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Sample records for 5-methylcytosine dna glycosylases

  1. A 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylase/lyase demethylates the retrotransposon Tos17 and promotes its transposition in rice

    PubMed Central

    La, Honggui; Ding, Bo; Mishra, Gyan P.; Zhou, Bo; Yang, Hongmei; Bellizzi, Maria del Rosario; Chen, Songbiao; Meyers, Blake C.; Peng, Zhaohua; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2011-01-01

    DNA 5-methylcytosine (5-meC) is an important epigenetic mark for transcriptional gene silencing in many eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, 5-meC DNA glycosylase/lyases actively remove 5-meC to counteract transcriptional gene silencing in a locus-specific manner, and have been suggested to maintain the expression of transposons. However, it is unclear whether plant DNA demethylases can promote the transposition of transposons. Here we report the functional characterization of the DNA glycosylase/lyase DNG701 in rice. DNG701 encodes a large (1,812 amino acid residues) DNA glycosylase domain protein. Recombinant DNG701 protein showed 5-meC DNA glycosylase and lyase activities in vitro. Knockout or knockdown of DNG701 in rice plants led to DNA hypermethylation and reduced expression of the retrotransposon Tos17. Tos17 showed less transposition in calli derived from dng701 knockout mutant seeds compared with that in wild-type calli. Overexpression of DNG701 in both rice calli and transgenic plants substantially reduced DNA methylation levels of Tos17 and enhanced its expression. The overexpression also led to more frequent transposition of Tos17 in calli. Our results demonstrate that rice DNG701 is a 5-meC DNA glycosylase/lyase responsible for the demethylation of Tos17 and this DNA demethylase plays a critical role in promoting Tos17 transposition in rice calli. PMID:21896764

  2. Lack of 5-methylcytosine in Dictyostelium discoideum DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S S; Ratner, D I

    1991-01-01

    We find no evidence for the presence of 5-methylcytosine in the DNA of Dictyostelium discoideum. Methylation was absent from CCGG sites in repetitive DNA and in DNA from the actin multigene family. Nor was 5-methylcytosine detected in total DNA when base composition was determined by means of h.p.l.c. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:1713034

  3. The rate of hydrolytic deamination of 5-methylcytosine in double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, J C; Rideout, W M; Jones, P A

    1994-01-01

    The modified base, 5-methylcytosine, constitutes approximately 1% of human DNA, but sites containing 5-methylcytosine account for at least 30% of all germline and somatic point mutations. A genetic assay with a sensitivity of 1 in 10(7), based on reversion to neomycin resistance of a mutant pSV2-neo plasmid, was utilized to determine and compare the deamination rates of 5-methylcytosine and cytosine in double-stranded DNA for the first time. The rate constants for spontaneous hydrolytic deamination of 5-methylcytosine and cytosine in double-stranded DNA at 37 degrees C were 5.8 x 10(-13) s-1 and 2.6 x 10(-13) s-1, respectively. These rates are more than sufficient to explain the observed frequency of mutation at sites containing 5-methylcytosine and emphasize the importance of hydrolytic deamination as a major source of human mutations. PMID:8152929

  4. Quantification of 5-methylcytosine in DNA by the chloroacetaldehyde reaction.

    PubMed

    Oakeley, E J; Schmitt, F; Jost, J P

    1999-10-01

    The study of changes in genome-wide levels of DNA methylation has become a key focus for understanding the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Many procedures exist to study DNA methylation, falling into two categories: gene-specific and genome-wide. Genome-wide methylation analysis is best performed by DNA hydrolysis followed by HPLC; however, it requires access to an HPLC machine, which is not always available. Alternative procedures, such as the radioactive labeling of CpG sites using SssI DNA methyltransferase, have been developed to address this problem, but it can only monitor CpG methylation changes, and CpNpG methylation is not detected. Here, we present a method for the analysis of DNA methylation in any sequence context by fluorescent labeling. We present control analyses using synthetic oligonucleotides of known methylation levels and a comparison of genomic DNA from two transgenic tobacco lines known to differ in their methylation levels. The results indicate that hygromycin-induced hypermethylation acts equally on all classes of methylatable cytosine, perhaps indicating a common mechanism. PMID:10524317

  5. The SRA domain of UHRF1 flips 5-methylcytosine out of the DNA helix

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, H.; Horton, J.R.; Zhang, X.; Bostick, M.; Jacobsen, S.; Cheng, X.

    2008-11-13

    Maintenance methylation of hemimethylated CpG dinucleotides at DNA replication forks is the key to faithful mitotic inheritance of genomic methylation patterns. UHRF1 (ubiquitin-like, containing PHD and RING finger domains 1) is required for maintenance methylation by interacting with DNA nucleotide methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), the maintenance methyltransferase, and with hemimethylated CpG, the substrate for DNMT1 (refs 1 and 2). Here we present the crystal structure of the SET and RING-associated (SRA) domain of mouse UHRF1 in complex with DNA containing a hemimethylated CpG site. The DNA is contacted in both the major and minor grooves by two loops that penetrate into the middle of the DNA helix. The 5-methylcytosine has flipped completely out of the DNA helix and is positioned in a binding pocket with planar stacking contacts, Watson-Crick polar hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions specific for 5-methylcytosine. Hence, UHRF1 contains a previously unknown DNA-binding module and is the first example of a non-enzymatic, sequence-specific DNA-binding protein domain to use the base flipping mechanism to interact with DNA.

  6. Modification-dependent restriction endonuclease, MspJI, flips 5-methylcytosine out of the DNA helix

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, J. R.; Wang, H.; Mabuchi, M. Y.; Zhang, X.; Roberts, R. J.; Zheng, Y.; Wilson, G. G.; Cheng, X.

    2014-09-27

    MspJI belongs to a family of restriction enzymes that cleave DNA containing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). MspJI is specific for the sequence 5(h)mC-N-N-G or A and cleaves with some variability 9/13 nucleotides downstream. Earlier, we reported the crystal structure of MspJI without DNA and proposed how it might recognize this sequence and catalyze cleavage. Here we report its co-crystal structure with a 27-base pair oligonucleotide containing 5mC. This structure confirms that MspJI acts as a homotetramer and that the modified cytosine is flipped from the DNA helix into an SRA-like-binding pocket. We expected the structure to reveal two DNA molecules bound specifically to the tetramer and engaged with the enzyme's two DNA-cleavage sites. A coincidence of crystal packing precluded this organization, however. We found that each DNA molecule interacted with two adjacent tetramers, binding one specifically and the other non-specifically. The latter interaction, which prevented cleavage-site engagement, also involved base flipping and might represent the sequence-interrogation phase that precedes specific recognition. MspJI is unusual in that DNA molecules are recognized and cleaved by different subunits. Such interchange of function might explain how other complex multimeric restriction enzymes act.

  7. Modification-dependent restriction endonuclease, MspJI, flips 5-methylcytosine out of the DNA helix

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Horton, J. R.; Wang, H.; Mabuchi, M. Y.; Zhang, X.; Roberts, R. J.; Zheng, Y.; Wilson, G. G.; Cheng, X.

    2014-09-27

    MspJI belongs to a family of restriction enzymes that cleave DNA containing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). MspJI is specific for the sequence 5(h)mC-N-N-G or A and cleaves with some variability 9/13 nucleotides downstream. Earlier, we reported the crystal structure of MspJI without DNA and proposed how it might recognize this sequence and catalyze cleavage. Here we report its co-crystal structure with a 27-base pair oligonucleotide containing 5mC. This structure confirms that MspJI acts as a homotetramer and that the modified cytosine is flipped from the DNA helix into an SRA-like-binding pocket. We expected the structure to reveal two DNAmore » molecules bound specifically to the tetramer and engaged with the enzyme's two DNA-cleavage sites. A coincidence of crystal packing precluded this organization, however. We found that each DNA molecule interacted with two adjacent tetramers, binding one specifically and the other non-specifically. The latter interaction, which prevented cleavage-site engagement, also involved base flipping and might represent the sequence-interrogation phase that precedes specific recognition. MspJI is unusual in that DNA molecules are recognized and cleaved by different subunits. Such interchange of function might explain how other complex multimeric restriction enzymes act.« less

  8. Ultrasensitive determination of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in genomic DNA by sheathless interfaced capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Nie, Ji; Chen, Hong-Xu; Zhou, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Xin-Xiang

    2016-02-14

    A newly developed sheathless interface for capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry, using a porous tip sprayer, was first applied for highly sensitive determination of cytosine modifications. The system performed well in identification and quantification of both 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine using only 125 pg (∼20 cells) genomic DNA samples. PMID:26753520

  9. Recognition and cleavage of 5-methylcytosine DNA by bacterial SRA-HNH proteins

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tiesheng; Yamada-Mabuchi, Megumu; Zhao, Gong; Li, Li; liu, Guang; Ou, Hong-Yu; Deng, Zixin; Zheng, Yu; He, Xinyi

    2015-01-01

    SET and RING-finger-associated (SRA) domain is involved in establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation in eukaryotes. Proteins containing SRA domains exist in mammals, plants, even microorganisms. It has been established that mammalian SRA domain recognizes 5-methylcytosine (5mC) through a base-flipping mechanism. Here, we identified and characterized two SRA domain-containing proteins with the common domain architecture of N-terminal SRA domain and C-terminal HNH nuclease domain, Sco5333 from Streptomyces coelicolor and Tbis1 from Thermobispora bispora. Both sco5333 and tbis1 cannot establish in methylated Escherichia coli hosts (dcm+), and this in vivo toxicity requires both SRA and HNH domain. Purified Sco5333 and Tbis1 displayed weak DNA cleavage activity in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+ and Co2+ and the cleavage activity was suppressed by Zn2+. Both Sco5333 and Tbis1 bind to 5mC-containing DNA in all sequence contexts and have at least a preference of 100 folds in binding affinity for methylated DNA over non-methylated one. We suggest that linkage of methyl-specific SRA domain and weakly active HNH domain may represent a universal mechanism in competing alien methylated DNA but to maximum extent minimizing damage to its own chromosome. PMID:25564526

  10. AP endonucleases process 5-methylcytosine excision intermediates during active DNA demethylation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiyoon; Jang, Hosung; Shin, Hosub; Choi, Woo Lee; Mok, Young Geun; Huh, Jin Hoe

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a primary epigenetic modification regulating gene expression and chromatin structure in many eukaryotes. Plants have a unique DNA demethylation system in that 5-methylcytosine (5mC) is directly removed by DNA demethylases, such as DME/ROS1 family proteins, but little is known about the downstream events. During 5mC excision, DME produces 3′-phosphor-α, β-unsaturated aldehyde and 3′-phosphate by successive β- and δ-eliminations, respectively. The kinetic studies revealed that these 3′-blocking lesions persist for a significant amount of time and at least two different enzyme activities are required to immediately process them. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis AP endonucleases APE1L, APE2 and ARP have distinct functions to process such harmful lesions to allow nucleotide extension. DME expression is toxic to E. coli due to excessive 5mC excision, but expression of APE1L or ARP significantly reduces DME-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, we propose a model of base excision repair and DNA demethylation pathway unique to plants. PMID:25228464

  11. A genomic sequencing protocol that yields a positive display of 5-methylcytosine residues in individual DNA strands.

    PubMed Central

    Frommer, M; McDonald, L E; Millar, D S; Collis, C M; Watt, F; Grigg, G W; Molloy, P L; Paul, C L

    1992-01-01

    The modulation of DNA-protein interactions by methylation of protein-binding sites in DNA and the occurrence in genomic imprinting, X chromosome inactivation, and fragile X syndrome of different methylation patterns in DNA of different chromosomal origin have underlined the need to establish methylation patterns in individual strands of particular genomic sequences. We report a genomic sequencing method that provides positive identification of 5-methylcytosine residues and yields strand-specific sequences of individual molecules in genomic DNA. The method utilizes bisulfite-induced modification of genomic DNA, under conditions whereby cytosine is converted to uracil, but 5-methylcytosine remains nonreactive. The sequence under investigation is then amplified by PCR with two sets of strand-specific primers to yield a pair of fragments, one from each strand, in which all uracil and thymine residues have been amplified as thymine and only 5-methylcytosine residues have been amplified as cytosine. The PCR products can be sequenced directly to provide a strand-specific average sequence for the population of molecules or can be cloned and sequenced to provide methylation maps of single DNA molecules. We tested the method by defining the methylation status within single DNA strands of two closely spaced CpG dinucleotides in the promoter of the human kininogen gene. During the analysis, we encountered in sperm DNA an unusual methylation pattern, which suggests that the high methylation level of single-copy sequences in sperm may be locally modulated by binding of protein factors in germ-line cells. Images PMID:1542678

  12. Neil DNA glycosylases promote substrate turnover by Tdg during DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Khelifa; Kienhöfer, Sabine; von Seggern, Annika; Niehrs, Christof

    2016-01-01

    DNA 5-methylcytosine is a dynamic epigenetic mark which plays important roles in development and disease. In the Tet-Tdg demethylation pathway, methylated cytosine is iteratively oxidized by Tet dioxygenases and unmodified cytosine is restored via thymine DNA glycosylase (Tdg). Here we show that human NEIL1 and NEIL2 DNA glycosylases coordinate abasic site processing during TET–TDG DNA demethylation. NEIL1 and NEIL2 cooperate with TDG during base excision: TDG occupies the abasic site and is displaced by NEILs, which further process the baseless sugar, thereby stimulating TDG substrate turnover. In early Xenopus embryos Neil2 cooperates with Tdg to remove oxidized methylcytosines and to specify neural crest development together with Tet3. Thus, Neils function as AP lyases in the coordinated AP site hand-over during oxidative DNA demethylation. PMID:26751644

  13. Effects of Tet-mediated Oxidation Products of 5-Methylcytosine on DNA Transcription in vitro and in Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Changjun; Ji, Debin; Dai, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-11-01

    5-methylcytosine (5-mC) is a well-characterized epigenetic regulator in mammals. Recent studies showed that Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) proteins can catalyze the stepwise oxidation of 5-mC to produce 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-HmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-FoC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-CaC). The exciting discovery of these novel cytosine modifications has stimulated substantial research interests about their roles in epigenetic regulation. Here we systematically examined the effects of the oxidized 5-mC derivatives on the efficiency and fidelity of DNA transcription using a recently developed competitive transcription and adduct bypass assay. Our results showed that, when located on the transcribed strand, 5-FoC and 5-CaC exhibited marginal mutagenic and modest inhibitory effects on DNA transcription mediated by single-subunit T7 RNA polymerase or multi-subunit human RNA polymerase II in vitro and in human cells. 5-HmC displayed relatively milder blocking effects on transcription, and no mutant transcript could be detectable for 5-HmC in vitro or in cells. The lack of considerable mutagenic effects of the oxidized 5-mC derivatives on transcription was in agreement with their functions in epigenetic regulation. The modest blocking effects on transcription suggested that 5-FoC and 5-CaC may function in transcriptional regulation. These findings provided new evidence for the potential functional interplay between cytosine methylation status and transcription.

  14. Effects of Tet-mediated oxidation products of 5-methylcytosine on DNA transcription in vitro and in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    You, Changjun; Ji, Debin; Dai, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-01-01

    5-methylcytosine (5-mC) is a well-characterized epigenetic regulator in mammals. Recent studies showed that Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) proteins can catalyze the stepwise oxidation of 5-mC to produce 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-HmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-FoC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-CaC). The exciting discovery of these novel cytosine modifications has stimulated substantial research interests about their roles in epigenetic regulation. Here we systematically examined the effects of the oxidized 5-mC derivatives on the efficiency and fidelity of DNA transcription using a recently developed competitive transcription and adduct bypass assay. Our results showed that, when located on the transcribed strand, 5-FoC and 5-CaC exhibited marginal mutagenic and modest inhibitory effects on DNA transcription mediated by single-subunit T7 RNA polymerase or multi-subunit human RNA polymerase II in vitro and in human cells. 5-HmC displayed relatively milder blocking effects on transcription, and no mutant transcript could be detectable for 5-HmC in vitro or in cells. The lack of considerable mutagenic effects of the oxidized 5-mC derivatives on transcription was in agreement with their functions in epigenetic regulation. The modest blocking effects on transcription suggested that 5-FoC and 5-CaC may function in transcriptional regulation. These findings provided new evidence for the potential functional interplay between cytosine methylation status and transcription. PMID:25394478

  15. Association of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine with mitochondrial DNA content and clinical and biochemical parameters in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fan; Huang, Wei; Qi, Jia-Hui; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Huang, Jing-Tao; Zhou, Xin; Feng, Yu-Qi; Liu, Ying-Juan; Liu, Song-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Increasing epidemiological evidence has indicated that inherited variations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number affect the genetic susceptibility of many malignancies in a tumour-specific manner and that DNA methylation also plays an important role in controlling gene expression during the differentiation and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our previous study demonstrated that HCC tissues showed a lower 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) content when compared to tumour-adjacent tissues, but the relationship among 5-hmC, 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and mtDNA content in HCC patients is still unknown. This study aimed to clarify the correlation among mtDNA content, 5-mC and 5-hmC by quantitative real-time PCR and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis. We demonstrated that 5-hmC correlated with tumour size [odds ratio (OR) 0.847, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.746-0.962, P = 0.011], and HCC patients with a tumour size ≥ 5.0 cm showed a lower 5-hmC content and higher levels of fasting plasma aspartate aminotransferase, the ratio of alanine aminotransferase to aspartate aminotransferase, γ-glutamyltransferase, alpha-fetoprotein than those with a tumour size <5 cm (all P<0.05). We further revealed that the mtDNA content of HCC tumour tissues was 225.97(105.42, 430.54) [median (25th Percentile, 75th Percentile)] and was negatively correlated with 5-mC content (P = 0.035), but not 5-hmC content, in genomic DNA from HCC tumour tissues. PMID:24143196

  16. Determination of 5-methylcytosine from plant DNA by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wagner, I; Capesius, I

    1981-06-26

    The relative amounts of the five nucleosides (deoxycytidine, 5-methyldeoxycytidine, deoxyadenosine, deoxyguanosine and thymidine) in the DNA of nine plant species, one plant satellite DNA, and one animal species were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. The method allows the clean separation of the nucleosides from 10 microgram samples with 15 min. The following values for the proportion of methylated cytosines among all cytosines were obtained: Lobularia maritima 18.5%, Nicotiana tabacum 32.6%, Pisum sativum 23.2%, Rhinanthus minor 29.2%, Sinapsis alba 12.2%, Vicia faba 30.5%, Viscum album 23.2%, Cymbidium pumilum 18.8%, Cymbidium pumilum AT-rich satellite DNA 15.8%, Triticum aestivum 22.4%. DNA of an animal, the gerbil, Meriones unguiculatus, had a methylation percentage of 3.1%. An estimate of the GC content based on the buoyant density of DNA tends to be lower than the actual value, an estimate based on the melting temperature tends to be higher. This supports the finding by other authors that DNA methylation decreases the buoyant density and may increase the melting temperature at high m5C concentration. PMID:7272310

  17. Effects of tet-induced oxidation products of 5-methylcytosine on DNA replication in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Debin; You, Changjun; Wang, Pengcheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-07-21

    Recently 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5hmdC), 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5fdC), and 5-carboxyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5cadC) were discovered in mammalian DNA as oxidation products of 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5mdC) induced by the ten-eleven translocation family of enzymes. These oxidized derivatives of 5mdC may not only act as intermediates of active cytosine demethylation in mammals but also serve as epigenetic marks on their own. It remains unclear how 5hmdC, 5fdC, and 5cadC affect DNA replication in mammalian cells. Here, we examined the effects of the three modified nucleosides on the efficiency and accuracy of DNA replication in HEK293T human kidney epithelial cells. Our results demonstrated that a single, site-specifically incorporated 5fdC or 5cadC conferred modest drops, by approximately 30%, in replication bypass efficiency without inducing detectable mutations in human cells, whereas replicative bypass of 5hmdC is both accurate and efficient. The lack of pronounced perturbation of these oxidized 5mdC derivatives on DNA replication is consistent with their roles in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. PMID:24979327

  18. Engineering nicking enzymes that preferentially nick 5-methylcytosine-modified DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gutjahr, Alice; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2014-01-01

    N.ϕGamma is a strand-specific and site-specific DNA nicking enzyme (YCG↓GT or AC↑CGR). Here we describe the isolation of single and double mutants of N.ϕGamma with attenuated activity. The nicking domains (NDs) of E59A and 11 double mutants were fused to the 5mCG-binding domain of MBD2 and generated fusion enzymes that preferentially nick 5mCG-modified DNA. The CG dinucleotide can be modified by C5 methyltransferases (MTases) such as M.SssI, M.HhaI or M.HpaII to create composite sites AC↑YGG N(8–15) 5mCG. We also constructed a fusion enzyme 2xMBD2-ND(N.BceSVIII) targeting more frequent composite sites AS↑YS N(5–12) 5mCG in Mn2+ buffer. 5mCG-dependent nicking requires special digestion conditions in high salt (0.3 M KCl) or in Ni2+ buffer. The fusion enzyme can be used to nick and label 5mCG-modified plasmid and genomic DNAs with fluorescently labeled Cy3-dUTP and potentially be useful for diagnostic applications, DNA sequencing and optical mapping of epigenetic markers. The importance of the predicted catalytic residues D89, H90, N106 and H115 in N.ϕGamma was confirmed by mutagenesis. We found that the wild-type enzyme N.ϕGamma prefers to nick 5mCG-modified DNA in Ni2+ buffer even though the nicking activity is sub-optimal compared to the activity in Mg2+ buffer. PMID:24609382

  19. Natural Larval Diet Differently Influences the Pattern of Developmental Changes in DNA 5-Methylcytosine Levels in Apis mellifera Queens as Compared with Workers and Drones.

    PubMed

    Strachecka, A; Olszewski, K; Bajda, M; Demetraki-Paleolog, J

    2015-08-01

    The principal mechanism of gene activation/silencing is DNA 5-methylcytosine methylation. This study was aimed at determining global DNA methylation levels in larvae, prepupae, pupae, and 1-day-old adults of Apis mellifera queens, workers and drones. The Imprint Methylated DNA Quantification Kit MDQ1 was used. Percentages of DNA 5-methylcytosine were low and relatively similar in the larvae of all the castes until 4th day of larval development (3-5%). However, they were higher in the drone and worker larvae than in the queen larvae. Generally, the developmental patterns of changes in the DNA methylation levels were different in the queens in comparison with the drones and workers. While methylation increased in the queens, it decreased in the drones and workers. Methylated DNA methylcytosine percentages and weights in the queen prepupae (15%, 9.18 ng) and pupae (21%, 10.74 ng) were, respectively, three and four times higher than in the worker/drone brood of the same age (2.5-4%, 0.03-0.07 ng). Only in the queens, after a substantial increase, did DNA methylation decrease almost twice between the pupal stage and queen emergence (from 21% and 10.74 ng to 12% and 6.78 ng). This finding seems very interesting, particularly for experimental gerontology. PMID:26547070

  20. Uracil-DNA Glycosylase UNG Promotes Tet-mediated DNA Demethylation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jian-Huang; Xu, Gui-Fang; Gu, Tian-Peng; Chen, Guo-Dong; Han, Bin-Bin; Xu, Zhi-Mei; Bjørås, Magnar; Krokan, Hans E; Xu, Guo-Liang; Du, Ya-Rui

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, active DNA demethylation involves oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) by Tet dioxygenases and excision of these two oxidized bases by thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG). Although TDG is essential for active demethylation in embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, it is hardly expressed in mouse zygotes and dispensable in pronuclear DNA demethylation. To search for other factors that might contribute to demethylation in mammalian cells, we performed a functional genomics screen based on a methylated luciferase reporter assay. UNG2, one of the glycosylases known to excise uracil residues from DNA, was found to reduce DNA methylation, thus activating transcription of a methylation-silenced reporter gene when co-transfected with Tet2 into HEK293T cells. Interestingly, UNG2 could decrease 5caC from the genomic DNA and a reporter plasmid in transfected cells, like TDG. Furthermore, deficiency in Ung partially impaired DNA demethylation in mouse zygotes. Our results suggest that UNG might be involved in Tet-mediated DNA demethylation. PMID:26620559

  1. The versatile thymine DNA-glycosylase: a comparative characterization of the human, Drosophila and fission yeast orthologs.

    PubMed

    Hardeland, Ulrike; Bentele, Marc; Jiricny, Josef; Schär, Primo

    2003-05-01

    Human thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) is well known to excise thymine and uracil from G.T and G.U mismatches, respectively, and was therefore proposed to play a central role in the cellular defense against genetic mutation through spontaneous deamination of 5-methylcytosine and cytosine. In this study, we characterized two newly discovered orthologs of TDG, the Drosophila melanogaster Thd1p and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Thp1p proteins, with an objective to address the function of this subfamily of uracil-DNA glycosylases from an evolutionary perspective. A systematic biochemical comparison of both enzymes with human TDG revealed a number of biologically significant facts. (i) All eukaryotic TDG orthologs have broad and species-specific substrate spectra that include a variety of damaged pyrimidine and purine bases; (ii) the common most efficiently processed substrates of all are uracil and 3,N4- ethenocytosine opposite guanine and 5-fluorouracil in any double-stranded DNA context; (iii) 5-methylcytosine and thymine derivatives are processed with an appreciable efficiency only by the human and the Drosophila enzymes; (iv) none of the proteins is able to hydrolyze a non-damaged 5'-methylcytosine opposite G; and (v) the double strand and mismatch dependency of the enzymes varies with the substrate and is not a stringent feature of this subfamily of DNA glycosylases. These findings advance our current view on the role of TDG proteins and document that they have evolved with high structural flexibility to counter a broad range of DNA base damage in accordance with the specific needs of individual species. PMID:12711670

  2. New strategy to address DNA-methyl transferase activity in ovarian cancer cell cultures by monitoring the formation of 5-methylcytosine using HPLC-UV.

    PubMed

    Iglesias González, T; Blanco-González, E; Montes-Bayón, M

    2016-08-15

    Methylation of mammalian genomic DNA is catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). Aberrant expression and activity of these enzymes has been reported to play an important role in the initiation and progression of tumors and its response to chemotherapy. Therefore, there is a great interest in developing strategies to detect human DNMTs activity. We propose a simple, antibody-free, label-free and non-radioactive analytical strategy in which methyltransferase activity is measured trough the determination of the 5-methylcytosine (5mC) content in DNA by a chromatographic method (HPLC-UV) previously developed. For this aim, a correlation between the enzyme activity and the concentration of 5mC obtained by HPLC-UV is previously obtained under optimized conditions using both, un-methylated and hemi-methylated DNA substrates and the prokaryotic methyltransferase M.SssI as model enzyme. The evaluation of the methylation yield in un-methylated known sequences (a 623bp PCR-amplicon) turned to be quantitative (110%) in experiments conducted in-vitro. Methylation of hemi-methylated and low-methylated sequences could be also detected with the proposed approach. The application of the methodology to the determination of the DNMTs activity in nuclear extracts from human ovarian cancer cells has revealed the presence of matrix effects (also confirmed by standard additions) that hampered quantitative enzyme recovery. The obtained results showed the high importance of adequate sample clean-up steps. PMID:27318640

  3. Application of N-halogeno-N-sodiobenzenesulfonamide reagents to the selective detection of 5-methylcytosine in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianlu; Hong, Tingting; Tang, Tun; Zhai, Qianqian; Xing, Xiwen; Mao, Wuxiang; Zheng, Xiaolong; Xu, Liang; Wu, Jinjun; Weng, Xiaocheng; Wang, Shaoru; Tian, Tian; Yuan, Bifeng; Huang, Bing; Zhuang, Lin; Zhou, Xiang

    2013-01-30

    To surmount the challenges of the locus determination and accurate quantification of 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine ((5Me)dC) in DNA fragments that contain multiple (5Me)dC residues, we designed and synthesized two N-halogeno-N-sodiobenzenesulfonamide reagents that provide a new chemical method for probing (5Me)dC in DNA sequences. When the strategy we provided was combined with β-glucosyltransferase, (5Me)dC could be distinguished from 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine ((5hm)dC) and deoxycytidine (dC) through the introduction of a glucose moiety to the hydroxyl group of (5hm)dC. PMID:23301810

  4. Detecting 5-methylcytosine using an enzyme-free DNA strand exchange reaction without pretreatment under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Wu, Jinjun; Liu, Wenting; Hong, Tingting; Wang, Tianlu; Zhang, Xiaoe; Fu, Boshi; Wu, Fan; Wu, Zhiguo; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-05-21

    We present here a novel and efficient method for 5mC detection using a DNA strand exchange reaction (SER) strategy. This enzyme-free method needs no pre-treatment of target DNAs and can be adapted to most of the target duplexes under physiological conditions. The high sequence selectivity of this method can distinguish 5mC from normal cytosine in an accurate manner. PMID:27139156

  5. Thymine DNA glycosylase exhibits negligible affinity for nucleobases that it removes from DNA

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Shuja S.; Coey, Christopher T.; Varney, Kristen M.; Pozharski, Edwin; Drohat, Alexander C.

    2015-01-01

    Thymine DNA Glycosylase (TDG) performs essential functions in maintaining genetic integrity and epigenetic regulation. Initiating base excision repair, TDG removes thymine from mutagenic G·T mispairs caused by 5-methylcytosine (mC) deamination and other lesions including uracil (U) and 5-hydroxymethyluracil (hmU). In DNA demethylation, TDG excises 5-formylcytosine (fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (caC), which are generated from mC by Tet (ten–eleven translocation) enzymes. Using improved crystallization conditions, we solved high-resolution (up to 1.45 Å) structures of TDG enzyme–product complexes generated from substrates including G·U, G·T, G·hmU, G·fC and G·caC. The structures reveal many new features, including key water-mediated enzyme–substrate interactions. Together with nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, the structures demonstrate that TDG releases the excised base from its tight product complex with abasic DNA, contrary to previous reports. Moreover, DNA-free TDG exhibits no significant binding to free nucleobases (U, T, hmU), indicating a Kd >> 10 mM. The structures reveal a solvent-filled channel to the active site, which might facilitate dissociation of the excised base and enable caC excision, which involves solvent-mediated acid catalysis. Dissociation of the excised base allows TDG to bind the beta rather than the alpha anomer of the abasic sugar, which might stabilize the enzyme–product complex. PMID:26358812

  6. Strandwise translocation of a DNA glycosylase on undamaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Yan; Nam, Kwangho; Spong, Marie C.; Banerjee, Anirban; Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2012-05-14

    Base excision repair of genotoxic nucleobase lesions in the genome is critically dependent upon the ability of DNA glycosylases to locate rare sites of damage embedded in a vast excess of undamaged DNA, using only thermal energy to fuel the search process. Considerable interest surrounds the question of how DNA glycosylases translocate efficiently along DNA while maintaining their vigilance for target damaged sites. Here, we report the observation of strandwise translocation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, MutM, along undamaged DNA. In these complexes, the protein is observed to translocate by one nucleotide on one strand while remaining untranslocated on the complementary strand. We further report that alterations of single base-pairs or a single amino acid substitution (R112A) can induce strandwise translocation. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that MutM can translocate along DNA in a strandwise fashion. These observations reveal a previously unobserved mode of movement for a DNA-binding protein along the surface of DNA.

  7. The effect of sequence context on the activity of cytosine DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Scott T; Brown, Tom; Fox, Keith R

    2015-12-01

    We have prepared single (N204D) and double (N204D:L272A) mutants of human uracil DNA glycosylase (hUDG), generating two cytosine DNA glycosylases (hCDG and hCYDG). Both these enzymes are able to excise cytosine (but not 5-methylcytosine), when this base is part of a mismatched base pair. hCDG is more active than the equivalent E. coli enzyme (eCYDG) and also has some activity when the cytosine is paired with guanine, unlike eCYDG. hCDG also has some activity against single stranded DNA, while having poor activity towards an unnatural base pair that forces the cytosine into an extrahelical conformation (in contrast to eCYDG for which a bulky base enhances the enzyme's activity). We also examined how sequence context affects the activity of these enzymes, determining the effect of flanking base pairs on cleavage efficiency. An abasic site or a hexaethylene glycol linker placed opposite the target cytosine, also causes an increase in activity compared with an AC mismatch. Flanking an AC mismatch with GC base pairs resulted in a 100-fold decrease in excision activity relative to flanking AT base pairs and the 5'-flanking base pair had a greater effect on the rate of cleavage. However, this effect is not simply due to the stability of the flanking base pairs as adjacent GT mismatches also produce low cleavage efficiency. PMID:26463365

  8. Strandwise translocation of a DNA glycosylase on undamaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yan; Nam, Kwangho; Spong, Marie C; Banerjee, Anirban; Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L

    2012-01-24

    Base excision repair of genotoxic nucleobase lesions in the genome is critically dependent upon the ability of DNA glycosylases to locate rare sites of damage embedded in a vast excess of undamaged DNA, using only thermal energy to fuel the search process. Considerable interest surrounds the question of how DNA glycosylases translocate efficiently along DNA while maintaining their vigilance for target damaged sites. Here, we report the observation of strandwise translocation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, MutM, along undamaged DNA. In these complexes, the protein is observed to translocate by one nucleotide on one strand while remaining untranslocated on the complementary strand. We further report that alterations of single base-pairs or a single amino acid substitution (R112A) can induce strandwise translocation. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that MutM can translocate along DNA in a strandwise fashion. These observations reveal a previously unobserved mode of movement for a DNA-binding protein along the surface of DNA. PMID:22219368

  9. Discovery of a Bacterial 5-Methylcytosine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    5-Methylcytosine is found in all domains of life, but the bacterial cytosine deaminase from Escherichia coli (CodA) will not accept 5-methylcytosine as a substrate. Since significant amounts of 5-methylcytosine are produced in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, this compound must eventually be catabolized and the fragments recycled by enzymes that have yet to be identified. We therefore initiated a comprehensive phylogenetic screen for enzymes that may be capable of deaminating 5-methylcytosine to thymine. From a systematic analysis of sequence homologues of CodA from thousands of bacterial species, we identified putative cytosine deaminases where a “discriminating” residue in the active site, corresponding to Asp-314 in CodA from E. coli, was no longer conserved. Representative examples from Klebsiella pneumoniae (locus tag: Kpn00632), Rhodobacter sphaeroides (locus tag: Rsp0341), and Corynebacterium glutamicum (locus tag: NCgl0075) were demonstrated to efficiently deaminate 5-methylcytosine to thymine with values of kcat/Km of 1.4 × 105, 2.9 × 104, and 1.1 × 103 M–1 s–1, respectively. These three enzymes also catalyze the deamination of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil with values of kcat/Km of 1.2 × 105, 6.8 × 104, and 2.0 × 102 M–1 s–1, respectively. The three-dimensional structure of Kpn00632 was determined by X-ray diffraction methods with 5-methylcytosine (PDB id: 4R85), 5-fluorocytosine (PDB id: 4R88), and phosphonocytosine (PDB id: 4R7W) bound in the active site. When thymine auxotrophs of E. coli express these enzymes, they are capable of growth in media lacking thymine when supplemented with 5-methylcytosine. Expression of these enzymes in E. coli is toxic in the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, due to the efficient transformation to 5-fluorouracil. PMID:25384249

  10. Recent Advances in the Structural Mechanisms of DNA Glycosylases

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Sonja C.; Adhikary, Suraj; Rubinson, Emily H.; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2012-01-01

    DNA glycosylases safeguard the genome by locating and excising a diverse array of aberrant nucleobases created from oxidation, alkylation, and deamination of DNA. Since the discovery 28 years ago that these enzymes employ a base flipping mechanism to trap their substrates, six different protein architectures have been identified to perform the same basic task. Work over the past several years has unraveled details for how the various DNA glycosylases survey DNA, detect damage within the duplex, select for the correct modification, and catalyze base excision. Here, we provide a broad overview of these latest advances in glycosylase mechanisms gleaned from structural enzymology, highlighting features common to all glycosylases as well as key differences that define their particular substrate specificities. PMID:23076011

  11. Direct visualization of a DNA glycosylase searching for damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liwei; Haushalter, Karl A; Lieber, Charles M; Verdine, Gregory L

    2002-03-01

    DNA glycosylases preserve the integrity of genetic information by recognizing damaged bases in the genome and catalyzing their excision. It is unknown how DNA glycosylases locate covalently modified bases hidden in the DNA helix amongst vast numbers of normal bases. Here we employ atomic-force microscopy (AFM) with carbon nanotube probes to image search intermediates of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) scanning DNA. We show that hOGG1 interrogates DNA at undamaged sites by inducing drastic kinks. The sharp DNA bending angle of these non-lesion-specific search intermediates closely matches that observed in the specific complex of 8-oxoguanine-containing DNA bound to hOGG1. These findings indicate that hOGG1 actively distorts DNA while searching for damaged bases. PMID:11927259

  12. Abundance of total genomic 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in different pig tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methylation of genomic DNA is essential in regulating gene expression in many biological processes including reproduction, development, and growth. Cytosine residues in mammalian genomes are enzymatically modified to 5-methylcytosine (5MC), which participates in transcriptional regulation of genes. ...

