar inhibitors included tetracaffeoylquinic acid, 5-galloylgalloylquinic acid, pentagalloylglucose, rosmarinic acid, and miquelianin. TbCet1 inhibitors were less active (or inactive) against the orthologous TTM-type RTPases of mimivirus, baculovirus, and budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Our results affirm that a TTM RTPase is subject to potent inhibition by small molecules, with the caveat that parallel screens against TTM RTPases from multiple different pathogens may be required to fully probe the chemical space of TTM inhibition. PMID:26908574

  2. Hypomagnesemia associated with a proton pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Jun; Tsuji, Kunihiro; Doyama, Hisashi; Kim, Fae; Takeda, Yasuhito; Kito, Yosuke; Ito, Renma; Nakanishi, Hiroyoshi; Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Waseda, Yohei; Tsuji, Shigetsugu; Takemura, Kenichi; Yamada, Shinya; Okada, Toshihide; Kanaya, Honin

    2012-01-01

    Severe hypomagnesemia is a serious clinical condition. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) induced hypomagnesemia has been recognized since 2006. In March 2011 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration advised that long-term use of PPI can induce hypomagnesemia. We report the first Japanese case of hypomagnesemia associated with chronic use of PPIs in a 64-year-old man hospitalized for nausea, bilateral ankle arthritis, and tremor of the extremities who had convulsions 3 days after admission. Blood analysis showed severe hypomagnesemia. He had been taking rabeprazole (10 mg/day) for 5 years. After stopping rabeprazole and correcting the electrolytes imbalances, his symptoms improved without recurrence.

  3. Inhibitors of glycogen synthase 3 kinase

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter; Ring, David B.; Harrison, Stephen D.; Bray, Andrew M.

    2006-05-30

    Compounds of formula 1: ##STR00001## wherein R.sub.1 is alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, heteroaryl, or heteroaralkyl, substituted with 0 3 substituents selected from lower alkyl, halo, hydroxy, lower alkoxy, amino, lower alkyl-amino, and nitro; R.sub.2 is hydroxy, amino, or lower alkoxy; R.sub.3 is H, lower alkyl, lower acyl, lower alkoxy-acyl, or amino-acyl; R.sub.4 is H or lower alkyl; and pharmaceutically acceptable salts and esters thereof; are effective inhibitors of GSK3.

  4. Inhibitors of glycogen synthase 3 kinase

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter; Ring, David B.; Harrison, Stephen D.; Bray, Andrew M.

    2000-01-01

    Compounds of formula 1: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 is alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, aralkyl, heteroaryl, or heteroaralkyl, substituted with 0-3 substituents selected from lower alkyl, halo, hydroxy, lower alkoxy, amino, lower alkyl-amino, and nitro; R.sub.2 is hydroxy, amino, or lower alkoxy; R.sub.3 is H, lower alkyl, lower acyl, lower alkoxy-acyl, or amnino-acyl; R.sub.4 is H or lower alkyl; and pharmaceutically acceptable salts and esters thereof; are effective inhibitors of GSK3.

  5. A new urease inhibitor from Viola betonicifolia.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Naveed; Saeed, Muhammad; Khan, Ajmal; Adhikari, Achyut; Wadood, Abdul; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2014-10-17

    Urease has attracted much attention, as it is directly involved in the formation of infection stones and contributes to the pathogenesis of urolithiasis, pyelonephritis, ammonia and hepatic encephalopathy, hepatic coma and urinary catheter encrustation. Moreover, urease is the major cause of pathologies induced by H. pylori, such as gastritis and peptic ulcer. In the present work, the new natural compound, 3-methoxydalbergione, was isolated from Viola betonicifolia. A mechanistic study of this compound as a natural urease inhibitor was performed by using enzyme kinetics and docking studies. 3-Methoxydalbergione could be considered as a lead molecule for drugs useful in the urease associated diseases.

  6. Inhibitors of platelet lipoxygenase from Ponkan fruit.

    PubMed

    Nogata, Y; Sekiya, K; Ohta, H; Kusumoto, K; Ishizu, T

    2001-04-01

    An activity-guided separation for inhibitors of rat platelet 12-lipoxygenase led to the isolation of two compounds, 4-O-feruloyl-5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (IC50; 5.5 microM) and methyl 4-O-feruloyl-5-O-caffeoylquinate (IC50; 1.9 microM) from the peel of Ponkan fruit (Citrus reticulata). The complete structure of each phenolic ester was determined by NMR spectroscopy [1H and 13C NMR spectra, 1H-1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY), 1H-detected heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC), and heteronuclear multiple bond connectivity (HMBC) spectroscopies] and other spectral methods. PMID:11314960

  7. PDE-10A inhibitors as insulin secretagogues.

    PubMed

    Cantin, Louis-David; Magnuson, Steven; Gunn, David; Barucci, Nicole; Breuhaus, Marina; Bullock, William H; Burke, Jennifer; Claus, Thomas H; Daly, Michelle; Decarr, Lynn; Gore-Willse, Ann; Hoover-Litty, Helana; Kumarasinghe, Ellalahewage S; Li, Yaxin; Liang, Sidney X; Livingston, James N; Lowinger, Timothy; Macdougall, Margit; Ogutu, Herbert O; Olague, Alan; Ott-Morgan, Ronda; Schoenleber, Robert W; Tersteegen, Adrian; Wickens, Philip; Zhang, Zhonghua; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Lei; Sweet, Laurel J

    2007-05-15

    Modulation of cAMP levels has been linked to insulin secretion in preclinical animal models and in humans. The high expression of PDE-10A in pancreatic islets suggested that inhibition of this enzyme may provide the necessary modulation to elicit increased insulin secretion. Using an HTS approach, we have identified quinoline-based PDE-10A inhibitors as insulin secretagogues in vitro. Optimized compounds were evaluated in vivo where improvements in glucose tolerance and increases in insulin secretion were measured. PMID:17400452

  8. Theoretical study of classical acetylcholinesterase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Érica C. M.; Martins, João B. L.; dos Santos, Maria L.; Gargano, R.

    2008-06-01

    Semi-empirical, RHF and DFT calculations were carried out to study well known acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, i.e., tacrine, donepezil, galantamine, physostigmine, and tacrine dimer (bis-tacrine). Electronic and structural parameters were used in order to correlate the acetylcholinesterase inhibition activity with their molecular structure. The optimized geometries of these drugs were analyzed by multivariate PCA statistical method. Frontier orbital energies (HOMO and LUMO), the (HOMO-LUMO) gap and the distance between more acidic hydrogen species were used to determine principal components. The PCA results indicated that these drugs were ordered into three groups according to the first principal component: galantamine/physostigmine, donepezil/tacrine dimer and tacrine.

  9. Radical scavengers as ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Basu, Arijit; Sinha, Barij Nayan

    2012-01-01

    This paper compiled all the previous reports on radical scavengers, an interesting class of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors. We have highlighted three key research areas: chemical classification of radical scavengers, structural and functional aspects of the radical site, and progress in drug designing for radical scavengers. Under the chemical classification section, we have recorded the discovery of hydroxyurea followed by discussions on hydroxamic acids, amidoximes, hydroxyguanidines, and phenolic compounds. In the next section, we have compiled the structural information for the radical site obtained from different crystallographic and theoretical studies. Finally, we have included the reported ligand based and structure based drug-designing studies.

  10. Inside HDACs with more selective HDAC inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Roche, Joëlle; Bertrand, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) are nowadays part of the therapeutic arsenal mainly against cancers, with four compounds approved by the Food and Drug Administration. During the last five years, several groups have made continuous efforts to improve this class of compounds, designing more selective compounds or compounds with multiple capacities. After a survey of the HDAC biology and structures, this review summarizes the results of the chemists working in this field, and highlights when possible the behavior of the molecules inside their targets.

  11. Protease Inhibitors Targeting Coronavirus and Filovirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H.; Renslo, Adam R.; Simmons, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess, whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  12. Modified 5-fluorouracil: Uridine phosphorylase inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkov, A. A.; Shchekotikhin, A. A.; Shtil, A. A.; Sotnichenko, S. E.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a medication widely used in chemotherapy to treat various types of cancer. Being a substrate for the reverse reaction catalyzed by uridine phosphorylase (UPase), 5-FU serves as a promising prototype molecule (molecular scaffold) for the design of a selective UPase inhibitor that enhances the antitumor activity of 5-FU and exhibits intrinsic cytostatic effects on cancer cells. The chemical formula of the new compound, which binds to the uracil-binding site and, in the presence of a phosphate anion, to the phosphate-binding site of UPase, is proposed and investigated by molecular simulation methods.

  13. Inactivation of C-1 inhibitor by proteases: demonstration by a monoclonal antibody of a neodeterminant on inactivated, non-complexed C-1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nuijens, J H; Huijbregts, C C; van Mierlo, G M; Hack, C E

    1987-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against kallikrein-C-1 inhibitor and factor XIIa-C-1 inhibitor complexes. One of the monoclonal antibodies (KII) appeared to react predominantly with C-1 inhibitor complexes in an ELISA. However, the apparent binding of KII to C-1 inhibitor complexes was probably due to the presence of proteolytically inactivated C-1 inhibitor in the complex mixture used for the coating:KII did not bind either kallikrein-C-1 inhibitor or factor XIIa-C-1 inhibitor complexes generated in plasma by dextran sulphate. SDS-PAGE analysis of C-1 inhibitor incubated with proteases revealed that KII-reactive C-1 inhibitor has a lower molecular weight than native C-1 inhibitor. We propose that the determinant that reacts with KII is exposed after cleavage of C-1 inhibitor in its reactive site. The monoclonal antibody KII will enable us to study the inactivation of C-1 inhibitor in human inflammatory disease.

  14. Examination of the change in returning molecular weight obtained during inhibitor squeeze treatments using polyacrylate based inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, G.M.; Sorbie, K.S.

    1995-11-01

    Scale inhibitors based on small polyelectrolytes are often employed in oilfield scale prevention treatments. These materials are injected into the near-well formation of producers in a scale inhibitor squeeze treatment. When the well is brought back on production, the objective is for the return concentration level of the inhibitor in the produced brine to be at or above a certain threshold level, C{sub t}. This threshold level is the minimum inhibitor concentration required to prevent the formation of mineral carbonate or sulfate scales in that well. The squeeze lifetime depends strongly on the nature of the interaction between the inhibitor and the formation either through an adsorption or precipitation mechanism. Both adsorption and precipitation processes depend on the molecular weight of the scale inhibitor, as well as on a range of other factors. However, polymeric inhibitor species always display some degree of polydispersity (spread of molecular weight). In this paper, the authors examine the effects of molecular weight on adsorption/desorption phenomena for polyacrylate based inhibitor species. This work shows that, in the inhibitor effluent after a squeeze treatment, the molecular weight of the returning inhibitor may be different from that which was injected. For commercially available polymeric inhibitor species, they demonstrate using core floods that preferential retention of higher molecular weight components occurs and preferential desorption of lower molecular weight components is observed. This leads to a gradation in molecular weight in the return profile, which can lead to increased molecular weight components returning as the inhibitor concentration approaches the threshold level. The significance of this observation to field application of polymeric inhibitor species is discussed.

  15. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling. PMID:26702150

  16. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling.

  17. The STAT5 inhibitor pimozide decreases survival of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells resistant to kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Gashin, Laurie B.; Terrell, Shariya; Klitgaard, Josephine L.; Santo, Loredana; Addorio, Martha R.; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Griffin, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is an essential mediator of the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). In CML, the BCR/ABL fusion kinase causes the constitutive activation of STAT5, thereby driving the expression of genes promoting survival. BCR/ABL kinase inhibitors have become the mainstay of therapy for CML, although CML cells can develop resistance through mutations in BCR/ABL. To overcome this problem, we used a cell-based screen to identify drugs that inhibit STAT-dependent gene expression. Using this approach, we identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as a STAT5 inhibitor. Pimozide decreases STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation, although it does not inhibit BCR/ABL or other tyrosine kinases. Furthermore, pimozide decreases the expression of STAT5 target genes and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CML cell lines. Pimozide also selectively inhibits colony formation of CD34+ bone marrow cells from CML patients. Importantly, pimozide induces similar effects in the presence of the T315I BCR/ABL mutation that renders the kinase resistant to presently available inhibitors. Simultaneously inhibiting STAT5 with pimozide and the kinase inhibitors imatinib or nilotinib shows enhanced effects in inhibiting STAT5 phosphorylation and in inducing apoptosis. Thus, targeting STAT5 may be an effective strategy for the treatment of CML and other myeloproliferative diseases. PMID:21233313

  18. The role of placental urokinase inhibitor in toxemia of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Terao, T; Kobayashi, T

    1983-01-01

    The fibrinolysis of the uterus can be reversed during the course of pregnancy. The chief cause of this physiologic change is an increase of urokinase (UK) inhibitor in the placenta. The UK inhibitor also has a pathologic aspect that can influence the course of pregnancy. We have proven that the hypofibrinolysis of toxemic pregnant urine results from increased UK inhibitor. Furthermore, we have shown the existence of UK inhibitor in toxemic pregnant serum and the glomerulus. On the basis of these facts we propose that UK inhibitor leaks into the maternal blood stream from the placenta and inhibits the fibrinolytic activity of UK, forming microthrombuses in the glomerulus. Excess UK inhibitor in the placenta also suppresses the fibrinolytic activity of placental plasminogen activator (PPA). Thus microthrombuses are apt to be formed in both the placenta and glomerulus. Such pathologic inhibition of fibrinolysis strongly influences the course of toxemia. PMID:6360225