  13. Structure of a DNA glycosylase searching for lesions.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Anirban; Santos, Webster L; Verdine, Gregory L

    2006-02-24

    DNA glycosylases must interrogate millions of base pairs of undamaged DNA in order to locate and then excise one damaged nucleobase. The nature of this search process remains poorly understood. Here we report the use of disulfide cross-linking (DXL) technology to obtain structures of a bacterial DNA glycosylase, MutM, interrogating undamaged DNA. These structures, solved to 2.0 angstrom resolution, reveal the nature of the search process: The protein inserts a probe residue into the helical stack and severely buckles the target base pair, which remains intrahelical. MutM therefore actively interrogates the intact DNA helix while searching for damage. PMID:16497933

  14. Detection of Damaged DNA Bases by DNA Glycosylase Enzymes†

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Joshua I.; Stivers, James T.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental and shared process in all forms of life is the use of DNA glycosylase enzymes to excise rare damaged bases from genomic DNA. Without such enzymes, the highly-ordered primary sequences of genes would rapidly deteriorate. Recent structural and biophysical studies are beginning to reveal a fascinating multistep mechanism for damaged base detection that begins with short-range sliding of the glycosylase along the DNA chain in a distinct conformation we refer to as the search complex (SC). Sliding is frequently punctuated by the formation of a transient “interrogation” complex (IC) where the enzyme extrahelically inspects both normal and damaged bases in an exosite pocket that is distant from the active site. When normal bases are presented in the exosite, the IC rapidly collapses back to the SC, while a damaged base will efficiently partition forward into the active site to form the catalytically competent excision complex (EC). Here we review the unique problems associated with enzymatic detection of rare damaged DNA bases in the genome, and emphasize how each complex must have specific dynamic properties that are tuned to optimize the rate and efficiency of damage site location. PMID:20469926

  15. TET proteins and 5-methylcytosine oxidation in the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Tsagaratou, Ageliki; Rao, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation in the form of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) is essential for normal development in mammals and influences a variety of biological processes including transcriptional regulation, imprinting and the maintenance of genomic stability. The recent discovery of TET proteins, which oxidize 5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC), has changed our understanding of the process of DNA demethylation. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the roles of DNA methylation and TET proteins in cell differentiation and function. The intensive research on this subject has so far focused primarily on ES cells and neurons. Here we summarize what is known about DNA methylation in T cell function. PMID:24619230

  16. DNA glycosylase enzymes induced during chemical adaptation of M. luteus.

    PubMed Central

    Riazuddin, S; Athar, A; Ahmed, Z; Lali, S M; Sohail, A

    1987-01-01

    Five peaks of DNA glycosylase activity showing a preference for MNNG alkylated DNA have been identified from extracts of adapted M. luteus. They are numerically designated as GI to GV in order of their decreasing molecular weights. The first two of these peaks have been highly purified. GI, is a constitutive heat labile protein, 35% stimulated by the presence of 50 mM NaCl, acts exclusively on 3 MeA residues in alkylated DNA, 60-70% inhibited by the presence of 2 mM free 3MeA and has been designated as 3MeA DNA glycosylase enzyme. GII, which is an inducible protein, is heat stable, 28% inhibited by the presence of 50 mM NaCl, removes 3MeA, 3MeG, 7MeA & 7MeG with different efficiency, and has been designated as 3,7 methylpurine DNA glycosylase enzyme. The rate of release of 3 methylpurines is 30 times that of 7MeG. There is no activity of either enzyme on O2-MeC, O2-MeT, O4-MeT or O6-MeG. The apparent molecular weights of GI and GII proteins are 28 Kd and 22 Kd respectively. PMID:3628000

  17. Reactions of 5-methylcytosine cation radicals in DNA and model systems: thermal deprotonation from the 5-methyl group vs. excited state deprotonation from sugar

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Palmer, Brian J.; Todd, Andrew D.; Heizer, Alicia N.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study the formation and subsequent reactions of the 5-methyl-2′-deoxycytidine cation radical (5-Me-2′-dC•+) in nucleosides and DNA-oligomers and compare to one electron oxidized thymidine. Materials and methods Employing electron spin resonance (ESR), cation radical formation and its reactions were investigated in 5-Me-2′-dC, thymidine (Thd) and their derivatives, in fully double stranded (ds) d[GC*GC*GC*GC*]2 and in the 5-Me-C/A mismatched, d[GGAC*AAGC:CCTAATCG], where C* = 5-Me-C. Results We report 5-Me-2′-dC•+ production by one-electron oxidation of 5-Me-2′-dC by Cl2•− via annealing in the dark at 155 K. Progressive annealing of 5-Me-2′-dC•+ at 155 K produces the allylic radical (C-CH2•). However, photoexcitation of 5-Me-2′-dC•+ by 405 nm laser or by photoflood lamp leads to only C3′• formation. Photoexcitation of N3-deprotonated thyminyl radical in Thd and its 5′-nucleotides leads to C3′• formation but not in 3′-TMP which resulted in the allylic radical (U-CH2•) and C5′• production. For excited 5-Me-2′,3′-ddC•+, absence of the 3′-OH group does not prevent C3′• formation. For d[GC*GC*GC*GC*]2 and d[GGAC*AAGC:CCTAATCG], intra-base paired proton transferred form of G cation radical (G(N1-H)•:C(+H+)) is found with no observable 5-Me-2′-dC•+ formation. Photoexcitation of (G(N1-H)•:C(+H+)) in d[GC*GC*GC*GC*]2 produced only C1′• and not the expected photoproducts from 5-Me-2′-dC•+. However, photoexcitation of (G(N1-H)•:C(+H+)) in d[GGAC*AAGC:CCTAATCG] led to C5′• and C1′• formation. Conclusions C-CH2• formation from 5-Me-2′-dC•+ occurs via ground state deprotonation from C5-methyl group on the base. In the excited 5-Me-2′-dC•+ and 5-Me-2′,3′-ddC•+, spin and charge localization at C3′ followed by deprotonation leads to C3′• formation. Thus, deprotonation from C3′ in the excited cation radical is kinetically controlled and sugar C-H bond energies are

  18. Base excision repair deficient mice lacking the Aag alkyladenine DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Engelward, Bevin P.; Weeda, Geert; Wyatt, Michael D.; Broekhof, José L. M.; de Wit, Jan; Donker, Ingrid; Allan, James M.; Gold, Barry; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Samson, Leona D.

    1997-01-01

    3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA glycosylases remove 3MeAs from alkylated DNA to initiate the base excision repair pathway. Here we report the generation of mice deficient in the 3MeA DNA glycosylase encoded by the Aag (Mpg) gene. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase turns out to be the major DNA glycosylase not only for the cytotoxic 3MeA DNA lesion, but also for the mutagenic 1,N6-ethenoadenine (ɛA) and hypoxanthine lesions. Aag appears to be the only 3MeA and hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase in liver, testes, kidney, and lung, and the only ɛA DNA glycosylase in liver, testes, and kidney; another ɛA DNA glycosylase may be expressed in lung. Although alkyladenine DNA glycosylase has the capacity to remove 8-oxoguanine DNA lesions, it does not appear to be the major glycosylase for 8-oxoguanine repair. Fibroblasts derived from Aag −/− mice are alkylation sensitive, indicating that Aag −/− mice may be similarly sensitive. PMID:9371804

  19. Human polymorphic variants of the NEIL1 DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Roy, Laura M; Jaruga, Pawel; Wood, Thomas G; McCullough, Amanda K; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2007-05-25

    In mammalian cells, the repair of DNA bases that have been damaged by reactive oxygen species is primarily initiated by a series of DNA glycosylases that include OGG1, NTH1, NEIL1, and NEIL2. To explore the functional significance of NEIL1, we recently reported that neil1 knock-out and heterozygotic mice develop the majority of symptoms of metabolic syndrome (Vartanian, V., Lowell, B., Minko, I. G., Wood, T. G., Ceci, J. D., George, S., Ballinger, S. W., Corless, C. L., McCullough, A. K., and Lloyd, R. S. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 103, 1864-1869). To determine whether this phenotype could be causally related to human disease susceptibility, we have characterized four polymorphic variants of human NEIL1. Although three of the variants (S82C, G83D, and D252N) retained near wild type levels of nicking activity on abasic (AP) site-containing DNA, G83D did not catalyze the wild type beta,delta-elimination reaction but primarily yielded the beta-elimination product. The AP nicking activity of the C136R variant was significantly reduced. Glycosylase nicking activities were measured on both thymine glycol-containing oligonucleotides and gamma-irradiated genomic DNA using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Two of the polymorphic variants (S82C and D252N) showed near wild type enzyme specificity and kinetics, whereas G83D was devoid of glycosylase activity. Although insufficient quantities of C136R could be obtained to carry out gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses, this variant was also devoid of the ability to incise thymine glycol-containing oligonucleotide, suggesting that it may also be glycosylase-deficient. Extrapolation of these data suggests that individuals who are heterozygous for these inactive variant neil1 alleles may be at increased risk for metabolic syndrome. PMID:17389588

  20. 5-Methylcytosine-Rich Heterochromatin in the Indian Muntjac.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Michael; Steinlein, Claus; Lomb, Christian; Sperling, Karl; Neitzel, Heidemarie

    2015-01-01

    Two 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC)-rich heterochromatic regions were demonstrated in metaphase chromosomes of the Indian muntjac by indirect immunofluorescence using a monoclonal anti-5-MeC antibody. The metaphases were obtained from diploid and triploid cell lines. A major region is located in the 'neck' of the 3;X fusion chromosome and can be detected after denaturation of the chromosomal DNA with UV-light irradiation for 1 h. It is located exactly at the border of the X chromosome and the translocated autosome 3. A minor region is found in the centromeric region of the free autosome 3 after denaturing the chromosomal DNA for 3 h or longer. The structure and possible function of the major hypermethylated region as barrier against spreading of the X-inactivation process into the autosome 3 is discussed. PMID:26959372

  1. A DNA enzyme with N-glycosylase activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, T. L.; Ordoukhanian, P.; Joyce, G. F.

    2000-01-01

    In vitro evolution was used to develop a DNA enzyme that catalyzes the site-specific depurination of DNA with a catalytic rate enhancement of about 10(6)-fold. The reaction involves hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of a particular deoxyguanosine residue, leading to DNA strand scission at the apurinic site. The DNA enzyme contains 93 nucleotides and is structurally complex. It has an absolute requirement for a divalent metal cation and exhibits optimal activity at about pH 5. The mechanism of the reaction was confirmed by analysis of the cleavage products by using HPLC and mass spectrometry. The isolation and characterization of an N-glycosylase DNA enzyme demonstrates that single-stranded DNA, like RNA and proteins, can form a complex tertiary structure and catalyze a difficult biochemical transformation. This DNA enzyme provides a new approach for the site-specific cleavage of DNA molecules.

  2. Actions of human DNA glycosylases on uracil-containing DNA, methylated DNA and their reconstituted chromatins.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, K; Oikawa, A

    1979-07-26

    Extracts of human lymphoblastoid cells catalyzed complete release of uracil (Ura) from PBS1 DNA, which contains Ura instead of thymine as a normal component (Ura-DNA), and 3-methyladenine (3-MeAde) from DNA methylated with methyl methanesulfonate (Me-DNA). These two activities, Ura-DNA glycosylase and 3-MeAde-DNA glycosylase, differed in heat stability. Cell extracts released Ura more rapidly and 3-MeAde more slowly from alkali-denatured preparations of Ura- and Me-DNA, respectively, than from native DNA's. On incubation with reconstituted chromatins, prepared from Ura-DNA and Me-DNA, respectively, with calf thymus chromosomal protein by salt gradient dialysis, cell extracts released all the Ura but only about half of the 3-MeAde residues, although both these chromatins were degraded by micrococcal nuclease until about half of the nucleotides became acid soluble. The activities of Ura-DNA and 3-MeAde-DNA glycosylase of xeroderma pigmentosum cells were similar to those of normal cells. PMID:465495

  3. Molecular crowding enhances facilitated diffusion of two human DNA glycosylases

    PubMed Central

    Cravens, Shannen L.; Schonhoft, Joseph D.; Rowland, Meng M.; Rodriguez, Alyssa A.; Anderson, Breeana G.; Stivers, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular space is at a premium due to the high concentrations of biomolecules and is expected to have a fundamental effect on how large macromolecules move in the cell. Here, we report that crowded solutions promote intramolecular DNA translocation by two human DNA repair glycosylases. The crowding effect increases both the efficiency and average distance of DNA chain translocation by hindering escape of the enzymes to bulk solution. The increased contact time with the DNA chain provides for redundant damage patrolling within individual DNA chains at the expense of slowing the overall rate of damaged base removal from a population of molecules. The significant biological implication is that a crowded cellular environment could influence the mechanism of damage recognition as much as any property of the enzyme or DNA. PMID:25845592

  4. Molecular crowding enhances facilitated diffusion of two human DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Cravens, Shannen L; Schonhoft, Joseph D; Rowland, Meng M; Rodriguez, Alyssa A; Anderson, Breeana G; Stivers, James T

    2015-04-30

    Intracellular space is at a premium due to the high concentrations of biomolecules and is expected to have a fundamental effect on how large macromolecules move in the cell. Here, we report that crowded solutions promote intramolecular DNA translocation by two human DNA repair glycosylases. The crowding effect increases both the efficiency and average distance of DNA chain translocation by hindering escape of the enzymes to bulk solution. The increased contact time with the DNA chain provides for redundant damage patrolling within individual DNA chains at the expense of slowing the overall rate of damaged base removal from a population of molecules. The significant biological implication is that a crowded cellular environment could influence the mechanism of damage recognition as much as any property of the enzyme or DNA. PMID:25845592

  5. Binding of undamaged double stranded DNA to vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Schormann, Norbert; Banerjee, Surajit; Ricciardi, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-06-02

    Background: Uracil-DNA glycosylases are evolutionarily conserved DNA repair enzymes. However, vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase (known as D4), also serves as an intrinsic and essential component of the processive DNA polymerase complex during DNA replication. In this complex D4 binds to a unique poxvirus specific protein A20 which tethers it to the DNA polymerase. At the replication fork the DNA scanning and repair function of D4 is coupled with DNA replication. So far, DNA-binding to D4 has not been structurally characterized. Results: This manuscript describes the first structure of a DNA-complex of a uracil-DNA glycosylase from the poxvirus family. This also represents the first structure of a uracil DNA glycosylase in complex with an undamaged DNA. In the asymmetric unit two D4 subunits bind simultaneously to complementary strands of the DNA double helix. Each D4 subunit interacts mainly with the central region of one strand. DNA binds to the opposite side of the A20-binding surface on D4. In comparison of the present structure with the structure of uracil-containing DNA-bound human uracil-DNA glycosylase suggests that for DNA binding and uracil removal D4 employs a unique set of residues and motifs that are highly conserved within the poxvirus family but different in other organisms. Conclusion: The first structure of D4 bound to a truly non-specific undamaged double-stranded DNA suggests that initial binding of DNA may involve multiple non-specific interactions between the protein and the phosphate backbone.

  6. Binding of undamaged double stranded DNA to vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schormann, Norbert; Banerjee, Surajit; Ricciardi, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-06-02

    Background: Uracil-DNA glycosylases are evolutionarily conserved DNA repair enzymes. However, vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase (known as D4), also serves as an intrinsic and essential component of the processive DNA polymerase complex during DNA replication. In this complex D4 binds to a unique poxvirus specific protein A20 which tethers it to the DNA polymerase. At the replication fork the DNA scanning and repair function of D4 is coupled with DNA replication. So far, DNA-binding to D4 has not been structurally characterized. Results: This manuscript describes the first structure of a DNA-complex of a uracil-DNA glycosylase from the poxvirus family. This alsomore » represents the first structure of a uracil DNA glycosylase in complex with an undamaged DNA. In the asymmetric unit two D4 subunits bind simultaneously to complementary strands of the DNA double helix. Each D4 subunit interacts mainly with the central region of one strand. DNA binds to the opposite side of the A20-binding surface on D4. In comparison of the present structure with the structure of uracil-containing DNA-bound human uracil-DNA glycosylase suggests that for DNA binding and uracil removal D4 employs a unique set of residues and motifs that are highly conserved within the poxvirus family but different in other organisms. Conclusion: The first structure of D4 bound to a truly non-specific undamaged double-stranded DNA suggests that initial binding of DNA may involve multiple non-specific interactions between the protein and the phosphate backbone.« less

  7. Glycosylases utilize ``stop and go'' motion to locate DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Shane

    2015-03-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA results in alterations that are mutagenic or even cytotoxic. Base excision repair is a mechanism that functions to identify and correct these lesions, and is present in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. DNA glycosylases are the first enzymes in this pathway and function to locate and remove oxidatively damaged bases, and do so utilizing only thermal energy. However, the question remains of how these enzymes locate and recognize a damaged base among millions of undamaged bases. Utilizing fluorescence video microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution, we have observed a number of different fluorescently labeled glycosylases (including bacterial FPG, NEI, and NTH as well as mammalian MutyH and OGG). These enzymes diffuse along DNA tightropes at approximately 0.01 +/- 0.005 μm2/s with binding lifetimes ranging from one second to several minutes. Chemically induced damage to the DNA substrate causes a ~ 50% reduction in diffusion coefficients and a ~ 400% increase in binding lifetimes, while mutation of the key ``wedge residue'' - which has been shown to be responsible for damage detection - results in a 200% increase in the diffusion coefficient. Utilizing a sliding window approach to measure diffusion coefficients within individual trajectories, we observe that distributions of diffusion coefficients are bimodal, consistent with periods of diffusive motion interspersed with immobile periods. Utilizing a unique chemo-mechanical simulation approach, we demonstrate that the motion of these glycosylases can be explained as free diffusion along the helical pitch of the DNA, punctuated with two different types of pauses: 1) rapid, short-lived pauses as the enzyme rapidly probes DNA bases to interrogate for damage and, 2) less frequent, longer lived pauses that reflect the enzyme bound to and catalytically removing a damaged base. These simulations also indicate that the wedge residue is critical for interrogation and recognition of

  8. 5-methylcytosine in RNA: detection, enzymatic formation and biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Motorin, Yuri; Lyko, Frank; Helm, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The nucleobase modification 5-methylcytosine (m5C) is widespread both in DNA and different cellular RNAs. The functions and enzymatic mechanisms of DNA m5C-methylation were extensively studied during the last decades. However, the location, the mechanism of formation and the cellular function(s) of the same modified nucleobase in RNA still remain to be elucidated. The recent development of a bisulfite sequencing approach for efficient m5C localization in various RNA molecules puts ribo-m5C in a highly privileged position as one of the few RNA modifications whose detection is amenable to PCR-based amplification and sequencing methods. Additional progress in the field also includes the characterization of several specific RNA methyltransferase enzymes in various organisms, and the discovery of a new and unexpected link between DNA and RNA m5C-methylation. Numerous putative RNA:m5C-MTases have now been identified and are awaiting characterization, including the identification of their RNA substrates and their related cellular functions. In order to bring these recent exciting developments into perspective, this review provides an ordered overview of the detection methods for RNA methylation, of the biochemistry, enzymology and molecular biology of the corresponding modification enzymes, and discusses perspectives for the emerging biological functions of these enzymes. PMID:20007150

  9. Functional Characterization of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Isabela Cecília; de Moura, Michelle Barbi; Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Franco, Glória Regina; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho; Teixeira, Santuza Maria Ribeiro; Van Houten, Bennett; Machado, Carlos Renato

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative lesion 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is removed during base excision repair by the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (Ogg1). This lesion can erroneously pair with adenine, and the excision of this damaged base by Ogg1 enables the insertion of a guanine and prevents DNA mutation. In this report, we identified and characterized Ogg1 from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (TcOgg1), the causative agent of Chagas disease. Like most living organisms, T. cruzi is susceptible to oxidative stress, hence DNA repair is essential for its survival and improvement of infection. We verified that the TcOGG1 gene encodes an 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase by complementing an Ogg1-defective Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. Heterologous expression of TcOGG1 reestablished the mutation frequency of the yeast mutant ogg1−/− (CD138) to wild type levels. We also demonstrate that the overexpression of TcOGG1 increases T. cruzi sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Analysis of DNA lesions using quantitative PCR suggests that the increased susceptibility to H2O2 of TcOGG1-overexpressor could be a consequence of uncoupled BER in abasic sites and/or strand breaks generated after TcOgg1 removes 8-oxoG, which are not rapidly repaired by the subsequent BER enzymes. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that TcOGG1-overexpressors have reduced levels of 8-oxoG both in the nucleus and in the parasite mitochondrion. The localization of TcOgg1 was examined in parasite transfected with a TcOgg1-GFP fusion, which confirmed that this enzyme is in both organelles. Taken together, our data indicate that T. cruzi has a functional Ogg1 ortholog that participates in nuclear and mitochondrial BER. PMID:22876325

  10. DNA-N-glycosylases process novel O-glycosidic sites in DNA.

    PubMed

    Admiraal, Suzanne J; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2013-06-11

    After the hydrolysis of the N-glycosyl bond between a damaged base and C1' of a deoxyribosyl moiety of DNA, human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) and Escherichia coli 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II (AlkA) bind tightly to their abasic DNA products, potentially protecting these reactive species. Here we show that both AAG and AlkA catalyze reactions between bound abasic DNA and small, primary alcohols to form novel DNA-O-glycosides. The synthesis reactions are reversible, as the DNA-O-glycosides are converted back into abasic DNA upon being incubated with AAG or AlkA in the absence of alcohol. AAG and AlkA are therefore able to hydrolyze O-glycosidic bonds in addition to N-glycosyl bonds. The newly discovered DNA-O-glycosidase activities of both enzymes compare favorably with their known DNA-N-glycosylase activities: AAG removes both methanol and 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (εA) from DNA with single-turnover rate constants that are 2.9 × 10(5)-fold greater than the corresponding uncatalyzed rates, whereas the rate enhancement of 3.7 × 10(7) for removal of methanol from DNA by AlkA is 300-fold greater than its rate enhancement for removal of εA from DNA. Although the biological significance of the DNA-O-glycosidase reactions is not known, the evolution of new DNA repair pathways may be aided by enzymes that practice catalytic promiscuity, such as these two unrelated DNA glycosylases. PMID:23688261

  11. The role of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ba, Xueqing; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Rashid, Qura Tul Ain Nmi; Bacsi, Attila; Radak, Zsolt; Sur, Sanjiv; Hosoki, Koa; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Boldogh, Istvan

    2014-01-01

    Many, if not all, environmental pollutants/chemicals and infectious agents increase intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the site of exposure. ROS not only function as intracellular signaling entities, but also induce damage to cellular molecules including DNA. Among the several dozen ROS-induced DNA base lesions generated in the genome, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) is one of the most abundant because of guanine's lowest redox potential among DNA bases. In mammalian cells, 8-oxoG is repaired by the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1)-initiated DNA base excision repair pathway (OGG1-BER). Accumulation of 8-oxoG in DNA has traditionally been associated with mutagenesis, as well as various human diseases and aging processes, while the free 8-oxoG base in body fluids is one of the best biomarkers of ongoing pathophysiological processes. In this review, we discuss the biological significance of the 8-oxoG base and particularly the role of OGG1-BER in the activation of small GTPases and changes in gene expression, including those that regulate pro-inflammatory chemokines/cytokines and cause inflammation. PMID:25250913

  12. Immunological lesions in human uracil DNA glycosylase: association with Bloom syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Seal, G; Brech, K; Karp, S J; Cool, B L; Sirover, M A

    1988-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies that react with uracil DNA glycosylase of normal human placenta were tested to determine whether one of the antibodies could be used as a negative marker for Bloom syndrome. As defined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, monoclonal antibody 40.10.09, which reacts with normal human glycosylase, neither recognized nor inhibited native uracil DNA glycosylase from any of five separate Bloom syndrome cell strains. Immunoblot analyses demonstrated that the denatured glycosylase protein from all five Bloom syndrome cell strains was immunoreactive with the 40.10.09 antibody. Further, each native enzyme was immunoreactive with two other anti-human placental uracil DNA glycosylase monoclonal antibodies. In contrast, ELISA reactivity was observed with all three monoclonal antibodies in reactions of glycosylases from 5 normal human cell types and 13 abnormal human cell strains. These results experimentally verify the specificity of the aberrant reactivity of the Bloom syndrome uracil DNA glycosylase. The possibility arises that determination of the lack of immunoreactivity with antibody 40.10.09 may have value in the early diagnosis of Bloom syndrome. Images PMID:3353381

  13. Effects of Tet-induced oxidation products of 5-methylcytosine on Dnmt1- and DNMT3a-mediated cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Debin; Lin, Krystal; Song, Jikui; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-07-01

    We investigated systematically the effects of Tet-induced oxidation products of 5-methylcytosine on Dnmt1- and DNMT3a-mediated cytosine methylation in synthetic duplex DNA. We found that the replacement of 5-methylcytosine at a CpG site with a 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine, 5-carboxylcytosine or 5-hydroxymethyluracil resulted in altered methylation of cytosine at both the opposite and the neighboring CpG sites. Our results provided important new knowledge about the implications of the 5-methylcytosine oxidation products in maintenance cytosine methylation. PMID:24789765

  14. Lesion search and recognition by thymine DNA glycosylase revealed by single molecule imaging.

    PubMed

    Buechner, Claudia N; Maiti, Atanu; Drohat, Alexander C; Tessmer, Ingrid

    2015-03-11

    The ability of DNA glycosylases to rapidly and efficiently detect lesions among a vast excess of nondamaged DNA bases is vitally important in base excision repair (BER). Here, we use single molecule imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) supported by a 2-aminopurine fluorescence base flipping assay to study damage search by human thymine DNA glycosylase (hTDG), which initiates BER of mutagenic and cytotoxic G:T and G:U mispairs in DNA. Our data reveal an equilibrium between two conformational states of hTDG-DNA complexes, assigned as search complex (SC) and interrogation complex (IC), both at target lesions and undamaged DNA sites. Notably, for both hTDG and a second glycosylase, hOGG1, which recognizes structurally different 8-oxoguanine lesions, the conformation of the DNA in the SC mirrors innate structural properties of their respective target sites. In the IC, the DNA is sharply bent, as seen in crystal structures of hTDG lesion recognition complexes, which likely supports the base flipping required for lesion identification. Our results support a potentially general concept of sculpting of glycosylases to their targets, allowing them to exploit the energetic cost of DNA bending for initial lesion sensing, coupled with continuous (extrahelical) base interrogation during lesion search by DNA glycosylases. PMID:25712093

  15. DNA CpG Methylation (5-Methylcytosine) and Its Derivative (5-Hydroxymethylcytosine) Alter Histone Posttranslational Modifications at the Pomc Promoter, Affecting the Impact of Perinatal Diet on Leanness and Obesity of the Offspring.

    PubMed

    Marco, Asaf; Kisliouk, Tatiana; Tabachnik, Tzlil; Weller, Aron; Meiri, Noam

    2016-08-01

    A maternal high-fat diet (HFD) alters the offspring's feeding regulation, leading to obesity. This phenomenon is partially mediated by aberrant expression of the hypothalamic anorexigenic neuropeptide proopiomelanocortin (POMC). Nevertheless, although some individual offspring suffer from morbid obesity, others escape the malprogramming. It is suggested that this difference is due to epigenetic programming. In this study, we report that in lean offspring of non-HFD-fed dams, essential promoter regions for Pomc expression were enriched with 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) together with a reduction in the level of 5-methylcytosine (5mC). Moreover, 5hmC was negatively correlated whereas 5mC was positively correlated with body weight in offspring from both HFD- and control-fed dams. We further found that Pomc expression in obese offspring is determined by a two-step epigenetic inhibitory mechanism in which CpG methylation is linked with histone posttranslational modifications. An increase in CpG methylation at the Poxmc promoter enables binding of methyl-binding domain 1 (MBD1) to 5mC, but not to its derivative 5hmC. MBD1 then interacts with SET domain bifurcated 1 methyltransferase to promote bimethylation on the histone 3 lysine 9 residue, reducing Pomc mRNA expression. These results suggest an epigenetic regulatory mechanism that affects obesity-prone or resilient traits. PMID:27217481

  16. Two DNA glycosylases in Esherichia coli which release primarily 3-methyladenine

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, L.; Yang, C.; Goldthwait, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Two enzymes have been partially purified from Escherichia coli and designated 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases I and II. The apparent molecular weight of glycosylase I is 20,000, and that of II is 27,000. Glycosylase I releases 3-methyladenine (3-MeA) while II releases 3-MeA, 3-methylguanine (3-MeG), 7-methylguanine (7-MeG), and 7-methyladenine (7-MeA). The rate of release of 3-MeA by glycosylase II is 30 times that of 7-MeG. Glycosylase I is missing in mutants tag 1 and tag 2. In crude extracts, the 3-MeA activity of II is approximately 10% of the total 3-MeA activity. A 50% inactivation at 48/sup 0/C required 5 min for I and 65 min for II. The 3-MeA and 7-MeG activities of the glycosylase II preparation could not be separated by isoelectric focusing, by chromatography of DEAE, Sephadex G-100, phosphocellulose, DNA-cellulose, or carboxymethylcellulose, or by heating at 50/sup 0/C.

  17. Cloning a Eukaryotic DNA Glycosylase Repair Gene by the Suppression of a DNA Repair Defect in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin; Derfler, Bruce; Maskati, Azmat; Samson, Leona

    1989-10-01

    If eukaryotic genes could protect bacteria with defects in DNA repair, this effect could be exploited for the isolation of eukaryotic DNA repair genes. We have thus cloned a DNA repair gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that directs the synthesis of a DNA glycosylase that specifically releases 3-methyladenine from alkylated DNA and in so doing protects alkylation-sensitive Escherichia coli from killing by methylating agents. The cloned yeast gene was then used to generate a mutant strain of S. cerevisiae that carries a defect in the glycosylase gene and is extremely sensitive to DNA methylation. This approach may allow the isolation of a large number of eukaryotic DNA repair genes.

  18. Structural and mutation studies of two DNA demethylation related glycosylases: MBD4 and TDG

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Hideharu

    2014-01-01

    Two mammalian DNA glycosylases, methyl-CpG binding domain protein 4 (MBD4) and thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG), are involved in active DNA demethylation via the base excision repair pathway. Both MBD4 and TDG excise the mismatch base from G:X, where X is uracil, thymine, and 5-hydroxymethyluracil (5hmU). In addition, TDG excises 5mC oxidized bases i.e. when X is 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) not 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). A MBD4 inactive mutant and substrate crystal structure clearly explains how MBD4 glycosylase discriminates substrates: 5mC are not able to be directly excised, but a deamination process from 5mC to thymine is required. On the other hand, TDG is much more complicated; in this instance, crystal structures show that TDG recognizes G:X mismatch DNA containing DNA and G:5caC containing DNA from the minor groove of DNA, which suggested that TDG might recognize 5mC oxidized product 5caC like mismatch DNA. In mutation studies, a N157D mutation results in a more 5caC specific glycosylase, and a N191A mutation inhibits 5caC activity while that when X=5fC or T remains. Here I revisit the recent MBD4 glycos ylase domain co-crystal structures with DNA, as well as TDG glycosylase domain co-crystal structures with DNA in conjunction with its mutation studies.

  19. Structural Investigation of a Viral Ortholog of Human NEIL2/3 DNA Glycosylases

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Aishwarya; Eckenroth, Brian E.; Averill, April M.; Imamura, Kayo; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Assault to DNA that leads to oxidative base damage is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway with specialized enzymes called DNA glycosylases catalyzing the first step of this pathway. These glycosylases can be categorized into two families: the HhH superfamily, which includes endonuclease III (or Nth), and the Fpg/Nei family, which comprises formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (or Fpg) and endonuclease VIII (or Nei). In humans there are three Nei-like (NEIL) glycosylases: NEIL1, 2, and 3. Here we present the first crystal structure of a viral ortholog of the human NEIL2/NEIL3 proteins, Mimivirus Nei2 (MvNei2), determined at 2.04 Å resolution. The C-terminal region of the MvNei2 enzyme comprises two conserved DNA binding motifs: the helix-two-turns-helix (H2TH) motif and a C-H-C-C type zinc-finger similar to that of human NEIL2. The N-terminal region of MvNei2 is most closely related to NEIL3. Like NEIL3, MvNei2 bears a valine at position 2 instead of the usual proline and it lacks two of the three conserved void-filling residues present in other members of the Fpg/Nei family. Mutational analysis of the only conserved void-filling residue methionine 72 to alanine yields an MvNei2 variant with impaired glycosylase activity. Mutation of the adjacent His73 causes the enzyme to be more productive thereby suggesting a plausible role for this residue in the DNA lesion search process. PMID:24120312

  20. Mutations at Arginine 276 transform human uracil-DNA glycosylase into a single-stranded DNA-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Yao; Mosbaugh, Dale W.; Bennett, Samuel E.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the role of Arginine 276 in the conserved leucine-loop of human uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG), the effects of six R276 amino acid substitutions (C, E, H, L, W, and Y) on nucleotide flipping and enzyme conformational change were determined using transient and steady state, fluorescence-based, kinetic analysis. Relative to UNG, the mutant proteins exhibited a 2.6- to 7.7-fold reduction in affinity for a doubled-stranded oligonucleotide containing a pseudouracil residue opposite 2-aminopurine, as judged by steady-state DNA binding-base flipping assays. An anisotropy binding assay was utilized to determine the Kd of UNG and the R276 mutants for carboxyfluorescein-labeled uracil-containing single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides; the binding affinities varied 11-fold for single-stranded uracil-DNA, and 43-fold for double-stranded uracil-DNA. Productive uracil-DNA binding was monitored by rapid quenching of UNG intrinsic protein fluorescence. Relative to UNG, the rate of intrinsic fluorescence quenching of five mutant proteins for binding double-stranded uracil-DNA was reduced approximately 50%; the R276E mutant exhibited 1% of the rate of fluorescence quenching of UNG. When reacted with single-stranded uracil-DNA, the rate of UNG fluorescence quenching increased. Moreover, the rate of fluorescence quenching for all the mutant proteins, except R276E, was slightly faster than UNG. The kcat of the R276 mutants was comparable to UNG on single-stranded DNA and differentially affected by NaCl; however, kcat on double-stranded DNA substrate was reduced 4–12-fold and decreased sharply at NaCl concentrations as low as 20 mM. Taken together, these results indicate that the effects of mutations at Arg276 were largely limited to enzyme interactions with double-stranded uracil-containing DNA, and suggested that mutations at Arg276 effectively transformed UNG into a single-stranded DNA-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase. PMID:15970468

  1. Analysis of nuclear uracil-DNA glycosylase (nUDG) turnover during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jennifer A; Caradonna, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Uracil-DNA glycosylases (UDG/UNG) are enzymes that remove uracil from DNA and initiate base-excision repair. These enzymes play a key role in maintaining genomic integrity by reducing the mutagenic events caused by G:C to A:T transition mutations. The recent finding that a family of RNA editing enzymes (AID/APOBECs) can deaminate cytosine in DNA has raised the interest in these base-excision repair enzymes. The methodology presented here focuses on determining the regulation of the nuclear isoform of uracil-DNA glycosylase (nUDG), a 36,000 Da protein. In synchronized HeLa cells, nUDG protein levels decrease to barely detectable levels during the S phase of the cell cycle. Immunoblot analysis of immunoprecipitated or affinity-isolated nUDG reveals ubiquitin-conjugated nUDG when proteolysis is inhibited by agents that block proteasomal-dependent protein degradation. PMID:21755446

  2. Atomic substitution reveals the structural basis for substrate adenine recognition and removal by adenine DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seongmin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2010-01-14

    Adenine DNA glycosylase catalyzes the glycolytic removal of adenine from the promutagenic A {center_dot} oxoG base pair in DNA. The general features of DNA recognition by an adenine DNA glycosylase, Bacillus stearothermophilus MutY, have previously been revealed via the X-ray structure of a catalytically inactive mutant protein bound to an A:oxoG-containing DNA duplex. Although the structure revealed the substrate adenine to be, as expected, extruded from the DNA helix and inserted into an extrahelical active site pocket on the enzyme, the substrate adenine engaged in no direct contacts with active site residues. This feature was paradoxical, because other glycosylases have been observed to engage their substrates primarily through direct contacts. The lack of direct contacts in the case of MutY suggested that either MutY uses a distinctive logic for substrate recognition or that the X-ray structure had captured a noncatalytically competent state in lesion recognition. To gain further insight into this issue, we crystallized wild-type MutY bound to DNA containing a catalytically inactive analog of 2'-deoxyadenosine in which a single 2'-H atom was replaced by fluorine. The structure of this fluorinated lesion-recognition complex (FLRC) reveals the substrate adenine buried more deeply into the active site pocket than in the prior structure and now engaged in multiple direct hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. This structure appears to capture the catalytically competent state of adenine DNA glycosylases, and it suggests a catalytic mechanism for this class of enzymes, one in which general acid-catalyzed protonation of the nucleobase promotes glycosidic bond cleavage.

  3. Hydroquinone Increases 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine Formation through Ten Eleven Translocation 1 (TET1) 5-Methylcytosine Dioxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Coulter, Jonathan B.; O'Driscoll, Cliona M.; Bressler, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation regulates gene expression throughout development and in a wide range of pathologies such as cancer and neurological disorders. Pathways controlling the dynamic levels and targets of methylation are known to be disrupted by chemicals and are therefore of great interest in both prevention and clinical contexts. Benzene and its metabolite hydroquinone have been shown to lead to decreased levels of DNA methylation, although the mechanism is not known. This study employs a cell culture model to investigate the mechanism of hydroquinone-mediated changes in DNA methylation. Exposures that do not affect HEK293 cell viability led to genomic and methylated reporter DNA demethylation. Hydroquinone caused reactivation of a methylated reporter plasmid that was prevented by the addition of N-acetylcysteine. Hydroquinone also caused an increase in Ten Eleven Translocation 1 activity and global levels of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine was found enriched at LINE-1 prior to a decrease in both 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and 5-methylcytosine. Ten Eleven Translocation-1 knockdown decreased 5-hydroxymethylcytosine formation following hydroquinone exposure as well as the induction of glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit and 14-3-3σ. Finally, Ten Eleven Translocation 1 knockdown decreased the percentage of cells accumulating in G2+M following hydroquinone exposure, indicating that it may have a role in cell cycle changes in response to toxicants. This work demonstrates that hydroquinone exposure leads to active and functional DNA demethylation in HEK293 cells in a mechanism involving reactive oxygen species and Ten Eleven Translocation 1 5-methylcytosine dioxygenase. PMID:23940045

  4. A poxvirus-encoded uracil DNA glycosylase is essential for virus viability.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, D T; Upton, C; Higman, M A; Niles, E G; McFadden, G

    1993-01-01

    Infection of cultured mammalian cells with the Leporipoxvirus Shope fibroma virus (SFV) causes the induction of a novel uracil DNA glycosylase activity in the cytoplasms of the infected cells. The induction of this activity, early in infection, correlates with the early expression of the SFV BamHI D6R open reading frame which possesses significant protein sequence similarity to eukaryotic and prokaryotic uracil DNA glycosylases. The SFV BamHI D6R open reading frame and the homologous HindIII D4R open reading frame from the Orthopoxvirus vaccinia virus were cloned under the regulation of a phage T7 promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli as insoluble high-molecular-weight aggregates. During electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, the E. coli-expressed proteins migrate with an apparent molecular mass of 25 kDa. The insoluble protein aggregate generated by expression in E. coli was solubilized in urea and, following a subsequent refolding step, displayed the ability to excise uracil residues from double-stranded plasmid DNA substrates, with the subsequent formation of apyrimidinic sites. The viral enzyme, like all other characterized uracil DNA glycosylases, is active in the presence of high concentrations of EDTA, is substrate inhibited by uracil, and does not display any endonuclease activity. Attempts to inactivate the HindIII D4R gene of vaccinia virus by targeted insertion of a dominant xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase selection marker or direct insertion of a frame-shifted oligonucleotide were uniformly unsuccessful demonstrating that, unlike the uracil DNA glycosylase described for herpesviruses, the poxvirus enzyme is essential for virus viability. Images PMID:8474156

  5. A model for 3-methyladenine recognition by 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase I (TAG) from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Yan, Xuan; Carter, Lester G.; Liu, Huanting; Graham, Shirley; Coote, Peter J.; Naismith, James

    2012-01-01

    The removal of chemically damaged DNA bases such as 3-methyladenine (3-­MeA) is an essential process in all living organisms and is catalyzed by the enzyme 3-MeA DNA glycosylase I. A key question is how the enzyme selectively recognizes the alkylated 3-MeA over the much more abundant adenine. The crystal structures of native and Y16F-mutant 3-MeA DNA glycosylase I from Staphylococcus aureus in complex with 3-MeA are reported to 1.8 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. Isothermal titration calorimetry shows that protonation of 3-MeA decreases its binding affinity, confirming previous fluorescence studies that show that charge–charge recognition is not critical for the selection of 3-MeA over adenine. It is hypothesized that the hydrogen-bonding pattern of Glu38 and Tyr16 of 3-MeA DNA glycosylase I with a particular tautomer unique to 3-MeA contributes to recognition and selection. PMID:22684054

  6. Crystal Structure of the Vaccinia Virus Uracil-DNA Glycosylase in Complex with DNA.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, Wim P; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Fender, Pascal; Contesto-Richefeu, Céline; Peyrefitte, Christophe N; Iseni, Frédéric

    2015-07-17

    Vaccinia virus polymerase holoenzyme is composed of the DNA polymerase catalytic subunit E9 associated with its heterodimeric co-factor A20·D4 required for processive genome synthesis. Although A20 has no known enzymatic activity, D4 is an active uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG). The presence of a repair enzyme as a component of the viral replication machinery suggests that, for poxviruses, DNA synthesis and base excision repair is coupled. We present the 2.7 Å crystal structure of the complex formed by D4 and the first 50 amino acids of A20 (D4·A201-50) bound to a 10-mer DNA duplex containing an abasic site resulting from the cleavage of a uracil base. Comparison of the viral complex with its human counterpart revealed major divergences in the contacts between protein and DNA and in the enzyme orientation on the DNA. However, the conformation of the dsDNA within both structures is very similar, suggesting a dominant role of the DNA conformation for UNG function. In contrast to human UNG, D4 appears rigid, and we do not observe a conformational change upon DNA binding. We also studied the interaction of D4·A201-50 with different DNA oligomers by surface plasmon resonance. D4 binds weakly to nonspecific DNA and to uracil-containing substrates but binds abasic sites with a Kd of <1.4 μm. This second DNA complex structure of a family I UNG gives new insight into the role of D4 as a co-factor of vaccinia virus DNA polymerase and allows a better understanding of the structural determinants required for UNG action. PMID:26045555

  7. Role of a MutY DNA Glycosylase in Combating Oxidative DNA damage in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Eutsey, Rory; Wang, Ge; Maier, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    MutY is an adenine glycosylase that has the ability to efficiently remove adenines from adenine/7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) or adenine/guanine mismatches, and plays an important role in oxidative DNA damage repair. The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has a homolog of the MutY enzyme. To investigate the physiological roles of MutY in H. pylori, we constructed and characterized a mutY mutant. H. pylori mutY mutants incubated at 5% O2 have a 325 fold higher spontaneous mutation rate than its parent. The mutation rate is further increased by exposing the mutant to atmospheric levels of oxygen, an effect that is not seen in an E. coli mutY mutant. Most of the mutations that occurred in H. pylori mutY mutants, as examined by rpoB sequence changes that confer rifampicin resistance, are GC to TA transversions. The H. pylori enzyme has the ability to complement an E. coli mutY mutant, restoring its mutation frequency to the wild-type level. Pure H. pylori MutY has the ability to remove adenines from A/8-oxo-G mismatches, but strikingly no ability to cleave A/G mismatches. This is surprising because E. coli MutY can more rapidly turnover A/G than A/8-oxo-G. Thus, H. pylori MutY is an adenine glycosylase involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage with a specificity for detecting 8-oxo-G. In addition, H. pylori mutY mutants are only 30% as efficient as wild-type in colonizing the stomach of mice, indicating that H. pylori MutY plays a significant role in oxidative DNA damage repair in vivo. PMID:16996809

  8. Expression and the Peculiar Enzymatic Behavior of the Trypanosoma cruzi NTH1 DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Ormeño, Fernando; Barrientos, Camila; Ramirez, Santiago; Ponce, Iván; Valenzuela, Lucía; Sepúlveda, Sofía; Bitar, Mainá; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Machado, Carlos Renato; Cabrera, Gonzalo; Galanti, Norbel

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, presents three cellular forms (trypomastigotes, epimastigotes and amastigotes), all of which are submitted to oxidative species in its hosts. However, T. cruzi is able to resist oxidative stress suggesting a high efficiency of its DNA repair machinery.The Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway is one of the main DNA repair mechanisms in other eukaryotes and in T. cruzi as well. DNA glycosylases are enzymes involved in the recognition of oxidative DNA damage and in the removal of oxidized bases, constituting the first step of the BER pathway. Here, we describe the presence and activity of TcNTH1, a nuclear T. cruzi DNA glycosylase. Surprisingly, purified recombinant TcNTH1 does not remove the thymine glycol base, but catalyzes the cleavage of a probe showing an AP site. The same activity was found in epimastigote and trypomastigote homogenates suggesting that the BER pathway is not involved in thymine glycol DNA repair. TcNTH1 DNA-binding properties assayed in silico are in agreement with the absence of a thymine glycol removing function of that parasite enzyme. Over expression of TcNTH1 decrease parasite viability when transfected epimastigotes are submitted to a sustained production of H2O2.Therefore, TcNTH1 is the only known NTH1 orthologous unable to eliminate thymine glycol derivatives but that recognizes and cuts an AP site, most probably by a beta-elimination mechanism. We cannot discard that TcNTH1 presents DNA glycosylase activity on other DNA base lesions. Accordingly, a different DNA repair mechanism should be expected leading to eliminate thymine glycol from oxidized parasite DNA. Furthermore, TcNTH1 may play a role in the AP site recognition and processing. PMID:27284968

  9. 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 driven DNA base excision repair: role in asthma pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Xueqing; Aguilera Aguirre, Leopoldo; Sur, Sanjiv; Boldogh, Istvan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide both an overview and evidence of the potential etiology of oxidative DNA base damage and repair-signaling in chronic inflammation and histological changes associated with asthma. Recent findings Asthma is initiated/maintained by immunological, genetic/epigenetic and environmental factors. It is a world-wide health problem, as current therapies suppress symptoms rather than prevent/reverse the disease, largely due to gaps in understanding its molecular mechanisms. Inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage are inseparable phenomena, but their molecular roles in asthma pathogenesis are unclear. It was found that among oxidatively modified DNA bases, 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is one of the most abundant, and its levels in DNA and body fluids are considered a biomarker of ongoing asthmatic processes. Free 8-oxoG forms a complex with 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) and activates RAS-family GTPases that induce gene expression to mobilize innate and adaptive immune systems, along with genes regulating airway hyperplasia, hyper-responsiveness and lung remodeling in atopic and non-atopic asthma. Summary DNA’s integrity must be maintained to prevent mutation, so its continuous repair and downstream signaling “fuels” chronic inflammatory processes in asthma, and forms the basic mechanism whose elucidation will allow the development of new drug targets for the prevention/reversal of lung diseases. PMID:25486379

  10. A unique uracil-DNA binding protein of the uracil DNA glycosylase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Pau Biak; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan; Patil, Aravind Goud; Woo, Eui-Jeon; Varshney, Umesh

    2015-01-01

    Uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs) are an important group of DNA repair enzymes, which pioneer the base excision repair pathway by recognizing and excising uracil from DNA. Based on two short conserved sequences (motifs A and B), UDGs have been classified into six families. Here we report a novel UDG, UdgX, from Mycobacterium smegmatis and other organisms. UdgX specifically recognizes uracil in DNA, forms a tight complex stable to sodium dodecyl sulphate, 2-mercaptoethanol, urea and heat treatment, and shows no detectable uracil excision. UdgX shares highest homology to family 4 UDGs possessing Fe-S cluster. UdgX possesses a conserved sequence, KRRIH, which forms a flexible loop playing an important role in its activity. Mutations of H in the KRRIH sequence to S, G, A or Q lead to gain of uracil excision activity in MsmUdgX, establishing it as a novel member of the UDG superfamily. Our observations suggest that UdgX marks the uracil-DNA for its repair by a RecA dependent process. Finally, we observed that the tight binding activity of UdgX is useful in detecting uracils in the genomes. PMID:26304551

  11. MUTYH DNA glycosylase: the rationale for removing undamaged bases from the DNA

    PubMed Central

    Markkanen, Enni; Dorn, Julia; Hübscher, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of genetic stability is crucial for all organisms in order to avoid the onset of deleterious diseases such as cancer. One of the many proveniences of DNA base damage in mammalian cells is oxidative stress, arising from a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources, generating highly mutagenic oxidative DNA lesions. One of the best characterized oxidative DNA lesion is 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G), which can give rise to base substitution mutations (also known as point mutations). This mutagenicity is due to the miscoding potential of 8-oxo-G that instructs most DNA polymerases (pols) to preferentially insert an Adenine (A) opposite 8-oxo-G instead of the appropriate Cytosine (C). If left unrepaired, such A:8-oxo-G mispairs can give rise to CG→AT transversion mutations. A:8-oxo-G mispairs are proficiently recognized by the MutY glycosylase homologue (MUTYH). MUTYH can remove the mispaired A from an A:8-oxo-G, giving way to the canonical base-excision repair (BER) that ultimately restores undamaged Guanine (G). The importance of this MUTYH-initiated pathway is illustrated by the fact that biallelic mutations in the MUTYH gene are associated with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome termed MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP). In this review, we will focus on MUTYH, from its discovery to the most recent data regarding its cellular roles and interaction partners. We discuss the involvement of the MUTYH protein in the A:8-oxo-G BER pathway acting together with pol λ, the pol that can faithfully incorporate C opposite 8-oxo-G and thus bypass this lesion in a correct manner. We also outline the current knowledge about the regulation of MUTYH itself and the A:8-oxo-G repair pathway by posttranslational modifications (PTM). Finally, to achieve a clearer overview of the literature, we will briefly touch on the rather confusing MUTYH nomenclature. In short, MUTYH is a unique DNA glycosylase that catalyzes the excision of an undamaged base from DNA. PMID

  12. A New Family of HEAT-Like Repeat Proteins Lacking a Critical Substrate Recognition Motif Present in Related DNA Glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Elwood A; Shi, Rongxin; Kotsch, Lyle A; Eichman, Brandt F

    2015-01-01

    DNA glycosylases are important repair enzymes that eliminate a diverse array of aberrant nucleobases from the genomes of all organisms. Individual bacterial species often contain multiple paralogs of a particular glycosylase, yet the molecular and functional distinctions between these paralogs are not well understood. The recently discovered HEAT-like repeat (HLR) DNA glycosylases are distributed across all domains of life and are distinct in their specificity for cationic alkylpurines and mechanism of damage recognition. Here, we describe a number of phylogenetically diverse bacterial species with two orthologs of the HLR DNA glycosylase AlkD. One ortholog, which we designate AlkD2, is substantially less conserved. The crystal structure of Streptococcus mutans AlkD2 is remarkably similar to AlkD but lacks the only helix present in AlkD that penetrates the DNA minor groove. We show that AlkD2 possesses only weak DNA binding affinity and lacks alkylpurine excision activity. Mutational analysis of residues along this DNA binding helix in AlkD substantially reduced binding affinity for damaged DNA, for the first time revealing the importance of this structural motif for damage recognition by HLR glycosylases. PMID:25978435

  13. Base excision repair: NMR backbone assignments of Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Wallace, Susan S.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2002-03-01

    Oxidative damage is emerging as one of the most important mechanisms responsible for mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, aging, and various diseases (Farr and Kogma, 1991). One of the potential targets for oxidation is cellular DNA. While exposure to exogenous agents, such as ionizing radiation and chemicals, contributes to damaging DNA, the most important oxidative agents are endogenous, such as the reactive free radicals produced during normal oxidative metabolism (Adelman et., 1988). To mitigate the potentially deleterious effects of oxidative DNA damage virtually all aerobic organisms have developed complex repair mechanisms (Petit and Sancar, 1999). One repair mechanism, base excision repair (BER), appears to be responsible for replacing most oxidative DNA damage (David and Williams, 1998). Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), a 269-residue metalloprotein with a molecular weight of 30.2 kDa, is a key BER enzyme in prokaryotes (Boiteaux et al., 1987). Substrates recognized and released by Fpg include 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), 2,6 diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamido pyrimidine (Fapy-G), the adenine equivalents 8-oxoA and Fapy-A, 5-hydroxycytosine, 5-hydroxyuracil, B ureidoisobutiric acid, and a-R-hydroxy-B-ureidoisobutiric acid (Freidberg et al., 1995). In vitro Fpg bind double-stranded DNA and performs three catalytic activities: (i) DNA glycosylase, (ii) AP lyase, and (iii) deoxyribophosphodiesterase.

  14. Induction of NEIL1 and NEIL2 DNA glycosylases in aniline-induced splenic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Huaxian; Wang Jianling; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.; Hazra, Tapas K.; Boor, Paul J.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2011-02-15

    The mechanisms by which aniline exposure elicits splenotoxic response, especially the tumorigenic response, are not well-understood. Earlier, we have shown that aniline-induced oxidative stress is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage in rat spleen. The base excision repair (BER) pathway is the major mechanism for the repair of oxidative DNA base lesions, and we have shown an up-regulation of 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1), a specific DNA glycosylase involved in the removal of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) adducts, following aniline exposure. Nei-like DNA glycosylases (NEIL1/2) belong to a family of BER proteins that are distinct from other DNA glycosylases, including OGG1. However, contribution of NEIL1/2 in the repair of aniline-induced oxidative DNA damage in the spleen is not known. This study was, therefore, focused on evaluating if NEILs also contribute to the repair of oxidative DNA lesions in the spleen following aniline exposure. To achieve that, male SD rats were subchronically exposed to aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water for 30 days), while controls received drinking water only. The BER activity of NEIL1/2 was assayed using a bubble structure substrate containing 5-OHU (preferred substrates for NEIL1 and NEIL2) and by quantitating the cleavage products. Aniline treatment led to a 1.25-fold increase in the NEIL1/2-associated BER activity in the nuclear extracts of spleen compared to the controls. Real-time PCR analysis for NEIL1 and NEIL2 mRNA expression in the spleen revealed 2.7- and 3.9-fold increases, respectively, in aniline-treated rats compared to controls. Likewise, Western blot analysis showed that protein expression of NEIL1 and NEIL2 in the nuclear extract of spleens from aniline-treated rats was 2.0- and 3.8-fold higher than controls, respectively. Aniline treatment also led to stronger immunoreactivity for NEIL1 and NEIL2 in the spleens, confined to the red pulp areas. These studies, thus, show that aniline

  15. DNA damage processing by human 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase mutants with the occluded active site.

    PubMed

    Lukina, Maria V; Popov, Alexander V; Koval, Vladimir V; Vorobjev, Yuri N; Fedorova, Olga S; Zharkov, Dmitry O

    2013-10-01

    8-Oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (OGG1) removes premutagenic lesion 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) from DNA and then nicks the nascent abasic (apurinic/apyrimidinic) site by β-elimination. Although the structure of OGG1 bound to damaged DNA is known, the dynamic aspects of 8-oxo-G recognition are not well understood. To comprehend the mechanisms of substrate recognition and processing, we have constructed OGG1 mutants with the active site occluded by replacement of Cys-253, which forms a wall of the base-binding pocket, with bulky leucine or isoleucine. The conformational dynamics of OGG1 mutants were characterized by single-turnover kinetics and stopped-flow kinetics with fluorescent detection. Additionally, the conformational mobility of wild type and the mutant OGG1 substrate complex was assessed using molecular dynamics simulations. Although pocket occlusion distorted the active site and greatly decreased the catalytic activity of OGG1, it did not fully prevent processing of 8-oxo-G and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. Both mutants were notably stimulated in the presence of free 8-bromoguanine, indicating that this base can bind to the distorted OGG1 and facilitate β-elimination. The results agree with the concept of enzyme plasticity, suggesting that the active site of OGG1 is flexible enough to compensate partially for distortions caused by mutation. PMID:23955443

  16. Structural Basis for Avoidance of Promutagenic DNA Repair by MutY Adenine DNA Glycosylase*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Lee, Seung-Joo; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2015-01-01

    The highly mutagenic A:oxoG (8-oxoguanine) base pair in DNA most frequently arises by aberrant replication of the primary oxidative lesion C:oxoG. This lesion is particularly insidious because neither of its constituent nucleobases faithfully transmit genetic information from the original C:G base pair. Repair of A:oxoG is initiated by adenine DNA glycosylase, which catalyzes hydrolytic cleavage of the aberrant A nucleobase from the DNA backbone. These enzymes, MutY in bacteria and MUTYH in humans, scrupulously avoid processing of C:oxoG because cleavage of the C residue in C:oxoG would actually promote mutagenic conversion to A:oxoG. Here we analyze the structural basis for rejection of C:oxoG by MutY, using a synthetic crystallography approach to capture the enzyme in the process of inspecting the C:oxoG anti-substrate, with which it ordinarily binds only fleetingly. We find that MutY uses two distinct strategies to avoid presentation of C to the enzyme active site. Firstly, MutY possesses an exo-site that serves as a decoy for C, and secondly, repulsive forces with a key active site residue prevent stable insertion of C into the nucleobase recognition pocket within the enzyme active site. PMID:25995449

  17. Structural Basis for Avoidance of Promutagenic DNA Repair by MutY Adenine DNA Glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Lee, Seung-Joo; Verdine, Gregory L

    2015-07-10

    The highly mutagenic A:oxoG (8-oxoguanine) base pair in DNA most frequently arises by aberrant replication of the primary oxidative lesion C:oxoG. This lesion is particularly insidious because neither of its constituent nucleobases faithfully transmit genetic information from the original C:G base pair. Repair of A:oxoG is initiated by adenine DNA glycosylase, which catalyzes hydrolytic cleavage of the aberrant A nucleobase from the DNA backbone. These enzymes, MutY in bacteria and MUTYH in humans, scrupulously avoid processing of C:oxoG because cleavage of the C residue in C:oxoG would actually promote mutagenic conversion to A:oxoG. Here we analyze the structural basis for rejection of C:oxoG by MutY, using a synthetic crystallography approach to capture the enzyme in the process of inspecting the C:oxoG anti-substrate, with which it ordinarily binds only fleetingly. We find that MutY uses two distinct strategies to avoid presentation of C to the enzyme active site. Firstly, MutY possesses an exo-site that serves as a decoy for C, and secondly, repulsive forces with a key active site residue prevent stable insertion of C into the nucleobase recognition pocket within the enzyme active site. PMID:25995449

  18. Detection and mapping of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine with nanopore MspA.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Andrew H; Derrington, Ian M; Brinkerhoff, Henry; Langford, Kyle W; Nova, Ian C; Samson, Jenny Mae; Bartlett, Joshua J; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Gundlach, Jens H

    2013-11-19

    Precise and efficient mapping of epigenetic markers on DNA may become an important clinical tool for prediction and identification of ailments. Methylated CpG sites are involved in gene expression and are biomarkers for diseases such as cancer. Here, we use the engineered biological protein pore Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A (MspA) to detect and map 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine within single strands of DNA. In this unique single-molecule tool, a phi29 DNA polymerase draws ssDNA through the pore in single-nucleotide steps, and the ion current through the pore is recorded. Comparing current levels generated with DNA containing methylated CpG sites to current levels obtained with unmethylated copies of the DNA reveals the precise location of methylated CpG sites. Hydroxymethylation is distinct from methylation and can also be mapped. With a single read, the detection efficiency in a quasirandom DNA strand is 97.5 ± 0.7% for methylation and 97 ± 0.9% for hydroxymethylation. PMID:24167255

  19. Thermodynamics of the DNA Damage Repair Steps of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A.; Vorobjev, Yuri N.; Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2014-01-01

    Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) is a key enzyme responsible for initiating the base excision repair of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine (oxoG). In this study a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction of hOGG1 with specific and non-specific DNA-substrates is performed based on stopped-flow kinetic data. The standard Gibbs energies, enthalpies and entropies of specific stages of the repair process were determined via kinetic measurements over a temperature range using the van’t Hoff approach. The three steps which are accompanied with changes in the DNA conformations were detected via 2-aminopurine fluorescence in the process of binding and recognition of damaged oxoG base by hOGG1. The thermodynamic analysis has demonstrated that the initial step of the DNA substrates binding is mainly governed by energy due to favorable interactions in the process of formation of the recognition contacts, which results in negative enthalpy change, as well as due to partial desolvation of the surface between the DNA and enzyme, which results in positive entropy change. Discrimination of non-specific G base versus specific oxoG base is occurring in the second step of the oxoG-substrate binding. This step requires energy consumption which is compensated by the positive entropy contribution. The third binding step is the final adjustment of the enzyme/substrate complex to achieve the catalytically competent state which is characterized by large endothermicity compensated by a significant increase of entropy originated from the dehydration of the DNA grooves. PMID:24911585

  20. Listeria monocytogenes DNA Glycosylase AdlP Affects Flagellar Motility, Biofilm Formation, Virulence, and Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Bae, Dongryeoul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is structurally similar to the Bacillus cereus alkyl base DNA glycosylase (AlkD), was identified. This determinant was involved in the transcriptional repression of flagellar motility genes and was named adlP (encoding an AlkD-like protein [AdlP]). Deletion of adlP activated the expression of flagellar motility genes at 37°C and disrupted the temperature-dependent inhibition of L. monocytogenes motility. The adlP null strains demonstrated decreased survival in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells and less virulence in mice. Furthermore, the deletion of adlP significantly decreased biofilm formation and impaired the survival of bacteria under several stress conditions, including the presence of a DNA alkylation compound (methyl methanesulfonate), an oxidative agent (H2O2), and aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our findings strongly suggest that adlP may encode a bifunctional protein that transcriptionally represses the expression of flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. IMPORTANCE We discovered a novel protein that we named AlkD-like protein (AdlP). This protein affected flagellar motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. Our data suggest that AdlP may be a bifunctional protein that represses flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. PMID:27316964

  1. Single Qdot-labeled glycosylase molecules use a wedge amino acid to probe for lesions while scanning along DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Andrew R.; Kad, Neil M.; Nelson, Shane R.; Warshaw, David M.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    Within the base excision repair (BER) pathway, the DNA N-glycosylases are responsible for locating and removing the majority of oxidative base damages. Endonuclease III (Nth), formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease VIII (Nei) are members of two glycosylase families: the helix–hairpin–helix (HhH) superfamily and the Fpg/Nei family. The search mechanisms employed by these two families of glycosylases were examined using a single molecule assay to image quantum dot (Qdot)-labeled glycosylases interacting with YOYO-1 stained λ-DNA molecules suspended between 5 µm silica beads. The HhH and Fpg/Nei families were found to have a similar diffusive search mechanism described as a continuum of motion, in keeping with rotational diffusion along the DNA molecule ranging from slow, sub-diffusive to faster, unrestricted diffusion. The search mechanism for an Fpg variant, F111A, lacking a phenylalanine wedge residue no longer displayed slow, sub-diffusive motion compared to wild type, suggesting that Fpg base interrogation may be accomplished by Phe111 insertion. PMID:21666255

  2. Active destabilization of base pairs by a DNA glycosylase wedge initiates damage recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Bergonzo, Christina; Campbell, Arthur J.; Li, Haoquan; Mechetin, Grigory V.; de los Santos, Carlos; Grollman, Arthur P.; Fedorova, Olga S.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Simmerling, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) excises 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) from DNA but ignores normal guanine. We combined molecular dynamics simulation and stopped-flow kinetics with fluorescence detection to track the events in the recognition of oxoG by Fpg and its mutants with a key phenylalanine residue, which intercalates next to the damaged base, changed to either alanine (F110A) or fluorescent reporter tryptophan (F110W). Guanine was sampled by Fpg, as evident from the F110W stopped-flow traces, but less extensively than oxoG. The wedgeless F110A enzyme could bend DNA but failed to proceed further in oxoG recognition. Modeling of the base eversion with energy decomposition suggested that the wedge destabilizes the intrahelical base primarily through buckling both surrounding base pairs. Replacement of oxoG with abasic (AP) site rescued the activity, and calculations suggested that wedge insertion is not required for AP site destabilization and eversion. Our results suggest that Fpg, and possibly other DNA glycosylases, convert part of the binding energy into active destabilization of their substrates, using the energy differences between normal and damaged bases for fast substrate discrimination. PMID:25520195

  3. Crystal Structure of Human Thymine DNA Glycosylase Bound to DNA Elucidates Sequence-Specific Mismatch Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Morgan, M.T.; Pozharski, E.; Drohat, A.C.

    2009-05-19

    Cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides produces m{sup 5}CpG, an epigenetic modification that is important for transcriptional regulation and genomic stability in vertebrate cells. However, m{sup 5}C deamination yields mutagenic G{center_dot}T mispairs, which are implicated in genetic disease, cancer, and aging. Human thymine DNA glycosylase (hTDG) removes T from G{center_dot}T mispairs, producing an abasic (or AP) site, and follow-on base excision repair proteins restore the G{center_dot}C pair. hTDG is inactive against normal A{center_dot}T pairs, and is most effective for G{center_dot}T mispairs and other damage located in a CpG context. The molecular basis of these important catalytic properties has remained unknown. Here, we report a crystal structure of hTDG (catalytic domain, hTDG{sup cat}) in complex with abasic DNA, at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. Surprisingly, the enzyme crystallized in a 2:1 complex with DNA, one subunit bound at the abasic site, as anticipated, and the other at an undamaged (nonspecific) site. Isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility-shift experiments indicate that hTDG and hTDG{sup cat} can bind abasic DNA with 1:1 or 2:1 stoichiometry. Kinetics experiments show that the 1:1 complex is sufficient for full catalytic (base excision) activity, suggesting that the 2:1 complex, if adopted in vivo, might be important for some other activity of hTDG, perhaps binding interactions with other proteins. Our structure reveals interactions that promote the stringent specificity for guanine versus adenine as the pairing partner of the target base and interactions that likely confer CpG sequence specificity. We find striking differences between hTDG and its prokaryotic ortholog (MUG), despite the relatively high (32%) sequence identity.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) by the tumor suppressor protein p53.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Nathalia Meireles; Hautefeuille, Agnès; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Melendez, Matias Eliseo; Waters, Timothy; Swann, Peter; Hainaut, Pierre; Pinto, Luis Felipe Ribeiro

    2012-12-15

    Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) belongs to the superfamily of uracil DNA glycosylases (UDG) and is the first enzyme in the base-excision repair pathway (BER) that removes thymine from G:T mismatches at CpG sites. This glycosylase activity has also been found to be critical for active demethylation of genes involved in embryonic development. Here we show that wild-type p53 transcriptionally regulates TDG expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and luciferase assays indicate that wild-type p53 binds to a domain of TDG promoter containing two p53 consensus response elements (p53RE) and activates its transcription. Next, we have used a panel of cell lines with different p53 status to demonstrate that TDG mRNA and protein expression levels are induced in a p53-dependent manner under different conditions. This panel includes isogenic breast and colorectal cancer cell lines with wild-type or inactive p53, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines lacking p53 or expressing a temperature-sensitive p53 mutant and normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Induction of TDG mRNA expression is accompanied by accumulation of TDG protein in both nucleus and cytoplasm, with nuclear re-localization occurring upon DNA damage in p53-competent, but not -incompetent, cells. These observations suggest a role for p53 activity in TDG nuclear translocation. Overall, our results show that TDG expression is directly regulated by p53, suggesting that loss of p53 function may affect processes mediated by TDG, thus negatively impacting on genetic and epigenetic stability. PMID:23165212

  5. Transcriptional regulation of thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) by the tumor suppressor protein p53

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Nathalia Meireles; Hautefeuille, Agnès; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Melendez, Matias Eliseo; Waters, Timothy; Swann, Peter; Hainaut, Pierre; Pinto, Luis Felipe Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) belongs to the superfamily of uracil DNA glycosylases (UDG) and is the first enzyme in the base-excision repair pathway (BER) that removes thymine from G:T mismatches at CpG sites. This glycosylase activity has also been found to be critical for active demethylation of genes involved in embryonic development. Here we show that wild-type p53 transcriptionally regulates TDG expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and luciferase assays indicate that wild-type p53 binds to a domain of TDG promoter containing two p53 consensus response elements (p53RE) and activates its transcription. Next, we have used a panel of cell lines with different p53 status to demonstrate that TDG mRNA and protein expression levels are induced in a p53-dependent manner under different conditions. This panel includes isogenic breast and colorectal cancer cell lines with wild-type or inactive p53, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines lacking p53 or expressing a temperature-sensitive p53 mutant and normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Induction of TDG mRNA expression is accompanied by accumulation of TDG protein in both nucleus and cytoplasm, with nuclear re-localization occurring upon DNA damage in p53-competent, but not -incompetent, cells. These observations suggest a role for p53 activity in TDG nuclear translocation. Overall, our results show that TDG expression is directly regulated by p53, suggesting that loss of p53 function may affect processes mediated by TDG, thus negatively impacting on genetic and epigenetic stability. PMID:23165212

  6. Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase of Escherichia coli: cloning and sequencing of the fpg structural gene and overproduction of the protein.

    PubMed Central

    Boiteux, S; O'Connor, T R; Laval, J

    1987-01-01

    An Escherichia coli genomic library composed of large DNA fragments (10-15 kb) was constructed using the plasmid pBR322 as vector. From it 700 clones were individually screened for increased excision of the ring-opened form of N7-methylguanine (2-6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5N-methyl-formamidopyrimidine) or Fapy. One clone overproduced the Fapy-DNA glycosylase activity by a factor of 10-fold as compared with the wild-type strain. The Fapy-DNA glycosylase overproducer character was associated with a 15-kb recombinant plasmid (pFPG10). After subcloning a 1.4-kb fragment which contained the Fapy-DNA glycosylase gene (fpg+) was inserted in the plasmids pUC18 and pUC19 yielding pFPG50 and pFPG60 respectively. The cells harbouring pFPG60 displayed a 50- to 100-fold increase in glycosylase activity and overexpressed a 31-kd protein. From these cells the Fapy-DNA glycosylase was purified to apparent physical homogeneity as evidenced by a single protein band at 31 kd on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. The amino acid composition of the protein and the amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence demonstrate that the cloned fragment contains the structural gene coding for the Fapy-DNA glycosylase. The nucleotide sequence of the fpg gene is composed of 809 base pairs and codes for a protein of 269 amino acids with a calculated mol. wt of 30.2 kd. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3319582

  7. Regulation of DNA glycosylases and their role in limiting disease

    PubMed Central

    SAMPATH, HARINI; MCCULLOUGH, AMANDA K.; LLOYD, R. STEPHEN

    2016-01-01

    This review will present a current understanding of mechanisms for the initiation of base excision repair (BER) of oxidatively-induced DNA damage and the biological consequences of deficiencies in these enzymes in mouse model systems and human populations. PMID:22300253

  8. Coordination of MYH DNA glycosylase and APE1 endonuclease activities via physical interactions.

    PubMed

    Luncsford, Paz J; Manvilla, Brittney A; Patterson, Dimeka N; Malik, Shuja S; Jin, Jin; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Gunther, Randall; Kalvakolanu, Snigdha; Lipinski, Leonora J; Yuan, Weirong; Lu, Wuyuan; Drohat, Alexander C; Lu, A-Lien; Toth, Eric A

    2013-12-01

    MutY homologue (MYH) is a DNA glycosylase which excises adenine paired with the oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG, or G(o)) during base excision repair (BER). Base excision by MYH results in an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site in the DNA where the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone remains intact. A key feature of MYH activity is its physical interaction and coordination with AP endonuclease I (APE1), which subsequently nicks DNA 5' to the AP site. Because AP sites are mutagenic and cytotoxic, they must be processed by APE1 immediately after the action of MYH glycosylase. Our recent reports show that the interdomain connector (IDC) of human MYH (hMYH) maintains interactions with hAPE1 and the human checkpoint clamp Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex. In this study, we used NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments to determine hMYH-binding site on hAPE1. Chemical shift perturbations indicate that the hMYH IDC peptide binds to the DNA-binding site of hAPE1 and an additional site which is distal to the APE1 DNA-binding interface. In these two binding sites, N212 and Q137 of hAPE1 are key mediators of the MYH/APE1 interaction. Intriguingly, despite the fact that hHus1 and hAPE1 both interact with the MYH IDC, hHus1 does not compete with hAPE1 for binding to hMYH. Rather, hHus1 stabilizes the hMYH/hAPE1 complex both in vitro and in cells. This is consistent with a common theme in BER, namely that the assembly of protein-DNA complexes enhances repair by efficiently coordinating multiple enzymatic steps while simultaneously minimizing the release of harmful repair intermediates. PMID:24209961

  9. Coordination of MYH DNA glycosylase and APE1 endonuclease activities via physical interactions

    PubMed Central

    Luncsford, Paz J.; Manvilla, Brittney A.; Patterson, Dimeka N.; Malik, Shuja S.; Jin, Jin; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Gunther, Randall; Kalvakolanu, Snigdha; Lipinski, Leonora J.; Yuan, Weirong; Lu, Wuyuan; Drohat, Alexander C.; Lu-Chang, A-Lien; Toth, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    MutY homologue (MYH) is a DNA glycosylase which excises adenine paired with the oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG, or G°) during base excision repair (BER). Base excision by MYH results in an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site in the DNA where the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone remains intact. A key feature of MYH activity is its physical interaction and coordination with AP endonuclease I (APE1), which subsequently nicks DNA 5' to the AP site. Because AP sites are mutagenic and cytotoxic, they must be processed by APE1 immediately after the action of MYH glycosylase. Our recent reports show that the interdomain connector (IDC) of human MYH (hMYH) maintains interactions with hAPE1 and the human checkpoint clamp Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex. In this study, we used NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments to determine hMYH-binding site on hAPE1. Chemical shift perturbations indicate that the hMYH IDC peptide binds to the DNA-binding site of hAPE1 and an additional site which is distal to the APE1 DNA-binding interface. In these two binding sites, N212 and Q137 of hAPE1 are key mediators of the MYH/APE1 interaction. Intriguingly, despite the fact that hHus1 and hAPE1 both interact with the MYH IDC, hHus1 does not compete with hAPE1 for binding to hMYH. Rather, hHus1 stabilizes the hMYH/hAPE1 complex both in vitro and in cells. This is consistent with a common theme in BER, namely that the assembly of protein-DNA complexes enhances repair by efficiently coordinating multiple enzymatic steps while simultaneously minimizing the release of harmful repair intermediates. PMID:24209961

  10. An AP endonuclease functions in active DNA demethylation and gene imprinting in Arabidopsis [corrected].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Córdoba-Cañero, Dolores; Qian, Weiqiang; Zhu, Xiaohong; Tang, Kai; Zhang, Huiming; Ariza, Rafael R; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation in plants occurs through base excision repair, beginning with removal of methylated cytosine by the ROS1/DME subfamily of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases. Active DNA demethylation in animals requires the DNA glycosylase TDG or MBD4, which functions after oxidation or deamination of 5-methylcytosine, respectively. However, little is known about the steps following DNA glycosylase action in the active DNA demethylation pathways in plants and animals. We show here that the Arabidopsis APE1L protein has apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activities and functions downstream of ROS1 and DME. APE1L and ROS1 interact in vitro and co-localize in vivo. Whole genome bisulfite sequencing of ape1l mutant plants revealed widespread alterations in DNA methylation. We show that the ape1l/zdp double mutant displays embryonic lethality. Notably, the ape1l+/-zdp-/- mutant shows a maternal-effect lethality phenotype. APE1L and the DNA phosphatase ZDP are required for FWA and MEA gene imprinting in the endosperm and are important for seed development. Thus, APE1L is a new component of the active DNA demethylation pathway and, together with ZDP, regulates gene imprinting in Arabidopsis. PMID:25569774

  11. Structural Characterization of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase Variants Bearing Active Site Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Radom,C.; Banerjee, A.; Verdine, G.

    2007-01-01

    The human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) protein is responsible for initiating base excision DNA repair of the endogenous mutagen 8-oxoguanine. Like nearly all DNA glycosylases, hOGG1 extrudes its substrate from the DNA helix and inserts it into an extrahelical enzyme active site pocket lined with residues that participate in lesion recognition and catalysis. Structural analysis has been performed on mutant versions of hOGG1 having changes in catalytic residues but not on variants having altered 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (oxoG) contact residues. Here we report high resolution structural analysis of such recognition variants. We found that Ala substitution at residues that contact the phosphate 5 to the lesion (H270A mutation) and its Watson-Crick face (Q315A mutation) simply removed key functionality from the contact interface but otherwise had no effect on structure. Ala substitution at the only residue making an oxoG-specific contact (G42A mutation) introduced torsional stress into the DNA contact surface of hOGG1, but this was overcome by local interactions within the folded protein, indicating that this oxoG recognition motif is 'hardwired'. Introduction of a side chain intended to sterically obstruct the active site pocket (Q315F mutation) led to two different structures, one of which (Q315F{sup *149}) has the oxoG lesion in an exosite flanking the active site and the other of which (Q315F{sup *292}) has the oxoG inserted nearly completely into the lesion recognition pocket. The latter structure offers a view of the latest stage in the base extrusion pathway yet observed, and its lack of catalytic activity demonstrates that the transition state for displacement of the lesion base is geometrically demanding.

  12. Repair of Alkylation Damage in Eukaryotic Chromatin Depends on Searching Ability of Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaru; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2015-11-20

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) initiates the base excision repair pathway by excising alkylated and deaminated purine lesions. In vitro biochemical experiments demonstrate that AAG uses facilitated diffusion to efficiently search DNA to find rare sites of damage and suggest that electrostatic interactions are critical to the searching process. However, it remains an open question whether DNA searching limits the rate of DNA repair in vivo. We constructed AAG mutants with altered searching ability and measured their ability to protect yeast from alkylation damage in order to address this question. Each of the conserved arginine and lysine residues that are near the DNA binding interface were mutated, and the functional impacts were evaluated using kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. These mutations do not perturb catalysis of N-glycosidic bond cleavage, but they decrease the ability to capture rare lesion sites. Nonspecific and specific DNA binding properties are closely correlated, suggesting that the electrostatic interactions observed in the specific recognition complex are similarly important for DNA searching complexes. The ability of the mutant proteins to complement repair-deficient yeast cells is positively correlated with the ability of the proteins to search DNA in vitro, suggesting that cellular resistance to DNA alkylation is governed by the ability to find and efficiently capture cytotoxic lesions. It appears that chromosomal access is not restricted and toxic sites of alkylation damage are readily accessible to a searching protein. PMID:26317160

  13. Kinetics and binding of the thymine-DNA mismatch glycosylase, Mig-Mth, with mismatch-containing DNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Begley, Thomas J; Haas, Brian J; Morales, Juan C; Kool, Eric T; Cunningham, Richard P

    2003-01-01

    We have examined the removal of thymine residues from T-G mismatches in DNA by the thymine-DNA mismatch glycosylase from Methanobacterium thermoautrophicum (Mig-Mth), within the context of the base excision repair (BER) pathway, to investigate why this glycosylase has such low activity in vitro. Using single-turnover kinetics and steady-state kinetics, we calculated the catalytic and product dissociation rate constants for Mig-Mth, and determined that Mig-Mth is inhibited by product apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) provide evidence that the specificity of product binding is dependent upon the base opposite the AP site. The binding of Mig-Mth to DNA containing the non-cleavable substrate analogue difluorotoluene (F) was also analyzed to determine the effect of the opposite base on Mig-Mth binding specificity for substrate-like duplex DNA. The results of these experiments support the idea that opposite strand interactions play roles in determining substrate specificity. Endonuclease IV, which cleaves AP sites in the next step of the BER pathway, was used to analyze the effect of product removal on the overall rate of thymine hydrolysis by Mig-Mth. Our results support the hypothesis that endonuclease IV increases the apparent activity of Mig-Mth significantly under steady-state conditions by preventing reassociation of enzyme to product. PMID:12509271

  14. Thymine DNA Glycosylase Is a Positive Regulator of Wnt Signaling in Colorectal Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuehe; Yu, Tianxin; Shi, Jiandang; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Wen; Lin, Ting; Liu, Zhihong; Wang, Yadong; Zeng, Zheng; Wang, Chi; Li, Mingsong; Liu, Chunming

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays an important role in colorectal cancer (CRC). Although the mechanisms of β-catenin degradation have been well studied, the mechanism by which β-catenin activates transcription is still not fully understood. While screening a panel of DNA demethylases, we found that thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) up-regulated Wnt signaling. TDG interacts with the transcription factor TCF4 and coactivator CREB-binding protein/p300 in the Wnt pathway. Knocking down TDG by shRNAs inhibited the proliferation of CRC cells in vitro and in vivo. In CRC patients, TDG levels were significantly higher in tumor tissues than in the adjacent normal tissues. These results suggest that TDG warrants consideration as a potential biomarker for CRC and as a target for CRC treatment. PMID:24532795

  15. Increased postischemic brain injury in mice deficient in uracil-DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Matthias; Biniszkiewicz, Detlev; Sobol, Robert W.; Harms, Christoph; Ahmadi, Michael; Lipski, Andreas; Katchanov, Juri; Mergenthaler, Philipp; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Wilson, Samuel H.; Meisel, Andreas; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2004-01-01

    Uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG) is involved in base excision repair of aberrant uracil residues in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Ung knockout mice generated by gene targeting are viable, fertile, and phenotypically normal and have regular mutation rates. However, when exposed to a nitric oxide donor, Ung–/– fibroblasts show an increase in the uracil/cytosine ratio in the genome and augmented cell death. After combined oxygen-glucose deprivation, Ung–/– primary cortical neurons have increased vulnerability to cell death, which is associated with early mitochondrial dysfunction. In vivo, UNG expression and activity are low in brains of naive WT mice but increase significantly after reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion. Moreover, major increases in infarct size are observed in Ung–/– mice compared with littermate control mice. In conclusion, our results provide compelling evidence that UNG is of major importance for tissue repair after brain ischemia. PMID:15199406

  16. Neil3 and NEIL1 DNA Glycosylases Remove Oxidative Damages from Quadruplex DNA and Exhibit Preferences for Lesions in the Telomeric Sequence Context*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jia; Liu, Minmin; Fleming, Aaron M.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    The telomeric DNA of vertebrates consists of d(TTAGGG)n tandem repeats, which can form quadruplex DNA structures in vitro and likely in vivo. Despite the fact that the G-rich telomeric DNA is susceptible to oxidation, few biochemical studies of base excision repair in telomeric DNA and quadruplex structures have been done. Here, we show that telomeric DNA containing thymine glycol (Tg), 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG), guanidinohydantoin (Gh), or spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) can form quadruplex DNA structures in vitro. We have tested the base excision activities of five mammalian DNA glycosylases (NEIL1, NEIL2, mNeil3, NTH1, and OGG1) on these lesion-containing quadruplex substrates and found that only mNeil3 had excision activity on Tg in quadruplex DNA and that the glycosylase exhibited a strong preference for Tg in the telomeric sequence context. Although Sp and Gh in quadruplex DNA were good substrates for mNeil3 and NEIL1, none of the glycosylases had activity on quadruplex DNA containing 8-oxoG. In addition, NEIL1 but not mNeil3 showed enhanced glycosylase activity on Gh in the telomeric sequence context. These data suggest that one role for Neil3 and NEIL1 is to repair DNA base damages in telomeres in vivo and that Neil3 and Neil1 may function in quadruplex-mediated cellular events, such as gene regulation via removal of damaged bases from quadruplex DNA. PMID:23926102

  17. Inhibition of uracil-DNA glycosylase increases SCEs in BrdU-treated and visible light-irradiated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, A.; Hernandez, P.; Gutierrez, C.