  19. Enzyme inhibitors in tuber crops and their thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Prathibha, S; Nambisan, B; Leelamma, S

    1995-10-01

    Tubers of Cassava (Manihot esculenta), yams (Dioscorea esculenta), aroids (Amorphophallus campanulatus, Colocasia esculenta, Xanthosoma sagittfolium) and Coleus (Solenostemon rotundifolius) were screened for inhibitory activities against amylase, trypsin and chymotrypsin. Coleus tuber possessed the highest anti-amylase activity, whereas Colocasia tuber was the most potent source of anti-tryptic and anti-chymotryptic activity. Xanthosoma tubers exhibited amylase inhibitory activity and Amorphophallus tubers antiprotease activity. Dioscorea esculenta had low levels of amylase and chymotrypsin inhibitors, while Cassava tubers were totally free of inhibitors. When tubers were processed by pressure cooking, there was significant reduction/complete elimination in inhibitory activity. Partial retention of inhibition was observed in the case of amylase inhibitor in Dioscorea, chymotrypsin inhibitor in Colocasia and trypsin inhibitor in Colocasia, Coleus and Amorphophallus. In vitro experiments on heat stability of the different inhibitors revealed almost similar pattern of inactivation. PMID:8833431

  20. Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Inhibitors: Current and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Currently, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is considered a serious health-care problem all over the world. A good number of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against HCV infection are in clinical progress including NS3-4A protease inhibitors, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors, and NS5A inhibitors as well as host targeted inhibitors. Two NS3-4A protease inhibitors (telaprevir and boceprevir) have been recently approved for the treatment of hepatitis C in combination with standard of care (pegylated interferon plus ribavirin). The new therapy has significantly improved sustained virologic response (SVR); however, the adverse effects associated with this therapy are still the main concern. In addition to the emergence of viral resistance, other targets must be continually developed. One such underdeveloped target is the helicase portion of the HCV NS3 protein. This review article summarizes our current understanding of HCV treatment, particularly with those of NS3 inhibitors. PMID:24282816

  1. GSK-3 Inhibitors: Preclinical and Clinical Focus on CNS

    PubMed Central

    Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit; Martinez, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) activity via pharmacological intervention has become an important strategy for treating neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. The known GSK-3 inhibitors are of diverse chemotypes and mechanisms of action and include compounds isolated from natural sources, cations, synthetic small-molecule ATP-competitive inhibitors, non-ATP-competitive inhibitors, and substrate–competitive inhibitors. Here we describe the variety of GSK-3 inhibitors with a specific emphasis on their biological activities in neurons and neurological disorders. We further highlight our current progress in the development of non-ATP-competitive inhibitors of GSK-3. The available data raise the hope that one or more of these drug design approaches will prove successful at stabilizing or even reversing the aberrant neuropathology and cognitive deficits of certain central nervous system disorders. PMID:22065134

  2. Towards a Green Hydrate Inhibitor: Imaging Antifreeze Proteins on Clathrates

    PubMed Central

    Gordienko, Raimond; Ohno, Hiroshi; Singh, Vinay K.; Jia, Zongchao; Ripmeester, John A.; Walker, Virginia K.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of hydrate plugs in oil and gas pipelines is a serious industrial problem and recently there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative hydrate inhibitors as substitutes for thermodynamic inhibitors like methanol. We show here that antifreeze proteins (AFPs) possess the ability to modify structure II (sII) tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate crystal morphologies by adhering to the hydrate surface and inhibiting growth in a similar fashion to the kinetic inhibitor poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The effects of AFPs on the formation and growth rate of high-pressure sII gas mix hydrate demonstrated that AFPs are superior hydrate inhibitors compared to PVP. These results indicate that AFPs may be suitable for the study of new inhibitor systems and represent an important step towards the development of biologically-based hydrate inhibitors. PMID:20161789

  3. Topical calcineurin inhibitors in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lampropoulos, Christos E; D’Cruz, David P

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) encompasses a variety of lesions that may be refractory to systemic or topical agents. Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) are the most common lesions in clinical practice. The topical calcineurin inhibitors, tacrolimus and pimecrolimus, have been used to treat resistant cutaneous lupus since 2002 and inhibit the proliferation and activation of T-cells and suppress immune-mediated cutaneous inflammation. This article reviews the mechanism of action, efficacy, adverse effects, and the recent concern about their possible carcinogenic effect. Although the total number of patients is small and there is only one relevant randomized controlled study, the data are encouraging. Many patients, previously resistant to systemic agents or topical steroids, improved after four weeks of treatment. DLE and SCLE lesions were less responsive, reflecting the chronicity of the lesions, although more than 50% of patients still showed improvement. Topical calcineurin inhibitors may be a safe and effective alternative to topical steroids for CLE although the only approved indication is for atopic dermatitis. PMID:20421909

  4. SGLT2 Inhibitors: Benefit/Risk Balance.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2016-10-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) reduce hyperglycemia by increasing urinary glucose excretion. They have been evaluated in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with diet/exercise, metformin, dual oral therapy or insulin. Three agents are available in Europe and the USA (canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, empagliflozin) and others are commercialized in Japan or in clinical development. SGLT2 inhibitors reduce glycated hemoglobin, with a minimal risk of hypoglycemia. They exert favorable effects beyond glucose control with consistent body weight, blood pressure, and serum uric acid reductions. Empagliflozin showed remarkable reductions in cardiovascular/all-cause mortality and in hospitalization for heart failure in patients with previous cardiovascular disease. Positive renal outcomes were also shown with empagliflozin. Mostly reported adverse events are genital mycotic infections, while urinary tract infections and events linked to volume depletion are rather rare. Concern about a risk of ketoacidosis and bone fractures has been recently raised, which deserves caution and further evaluation. PMID:27541294

  5. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in aging.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Koji; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Saito, Hidehiko

    2014-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a principal inhibitor of fibrinolysis, is induced in thrombotic, fibrotic, and cardiovascular diseases, which in turn primarily afflict the older population. This induction of PAI-1 may play an important role in the pathology of these diseases as PAI-1 can regulate the dissolution of fibrin and also inhibit the degradation of the extracellular matrix by reducing plasmin generation. PAI-1 expression is elevated in aged individuals and is significantly upregulated in a variety of pathologies associated with the process of aging, including myocardial and cerebral infarction, vascular (athero) sclerosis, cardiac and lung fibrosis, metabolic syndromes (e.g., hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance), cancer, and inflammatory/stress responses. Thus, PAI-1 may play a critical role in the development of aging-associated pathological changes. In addition, PAI-1 is recognized as a marker of senescence and a key member of a group of proteins collectively known as the senescence-messaging secretome. In this review, we highlight the role of PAI-1 in the pathophysiology of aging and aging-associated disorders.

  6. Development of sulfonamide AKT PH domain inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ahad, Ali Md.; Zuohe, Song; Du-Cuny, Lei; Moses, Sylvestor A.; Zhou, Li Li; Zhang, Shuxing; Powis, Garth; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.; Mash, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway can lead to apoptosis in cancer cells. Previously we identified a lead sulfonamide that selectively bound to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of AKT and induced apoptosis when present at low micromolar concentrations. To examine the effects of structural modification, a set of sulfonamides related to the lead compound was designed, synthesized, and tested for binding to the expressed PH domain of AKT using a surface plasmon resonance-based competitive binding assay. Cellular activity was determined by means of an assay for pAKT production and a cell killing assay using BxPC3 cells. The most active compounds in the set are lipophilic and possess an aliphatic chain of the proper length. Results were interpreted with the aid of computational modeling. This paper represents the first structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of a large family of AKT PH domain inhibitors. Information obtained will be used in the design of the next generation of inhibitors of AKT PH domain function. PMID:21353784

  7. Peptide deformylase inhibitors as potent antimycobacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Teo, Jeanette W P; Thayalan, Pamela; Beer, David; Yap, Amelia S L; Nanjundappa, Mahesh; Ngew, Xinyi; Duraiswamy, Jeyaraj; Liung, Sarah; Dartois, Veronique; Schreiber, Mark; Hasan, Samiul; Cynamon, Michael; Ryder, Neil S; Yang, Xia; Weidmann, Beat; Bracken, Kathryn; Dick, Thomas; Mukherjee, Kakoli

    2006-11-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the hydrolytic removal of the N-terminal formyl group from nascent proteins. This is an essential step in bacterial protein synthesis, making PDF an attractive target for antibacterial drug development. Essentiality of the def gene, encoding PDF from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, was demonstrated through genetic knockout experiments with Mycobacterium bovis BCG. PDF from M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv was cloned, expressed, and purified as an N-terminal histidine-tagged recombinant protein in Escherichia coli. A novel class of PDF inhibitors (PDF-I), the N-alkyl urea hydroxamic acids, were synthesized and evaluated for their activities against the M. tuberculosis PDF enzyme as well as their antimycobacterial effects. Several compounds from the new class had 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of <100 nM. Some of the PDF-I displayed antibacterial activity against M. tuberculosis, including MDR strains with MIC90 values of <1 microM. Pharmacokinetic studies of potential leads showed that the compounds were orally bioavailable. Spontaneous resistance towards these inhibitors arose at a frequency of < or =5 x 10(-7) in M. bovis BCG. DNA sequence analysis of several spontaneous PDF-I-resistant mutants revealed that half of the mutants had acquired point mutations in their formyl methyltransferase gene (fmt), which formylated Met-tRNA. The results from this study validate M. tuberculosis PDF as a drug target and suggest that this class of compounds have the potential to be developed as novel antimycobacterial agents.

  8. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, B.A.; Whitlow, E.P.

    1998-09-22

    A method is described for inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425 F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25 C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425 F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer. 5 figs.

  9. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Whitlow, Eugene P.

    1998-09-22

    A method of inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425.degree. F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25.degree. C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425.degree. F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer.

  10. Replication and Inhibitors of Enteroviruses and Parechoviruses.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Lonneke; Wolthers, Katja C; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2015-08-01

    The Enterovirus (EV) and Parechovirus genera of the picornavirus family include many important human pathogens, including poliovirus, rhinovirus, EV-A71, EV-D68, and human parechoviruses (HPeV). They cause a wide variety of diseases, ranging from a simple common cold to life-threatening diseases such as encephalitis and myocarditis. At the moment, no antiviral therapy is available against these viruses and it is not feasible to develop vaccines against all EVs and HPeVs due to the great number of serotypes. Therefore, a lot of effort is being invested in the development of antiviral drugs. Both viral proteins and host proteins essential for virus replication can be used as targets for virus inhibitors. As such, a good understanding of the complex process of virus replication is pivotal in the design of antiviral strategies goes hand in hand with a good understanding of the complex process of virus replication. In this review, we will give an overview of the current state of knowledge of EV and HPeV replication and how this can be inhibited by small-molecule inhibitors.

  11. A novel molluscicide, corrosion inhibitor, and dispersant

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuser, R.T.; Vanlaer, A.; Damour, A.

    1997-12-01

    The efficacy of filming amines as corrosion inhibitors and dispersants in steam systems is well-documented. A novel formulation retains these functions of traditional filming amines and adds molluscicide capability for controlling macrofouling in fresh water and sea water. Criteria for this development included low toxicity to mammals and to non-target aquatic species, rapid biodegradation, and multifunctionality. Low mammalian toxicity and lack of other hazards exempt it from reporting requirements under SARA Title 3. Toxicity (LC{sub 50}) levels for rainbow trout and fathead minnow are higher than typical dosage rates. Biodegradation is rapid; half life is 22 hours in river water. By effectively dispersing slimes (along with biofilm, scale, and tubercles), it controls slimes without toxicity to biofilm organisms. As corrosion inhibitor, it reduces the open cell potential of metal surfaces by 50--200 millivolts and retards pitting and crevice corrosion. Its molluscicide activity gradually kills and disperses mussels, clams, and barnacles. The protective film, renewed by dosage for a brief period of time each day, proactively prevents scale and slime deposits and repels settling and adhesion by macrofouling species. Refinement of established technology has produced a multi-functional formulation that is safe to handle and has minimal impact on the environment.