    1985-11-01

    The authors have approached the study of the ability of different types of lesions produced by DNA-damaging agents to develop sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) by analyzing SCE levels observed in Allium cepa L cells with BrdU-substituted DNA and exposed to visible light (VL), an irradiation which produces uracil residues in DNA after debromination of bromouracil and enhances SCE levels but only above a certain dose. They have partially purified an uracil-DNA glycosylase activity from A. cepa L root meristem cells, which removes uracil from DNA, the first step in the excision repair of this lesion. This enzyme was inhibited in vitro by 6-amino-uracil and uracil but not by thymine. When cells exposed to VL, at a dose that did not produce per se an SCE increase, were immediately post-treated with these inhibitors of uracil-DNA glycosylase, a significant increase in SCE levels was obtained. Moreover, SCE levels in irradiated cells dropped to control level when a short holding time elapsed between exposure to VL and the beginning of post-treatment with the inhibitor. Thus, our results showed that inhibitors of uracil-DNA glycosylase enhanced SCE levels in cells with unifilarly BrdU-substituted DNA exposed to visible light; and indicated the existence of a very rapid repair of SCE-inducing lesions produced by visible light irradiation of cells with unifilarly BrdU-containing DNA.

  18. Similar kinetics for 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine during human preimplantation development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Petrussa, Laetitia; Van de Velde, Hilde; De Rycke, Martine

    2016-07-01

    After fertilization, the mammalian embryo undergoes epigenetic reprogramming with genome-wide DNA demethylation and subsequent remethylation. Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) was suggested to be an intermediate step in the DNA demethylation pathway. Other evidence, such as the stability of 5hmC in specific tissues, suggests that 5hmC constitutes a new epigenetic modification with its own biological function. Since few studies have been conducted on human material compared to animal models and species-specific epigenetic differences have been reported, we studied global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation patterns in human in vitro preimplantation embryos using immunocytochemistry, comparing these patterns in good-quality and abnormally developing embryos. Our data showed that DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation modifications co-exist. 5mC and 5hmC signals were found in oocytes and in paternal and maternal pronuclei of zygotes, present in non-reciprocal patterns-which contrasts published data for the mouse. These two epigenetic modifications are present between Days 1 and 7 of in vitro development, with 5mC levels declining over cell divisions without noticeable remethylation during this period. A main decline in 5mC and 5hmC occurred as the embryo progressed from compaction to the blastocyst stage. No difference in (hydroxy)methylation was found between the inner cell mass and trophectoderm. When comparing normally and abnormally developing embryos, DNA (hydroxy)methylation reprogramming was abnormal in poor-quality embryos, especially during the first cleavages. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 594-605, 2016 © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27163211

  19. Structural Features of the Interaction between Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase hOGG1 and DNA

    PubMed Central

    Koval, V. V.; Knorre, D. G.; Fedorova, O. S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present review is to summarize the data related with the structural features of interaction between the human repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) and DNA. The review covers the questions concerning the role of individual amino acids of hOGG1 in the specific recognition of the oxidized DNA bases, formation of the enzyme–substrate complex, and excision of the lesion bases from DNA. Attention is also focused upon conformational changes in the enzyme active site and disruption of enzyme activity as a result of amino acid mutations. The mechanism of damaged bases release from DNA induced by hOGG1 is discussed in the context of structural dynamics. PMID:25349714

  20. Two glycosylase families diffusively scan DNA using a wedge residue to probe for and identify oxidatively damaged bases

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Shane R.; Dunn, Andrew R.; Kathe, Scott D.; Warshaw, David M.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    DNA glycosylases are enzymes that perform the initial steps of base excision repair, the principal repair mechanism that identifies and removes endogenous damages that occur in an organism’s DNA. We characterized the motion of single molecules of three bacterial glycosylases that recognize oxidized bases, Fpg, Nei, and Nth, as they scan for damages on tightropes of λ DNA. We find that all three enzymes use a key “wedge residue” to scan for damage because mutation of this residue to an alanine results in faster diffusion. Moreover, all three enzymes bind longer and diffuse more slowly on DNA that contains the damages they recognize and remove. Using a sliding window approach to measure diffusion constants and a simple chemomechanical simulation, we demonstrate that these enzymes diffuse along DNA, pausing momentarily to interrogate random bases, and when a damaged base is recognized, they stop to evert and excise it. PMID:24799677

  1. Pre-steady-state kinetics shows differences in processing of various DNA lesions by Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Koval, Vladimir V.; Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Douglas, Kenneth T.; Nevinsky, Georgy A.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2004-01-01

    Formamidopyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase (Fpg pro tein, MutM) catalyses excision of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) and other oxidatively damaged purines from DNA in a glycosylase/apurinic/apyrimidinic-lyase reaction. We report pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of Fpg action on oligonucleotide duplexes containing 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine, natural abasic site or tetrahydrofuran (an uncleavable abasic site analogue). Monitoring Fpg intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in stopped-flow experiments reveals multiple conformational transitions in the protein molecule during the catalytic cycle. At least four and five conformational transitions occur in Fpg during the interaction with abasic and 8-oxoG-containing substrates, respectively, within 2 ms to 10 s time range. These transitions reflect the stages of enzyme binding to DNA and lesion recognition with the mutual adjustment of DNA and enzyme structures to achieve catalytically competent conformation. Unlike these well-defined binding steps, catalytic stages are not associated with discernible fluorescence events. Only a single conformational change is detected for the cleavable substrates at times exceeding 10 s. The data obtained provide evidence that several fast sequential conformational changes occur in Fpg after binding to its substrate, converting the protein into a catalytically active conformation. PMID:14769949

  2. 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase (OGG1) Deficiency Increases Susceptibility to Obesity and Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sampath, Harini; Vartanian, Vladimir; Rollins, M. Rick; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Lloyd, R. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA is mainly repaired via base excision repair, a pathway that is catalyzed by DNA glycosylases such as 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1). While OGG1 has been implicated in maintaining genomic integrity and preventing tumorigenesis, we report a novel role for OGG1 in altering cellular and whole body energy homeostasis. OGG1-deficient (Ogg1−/−) mice have increased adiposity and hepatic steatosis following exposure to a high-fat diet (HFD), compared to wild-type (WT) animals. Ogg1−/− animals also have higher plasma insulin levels and impaired glucose tolerance upon HFD feeding, relative to WT counterparts. Analysis of energy expenditure revealed that HFD-fed Ogg1−/− mice have a higher resting VCO2 and consequently, an increased respiratory quotient during the resting phase, indicating a preference for carbohydrate metabolism over fat oxidation in these mice. Additionally, microarray and quantitative PCR analyses revealed that key genes of fatty acid oxidation, including carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, and the integral transcriptional co-activator Pgc-1α were significantly downregulated in Ogg1−/− livers. Multiple genes involved in TCA cycle metabolism were also significantly reduced in livers of Ogg1−/− mice. Furthermore, hepatic glycogen stores were diminished, and fasting plasma ketones were significantly reduced in Ogg1−/− mice. Collectively, these data indicate that OGG1 deficiency alters cellular substrate metabolism, favoring a fat sparing phenotype, that results in increased susceptibility to obesity and related pathologies in Ogg1−/− mice. PMID:23284747

  3. Association of the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 checkpoint clamp with MYH DNA glycosylase and DNA.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Bor-Jang; Jin, Jin; Gunther, Randall; Madabushi, Amrita; Shi, Guoli; Wilson, Gerald M; Lu, A-Lien

    2015-07-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints provide surveillance mechanisms to activate the DNA damage response, thus preserving genomic integrity. The heterotrimeric Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) clamp is a DNA damage response sensor and can be loaded onto DNA. 9-1-1 is involved in base excision repair (BER) by interacting with nearly every enzyme in BER. Here, we show that individual 9-1-1 components play distinct roles in BER directed by MYH DNA glycosylase. Analyses of Hus1 deletion mutants revealed that the interdomain connecting loop (residues 134-155) is a key determinant of MYH binding. Both the N-(residues 1-146) and C-terminal (residues 147-280) halves of Hus1, which share structural similarity, can interact with and stimulate MYH. The Hus1(K136A) mutant retains physical interaction with MYH but cannot stimulate MYH glycosylase activity. The N-terminal domain, but not the C-terminal half of Hus1 can also bind DNA with moderate affinity. Intact Rad9 expressed in bacteria binds to and stimulates MYH weakly. However, Rad9(1-266) (C-terminal truncated Rad9) can stimulate MYH activity and bind DNA with high affinity, close to that displayed by heterotrimeric 9(1-266)-1-1 complexes. Conversely, Rad1 has minimal roles in stimulating MYH activity or binding to DNA. Finally, we show that preferential recruitment of 9(1-266)-1-1 to 5'-recessed DNA substrates is an intrinsic property of this complex and is dependent on complex formation. Together, our findings provide a mechanistic rationale for unique contributions by individual 9-1-1 subunits to MYH-directed BER based on subunit asymmetry in protein-protein interactions and DNA binding events. PMID:26021743

  4. The DNA glycosylase AlkD uses a non-base-flipping mechanism to excise bulky lesions.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Elwood A; Shi, Rongxin; Parsons, Zachary D; Yuen, Philip K; David, Sheila S; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Eichman, Brandt F

    2015-11-12

    Threats to genomic integrity arising from DNA damage are mitigated by DNA glycosylases, which initiate the base excision repair pathway by locating and excising aberrant nucleobases. How these enzymes find small modifications within the genome is a current area of intensive research. A hallmark of these and other DNA repair enzymes is their use of base flipping to sequester modified nucleotides from the DNA helix and into an active site pocket. Consequently, base flipping is generally regarded as an essential aspect of lesion recognition and a necessary precursor to base excision. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, DNA glycosylase mechanism that does not require base flipping for either binding or catalysis. Using the DNA glycosylase AlkD from Bacillus cereus, we crystallographically monitored excision of an alkylpurine substrate as a function of time, and reconstructed the steps along the reaction coordinate through structures representing substrate, intermediate and product complexes. Instead of directly interacting with the damaged nucleobase, AlkD recognizes aberrant base pairs through interactions with the phosphoribose backbone, while the lesion remains stacked in the DNA duplex. Quantum mechanical calculations revealed that these contacts include catalytic charge-dipole and CH-π interactions that preferentially stabilize the transition state. We show in vitro and in vivo how this unique means of recognition and catalysis enables AlkD to repair large adducts formed by yatakemycin, a member of the duocarmycin family of antimicrobial natural products exploited in bacterial warfare and chemotherapeutic trials. Bulky adducts of this or any type are not excised by DNA glycosylases that use a traditional base-flipping mechanism. Hence, these findings represent a new model for DNA repair and provide insights into catalysis of base excision. PMID:26524531

  5. The DNA glycosylase AlkD uses a non-base-flipping mechanism to excise bulky lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, Elwood A.; Shi, Rongxin; Parsons, Zachary D.; Yuen, Philip K.; David, Sheila S.; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2015-11-01

    Threats to genomic integrity arising from DNA damage are mitigated by DNA glycosylases, which initiate the base excision repair pathway by locating and excising aberrant nucleobases. How these enzymes find small modifications within the genome is a current area of intensive research. A hallmark of these and other DNA repair enzymes is their use of base flipping to sequester modified nucleotides from the DNA helix and into an active site pocket. Consequently, base flipping is generally regarded as an essential aspect of lesion recognition and a necessary precursor to base excision. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, DNA glycosylase mechanism that does not require base flipping for either binding or catalysis. Using the DNA glycosylase AlkD from Bacillus cereus, we crystallographically monitored excision of an alkylpurine substrate as a function of time, and reconstructed the steps along the reaction coordinate through structures representing substrate, intermediate and product complexes. Instead of directly interacting with the damaged nucleobase, AlkD recognizes aberrant base pairs through interactions with the phosphoribose backbone, while the lesion remains stacked in the DNA duplex. Quantum mechanical calculations revealed that these contacts include catalytic charge-dipole and CH-π interactions that preferentially stabilize the transition state. We show in vitro and in vivo how this unique means of recognition and catalysis enables AlkD to repair large adducts formed by yatakemycin, a member of the duocarmycin family of antimicrobial natural products exploited in bacterial warfare and chemotherapeutic trials. Bulky adducts of this or any type are not excised by DNA glycosylases that use a traditional base-flipping mechanism. Hence, these findings represent a new model for DNA repair and provide insights into catalysis of base excision.

  6. A dynamic checkpoint in oxidative lesion discrimination by formamidopyrimidine–DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoquan; Endutkin, Anton V.; Bergonzo, Christina; Campbell, Arthur J.; de los Santos, Carlos; Grollman, Arthur; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Simmerling, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to proteins recognizing small-molecule ligands, DNA-dependent enzymes cannot rely solely on interactions in the substrate-binding centre to achieve their exquisite specificity. It is widely believed that substrate recognition by such enzymes involves a series of conformational changes in the enzyme–DNA complex with sequential gates favoring cognate DNA and rejecting nonsubstrates. However, direct evidence for such mechanism is limited to a few systems. We report that discrimination between the oxidative DNA lesion, 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) and its normal counterpart, guanine, by the repair enzyme, formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), likely involves multiple gates. Fpg uses an aromatic wedge to open the Watson–Crick base pair and everts the lesion into its active site. We used molecular dynamics simulations to explore the eversion free energy landscapes of oxoG and G by Fpg, focusing on structural and energetic details of oxoG recognition. The resulting energy profiles, supported by biochemical analysis of site-directed mutants disturbing the interactions along the proposed path, show that Fpg selectively facilitates eversion of oxoG by stabilizing several intermediate states, helping the rapidly sliding enzyme avoid full extrusion of every encountered base for interrogation. Lesion recognition through multiple gating intermediates may be a common theme in DNA repair enzymes. PMID:26553802

  7. A dynamic checkpoint in oxidative lesion discrimination by formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoquan; Endutkin, Anton V; Bergonzo, Christina; Campbell, Arthur J; de los Santos, Carlos; Grollman, Arthur; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Simmerling, Carlos

    2016-01-29

    In contrast to proteins recognizing small-molecule ligands, DNA-dependent enzymes cannot rely solely on interactions in the substrate-binding centre to achieve their exquisite specificity. It is widely believed that substrate recognition by such enzymes involves a series of conformational changes in the enzyme-DNA complex with sequential gates favoring cognate DNA and rejecting nonsubstrates. However, direct evidence for such mechanism is limited to a few systems. We report that discrimination between the oxidative DNA lesion, 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) and its normal counterpart, guanine, by the repair enzyme, formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), likely involves multiple gates. Fpg uses an aromatic wedge to open the Watson-Crick base pair and everts the lesion into its active site. We used molecular dynamics simulations to explore the eversion free energy landscapes of oxoG and G by Fpg, focusing on structural and energetic details of oxoG recognition. The resulting energy profiles, supported by biochemical analysis of site-directed mutants disturbing the interactions along the proposed path, show that Fpg selectively facilitates eversion of oxoG by stabilizing several intermediate states, helping the rapidly sliding enzyme avoid full extrusion of every encountered base for interrogation. Lesion recognition through multiple gating intermediates may be a common theme in DNA repair enzymes. PMID:26553802

  8. An amplified electrochemical strategy using DNA-QDs dendrimer superstructure for the detection of thymine DNA glycosylase activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongying; Lou, Youbing; Zhou, Fei; Zhu, Hao; Abdel-Halim, E S; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-09-15

    A triple-signal amplification strategy was proposed for highly sensitive and selective detection of thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) by coupling a dendrimer-like DNA label with the electrochemical method and quantum dots (QDs) tagging. The DNA-QDs dendrimer-like superstructure was designed by DNA hybridization and covalent assembling. Benefiting from outstanding performance of the amplification strategy, this assay showed high sensitivity, extraordinary stability, and easy operation. The limit of detection could reach 0.00003 U µL(-1) with a splendid specificity. The TDG content in different concentration of HeLa cell was also determined. This assay opens a new horizon for both qualitative and quantitative detection of TDG, holding great promise for potential application in cancer cell research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:25913445

  9. Characterization of GM-CSF-inhibitory factor and Uracil DNA glycosylase encoding genes from camel pseudocowpoxvirus.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, G; Swami, Shelesh Kumar; Dahiya, Shyam Singh; Narnaware, S D; Mehta, S C; Singh, P K; Singh, Raghvendar; Tuteja, F C; Patil, N V

    2015-06-01

    The present study describes the PCR amplification of GM-CSF-inhibitory factor (GIF) and Uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) encoding genes of pseudocowpoxvirus (PCPV) from the Indian Dromedaries (Camelus dromedarius) infected with contagious ecthyma using the primers based on the corresponding gene sequences of human PCPV and reindeer PCPV, respectively. The length of GIF gene of PCPV obtained from camel is 795 bp and due to the addition of one cytosine residue at position 374 and one adenine residue at position 516, the open reading frame (ORF) got altered, resulting in the production of truncated polypeptide. The ORF of UDG encoding gene of camel PCPV is 696 bp encoding a polypeptide of 26.0 kDa. Comparison of amino acid sequence homologies of GIF and UDG of camel PCPV revealed that the camel PCPV is closer to ORFV and PCPV (reference stains of both human and reindeer), respectively. PMID:25816930

  10. [THE INFLUENCE OF THE PREPARATION PRETREATMENT ON IN SITU DETECTION OF 5-METHYLCYTOSINE IN METAPHASE CHROMOSOMES AND IN INTERPHASE NUCLEI].

    PubMed

    Grudinina, N A; Sasina, L K; Noniashvili, E M; Neronova, E G; Pavlinova, L I; Suchkova, I O; Sofronov, G A; Patkin, E L

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitate analysis of DNA methylation in situ at the level of cells, chromosomes and chromosomal domains is extremely important for the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases, the study of ageing and the consequences of environmental impacts. An important question arises, whether the revealed in situ methylation pattern reflects DNA methylation per se and (or) availability of the DNA for antibodies, which in turn depends on the peculiarities of chromatin structure and chromosome condensation. These events can lead to an incorrect evaluation of the actual pattern of DNA methylation. To avoid this shortcoming as far as possible, we have modified the most widely used method of revealing 5-methylcytosine in situ with monoclonal antibodies. Here we have shown that the detection of DNA methylation staining of chromosomes including C-heterochromatin, chromosomal arms and sister chromatids is drastically dependent on pretreatment of chromosomal preparations for immunocytochemical study using fluorescent antibodies. Using undifferentiated stem cells of mouse embryonal carcinoma line F9, it has been found that change in preparations storage results in a sharp fluorescence decrease up to complete disappearance of the signal in centromeric heterochromatin. With the help of the method described in the work, we have first revealed the asymmetry of sister chromatids methylation in metaphase chromosomes of F9 cell and lymphocytes of human periphery blood. This may lead to asymmetry of transcriptional signature of daughter cells after division. The proposed here modification of 5-methylcytosine detection in situ provides a more complete characterization of methylation of chromosomes and chromosomal domains, compared to previously published methods. PMID:26591571

  11. Analysis of substrate specificity of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mag1 alkylpurine DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikary, Suraj; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2014-10-02

    DNA glycosylases specialized for the repair of alkylation damage must identify, with fine specificity, a diverse array of subtle modifications within DNA. The current mechanism involves damage sensing through interrogation of the DNA duplex, followed by more specific recognition of the target base inside the active site pocket. To better understand the physical basis for alkylpurine detection, we determined the crystal structure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mag1 (spMag1) in complex with DNA and performed a mutational analysis of spMag1 and the close homologue from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (scMag). Despite strong homology, spMag1 and scMag differ in substrate specificity and cellular alkylation sensitivity, although the enzymological basis for their functional differences is unknown. We show that Mag preference for 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine ({var_epsilon}A) is influenced by a minor groove-interrogating residue more than the composition of the nucleobase-binding pocket. Exchanging this residue between Mag proteins swapped their {var_epsilon}A activities, providing evidence that residues outside the extrahelical base-binding pocket have a role in identification of a particular modification in addition to sensing damage.

  12. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of 5-methylcytosine oxidation derivatives by the SUVH5 SRA domain

    PubMed Central

    Rajakumara, Eerappa; Nakarakanti, Naveen Kumar; Nivya, M. Angel; Satish, Mutyala

    2016-01-01

    5-Methylcytosine (5 mC) is associated with epigenetic gene silencing in mammals and plants. 5 mC is consecutively oxidized to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5 hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) by ten-eleven translocation enzymes. We performed binding and structural studies to investigate the molecular basis of the recognition of the 5 mC oxidation derivatives in the context of a CG sequence by the SET- and RING-associated domain (SRA) of the SUVH5 protein (SUVH5 SRA). Using calorimetric measurements, we demonstrate that the SRA domain binds to the hydroxymethylated CG (5hmCG) DNA duplex in a similar manner to methylated CG (5mCG). Interestingly, the SUVH5 SRA domain exhibits weaker affinity towards carboxylated CG (5caCG) and formylated CG (5fCG). We report the 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure of the SUVH5 SRA domain in a complex with fully hydroxymethyl-CG and demonstrate a dual flip-out mechanism, whereby the symmetrical 5hmCs are simultaneously extruded from the partner strands of the DNA duplex and are positioned within the binding pockets of individual SRA domains. The hydroxyl group of 5hmC establishes both intra- and intermolecular interactions in the binding pocket. Collectively, we show that SUVH5 SRA recognizes 5hmC in a similar manner to 5 mC, but exhibits weaker affinity towards 5 hmC oxidation derivatives. PMID:26841909

  13. Excision of hypoxanthine from DNA containing dIMP residues by the Escherichia coli, yeast, rat, and human alkylpurine DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Saparbaev, M; Laval, J

    1994-06-21

    The deamination of adenine residues in DNA generates hypoxanthine, which is mutagenic since it gives rise to an A.T to G.C transition. Hypoxanthine is removed by hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase activity present in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. Using polydeoxyribonucleotides or double-stranded synthetic oligonucleotides that contain dIMP residues, we show that this activity in E. coli is associated with the 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II coded for by the alkA gene. This conclusion is based on the following facts: (i) the two enzymatic activities have the same chromatographic behavior on various supports and they have the same molecular weight, (ii) both are induced during the adaptive response, (iii) a multicopy plasmid bearing the alkA gene overproduces both activities, (iv) homogeneous preparation of AlkA has both enzymatic activities, (v) the E. coli alkA- mutant does not show any detectable hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase activity. Under the same experimental conditions, but using different substrates, the same amount of AlkA protein liberates 1 pmol of 3-methyladenine from alkylated DNA and 1.2 fmol of hypoxanthine from dIMP-containing DNA. The Km for the latter substrate is 420 x 10(-9) M as compared to 5 x 10(-9) M for alkylated DNA. Hypoxanthine is released as a free base during the reaction. Duplex oligodeoxynucleotides containing hypoxanthine positioned opposite T, G, C, and A were cleaved efficiently. ANPG protein, APDG protein, and MAG protein--the 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases of human, rat, and yeast origin, respectively--were also able to release hypoxanthine from various DNA substrates containing dIMP residues. The mammalian enzyme is by far the most efficient hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase of all the enzymes tested. PMID:8016081

  14. Excision of hypoxanthine from DNA containing dIMP residues by the Escherichia coli, yeast, rat, and human alkylpurine DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed Central

    Saparbaev, M; Laval, J

    1994-01-01

    The deamination of adenine residues in DNA generates hypoxanthine, which is mutagenic since it gives rise to an A.T to G.C transition. Hypoxanthine is removed by hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase activity present in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. Using polydeoxyribonucleotides or double-stranded synthetic oligonucleotides that contain dIMP residues, we show that this activity in E. coli is associated with the 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II coded for by the alkA gene. This conclusion is based on the following facts: (i) the two enzymatic activities have the same chromatographic behavior on various supports and they have the same molecular weight, (ii) both are induced during the adaptive response, (iii) a multicopy plasmid bearing the alkA gene overproduces both activities, (iv) homogeneous preparation of AlkA has both enzymatic activities, (v) the E. coli alkA- mutant does not show any detectable hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase activity. Under the same experimental conditions, but using different substrates, the same amount of AlkA protein liberates 1 pmol of 3-methyladenine from alkylated DNA and 1.2 fmol of hypoxanthine from dIMP-containing DNA. The Km for the latter substrate is 420 x 10(-9) M as compared to 5 x 10(-9) M for alkylated DNA. Hypoxanthine is released as a free base during the reaction. Duplex oligodeoxynucleotides containing hypoxanthine positioned opposite T, G, C, and A were cleaved efficiently. ANPG protein, APDG protein, and MAG protein--the 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases of human, rat, and yeast origin, respectively--were also able to release hypoxanthine from various DNA substrates containing dIMP residues. The mammalian enzyme is by far the most efficient hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase of all the enzymes tested. Images PMID:8016081

  15. Role of uracil-DNA glycosylase in mutation avoidance by Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jau-Der; Lacks, S.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Uracil-DNA glycosylase activity was found in Streptococcus pneumoniae, and the enzyme was partially purified. An ung mutant lacking the activity was obtained by positive selection of cells transformed with a plasmid containing uracil in its DNA. The effects of the ung mutation on mutagenic processes in S. pneumoniae were examined. The sequence of several malM mutations revertible by nitrous acid showed them to correspond to A {center dot}T{r arrow}G {center dot} C transitions. This confirmed a prior deduction that nitrous acid action on transforming DNA gave only G {center dot} C{r arrow}A {center dot} T mutations. Examination of malM mutant reversion frequencies in ung strains indicated that G {center dot} C{r arrow}A {center dot} T mutation rates generally were 10-fold higher than in wild-type strains, presumably owing to lack of repair of deaminated cytosine residues in DNA. No effect of ung on mutation avoidance by the Hex mismatch repair system was observed, which means that uracil incorporation and removal from nascent DNA cannot be solely responsible for producing strand breaks that target nascent DNA for correction after replication. One malM mutation corresponding to an A {center dot} T{r arrow}G {center dot} C transition showed a 10-fold-higher spontaneous reversion frequency than other such transitions in a wild-type background. This hot spot was located in a directly repeated DNA sequence; it is proposed that transient slippage to the wild-type repeat during replication accounts for the higher reversion frequency.

  16. TET proteins and 5-methylcytosine oxidation in hematological cancers

    PubMed Central

    An, Jungeun; Pastor, William A.; Ko, Myunggon; Rao, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Summary DNA methylation has pivotal regulatory roles in mammalian development, retrotransposon silencing, genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. Cancer cells display highly dysregulated DNA methylation profiles characterized by global hypomethylation in conjunction with hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands (CGIs) that presumably lead to genome instability and aberrant expression of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. The recent discovery of Ten-Eleven-Translocation (TET) family dioxygenases that oxidize 5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in DNA has led to profound progress in understanding the mechanism underlying DNA demethylation. Among the three TET genes, TET2 recurrently undergoes inactivating mutations in a wide range of myeloid and lymphoid malignancies. TET2 functions as a bona fide tumor suppressor particularly in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies resembling chronic myelomoncytic leukemia (CMML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in human. Here we review diverse functions of TET proteins and the novel epigenetic marks that they generate in DNA methylation/demethylation dynamics and normal and malignant hematopoietic differentiation. The impact of TET2 inactivation in hematopoiesis and various mechanisms modulating the expression or activity of TET proteins are also discussed. Furthermore, we also present evidence that TET2 and TET3 collaborate to suppress aberrant hematopoiesis and hematopoietic transformation. A detailed understanding of the normal and pathological functions of TET proteins may provide new avenues to develop novel epigenetic therapies for treating hematological malignancies. PMID:25510268

  17. A Germline Polymorphism of Thymine DNA Glycosylase Induces Genomic Instability and Cellular Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Sjolund, Ashley; Nemec, Antonia A.; Paquet, Nicolas; Prakash, Aishwarya; Sung, Patrick; Doublié, Sylvie; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2014-01-01

    Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) functions in base excision repair, a DNA repair pathway that acts in a lesion-specific manner to correct individual damaged or altered bases. TDG preferentially catalyzes the removal of thymine and uracil paired with guanine, and is also active on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) paired with adenine or guanine. The rs4135113 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of TDG is found in 10% of the global population. This coding SNP results in the alteration of Gly199 to Ser. Gly199 is part of a loop responsible for stabilizing the flipped abasic nucleotide in the active site pocket. Biochemical analyses indicate that G199S exhibits tighter binding to both its substrate and abasic product. The persistent accumulation of abasic sites in cells expressing G199S leads to the induction of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Cells expressing the G199S variant also activate a DNA damage response. When expressed in cells, G199S induces genomic instability and cellular transformation. Together, these results suggest that individuals harboring the G199S variant may have increased risk for developing cancer. PMID:25375110

  18. Dynamics of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine during germ cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shinpei; Hong, Kwonho; Liu, Rui; Inoue, Azusa; Shen, Li; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yi

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have revealed that mouse primordial germ cells (PGCs) undergo genome-wide DNA methylation reprogramming to reset the epigenome for totipotency. However, the precise 5-methylcytosine (5mC) dynamics and its relationship with the generation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) are not clear. Here we analyzed the dynamics of 5mC and 5hmC during PGC reprograming and germ cell development. Unexpectedly, we found a specific period (E8.5-9.5) during which both 5mC and 5hmC levels are low. Subsequently, 5hmC levels increase reaching its peak at E11.5 and gradually decrease until E13.5 likely by replication-dependent dilution. Interestingly, 5hmC is enriched in chromocenters during this period. While this germ cell-specific 5hmC subnuclear localization pattern is maintained in female germ cells even in mature oocytes, such pattern is gradually lost in male germ cells as mitotic proliferation resumes during the neonatal stage. Pericentric 5hmC plays an important role in silencing major satellite repeat, especially in female PGCs. Global transcriptome analysis by RNA-seq revealed that the great majority of differentially expressed genes from E9.5 to 13.5 are upregulated in both male and female PGCs. Although only female PGCs enter meiosis during the prenatal stage, meiosis-related and a subset of imprinted genes are significantly upregulated in both male and female PGCs at E13.5. Thus, our study not only reveals the dynamics of 5mC and 5hmC during PGC reprogramming and germ cell development, but also their potential role in epigenetic reprogramming and transcriptional regulation of meiotic and imprinted genes. PMID:23399596

  19. Identification of Sequence Specificity of 5-Methylcytosine Oxidation by Tet1 Protein with High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Seiichiro; Chandran, Anandhakumar; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Tet (ten-eleven translocation) family proteins have the ability to oxidize 5-methylcytosine (mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC), 5-formylcytosine (fC), and 5-carboxycytosine (caC). However, the oxidation reaction of Tet is not understood completely. Evaluation of genomic-level epigenetic changes by Tet protein requires unbiased identification of the highly selective oxidation sites. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing to investigate the sequence specificity of mC oxidation by Tet1. A 6.6×10(4) -member mC-containing random DNA-sequence library was constructed. The library was subjected to Tet-reactive pulldown followed by high-throughput sequencing. Analysis of the obtained sequence data identified the Tet1-reactive sequences. We identified mCpG as a highly reactive sequence of Tet1 protein. PMID:26715454

  20. Ginsenoside Rd Attenuates DNA Damage by Increasing Expression of DNA Glycosylase Endonuclease VIII-like Proteins after Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Long-Xiu; Zhang, Xiao; Zhao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ginsenoside Rd (GSRd), one of the main active ingredients in traditional Chinese herbal Panax ginseng, has been found to have therapeutic effects on ischemic stroke. However, the molecular mechanisms of GSRd's neuroprotective function remain unclear. Ischemic stroke-induced oxidative stress results in DNA damage, which triggers cell death and contributes to poor prognosis. Oxidative DNA damage is primarily processed by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Three of the five major DNA glycosylases that initiate the BER pathway in the event of DNA damage from oxidation are the endonuclease VIII-like (NEIL) proteins. This study aimed to investigate the effect of GSRd on the expression of DNA glycosylases NEILs in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Methods: NEIL expression patterns were evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in both normal and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rat models. Survival rate and Zea-Longa neurological scores were used to assess the effect of GSRd administration on MCAO rats. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) damages were evaluated by the way of real-time analysis of mutation frequency. NEIL expressions were measured in both messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analysis. Apoptosis level was quantitated by the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP biotin nick end labeling assay. Results: We found that GSRd administration reduced mtDNA and nDNA damages, which contributed to an improvement in survival rate and neurological function; significantly up-regulated NEIL1 and NEIL3 expressions in both mRNA and protein levels of MCAO rats; and reduced cell apoptosis and the expression of cleaved caspase-3 in rats at 7 days after MCAO. Conclusions: Our results indicated that the neuroprotective function of GSRd for acute ischemic stroke might be partially explained by the up

  1. Purification and characterization of a novel UV lesion-specific DNA glycosylase/AP lyase from Bacillus sphaericus.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, D A; Nyaga, S G; Lloyd, R S

    2000-05-31

    The purification and characterization of a pyrimidine dimer-specific glycosylase/AP lyase from Bacillus sphaericus (Bsp-pdg) are reported. Bsp-pdg is highly specific for DNA containing the cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, displaying no detectable activity on oligonucleotides with trans-syn I, trans-syn II, (6-4), or Dewar photoproducts. Like other glycosylase/AP lyases that sequentially cleave the N--glycosyl bond of the 5' pyrimidine of a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, and the phosphodiester backbone, this enzyme appears to utilize a primary amine as the attacking nucleophile. The formation of a covalent enzyme-DNA imino intermediate is evidenced by the ability to trap this protein-DNA complex by reduction with sodium borohydride. Also consistent with its AP lyase activity, Bsp-pdg was shown to incise an AP site-containing oligonucleotide, yielding beta- and delta-elimination products. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of this 26 kDa protein revealed little amino acid homology to any previously reported protein. This is the first report of a glycosylase/AP lyase enzyme from Bacillus sphaericus that is specific for cis-syn pyrimidine dimers. PMID:10844244

  2. Electrostatic Properties of Complexes along a DNA Glycosylase Damage Search Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human uracil DNA glycosylase (hUNG) follows an extended reaction coordinate for locating rare uracil bases in genomic DNA. This process begins with diffusion-controlled engagement of undamaged DNA, followed by a damage search step in which the enzyme remains loosely associated with the DNA chain (translocation), and finally, a recognition step that allows the enzyme to efficiently bind and excise uracil when it is encountered. At each step along this coordinate, the enzyme must form DNA interactions that are highly specialized for either rapid damage searching or catalysis. Here we make extensive measurements of hUNG activity as a function of salt concentration to dissect the thermodynamic, kinetic, and electrostatic properties of key enzyme states along this reaction coordinate. We find that the interaction of hUNG with undamaged DNA is electrostatically driven at a physiological concentration of potassium ions (ΔGelect = −3.5 ± 0.5 kcal mol–1), with only a small nonelectrostatic contribution (ΔGnon = −2.0 ± 0.2 kcal mol–1). In contrast, the interaction with damaged DNA is dominated by the nonelectrostatic free energy term (ΔGnon = −7.2 ± 0.1 kcal mol–1), yet retains the nonspecific electrostatic contribution (ΔGelect = −2.3 ± 0.2 kcal mol–1). Stopped-flow kinetic experiments established that the salt sensitivity of damaged DNA binding originates from a reduction of kon, while koff is weakly dependent on salt. Similar findings were obtained from the salt dependences of the steady-state kinetic parameters, where the diffusion-controlled kcat/Km showed a salt dependence similar to kon, while kcat (limited by product release) was weakly dependent on salt. Finally, the salt dependence of translocation between two uracil sites separated by 20 bp in the same DNA chain was indistinguishable from that of kon. This result suggests that the transition-state for translocation over this spacing resembles that for DNA association from bulk solution and

  3. Electrostatic properties of complexes along a DNA glycosylase damage search pathway.

    PubMed

    Cravens, Shannen L; Hobson, Matthew; Stivers, James T

    2014-12-01

    Human uracil DNA glycosylase (hUNG) follows an extended reaction coordinate for locating rare uracil bases in genomic DNA. This process begins with diffusion-controlled engagement of undamaged DNA, followed by a damage search step in which the enzyme remains loosely associated with the DNA chain (translocation), and finally, a recognition step that allows the enzyme to efficiently bind and excise uracil when it is encountered. At each step along this coordinate, the enzyme must form DNA interactions that are highly specialized for either rapid damage searching or catalysis. Here we make extensive measurements of hUNG activity as a function of salt concentration to dissect the thermodynamic, kinetic, and electrostatic properties of key enzyme states along this reaction coordinate. We find that the interaction of hUNG with undamaged DNA is electrostatically driven at a physiological concentration of potassium ions (ΔGelect = -3.5 ± 0.5 kcal mol(-1)), with only a small nonelectrostatic contribution (ΔGnon = -2.0 ± 0.2 kcal mol(-1)). In contrast, the interaction with damaged DNA is dominated by the nonelectrostatic free energy term (ΔGnon = -7.2 ± 0.1 kcal mol(-1)), yet retains the nonspecific electrostatic contribution (ΔGelect = -2.3 ± 0.2 kcal mol(-1)). Stopped-flow kinetic experiments established that the salt sensitivity of damaged DNA binding originates from a reduction of kon, while koff is weakly dependent on salt. Similar findings were obtained from the salt dependences of the steady-state kinetic parameters, where the diffusion-controlled kcat/Km showed a salt dependence similar to kon, while kcat (limited by product release) was weakly dependent on salt. Finally, the salt dependence of translocation between two uracil sites separated by 20 bp in the same DNA chain was indistinguishable from that of kon. This result suggests that the transition-state for translocation over this spacing resembles that for DNA association from bulk solution and that h