  12. RNA aptamer inhibitors of a restriction endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón, Estefanía; Maher, L. James

    2015-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases (REases) recognize and cleave short palindromic DNA sequences, protecting bacterial cells against bacteriophage infection by attacking foreign DNA. We are interested in the potential of folded RNA to mimic DNA, a concept that might be applied to inhibition of DNA-binding proteins. As a model system, we sought RNA aptamers against the REases BamHI, PacI and KpnI using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). After 20 rounds of selection under different stringent conditions, we identified the 10 most enriched RNA aptamers for each REase. Aptamers were screened for binding and specificity, and assayed for REase inhibition. We obtained eight high-affinity (Kd ∼12-30 nM) selective competitive inhibitors (IC50 ∼20-150 nM) for KpnI. Predicted RNA secondary structures were confirmed by in-line attack assay and a 38-nt derivative of the best anti-KpnI aptamer was sufficient for inhibition. These competitive inhibitors presumably act as KpnI binding site analogs, but lack the primary consensus KpnI cleavage sequence and are not cleaved by KpnI, making their potential mode of DNA mimicry fascinating. Anti-REase RNA aptamers could have value in studies of REase mechanism and may give clues to a code for designing RNAs that competitively inhibit DNA binding proteins including transcription factors. PMID:26184872

  13. HTCC: Broad Range Inhibitor of Coronavirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Milewska, Aleksandra; Kaminski, Kamil; Ciejka, Justyna; Kosowicz, Katarzyna; Zeglen, Slawomir; Wojarski, Jacek; Nowakowska, Maria; Szczubiałka, Krzysztof; Pyrc, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    To date, six human coronaviruses have been known, all of which are associated with respiratory infections in humans. With the exception of the highly pathogenic SARS and MERS coronaviruses, human coronaviruses (HCoV-NL63, HCoV-OC43, HCoV-229E, and HCoV-HKU1) circulate worldwide and typically cause the common cold. In most cases, infection with these viruses does not lead to severe disease, although acute infections in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised patients may progress to severe disease requiring hospitalization. Importantly, no drugs against human coronaviruses exist, and only supportive therapy is available. Previously, we proposed the cationically modified chitosan, N-(2-hydroxypropyl)-3-trimethylammonium chitosan chloride (HTCC), and its hydrophobically-modified derivative (HM-HTCC) as potent inhibitors of the coronavirus HCoV-NL63. Here, we show that HTCC inhibits interaction of a virus with its receptor and thus blocks the entry. Further, we demonstrate that HTCC polymers with different degrees of substitution act as effective inhibitors of all low-pathogenic human coronaviruses. PMID:27249425

  14. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-11-01

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor-DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)). PMID:26529010

  15. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-01-01

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)). PMID:26529010

  16. Undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase inhibitors: antibacterial drug leads.

    PubMed

    Sinko, William; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Yonghui; Feixas, Ferran; Cox, Courtney L; Mitchell, Douglas A; Oldfield, Eric; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-07-10

    There is a significant need for new antibiotics due to the rise in drug resistance. Drugs such as methicillin and vancomycin target bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, but methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) have now arisen and are of major concern. Inhibitors acting on new targets in cell wall biosynthesis are thus of particular interest since they might also restore sensitivity to existing drugs, and the cis-prenyl transferase undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), essential for lipid I, lipid II, and thus, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, is one such target. We used 12 UPPS crystal structures to validate virtual screening models and then assayed 100 virtual hits (from 450,000 compounds) against UPPS from S. aureus and Escherichia coli. The most promising inhibitors (IC50 ∼2 μM, Ki ∼300 nM) had activity against MRSA, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus sp. with MIC or IC50 values in the 0.25-4 μg/mL range. Moreover, one compound (1), a rhodanine with close structural similarity to the commercial diabetes drug epalrestat, exhibited good activity as well as a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of 0.1 with methicillin against the community-acquired MRSA USA300 strain, indicating strong synergism. PMID:24827744

  17. Replication and Inhibitors of Enteroviruses and Parechoviruses

    PubMed Central

    van der Linden, Lonneke; Wolthers, Katja C.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The Enterovirus (EV) and Parechovirus genera of the picornavirus family include many important human pathogens, including poliovirus, rhinovirus, EV-A71, EV-D68, and human parechoviruses (HPeV). They cause a wide variety of diseases, ranging from a simple common cold to life-threatening diseases such as encephalitis and myocarditis. At the moment, no antiviral therapy is available against these viruses and it is not feasible to develop vaccines against all EVs and HPeVs due to the great number of serotypes. Therefore, a lot of effort is being invested in the development of antiviral drugs. Both viral proteins and host proteins essential for virus replication can be used as targets for virus inhibitors. As such, a good understanding of the complex process of virus replication is pivotal in the design of antiviral strategies goes hand in hand with a good understanding of the complex process of virus replication. In this review, we will give an overview of the current state of knowledge of EV and HPeV replication and how this can be inhibited by small-molecule inhibitors. PMID:26266417

  18. Lonafarnib is a potential inhibitor for neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Linlin; Xie, Songbo; Peng, Guoyuan; Wang, Jian; Li, Yuanyuan; Qin, Juan; Zhong, Diansheng

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a common cardiovascular disease that involves the build-up of plaque on the inner walls of the arteries. Intraplaque neovacularization has been shown to be essential in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Previous studies showed that small-molecule compounds targeting farnesyl transferase have the ability to prevent atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice, but the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that lonafarnib, a specific inhibitor of farnesyl transferase, elicits inhibitory effect on vascular endothelial capillary assembly in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we showed that lonafarnib treatment led to a dose-dependent decrease in scratch wound closure in vitro, whereas it had little effect on endothelial cell proliferation. These data indicate that lonafarnib inhibits neovascularization via directly targeting endothelial cells and disturbing their motility. Moreover, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of farnesyl transferase by lonafarnib significantly impaired centrosome reorientation toward the leading edge of endothelial cells. Mechanistically, we found that the catalytic β subunit of farnesyl transferase associated with a cytoskeletal protein important for the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity. Additionally, we showed that lonafarnib remarkably inhibited the expression of the cytoskeletal protein and interrupted its interaction with farnesyl transferase. Our findings thus offer novel mechanistic insight into the protective effect of farnesyl transferase inhibitors on atherosclerosis and provide encouraging evidence for the potential use of this group of agents in inhibiting plaque neovascularization. PMID:25853815

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor associated skin eruption.

    PubMed

    Seiverling, Elizabeth V; Fernanadez, Emmy M; Adams, David

    2006-04-01

    EGFR Inhibitors are used to treat Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and colorectal cancer (CRC). A common side effect of EGFR Inhibitors is a follicular/pustular skin eruption. We report a case of gefitinib (Iressa) associated skin eruption. The treatment regimen consisted of triamcinolone 0.1% cream twice daily, clindamycin 1% lotion twice daily and sodium sulfacetamide lotion twice daily. The clinical presentation, etiology, and management options of EGFR Inhibitor associated skin eruptions are discussed.

  20. Aromatase inhibitors in men: effects and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors effectively delay epiphysial maturation in boys and improve testosterone levels in adult men Therefore, aromatase inhibitors may be used to increase adult height in boys with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty, idiopathic short stature and constitutional delay of puberty. Long-term efficacy and safety of the use of aromatase inhibitors has not yet been established in males, however, and their routine use is therefore not yet recommended. PMID:21693046

  1. Toxicity issues of organic corrosion inhibitors: Applications of QSAR model

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, W.P.; Bockris, J.O`M.

    1996-12-01

    Less toxic corrosion inhibitors can be designed, if one has a reliable method of estimation of toxicity of these compounds before these are actually synthesized. This paper deals with a review of various methods of estimation of aquatic toxicity of organic compounds and highlights the relationship between the structures of these inhibitors and their aquatic toxicity. Such relationships can form the basis for changing the structure of the existing corrosion inhibitors to make these less toxic.

  2. Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of Aspartate Transcarbamoylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Coudray, Laëtitia; Pennebaker, Anne F.; Montchamp, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and evaluation of a series of novel inhibitors of aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) are reported. Several submicromolar phosphorus-containing inhibitors are described, but all-carboxylate compounds are inactive. Compounds were synthesized to probe the postulated cyclic transition-state of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. In addition, the associated role of the protonation state at the phosphorus acid moiety was evaluated using phosphinic and carboxylic acids. Although none of the synthesized inhibitors is more potent than N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate (PALA), the compounds provide useful mechanistic information, as well as the basis for the design of future inhibitors and/or prodrugs. PMID:19828320

  3. Solderability preservation through the use of organic inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, N.R.; Hosking, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    Organic inhibitors can be used to prevent corrosion of metals and have application in the electronics industry as solderability preservatives. We have developed a model to describe the action of two inhibitors (benzotriazole and imidazole) during the environmental aging and soldering process. The inhibitors bond with the metal surface and form a barrier that prevents or retards oxidation. At soldering temperatures, the metal-organic complex breaks down leaving an oxide-free metal surface that allows excellent wetting by molten solder. The presence of the inhibitor retards the wetting rate relative to clean copper, but provides a vast improvement relative to oxidized copper.

  4. Discovery of Biarylaminoquinazolines as Novel Tubulin Polymerization Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarese, Alessandro; Brun, Paola; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Conconi, Maria Teresa; La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Silvestri, Romano; Hamel, Ernest; Chilin, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycle experiments with our previously reported 4-biphenylaminoquinazoline (1–3) multityrosine kinase inhibitors revealed an activity profile resembling that of known tubulin polymerization inhibitors. Novel 4-biarylaminoquinazoline analogues of compound 2 were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of several tyrosine kinases and of tubulin. Although compounds 1–3 acted as dual inhibitors, the heterobiaryl analogues possessed only anti-tubulin properties and targeted the colchicine site. Furthermore, molecular modeling studies allowed the rationalization of the pharmacodynamic properties of the compounds. PMID:24801610

  5. Discovery of a selective irreversible BMX inhibitor for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feiyang; Zhang, Xin; Weisberg, Ellen; Chen, Sen; Hur, Wooyoung; Wu, Hong; Zhao, Zheng; Wang, Wenchao; Mao, Mao; Cai, Changmeng; Simon, Nicholas I; Sanda, Takaomi; Wang, Jinhua; Look, A Thomas; Griffin, James D; Balk, Steven P; Liu, Qingsong; Gray, Nathanael S

    2013-07-19

    BMX is a member of the TEC family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. We have used structure-based drug design in conjunction with kinome profiling to develop a potent, selective, and irreversible BMX kinase inhibitor, BMX-IN-1, which covalently modifies Cys496. BMX-IN-1 inhibits the proliferation of Tel-BMX-transformed Ba/F3 cells at two digit nanomolar concentrations but requires single digit micromolar concentrations to inhibit the proliferation of prostate cancer cell lines. Using a combinatorial kinase inhibitor screening strategy, we discovered that the allosteric Akt inhibitor, MK2206, is able to potentiate BMX inhibitor's antiproliferation efficacy against prostate cancer cells. PMID:23594111

  6. Squash inhibitors: from structural motifs to macrocyclic knottins.

    PubMed

    Chiche, Laurent; Heitz, Annie; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Gracy, Jérôme; Chau, Pham T T; Ha, Phan T; Hernandez, Jean-François; Le-Nguyen, Dung

    2004-10-01

    In this article, we will first introduce the squash inhibitor, a well established family of highly potent canonical serine proteinase inhibitors isolated from Cucurbitaceae. The squash inhibitors were among the first discovered proteins with the typical knottin fold shared by numerous peptides extracted from plants, animals and fungi. Knottins contain three knotted disulfide bridges, two of them arranged as a Cystine-Stabilized Beta-sheet motif. In contrast to cyclotides for which no natural linear homolog is known, most squash inhibitors are linear. However, Momordica cochinchinensis Trypsin Inhibitor-I and (MCoTI-I and -II), 34-residue squash inhibitors isolated from seeds of a common Cucurbitaceae from Vietnam, were recently shown to be macrocyclic. In these circular squash inhibitors, a short peptide linker connects residues that correspond to the N- and C-termini in homologous linear squash inhibitors. In this review we present the isolation, characterization, chemical synthesis, and activity of these macrocyclic knottins. The solution structure of MCoTI-II will be compared with topologically similar cyclotides, homologous linear squash inhibitors and other knottins, and potential applications of such scaffolds will be discussed. PMID:15551519

  7. Enzymatic synthesis of hyaluronan hybrid urinary trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kakizaki, Ikuko; Takahashi, Ryoki; Yanagisawa, Miho; Yoshida, Futaba; Takagaki, Keiichi

    2015-09-01

    Human urinary trypsin inhibitor is a proteoglycan that has a single low-sulfated chondroitin 4-sulfate chain at the seryl residue in position 10 of the core protein as a glycosaminoglycan moiety, and is used as an anti-inflammatory medicine based on the protease inhibitory activity of the core protein. However, the functions of the glycosaminoglycan moiety have not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, the glycosaminoglycan chains of a native urinary trypsin inhibitor were remodeled to hyaluronan chains, with no changes to the core protein, using transglycosylation as a reverse reaction of the hydrolysis of bovine testicular hyaluronidase, and the properties of the hybrid urinary trypsin inhibitor were then analyzed. The trypsin inhibitory activitiy of the hyaluronan hybrid urinary trypsin inhibitor was similar to that of the native type; however, its inhibitory effect on the hydrolysis of hyaluronidase were not as strong as that of the native type. This result demonstrated that the native urinary trypsin inhibitor possessed hyaluronidase inhibitory activity on its chondroitin sulfate chain. The hyaluronan hybrid urinary trypsin inhibitors obtained affinity to a hyaluronan-binding protein not exhibited by the native type. The interactions between the hyaluronan hybrid urinary trypsin inhibitors and phosphatidylcholine (abundant in the outer layer of plasma membrane) were stronger than that of the native type. Hyaluronan hybrid urinary trypsin inhibitors may be useful for investigating the functions of the glycosaminoglycan chains of urinary trypsin inhibitors and hyaluronan, and our hybrid synthesizing method may be used widely in research for future medical applications.