  4. Structural Characterization of Viral Ortholog of Human DNA Glycosylase NEIL1 Bound to Thymine Glycol or 5-Hydroxyuracil-containing DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Kayo; Averill, April; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Thymine glycol (Tg) and 5-hydroxyuracil (5-OHU) are common oxidized products of pyrimidines, which are recognized and cleaved by two DNA glycosylases of the base excision repair pathway, endonuclease III (Nth) and endonuclease VIII (Nei). Although there are several structures of Nei enzymes unliganded or bound to an abasic (apurinic or apyrimidinic) site, until now there was no structure of an Nei bound to a DNA lesion. Mimivirus Nei1 (MvNei1) is an ortholog of human NEIL1, which was previously crystallized bound to DNA containing an apurinic site (Imamura, K., Wallace, S. S., and Doublié, S. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 26174–26183). Here, we present two crystal structures of MvNei1 bound to two oxidized pyrimidines, Tg and 5-OHU. Both lesions are flipped out from the DNA helix. Tg is in the anti conformation, whereas 5-OHU adopts both anti and syn conformations in the glycosylase active site. Only two protein side chains (Glu-6 and Tyr-253) are within hydrogen-bonding contact with either damaged base, and mutating these residues did not markedly affect the glycosylase activity. This finding suggests that lesion recognition by Nei occurs before the damaged base flips into the glycosylase active site. PMID:22170059

  5. ATM regulates 3-Methylpurine-DNA glycosylase and promotes therapeutic resistance to alkylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Burrell, Kelly; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Chornenkyy, Yevgen; Gajadhar, Aaron; Fernandez, Nestor A.; Clarke, Ian D.; Barszczyk, Mark S.; Pajovic, Sanja; Ternamian, Christian; Head, Renee; Sabha, Nesrin; Sobol, Robert W.; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T.; Jones, Chris; Dirks, Peter B.; Zadeh, Gelareh; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a frontline therapy for the treatment of several aggressive cancers including pediatric glioblastoma, a lethal tumor in children. Unfortunately, many tumors are resistant to this therapy. We sought to identify ways of sensitizing tumor cells to alkylating agents while leaving normal cells unharmed; increasing therapeutic response while minimizing toxicity. Using a siRNA screen targeting over 240 DNA damage response genes, we identified novel sensitizers to alkylating agents. In particular the base excision repair (BER) pathway, including 3-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG), as well as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) were identified in our screen. Interestingly, we identified MPG as a direct novel substrate of ATM. ATM-mediated phosphorylation of MPG was required for enhanced MPG function. Importantly, combined inhibition or loss of MPG and ATM resulted in increased alkylating agent-induced cytotoxicity in vitro and prolonged survival in vivo. The discovery of the ATM-MPG axis will lead to improved treatment of alkylating agent-resistant tumors. PMID:25100205

  6. Kinetics of substrate recognition and cleavage by human 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Koval, Vladimir V.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Nevinsky, Georgy A.; Douglas, Kenneth T.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2005-01-01

    Human 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (hOgg1) excises 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) from damaged DNA. We report a pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of hOgg1 mechanism using stopped-flow and enzyme fluorescence monitoring. The kinetic scheme for hOgg1 processing an 8-oxoG:C-containing substrate was found to include at least three fast equilibrium steps followed by two slow, irreversible steps and another equilibrium step. The second irreversible step was rate-limiting overall. By comparing data from Ogg1 intrinsic fluorescence traces and from accumulation of products of different types, the irreversible steps were attributed to two main chemical steps of the Ogg1-catalyzed reaction: cleavage of the N-glycosidic bond of the damaged nucleotide and β-elimination of its 3′-phosphate. The fast equilibrium steps were attributed to enzyme conformational changes during the recognition of 8-oxoG, and the final equilibrium, to binding of the reaction product by the enzyme. hOgg1 interacted with a substrate containing an aldehydic AP site very slowly, but the addition of 8-bromoguanine (8-BrG) greatly accelerated the reaction, which was best described by two initial equilibrium steps followed by one irreversible chemical step and a final product release equilibrium step. The irreversible step may correspond to β-elimination since it is the very step facilitated by 8-BrG. PMID:16024742

  7. Protein p56 from the Bacillus subtilis phage ϕ29 inhibits DNA-binding ability of uracil-DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Heras, Gemma; Ruiz-Masó, José A.; del Solar, Gloria; Espinosa, Manuel; Bravo, Alicia; Salas, Margarita

    2007-01-01

    Protein p56 (56 amino acids) from the Bacillus subtilis phage ϕ29 inactivates the host uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG), an enzyme involved in the base excision repair pathway. At present, p56 is the only known example of a UDG inhibitor encoded by a non-uracil containing viral DNA. Using analytical ultracentrifugation methods, we found that protein p56 formed dimers at physiological concentrations. In addition, circular dichroism spectroscopic analyses revealed that protein p56 had a high content of β-strands (around 40%). To understand the mechanism underlying UDG inhibition by p56, we carried out in vitro experiments using the Escherichia coli UDG enzyme. The highly acidic protein p56 was able to compete with DNA for binding to UDG. Moreover, the interaction between p56 and UDG blocked DNA binding by UDG. We also demonstrated that Ugi, a protein that interacts with the DNA-binding domain of UDG, was able to replace protein p56 previously bound to the UDG enzyme. These results suggest that protein p56 could be a novel naturally occurring DNA mimicry. PMID:17698500

  8. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic mechanism of Escherichia coli MutY DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Raymond C; Hitomi, Kenichi; Arvai, Andrew S; House, Paul G; Kurtz, Andrew J; Dodson, M L; McCullough, Amanda K; Tainer, John A; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2004-11-01

    The Escherichia coli adenine DNA glycosylase, MutY, plays an important role in the maintenance of genomic stability by catalyzing the removal of adenine opposite 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine or guanine in duplex DNA. Although the x-ray crystal structure of the catalytic domain of MutY revealed a mechanism for catalysis of the glycosyl bond, it appeared that several opportunistically positioned lysine side chains could participate in a secondary beta-elimination reaction. In this investigation, it is established via site-directed mutagenesis and the determination of a 1.35-A structure of MutY in complex with adenine that the abasic site (apurinic/apyrimidinic) lyase activity is alternatively regulated by two lysines, Lys142 and Lys20. Analyses of the crystallographic structure also suggest a role for Glu161 in the apurinic/apyrimidinic lyase chemistry. The beta-elimination reaction is structurally and chemically uncoupled from the initial glycosyl bond scission, indicating that this reaction occurs as a consequence of active site plasticity and slow dissociation of the product complex. MutY with either the K142A or K20A mutation still catalyzes beta and beta-delta elimination reactions, and both mutants can be trapped as covalent enzyme-DNA intermediates by chemical reduction. The trapping was observed to occur both pre- and post-phosphodiester bond scission, establishing that both of these intermediates have significant half-lives. Thus, the final spectrum of DNA products generated reflects the outcome of a delicate balance of closely related equilibrium constants. PMID:15326180

  9. Asbestos-induced pulmonary fibrosis is augmented in 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Cheresh, Paul; Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Kim, Seok-Jo; Yeldandi, Anjana; Williams, David B; Cheng, Yuan; Mutlu, Gökhan M; Budinger, G R Scott; Ridge, Karen; Schumacker, Paul T; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Kamp, David W

    2015-01-01

    Asbestos causes asbestosis and malignancies by mechanisms that are not fully established. Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) injury and repair are crucial determinants of the fibrogenic potential of noxious agents such as asbestos. We previously showed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediate asbestos-induced AEC intrinsic apoptosis and that mitochondrial human 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1), a DNA repair enzyme, prevents oxidant-induced AEC apoptosis. We reasoned that OGG1 deficiency augments asbestos-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Compared with intratracheal instillation of PBS (50 μl) or titanium dioxide (100 μg/50 μl), crocidolite or Libby amphibole asbestos (100 μg/50 μl) each augmented pulmonary fibrosis in wild-type C57BL/6J (WT) mice after 3 weeks as assessed by histology, fibrosis score, lung collagen via Sircol, and type 1 collagen expression; these effects persisted at 2 months. Compared with WT mice, Ogg1 homozygous knockout (Ogg1(-/-)) mice exhibit increased pulmonary fibrosis after crocidolite exposure and apoptosis in cells at the bronchoalveolar duct junctions as assessed via cleaved caspase-3 immunostaining. AEC involvement was verified by colocalization studies using surfactant protein C. Asbestos increased endoplasmic reticulum stress in the lungs of WT and Ogg1(-/-) mice. Compared with WT, alveolar type 2 cells isolated from Ogg1(-/-) mice have increased mtDNA damage, reduced mitochondrial aconitase expression, and increased P53 and cleaved caspase-9 expression, and these changes were enhanced 3 weeks after crocidolite exposure. These findings suggest an important role for AEC mtDNA integrity maintained by OGG1 in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis that may represent a novel therapeutic target. PMID:24918270

  10. Oxidized dNTPs and the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases combine to induce CAG/CTG repeat instability

    PubMed Central

    Cilli, Piera; Ventura, Ilenia; Minoprio, Anna; Meccia, Ettore; Martire, Alberto; Wilson, Samuel H.; Bignami, Margherita; Mazzei, Filomena

    2016-01-01

    DNA trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion underlies several neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington's disease (HD). Accumulation of oxidized DNA bases and their inefficient processing by base excision repair (BER) are among the factors suggested to contribute to TNR expansion. In this study, we have examined whether oxidation of the purine dNTPs in the dNTP pool provides a source of DNA damage that promotes TNR expansion. We demonstrate that during BER of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxodG) in TNR sequences, DNA polymerase β (POL β) can incorporate 8-oxodGMP with the formation of 8-oxodG:C and 8-oxodG:A mispairs. Their processing by the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases generates closely spaced incisions on opposite DNA strands that are permissive for TNR expansion. Evidence in HD model R6/2 mice indicates that these DNA glycosylases are present in brain areas affected by neurodegeneration. Consistent with prevailing oxidative stress, the same brain areas contained increased DNA 8-oxodG levels and expression of the p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase. Our in vitro and in vivo data support a model where an oxidized dNTPs pool together with aberrant BER processing contribute to TNR expansion in non-replicating cells. PMID:26980281

  11. Oxidized dNTPs and the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases combine to induce CAG/CTG repeat instability.

    PubMed

    Cilli, Piera; Ventura, Ilenia; Minoprio, Anna; Meccia, Ettore; Martire, Alberto; Wilson, Samuel H; Bignami, Margherita; Mazzei, Filomena

    2016-06-20

    DNA trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion underlies several neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington's disease (HD). Accumulation of oxidized DNA bases and their inefficient processing by base excision repair (BER) are among the factors suggested to contribute to TNR expansion. In this study, we have examined whether oxidation of the purine dNTPs in the dNTP pool provides a source of DNA damage that promotes TNR expansion. We demonstrate that during BER of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxodG) in TNR sequences, DNA polymerase β (POL β) can incorporate 8-oxodGMP with the formation of 8-oxodG:C and 8-oxodG:A mispairs. Their processing by the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases generates closely spaced incisions on opposite DNA strands that are permissive for TNR expansion. Evidence in HD model R6/2 mice indicates that these DNA glycosylases are present in brain areas affected by neurodegeneration. Consistent with prevailing oxidative stress, the same brain areas contained increased DNA 8-oxodG levels and expression of the p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase. Our in vitro and in vivo data support a model where an oxidized dNTPs pool together with aberrant BER processing contribute to TNR expansion in non-replicating cells. PMID:26980281

  12. Folate Deficiency Induces Neurodegeneration and Brain Dysfunction in Mice Lacking Uracil DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Kronenberg, Golo; Harms, Christoph; Sobol, Robert W.; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Linhart, Heinz; Winter, Benjamin; Balkaya, Mustafa; Gertz, Karen; Gay, Shanna B.; Cox, David; Eckart, Sarah; Ahmadi, Michael; Juckel, Georg; Kempermann, Gerd; Hellweg, Rainer; Sohr, Reinhard; Hörtnagl, Heide; Wilson, Samuel H.; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Folate deficiency and resultant increased homocysteine levels have been linked experimentally and epidemiologically with neurodegenerative conditions like stroke and dementia. Moreover, folate deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, most notably depression. We hypothesized that the pathogenic mechanisms include uracil misincorporation and, therefore, analyzed the effects of folate deficiency in mice lacking uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung−/−) versus wild-type controls. Folate depletion increased nuclear mutation rates in Ung−/− embryonic fibroblasts, and conferred death of cultured Ung−/− hippocampal neurons. Feeding animals a folate-deficient diet (FD) for 3 months induced degeneration of CA3 pyramidal neurons in Ung−/− but not Ung+/+ mice along with decreased hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein and decreased brain levels of antioxidant glutathione. Furthermore, FD induced cognitive deficits and mood alterations such as anxious and despair-like behaviors that were aggravated in Ung−/− mice. Independent of Ung genotype, FD increased plasma homocysteine levels, altered brain monoamine metabolism, and inhibited adult hippocampal neurogenesis. These results indicate that impaired uracil repair is involved in neurodegeneration and neuropsychiatric dysfunction induced by experimental folate deficiency. PMID:18614692

  13. The DNA glycosylases OGG1 and NEIL3 influence differentiation potential, proliferation, and senescence-associated signs in neural stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Amilcar; Hermanson, Ola

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA glycosylases OGG1 and NEIL3 are required for neural stem cell state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No effect on cell viability by OGG1 or NEIL3 knockdown in neural stem cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OGG1 or NEIL3 RNA knockdown result in decreased proliferation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased HP1{gamma} immunoreactivity after NEIL3 knockdown suggests premature senescence. -- Abstract: Embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) exhibit self-renewal and multipotency as intrinsic characteristics that are key parameters for proper brain development. When cells are challenged by oxidative stress agents the resulting DNA lesions are repaired by DNA glycosylases through the base excision repair (BER) pathway as a means to maintain the fidelity of the genome, and thus, proper cellular characteristics. The functional roles for DNA glycosylases in NSCs have however remained largely unexplored. Here we demonstrate that RNA knockdown of the DNA glycosylases OGG1 and NEIL3 decreased NSC differentiation ability and resulted in decreased expression of both neuronal and astrocytic genes after mitogen withdrawal, as well as the stem cell marker Musashi-1. Furthermore, while cell survival remained unaffected, NEIL3 deficient cells displayed decreased cell proliferation rates along with an increase in HP1{gamma} immunoreactivity, a sign of premature senescence. Our results suggest that DNA glycosylases play multiple roles in governing essential neural stem cell characteristics.

  14. Uracil DNA Glycosylase BKRF3 Contributes to Epstein-Barr Virus DNA Replication through Physical Interactions with Proteins in Viral DNA Replication Complex

    PubMed Central

    Su, Mei-Tzu; Liu, I-Hua; Wu, Chia-Wei; Chang, Shu-Ming; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Yang, Pei-Wen; Chuang, Yu-Chia; Lee, Chung-Pei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BKRF3 shares sequence homology with members of the uracil-N-glycosylase (UNG) protein family and has DNA glycosylase activity. Here, we explored how BKRF3 participates in the DNA replication complex and contributes to viral DNA replication. Exogenously expressed Flag-BKRF3 was distributed mostly in the cytoplasm, whereas BKRF3 was translocated into the nucleus and colocalized with the EBV DNA polymerase BALF5 in the replication compartment during EBV lytic replication. The expression level of BKRF3 increased gradually during viral replication, coupled with a decrease of cellular UNG2, suggesting BKRF3 enzyme activity compensates for UNG2 and ensures the fidelity of viral DNA replication. In immunoprecipitation-Western blotting, BKRF3 was coimmunoprecipitated with BALF5, the polymerase processivity factor BMRF1, and the immediate-early transactivator Rta. Coexpression of BMRF1 appeared to facilitate the nuclear targeting of BKRF3 in immunofluorescence staining. Residues 164 to 255 of BKRF3 were required for interaction with Rta and BALF5, whereas residues 81 to 166 of BKRF3 were critical for BMRF1 interaction in glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown experiments. Viral DNA replication was defective in cells harboring BKRF3 knockout EBV bacmids. In complementation assays, the catalytic mutant BKRF3(Q90L,D91N) restored viral DNA replication, whereas the leucine loop mutant BKRF3(H213L) only partially rescued viral DNA replication, coupled with a reduced ability to interact with the viral DNA polymerase and Rta. Our data suggest that BKRF3 plays a critical role in viral DNA synthesis predominantly through its interactions with viral proteins in the DNA replication compartment, while its enzymatic activity may be supplementary for uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) function during virus replication. IMPORTANCE Catalytic activities of both cellular UDG UNG2 and viral UDGs contribute to herpesviral DNA replication. To ensure that the enzyme

  15. DNA methylation patterns of candidate genes regulated by thymine DNA glycosylase in patients with TP53 germline mutations

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, F.P.; Kuasne, H.; Marchi, F.A.; Miranda, P.M.; Rogatto, S.R.; Achatz, M.I.

    2015-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, hereditary cancer predisposition disorder. In Brazil, the p.R337H TP53 founder mutation causes the variant form of LFS, Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome. The occurrence of cancer and age of disease onset are known to vary, even in patients carrying the same mutation, and several mechanisms such as genetic and epigenetic alterations may be involved in this variability. However, the extent of involvement of such events has not been clarified. It is well established that p53 regulates several pathways, including the thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) pathway, which regulates the DNA methylation of several genes. This study aimed to identify the DNA methylation pattern of genes potentially related to the TDG pathway (CDKN2A, FOXA1, HOXD8, OCT4, SOX2, and SOX17) in 30 patients with germline TP53mutations, 10 patients with wild-type TP53, and 10 healthy individuals. We also evaluated TDG expression in patients with adrenocortical tumors (ADR) with and without the p.R337H TP53 mutation. Gene methylation patterns of peripheral blood DNA samples assessed by pyrosequencing revealed no significant differences between the three groups. However, increased TDG expression was observed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in p.R337H carriers with ADR. Considering the rarity of this phenotype and the relevance of these findings, further studies using a larger sample set are necessary to confirm our results. PMID:25945745

  16. DNA methylation patterns of candidate genes regulated by thymine DNA glycosylase in patients with TP53 germline mutations.

    PubMed

    Fortes, F P; Kuasne, H; Marchi, F A; Miranda, P M; Rogatto, S R; Achatz, M I

    2015-07-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, hereditary cancer predisposition disorder. In Brazil, the p.R337H TP53 founder mutation causes the variant form of LFS, Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome. The occurrence of cancer and age of disease onset are known to vary, even in patients carrying the same mutation, and several mechanisms such as genetic and epigenetic alterations may be involved in this variability. However, the extent of involvement of such events has not been clarified. It is well established that p53 regulates several pathways, including the thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) pathway, which regulates the DNA methylation of several genes. This study aimed to identify the DNA methylation pattern of genes potentially related to the TDG pathway (CDKN2A, FOXA1, HOXD8, OCT4, SOX2, and SOX17) in 30 patients with germline TP53 mutations, 10 patients with wild-type TP53, and 10 healthy individuals. We also evaluated TDG expression in patients with adrenocortical tumors (ADR) with and without the p.R337H TP53 mutation. Gene methylation patterns of peripheral blood DNA samples assessed by pyrosequencing revealed no significant differences between the three groups. However, increased TDG expression was observed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in p.R337H carriers with ADR. Considering the rarity of this phenotype and the relevance of these findings, further studies using a larger sample set are necessary to confirm our results. PMID:25945745

  17. Electrostatic interactions play an essential role in DNA repair and cold-adaptation of uracil DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Olufsen, Magne; Smalås, Arne O; Brandsdal, Bjørn O

    2008-03-01

    Life has adapted to most environments on earth, including low and high temperature niches. The increased catalytic efficiency and thermoliability observed for enzymes from organisms living in constantly cold regions when compared to their mesophilic and thermophilic cousins are poorly understood at the molecular level. Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) from cod (cUNG) catalyzes removal of uracil from DNA with an increased k(cat) and reduced K(m) relative to its warm-active human (hUNG) counterpart. Specific issues related to DNA repair and substrate binding/recognition (K(m)) are here investigated by continuum electrostatics calculations, MD simulations and free energy calculations. Continuum electrostatic calculations reveal that cUNG has surface potentials that are more complementary to the DNA potential at and around the catalytic site when compared to hUNG, indicating improved substrate binding. Comparative MD simulations combined with free energy calculations using the molecular mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method show that large opposing energies are involved when forming the enzyme-substrate complexes. Furthermore, the binding free energies obtained reveal that the Michaelis-Menten complex is more stable for cUNG, primarily due to enhanced electrostatic properties, suggesting that energetic fine-tuning of electrostatics can be utilized for enzymatic temperature adaptation. Energy decomposition pinpoints the residual determinants responsible for this adaptation. PMID:18196298

  18. Uracil DNa-glycosylase from HeLa cells: general properties, substrate specificity and effect of uracil analogs.

    PubMed

    Krokan, H; Wittwer, C U

    1981-06-11

    Uracil-DNA glycosylase was partially purified from HeLa cells. Various substrates containing [3H]dUMP residues were prepared by nick-translation of calf thymus DNA. The standard substrate was double-stranded DNA with [3H]dUMP located internally in the chain. Compared to the release of uracil from this substrate, a 3-fold increase in the rate was seen with single-stranded DNA, and a 20-fold reduction in the rate was observed when the [3H]dUMP-residue was located at the 3'end. The rate of [3H]uracil release decreased progressively when one, two or three of the dNMP residues were replaced by the corresponding rNMP; in the extreme case when the substrate contained [3H]dUMP in addition to rCMP, rGMP, and rAMP, the rate of [3H]uracil release was less than 3% of that of the control. The enzyme was inhibited to the same extent by uracil and the uracil analogs 6-aminouracil and 5-azauracil, but very weakly, or not at all, by 5 other analogs. Our results suggest strongly that uracil-DNA glycosylase has a high degree of selectivity for uracil in dUMP residues located internally in DNA chains and that the recognition of the correct substrate also depends on the residues flanking dUMP being deoxyribonucleotides. PMID:7279657

  19. The Potential Role of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase-Driven DNA Base Excision Repair in Exercise-Induced Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Belanger, KarryAnne K.; Ameredes, Bill T.; Boldogh, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by reversible airway narrowing, shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing, and other symptoms driven by chronic inflammatory processes, commonly triggered by allergens. In 90% of asthmatics, most of these symptoms can also be triggered by intense physical activities and severely exacerbated by environmental factors. This condition is known as exercise-induced asthma (EIA). Current theories explaining EIA pathogenesis involve osmotic and/or thermal alterations in the airways caused by changes in respiratory airflow during exercise. These changes, along with existing airway inflammatory conditions, are associated with increased cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) affecting important biomolecules including DNA, although the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. One of the most abundant oxidative DNA lesions is 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), which is repaired by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) during the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Whole-genome expression analyses suggest a cellular response to OGG1-BER, involving genes that may have a role in the pathophysiology of EIA leading to mast cell degranulation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and bronchoconstriction. Accordingly, this review discusses a potential new hypothesis in which OGG1-BER-induced gene expression is associated with EIA symptoms. PMID:27524866

  20. Expansion Mechanisms and Evolutionary History on Genes Encoding DNA Glycosylases and Their Involvement in Stress and Hormone Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    DNA glycosylases catalyze the release of methylated bases. They play vital roles in the base excision repair pathway and might also function in DNA demethylation. At least three families of DNA glycosylases have been identified, which included 3′-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (MDG) I, MDG II, and HhH-GPD (Helix–hairpin–Helix and Glycine/Proline/aspartate (D)). However, little is known on their genome-wide identification, expansion, and evolutionary history as well as their expression profiling and biological functions. In this study, we have genome-widely identified and evolutionarily characterized these family members. Generally, a genome encodes only one MDG II gene in most of organisms. No MDG I or MDG II gene was detected in green algae. However, HhH-GPD genes were detectable in all available organisms. The ancestor species contain small size of MDG I and HhH-GPD families. These two families were mainly expanded through the whole-genome duplication and segmental duplication. They were evolutionarily conserved and were generally under purifying selection. However, we have detected recent positive selection among the Oryza genus, which might play roles in species divergence. Further investigation showed that expression divergence played important roles in gene survival after expansion. All of these family genes were expressed in most of developmental stages and tissues in rice plants. High ratios of family genes were downregulated by drought and fungus pathogen as well as abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) treatments, suggesting a negative regulation in response to drought stress and pathogen infection through ABA- and/or JA-dependent hormone signaling pathway. PMID:27026054

  1. Expansion Mechanisms and Evolutionary History on Genes Encoding DNA Glycosylases and Their Involvement in Stress and Hormone Signaling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    DNA glycosylases catalyze the release of methylated bases. They play vital roles in the base excision repair pathway and might also function in DNA demethylation. At least three families of DNA glycosylases have been identified, which included 3'-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (MDG) I, MDG II, and HhH-GPD (Helix-hairpin-Helix and Glycine/Proline/aspartate (D)). However, little is known on their genome-wide identification, expansion, and evolutionary history as well as their expression profiling and biological functions. In this study, we have genome-widely identified and evolutionarily characterized these family members. Generally, a genome encodes only one MDG II gene in most of organisms. No MDG I or MDG II gene was detected in green algae. However, HhH-GPD genes were detectable in all available organisms. The ancestor species contain small size of MDG I and HhH-GPD families. These two families were mainly expanded through the whole-genome duplication and segmental duplication. They were evolutionarily conserved and were generally under purifying selection. However, we have detected recent positive selection among the Oryza genus, which might play roles in species divergence. Further investigation showed that expression divergence played important roles in gene survival after expansion. All of these family genes were expressed in most of developmental stages and tissues in rice plants. High ratios of family genes were downregulated by drought and fungus pathogen as well as abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) treatments, suggesting a negative regulation in response to drought stress and pathogen infection through ABA- and/or JA-dependent hormone signaling pathway. PMID:27026054

  2. Comparison of the absolute level of epigenetic marks 5-methylcytosine, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, and 5-hydroxymethyluracil between human leukocytes and sperm.

    PubMed

    Guz, Jolanta; Gackowski, Daniel; Foksinski, Marek; Rozalski, Rafal; Olinski, Ryszard

    2014-09-01

    5-Methylcytosine is one of the most important epigenetic modifications and has a profound impact on embryonic development. After gamete fusion, there is a widespread and rapid active demethylation process of sperm DNA, which suggests that the paternal epigenome has an important role during embryonic development. To better understand the epigenome of sperm DNA and its possible involvement in a developing embryo, we determined epigenetic marks in human sperm DNA and in surrogate somatic tissue leukocytes; the analyzed epigenetic modifications included 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine. For absolute determination of the modification, we used liquid chromatography with UV detection and tandem mass spectrometry techniques with isotopically labeled internal standards. Our analyses demonstrated, for the first time to date, that absolute global values of 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine in sperm are highly statistically different from those observed for leukocyte DNA, with respective mean values of 3.815% versus 4.307%, 0.797 versus 2.945 per 10⁴ deoxynucleosides, and 5.209 versus 0.492 per 10⁶ deoxynucleosides. We hypothesize that an exceptionally high value of 5-hydroxymethyluracil in sperm (>10-fold higher than in leukocytes) may play a not yet recognized regulatory role in the paternal genome. PMID:25061097

  3. Sequence-dependent Structural Variation in DNA Undergoing Intrahelical Inspection by the DNA glycosylase MutM

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Qi, Yan; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2012-08-31

    MutM, a bacterial DNA-glycosylase, plays a critical role in maintaining genome integrity by catalyzing glycosidic bond cleavage of 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) lesions to initiate base excision DNA repair. The task faced by MutM of locating rare oxoG residues embedded in an overwhelming excess of undamaged bases is especially challenging given the close structural similarity between oxoG and its normal progenitor, guanine (G). MutM actively interrogates the DNA to detect the presence of an intrahelical, fully base-paired oxoG, whereupon the enzyme promotes extrusion of the target nucleobase from the DNA duplex and insertion into the extrahelical active site. Recent structural studies have begun to provide the first glimpse into the protein-DNA interactions that enable MutM to distinguish an intrahelical oxoG from G; however, these initial studies left open the important question of how MutM can recognize oxoG residues embedded in 16 different neighboring sequence contexts (considering only the 5'- and 3'-neighboring base pairs). In this study we set out to understand the manner and extent to which intrahelical lesion recognition varies as a function of the 5'-neighbor. Here we report a comprehensive, systematic structural analysis of the effect of the 5'-neighboring base pair on recognition of an intrahelical oxoG lesion. These structures reveal that MutM imposes the same extrusion-prone ('extrudogenic') backbone conformation on the oxoG lesion irrespective of its 5'-neighbor while leaving the rest of the DNA relatively free to adjust to the particular demands of individual sequences.

  4. A human nuclear uracil DNA glycosylase is the 37-kDa subunit of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Siegler, K.; Mauro, D.J.; Seal, G.; Wurzer, J.; DeRiel, J.K.; Sirover, M.A. )

    1991-10-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized a plasmid (pChug 20.1) that contains the cDNA of a nuclear uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) gene isolated from normal human placenta. This cDNA directed the synthesis of a fusion protein that exhibited UDG activity. The enzymatic activity was specific for a uracil-containing polynucleotide substrate and was inhibited by a glycosylase antibody or a {beta}-galactosidase antibody. Sequence analysis demonstrated an open reading frame that encoded a protein of 335 amino acids of calculated M{sub r} 36,050 and pI 8.7, corresponding to the M{sub r} 37,000 and pI 8.1 of purified human placental UDG. Surprisingly, a search of the GenBank data base revealed that the cDNA of UDG was completely homologous with the 378-kDa subunit of human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Human erythrocyte glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was obtained commercially in its tetrameric form. A 37-kDa subunit was isolated form it and shown to possess UDG activity equivalent to that seen for the purified human placental UDG. The multiple functions of this 37-kDa protein as here and previously reported indicate that it possesses a series of activities, depending on its oligomeric state. Accordingly, mutation(s) in the gene of this multifunctional protein may conceivably result in the diverse cellular phenotypes of Bloom syndrome.

  5. The C-terminal Lysine of Ogg2 DNA Glycosylases is a Major Molecular Determinant for Guanine/8-Oxoguanine Distinction

    SciTech Connect

    Faucher, Frédérick; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie

    2010-08-12

    7,8-Dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is a major oxidative lesion found in DNA. The 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylases (Ogg) responsible for the removal of 8-oxoG are divided into three families Ogg1, Ogg2 and AGOG. The Ogg2 members are devoid of the recognition loop used by Ogg1 to discriminate between 8-oxoG and guanine and it was unclear until recently how Ogg2 enzymes recognize the oxidized base. We present here the first crystallographic structure of an Ogg2 member, Methanocaldococcus janischii Ogg, in complex with a DNA duplex containing the 8-oxoG lesion. This structure highlights the crucial role of the C-terminal lysine, strictly conserved in Ogg2, in the recognition of 8-oxoG. The structure also reveals that Ogg2 undergoes a conformational change upon DNA binding similar to that observed in Ogg1 glycosylases. Furthermore, this work provides a structural rationale for the lack of opposite base specificity in this family of enzymes.

  6. 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1-deficiency modifies allergic airway inflammation by regulating STAT6 and IL-4 in cells and in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (OGG-1) is an enzyme involved in DNA repair. OGG-1 has a potential role in regulating inflammation but its function in modulating allergic diseases remains undefined. Objectives: To investigate the role of OGG-1 in mediating allergic inflammation, we used OGG...

  7. Uracil DNA glycosylase initiates degradation of HIV-1 cDNA containing misincorporated dUTP and prevents viral integration

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Amy F.; Ghosh, Devlina; Zhou, Yan; Seiple, Lauren; McMahon, Moira A.; Spivak, Adam M.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Stivers, James T.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase discriminates poorly between dUTP and dTTP, and accordingly, viral DNA products become heavily uracilated when viruses infect host cells that contain high ratios of dUTP:dTTP. Uracilation of invading retroviral DNA is thought to be an innate immunity barrier to retroviral infection, but the mechanistic features of this immune pathway and the cellular fate of uracilated retroviral DNA products is not known. Here we developed a model system in which the cellular dUTP:dTTP ratio can be pharmacologically increased to favor dUTP incorporation, allowing dissection of this innate immunity pathway. When the virus-infected cells contained elevated dUTP levels, reverse transcription was found to proceed unperturbed, but integration and viral protein expression were largely blocked. Furthermore, successfully integrated proviruses lacked detectable uracil, suggesting that only nonuracilated viral DNA products were integration competent. Integration of the uracilated proviruses was restored using an isogenic cell line that had no detectable human uracil DNA glycosylase (hUNG2) activity, establishing that hUNG2 is a host restriction factor in cells that contain high dUTP. Biochemical studies in primary cells established that this immune pathway is not operative in CD4+ T cells, because these cells have high dUTPase activity (low dUTP), and only modest levels of hUNG activity. Although monocyte-derived macrophages have high dUTP levels, these cells have low hUNG activity, which may diminish the effectiveness of this restriction pathway. These findings establish the essential elements of this pathway and reconcile diverse observations in the literature. PMID:23341616

  8. Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) loss enhances DNA double strand break formation in human cancer cells exposed to pemetrexed

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, L D; Zentner, G E; Scacheri, P C; Gerson, S L

    2014-01-01

    Misincorporation of genomic uracil and formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are known consequences of exposure to TS inhibitors such as pemetrexed. Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) catalyzes the excision of uracil from DNA and initiates DNA base excision repair (BER). To better define the relationship between UNG activity and pemetrexed anticancer activity, we have investigated DNA damage, DSB formation, DSB repair capacity, and replication fork stability in UNG+/+ and UNG−/− cells. We report that despite identical growth rates and DSB repair capacities, UNG−/− cells accumulated significantly greater uracil and DSBs compared with UNG+/+ cells when exposed to pemetrexed. ChIP-seq analysis of γ-H2AX enrichment confirmed fewer DSBs in UNG+/+ cells. Furthermore, DSBs in UNG+/+ and UNG−/− cells occur at distinct genomic loci, supporting differential mechanisms of DSB formation in UNG-competent and UNG-deficient cells. UNG−/− cells also showed increased evidence of replication fork instability (PCNA dispersal) when exposed to pemetrexed. Thymidine co-treatment rescues S-phase arrest in both UNG+/+ and UNG−/− cells treated with IC50-level pemetrexed. However, following pemetrexed exposure, UNG−/− but not UNG+/+ cells are refractory to thymidine rescue, suggesting that deficient uracil excision rather than dTTP depletion is the barrier to cell cycle progression in UNG−/− cells. Based on these findings we propose that pemetrexed-induced uracil misincorporation is genotoxic, contributing to replication fork instability, DSB formation and ultimately cell death. PMID:24503537

  9. Label-free fluorescence turn-on detection of uracil DNA glycosylase activity based on G-quadruplex formation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changbei; Wu, Kefeng; Liu, Haisheng; Xia, Kun; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Jun

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a new methodology for fluorescence turn-on detection of uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) activity based on G-quadruplex formation using a thioflavin T probe. In the presence of UDG, it catalyzed the hydrolysis of the uracil bases in the duplex DNA, resulting in the dissociation of the duplex DNA owing to their low melting temperature. Then, the probe DNA can be recognized quickly by the ThT dye and resulting in an increase in fluorescence. This approach is highly selective and sensitive with a detection limit of 0.01U/mL. It is simple and cost effective without requirement of labeling with a fluorophore-quencher pair. This new method could be used to evaluate the inhibition effect of 5-fluorouracil on UDG activity, and become a useful tool in biomedical research. PMID:27591637

  10. N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase overexpression increases alkylation sensitivity by rapidly removing non-toxic 7-methylguanine adducts

    PubMed Central

    Rinne, M. L.; He, Y.; Pachkowski, B. F.; Nakamura, J.; Kelley, M. R.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that overexpression of N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG) dramatically sensitizes cells to alkylating agent-induced cytotoxicity. We recently demonstrated that this sensitivity is preceded by an increased production of AP sites and strand breaks, confirming that overexpression of MPG disrupts normal base excision repair and causes cell death through overproduction of toxic repair intermediates. Here we establish through site-directed mutagenesis that MPG-induced sensitivity to alkylation is dependent on enzyme glycosylase activity. However, in contrast to the sensitivity seen to heterogeneous alkylating agents, MPG overexpression generates no cellular sensitivity to MeOSO2(CH2)2-lexitropsin, an alkylator which exclusively induces 3-meA lesions. Indeed, MPG overexpression has been shown to increase the toxicity of alkylating agents that produce 7-meG adducts, and here we demonstrate that MPG-overexpressing cells have dramatically increased removal of 7-meG from their DNA. These data suggest that the mechanism of MPG-induced cytotoxicity involves the conversion of non-toxic 7-meG lesions into highly toxic repair intermediates. This study establishes a mechanism by which a benign DNA modification can be made toxic through the overexpression of an otherwise well-tolerated gene product, and the application of this principle could lead to improved chemotherapeutic strategies that reduce the peripheral toxicity of alkylating agents. PMID:15905475

  11. Functional Evaluation of Nine Missense-Type Variants of the Human DNA Glycosylase Enzyme MUTYH in the Japanese Population.

    PubMed

    Shinmura, Kazuya; Kato, Hisami; Goto, Masanori; Yamada, Hidetaka; Tao, Hong; Nakamura, Satoki; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2016-04-01

    Biallelic germline mutations of MUTYH, the gene encoding DNA glycosylase, cause MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), characterized by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma(s). However, a considerable number of MUTYH variants are still functionally uncharacterized. Herein, we report the results of functional evaluation of nine missense-type MUTYH variant proteins in the Japanese population. The DNA glycosylase activity and ability to suppress mutations caused by 8-hydroxyguanine, an oxidized form of guanine, were examined for the nine variants of type 2 MUTYH, a nuclear form of the enzyme, by DNA cleavage activity assay and supF forward mutation assay, respectively. Both activities were severely defective in the p.N210S MUTYH type 2 variant corresponding to p.N238S in the reference MUTYH form and partially defective in p.R219G variant corresponding to p.R247G, but nearly fully retained in seven other variants examined. Our results suggest that p.N238S and p.R247G are likely to be pathogenic alleles for MAP. PMID:26694661

  12. Base-Excision-Repair-Induced Construction of a Single Quantum-Dot-Based Sensor for Sensitive Detection of DNA Glycosylase Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Juan; Ma, Fei; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2016-08-01

    DNA glycosylase is an initiating enzyme of cellular base excision repair pathway which is responsible for the repair of various DNA lesions and the maintenance of genomic stability, and the dysregulation of DNA glycosylase activity is associated with a variety of human pathology. Accurate detection of DNA glycosylase activity is critical to both clinical diagnosis and therapeutics, but conventional methods for the DNA glycosylase assay are usually time-consuming with poor sensitivity. Here, we demonstrate the base-excision-repair-induced construction of a single quantum dot (QD)-based sensor for highly sensitive measurement of DNA glycosylase activity. We use human 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), which is responsible for specifically repairing the damaged 8-hydroxyguanine (8-oxoG, one of the most abundant and widely studied DNA damage products), as a model DNA glycosylase. In the presence of biotin-labeled DNA substrate, the hOGG1 may catalyze the removal of 8-oxo G from 8-oxoG·C base pairs to generate an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site. With the assistance of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), the cleavage of the AP site results in the generation of a single-nucleotide gap. Subsequently, DNA polymerase β incorporates a Cy5-labeled dGTP into the DNA substrate to fill the gap. With the addition of streptavidin-coated QDs, a QD-DNA-Cy5 nanostructure is formed via specific biotin-streptavidin binding, inducing the occurrence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the QD to Cy5. The resulting Cy5 signal can be simply monitored by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) imaging. The proposed method enables highly sensitive measurement of hOGG1 activity with a detection limit of 1.8 × 10(-6) U/μL. Moreover, it can be used to measure the enzyme kinetic parameters and detect the hOGG1 activity in crude cell extracts, offering a powerful tool for biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. PMID:27401302

  13. Metal inhibition of human alkylpurine-DNA-N-glycosylase activityin base excision repair

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ping; Guliaev, Anton B.; Hang, Bo

    2006-02-28

    Cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}), nickel (Ni{sup 2+}) and cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) are human and/or animal carcinogens. Zinc (Zn{sup 2+}) is not categorized as a carcinogen, and rather an essential element to humans. Metals were recently shown to inhibit DNA repair proteins that use metals for their function and/or structure. Here we report that the divalent ions Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} can inhibit the activity of a recombinant human N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) toward a deoxyoligonucleotide with ethenoadenine (var epsilonA). MPG removes a variety of toxic/mutagenic alkylated bases and does not require metal for its catalytic activity or structural integrity. At concentrations starting from 50 to 1000 {micro}M, both Cd{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} showed metal-dependent inhibition of the MPG catalytic activity. Ni{sup 2+} also inhibited MPG, but to a lesser extent. Such an effect can be reversed with EDTA addition. In contrast, Co{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} did not inhibit the MPG activity in the same dose range. Experiments using HeLa cell-free extracts demonstrated similar patterns of inactivation of the var epsilonA excision activity by the same metals. Binding of MPG to the substrate was not significantly affected by Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+} at concentrations that show strong inhibition of the catalytic function, suggesting that the reduced catalytic activity is not due to altered MPG binding affinity to the substrate. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with Zn{sup 2+} showed that the MPG active site has a potential binding site for Zn{sup 2+}, formed by several catalytically important and conserved residues. Metal binding to such a site is expected to interfere with the catalytic mechanism of this protein. These data suggest that inhibition of MPG activity may contribute to metal genotoxicity and depressed repair of alkylation damage by metals in vivo.

  14. Characterization of a novel DNA glycosylase from S. sahachiroi involved in the reduction and repair of azinomycin B induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Liu, Kai; Xiao, Le; Yang, LiYuan; Li, Hong; Zhang, FeiXue; Lei, Lei; Li, ShengQing; Feng, Xu; Li, AiYing; He, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Azinomycin B is a hybrid polyketide/nonribosomal peptide natural product and possesses antitumor activity by interacting covalently with duplex DNA and inducing interstrand crosslinks. In the biosynthetic study of azinomycin B, a gene (orf1) adjacent to the azinomycin B gene cluster was found to be essential for the survival of the producer, Streptomyces sahachiroi ATCC33158. Sequence analyses revealed that Orf1 belongs to the HTH_42 superfamily of conserved bacterial proteins which are widely distributed in pathogenic and antibiotic-producing bacteria with unknown functions. The protein exhibits a protective effect against azinomycin B when heterologously expressed in azinomycin-sensitive strains. EMSA assays showed its sequence nonspecific binding to DNA and structure-specific binding to azinomycin B-adducted sites, and ChIP assays revealed extensive association of Orf1 with chromatin in vivo. Interestingly, Orf1 not only protects target sites by protein–DNA interaction but is also capable of repairing azinomycin B-mediated DNA cross-linking. It possesses the DNA glycosylase-like activity and specifically repairs DNA damage induced by azinomycin B through removal of both adducted nitrogenous bases in the cross-link. This bifunctional protein massively binds to genomic DNA to reduce drug attack risk as a novel DNA binding protein and triggers the base excision repair system as a novel DNA glycosylase. PMID:26400161

  15. Partial uracil-DNA-glycosylase treatment for screening of ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Rohland, Nadin; Harney, Eadaoin; Mallick, Swapan; Nordenfelt, Susanne; Reich, David

    2015-01-19

    The challenge of sequencing ancient DNA has led to the development of specialized laboratory protocols that have focused on reducing contamination and maximizing the number of molecules that are extracted from ancient remains. Despite the fact that success in ancient DNA studies is typically obtained by screening many samples to identify a promising subset, ancient DNA protocols have not, in general, focused on reducing the time required to screen samples. We present an adaptation of a popular ancient library preparation method that makes screening more efficient. First, the DNA extract is treated using a protocol that causes characteristic ancient DNA damage to be restricted to the terminal nucleotides, while nearly eliminating it in the interior of the DNA molecules, allowing a single library to be used both to test for ancient DNA authenticity and to carry out population genetic analysis. Second, the DNA molecules are ligated to a unique pair of barcodes, which eliminates undetected cross-contamination from this step onwards. Third, the barcoded library molecules include incomplete adapters of short length that can increase the specificity of hybridization-based genomic target enrichment. The adapters are completed just before sequencing, so the same DNA library can be used in multiple experiments, and the sequences distinguished. We demonstrate this protocol on 60 ancient human samples. PMID:25487342

  16. Phosphorylation Sites Identified in the NEIL1 DNA Glycosylase Are Potential Targets for the JNK1 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Aishwarya; Cao, Vy Bao; Doublié, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    The NEIL1 DNA glycosylase is one of eleven mammalian DNA glycosylases that partake in the first step of the base excision repair (BER) pathway. NEIL1 recognizes and cleaves mainly oxidized pyrimidines from DNA. The past decade has witnessed the identification of an increasing number of post-translational modifications (PTMs) in BER enzymes including phosphorylation, acetylation, and sumoylation, which modulate enzyme function. In this work, we performed the first comprehensive analysis of phosphorylation sites in human NEIL1 expressed in human cells. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis revealed phosphorylation at three serine residues: S207, S306, and a third novel site, S61. We expressed, purified, and characterized phosphomimetic (glutamate) and phosphoablating (alanine) mutants of the three phosphorylation sites in NEIL1 revealed by the MS analysis. All mutant enzymes were active and bound tightly to DNA, indicating that phosphorylation does not affect DNA binding and enzyme activity at these three serine sites. We also characterized phosphomimetic mutants of two other sites of phosphorylation, Y263 and S269, reported previously, and observed that mutation of Y263 to E yielded a completely inactive enzyme. Furthermore, based on sequence motifs and kinase prediction algorithms, we identified the c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) as the kinase involved in the phosphorylation of NEIL1. JNK1, a member of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, was detected in NEIL1 immunoprecipitates, interacted with NEIL1 in vitro, and was able to phosphorylate the enzyme at residues S207, S306, and S61. PMID:27518429

  17. Down-regulation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 expression in the airway epithelium ameliorates allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bacsi, Attila; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Szczesny, Bartosz; Radak, Zsolt; Hazra, Tapas K; Sur, Sanjiv; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Allergic airway inflammation is characterized by increased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, inflammatory cell infiltration, mucus hypersecretion, and airway hyperresponsiveness, in parallel with oxidative DNA base and strand damage, whose etiological role is not understood. Our goal was to establish the role of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a common oxidatively damaged base, and its repair by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) in allergic airway inflammatory processes. Airway inflammation was induced by intranasally administered ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grain extract (RWPE) in sensitized BALB/c mice. We utilized siRNA technology to deplete Ogg1 from airway epithelium; 8-oxoG and DNA strand break levels were quantified by Comet assays. Inflammatory cell infiltration and epithelial methaplasia were determined histologically, mucus and cytokines levels biochemically and enhanced pause was used as the main index of airway hyperresponsiveness. Decreased Ogg1 expression and thereby 8-oxoG repair in the airway epithelium conveyed a lower inflammatory response after RWPE challenge of sensitized mice, as determined by expression of Th2 cytokines, eosinophilia, epithelial methaplasia, and airway hyperresponsiveness. In contrast, 8-oxoG repair in Ogg1-proficient airway epithelium was coupled to an increase in DNA single-strand break (SSB) levels and exacerbation of allergen challenge-dependent inflammation. Decreased expression of the Nei-like glycosylases Neil1 and Neil2 that preferentially excise ring-opened purines and 5-hydroxyuracil, respectively, did not alter the above parameters of allergic immune responses to RWPE. These results show that DNA SSBs formed during Ogg1-mediated repair of 8-oxoG augment antigen-driven allergic immune responses. A transient modulation of OGG1 expression/activity in airway epithelial cells could have clinical benefits. PMID:23127499

  18. Synthetic Routes to N-9 Alkylated 8-Oxoguanines; Weak Inhibitors of the Human DNA Glycosylase OGG1.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Tushar R; Ytre-Arne, Mari Eknes; Strøm-Andersen, Pernille; Dalhus, Bjørn; Gundersen, Lise-Lotte

    2015-01-01

    The human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase OGG1 is involved in base excision repair (BER), one of several DNA repair mechanisms that may counteract the effects of chemo- and radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. We envisage that potent inhibitors of OGG1 may be found among the 9-alkyl-8-oxoguanines. Thus we explored synthetic routes to 8-oxoguanines and examined these as OGG1 inhibitors. The best reaction sequence started from 6-chloroguanine and involved N-9 alkylation, C-8 bromination, and finally simultaneous hydrolysis of both halides. Bromination before N-alkylation should only be considered when the N-substituent is not compatible with bromination conditions. The 8-oxoguanines were found to be weak inhibitors of OGG1. 6-Chloro-8-oxopurines, byproducts in the hydrolysis of 2,6-halopurines, turned out to be slightly better inhibitors than the corresponding 8-oxoguanines. PMID:26364627

  19. Solution-state NMR Investigation of DNA Binding Interactions in Escherichia coli Formamidopyrimidine-DNA Glycosylase (Fpg): A Dynamic Description of the DNA/Protein Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; McAteer, Kathleen; Wallace, Susan S.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2005-03-02

    Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) is a base excision repair protein that removes oxidative DNA lesions. Recent crystal structures of Fpg bound to DNA revealed residues involved in damage recognition and enzyme catalysis, but failed to shed light on the dynamic nature of the processes. To examine the structural and dynamic changes that occur in solution when Fpg binds DNA, NMR spectroscopy was used to study Escherichia coli Fpg free and bound to a double-stranded DNA oligomer (13-PD) containing propanediol, a non-hydrolyzable abasic-site analogue. Only 209 out of a possible 252 (83%) free-precession HSQC cross peaks were observed and 180 of these were assignable, indicating that ~30% of the residues undergo intermediate timescale motion that makes them intractable in backbone assignment experiments. DNA titration experiments revealed line broadening and chemical shift perturbations for backbone amides nearby and distant from the DNA binding surface, but failed to quench the intermediate time-scale motion observed for free Fpg. CPMG-HSQC experiments revealed millisecond to microsecond motion for the backbone amides of D91 and H92 that was quenched upon binding 13-PD. Collectively, these observations reveal that, in solution, Fpg contains highly flexible regions. The dynamic nature of Fpg, especially at the DNA binding surface, may be key to its processive search mechanism.

  20. Involvement of phylogenetically conserved acidic amino acid residues in catalysis by an oxidative DNA damage enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Lavrukhin, O V; Lloyd, R S

    2000-12-12

    Formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg) is an important bacterial base excision repair enzyme, which initiates removal of damaged purines such as the highly mutagenic 8-oxoguanine. Similar to other glycosylase/AP lyases, catalysis by Fpg is known to proceed by a nucleophilic attack by an amino group (the secondary amine of its N-terminal proline) on C1' of the deoxyribose sugar at a damaged base, which results in the departure of the base from the DNA and removal of the sugar ring by beta/delta-elimination. However, in contrast to other enzymes in this class, in which acidic amino acids have been shown to be essential for glycosyl and phosphodiester bond scission, the catalytically essential acidic residues have not been documented for Fpg. Multiple sequence alignments of conserved acidic residues in all known bacterial Fpg-like proteins revealed six conserved glutamic and aspartic acid residues. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to change glutamic and aspartic acid residues to glutamines and asparagines, respectively. While the Asp to Asn mutants had no effect on the incision activity on 8-oxoguanine-containing DNA, several of the substitutions at glutamates reduced Fpg activity on the 8-oxoguanosine DNA, with the E3Q and E174Q mutants being essentially devoid of activity. The AP lyase activity of all of the glutamic acid mutants was slightly reduced as compared to the wild-type enzyme. Sodium borohydride trapping of wild-type Fpg and its E3Q and E174Q mutants on 8-oxoguanosine or AP site containing DNA correlated with the relative activity of the mutants on either of these substrates. PMID:11106507

  1. Slow base excision by human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase limits the rate of formation of AP sites and AP endonuclease 1 does not stimulate base excision.

    PubMed

    Maher, Robyn L; Vallur, Aarthy C; Feller, Joyce A; Bloom, Linda B

    2007-01-01

    The base excision repair pathway removes damaged DNA bases and resynthesizes DNA to replace the damage. Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) is one of several damage-specific DNA glycosylases that recognizes and excises damaged DNA bases. AAG removes primarily damaged adenine residues. Human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) recognizes AP sites produced by DNA glycosylases and incises the phophodiester bond 5' to the damaged site. The repair process is completed by a DNA polymerase and DNA ligase. If not tightly coordinated, base excision repair could generate intermediates that are more deleterious to the cell than the initial DNA damage. The kinetics of AAG-catalyzed excision of two damaged bases, hypoxanthine and 1,N6-ethenoadenine, were measured in the presence and absence of APE1 to investigate the mechanism by which the base excision activity of AAG is coordinated with the AP incision activity of APE1. 1,N6-ethenoadenine is excised significantly slower than hypoxanthine and the rate of excision is not affected by APE1. The excision of hypoxanthine is inhibited to a small degree by accumulated product, and APE1 stimulates multiple turnovers by alleviating product inhibition. These results show that APE1 does not significantly affect the kinetics of base excision by AAG. It is likely that slow excision by AAG limits the rate of AP site formation in vivo such that AP sites are not created faster than can be processed by APE1. PMID:17018265

  2. Interaction of the recombinant human methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG protein) with oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing either hypoxanthine or abasic sites.

    PubMed Central

    Miao, F; Bouziane, M; O'Connor, T R

    1998-01-01

    Methylpurine-DNA glycosylases (MPG proteins, 3-methyladenine-DNA glycosylases) excise numerous damaged bases from DNA during the first step of base excision repair. The damaged bases removed by these proteins include those induced by both alkylating agents and/or oxidizing agents. The intrinsic kinetic parameters (k(cat) and K(m)) for the excision of hypoxanthine by the recombinant human MPG protein from a 39 bp oligodeoxyribonucleotide harboring a unique hypoxanthine were determined. Comparison with other reactions catalyzed by the human MPG protein suggests that the differences in specificity are primarily in product release and not binding. Analysis of MPG protein binding to the 39 bp oligodeoxyribonucleotide revealed that the apparent dissociation constant is of the same order of magnitude as the K(m) and that a 1:1 complex is formed. The MPG protein also forms a strong complex with the product of excision, an abasic site, as well as with a reduced abasic site. DNase I footprinting experiments with the MPG protein on an oligodeoxyribonucleotide with a unique hypoxanthine at a defined position indicate that the protein protects 11 bases on the strand with the hypoxanthine and 12 bases on the complementary strand. Competition experiments with different length, double-stranded, hypoxanthine-containing oligodeoxyribonucleotides show that the footprinted region is relatively small. Despite the small footprint, however, oligodeoxyribonucleotides comprising <15 bp with a hypoxanthine have a 10-fold reduced binding capacity compared with hypoxanthine-containing oligodeoxyribonucleotides >20 bp in length. These results provide a basis for other structural studies of the MPG protein with its targets. PMID:9705516

  3. Using structural-based protein engineering to modulate the differential inhibition effects of SAUGI on human and HSV uracil DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao-Ching; Ho, Chun-Han; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Huang, Ming-Fen; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2016-05-19

    Uracil-DNA glycosylases (UDGs) are highly conserved proteins that can be found in a wide range of organisms, and are involved in the DNA repair and host defense systems. UDG activity is controlled by various cellular factors, including the uracil-DNA glycosylase inhibitors, which are DNA mimic proteins that prevent the DNA binding sites of UDGs from interacting with their DNA substrate. To date, only three uracil-DNA glycosylase inhibitors, phage UGI, p56, and Staphylococcus aureus SAUGI, have been determined. We show here that SAUGI has differential inhibitory effects on UDGs from human, bacteria, Herpes simplex virus (HSV; human herpesvirus 1) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV; human herpesvirus 4). Newly determined crystal structures of SAUGI/human UDG and a SAUGI/HSVUDG complex were used to explain the differential binding activities of SAUGI on these two UDGs. Structural-based protein engineering was further used to modulate the inhibitory ability of SAUGI on human UDG and HSVUDG. The results of this work extend our understanding of DNA mimics as well as potentially opening the way for novel therapeutic applications for this kind of protein. PMID:26980279

  4. Using structural-based protein engineering to modulate the differential inhibition effects of SAUGI on human and HSV uracil DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao-Ching; Ho, Chun-Han; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Huang, Ming-Fen; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Uracil-DNA glycosylases (UDGs) are highly conserved proteins that can be found in a wide range of organisms, and are involved in the DNA repair and host defense systems. UDG activity is controlled by various cellular factors, including the uracil-DNA glycosylase inhibitors, which are DNA mimic proteins that prevent the DNA binding sites of UDGs from interacting with their DNA substrate. To date, only three uracil-DNA glycosylase inhibitors, phage UGI, p56, and Staphylococcus aureus SAUGI, have been determined. We show here that SAUGI has differential inhibitory effects on UDGs from human, bacteria, Herpes simplex virus (HSV; human herpesvirus 1) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV; human herpesvirus 4). Newly determined crystal structures of SAUGI/human UDG and a SAUGI/HSVUDG complex were used to explain the differential binding activities of SAUGI on these two UDGs. Structural-based protein engineering was further used to modulate the inhibitory ability of SAUGI on human UDG and HSVUDG. The results of this work extend our understanding of DNA mimics as well as potentially opening the way for novel therapeutic applications for this kind of protein. PMID:26980279

  5. Distribution of 5-methylcytosine residues in 5S rRNA genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Secale cereale.

    PubMed

    Fulnecek, J; Matyásek, R; Kovarík, A

    2002-12-01

    Bisulfite genomic sequencing was used to localise 5-methylcytosine residues (mC) in 5S rRNA genes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Secale cereale. The maps of mC distribution were compared with the previously published map of the corresponding region in Nicotiana tabacum. In all three species, the level of methylation of 5S rRNA genes was generally higher than the average for the entire genome. The ratio of 5S rDNA methylation to average overall methylation was 44%/30-33% for N. tabacum, 27%/4-6% for A. thaliana and 24%/20-22% for S. cereale. With the exception of one clone from S. cereale, no methylation-free 5S rDNA was detected. The level of methylation at different sequence motifs in 5S rDNA was calculated for N. tabacum/A. thaliana/ S. cereale, and this analysis yielded the following values (expressed as a percentage of total C): mCG 90%/78%/85%, mCWG 89%/41%/53%, mCmCG 72%/32%/16%, mCCG 4%/2%/0%, mCHH 15%/6%/1%, where W=A or T, and H=A or C or T. Non-symmetrical methylation was almost negligible in the large genome of S. cereale but relatively frequent in N. tabacum and A. thaliana, suggesting that the strict correlation between genome size and cytosine methylation might be violated for this type of methylation. Among non-symmetrical motifs the mCWA triplets were significantly over-represented in Arabidopsis, while in tobacco this preference was not as pronounced. The differences in methylation levels in different sequence contexts might be of phylogenetic significance, but further species in related and different taxa need to be studied before firm conclusions can be drawn. PMID:12471448

  6. A Strategy for Accurate Quantification of 5-Methylcytosine and 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine at CpG Sites Within Gene Promoter.

    PubMed

    Qui, Yiping; Yang, Qi; Sui, Fang; Lu, Rong; Dang, Siwen; Ji, Meiju; He, Nongyue; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2015-06-01

    5-Methylcytosine (5mC) can be converted to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in mammalian DNA by the ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes. Traditional bisulfite-based DNA methylation analysis techniques have been widely used in the detection of 5mC. However, they can not discriminate 5hmC from 5mC, leading to overestimate 5mC levels. We here introduce a strategy, combination of selective oxidation and bisulfite pyrosequencing (BS-Pyroseq), for quantification of both 5mC and 5hmC at CpG sites within the promoters of CDH1, DAPK, RARβ and RUNX3 genes in a panel of cell lines and clinical samples. As expected, oxidative bisulfite pyrosequencing (oxBS-Pyroseq) assay decreased overall or site-specific methylation levels of three of these genes in most cell lines as compared with BS-Pyroseq assay. Similarly, decreased overall or site-specific methylation levels of DAPK, RARβ and RUNX3 genes in laryngeal, gastric and thyroid cancer and their matched normal tissues, respectively, were also found by a comparison between these two techniques, particularly in cancerous tissues. In addition, by using this combined strategy and hydroxymethylcytosine DNA immunoprecipitation (hMeDIP) assay, we demonstrated that TET1 up-regulated DAPK expression through promoter demethylation. Collectively, this strategy is easy to establish and accurately discriminates and quantifies 5mC and 5hmC at CpG sites within selected gene promoters. PMID:26353591

  7. Opinion: uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) plays distinct and non-canonical roles in somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Ashraf S.; Stanlie, Andre; Begum, Nasim A.

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential to class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a member of the base excision repair complex, is required for CSR. The role of UNG in CSR and SHM is extremely controversial. AID deficiency in mice abolishes both CSR and SHM, while UNG-deficient mice have drastically reduced CSR but augmented SHM raising a possibility of differential functions of UNG in CSR and SHM. Interestingly, UNG has been associated with a CSR-specific repair adapter protein Brd4, which interacts with acetyl histone 4, γH2AX and 53BP1 to promote non-homologous end joining during CSR. A non-canonical scaffold function of UNG, but not the catalytic activity, can be attributed to the recruitment of essential repair proteins associated with the error-free repair during SHM, and the end joining during CSR. PMID:24994819

  8. Opinion: uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) plays distinct and non-canonical roles in somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Ashraf S; Stanlie, Andre; Begum, Nasim A; Honjo, Tasuku

    2014-10-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential to class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a member of the base excision repair complex, is required for CSR. The role of UNG in CSR and SHM is extremely controversial. AID deficiency in mice abolishes both CSR and SHM, while UNG-deficient mice have drastically reduced CSR but augmented SHM raising a possibility of differential functions of UNG in CSR and SHM. Interestingly, UNG has been associated with a CSR-specific repair adapter protein Brd4, which interacts with acetyl histone 4, γH2AX and 53BP1 to promote non-homologous end joining during CSR. A non-canonical scaffold function of UNG, but not the catalytic activity, can be attributed to the recruitment of essential repair proteins associated with the error-free repair during SHM, and the end joining during CSR. PMID:24994819

  9. Excision of 5-halogenated Uracils by Human Thymine DNA Glycosylase: Robust Activity for DNA Contexts other than CpG*

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Michael T.; Bennett, Matthew T.; Drohat, Alexander C.

    2010-01-01

    Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) excises thymine from G·T mispairs, and removes a variety of damaged bases (X), with a preference for lesions in a CpG·X context. We recently reported that human TDG rapidly excises 5-halogenated uracils, exhibiting much greater activity for CpG·FU, CpG·ClU, and CpG·BrU than for CpG·T. Here, we examine the effects of altering the CpG context on the excision activity for U, T, FU, ClU, and BrU. We show that the maximal activity (kmax) for G·X substrates depends significantly on the 5′ base pair. For example, kmax decreases by 6-, 11-, and 82-fold for TpG·ClU, GpG·ClU, and ApG·ClU, respectively, as compared to CpG·ClU. For the other G·X substrates, the 5′-neighbor effects have a similar trend but vary in magnitude. The activity for G·FU, G·ClU, and G·BrU, with any 5′-flanking pair, meets and in most cases significantly exceeds the CpG·T activity. Strikingly, hTDG activity is reduced 102.3- to 104.3-fold for A·X relative to G·X pairs, and reduced further for A·X pairs with a 5′ pair other than C·G. The effect of altering the 5′ pair and/or the opposing base (G·X versus A·X) is greater for substrates that are larger (BrdU, dT) or have a more stable N-glycosidic bond (such as dT). The largest CpG context effects are observed for the excision of thymine. The potential role played by hTDG in the cytotoxic effects of ClU and BrU incorporation into DNA, which can occur under inflammatory conditions, and in the cytotoxicity of FU, a widely used anticancer agent, are discussed. PMID:17602166

  10. Deficiency of the oxidative damage-specific DNA glycosylase NEIL1 leads to reduced germinal center B cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hiromi; Ouchida, Rika; Hijikata, Atsushi; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Ohara, Osamu; Li, Yingqian; Gao, Xiang; Yasui, Akira; Lloyd, R. Stephen; Wang, Ji-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells possess multiple DNA glycosylases, including OGG1, NTH1, NEIL1, NEIL2 and NEIL3, for the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Among these, NEIL1 and NEIL2 are able to excise oxidized bases on single stranded or bubble-structured DNA and has been implicated in repair of oxidative damage associated with DNA replication or transcription. We found that Neil1 was highly constitutively expressed in the germinal center (GC) B cells, a rapidly dividing cell population that is undergoing immunoglobulin (Ig) gene hypermutation and isotype switching. While Neil1−/− mice exhibited normal B and T cell development and maturation, these mice contained a significantly lower frequency of GC B cells than did WT mice after immunization with a T-dependent antigen. Consistent with the reduced expansion of GC B cells, Neil1−/− mice had a decreased frequency of Ig gene hypermutation and produced less antibody against a T-dependent antigen during both primary and secondary immune responses. These results suggest that repair of endogenous oxidative DNA damage by NEIL1 is important for the rapid expansion of GC B cells and efficient induction of humoral immune responses. PMID:19782007

  11. Structural basis for removal of adenine mispaired with 8-oxoguanine by MutY adenine DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Fromme, J Christopher; Banerjee, Anirban; Huang, Susan J; Verdine, Gregory L

    2004-02-12

    The genomes of aerobic organisms suffer chronic oxidation of guanine to the genotoxic product 8-oxoguanine (oxoG). Replicative DNA polymerases misread oxoG residues and insert adenine instead of cytosine opposite the oxidized base. Both bases in the resulting A*oxoG mispair are mutagenic lesions, and both must undergo base-specific replacement to restore the original C*G pair. Doing so represents a formidable challenge to the DNA repair machinery, because adenine makes up roughly 25% of the bases in most genomes. The evolutionarily conserved enzyme adenine DNA glycosylase (called MutY in bacteria and hMYH in humans) initiates repair of A*oxoG to C*G by removing the inappropriately paired adenine base from the DNA backbone. A central issue concerning MutY function is the mechanism by which A*oxoG mispairs are targeted among the vast excess of A*T pairs. Here we report the use of disulphide crosslinking to obtain high-resolution crystal structures of MutY-DNA lesion-recognition complexes. These structures reveal the basis for recognizing both lesions in the A*oxoG pair and for catalysing removal of the adenine base. PMID:14961129

  12. Repair-deficient 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase homozygous mutant mouse cells have increased sensitivity to alkylation-induced chromosome damage and cell killing.

    PubMed Central

    Engelward, B P; Dreslin, A; Christensen, J; Huszar, D; Kurahara, C; Samson, L

    1996-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the repair of 3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA lesions prevents alkylation-induced cell death because unrepaired 3MeA blocks DNA replication. Whether this lesion is cytotoxic to mammalian cells has been difficult to establish in the absence of 3MeA repair-deficient cell lines. We previously isolated and characterized a mouse 3MeA DNA glycosylase cDNA (Aag) that provides resistance to killing by alkylating agents in E. coli. To determine the in vivo role of Aag, we cloned a large fragment of the Aag gene and used it to create Aag-deficient mouse cells by targeted homologous recombination. Aag null cells have no detectable Aag transcripts or 3MeA DNA glycosylase activity. The loss of Aag renders cells significantly more sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate-induced chromosome damage, and to cell killing induced by two methylating agents, one of which produces almost exclusively 3MeAs. Aag null embryonic stem cells become sensitive to two cancer chemotherapeutic alkylating agents, namely 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea and mitomycin C, indicating that Aag status is an important determinant of cellular resistance to these agents. We conclude that this mammalian 3MeA DNA glycosylase plays a pivotal role in preventing alkylation-induced chromosome damage and cytotoxicity. Images PMID:8631315

  13. Differential regulation of S-region hypermutation and class-switch recombination by noncanonical functions of uracil DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Ashraf S.; Stanlie, Andre; Mondal, Samiran; Honjo, Tasuku; Begum, Nasim A.

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential to class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in both V region SHM and S region SHM (s-SHM). Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a member of the base excision repair (BER) complex, is required for CSR. Strikingly, however, UNG deficiency causes augmentation of SHM, suggesting involvement of distinct functions of UNG in SHM and CSR. Here, we show that noncanonical scaffold functions of UNG regulate s-SHM negatively and CSR positively. The s-SHM suppressive function of UNG is attributed to the recruitment of faithful BER components at the cleaved DNA locus, with competition against error-prone polymerases. By contrast, the CSR-promoting function of UNG enhances AID-dependent S-S synapse formation by recruiting p53-binding protein 1 and DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit. Several loss-of-catalysis mutants of UNG discriminated CSR-promoting activity from s-SHM suppressive activity. Taken together, the noncanonical function of UNG regulates the steps after AID-induced DNA cleavage: error-prone repair suppression in s-SHM and end-joining promotion in CSR. PMID:24591630

  14. Differential regulation of S-region hypermutation and class-switch recombination by noncanonical functions of uracil DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Ashraf S; Stanlie, Andre; Mondal, Samiran; Honjo, Tasuku; Begum, Nasim A

    2014-03-18

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential to class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in both V region SHM and S region SHM (s-SHM). Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a member of the base excision repair (BER) complex, is required for CSR. Strikingly, however, UNG deficiency causes augmentation of SHM, suggesting involvement of distinct functions of UNG in SHM and CSR. Here, we show that noncanonical scaffold functions of UNG regulate s-SHM negatively and CSR positively. The s-SHM suppressive function of UNG is attributed to the recruitment of faithful BER components at the cleaved DNA locus, with competition against error-prone polymerases. By contrast, the CSR-promoting function of UNG enhances AID-dependent S-S synapse formation by recruiting p53-binding protein 1 and DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit. Several loss-of-catalysis mutants of UNG discriminated CSR-promoting activity from s-SHM suppressive activity. Taken together, the noncanonical function of UNG regulates the steps after AID-induced DNA cleavage: error-prone repair suppression in s-SHM and end-joining promotion in CSR. PMID:24591630

  15. Arsenite Targets the Zinc Finger Domains of Tet Proteins and Inhibits Tet-Mediated Oxidation of 5-Methylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Jiang, Ji; Li, Lin; Amato, Nicholas J; Wang, Zi; Wang, Yinsheng

    2015-10-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a serious public health problem worldwide that brings more than 100 million people into the risk of arsenic exposure from groundwater and food contamination. Although there is accumulating evidence linking arsenic exposure with aberrant cytosine methylation in the global genome or at specific genomic loci, very few have investigated the impact of arsenic on the oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) mediated by the Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) family of proteins. Owing to the high binding affinity of As(III) toward cysteine residues, we reasoned that the highly conserved C3H-type zinc fingers situated in Tet proteins may constitute potential targets for arsenic binding. Herein, we found that arsenite could bind directly to the zinc fingers of Tet proteins in vitro and in cells, and this interaction substantially impaired the catalytic efficiency of Tet proteins in oxidizing 5-mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-foC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Treatments with arsenite also led to a dose-dependent decrease in the level of 5-hmC, but not 5-mC, in DNA isolated from HEK293T cells overexpressing the catalytic domain of any of the three Tet proteins and from mouse embryonic stem cells. Together, our study unveiled, for the first time, that arsenite could alter epigenetic signaling by targeting the zinc fingers of Tet proteins and perturbing the Tet-mediated oxidation of 5-mC in vitro and in cells. Our results offer important mechanistic understanding of arsenic epigenotoxicity and carcinogenesis in mammalian systems and may lead to novel approaches for the chemoprevention of arsenic toxicity. PMID:26355596

  16. Potential role of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 as a STAT1 coactivator in endotoxin-induced inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Sook; Kim, Byung-Hak; Jung, Joo Eun; Lee, Chang Seok; Lee, Hyun Gyu; Lee, Jung Weon; Lee, Kun Ho; You, Ho Jin; Chung, Myung-Hee; Ye, Sang-Kyu

    2016-04-01

    Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) is the major DNA repair enzyme that plays a key role in excision of oxidative damaged DNA bases such as 8-oxoguainine (8-oxoG). Recent studies suggest another function of OGG1, namely that it may be involved in the endotoxin- or oxidative stress-induced inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the role of OGG1 in the inflammatory response. OGG1 expression is increased in the organs of endotoxin-induced or myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-immunized mice and immune cells, resulting in induction of the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators at the transcriptional levels. Biochemical studies showed that signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) plays a key role in endotoxin-induced OGG1 expression and inflammatory response. STAT1 regulates the transcriptional activity of OGG1 through recruiting and binding to the gamma-interferon activation site (GAS) motif of the OGG1 promoter region, and chromatin remodeling by acetylation and dimethylation of lysine-14 and -4 residues of histone H3. In addition, OGG1 acts as a STAT1 coactivator and has transcriptional activity in the presence of endotoxin. The data presented here identifies a novel mechanism, and may provide new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of endotoxin-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26496208

  17. Structure/Function Analysis of DNA-glycosylases That Repair Oxidized Purines and Pyrimidines and the Influence of Surrounding DNA Sequence on Their Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Susan S.

    2005-08-22

    The overall goal of this project was to elucidate the structure/function relationships between oxidized DNA bases and the DNA repair enzymes that recognize and remove them. The NMR solution structure of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) that recognizes oxidized DNA purines was to be determined. Furthermore, the solution structures of DNA molecules containing specific lesions recognized by Fpg was to be determined in sequence contexts that either facilitate or hinder this recognition. These objectives were in keeping with the long-term goals of the Principal Investigator's laboratory, that is, to understand the basic mechanisms that underpin base excision repair processing of oxidative DNA lesions and to elucidate the interactions of unrepaired lesions with DNA polymerases. The results of these two DNA transactions can ultimately determine the fate of the cell. These objectives were also in keeping with the goals of our collaborator, Dr. Michael Kennedy, who is studying the repair and recognition of damaged DNA. Overall the goals of this project were congruent with those of the Department of Energy's Health Effects and Life Sciences Research Program, especially to the Structural Biology, the Human Genome and the Health Effects Programs. The mission of the latter Program includes understanding the biological effects and consequences of DNA damages produced by toxic agents in the many DOE waste sites so that cleanup can be accomplished in a safe, effective and timely manner.

  18. Absence of the Uracil DNA Glycosylase of Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Impairs Replication and Delays the Establishment of Latency In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Minkah, Nana; Macaluso, Marc; Oldenburg, Darby G.; Paden, Clinton R.; White, Douglas W.; McBride, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Uracil DNA glycosylases (UNG) are highly conserved proteins that preserve DNA fidelity by catalyzing the removal of mutagenic uracils. All herpesviruses encode a viral UNG (vUNG), and yet the role of the vUNG in a pathogenic course of gammaherpesvirus infection is not known. First, we demonstrated that the vUNG of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) retains the enzymatic function of host UNG in an in vitro class switch recombination assay. Next, we generated a recombinant MHV68 with a stop codon in ORF46/UNG (ΔUNG) that led to loss of UNG activity in infected cells and a replication defect in primary fibroblasts. Acute replication of MHV68ΔUNG in the lungs of infected mice was reduced 100-fold and was accompanied by a substantial delay in the establishment of splenic latency. Latency was largely, yet not fully, restored by an increase in virus inoculum or by altering the route of infection. MHV68 reactivation from latent splenocytes was not altered in the absence of the vUNG. A survey of host UNG activity in cells and tissues targeted by MHV68 indicated that the lung tissue has a lower level of enzymatic UNG activity than the spleen. Taken together, these results indicate that the vUNG plays a critical role in the replication of MHV68 in tissues with limited host UNG activity and this vUNG-dependent expansion, in turn, influences the kinetics of latency establishment in distal reservoirs. IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses establish chronic lifelong infections using a strategy of replicative expansion, dissemination to latent reservoirs, and subsequent reactivation for transmission and spread. We examined the role of the viral uracil DNA glycosylase, a protein conserved among all herpesviruses, in replication and latency of murine gammaherpesvirus 68. We report that the viral UNG of this murine pathogen retains catalytic activity and influences replication in culture. The viral UNG was impaired for productive replication in the lung. This defect in expansion at the

  19. The lytic phase of epstein-barr virus requires a viral genome with 5-methylcytosine residues in CpG sites.

    PubMed

    Kalla, Markus; Göbel, Christine; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus which has been studied intensively for its role in certain human tumors. It also serves as a model of herpesviral latency because it establishes an immediate, latent infection in human B cells. When EBV infects quiescent, primary B cells it induces their continuous proliferation to yield growth-transformed B-cell lines in vitro. The lytic or productive phase of EBV's life cycle is induced by the expression of the viral BZLF1 gene in latently infected cells. The BZLF1 protein is a transactivator, which selectively binds to two classes of distinct DNA sequence motifs. One class is similar to the motifs that are bound by members of the AP-1 transcription factor family to which BZLF1 belongs. The second class, which contains CpG motifs, is predominant in viral promoters of early lytic genes and is BZLF1's preferred or exclusive target sequence when methylated. The BZLF1 gene is transiently expressed in newly infected B cells but fails to induce EBV's lytic cycle, potentially because the virion DNA is unmethylated. Here we report that the lack of 5-methylcytosine residues in CpG sites of virion DNA prevents the expression of essential lytic genes indispensable for viral DNA amplification during productive infection. This finding indicates that BZLF1 transactivates these promoters in a methylation-dependent fashion and explains how progeny virus synthesis is abrogated in newly infected B cells. Our data also reveal that viral lytic DNA synthesis precludes CpG methylation of virion DNA during EBV's lytic, productive cycle, which can be overcome by the ectopic expression of a prokaryotic cytosine methyltransferase to yield CpG-methylated virion DNA. Upon infection of B cells, randomly CpG-methylated virion DNA induces high expression of essential lytic genes in contrast to virion DNA free of 5-methylcytosine residues. Our data suggest that unmethylated virion DNA is part of EBV's strategy to prevent the viral lytic phase in

  20. Triphlorethol-A from Ecklonia cava up-regulates the oxidant sensitive 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Cheon; Lee, In Kyung; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Piao, Mei Jing; Ryu, Min Ju; Kim, Jeong Mi; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the protective mechanisms of triphlorethol-A, isolated from Ecklonia cava, against oxidative stress-induced DNA base damage, especially 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast V79-4 cells. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) plays an important role in the removal of 8-oxoG during the cellular response to DNA base damage. Triphlorethol-A significantly decreased the levels of 8-oxoG induced by H2O2, and this correlated with increases in OGG1 mRNA and OGG1 protein levels. Furthermore, siOGG1-transfected cell attenuated the protective effect of triphlorethol-A against H2O2 treatment. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor for OGG1, and Nrf2 combines with small Maf proteins in the nucleus to bind to antioxidant response elements (ARE) in the upstream promoter region of the OGG1 gene. Triphlorethol-A restored the expression of nuclear Nrf2, small Maf protein, and the Nrf2-Maf complex, all of which were reduced by oxidative stress. Furthermore, triphlorethol-A increased Nrf2 binding to ARE sequences and the resulting OGG1 promoter activity, both of which were also reduced by oxidative stress. The levels of the phosphorylated forms of Akt kinase, downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and Erk, which are regulators of OGG1, were sharply decreased by oxidative stress, but these decreases were prevented by triphlorethol-A. Specific PI3K, Akt, and Erk inhibitors abolished the cytoprotective effects of triphlorethol-A, suggesting that OGG1 induction by triphlorethol-A involves the PI3K/Akt and Erk pathways. Taken together, these data indicate that by activating the DNA repair system, triphlorethol-A exerts protective effects against DNA base damage induced by oxidative stress. PMID:25353254

  1. Comparison of the structural and dynamic effects of 5-methylcytosine and 5-chlorocytosine in a CpG dinucleotide sequence†

    PubMed Central

    Theruvathu, Jacob A.; Yin, Whitney; Pettitt, B. Montgomery; Sowers, Lawrence C.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation-mediated reactive molecules can result in an array of oxidized and halogenated DNA damage products including 5-chlorocytosine (ClC). Previous studies have shown that ClC can mimic 5-methylcytosine (mC) and act as a fraudulent epigenetic signal, promoting the methylation of previously unmethylated DNA sequences. Although the 5-halouracils are good substrates for base excision repair, no repair activity has yet been identified for ClC. Due to the apparent biochemical similarities of mC and ClC, we have investigated the effects of mC and ClC substitution on oligonucleotide structure and dynamics. In this study, we have constructed oligonucleotide duplexes containing C, ClC and mC within a CpG dinucleotide. The thermal and thermodynamic stability of these duplexes are found to be experimentally indistinguishable. Crystallographic structures of duplex oligonucleotides containing mC and ClC were determined to 1.2 and 1.9 Å, respectively. Both duplexes are B-form and are superimposable on a previously determined structure of a cytosine-containing duplex with RMSD of approximately 0.25 Å. NMR solution studies indicate that all duplexes containing cytosine or the cytosine analogs are normal B-form, and no structural perturbations are observed surrounding the site of each substitution. The magnitude of the base-stacking induced upfield shifts for non-exchangeable base proton resonances are similar for each of the duplexes examined, indicating that neither mC nor ClC significantly alter base stacking interactions. The ClC analog is paired with G in an apparently normal geometry; however the G-imino proton of the ClC-G base pair resonates to higher field relative to mC-G or C-G, indicating a weaker imino hydrogen bond. Using selective 15N-enrichment and isotope-edited NMR, we observe that the amino group of ClC rotates at roughly half the rate of the corresponding amino groups of the C-G or mC-G base pairs. The altered chemical shifts of hydrogen bonding proton

  2. Targeted deletion of the genes encoding NTH1 and NEIL1 DNA N-glycosylases reveals the existence of novel carcinogenic oxidative damage to DNA☆

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Michael K.; Ocampo-Hafalla, Maria T.; Vartanian, Vladimir; Jaruga, Pawel; Kirkali, Güldal; Koenig, Karen L.; Brown, Stuart; Lloyd, R. Stephen; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Teebor, George W.