  8. Pharmacology and laboratory testing of the oral Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Samama, Meyer Michel; Meddahi, Sadia; Samama, Charles Marc

    2014-09-01

    New oral factor Xa inhibitors are intended to progressively substitute the oral vitamin K antagonists and parenteral indirect inhibitors of factor Xa in the prevention and treatment of venous and arterial thromboembolic episodes. This article focuses on the main clinical studies and on biological measurements of new oral factor Xa inhibitors, and addresses several safety issues. These newer agents do not require any routine laboratory monitoring of blood coagulation; however, biological tests have been developed in order to assess the plasma concentration of these drugs in several clinical settings. This article reviews these 4 oral direct factor Xa inhibitors. PMID:25168939

  9. A series of novel, potent, and selective histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Philip; Altamura, Sergio; Chakravarty, Prasun K; Cecchetti, Ottavia; De Francesco, Raffaele; Gallinari, Paola; Ingenito, Raffaele; Meinke, Peter T; Petrocchi, Alessia; Rowley, Michael; Scarpelli, Rita; Serafini, Sergio; Steinkühler, Christian

    2006-12-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors offer a promising strategy for cancer therapy and the first generation HDAC inhibitors are currently in clinical trials. A structurally novel series of HDAC inhibitors based on the natural cyclic tetrapeptide Apicidin is described. Selected screening of the sample collection looking for L-2-amino-8-oxodecanoic acid (L-Aoda) derivatives identified a small acyclic lead molecule 1 with the unusual ketone zinc binding group. SAR studies around this lead resulted in optimization to potent, low molecular weight, selective, non-hydroxamic acid HDAC inhibitors, equipotent to current clinical candidates.

  10. Squash inhibitors: from structural motifs to macrocyclic knottins.

    PubMed

    Chiche, Laurent; Heitz, Annie; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Gracy, Jérôme; Chau, Pham T T; Ha, Phan T; Hernandez, Jean-François; Le-Nguyen, Dung

    2004-10-01

    In this article, we will first introduce the squash inhibitor, a well established family of highly potent canonical serine proteinase inhibitors isolated from Cucurbitaceae. The squash inhibitors were among the first discovered proteins with the typical knottin fold shared by numerous peptides extracted from plants, animals and fungi. Knottins contain three knotted disulfide bridges, two of them arranged as a Cystine-Stabilized Beta-sheet motif. In contrast to cyclotides for which no natural linear homolog is known, most squash inhibitors are linear. However, Momordica cochinchinensis Trypsin Inhibitor-I and (MCoTI-I and -II), 34-residue squash inhibitors isolated from seeds of a common Cucurbitaceae from Vietnam, were recently shown to be macrocyclic. In these circular squash inhibitors, a short peptide linker connects residues that correspond to the N- and C-termini in homologous linear squash inhibitors. In this review we present the isolation, characterization, chemical synthesis, and activity of these macrocyclic knottins. The solution structure of MCoTI-II will be compared with topologically similar cyclotides, homologous linear squash inhibitors and other knottins, and potential applications of such scaffolds will be discussed.

  11. New low toxicity corrosion inhibitors for industrial cleaning operations

    SciTech Connect

    Lindert, A.; Johnston, W.G.

    1999-11-01

    Inhibitors are routinely employed in chemical cleaning solvents used for removing scale from electrical power plants and industrial equipment since these cleaning solvents are corrosive to metal surfaces. This paper discusses the development of three new inhibitors developed for the use in hydrochloric acid, ammoniated EDTA or citric acid chemical cleaning solutions. Synthesis procedures used in the production of Mannich derivatives employed in the inhibitors were optimized for maximum corrosion resistance and reduced toxicity. All auxiliary ingredients used in the formulation of final inhibitor products were chosen to give the lowest possible toxicity of these products.

  12. MEK inhibitors beyond monotherapy: current and future development.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Ian E; Musib, Luna

    2015-08-01

    The development of MEK inhibitors has led to improved progression-free survival in patients with mutant BRAF(V600) cancers when used in combination with BRAF inhibitors. However, resistance to combination therapy remains an issue. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of MEK in cancer cell proliferation and the mechanisms which lead to resistance in patients. Specific adverse events, which have been linked to the MEK inhibitor class, have been described. Future combinations of MEK inhibitors with other cancer therapy options, currently under investigation in clinical trials, are also discussed.

  13. Characterization of carbonic anhydrase-inhibitor noncovalent complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xueheng; Chen, R.; Bruce, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    Competitive binding of two mixtures of inhibitors to bovine carbonic anhydrase H (BCAII) was studied using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The first mixture contained inhibitors with hydrocarbon/fluorohydrocarbon linker groups and with an 800 fold span of binding constants. The second contained inhibitors with dipeptide extensions synthesized using the solid phase method. Noncovalent enzyme-inhibitor complexes were observed from solutions in 10 mM ammonia acetate having abundances consistent with their relative binding constants measured in solution. The inhibitor with highest affinity was readily identified in an equimolar mixture. The inhibitors with very low affinity were identified to form specific complexes as well. Several control experiments including acidifying the solution or removing the Zn metal from the enzyme resulted in the disappearance of the enzyme-inhibitor complexes, (mass spectrometrically) observed complexation and characterization of biomolecular binding. Good correlation between gas phase inhibitor ion abundances and their binding constants in solution were observed. Structural information and relative binding constants of masses were obtained using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) through multi-stage dissociation experiments. These results support the role of ESI-FTICR-MS in the study of specific noncovalent associations from solution, and show that its unique capabilities can be exploited to extend studies to large mixtures of inhibitors in drug leads discovery.

  14. Behaviour of tetramine inhibitors during pickling of hot rolled steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornu, Marie-José; Koltsov, Alexey; Nicolas, Sabrina; Colom, Lydia; Dossot, Manuel

    2014-02-01

    To avoid the dissolution of steel in industrial pickling process, tetramine inhibitors are added to the pickling bath. This study is devoted to the understanding of the action mechanism of these inhibitors in hydrochloric and sulphuric baths on non-alloyed and alloyed steels. Pickling experiments and characterization with XPS, Raman and infrared spectroscopies have shown that inhibitors work only in acid media and leached out from the steel surfaces during the rinsing operation just after pickling. The effectiveness of inhibitors depends on the acid media and the temperature. Experimental data are consistent with a surface mechanism, i.e., the so-called "outer-sphere" adsorption.

  15. CHZ868, a Type II JAK2 Inhibitor, Reverses Type I JAK Inhibitor Persistence and Demonstrates Efficacy in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Sara C.; Keller, Matthew D.; Chiu, Sophia; Koppikar, Priya; Guryanova, Olga A.; Rapaport, Franck; Xu, Ke; Manova, Katia; Pankov, Dmitry; O’Reilly, Richard J.; Kleppe, Maria; McKenney, Anna Sophia; Shih, Alan H.; Shank, Kaitlyn; Ahn, Jihae; Papalexi, Eftymia; Spitzer, Barbara; Socci, Nick; Viale, Agnes; Mandon, Emeline; Ebel, Nicolas; Andraos, Rita; Rubert, Joëlle; Dammassa, Ernesta; Romanet, Vincent; Dölemeyer, Arno; Zender, Michael; Heinlein, Melanie; Rampal, Rajit; Weinberg, Rona Singer; Hoffman, Ron; Sellers, William R.; Hofmann, Francesco; Murakami, Masato; Baffert, Fabienne; Gaul, Christoph; Radimerski, Thomas; Levine, Ross L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Although clinically tested JAK inhibitors reduce splenomegaly and systemic symptoms, molecular responses are not observed in most myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) patients. We previously demonstrated that MPN cells become persistent to type I JAK inhibitors that bind the active conformation of JAK2. We investigated if CHZ868, a type II JAK inhibitor, would demonstrate activity in JAK inhibitor persistent cells, murine MPN models, and MPN patient samples. JAK2- and MPL-mutant cell lines were sensitive to CHZ868, including type I JAK inhibitor persistent cells. CHZ868 showed significant activity in murine MPN models and induced reductions in mutant allele burden not observed with type I JAK inhibitors. These data demonstrate that type II JAK inhibition is a viable therapeutic approach for MPN patients. PMID:26175413

  16. [Prospects for the design of new therapeutically significant protease inhibitors based on knottins and sunflower seed trypsin inhibitor (SFTI 1)].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, S S; Kolesanova, E F; Talanova, A V; Veselovsky, A V

    2016-05-01

    Plant seed knottins, mainly from the Cucurbitacea family, and sunflower seed trypsin inhibitor (SFTI 1) are the most low-molecular canonical peptide inhibitors of serine proteases. High efficiency of inhibition of various serine proteases, structure rigidity together with the possibility of limited variations of amino acid sequences, high chemical stability, lack of toxic properties, opportunity of production by either chemical synthesis or use of heterologous expression systems make these inhibitors attractive templates for design of new compounds for regulation of therapeutically significant serine protease activities. Hence the design of such compounds represents a prospective research field. The review considers structural characteristics of these inhibitors, their properties, methods of preparation and design of new analogs. Examples of successful employment of natural serine protease inhibitors belonging to knottin family and SFTI 1 as templates for the design of highly specific inhibitors of certain proteases are given. PMID:27562989

  17. Identification of fermentation inhibitors in wood hydrolyzates and removal of inhibitors by ion exchange and liquid-liquid extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Caidian

    1998-12-01

    Common methods employed in the ethanol production from biomass consist of chemical or enzymatic degradation of biomass into sugars and then fermentation of sugars into ethanol or other chemicals. However, some degradation products severely inhibit the fermentation processes and substantially reduce the efficiency of ethanol production. How to remove inhibitors from the reaction product mixture and increase the production efficiency are critical in the commercialization of any processes of energy from biomass. The present study has investigated anion exchange and liquid-liquid extraction as potential methods for inhibitor removal. An analytical method has been developed to identify the fermentation inhibitors in a hydrolyzate. The majority of inhibitors present in hybrid poplar hydrolyzate have positively been identified. Ion exchange with weak basic Dowex-MWA-1 resin has been proved to be an effective mean to remove fermentation inhibitors from hybrid poplar hydrolyzate and significantly increase the fermentation productivity. Extraction with n-butanol might be a preferred way to remove inhibitors from wood hydrolyzates and improve the fermentability of sugars in the hydrolyzates. n-Butanol also removes some glucose, mannose and xylose from the hydrolyzate. Inhibitor identification reveals that lignin and sugar degradation compounds including both aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes and carboxylic acids formed in hydrolysis, plus fatty acids and other components from wood extractives are major fermentation inhibitors in Sacchromyces cerevisiae fermentation. There are 35 components identified as fermentation inhibitors. Among them, 4-hydroxy benzoic acid, 3,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid, syringic acid, syringaldehyde, and ferulic acid are among the most abundant aromatic inhibitors in hybrid poplar hydrolyzate. The conversion of aldehyde groups into carboxylic acid groups in the nitric acid catalyzed hydrolysis reduces the toxicity of the hydrolyzate. A wide spectrum of

  18. The presence and inactivation of trypsin inhibitors, tannins, lectins and amylase inhibitors in legume seeds during germination. A review.

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, F H; van der Poel, A F; Tamminga, S

    1992-01-01

    During the germination of legume seeds, enzymes become active in order to degrade starch, storage-protein and proteinaceous antinutritional factors. The degradation of storage-protein is necessary to make peptides and amino acids available in order to stimulate seed growth and early plant growth. Proteinaceous antinutritional factors such as amylase inhibitors, lectins and trypsin inhibitors are present in legume seeds and protect them against predators. However, during germination, they degrade to a lower level by the action of several enzymes. The effect of germination on the content and activity of amylase inhibitors, lectins, tannins and trypsin inhibitors is discussed. PMID:1372122

  19. A fast-acting elastase inhibitor in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    A proteinase inhibitor active against neutrophil and pancreatic elastase was detected in extracts of cultured human monocytes and the human monocyte-like cell line U937. This component forms a covalent complex with the active site of elastase; the complex is stable in boiling sodium dodecyl sulfate solution, and is susceptible to nucleophilic cleavage. The activity of the elastase inhibitor is not detected in extracts of freshly isolated monocytes, but becomes detectable when the monocytes are allowed to mature in culture, with maximum levels occurring at 5-7 d. The monocyte inhibitor is fast- acting; its reaction with 125I-labeled elastase is complete in less than 1 min at 37 degrees C. Analysis by electrophoresis and studies using a heteroantiserum to alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor demonstrated that the elastase inhibitor of monocytes/U937 cells is not identical to alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, the major elastase inhibitor of blood plasma. The extent of conversion of 125I-elastase to the 125I-elastase- inhibitor complex is proportional to the amount of U937 extract or cultured monocyte extract, indicating that this reaction can serve to quantify the elastase inhibitor. The elastase inhibitor is an abundant component in mature monocytes, with greater than or equal to 1.5 X 10(6) molecules/cell (greater than or equal to 12 micrograms per 10(8) cells, greater than 0.1% of total cell protein). Its mol wt is estimated at 50,000. Thus, the monocyte inhibitor should be classified as a putative regulator of neutrophil (and monocyte) elastase activity at inflammatory sites. This designation is based on the properties of the molecule, including its high concentration in maturing monocytes, its affinity for elastase, and its fast reaction with this enzyme. PMID:3906019

  20. Green corrosion inhibitors: An oil company perspective

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, A.J.; Harrop, D.

    1995-10-01

    Environmental concerns are increasingly likely to influence the choice of oilfield production and drilling chemicals. The Paris Commission (PARCOM) is currently developing legislation for the North Sea. The regulations which emerge may well restrict the use of many current products. Uncertainty over the eventual details has meant that new product development has been somewhat tentative. Little genuinely new chemistry has been explored to meet the environmental challenge. Polypeptides are one of several new classes which deserve attention. Polyaspartate is the most efficient corrosion inhibitor (ca 80% max) of the polypeptides. Molecular weight (1,000--22,000) does not affect the efficiency but both high [Ca{sup 2+}] and high pH are beneficial. Performance is particularly good in batch treatment tests (> 95% efficiency).