    2016-01-01

    We have generated a strain of mice lacking two DNA N-glycosylases of base excision repair (BER), NTH1 and NEIL1, homologs of bacterial Nth (endonuclease three) and Nei (endonuclease eight). Although these enzymes remove several oxidized bases from DNA, they do not remove the well-known carcinogenic oxidation product of guanine: 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-OH-Gua), which is removed by another DNA N-glycosylase, OGG1. The Nth1−/−Neil1−/− mice developed pulmonary and hepatocellular tumors in much higher incidence than either of the single knockouts, Nth1−/− and Neil1−/−. The pulmonary tumors contained, exclusively, activating GGT→GAT transitions in codon 12 of K-ras of their DNA. Such transitions contrast sharply with the activating GGT→GTT transversions in codon 12 of K-ras of the pathologically similar pulmonary tumors, which arose in mice lacking OGG1 and a second DNA N-glycosylase, MUTY. To characterize the biochemical phenotype of the knockout mice, the content of oxidative DNA base damage was analyzed from three tissues isolated from control, single and double knockout mice. The content of 8-OH-Gua was indistinguishable among all genotypes. In contrast, the content of 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyAde) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyGua) derived from adenine and guanine, respectively, were increased in some but not all tissues of Neil1−/− and Neil1−/−Nth1−/− mice. The high incidence of tumors in our Nth1−/−Neil1−/− mice together with the nature of the activating mutation in the K-ras gene of their pulmonary tumors, reveal for the first time, the existence of mutagenic and carcinogenic oxidative damage to DNA which is not 8-OH-Gua. PMID:19346169

  3. Thermodynamics of the multi-stage DNA lesion recognition and repair by formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase using pyrrolocytosine fluorescence—stopped-flow pre-steady-state kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Vorobjev, Yuri N.; Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2012-01-01

    Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase, Fpg protein from Escherichia coli, initiates base excision repair in DNA by removing a wide variety of oxidized lesions. In this study, we perform thermodynamic analysis of the multi-stage interaction of Fpg with specific DNA-substrates containing 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine (oxoG), or tetrahydrofuran (THF, an uncleavable abasic site analog) and non-specific (G) DNA-ligand based on stopped-flow kinetic data. Pyrrolocytosine, highly fluorescent analog of the natural nucleobase cytosine, is used to record multi-stage DNA lesion recognition and repair kinetics over a temperature range (10–30°C). The kinetic data were used to obtain the standard Gibbs energy, enthalpy and entropy of the specific stages using van’t Hoff approach. The data suggest that not only enthalpy-driven exothermic oxoG recognition, but also the desolvation-accompanied entropy-driven enzyme-substrate complex adjustment into the catalytically active state play equally important roles in the overall process. PMID:22584623

  4. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  5. Partial uracil–DNA–glycosylase treatment for screening of ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rohland, Nadin; Harney, Eadaoin; Mallick, Swapan; Nordenfelt, Susanne; Reich, David

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of sequencing ancient DNA has led to the development of specialized laboratory protocols that have focused on reducing contamination and maximizing the number of molecules that are extracted from ancient remains. Despite the fact that success in ancient DNA studies is typically obtained by screening many samples to identify a promising subset, ancient DNA protocols have not, in general, focused on reducing the time required to screen samples. We present an adaptation of a popular ancient library preparation method that makes screening more efficient. First, the DNA extract is treated using a protocol that causes characteristic ancient DNA damage to be restricted to the terminal nucleotides, while nearly eliminating it in the interior of the DNA molecules, allowing a single library to be used both to test for ancient DNA authenticity and to carry out population genetic analysis. Second, the DNA molecules are ligated to a unique pair of barcodes, which eliminates undetected cross-contamination from this step onwards. Third, the barcoded library molecules include incomplete adapters of short length that can increase the specificity of hybridization-based genomic target enrichment. The adapters are completed just before sequencing, so the same DNA library can be used in multiple experiments, and the sequences distinguished. We demonstrate this protocol on 60 ancient human samples. PMID:25487342

  6. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Vaclová, Tereza; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, Rosario; Peterlongo, Paolo; Blanco, Ignacio; de la Hoya, Miguel; Duran, Mercedes; Díez, Orland; Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Andrés Conejero, Raquel; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Swe-Brca; Arver, Brita; Rantala, Johanna; Loman, Niklas; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Beattie, Mary S; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; John, Esther M; Whittemore, Alice S; Daly, Mary B; Southey, Melissa; Hopper, John; Terry, Mary B; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Infante, Mar; Herráez, Belén; Moreno, Leticia Thais; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Herzog, Josef; Weeman, Kisa; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariette, Frederique; Volorio, Sara; Viel, Alessandra; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Garber, Judy; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Douglas, Fiona; Porteous, Mary; Side, Lucy; Walker, Lisa; Morrison, Patrick; Donaldson, Alan; Kennedy, John; Foo, Claire; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Damiola, Francesca; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Tucker, Kathy; Backes, Floor; Rodríguez, Gustavo; Brewster, Wendy; Wakeley, Katie; Rutherford, Thomas; Caldés, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Rookus, Matti A; van Os, Theo A M; van der Kolk, Lizet; de Lange, J L; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, A H; van Asperen, Christi J; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J Margriet; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van der Luijt, Rob B; Devilee, Peter; Hebon; Olah, Edith; Lázaro, Conxi; Teulé, Alex; Menéndez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Maugard, Christine; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Teixeira, Manuel R; Healey, Sue; Investigators, Kconfab; Olswold, Curtis; Guidugli, Lucia; Lindor, Noralane; Slager, Susan; Szabo, Csilla I; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Zhang, Liying; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Geschwantler Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shimon, Shani Paluch; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Benitez, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase), and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2). Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2) gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03-1.16), p = 2.7 × 10(-3)) for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase) gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03-1.21, p = 4.8 × 10(-3)). DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied. PMID:24698998

  7. DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Vaclová, Tereza; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, Rosario; Peterlongo, Paolo; Blanco, Ignacio; de la Hoya, Miguel; Duran, Mercedes; Díez, Orland; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Andrés Conejero, Raquel; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; SWE-BRCA; Arver, Brita; Rantala, Johanna; Loman, Niklas; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Beattie, Mary S.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa; Hopper, John; Terry, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Infante, Mar; Herráez, Belén; Moreno, Leticia Thais; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Herzog, Josef; Weeman, Kisa; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariette, Frederique; Volorio, Sara; Viel, Alessandra; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Garber, Judy; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Douglas, Fiona; Porteous, Mary; Side, Lucy; Walker, Lisa; Morrison, Patrick; Donaldson, Alan; Kennedy, John; Foo, Claire; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Damiola, Francesca; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Tucker, Kathy; Backes, Floor; Rodríguez, Gustavo; Brewster, Wendy; Wakeley, Katie; Rutherford, Thomas; Caldés, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Rookus, Matti A.; van Os, Theo A. M.; van der Kolk, Lizet; de Lange, J. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, A. H.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Devilee, Peter; HEBON; Olah, Edith; Lázaro, Conxi; Teulé, Alex; Menéndez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Maugard, Christine; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Healey, Sue; Investigators, kConFab; Olswold, Curtis; Guidugli, Lucia; Lindor, Noralane; Slager, Susan; Szabo, Csilla I.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Zhang, Liying; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Geschwantler Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shimon, Shani Paluch; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Benitez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase), and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2). Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2) gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03–1.16), p = 2.7×10−3) for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase) gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03–1.21, p = 4.8×10−3). DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied. PMID:24698998

  8. Distributive Processing by the Iron(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Catalytic Domains of the TET Enzymes Is Consistent with Epigenetic Roles for Oxidized 5-Methylcytosine Bases.

    PubMed

    Tamanaha, Esta; Guan, Shengxi; Marks, Katherine; Saleh, Lana

    2016-08-01

    The ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins catalyze oxidation of 5-methylcytosine ((5m)C) residues in nucleic acids to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine ((5hm)C), 5-formylcytosine ((5f)C), and 5-carboxycytosine ((5ca)C). These nucleotide bases have been implicated as intermediates on the path to active demethylation, but recent reports have suggested that they might have specific regulatory roles in their own right. In this study, we present kinetic evidence showing that the catalytic domains (CDs) of TET2 and TET1 from mouse and their homologue from Naegleria gruberi, the full-length protein NgTET1, are distributive in both chemical and physical senses, as they carry out successive oxidations of a single (5m)C and multiple (5m)C residues along a polymethylated DNA substrate. We present data showing that the enzyme neither retains (5hm)C/(5f)C intermediates of preceding oxidations nor slides along a DNA substrate (without releasing it) to process an adjacent (5m)C residue. These findings contradict a recent report by Crawford et al. ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016 , 138 , 730 ) claiming that oxidation of (5m)C by CD of mouse TET2 is chemically processive (iterative). We further elaborate that this distributive mechanism is maintained for TETs in two evolutionarily distant homologues and posit that this mode of function allows the introduction of (5m)C forms as epigenetic markers along the DNA. PMID:27362828

  9. A new protein superfamily includes two novel 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases from Bacillus cereus, AlkC and AlkD.

    PubMed

    Alseth, Ingrun; Rognes, Torbjørn; Lindbäck, Toril; Solberg, Inger; Robertsen, Kristin; Kristiansen, Knut Ivan; Mainieri, Davide; Lillehagen, Lucy; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Bjørås, Magnar

    2006-03-01

    Soil bacteria are heavily exposed to environmental methylating agents such as methylchloride and may have special requirements for repair of alkylation damage on DNA. We have used functional complementation of an Escherichia coli tag alkA mutant to screen for 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase genes in genomic libraries of the soil bacterium Bacillus cereus. Three genes were recovered: alkC, alkD and alkE. The amino acid sequence of AlkE is homologous to the E. coli AlkA sequence. AlkC and AlkD represent novel proteins without sequence similarity to any protein of known function. However, iterative and indirect sequence similarity searches revealed that AlkC and AlkD are distant homologues of each other within a new protein superfamily that is ubiquitous in the prokaryotic kingdom. Homologues of AlkC and AlkD were also identified in the amoebas Entamoeba histolytica and Dictyostelium discoideum, but no other eukaryotic counterparts of the superfamily were found. The alkC and alkD genes were expressed in E. coli and the proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both proteins were found to be specific for removal of N-alkylated bases, and showed no activity on oxidized or deaminated base lesions in DNA. B. cereus AlkC and AlkD thus define novel families of alkylbase DNA glycosylases within a new protein superfamily. PMID:16468998

  10. A new protein superfamily includes two novel 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases from Bacillus cereus, AlkC and AlkD

    PubMed Central

    Alseth, Ingrun; Rognes, Torbjørn; Lindbäck, Toril; Solberg, Inger; Robertsen, Kristin; Kristiansen, Knut Ivan; Mainieri, Davide; Lillehagen, Lucy; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Bjørås, Magnar

    2006-01-01

    Summary Soil bacteria are heavily exposed to environmental methylating agents such as methylchloride and may have special requirements for repair of alkylation damage on DNA. We have used functional complementation of an Escherichia coli tag alkA mutant to screen for 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase genes in genomic libraries of the soil bacterium Bacillus cereus. Three genes were recovered: alkC, alkD and alkE. The amino acid sequence of AlkE is homologous to the E. coli AlkA sequence. AlkC and AlkD represent novel proteins without sequence similarity to any protein of known function. However, iterative and indirect sequence similarity searches revealed that AlkC and AlkD are distant homologues of each other within a new protein superfamily that is ubiquitous in the prokaryotic kingdom. Homologues of AlkC and AlkD were also identified in the amoebas Entamoeba histolytica and Dictyostelium discoideum, but no other eukaryotic counterparts of the superfamily were found. The alkC and alkD genes were expressed in E. coli and the proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both proteins were found to be specific for removal of N-alkylated bases, and showed no activity on oxidized or deaminated base lesions in DNA. B. cereus AlkC and AlkD thus define novel families of alkylbase DNA glycosylases within a new protein superfamily. PMID:16468998

  11. Evaluation of the Role of the Vaccinia Virus Uracil DNA Glycosylase and A20 Proteins as Intrinsic Components of the DNA Polymerase Holoenzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Kathleen A.; Stanitsa, Eleni S.; Greseth, Matthew D.; Lindgren, Jill K.; Traktman, Paula

    2011-01-01

    The vaccinia virus DNA polymerase is inherently distributive but acquires processivity by associating with a heterodimeric processivity factor comprised of the viral A20 and D4 proteins. D4 is also an enzymatically active uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG). The presence of an active repair protein as an essential component of the polymerase holoenzyme is a unique feature of the replication machinery. We have shown previously that the A20-UDG complex has a stoichiometry of ∼1:1, and our data suggest that A20 serves as a bridge between polymerase and UDG. Here we show that conserved hydrophobic residues in the N′ terminus of A20 are important for its binding to UDG. Our data argue against the assembly of D4 into higher order multimers, suggesting that the processivity factor does not form a toroidal ring around the DNA. Instead, we hypothesize that the intrinsic, processive DNA scanning activity of UDG tethers the holoenzyme to the DNA template. The inclusion of UDG as an essential holoenzyme component suggests that replication and base excision repair may be coupled. Here we show that the DNA polymerase can utilize dUTP as a substrate in vitro. Moreover, uracil moieties incorporated into the nascent strand during holoenzyme-mediated DNA synthesis can be excised by the viral UDG present within this holoenzyme, leaving abasic sites. Finally, we show that the polymerase stalls upon encountering an abasic site in the template strand, indicating that, like many replicative polymerases, the poxviral holoenzyme cannot perform translesion synthesis across an abasic site. PMID:21572084

  12. Standard role for a conserved aspartate or more direct involvement in deglycosylation? An ONIOM and MD investigation of adenine-DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Kellie, Jennifer L; Wilson, Katie A; Wetmore, Stacey D

    2013-12-01

    8-Oxoguanine (OG) is one of the most frequently occurring forms of DNA damage and is particularly deleterious since it forms a stable Hoogsteen base pair with adenine (A). The repair of an OG:A mispair is initiated by adenine-DNA glycosylase (MutY), which hydrolyzes the sugar-nucleobase bond of the adenine residue before the lesion is processed by other proteins. MutY has been proposed to use a two-part chemical step involving protonation of the adenine nucleobase, followed by SN1 hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond. However, differences between a recent (fluorine recognition complex, denoted as the FLRC) crystal structure and the structure on which most mechanistic conclusions have been based to date (namely, the lesion recognition complex or LRC) raise questions regarding the mechanism used by MutY and the discrete role of various active-site residues. The present work uses both molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum mechanical (ONIOM) models to compare the active-site conformational dynamics in the two crystal structures, which suggests that only the understudied FLRC leads to a catalytically competent reactant. Indeed, all previous computational studies on MutY have been initiated from the LRC structure. Subsequently, for the first time, various mechanisms are examined with detailed ONIOM(M06-2X:PM6) reaction potential energy surfaces (PES) based on the FLRC structure, which significantly extends the mechanistic picture. Specifically, our work reveals that the reaction proceeds through a different route than the commonly accepted mechanism and the catalytic function of various active-site residues (Geobacillus stearothermophilus numbering). Specifically, contrary to proposals based on the LRC, E43 is determined to solely be involved in the initial adenine protonation step and not the deglycosylation reaction as the general base. Additionally, a novel catalytic role is proposed for Y126, whereby this residue plays a significant role in stabilizing the highly charged

  13. Naturally occurring polyphenol, morin hydrate, inhibits enzymatic activity of N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase, a DNA repair enzyme with various roles in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Monica; Woodrick, Jordan; Gupta, Suhani; Karmahapatra, Soumendra Krishna; Devito, Stephen; Vasudevan, Sona; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan; Adhikari, Sanjay; Yenugonda, Venkata M.; Roy, Rabindra

    2015-01-01

    Interest in the mechanisms of DNA repair pathways, including the base excision repair (BER) pathway specifically, has heightened since these pathways have been shown to modulate important aspects of human disease. Modulation of the expression or activity of a particular BER enzyme, N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG), has been demonstrated to play a role in carcinogenesis and resistance to chemotherapy as well as neurodegenerative diseases, which has intensified the focus on studying MPG-related mechanisms of repair. A specific small molecule inhibitor for MPG activity would be a valuable biochemical tool for understanding these repair mechanisms. By screening several small molecule chemical libraries, we identified a natural polyphenolic compound, morin hydrate, which inhibits MPG activity specifically (IC50 = 2.6 µM). Detailed mechanism analysis showed that morin hydrate inhibited substrate DNA binding of MPG, and eventually the enzymatic activity of MPG. Computational docking studies with an x-ray derived MPG structure as well as comparison studies with other structurally-related flavanoids offer a rationale for the inhibitory activity of morin hydrate observed. The results of this study suggest that the morin hydrate could be an effective tool for studying MPG function and it is possible that morin hydrate and its derivatives could be utilized in future studies focused on the role of MPG in human disease. PMID:25650313

  14. "Light-up" Sensing of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase activity by target-induced autocatalytic DNAzyme-generated rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang-Juan; Wu, Shuang; Cen, Yao; Yu, Ru-Qin; Chu, Xia

    2016-05-15

    Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) plays a crucial role in maintaining the genomic integrity of living organisms for its capability of repairing DNA oxidative damage. The expression level of hOGG1 is closely associated with many diseases including various kinds of cancers. In this study, a novel "light-up" sensor based on target-induced formation of 5' phosphorylated probe and autocatalytic DNAzyme-generated rolling circle amplification has been developed for highly sensitive human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) activity assay. The approach reaches detection limit as low as 0.001U/mL for hOGG1 via scarcely increased background signal and dual signal amplification strategy. To the best of our knowledge, it is one of the most sensitive methods for the detection of base excision repair enzyme. Moreover, the approach shows excellent specificity over other nonspecific enzymes would interfere with the assay and holds great promise for application in real sample analysis. Hence, the proposed method provides a highly sensitive, selective, and desirable hOGG1 sensing platform. PMID:26765532

  15. Association between oxidative DNA damage and the expression of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 in lung epithelial cells of neonatal rats exposed to hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    JIN, LINLIN; YANG, HAIPING; FU, JIANHUA; XUE, XINDONG; YAO, LI; QIAO, LIN

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that oxidative stress-induced lung injury is involved in the occurrence and developmental process of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The present study assessed whether oxidative DNA damage occurs in the early stages of hyperoxia-induced BPD in neonatal rats and evaluated the expression and localization of the DNA repair gene, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1), upon exposure to hyperoxia. Neonatal rats and primary cultured neonatal rat alveolar epithelial type II (AECII) cells were exposed to hyperoxia (90% O2) or normoxia (21% O2) and the expression levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in the lung tissues and AECII cells were determined using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. DNA strand breaks in the AECII cells were detected using a comet assay. The expression and localization of the OGG1 protein in the lung tissues and AECII cells were determined by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and western blotting. The mRNA expression levels of OGG1 in the lung tissues and AECII cells were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The expression of 8-OHdG was elevated in the hyperoxia-exposed neonatal rat lung tissue and the AECII cells compared with the normoxic controls. The occurrence of DNA strand breaks in the AECII cells increased with increasing duration of hyperoxia exposure. The protein expression of OGG1 was significantly increased in the hyperoxia-exposed lung tissues and AECII cells, with OGG1 preferentially localized to the cytoplasm. No concomitant increase in the mRNA expression of OGG1 was detected. These results revealed that oxidative DNA damage occurred in lung epithelial cells during early-stage BPD, as confirmed by in vitro and in vivo hyperoxia exposure experiments, and the increased expression of OGG1 was associated with this process. PMID:25672835

  16. Mitochondrial-targeted DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 protects against ventilator-induced lung injury in intact mice

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Masahiro; Mouner, Marc; Chouteau, Joshua M.; Gorodnya, Olena M.; Ruchko, Mykhaylo V.; Potter, Barry J.; Wilson, Glenn L.; Gillespie, Mark N.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that oxidative mitochondrial-targeted DNA (mtDNA) damage triggered ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Control mice and mice infused with a fusion protein targeting the DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) to mitochondria were mechanically ventilated with a range of peak inflation pressures (PIP) for specified durations. In minimal VILI (1 h at 40 cmH2O PIP), lung total extravascular albumin space increased 2.8-fold even though neither lung wet/dry (W/D) weight ratios nor bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 or IL-6 failed to differ from nonventilated or low PIP controls. This increase in albumin space was attenuated by OGG1. Moderately severe VILI (2 h at 40 cmH2O PIP) produced a 25-fold increase in total extravascular albumin space, a 60% increase in W/D weight ratio and marked increases in BAL MIP-2 and IL-6, accompanied by oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage, as well as decreases in the total tissue glutathione (GSH) and GSH/GSSH ratio compared with nonventilated lungs. All of these injury indices were attenuated in OGG1-treated mice. At the highest level of VILI (2 h at 50 cmH2O PIP), OGG1 failed to protect against massive lung edema and BAL cytokines or against depletion of the tissue GSH pool. Interestingly, whereas untreated mice died before completing the 2-h protocol, OGG1-treated mice lived for the duration of observation. Thus mitochondrially targeted OGG1 prevented VILI over a range of ventilation times and pressures and enhanced survival in the most severely injured group. These findings support the concept that oxidative mtDNA damage caused by high PIP triggers induction of acute lung inflammation and injury. PMID:23241530

  17. Identification of a 5-Methylcytosine Site that may Regulate C/EBPβ Binding and Determine Tissue-Specific Expression of the BPI Gene in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Wang, Jing; Yin, Xuemei; Sun, Shouyong; Zi, Chen; Zhu, Guoqiang; Wu, Shenglong; Bao, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) plays an important role in innate immune defense in mammals. A previous study showed that BPI gene expression correlates to gram-negative bacteria resistance. However, this gene showed tissue-specific expression in piglets and strongly expressed only in the digestive tract. To investigate the mechanisms governing the tissue-specificity, bisulfite sequencing PCR and next generation sequencing were used for high accuracy methylation quantitation of CpG islands of BPI gene upstream in 11 different tissues from weaned Yorkshire piglets. Additionally, qPCR was used to examine mRNA levels of BPI gene as well as transcription factor. We additionally analyzed transcriptional regulation by studying key 5-methylcytosine sites and transcription factors. Results showed that BPI mRNA levels significantly correlated with the overall methylation as well as methylation at mC-15 which was non-CpG site, no significant correlation could be found between the BPI and transcription factor mRNA levels, EMSA test showed that C/EBPβ could interact with BPI wild-type promoter DNA, but not methylated DNA. So we confirmed that methylation of mC-15 residue could inhibit the ability of C/EBPβ binding to the BPI promoter and affect the expression, and this mechanism probably plays a role in the tissue specificity of BPI gene expression in weaned piglets. PMID:27338589

  18. 3-methyladenine-DNA-glycosylase and O6-alkyl guanine-DNA-alkyltransferase activities and sensitivity to alkylating agents in human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Damia, G.; Imperatori, L.; Citti, L.; Mariani, L.; D'Incalci, M.

    1996-01-01

    The activities and the expression of 3-methyladenine glycosylase (3-meAde gly) and O6-alkylguanine-DNA-alkyltransferase (O6 ATase) were investigated in ten human cancer cell lines. Both 3-meAde gly and O6 ATase activities were variable among different cell lines. mRNA levels of the O6 ATase gene, appeared to be related to the content of O6 ATase in different cell lines, whereas no apparent correlation was found between mRNA of 3-meAde gly and the enzyme activity. No correlation was found between the activity of the two enzymes and the sensitivity to alkylating agents of different structures such as CC-1065, tallimustine, dimethylsulphate (DMSO), N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (cDDP) and melphalan (L-PAM). The most striking finding of this study is that a correlation exists between the activity of O6 ATase and 3-meAde gly in the various cell lines investigated (P<0.01), suggesting a common mechanism of regulation of two DNA repair enzymes. Images Figure 2 PMID:8611396

  19. Prenatal Arsenic Exposure and the Epigenome: Identifying Sites of 5-methylcytosine Alterations that Predict Functional Changes in Gene Expression in Newborn Cord Blood and Subsequent Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Daniel; Rager, Julia E.; Smeester, Lisa; Bailey, Kathryn A.; Drobná, Zuzana; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Stýblo, Miroslav; García-Vargas, Gonzalo; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is detrimental to the health of newborns and increases the risk of disease development later in life. Here we examined a subset of newborn cord blood leukocyte samples collected from subjects enrolled in the Biomarkers of Exposure to ARsenic (BEAR) pregnancy cohort in Gómez Palacio, Mexico, who were exposed to a range of drinking water arsenic concentrations (0.456–236 µg/l). Changes in iAs-associated DNA 5-methylcytosine methylation were assessed across 424 935 CpG sites representing 18 761 genes and compared with corresponding mRNA expression levels and birth outcomes. In the context of arsenic exposure, a total of 2919 genes were identified with iAs-associated differences in DNA methylation. Site-specific analyses identified DNA methylation changes that were most predictive of gene expression levels where CpG methylation within CpG islands positioned within the first exon, the 5′ untranslated region and 200 bp upstream of the transcription start site yielded the most significant association with gene expression levels. A set of 16 genes was identified with correlated iAs-associated changes in DNA methylation and mRNA expression and all were highly enriched for binding sites of the early growth response (EGR) and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) transcription factors. Furthermore, DNA methylation levels of 7 of these genes were associated with differences in birth outcomes including gestational age and head circumference.These data highlight the complex interplay between DNA methylation, functional changes in gene expression and health outcomes and underscore the need for functional analyses coupled to epigenetic assessments. PMID:25304211

  20. A highly conserved family of domains related to the DNA-glycosylase fold helps predict multiple novel pathways for RNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, A Maxwell; Aravind, L

    2014-01-01

    A protein family including mammalian NEMF, Drosophila caliban, yeast Tae2, and bacterial FpbA-like proteins was first defined over a decade ago and found to be universally distributed across the three domains/superkingdoms of life. Since its initial characterization, this family of proteins has been tantalizingly linked to a wide range of biochemical functions. Tapping the enormous wealth of genome information that has accumulated since the initial characterization of these proteins, we perform a detailed computational analysis of the family, identifying multiple conserved domains. Domains identified include an enzymatic domain related to the formamidopyrimidine (Fpg), MutM, and Nei/EndoVIII family of DNA glycosylases, a novel, predicted RNA-binding domain, and a domain potentially mediating protein–protein interactions. Through this characterization, we predict that the DNA glycosylase-like domain catalytically operates on double-stranded RNA, as part of a hitherto unknown base modification mechanism that probably targets rRNAs. At least in archaea, and possibly eukaryotes, this pathway might additionally include the AMMECR1 family of proteins. The predicted RNA-binding domain associated with this family is also observed in distinct architectural contexts in other proteins across phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes. Here it is predicted to play a key role in a new pathway for tRNA 4-thiouridylation along with TusA-like sulfur transfer proteins. PMID:24646681

  1. Selective inhibition by methoxyamine of the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activity associated with pyrimidine dimer-DNA glycosylases from Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4

    SciTech Connect

    Liuzzi, M.; Weinfeld, M.; Paterson, M.C.

    1987-06-16

    The UV endonucleases from Micrococcus luteus and bacteriophage T4 possess two catalytic activities specific for the site of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in UV-irradiated DNA: a DNA glycosylase that cleaves the 5'-glycosyl bond of the dimerized pyrimidines and an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease that thereupon incises the phosphodiester bond 3' to the resulting apyrimidinic site. The authors have explored the potential use of methoxyamine, a chemical that reacts at neutral pH with AP sites in DNA, as a selective inhibitor of the AP endonuclease activities residing in the M. luteus and T4 enzymes. The presence of 50 mM methoxyamine during incubation of UV-treated, (/sup 3/H)thymine-labeled poly(dA) x poly(dT) with either enzyme preparation was found to protect completely the irradiated copolymer from endonucleolytic attack at dimer sites, as assayed by yield of acid-soluble radioactivity. In contrast, the dimer-DNA glycosylase activity of each enzyme remained fully functional, as monitored retrospectively by release of free thymine after either photochemical-(5 kJ/m/sup 2/, 254 nm) or photoenzymic- (Escherichia coli photolyase plus visible light) induced reversal of pyrimidine dimers in the UV-damaged substrate. The data demonstrate that the inhibition of the strand-incision reaction arises because of chemical modification of the AP sites and is not due to inactivation of the enzyme by methoxyamine. The results, combined with earlier findings for 5'-acting AP endonucleases, strongly suggest that methoxyamine is a highly specific inhibitor of virtually all AP endonucleases, irrespective of their modes of action, and may therefore prove useful in a wide variety of DNA repair studies.

  2. Influence of local duplex stability and N6-methyladenine on uracil recognition by mismatch-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase (Mug).

    PubMed

    Valinluck, Victoria; Liu, Pingfang; Burdzy, Artur; Ryu, Junichi; Sowers, Lawrence C

    2002-12-01

    To maintain genomic integrity, DNA repair enzymes continually remove damaged bases and lesions resulting from endogenous and exogenous processes. These repair enzymes must distinguish damaged bases from normal bases to prevent the inadvertent removal of normal bases, which would promote genomic instability. The mechanisms by which this high level of specificity is accomplished are as yet unresolved. One member of the uracil-DNA glycosylase family of repair enzymes, Escherichia coli mismatch-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase (Mug), is reported to distinguish U:G mispairs from U:A base pairs based upon specific contacts with the mispaired guanine after flipping the target uracil out of the duplex. However, recent studies suggest other mechanisms for base selection, including local duplex stability. In this study, we used the modified base N6-methyladenine to probe the effect of local helix perturbation on Mug recognition of uracil. N6-Methyladenine is found in E. coli as part of both the mismatch repair and restriction-modification systems. In its cis isomer, N6-methyladenine destabilizes hydrogen bonding by interfering with pseudo-Watson-Crick base pairing. It is observed that the selection of uracil by Mug is sequence dependent and that uracil residues in sequences of reduced thermostability are preferentially removed. The replacement of adenine by N6-methyladenine increases the frequency of removal of the uracil residue paired opposite the modified adenine. These results are in accord with suggestions that local helix stability is an important determinant of base recognition by some DNA repair enzymes and provide a potential strategy for identifying the sequence location of modified bases in DNA. PMID:12482242

  3. Label-free and selective photoelectrochemical detection of chemical DNA methylation damage using DNA repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiping; Zhang, Bintian; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2013-07-16

    Exogenous chemicals may produce DNA methylation that is potentially toxic to living systems. Methylated DNA bases are difficult to detect with biosensors because the methyl group is small and chemically inert. In this report, a label-free photoelectrochemical sensor was developed for the selective detection of chemically methylated bases in DNA films. The sensor employed two DNA repair enzymes, human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, to convert DNA methylation sites in DNA films on indium tin oxide electrodes into strand breaks. A DNA intercalator, Ru(bpy)2(dppz)(2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine) was then used as the photoelectrochemical signal indicator to detect the DNA strand breaks. Its photocurrent signal was found to correlate inversely with the amount of 3-methyladenines (metAde) produced with a methylating agent, methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). The sensor detected the methylated bases produced with as low as 1 mM MMS, at which concentration the amount of metAde on the sensor surface was estimated to be 0.5 pg, or 1 metAde in 1.6 × 10(5) normal bases. Other DNA base modification products, such as 5-methylcytosine and DNA adducts with ethyl and styrene groups did not attenuate the photocurrent, demonstrating good selectivity of the sensor. This strategy can be utilized to develop sensors for the detection of other modified DNA bases with specific DNA repair enzymes. PMID:23777269

  4. The levels of 7,8-dihydrodeoxyguanosine (8-oxoG) and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) - A potential diagnostic biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sliwinska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowski, Dominik; Czarny, Piotr; Toma, Monika; Wigner, Paulina; Drzewoski, Jozef; Fabianowska-Majewska, Krystyna; Szemraj, Janusz; Maes, Michael; Galecki, Piotr; Sliwinski, Tomasz

    2016-09-15

    Evidence indicates that oxidative stress contributes to neuronal cell death in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased oxidative DNA damage l, as measured with 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), and reduced capacity of proteins responsible for removing of DNA damage, including 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1), were detected in brains of AD patients. In the present study we assessed peripheral blood biomarkers of oxidative DNA damage, i.e. 8- oxoG and OGG1, in AD diagnosis, by comparing their levels between the patients and the controls. Our study was performed on DNA and serum isolated from peripheral blood taken from 100 AD patients and 110 controls. For 8-oxoG ELISA was employed. The OGG1 level was determined using ELISA and Western blot technique. Levels of 8-oxoG were significantly higher in DNA of AD patients. Both ELISA and Western blot showed decreased levels of OGG1 in serum of AD patients. Our results show that oxidative DNA damage biomarkers detected in peripheral tissue could reflect the changes occurring in the brain of patients with AD. These results also suggest that peripheral blood samples may be useful to measure oxidative stress biomarkers in AD. PMID:27538622

  5. Aberrant repair initiated by mismatch-specific thymine-DNA glycosylases provides a mechanism for the mutational bias observed in CpG islands

    PubMed Central

    Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Couve, Sophie; Gros, Laurent; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Matkarimov, Bakhyt; Saparbaev, Murat K.

    2014-01-01

    The human thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) initiates the base excision repair (BER) pathway to remove spontaneous and induced DNA base damage. It was first biochemically characterized for its ability to remove T mispaired with G in CpG context. TDG is involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expressions by protecting CpG-rich promoters from de novo DNA methylation. Here we demonstrate that TDG initiates aberrant repair by excising T when it is paired with a damaged adenine residue in DNA duplex. TDG targets the non-damaged DNA strand and efficiently excises T opposite of hypoxanthine (Hx), 1,N6-ethenoadenine, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoadenine and abasic site in TpG/CpX context, where X is a modified residue. In vitro reconstitution of BER with duplex DNA containing Hx•T pair and TDG results in incorporation of cytosine across Hx. Furthermore, analysis of the mutation spectra inferred from single nucleotide polymorphisms in human population revealed a highly biased mutation pattern within CpG islands (CGIs), with enhanced mutation rate at CpA and TpG sites. These findings demonstrate that under experimental conditions used TDG catalyzes sequence context-dependent aberrant removal of thymine, which results in TpG, CpA→CpG mutations, thus providing a plausible mechanism for the putative evolutionary origin of the CGIs in mammalian genomes. PMID:24692658

  6. Structural and biophysical analysis of interactions between cod and human uracil-DNA N-glycosylase (UNG) and UNG inhibitor (Ugi)

    SciTech Connect

    Assefa, Netsanet Gizaw; Niiranen, Laila; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti Schrøder; Smalås, Arne Oskar; Willassen, Nils Peder; Moe, Elin

    2014-08-01

    A structural and biophysical study of the interactions between cod and human uracil-DNA N-glycosylase (UNG) and their inhibitor Ugi is presented. The stronger interaction between cod UNG and Ugi can be explained by a greater positive electrostatic surface potential. Uracil-DNA N-glycosylase from Atlantic cod (cUNG) shows cold-adapted features such as high catalytic efficiency, a low temperature optimum for activity and reduced thermal stability compared with its mesophilic homologue human UNG (hUNG). In order to understand the role of the enzyme–substrate interaction related to the cold-adapted properties, the structure of cUNG in complex with a bacteriophage encoded natural UNG inhibitor (Ugi) has been determined. The interaction has also been analyzed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The crystal structure of cUNG–Ugi was determined to a resolution of 1.9 Å with eight complexes in the asymmetric unit related through noncrystallographic symmetry. A comparison of the cUNG–Ugi complex with previously determined structures of UNG–Ugi shows that they are very similar, and confirmed the nucleotide-mimicking properties of Ugi. Biophysically, the interaction between cUNG and Ugi is very strong and shows a binding constant (K{sub b}) which is one order of magnitude larger than that for hUNG–Ugi. The binding of both cUNG and hUNG to Ugi was shown to be favoured by both enthalpic and entropic forces; however, the binding of cUNG to Ugi is mainly dominated by enthalpy, while the entropic term is dominant for hUNG. The observed differences in the binding properties may be explained by an overall greater positive electrostatic surface potential in the protein–Ugi interface of cUNG and the slightly more hydrophobic surface of hUNG.

  7. Entrapment and Structure of an Extrahelical Guanine Attempting to Enter the Active Site of a Bacterial DNA Glycosylase, MutM

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Yan; Spong, Marie C.; Nam, Kwangho; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2010-09-21

    MutM, a bacterial DNA glycosylase, protects genome integrity by catalyzing glycosidic bond cleavage of 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) lesions, thereby initiating base excision DNA repair. The process of searching for and locating oxoG lesions is especially challenging, because of the close structural resemblance of oxoG to its million-fold more abundant progenitor, G. Extrusion of the target nucleobase from the DNA double helix to an extrahelical position is an essential step in lesion recognition and catalysis by MutM. Although the interactions between the extruded oxoG and the active site of MutM have been well characterized, little is known in structural detail regarding the interrogation of extruded normal DNA bases by MutM. Here we report the capture and structural elucidation of a complex in which MutM is attempting to present an undamaged G to its active site. The structure of this MutM-extrahelical G complex provides insights into the mechanism MutM employs to discriminate against extrahelical normal DNA bases and into the base extrusion process in general.