  1. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hi Bahl; Ha, Hunjoo

    2005-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the kidney. Decreased ECM degradation as well as increased ECM synthesis plays an important role in ECM remodeling that favours tissue fibrosis. Plasminogen activator (PA)/plasmin/PA inhibitor (PAI) system is involved in ECM degradation and PAI-1 plays a critical role in ECM remodeling in the kidney. Normal human kidneys do not express PAI-1 but PAI-1 is overexpressed in pathologic conditions associated with renal fibrosis including diabetic nephropathy. Reactive oxygen species mediate PAI-1 up-regulation in renal cells cultured under high glucose, hypoxia, and TGF-beta1. Recent studies utilizing PAI-1 deficient mice suggest that PAI-1 induce ECM deposition in diabetic kidney through increased ECM synthesis by TGF-beta1 up-regulation as well as through decreased ECM degradation by suppression of plasmin and MMP-2 activity.

  2. Can proton pump inhibitors accentuate skin aging?

    PubMed

    Namazi, Mohammad Reza; Jowkar, Farideh

    2010-02-01

    Skin aging has long been important to human beings and in recent years this field has received tremendous attention by both researchers and the general population. Cutaneous aging includes two distinct phenomena, intrinsic aging and photoaging, and is characterized mainly by the loss of collagen fibers from dermis. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely prescribed gastric acid-reducing agents that are usually consumed for long periods in some conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease. We suggest that PPIs can accentuate skin aging by two mechanisms. First, through increasing intralysosomal PH, PPIs can suppress transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) processing and consequently decrease its secretion. Second, through inhibiting MNK, a P-type ATPase with steady-state localization at the trans-Golgi network, PPIs can hamper copper transport and consequently curb lysyl oxidase activity. PMID:20470945

  3. Specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rubin, B R

    1999-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are currently among the most widely prescribed drugs worldwide. Their therapeutic benefits and their side effects in the gastrointestinal tract and kidney, as well as in hemostasis, are of great importance in modern medicine. Within the past decade, new insights into how NSAIDs produce both their therapeutic benefits and their serious side effects have been discovered. It is now known that there are two froms of the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzyme that metabolize arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. Drugs that specifically inhibit the COX-2 enzyme were formulated and put into clinical trials during the past 5 years. These drugs are now available to treat patients in the United States. Specific COX-2 inhibitors offer the benefit of being able to treat the pain and inflammation of arthritis with potentially little risk of serious gastrointestinal injury.

  4. Mushroom tyrosinase inhibitors from Aloe barbadensis Miller.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaofang; Yin, Sheng; Zhong, Jiasheng; Ding, Wenjing; Wan, Jinzhi; Xie, Zhiyong

    2012-12-01

    Two new chromones, 5-((S)-2'-oxo-4'-hydroxypentyl)-2-(β-glucopyranosyl-oxy-methyl)chromone (1) and 5-((S)-2'-oxo-4'-hydroxypentyl)-2-methoxychromone (2), together with four known analogues, 8-C-glucosyl-7-O-methyl-(S)-aloesol (3), isoaloeresin D (4), 8-C-glucosyl-(R)-aloesol (5), and aloesin (6) were isolated from the aqueous extract of Aloe barbadensis Miller. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic evidences (1-D and 2-D NMR, HRMS, UV, and IR data), chemical methods and the literature data. The Mosher's method was applied to establish the absolute configuration of compounds 1 and 2. The inhibitory effects of these chromones on the activity of mushroom tyrosinase were examined, and compound 6 was identified as a noncompetitive tyrosinase inhibitor with an IC(50) value of 108.62μg·mL(-1).

  5. Protection from extinction by a conditioned inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Sołtysik, S; Wolfe, G

    1980-01-01

    The phenomenon of protection from extinction (PFE) of a conditioned stimulus (CS) by a conditioned inhibitor (CI) has not been yet unequivocally demonstrated for the CS-CI compound in which the CS precedes the onset of the CI. Preliminary data from a project addressed to this problem strongly indicate that PFE is a real and robust phenomenon. Moreover, the protection is demonstrated not only for the CS duration overlapping with the CI but also for the early part of the CS which is not prevented by the CI from eliciting a conditioned response. The review of a few theories of conditioning suggests that the phenomenon of PFE is theoretically acceptable and predicted within the framework of any hypothetical mechanism which allows for post-trial "processing" or "consolidation" of information acquired during the trial.

  6. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhong, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a vast family of enzymes involved in chromatin remodeling and have crucial roles in numerous biological processes, largely through their repressive influence on transcription. In addition to modifying histones, HDACs also target many other non-histone protein substrates to regulate gene expression. Recently, HDACs have gained growing attention as HDAC-inhibiting compounds are being developed as promising cancer therapeutics. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been shown to induce differentiation, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, autophagy and necrosis in a variety of transformed cell lines. In this review, we mainly discuss how HDACi may elicit a therapeutic response to human cancers through different cell death pathways, in particular, apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:24898083

  7. Antithrombin, an Important Inhibitor in Blood Clots.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Cong, Qing-Wei; Liu, Yue; Wan, Chun-Ling; Yu, Tao; He, Guang; He, Lin; Cai, Lei; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Blood coagulation is healthy and lifesaving because it can stop bleeding. It can, however, be a troublemaker as well, causing serious medical problems including heart attack and stroke. Body has complex blood coagulation cascade to modulate the blood clots. In the environment of plasma, the blood coagulation cascade is regulated by antithrombin, which is deemed one of the most important serine protease inhibitors. It inhibits thrombin; it can inhibit factors IXa and Xa as well. Interestingly, its inhibitory ability will be significantly increased with the existence of heparin. In this minireview paper, we are to summarize the structural features of antithrombin, as well as its heparin binding modes and anti-coagulation mechanisms, in hopes that the discussion and analysis presented in this paper can stimulate new strategies to find more effective approaches or compounds to modulate the antithrombin. PMID:26411319

  8. Inherent formulation issues of kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Herbrink, M; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H; Nuijen, B

    2016-10-10

    The small molecular Kinase Inhibitor (smKI) drug class is very promising and rapidly expanding. All of these drugs are administered orally. The clear relationship between structure and function has led to drugs with a general low intrinsic solubility. The majority of the commercial pharmaceutical formulations of the smKIs are physical mixtures that are limited by the low drug solubility of a salt form. This class of drugs is therefore characterized by an impaired and variable bioavailability rendering them costly and their therapies suboptimal. New formulations are sparingly being reported in literature and patents. The presented data suggests that continued research into formulation design can help to develop more efficient and cost-effective smKI formulation. Moreover, it may also be of help in the future design of the formulations of new smKIs.

  9. [PCSK9 inhibitors : Recommendations for patient selection].

    PubMed

    Laufs, U; Custodis, F; Werner, C

    2016-06-01

    The 2 or 4‑week subcutaneous therapy with the recently approved antibodies alirocumab and evolocumab for inhibition of proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9) reduces low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in addition to statins and ezetimibe by 50-60 %. The therapy is well-tolerated. The safety profile in the published studies is comparable to placebo. Outcome data and information on long-term safety and the influence on cardiovascular events are not yet available but the results of several large trials are expected in 2016-2018. At present (spring 2016) PCSK9 inhibitors represent an option for selected patients with a high cardiovascular risk and high LDL-C despite treatment with the maximum tolerated oral lipid-lowering therapy. This group includes selected patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and high-risk individuals with statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS). PMID:27207595

  10. Molecular modeling of auxin transport inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, G.; Black-Schaefer, C.; Bures, M.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Molecular modeling techniques have been used to study the chemical and steric properties of auxin transport inhibitors. These bind to a specific site on the plant plasma membrane characterized by its affinity for N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). A three-dimensional model was derived from critical features of ligands for the NPA receptor, and a suggested binding conformation is proposed. This model, along with three-dimensional structural searching techniques, was then used to search the Abbott corporate database of chemical structures. Of the 467 compounds that satisfied the search criteria, 77 representative molecules were evaluated for their ability to compete for ({sup 3}H)NPA binding to corn microsomal membranes. Nineteen showed activity that ranged from 16 to 85% of the maximum NPA binding. Four of the most active of these, from chemical classes not included in the original compound set, also inhibited polar auxin transport through corn coleoptile sections.

  11. Novel inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Sit, S Y; Conway, Charlie; Bertekap, Robert; Xie, Kai; Bourin, Clotilde; Burris, Kevin; Deng, Hongfeng

    2007-06-15

    A class of bisarylimidazole derivatives are identified as potent inhibitors of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Compound 17 (IC(50)=2 nM) dose-dependently (0.1-10mg/kg, iv) potentiates the effects of exogenous anandamide (1 mg/kg, iv) in a rat thermal escape test (Hargreaves test), and shows robust antinociceptive activity in animal models of persistent (formalin test) and neuropathic (Chung model) pain. Compound 17 (20 mg/kg, iv) demonstrates activity in the formalin test that is comparable to morphine (3mg/kg, iv), and is dose-dependently inhibited by the CB1 antagonist SR141716A. In the Chung model, compound 17 shows antineuropathic effects similar to high-dose (100 mg/kg) gabapentin. FAAH inhibition shows potential utility for the clinical treatment of persistent and neuropathic pain.

  12. Identification of pyrazolopyridazinones as PDEδ inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Papke, Björn; Murarka, Sandip; Vogel, Holger A; Martín-Gago, Pablo; Kovacevic, Marija; Truxius, Dina C; Fansa, Eyad K; Ismail, Shehab; Zimmermann, Gunther; Heinelt, Kaatje; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Al Saabi, Alaa; Baumann, Matthias; Nussbaumer, Peter; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Waldmann, Herbert; Bastiaens, Philippe I.H.

    2016-01-01

    The prenyl-binding protein PDEδ is crucial for the plasma membrane localization of prenylated Ras. Recently, we have reported that the small-molecule Deltarasin binds to the prenyl-binding pocket of PDEδ, and impairs Ras enrichment at the plasma membrane, thereby affecting the proliferation of KRas-dependent human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Here, using structure-based compound design, we have now identified pyrazolopyridazinones as a novel, unrelated chemotype that binds to the prenyl-binding pocket of PDEδ with high affinity, thereby displacing prenylated Ras proteins in cells. Our results show that the new PDEδ inhibitor, named Deltazinone 1, is highly selective, exhibits less unspecific cytotoxicity than the previously reported Deltarasin and demonstrates a high correlation with the phenotypic effect of PDEδ knockdown in a set of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. PMID:27094677

  13. The TRPM4 channel inhibitor 9-phenanthrol

    PubMed Central

    Guinamard, R; Hof, T; Del Negro, C A

    2014-01-01

    The phenanthrene-derivative 9-phenanthrol is a recently identified inhibitor of the transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) 4 channel, a Ca2+-activated non-selective cation channel whose mechanism of action remains to be determined. Subsequent studies performed on other ion channels confirm the specificity of the drug for TRPM4. In addition, 9-phenanthrol modulates a variety of physiological processes through TRPM4 current inhibition and thus exerts beneficial effects in several pathological conditions. 9-Phenanthrol modulates smooth muscle contraction in bladder and cerebral arteries, affects spontaneous activity in neurons and in the heart, and reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced cell death. Among promising potential applications, 9-phenanthrol exerts cardioprotective effects against ischaemia-reperfusion injuries and reduces ischaemic stroke injuries. In addition to reviewing the biophysical effects of 9-phenanthrol, here we present information about its appropriate use in physiological studies and possible clinical applications. PMID:24433510

  14. Inhibitors of Kallikrein in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, David J.

    1972-01-01

    Human plasma was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration to determine which method would give the greatest number of clearly separable kallikrein inhibitory peaks. With G-200 gel filtration three peaks could be separated which were demonstrated to contain α2-macroglobulin, C1̄ inactivator, and α1-antitrypsin. No other kallikrein inhibitors could be identified. The fractions containing C1̄ inactivator and α2-macroglobulin appeared to be more effective against kallikrein than that containing α1-antitrypsin. A patient with hereditary angioneurotic edema was shown to have an abnormal C1̄ inactivator protein capable of interfering with kallikrein's biologic, but not its esterolytic activity. Heat-treated human plasma, a commonly used source of kininogen for experiments with kallikrein, was shown to have kallikrein inhibitory activity. PMID:4113391

  15. Evolution of resistance to quorum sensing inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Vipin C.; Wood, Thomas K.; Kumar, Prasun

    2013-01-01

    The major cause of mortality and morbidity in human beings is bacterial infection. Bacteria have developed resistance to most of the antibiotics primarily due to large scale and “indiscriminate” usage. The need is to develop novel mechanisms to treat bacterial infections. The expression of pathogenicity during bacterial infections is mediated by a cell density dependent phenomenon known as quorum sensing (QS). A wide array of QS systems (QSS) is operative in expressing the virulent behavior of bacterial pathogens. Each QSS may be mediated largely by a few major signals along with others produced in minuscule quantities. Efforts to target signal molecules and their receptors have proved effective in alleviating the virulent behavior of such pathogenic bacteria. These QS inhibitors (QSIs) have been reported to be effective in influencing the pathogenicity without affecting bacterial growth. However, evidence is accumulating that bacteria may develop resistance to QSIs. The big question is whether QSIs will meet the same fate as antibiotics? PMID:24194099

  16. Development of Inhibitors of Salicylic Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kai; Kurimoto, Tetsuya; Seo, Eun-kyung; Miyazaki, Sho; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Hidemitsu; Asami, Tadao

    2015-08-19

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays important roles in the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants. Determining the mechanism of SAR will extend our understanding of plant defenses against pathogens. We recently reported that PAMD is an inhibitor of SA signaling, which suppresses the expression of the pathogenesis-related PR genes and is expected to facilitate the understanding of SA signaling. However, PAMD strongly inhibits plant growth. To minimize the side effects of PAMD, we synthesized a number of PAMD derivatives, and identified compound 4 that strongly suppresses the expression of the PR genes with fewer adverse effects on plant growth than PAMD. We further showed that the adverse effects on plant growth were partially caused the stabilization of DELLA, which is also related to the pathogen responses. These results indicate that compound 4 would facilitate our understanding of SA signaling and its cross talk with other plant hormones.

  17. Structural investigation of protein kinase C inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barak, D.; Shibata, M.; Rein, R.

    1991-01-01

    The phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent protein kinase (PKC) plays an essential role in a variety of cellular events. Inhibition of PKC was shown to arrest growth in tumor cell cultures making it a target for possible antitumor therapy. Calphostins are potent inhibitors of PKC with high affinity for the enzyme regulatory site. Structural characteristics of calphostins, which confer the inhibitory activity, are investigated by comparing their optimized structures with the existing models for PKC activation. The resulting model of inhibitory activity assumes interaction with two out of the three electrostatic interaction sites postulated for activators. The model shows two sites of hydrophobic interaction and enables the inhibitory activity of gossypol to be accounted for.

  18. The new factor Xa inhibitor: Apixaban

    PubMed Central

    Bhanwra, Sangeeta; Ahluwalia, Kaza

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are still the most important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and anti-thrombotic treatment is widely used as a result. The currently used drugs include heparin and its derivatives, vitamin K antagonists, though efficacious, have their own set of limitations like unpredictable pharmacokinetic profile, parenteral route (with heparin and its derivatives only), narrow therapeutic window, and constant laboratory monitoring for their efficacy and safety. This lead to the development of novel factor Xa inhibitors which could be given orally, have predictable dose response relationship and are associated with lesser hemorrhagic complications. They include rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban among others. Apixaban has currently been approved for use in patients undergoing total knee or hip replacement surgery and to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Many trials are ongoing for apixaban to firmly establish its place in future, among the anti-thrombotic drugs. PMID:24554904

  19. Cyclooxygenase (COX) Inhibitors and the Newborn Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Francine G.; Wade, Andrew W.; Lewis, Megan L.; Qi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors (COXI) in influencing the structural development as well as the function of the developing kidney. COXI administered either during pregnancy or after birth can influence kidney development including nephronogenesis, and can decrease renal perfusion and ultrafiltration potentially leading to acute kidney injury in the newborn period. To date, which COX isoform (COX-1 or COX-2) plays a more important role in during fetal development and influences kidney function early in life is not known, though evidence points to a predominant role for COX-2. Clinical implications of the use of COXI in pregnancy and in the newborn infant are also evaluated herein, with specific reference to the potential effects of COXI on nephronogenesis as well as newborn kidney function. PMID:24281306

  20. Tumour Angiogenesis and Angiogenic Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Lalita; Puri, Naveen; Satpute, Pranali; Sharma, Vandana

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex process depending on the coordination of many regulators and there by activating angiogenic switch. Recent advances in understanding of angiogenic mechanism have lead to the development of several anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic agents that use the strategy of regulation of angiogenic switch. Antiangiogenic therapy is a form of treatment not cure for cancer and represents a highly effective strategy for destroying tumour because vascular supply is the fundamental requirement for growth of tumour. Because of the quiescent nature of normal adult vasculature, angiogenic inhibitors are expected to confer a degree of specificity when compared to nonspecific modalities of chemo and radiotherapy, so it has the advantage of less toxicities, does not induce drug resistance and deliver a relatively non toxic, long term treatment of tumour. PMID:26266204

  1. Comparative QSAR studies on peptide deformylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Young; Doddareddy, Munikumar Reddy; Cho, Yong Seo; Choo, Hyunah; Koh, Hun Yeong; Kang, Jae-Hoon; No, Kyoung Tai; Pae, Ae Nim

    2007-05-01

    Comparative quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses of peptide deformylase (PDF) inhibitors were performed with a series of previously published (British Biotech Pharmaceuticals, Oxford, UK) reverse hydroxamate derivatives having antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli PDF, using 2D and 3D QSAR methods, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), and hologram QSAR (HQSAR). Statistically reliable models with good predictive power were generated from all three methods (CoMFA r (2) = 0.957, q (2) = 0.569; CoMSIA r (2) = 0.924, q (2) = 0.520; HQSAR r (2) = 0.860, q (2) = 0.578). The predictive capability of these models was validated by a set of compounds that were not included in the training set. The models based on CoMFA and CoMSIA gave satisfactory predictive r (2) values of 0.687 and 0.505, respectively. The model derived from the HQSAR method showed a low predictability of 0.178 for the test set. In this study, 3D prediction models showed better predictive power than 2D models for the test set. This might be because 3D information is more important in the case of datasets containing compounds with similar skeletons. Superimposition of CoMFA contour maps in the active site of the PDF crystal structure showed a meaningful correlation between receptor-ligand binding and biological activity. The final QSAR models, along with information gathered from 3D contour and 2D contribution maps, could be useful for the design of novel active inhibitors of PDF. PMID:17333308

  2. Molecular Dynamics simulations of Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins and identification of potential small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Jayanthi; Anishetty, Sharmila

    2014-05-01

    Chemotherapeutic resistance due to over expression of Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) XIAP, survivin and livin has been observed in various cancers. In the current study, Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out for all three IAPs and a common ligand binding scaffold was identified. Further, a novel sequence based motif specific to these IAPs was designed. SMAC is an endogenous inhibitor of IAPs. Screening of ChemBank for compounds similar to lead SMAC-non-peptidomimetics yielded a cemadotin related compound NCIMech_000654. Cemadotin is a derivative of natural anti-tumor peptide dolastatin-15; hence these compounds were docked against all three IAPs. Based on our analysis, we propose that NCIMech_000654/dolastatin-15/cemadotin derivatives may be investigated for their potential in inhibiting XIAP, survivin and livin.

  3. Chemoproteomic characterization of protein kinase inhibitors using immobilized ATP.

    PubMed

    Duncan, James S; Haystead, Timothy A J; Litchfield, David W

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors have emerged as indispensable tools for the elucidation of the biological functions of specific signal transduction pathways and as promising candidates for molecular-targeted therapy. However, because many protein kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive inhibitors targeting the catalytic site of specific protein kinases, the large number of protein kinases that are encoded within eukaryotic genomes and the existence of many other cellular proteins that bind ATP result in the prospect of off-target effects for many of these compounds. Many of the potential off-target effects remain unrecognized because protein kinase inhibitors are often developed and tested primarily on the basis of in vitro assays using purified components. To overcome this limitation, we describe a systematic approach to characterize ATP-competitive protein kinase inhibitors employing ATP-sepharose to capture the purine-binding proteome from cell extracts. Protein kinase inhibitors can be used in competition experiments to prevent binding of specific cellular proteins to ATP-sepharose or to elute bound proteins from ATP-sepharose. Collectively, these strategies can enable validation of interactions between a specific protein kinase and an inhibitor in complex mixtures and can yield the identification of inhibitor targets.

  4. Bioabatement with xylanase supplementation to reduce enzymatic hydrolysis inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioabatement, using the fungus Coniochaeta ligniaria NRRL30616 can effectively eliminate enzyme inhibitors from pretreated biomass hydrolysis. However, our recent research suggested that bioabatement had no beneficial effect on removing xylo-oligomers which were identified as strong inhibitors to ce...

  5. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Anthrax Lethal Factor Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John D.; Khan, Atiyya R.; Cardinale, Steven C.; Butler, Michelle M.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Peet, Norton P.

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript describes the preparation of new small molecule inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis lethal factor. Our starting point was the symmetrical, bis-quinolinyl compound 1 (NSC 12155). Optimization of one half of this molecule led to new LF inhibitors that were desymmetrized to afford more drug-like compounds. PMID:24290062

  6. Role of Protease-Inhibitors in Ocular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, Nicola; Barbato, Andrea; Pascarella, Antonia; Giannotti, Rossella; Genzano, Martina; Nebbioso, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the balance between proteases and protease-inhibitors system plays a key role in maintaining cellular and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, its alteration has been involved in many ocular and systemic diseases. In particular, research has focused on keratoconus, corneal wounds and ulcers, keratitis, endophthalmitis, age-related macular degeneration, Sorsby fundus dystrophy, loss of nerve cells and photoreceptors during optic neuritis both in vivo and in vitro models. Protease-inhibitors have been extensively studied, rather than proteases, because they may represent a therapeutic approach for some ocular diseases. The protease-inhibitors mainly involved in the onset of the above-mentioned ocular pathologies are: α2-macroglobulin, α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI), metalloproteinase inhibitor (TIMP), maspin, SERPINA3K, SERPINB13, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and calpeptin. This review is focused on the several characteristics of dysregulation of this system and, particularly, on a possible role of proteases and protease-inhibitors in molecular remodeling that may lead to some ocular diseases. Recently, researchers have even hypothesized a possible therapeutic effect of the protease-inhibitors in the treatment of injured eye in animal models. PMID:25493637

  7. A low molecular weight proteinase inhibitor produced by T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ganea, D; Teodorescu, M; Dray, S

    1986-01-01

    A low molecular weight (MW) proteinase inhibitor, between 6500 and 21,500 MW, appeared in the supernatant of rabbit spleen cells cultured at high density for 24 hr. The inhibitor inhibited the enzymatic activity of trypsin for both a high MW natural substrate, fibrinogen, and for a low MW artificial substrate, Chromozym TRY. The low MW proteinase inhibitor is protein in nature and is different, in terms of specificity for enzymes, MW and sensitivity to different physical or chemical treatments, from aprotinin, a low MW proteinase inhibitor (6500 MW) of bovine origin, and from the soybean trypsin inhibitor, a relatively high MW proteinase inhibitor (21,500 MW). The inhibitor was found in the supernatant of purified T cells but not B cells, and its production was increased in the presence of an optimal concentration of Con A. The possibility that this proteinase inhibitor has a role in the regulation of trypsin-like proteinases involved to the immune response remains to be investigated. Images Figure 4 PMID:2417942

  8. Regulation of collagenase inhibitor production in chondrosarcoma chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, J.; Harper, E.

    1987-05-01

    Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes produce an inhibitor of collagenase. This inhibitor is similar to those isolated from normal cartilage tissues. These cells will synthesize proteins in the absence of serum. Since serum contains inhibitors of collagenase, it is necessary to culture cells without serum in order to obtain accurate measurements of enzyme and inhibitor levels. They examined the effect of insulin on inhibitor secretion by cultures of Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes. They observed a 2.5 to 3.5 fold stimulation of inhibitory activity in the presence of as little as 10 ng/ml insulin as compared to controls in serum free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 4.5 g/l glucose. The units of inhibitor were determined over a 7 day culture period. Medium was harvested daily and assayed for collagenase activity and for inhibition of a known collagenase from rabbit skin or human skin, using the /sup 14/C-glycine peptide release assay. The amount of inhibitor obtained from days 2 through 7 were: 1.4 unit (control), 3.8 units (10 ng/ml insulin), 5.2 units (1 ..mu..g/ml insulin). The addition of 1 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP to these chondrocytes in the presence of 1 ..mu..g/ml insulin caused a decrease in the level of inhibitor, suggesting that a dephosphorylation event may be necessary for this stimulation by insulin to occur.

  9. Rational design of an organometallic glutathione transferase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, W.H.; Parker, L.J.; De Luca, A.; Juillerat-Jeanneret, L.; Morton, C.J.; LoBello, M.; Parker, M.W.; Dyson, P.J.

    2010-08-17

    A hybrid organic-inorganic (organometallic) inhibitor was designed to target glutathione transferases. The metal center is used to direct protein binding, while the organic moiety acts as the active-site inhibitor. The mechanism of inhibition was studied using a range of biophysical and biochemical methods.

  10. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor therapy for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Sidman, James D.

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor pathway has been implicated in various tumors, including human papillomavirus (HPV) lesions such as recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). Due to the presence of epidermal growth factor receptors in RRP, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors have been utilized as adjuvant therapy. This case series examines the response to EGFR inhibitors in RRP. Four patients with life-threatening RRP were treated with EGFR inhibitors. Operative frequency and anatomical Derkay scores were calculated prior to, and following EGFR inhibitor treatment via retrospective chart review. The anatomical Derkay score decreased for all four patients after initiation of EGFR inhibitor therapy. In one patient, the operative frequency increased after switching to an intravenous inhibitor after loss of control with an oral inhibitor. In the other patients there was a greater than 20% decrease in operative frequency in one and a more than doubling in the time between procedures in two.  This study suggests that EGFR inhibitors are a potential adjuvant therapy in RRP and deserve further study in a larger number of patients. PMID:24795806

  11. Electrochemical corrosion testing: An effective tool for corrosion inhibitor evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, L.S.; Van de Ven, P.; Mowlem, J.K.

    1996-10-01

    Corrosivity of an Antifreeze/Coolant can lead to localized attacks which are a major cause for metal failure. To prevent this phenomenon, specific corrosion inhibitors are used to protect the different metals in service. This paper will discuss the electrochemical principles behind corrosion, Realized corrosion and corrosion inhibition. It will also discuss electrochemical techniques which allow for the evaluation of these inhibitors.

  12. Indanones as high-potency reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Samantha; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2015-05-01

    Recent reports document that α-tetralone (3,4-dihydro-2H-naphthalen-1-one) is an appropriate scaffold for the design of high-potency monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. Based on the structural similarity between α-tetralone and 1-indanone, the present study involved synthesis of 34 1-indanone and related indane derivatives as potential inhibitors of recombinant human MAO-A and MAO-B. The results show that C6-substituted indanones are particularly potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors, with IC50 values ranging from 0.001 to 0.030 μM. C5-Substituted indanone and indane derivatives are comparatively weaker MAO-B inhibitors. Although the 1-indanone and indane derivatives are selective inhibitors of the MAO-B isoform, a number of homologues are also potent MAO-A inhibitors, with three homologues possessing IC50 values <0.1 μM. Dialysis of enzyme-inhibitor mixtures further established a selected 1-indanone as a reversible MAO inhibitor with a competitive mode of inhibition. It may be concluded that 1-indanones are promising leads for the design of therapies for neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders such as Parkinson's disease and depression.

  13. Aminopiperidine-Fused Imidazoles as Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, S.; Mastracchio, A; Cox, J; Eiermann, G; He, H; Lyons, K; Patel, R; Patel, S; Petrov, A; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    A new series of DPP-4 inhibitors derived from piperidine-fused benzimidazoles and imidazopyridines is described. Optimization of this class of DPP-4 inhibitors led to the discovery of imidazopyridine 34. The potency, selectivity, cross-species DMPK profiles, and in vivo efficacy of 34 is reported.

  14. Ureidopenicillins and beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations.

    PubMed

    Bush, L M; Johnson, C C

    2000-06-01

    Although research and development of new penicillins have declined, penicillins continue to be essential antibiotics for the treatment and prophylaxis of infectious diseases. The most recent additions are the ureidopenicillins and beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations. This article reviews the spectrum of activity, toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and clinical uses of the ureidopenicillins, and the beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combination agents.

  15. A new method for evaluating wax inhibitors and drag reducers

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.J.C.; Brubaker, J.P.

    1995-12-01

    Conventional wax inhibitor evaluation methods such as cold finger and laminar flow loop are not adequate and accurate for evaluating wax inhibitors to be used in a wide operating temperature range and flow regimes such as North Sea subsea transport pipelines. A new method has been developed to simultaneously measure fluid rheology change and wax inhibition and to evaluate wax inhibitors or drag reducers at the field operating conditions. Selection criteria have been defined to search for an effective wax inhibitor. The criteria ensure the chemical selected is the most effective one for the specific oil and flow conditions. The operation cost savings by this accurate method is significant. Nine chemical companies joined the project of finding an wax inhibitor for a North Sea prospect. More than twenty wax inhibitors have been tested and evaluated with this new method for several waxy oil fields. The new method provides data of fluid rheology, war deposition rates and wax inhibition in the operating temperature range, overall average wax inhibition and degree of fluid flow improvement. These data are important to evaluate a wax inhibitor or drag reducer. Most of the wax inhibitors tested have good wax inhibition at high temperatures, but not many chemicals work well at low temperatures. The chemical tested may improved fluid flow behavior at low temperature but not wax deposition. Drag reducers tested did not work well at North Sea seabed temperature.

  16. Designing green corrosion inhibitors using chemical computation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Singhl, W.P.; Lin, G.; Bockris, J.O.M.; Kang, Y.

    1998-12-31

    Green corrosion inhibitors have been designed by understanding the relationships between the structure of organic compounds and toxicity as well as corrosion inhibition efficiency. The estimation of aquatic toxicity as well as corrosion inhibition efficiency are made using QSAR techniques. The predicted structures with reduced toxicity and improved corrosion inhibition efficiency are then tested experimentally for these properties, thus leading to green inhibitors.

  17. Discovery – Targeted Treatments and mTOR Inhibitors

    Cancer.gov

    Thanks to discovering the anticancer effects of mTOR inhibitors, cancer treatment for pNet, a rare type of pancreatic cancer, were revolutionized. Through clinical trials, NCI continues to investigate the life-saving potential of mTOR inhibitors.

  18. Role of Protease-Inhibitors in Ocular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, Nicola; Barbato, Andrea; Pascarella, Antonia; Giannotti, Rossella; Genzano, Martina; Nebbioso, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the balance between proteases and protease-inhibitors system plays a key role in maintaining cellular and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, its alteration has been involved in many ocular and systemic diseases. In particular, research has focused on keratoconus, corneal wounds and ulcers, keratitis, endophthalmitis, age-related macular degeneration, Sorsby fundus dystrophy, loss of nerve cells and photoreceptors during optic neuritis both in vivo and in vitro models. Protease-inhibitors have been extensively studied, rather than proteases, because they may represent a therapeutic approach for some ocular diseases. The protease-inhibitors mainly involved in the onset of the above-mentioned ocular pathologies are: α2-macroglobulin, α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI), metalloproteinase inhibitor (TIMP), maspin, SERPINA3K, SERPINB13, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and calpeptin. This review is focused on the several characteristics of dysregulation of this system and, particularly, on a possible role of proteases and protease-inhibitors in molecular remodeling that may lead to some ocular diseases. Recently, researchers have even hypothesized a possible therapeutic effect of the protease-inhibitors in the treatment of injured eye in animal models.

  19. Urea Transporter Inhibitors: En Route to New Diuretics

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Jeff M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A selective urea transporter UT-A1 inhibitor would be a novel type of diuretic, likely with less undesirable side-effects than conventional diureticssince it acts on the last portion of the nephron. Esteva-Font et al. (2013) develop suchan inhibitor by using a clever high-throughput screening assay, and document its selectivity. . PMID:24210002

  20. Replacement inhibitors for tank farm cooling coil systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, T.C.

    1995-03-23

    Sodium chromate has been an effective corrosion inhibitor for the cooling coil systems in Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks for over 40 years. Due to their age and operating history, cooling coils occasionally fail allowing chromate water to leak into the environment. When the leaks spill 10 lbs. or more of sodium chromate over a 24-hr period, the leak incidents are classified as Unusual Occurrences (UO) per CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act). The cost of reporting and cleaning up chromate spills prompted High Level Waste Engineering (HLWE) to initiate a study to investigate alternative tank cooling water inhibitor systems and the associated cost of replacement. Several inhibitor systems were investigated as potential alternatives to sodium chromate. All would have a lesser regulatory impact, if a spill occurred. However, the conversion cost is estimated to be $8.5 million over a period of 8 to 12 months to convert all 5 cooling systems. Although each of the alternative inhibitors examined is effective in preventing corrosion, there is no inhibitor identified that is as effective as chromate. Assuming 3 major leaks a year (the average over the past several years), the cost of maintaining the existing inhibitor was estimated at $0.5 million per year. Since there is no economic or regulatory incentive to replace the sodium chromate with an alternate inhibitor, HLWE recommends that sodium chromate continue to be used as the inhibitor for the waste tank cooling systems.

  1. BRAF inhibitors in colorectal cancer: Toward a differentiation therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Ricarda; Brummer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    BRAF inhibitor monotherapy appears to be ineffective in BRAFV600E-positive colorectal cancer (CRC) as a result of inherent EGFR-mediated resistance mechanisms. This concept initiated combinatorial treatment approaches. Nevertheless, BRAF inhibition in isogenic CRC cell lines induced enhanced cell-cell adhesion and differentiation, underlining a potential benefit of BRAF inhibitors in CRC. PMID:27308494

  2. Detecting and treating breast cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Moonlee, Sun-Young; Bissell, Mina J.; Furuta, Saori; Meier, Roland; Kenny, Paraic A.

    2016-04-05

    The application describes therapeutic compositions and methods for treating cancer. For example, therapeutic compositions and methods related to inhibition of FAM83A (family with sequence similarity 83) are provided. The application also describes methods for diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors. For example, a method of diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors by detecting increased FAM83A levels is described.

  3. Fragment-based discovery of JAK-2 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Antonysamy, Stephen; Hirst, Gavin; Park, Frances; Sprengeler, Paul; Stappenbeck, Frank; Steensma, Ruo; Wilson, Mark; Wong, Melissa

    2009-07-22

    Fragment-based hit identification coupled with crystallographically enabled structure-based drug design was used to design potent inhibitors of JAK-2. After two iterations from fragment 1, we were able to increase potency by greater than 500-fold to provide sulfonamide 13, a 78-nM JAK-2 inhibitor.

  4. Discovery, Design, and Optimization of Isoxazole Azepine BET Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gehling, Victor S; Hewitt, Michael C; Vaswani, Rishi G; Leblanc, Yves; Côté, Alexandre; Nasveschuk, Christopher G; Taylor, Alexander M; Harmange, Jean-Christophe; Audia, James E; Pardo, Eneida; Joshi, Shivangi; Sandy, Peter; Mertz, Jennifer A; Sims, Robert J; Bergeron, Louise; Bryant, Barbara M; Bellon, Steve; Poy, Florence; Jayaram, Hariharan; Sankaranarayanan, Ravichandran; Yellapantula, Sreegouri; Bangalore Srinivasamurthy, Nandana; Birudukota, Swarnakumari; Albrecht, Brian K

    2013-09-12

    The identification of a novel series of small molecule BET inhibitors is described. Using crystallographic binding modes of an amino-isoxazole fragment and known BET inhibitors, a structure-based drug design effort lead to a novel isoxazole azepine scaffold. This scaffold showed good potency in biochemical and cellular assays and oral activity in an in vivo model of BET inhibition. PMID:24900758

  5. Heart failure: SGLT2 inhibitors and heart failure -- clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Raz, Itamar; Cahn, Avivit

    2016-04-01

    The latest findings from the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial show a 34% reduction in hospitalization for heart failure or cardiovascular death in patients receiving empagliflozin, a sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, compared with placebo. These outstanding results call for discussion of the clinical implications, and in-depth studies of the mechanisms of action of SGLT2 inhibitors.

  6. The heat shock protein-90 inhibitor XL888 overcomes BRAF inhibitor resistance mediated through diverse mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Paraiso, Kim H. T.; Haarberg, H. Eirik; Wood, Elizabeth; Rebecca, Vito W.; Chen, Y. Ann; Xiang, Yun; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Sondak, Vernon K.; John, Jobin K.; Sarnaik, Amod A.; Koomen, John M.; Smalley, Keiran S. M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The clinical use of BRAF inhibitors is being hampered by the acquisition of drug resistance. This study demonstrates the potential therapeutic utility of the HSP90 inhibitor (XL888) in 6 different models of vemurafenib resistance. Experimental design The ability of XL888 to inhibit growth and to induce apoptosis and tumor regression of vemurafenib-resistant melanoma cell lines was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. A novel mass spectrometry-based pharmacodynamic assay was developed to measure intratumoral HSP70 levels following HSP90 inhibition in melanoma cell lines, xenografts and melanoma biopsies. Mechanistic studies were performed to determine the mechanism of XL888-induced apoptosis. Results XL888 potently inhibited cell growth, induced apoptosis and prevented the growth of vemurafenib resistant melanoma cell lines in 3D cell culture, long-term colony formation assays and human melanoma mouse xenografts. The reversal of the resistance phenotype was associated with the degradation of PDGFRβ, COT, IGFR1, CRAF, ARAF, S6, cyclin D1 and AKT, which in turn led to the nuclear accumulation of FOXO3a, an increase in BIM expression and the downregulation of Mcl-1. In most resistance models, XL888 treatment increased BIM expression, decreased Mcl-1 expression, and induced apoptosis more effectively than dual MEK/PI3K inhibition. Conclusions HSP90 inhibition may be a highly effective strategy at managing the diverse array of resistance mechanisms being reported to BRAF inhibitors and appears to be more effective at restoring BIM expression and downregulating Mcl-1 expression than combined MEK/PI3K inhibitor therapy. PMID:22351686

  7. Nox Inhibitors & Therapies: Rational Design of Peptidic and Small Molecule Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes-Pagano, M Eugenia; Meijles, Daniel N; Pagano, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress-related diseases underlie many if not all of the major leading causes of death in United States and the Western World. Thus, enormous interest from both academia and pharmaceutical industry has been placed on the development of agents which attenuate oxidative stress. With that in mind, great efforts have been placed in the development of inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (Nox), the major enzymatic source of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in many cells and tissue. The regulation of a catalytically active Nox enzyme involves numerous protein-protein interactions which, in turn, afford numerous targets for inhibition of its activity. In this review, we will provide an updated overview of the available Nox inhibitors, both peptidic and small molecules, and discuss the body of data related to their possible mechanisms of action and specificity towards each of the various isoforms of Nox. Indeed, there have been some very notable successes. However, despite great commitment by many in the field, the need for efficacious and well-characterized, isoform-specific Nox inhibitors, essential for the treatment of major diseases as well as for delineating the contribution of a given Nox in physiological redox signalling, continues to grow.

  8. Novel Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Inhibitors Prevent Diabetic Kidney Injury in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Hee; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hi Bahl; Miyata, Toshio; Ha, Hunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide, but no effective therapeutic strategy is available. Because plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is increasingly recognized as a key factor in extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in diabetic nephropathy, this study examined the renoprotective effects of TM5275 and TM5441, two novel orally active PAI-1 inhibitors that do not trigger bleeding episodes, in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. TM5275 (50 mg/kg) and TM5441 (10 mg/kg) were administered orally for 16 weeks to STZ-induced diabetic and age-matched control mice. Relative to the control mice, the diabetic mice showed significantly increased (p < 0.05) plasma glucose and creatinine levels, urinary albumin excretion, kidney-to-bodyweight ratios, glomerular volume, and fractional mesangial area. Markers of fibrosis and inflammation along with PAI-1 were also upregulated in the kidney of diabetic mice, and treatment with TM5275 and TM5441 effectively inhibited albuminuria, mesangial expansion, ECM accumulation, and macrophage infiltration in diabetic kidneys. Furthermore, in mouse proximal tubular epithelial (mProx24) cells, both TM5275 and TM5441 effectively inhibited PAI-1-induced mRNA expression of fibrosis and inflammation markers and also reversed PAI-1-induced inhibition of plasmin activity, which confirmed the efficacy of the TM compounds as PAI-1 inhibitors. These data suggest that TM compounds could be used to prevent diabetic kidney injury. PMID:27258009

  9. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: glycosylsulfanilamides act as subnanomolar inhibitors of the human secreted isoform VI.

    PubMed

    Winum, Jean-Yves; Montero, Jean-Louis; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2009-12-01

    A series of sulfonamides incorporating sugar moieties and the sulfanilamide scaffold have been investigated for their interaction with the secretory isoform of the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), CA VI. This isoform is secreted in saliva, tears, and milk of mammals - where it plays important physiological roles - even if little is understood at this moment regarding its inhibition, due to the lack of potent and/or selective inhibitors. Here we report a series of low nanomolar and subnanomolar CA VI inhibitors, belonging to the glycosylamine-sulfanilamide class. The glucose, ribose, arabinose, xylose, and fucose derivatives showed excellent CA VI inhibitory activity, with K(i)s in the range of 0.56-5.1 nm, whereas the least active derivatives, incorporating gallactose, mannose, and rhamnose scaffolds showed inhibition constants in the range of 10.1-34.1 nm. Many of these sulfonamides were also selective inhibitors for their interaction with CA VI over the physiologically dominant and ubiquitous isoform CA II, with selectivity ratios of 4.11-35.93 for inhibiting the secreted over the cytosolic isozyme. Because of their high water solubility and high affinity for CA VI over CA II, these compounds are useful tools for better understanding the secreted CA isoform CA VI. PMID:19824891

  10. Nox Inhibitors & Therapies: Rational Design of Peptidic and Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes-Pagano, M. Eugenia; Meijles, Daniel N.; Pagano, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress-related diseases underlie many if not all of the major leading causes of death in United States and the Western World. Thus, enormous interest from both academia and pharmaceutical industry has been placed on the development of agents which attenuate oxidative stress. With that in mind, great efforts have been placed in the development of inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (Nox), the major enzymatic source of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in many cells and tissue. The regulation of a catalytically active Nox enzyme involves numerous protein-protein interactions which, in turn, afford numerous targets for inhibition of its activity. In this review, we will provide an updated overview of the available Nox inhibitors, both peptidic and small molecules, and discuss the body of data related to their possible mechanisms of action and specificity towards each of the various isoforms of Nox. Indeed, there have been some very notable successes. However, despite great commitment by many in the field, the need for efficacious and well-characterized, isoform-specific Nox inhibitors, essential for the treatment of major diseases as well as for delineating the contribution of a given Nox in physiological redox signalling, continues to grow. PMID:26510437

  11. A bumblebee (Bombus ignitus) venom serine protease inhibitor that acts as a microbial serine protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hu; Kim, Bo Yeon; Lee, Kwang Sik; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Lee, Kyung Yong; Jin, Byung Rae

    2014-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors from bumblebee venom have been shown to block plasmin activity. In this study, we identified the protein BiVSPI from the venom of Bombus ignitus to be a serine protease inhibitor and an antimicrobial factor. BiVSPI is a 55-amino acid mature peptide with ten conserved cysteine residues and a P1 methionine residue. BiVSPI is expressed in the venom gland and also found in the venom as an 8-kDa peptide. Recombinant BiVSPI that was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells exhibited inhibitory activity against chymotrypsin but not trypsin. BiVSPI also inhibited microbial serine proteases, such as subtilisin A (Ki=6.57nM) and proteinase K (Ki=7.11nM). In addition, BiVSPI was shown to bind directly to Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Beauveria bassiana but not to Escherichia coli. Consistent with these results, BiVSPI exhibited antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. These findings provide evidence for a novel serine protease inhibitor in bumblebee venom that has antimicrobial functions.

  12. Suppression of caspase-11 expression by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Hyejung; Yoo, Lang; Shin, Ki Soon; Kang, Shin Jung

    2009-01-02

    It has been well documented that histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress inflammatory gene expression. Therefore, we investigated whether histone deacetylase inhibitors modulate the expression of caspase-11 that is known as an inducible caspase regulating both inflammation and apoptosis. In the present study, we show that sodium butyrate and trichostatin A, two structurally unrelated inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDAC), effectively suppressed the induction of caspase-11 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts stimulated with lipopolysaccharides. Sodium butyrate inhibited the activation of upstream signaling events for the caspase-11 induction such as activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, degradation of inhibitor of {kappa}B, and activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B. These results suggest that the HDAC inhibitor suppressed cytosolic signaling events for the induction of caspase-11 by inhibiting the deacetylation of non-histone proteins.

  13. HDAC inhibitors in experimental liver and kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been extensively studied in experimental models of cancer, where their inhibition of deacetylation has been proven to regulate cell survival, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. This in turn has led to the use of a variety of HDAC inhibitors in clinical trials. In recent years the applicability of HDAC inhibitors in other areas of disease has been explored, including the treatment of fibrotic disorders. Impaired wound healing involves the continuous deposition and cross-linking of extracellular matrix governed by myofibroblasts leading to diseases such as liver and kidney fibrosis; both diseases have high unmet medical needs which are a burden on health budgets worldwide. We provide an overview of the potential use of HDAC inhibitors against liver and kidney fibrosis using the current understanding of these inhibitors in experimental animal models and in vitro models of fibrosis. PMID:23281659

  14. Quantum chemical assessment of benzimidazole derivatives as corrosion inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of well-known inhibitors are organic compounds containing multiple bonds and heteroatoms, such as O, N or S, which allow adsorption onto the metal surface. These compounds can adsorb onto the metal surface and block active surface sites, reducing the rate of corrosion. Results A comparative theoretical study of three benzimidazole isomers, benzimidazole (BI), 2-methylbenzimidazole (2-CH3-BI), and 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2-SH-BI), as corrosion inhibitors was performed using density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP functional basis set. Conclusions Nitro and amino groups were selected for investigation as substituents of the three corrosion inhibitors. Nitration of the corrosion inhibitor molecules led to a decrease in inhibition efficiency, while reduction of the nitro group led to an increase in inhibition efficiency. These aminobenzimidazole isomers represent a significant improvement in the inhibition efficiency of corrosion inhibitor molecules. PMID:24674343

  15. Characterization of Encapsulated Corrosion Inhibitors for Environmentally Friendly Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearman, Benjamin Pieter; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Zhang, Xuejun; Surma, Jan; Fitzpatrick, Lilly; Montgomery, Eliza; Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Research efforts are under way to replace current corrosion inhibitors with more environmentally friendly alternatives. However, problems with corrosion inhibition efficiency, coating compatibility and solubility have hindered the use of many of these materials as simple pigment additives.This paper will present technical details on how the Corrosion Technology Lab at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has addressed these issues by encapsulating environmentally friendly inhibitors into organic and inorganic microparticles and microcapsules. The synthetic process for polymer particles was characterized and post-synthesis analysis was performed to determine the interactions between the inhibitors and the encapsulation material. The pH-controlled release of inhibitors from various particle formulations in aqueous base was monitored and compared to both electrochemical and salt immersion accelerated corrosion experiment. Furthermore, synergistic corrosion inhibition effects observed during the corrosion testing of several inhibitor combinations will be presented.

  16. Skin problems and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kozuki, Toshiyuki

    2016-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition is a good target for the treatment of lung, colon, pancreatic and head and neck cancers. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor was first approved for the treatment of advanced lung cancer in 2002. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor plays an essential role in the treatment of cancer, especially for patients harbouring epidermal growth factor receptor activating mutation. Hence, skin toxicity is the most concerning issue for the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. Skin toxicity is bothersome and sometimes affects the quality of life and treatment compliance. Thus, it is important for physicians to understand the background and how to manage epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor-associated skin toxicity. Here, the author reviewed the mechanism and upfront preventive and reactive treatments for epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor-associated skin toxicities.

  17. Development of nitrile-based peptidic inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins.

    PubMed

    Frizler, Maxim; Stirnberg, Marit; Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Gütschow, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that several papain-like cysteine cathepsins are involved in the pathophysiology of diseases such as osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Therefore, the development of potent and selective cathepsin inhibitors is an attractive subject for medicinal chemists. New advances have been made for nitrile-based inhibitors, leading to the identification of the cathepsin K inhibitor odanacatib and other candidates with potential for therapeutic use. This review summarizes the development of peptidic and peptidomimetic compounds with an electrophilic nitrile 'warhead' as inhibitors of the cysteine cathepsins B, S, L, C, and K. Peptide nitriles have been shown to reversibly react with the active site cysteine under formation of a covalent thioimidate adduct. The structural optimization with respect to the positions P3, P2, P1, P1', and P2' resulted in the identification of potent and selective inhibitors of the corresponding cathepsins. The underlying structure-activity relationships are discussed herein. PMID:20166952

  18. Compatibility of a corrosion inhibitor with gas sweetening agents

    SciTech Connect

    Ramkez, M.; Morales, J.L.; Afonso, M.E.; Viloria, A.

    1998-12-31

    A methodology to establish the effect of a corrosion inhibitor on the behavior of two gas sweetening agents namely an amine (A) and a solid product constituted by iron oxides (B), has been developed. This information will be useful in case of traces of inhibitor passing through these two sweetening systems. Tests conducted in a static autoclave tester in gas sweetening conditions were made to determine the sour gas absorption power of the two agents, A and B, in presence or absence of inhibitor. Additionally, the effect of the inhibitor on the foaming power of agent A was evaluated, at room conditions. According to the results obtained, in the range of conditions considered in this study, neither does the inhibitor affect the sour gas absorption power nor the foaming power of agent A. Nevertheless, the anticorrosive product diminished by 12.5% the sour gas removal capability of agent B.

  19. Peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin by mRNA display

    SciTech Connect

    Yiadom, Kwabena P.A.B.; Muhie, Seid; Yang, David C.H. . E-mail: yangdc@georgetown.edu

    2005-10-07

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely toxic. The metalloproteases associated with the toxins cleave proteins essential for neurotransmitter secretion. Inhibitors of the metalloprotease are currently sought to control the toxicity of BoNTs. Toward that goal, we produced a synthetic cDNA for the expression and purification of the metalloprotease of BoNT/A in Escherichia coli as a biotin-ubiquitin fusion protein, and constructed a combinatorial peptide library to screen for BoNT/A light chain inhibitors using mRNA display. A protease assay was developed using immobilized intact SNAP-25 as the substrate. The new peptide inhibitors showed a 10-fold increase in affinity to BoNT/A light chain than the parent peptide. Interestingly, the sequences of the new peptide inhibitors showed abundant hydrophobic residues but few hydrophilic residues. The results suggest that mRNA display may provide a general approach in developing peptide inhibitors of BoNTs.

  20. Specificity of a protein phosphatase inhibitor from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P; Nimmo, G A; Antoniw, J F

    1977-01-01

    A hear-stable protein, which is a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatase-III, was purified 700-fold from skeletal muscle by a procedure that involved heat-treatment at 95 degrees C, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The final step completely resolved the protein phosphatase inhibitor from the protein inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The phosphorylase phosphatase, beta-phosphorylase kinase phosphatase, glycogen synthase phosphatase-1 and glycogen synthase phosphatase-2 activities of protein phosphatase-III [Antoniw, J. F., Nimmo, H. G., Yeaman, S. J. & Cohen, P.(1977) Biochem.J. 162, 423-433] were inhibited in a very similar manner by the protein phosphatase inhibitor and at least 95% inhibition was observed at high concentrations of inhibitor. The two forms of protein phosphatase-III, termed IIIA and IIIB, were equally susceptible to the protein phosphatase inhibitor. The protein phosphatase inhibitor was at least 200 times less effective in inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase-I and protein phosphatase-II. The high degree of specificity of the inhibitor for protein phosphatase-III was used to show that 90% of the phosphorylase phosphatase and glycogen synthase phosphatase activities measured in muscle extracts are catalysed by protein phosphatase-III. Protein phosphatase-III was tightly associated with the protein-glycogen complex that can be isolated from skeletal muscle, whereas the protein phosphatase inhibitor and protein phosphatase-II were not. The results provide further evidence that the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the alpha-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-II) and the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the beta-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-III) are distinct. The results suggest that the protein phosphatase inhibitor may be a useful probe for differentiating different classes of protein phosphatases in mammalian