  8. Synthesis of decadeoxyribonucleotides containing N6-methyladenine, N4-methylcytosine, and 5-methylcytosine: recognition and cleavage by restriction endonucleases (nucleosides and nucleotides part 74).

    PubMed Central

    Ono, A; Ueda, T

    1987-01-01

    The naturally-occurring modified bases, N6-methyladenine, N4-methylcytosine, and 5-methylcytosine were chemically introduced in place of the adenine or cytosine in the decadeoxyribonucleotides containing recognition sequences of Bgl II, Sau 3AI, Mbo I and Mfl I. The modified oligomers bind to the enzymes but the rates of cleavage by the enzymes are variable. Images PMID:3029671

  9. Exercise-Induced Neuroprotection of Hippocampus in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice via Upregulation of Mitochondrial 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Weimin; Jiang, Ning; Wang, Xun; Zhang, Yong; Ji, Li Li

    2014-01-01

    Improving mitochondrial function has been proposed as a reasonable therapeutic strategy to reduce amyloid-β (Aβ) load and to modify the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the relationship between mitochondrial adaptation and brain neuroprotection caused by physical exercise in AD is poorly understood. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of long-term treadmill exercise on mitochondrial 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) level, mtDNA oxidative damage, and mitochondrial function in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD. In the present study, twenty weeks of treadmill training significantly improved the cognitive function and reduced the expression of Aβ-42 in APP/PS1 transgenic (Tg) mice. Training also ameliorated mitochondrial respiratory function by increasing the complexes I, and IV and ATP synthase activities, whereas it attenuated ROS generation and mtDNA oxidative damage in Tg mice. Furthermore, the impaired mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and mitochondrial OGG1 activities seen in Tg mice were restored with training. Acetylation level of mitochondrial OGG1 and MnSOD was markedly suppressed in Tg mice after exercise training, in parallel with increased level of SIRT3. These findings suggest that exercise training could increase mtDNA repair capacity in the mouse hippocampus, which in turn would result in protection against AD-related mitochondrial dysfunction and phenotypic deterioration. PMID:25538817

  10. Characterizing Requirements for Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) Modification and Binding on Base Excision Repair Activity of Thymine-DNA Glycosylase in Vivo.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Dylan; Coey, Christopher T; Yang, Wei-Chih; Drohat, Alexander C; Matunis, Michael J

    2016-04-22

    Thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) plays critical roles in DNA base excision repair and DNA demethylation. It has been proposed, based on structural studies and in vitro biochemistry, that sumoylation is required for efficient TDG enzymatic turnover following base excision. However, whether sumoylation is required for TDG activity in vivo has not previously been tested. We have developed an in vivo assay for TDG activity that takes advantage of its recently discovered role in DNA demethylation and selective recognition and repair of 5-carboxylcytosine. Using this assay, we investigated the role of sumoylation in regulating TDG activity through the use of TDG mutants defective for sumoylation and Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) binding and by altering TDG sumoylation through SUMO and SUMO protease overexpression experiments. Our findings indicate that sumoylation and SUMO binding are not essential for TDG-mediated excision and repair of 5-carboxylcytosine bases. Moreover, in vitro assays revealed that apurinic/apyrimidinic nuclease 1 provides nearly maximum stimulation of TDG processing of G·caC substrates. Thus, under our assay conditions, apurinic/apyrimidinic nuclease 1-mediated stimulation or other mechanisms sufficiently alleviate TDG product inhibition and promote its enzymatic turnover in vivo. PMID:26917720

  11. Age-dependent changes in 8-oxoguanine-DNA-glycosylase activity is modulated by adaptive responses to physical exercise in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Radak, Zsolt; Bori, Zoltan; Koltai, Erika; Fatouros, Ioannis G.; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Douroudos, Ioannis I.; Terzis, Gerasimos; Nikolaidis, Michalis G.; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Sovatzidis, Apostolos; Kumagai, Shuzo; Naito, Hisahi; Boldogh, Istvan

    2012-01-01

    8-Oxo-7,8 dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) accumulates in the genome over time and is believed to contribute to the development of aging characteristics of skeletal muscle and various aging-related diseases. Here, we show a significantly increased level of intrahelical 8-oxoG and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) expression in aged human skeletal muscle compared to that of young individuals. In response to exercise, the 8-oxoG level was found to be lastingly elevated in sedentary young and old subjects, but returned rapidly to pre-exercise levels in the DNA of physically active individuals independent of age. 8-OxoG levels in DNA were inversely correlated with the abundance of acetylated OGG1 (Ac-OGG1), but not with total OGG1, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (AP)-1 or Ac-APE1. The actual Ac-OGG1 level was linked to exercise-induced oxidative stress, as shown by changes in lipid peroxide levels and expression of Cu,Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and SIRT3, as well as the balance between acetyl transferase p300/CBP and the deacetylase SIRT1, but not SIRT6 expression. Together these data suggest that that acetylated form of OGG1, and not OGGl itself, correlates inversely with the 8-oxoG level in the DNA of human skeletal muscle, and the Ac-OGG1 level is dependent on adaptive cellular responses to physical activity, but is age independent. PMID:21569841

  12. Exercise-induced neuroprotection of hippocampus in APP/PS1 transgenic mice via upregulation of mitochondrial 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Bo, Hai; Kang, Weimin; Jiang, Ning; Wang, Xun; Zhang, Yong; Ji, Li Li

    2014-01-01

    Improving mitochondrial function has been proposed as a reasonable therapeutic strategy to reduce amyloid-β (Aβ) load and to modify the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the relationship between mitochondrial adaptation and brain neuroprotection caused by physical exercise in AD is poorly understood. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of long-term treadmill exercise on mitochondrial 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) level, mtDNA oxidative damage, and mitochondrial function in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD. In the present study, twenty weeks of treadmill training significantly improved the cognitive function and reduced the expression of Aβ-42 in APP/PS1 transgenic (Tg) mice. Training also ameliorated mitochondrial respiratory function by increasing the complexes I, and IV and ATP synthase activities, whereas it attenuated ROS generation and mtDNA oxidative damage in Tg mice. Furthermore, the impaired mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and mitochondrial OGG1 activities seen in Tg mice were restored with training. Acetylation level of mitochondrial OGG1 and MnSOD was markedly suppressed in Tg mice after exercise training, in parallel with increased level of SIRT3. These findings suggest that exercise training could increase mtDNA repair capacity in the mouse hippocampus, which in turn would result in protection against AD-related mitochondrial dysfunction and phenotypic deterioration. PMID:25538817

  13. Hyperosmotic stress memory in Arabidopsis is mediated by distinct epigenetically labile sites in the genome and is restricted in the male germline by DNA glycosylase activity

    PubMed Central

    Wibowo, Anjar; Becker, Claude; Marconi, Gianpiero; Durr, Julius; Price, Jonathan; Hagmann, Jorg; Papareddy, Ranjith; Putra, Hadi; Kageyama, Jorge; Becker, Jorg; Weigel, Detlef; Gutierrez-Marcos, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Inducible epigenetic changes in eukaryotes are believed to enable rapid adaptation to environmental fluctuations. We have found distinct regions of the Arabidopsis genome that are susceptible to DNA (de)methylation in response to hyperosmotic stress. The stress-induced epigenetic changes are associated with conditionally heritable adaptive phenotypic stress responses. However, these stress responses are primarily transmitted to the next generation through the female lineage due to widespread DNA glycosylase activity in the male germline, and extensively reset in the absence of stress. Using the CNI1/ATL31 locus as an example, we demonstrate that epigenetically targeted sequences function as distantly-acting control elements of antisense long non-coding RNAs, which in turn regulate targeted gene expression in response to stress. Collectively, our findings reveal that plants use a highly dynamic maternal ‘short-term stress memory’ with which to respond to adverse external conditions. This transient memory relies on the DNA methylation machinery and associated transcriptional changes to extend the phenotypic plasticity accessible to the immediate offspring. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13546.001 PMID:27242129

  14. Uracil DNA Glycosylase Is Dispensable for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication and Does Not Contribute to the Antiviral Effects of the Cytidine Deaminase Apobec3G

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Shari M.; Emerman, Michael

    2006-01-01

    It is well established that many host factors are involved in the replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1. One host protein, uracil DNA glycosylase 2 (UNG2), binds to multiple viral proteins and is packaged into HIV type 1 virions. UNG initiates the removal of uracils from DNA, and this has been proposed to be important both for reverse transcription and as a mediator to the antiviral effect of virion-incorporated Apobec3G, a cytidine deaminase that generates numerous uracils in the viral DNA during virus replication. We used a natural human UNG−/− cell line as well as cells that express a potent catalytic active-site inhibitor of UNG to assess the effects of removing UNG activity on HIV infectivity. In both cases, we find UNG2 activity and protein to be completely dispensable for virus replication. Moreover, we find that virion-associated UNG2 does not affect the loss of infectivity caused by Apobec3G. PMID:16378989

  15. Hyperosmotic stress memory in Arabidopsis is mediated by distinct epigenetically labile sites in the genome and is restricted in the male germline by DNA glycosylase activity.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, Anjar; Becker, Claude; Marconi, Gianpiero; Durr, Julius; Price, Jonathan; Hagmann, Jorg; Papareddy, Ranjith; Putra, Hadi; Kageyama, Jorge; Becker, Jorg; Weigel, Detlef; Gutierrez-Marcos, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Inducible epigenetic changes in eukaryotes are believed to enable rapid adaptation to environmental fluctuations. We have found distinct regions of the Arabidopsis genome that are susceptible to DNA (de)methylation in response to hyperosmotic stress. The stress-induced epigenetic changes are associated with conditionally heritable adaptive phenotypic stress responses. However, these stress responses are primarily transmitted to the next generation through the female lineage due to widespread DNA glycosylase activity in the male germline, and extensively reset in the absence of stress. Using the CNI1/ATL31 locus as an example, we demonstrate that epigenetically targeted sequences function as distantly-acting control elements of antisense long non-coding RNAs, which in turn regulate targeted gene expression in response to stress. Collectively, our findings reveal that plants use a highly dynamic maternal 'short-term stress memory' with which to respond to adverse external conditions. This transient memory relies on the DNA methylation machinery and associated transcriptional changes to extend the phenotypic plasticity accessible to the immediate offspring. PMID:27242129

  16. Placental 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine patterns associate with size at birth

    PubMed Central

    Piyasena, Chinthika; Reynolds, Rebecca M; Khulan, Batbayar; Seckl, Jonathan R; Menon, Gopi; Drake, Amanda J

    2015-01-01

    Altered placental function as a consequence of aberrant imprinted gene expression may be one mechanism mediating the association between low birth weight and increased cardiometabolic disease risk. Imprinted gene expression is regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, particularly DNA methylation (5mC) at differentially methylated regions (DMRs). While 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is also present at DMRs, many techniques do not distinguish between 5mC and 5hmC. Using human placental samples, we show that the expression of the imprinted gene CDKN1C associates with birth weight. Using specific techniques to map 5mC and 5hmC at DMRs controlling the expression of CDKN1C and the imprinted gene IGF2, we show that 5mC enrichment at KvDMR and DMR0, and 5hmC enrichment within the H19 gene body, associate positively with birth weight. Importantly, the presence of 5hmC at imprinted DMRs may complicate the interpretation of DNA methylation studies in placenta; future studies should consider using techniques that distinguish between, and permit quantification of, both modifications. PMID:26091021

  17. Bisulfite oligonucleotide-capture sequencing for targeted base- and strand-specific absolute 5-methylcytosine quantitation.

    PubMed

    Masser, Dustin R; Stanford, David R; Hadad, Niran; Giles, Cory B; Wren, Jonathan D; Sonntag, William E; Richardson, Arlan; Freeman, Willard M

    2016-06-01

    Epigenetic regulation through DNA methylation (5mC) plays an important role in development, aging, and a variety of diseases. Genome-wide studies of base- and strand-specific 5mC are limited by the extensive sequencing required. Targeting bisulfite sequencing to specific genomic regions through sequence capture with complimentary oligonucleotide probes retains the advantages of bisulfite sequencing while focusing sequencing reads on regions of interest, enables analysis of more samples by decreasing the amount of sequence required per sample, and provides base- and strand-specific absolute quantitation of CG and non-CG methylation levels. As an example, an oligonucleotide capture set to interrogate 5mC levels in all rat RefSeq gene promoter regions (18,814) and CG islands, shores, and shelves (18,411) was generated. Validation using whole-genome methylation standards and biological samples demonstrates enrichment of the targeted regions and accurate base-specific quantitation of CG and non-CG methylation for both forward and reverse genomic strands. A total of 170 Mb of the rat genome is covered including 6.6 million CGs and over 67 million non-CG sites, while reducing the amount of sequencing required by ~85 % as compared to existing whole-genome sequencing methods. This oligonucleotide capture targeting approach and quantitative validation workflow can also be applied to any genome of interest. PMID:27091453

  18. The simian varicella virus uracil DNA glycosylase and dUTPase genes are expressed in vivo, but are non-essential for replication in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Toby M.; Williams, Marshall V.; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Gray, Wayne L.

    2012-01-01

    Neurotropic herpesviruses express viral deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) and uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) enzymes which may reduce uracil misincorporation into viral DNA, particularly in neurons of infected ganglia. The simian varicella virus (SVV) dUTPase (ORF 8) and UDG (ORF 59) share 37.7% and 53.9% amino acid identity, respectively, with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) homologs. Infectious SVV mutants defective in either dUTPase (SVV-dUTPase−) or UDG (SVV-UDG−) activity or both (SVV-dUTPase−/UDG−) were constructed using recA assisted endonuclease cleavage (RARE) and a cosmid recombination system. Loss of viral dUTPase and UDG enzymatic activity was confirmed in CV-1 cells infected with the SVV mutants. The SVV-dUTPase−, SVV-UDG−, and SVV-dUTPase−/UDG− mutants replicated as efficiently as wild-type SVV in cell culture. SVV dUTPase and UDG expression was detected in tissues derived from acutely infected animals, but not in tissues derived from latently infected animals. Further studies will evaluate the pathogenesis of SVV dUTPase and UDG mutants and their potential as varicella vaccines. PMID:19200445

  19. Novel repair activities of AlkA (3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II) and endonuclease VIII for xanthine and oxanine, guanine lesions induced by nitric oxide and nitrous acid

    PubMed Central

    Terato, Hiroaki; Masaoka, Aya; Asagoshi, Kenjiro; Honsho, Akiko; Ohyama, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Toshinori; Yamada, Masaki; Makino, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Ide, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Nitrosation of guanine in DNA by nitrogen oxides such as nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid leads to formation of xanthine (Xan) and oxanine (Oxa), potentially cytotoxic and mutagenic lesions. In the present study, we have examined the repair capacity of DNA N-glycosylases from Escherichia coli for Xan and Oxa. The nicking assay with the defined substrates containing Xan and Oxa revealed that AlkA [in combination with endonuclease (Endo) IV] and Endo VIII recognized Xan in the tested enzymes. The activity (Vmax/Km) of AlkA for Xan was 5-fold lower than that for 7-methylguanine, and that of Endo VIII was 50-fold lower than that for thymine glycol. The activity of AlkA and Endo VIII for Xan was further substantiated by the release of [3H]Xan from the substrate. The treatment of E.coli with N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine increased the Xan-excising activity in the cell extract from alkA+ but not alkA– strains. The alkA and nei (the Endo VIII gene) double mutant, but not the single mutants, exhibited increased sensitivity to nitrous acid relative to the wild type strain. AlkA and Endo VIII also exhibited excision activity for Oxa, but the activity was much lower than that for Xan. PMID:12434002

  20. Quantification of 5-methylcytosine, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine from the blood of cancer patients by an Enzyme-based Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Basudev; Cho, Il-Hoon; Hahn, Noah; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide aberrations of the classic epigenetic modification 5-methylcytosine (5mC), considered the hallmark of gene silencing, has been implicated to play a pivotal role in mediating carcinogenic transformation of healthy cells. Recently, three epigenetic marks derived from enzymatic oxidization of 5mC namely 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC), have been discovered in the mammalian genome. Growing evidence suggests that these novel bases possess unique regulatory functions and may play critical roles in carcinogenesis. Methods To provide a quantitative basis for these rare epigenetic marks, we have designed a biotin-avidin mediated Enzyme-based Immunoassay (EIA) and evaluated its performance in genomic DNA isolated from blood of patients diagnosed with metastatic forms of lung, pancreatic and bladder cancer, as well as healthy controls. The proposed EIA incorporates spatially optimized biotinylated antibody and a high degree of horseradish-peroxidase (HRP) labeled streptavidin, facilitating signal amplification and sensitive detection. Results We report that the percentages of 5mC, 5hmC and 5caC present in the genomic DNA of blood in healthy controls as 1.025 + 0.081, 0.023 + 0.006 and 0.001 + 0.0002 respectively. We observed a significant (p<0.05) decrease in the mean global percentage of 5hmC in blood of patients with malignant lung cancer (0.013 + 0.003 %) in comparison to healthy controls. Conclusion The precise biological roles of these epigenetic modifications in cancers are still unknown but in the past two years it has become evident that the global 5hmC content is drastically reduced in a variety of cancers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of decreased 5hmC content in the blood of metastatic lung cancer patients and the clinical utility of this observation needs to be further validated in larger sample datasets. PMID:25441900

  1. Whole-genome analysis of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and 5-methylcytosine at base resolution in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background 5-methylcytosine (mC) can be oxidized by the tet methylcytosine dioxygenase (Tet) family of enzymes to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC), which is an intermediate of mC demethylation and may also be a stable epigenetic modification that influences chromatin structure. hmC is particularly abundant in mammalian brains but its function is currently unknown. A high-resolution hydroxymethylome map is required to fully understand the function of hmC in the human brain. Results We present genome-wide and single-base resolution maps of hmC and mC in the human brain by combined application of Tet-assisted bisulfite sequencing and bisulfite sequencing. We demonstrate that hmCs increase markedly from the fetal to the adult stage, and in the adult brain, 13% of all CpGs are highly hydroxymethylated with strong enrichment at genic regions and distal regulatory elements. Notably, hmC peaks are identified at the 5′splicing sites at the exon-intron boundary, suggesting a mechanistic link between hmC and splicing. We report a surprising transcription-correlated hmC bias toward the sense strand and an mC bias toward the antisense strand of gene bodies. Furthermore, hmC is negatively correlated with H3K27me3-marked and H3K9me3-marked repressive genomic regions, and is more enriched at poised enhancers than active enhancers. Conclusions We provide single-base resolution hmC and mC maps in the human brain and our data imply novel roles of hmC in regulating splicing and gene expression. Hydroxymethylation is the main modification status for a large portion of CpGs situated at poised enhancers and actively transcribed regions, suggesting its roles in epigenetic tuning at these regions. PMID:24594098

  2. Abnormal Expressions of DNA Glycosylase Genes NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 Are Associated with Somatic Mutation Loads in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shinmura, Kazuya; Kato, Hisami; Kawanishi, Yuichi; Igarashi, Hisaki; Goto, Masanori; Tao, Hong; Inoue, Yusuke; Nakamura, Satoki; Misawa, Kiyoshi; Mineta, Hiroyuki; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of abnormalities in the DNA glycosylases NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 on human cancer have not been fully elucidated. In this paper, we found that the median somatic total mutation loads and the median somatic single nucleotide mutation loads exhibited significant inverse correlations with the median NEIL1 and NEIL2 expression levels and a significant positive correlation with the median NEIL3 expression level using data for 13 cancer types from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. A subset of the cancer types exhibited reduced NEIL1 and NEIL2 expressions and elevated NEIL3 expression, and such abnormal expressions of NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 were also significantly associated with the mutation loads in cancer. As a mechanism underlying the reduced expression of NEIL1 in cancer, the epigenetic silencing of NEIL1 through promoter hypermethylation was found. Finally, we investigated the reason why an elevated NEIL3 expression level was associated with an increased number of somatic mutations in cancer and found that NEIL3 expression was positively correlated with the expression of APOBEC3B, a potent inducer of mutations, in diverse cancers. These results suggested that the abnormal expressions of NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 are involved in cancer through their association with the somatic mutation load. PMID:27042257

  3. X4 and R5 HIV-1 have distinct post-entry requirements for uracil DNA glycosylase during infection of primary cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kate L; Roche, Michael; Gantier, Michael P; Begum, Nasim A; Honjo, Tasuku; Caradonna, Salvatore; Williams, Bryan R G; Mak, Johnson

    2010-06-11

    It has been assumed that R5 and X4 HIV utilize similar strategies to support viral cDNA synthesis post viral entry. In this study, we provide evidence to show that R5 and X4 HIV have distinct requirements for host cell uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG2) during the early stage of infection. UNG2 has been previously implicated in HIV infection, but its precise role remains controversial. In this study we show that, although UNG2 is highly expressed in different cell lines, UNG2 levels are low in the natural host cells of HIV. Short interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous UNG2 in primary cells showed that UNG2 is required for R5 but not X4 HIV infection and that this requirement is bypassed when HIV enters the target cell via vesicular stomatitis virus envelope-glycoprotein-mediated endocytosis. We also show that short interfering RNA knockdown of UNG2 in virus-producing primary cells leads to defective R5 HIV virions that are unable to complete viral cDNA synthesis. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that endogenous UNG2 levels are transiently up-regulated post HIV infection, and this increase in UNG2 mRNA is approximately 10-20 times higher in R5 versus X4 HIV-infected cells. Our data show that both virion-associated UNG2 and HIV infection-induced UNG2 expression are critical for reverse transcription during R5 but not X4 HIV infection. More importantly, we have made the novel observation that R5 and X4 HIV have distinct host cell factor requirements and differential capacities to induce gene expression during the early stages of infection. These differences may result from activation of distinct signaling cascades and/or infection of divergent T-lymphocyte subpopulations. PMID:20371602

  4. X4 and R5 HIV-1 Have Distinct Post-entry Requirements for Uracil DNA Glycosylase during Infection of Primary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kate L.; Roche, Michael; Gantier, Michael P.; Begum, Nasim A.; Honjo, Tasuku; Caradonna, Salvatore; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Mak, Johnson

    2010-01-01

    It has been assumed that R5 and X4 HIV utilize similar strategies to support viral cDNA synthesis post viral entry. In this study, we provide evidence to show that R5 and X4 HIV have distinct requirements for host cell uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG2) during the early stage of infection. UNG2 has been previously implicated in HIV infection, but its precise role remains controversial. In this study we show that, although UNG2 is highly expressed in different cell lines, UNG2 levels are low in the natural host cells of HIV. Short interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous UNG2 in primary cells showed that UNG2 is required for R5 but not X4 HIV infection and that this requirement is bypassed when HIV enters the target cell via vesicular stomatitis virus envelope-glycoprotein-mediated endocytosis. We also show that short interfering RNA knockdown of UNG2 in virus-producing primary cells leads to defective R5 HIV virions that are unable to complete viral cDNA synthesis. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that endogenous UNG2 levels are transiently up-regulated post HIV infection, and this increase in UNG2 mRNA is ∼10–20 times higher in R5 versus X4 HIV-infected cells. Our data show that both virion-associated UNG2 and HIV infection-induced UNG2 expression are critical for reverse transcription during R5 but not X4 HIV infection. More importantly, we have made the novel observation that R5 and X4 HIV have distinct host cell factor requirements and differential capacities to induce gene expression during the early stages of infection. These differences may result from activation of distinct signaling cascades and/or infection of divergent T-lymphocyte subpopulations. PMID:20371602

  5. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 augments pro-inflammatory gene expression by facilitating the recruitment of site-specific transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Xueqing; Bacsi, Attila; Luo, Jixian; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Zeng, Xianlu; Radak, Zsolt; Brasier, Allan R; Boldogh, Istvan

    2014-01-01

    Among the insidious DNA base lesions, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) is one of the most abundant, a lesion that arises through the attack by reactive oxygen species on guanine, especially when located in cis-regulatory elements. 8-oxoG is repaired by the 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1)-initiated DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. Here we investigated whether 8-oxoG repair by OGG1 in promoter regions is compatible with a prompt gene expression and a host innate immune response. For this purpose, we utilized a mouse model of airway inflammation, supplemented with cell cultures, chromatin immunoprecipitation, siRNA knockdown, real-time PCR, Comet and reporter transcription assays. Our data show that exposure of cells to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) altered cellular redox, increased the 8-oxoG level in DNA, recruited OGG1 to promoter sequences and transiently inhibited BER of 8-oxoG. Promoter-associated OGG1 then enhanced NF-êB/RelA binding to cis-elements and facilitated recruitment of Specificity Protein 1 (SP1), transcription initiation factor II-D (TFIID), and phospho-RNA polymerase II, resulting in the rapid expression of chemokines/cytokines and inflammatory cell accumulation in mouse airways. siRNA depletion of OGG1 or prevention of guanine oxidation significantly decreased TNF-α-induced inflammatory responses. Together, these results show that non-productive binding of OGG1 to 8-oxoG in promoter sequences could be an epigenetic mechanism to modulate gene expression for a prompt innate immune response. PMID:24489103

  6. Effects of vaccinia virus uracil DNA glycosylase catalytic site and deoxyuridine triphosphatase deletion mutations individually and together on replication in active and quiescent cells and pathogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Frank S; Moss, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Background Low levels of uracil in DNA result from misincorporation of dUMP or cytosine deamination. Vaccinia virus (VACV), the prototype poxvirus, encodes two enzymes that can potentially reduce the amount of uracil in DNA. Deoxyuridine triphosphatase (dUTPase) hydrolyzes dUTP, generating dUMP for biosynthesis of thymidine nucleotides while decreasing the availability of dUTP for misincorporation; uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) cleaves uracil N-glycosylic bonds in DNA initiating base excision repair. Studies with actively dividing cells showed that the VACV UNG protein is required for DNA replication but the UNG catalytic site is not, whereas the dUTPase gene can be deleted without impairing virus replication. Recombinant VACV with an UNG catalytic site mutation was attenuated in vivo, while a dUTPase deletion mutant was not. However, the importance of the two enzymes for replication in quiescent cells, their possible synergy and roles in virulence have not been fully assessed. Results VACV mutants lacking the gene encoding dUTPase or with catalytic site mutations in UNG and double UNG/dUTPase mutants were constructed. Replication of UNG and UNG/dUTPase mutants were slightly reduced compared to wild type or the dUTPase mutant in actively dividing cells. Viral DNA replication was reduced about one-third under these conditions. After high multiplicity infection of quiescent fibroblasts, yields of wild type and mutant viruses were decreased by 2-logs with relative differences similar to those observed in active fibroblasts. However, under low multiplicity multi-step growth conditions in quiescent fibroblasts, replication of the dUTPase/UNG mutant was delayed and 5-fold lower than that of either single mutant or parental virus. This difference was exacerbated by 1-day serial passages on quiescent fibroblasts, resulting in 2- to 3-logs lower titer of the double mutant compared to the parental and single mutant viruses. Each mutant was more attenuated than a revertant

  7. Eukaryotic rRNA Modification by Yeast 5-Methylcytosine-Methyltransferases and Human Proliferation-Associated Antigen p120

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Imre; Aigueperse, Christelle; Schaefer, Matthias; Kellner, Stefanie; Helm, Mark; Motorin, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Modified nucleotide 5-methylcytosine (m5C) is frequently present in various eukaryotic RNAs, including tRNAs, rRNAs and in other non-coding RNAs, as well as in mRNAs. RNA:m5C-methyltranferases (MTases) Nop2 from S. cerevisiae and human proliferation-associated nucleolar antigen p120 are both members of a protein family called Nop2/NSUN/NOL1. Protein p120 is well-known as a tumor marker which is over-expressed in various cancer tissues. Using a combination of RNA bisulfite sequencing and HPLC-MS/MS analysis, we demonstrated here that p120 displays an RNA:m5C- MTase activity, which restores m5C formation at position 2870 in domain V of 25S rRNA in a nop2Δ yeast strain. We also confirm that yeast proteins Nop2p and Rcm1p catalyze the formation of m5C in domains V and IV, respectively. In addition, we do not find any evidence of m5C residues in yeast 18S rRNA. We also performed functional complementation of Nop2-deficient yeasts by human p120 and studied the importance of different sequence and structural domains of Nop2 and p120 for yeast growth and m5C-MTase activity. Chimeric protein formed by Nop2 and p120 fragments revealed the importance of Nop2 N-terminal domain for correct protein localization and its cellular function. We also validated that the presence of Nop2, rather than the m5C modification in rRNA itself, is required for pre-rRNA processing. Our results corroborate that Nop2 belongs to the large family of pre-ribosomal proteins and possesses two related functions in pre-rRNA processing: as an essential factor for cleavages and m5C:RNA:modification. These results support the notion of quality control during ribosome synthesis by such modification enzymes. PMID:26196125

  8. A unique dual recognition hairpin probe mediated fluorescence amplification method for sensitive detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase and endonuclease IV activities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yushu; Yan, Ping; Xu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) and endonuclease IV (Endo IV) play cooperative roles in uracil base-excision repair (UBER) and inactivity of either will interrupt the UBER to cause disease. Detection of UDG and Endo IV activities is crucial to evaluate the UBER process in fundamental research and diagnostic application. Here, a unique dual recognition hairpin probe mediated fluorescence amplification method was developed for sensitively and selectively detecting UDG and Endo IV activities. For detecting UDG activity, the uracil base in the probe was excised by the target enzyme to generate an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site, achieving the UDG recognition. Then, the AP site was cleaved by a tool enzyme Endo IV, releasing a primer to trigger rolling circle amplification (RCA) reaction. Finally, the RCA reaction produced numerous repeated G-quadruplex sequences, which interacted with N-methyl-mesoporphyrin IX to generate an enhanced fluorescence signal. Alternatively, for detecting Endo IV activity, the uracil base in the probe was first converted into an AP site by a tool enzyme UDG. Next, the AP site was cleaved by the target enzyme, achieving the Endo IV recognition. The signal was then generated and amplified in the same way as those in the UDG activity assay. The detection limits were as low as 0.00017 U mL(-1) for UDG and 0.11 U mL(-1) for Endo IV, respectively. Moreover, UDG and Endo IV can be well distinguished from their analogs. This method is beneficial for properly evaluating the UBER process in function studies and disease prognoses. PMID:26899234

  9. Polymorphisms of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine increase susceptibility to arsenic methylation capacity-related urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Jen; Lin, Ying-Chin; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2016-08-01

    Arsenic causes oxidative stress in cultured animal and human cells, and it is a well-documented human carcinogen. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study including 167 cases of urothelial carcinoma (UC) and 334 age- and gender-matched healthy controls to evaluate the relationships between urinary arsenic profiles, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels, and human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) genotypes and UC. The urinary arsenic species were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry. Genotyping for hOGG1 (Ser326Cys) and hOGG1 (-15C>G) was performed using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform with iPLEX Gold chemistry. Urinary 8-OHdG was measured with high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The results indicated that the hOGG1 326 Cys/Cys genotype and the hOGG1 -15C>G G/G genotype were associated with an increased risk of UC (OR [95 % CI] 1.57 [1.04-2.35] and 1.57 [1.04-2.35], respectively). Participants with high urinary total arsenic, regardless of the haplotype of hOGG1 Ser326Cys and the -15C>G polymorphism, had significantly higher urinary 8-OHdG compared to participants with low urinary total arsenic. This is the first study to investigate the joint effects of high urinary total arsenic or inefficient arsenic methylation capacity indices, and the high-risk G-G haplotype of hOGG1 on the risk of UC. The findings are especially meaningful for participants with risk factors such as high urinary total arsenic, inefficient arsenic methylation indices, high urinary 8-OHdG, and the high-risk G-G haplotype of hOGG1 which are all associated with an increased UC risk. PMID:26359225

  10. Structural and biophysical analysis of interactions between cod and human uracil-DNA N-glycosylase (UNG) and UNG inhibitor (Ugi).

    PubMed

    Assefa, Netsanet Gizaw; Niiranen, Laila; Johnson, Kenneth A; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti Schrøder; Smalås, Arne Oskar; Willassen, Nils Peder; Moe, Elin

    2014-08-01

    Uracil-DNA N-glycosylase from Atlantic cod (cUNG) shows cold-adapted features such as high catalytic efficiency, a low temperature optimum for activity and reduced thermal stability compared with its mesophilic homologue human UNG (hUNG). In order to understand the role of the enzyme-substrate interaction related to the cold-adapted properties, the structure of cUNG in complex with a bacteriophage encoded natural UNG inhibitor (Ugi) has been determined. The interaction has also been analyzed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The crystal structure of cUNG-Ugi was determined to a resolution of 1.9 Å with eight complexes in the asymmetric unit related through noncrystallographic symmetry. A comparison of the cUNG-Ugi complex with previously determined structures of UNG-Ugi shows that they are very similar, and confirmed the nucleotide-mimicking properties of Ugi. Biophysically, the interaction between cUNG and Ugi is very strong and shows a binding constant (Kb) which is one order of magnitude larger than that for hUNG-Ugi. The binding of both cUNG and hUNG to Ugi was shown to be favoured by both enthalpic and entropic forces; however, the binding of cUNG to Ugi is mainly dominated by enthalpy, while the entropic term is dominant for hUNG. The observed differences in the binding properties may be explained by an overall greater positive electrostatic surface potential in the protein-Ugi interface of cUNG and the slightly more hydrophobic surface of hUNG. PMID:25084329

  11. The cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly component MET18 is required for the full enzymatic activity of ROS1 in active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaokang; Li, Qi; Yuan, Wei; Cao, Zhendong; Qi, Bei; Kumar, Suresh; Li, Yan; Qian, Weiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns in plants are dynamically regulated by DNA methylation and active DNA demethylation in response to both environmental changes and development of plant. Beginning with the removal of methylated cytosine by ROS1/DME family of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases, active DNA demethylation in plants occurs through base excision repair. So far, many components involved in active DNA demethylation remain undiscovered. Through a forward genetic screening of Arabidopsis mutants showing DNA hypermethylation at the EPF2 promoter region, we identified the conserved iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein MET18. MET18 dysfunction caused DNA hypermethylation at more than 1000 loci as well as the silencing of reporter genes and some endogenous genes. MET18 can directly interact with ROS1 in vitro and in vivo. ROS1 activity was reduced in the met18 mutant plants and point mutation in the conserved Fe-S cluster binding motif of ROS1 disrupted its biological function. Interestingly, a large number of DNA hypomethylated loci, especially in the CHH context, were identified from the met18 mutants and most of the hypo-DMRs were from TE regions. Our results suggest that MET18 can regulate both active DNA demethylation and DNA methylation pathways in Arabidopsis. PMID:27193999

  12. The cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly component MET18 is required for the full enzymatic activity of ROS1 in active DNA demethylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaokang; Li, Qi; Yuan, Wei; Cao, Zhendong; Qi, Bei; Kumar, Suresh; Li, Yan; Qian, Weiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns in plants are dynamically regulated by DNA methylation and active DNA demethylation in response to both environmental changes and development of plant. Beginning with the removal of methylated cytosine by ROS1/DME family of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases, active DNA demethylation in plants occurs through base excision repair. So far, many components involved in active DNA demethylation remain undiscovered. Through a forward genetic screening of Arabidopsis mutants showing DNA hypermethylation at the EPF2 promoter region, we identified the conserved iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein MET18. MET18 dysfunction caused DNA hypermethylation at more than 1000 loci as well as the silencing of reporter genes and some endogenous genes. MET18 can directly interact with ROS1 in vitro and in vivo. ROS1 activity was reduced in the met18 mutant plants and point mutation in the conserved Fe-S cluster binding motif of ROS1 disrupted its biological function. Interestingly, a large number of DNA hypomethylated loci, especially in the CHH context, were identified from the met18 mutants and most of the hypo-DMRs were from TE regions. Our results suggest that MET18 can regulate both active DNA demethylation and DNA methylation pathways in Arabidopsis. PMID:27193999

  13. Overproduction of stomatal lineage cells in Arabidopsis mutants defective in active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamuro, Chizuko; Miki, Daisuke; Zheng, Zhimin; Ma, Jun; Wang, Jing; Yang, Zhenbiao; Dong, Juan; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a reversible epigenetic mark regulating genome stability and function in many eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, active DNA demethylation depends on the function of the ROS1 subfamily of genes that encode 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases/lyases. ROS1-mediated DNA demethylation plays a critical role in the regulation of transgenes, transposable elements and some endogenous genes, but there have been no reports of clear developmental phenotypes in ros1 mutant plants. Here we report that, in the ros1 mutant, the promoter region of the peptide ligand gene EPF2 is hypermethylated, which greatly reduces EPF2 expression and thereby leads to a phenotype of overproduction of stomatal lineage cells. EPF2 gene expression in ros1 is restored and the defective epidermal cell patterning is suppressed by mutations in genes in the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway. Our results show that active DNA demethylation combats the activity of RNA-directed DNA methylation to influence the initiation of stomatal lineage cells. PMID:24898766

  14. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (ogg1) maintains the function of cardiac progenitor cells during heart formation in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lifeng; Zhou, Yong; Yu, Shanhe; Ji, Guixiang; Liu, Wei; Gu, Aihua

    2013-11-15

    Genomic damage may devastate the potential of progenitor cells and consequently impair early organogenesis. We found that ogg1, a key enzyme initiating the base-excision repair, was enriched in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. So far, little is known about DNA repair in cardiogenesis. Here, we addressed the critical role of ogg1 in cardiogenesis for the first time. ogg1 mainly expressed in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), the primary heart tube, and subsequently the embryonic myocardium by in situ hybridisation. Loss of ogg1 resulted in severe cardiac morphogenesis and functional abnormalities, including the short heart length, arrhythmia, decreased cardiomyocytes and nkx2.5{sup +} cardiac progenitor cells. Moreover, the increased apoptosis and repressed proliferation of progenitor cells caused by ogg1 deficiency might contribute to the heart phenotype. The microarray analysis showed that the expression of genes involved in embryonic heart tube morphogenesis and heart structure were significantly changed due to the lack of ogg1. Among those, foxh1 is an important partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage. Our work demonstrates the requirement of ogg1 in cardiac progenitors and heart development in zebrafish. These findings may be helpful for understanding the aetiology of congenital cardiac deficits. - Highlights: • A key DNA repair enzyme ogg1 is expressed in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. • We found that ogg1 is essential for normal cardiac morphogenesis in zebrafish. • The production of embryonic cardiomyocytes requires appropriate ogg1 expression. • Ogg1 critically regulated proliferation of cardiac progenitor cells in zebrafish. • foxh1 is a partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage.

  15. Growth Arrest and DNA-Damage-Inducible, Beta (GADD45b)-Mediated DNA Demethylation in Major Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, David P; Sharma, Rajiv P; Chase, Kayla A; Matrisciano, Francesco; Dong, Erbo; Guidotti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant neocortical DNA methylation has been suggested to be a pathophysiological contributor to psychotic disorders. Recently, a growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible, beta (GADD45b) protein-coordinated DNA demethylation pathway, utilizing cytidine deaminases and thymidine glycosylases, has been identified in the brain. We measured expression of several members of this pathway in parietal cortical samples from the Stanley Foundation Neuropathology Consortium (SFNC) cohort. We find an increase in GADD45b mRNA and protein in patients with psychosis. In immunohistochemistry experiments using samples from the Harvard Brain Tissue Resource Center, we report an increased number of GADD45b-stained cells in prefrontal cortical layers II, III, and V in psychotic patients. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor IX (BDNF IXabcd) was selected as a readout gene to determine the effects of GADD45b expression and promoter binding. We find that there is less GADD45b binding to the BDNF IXabcd promoter in psychotic subjects. Further, there is reduced BDNF IXabcd mRNA expression, and an increase in 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at its promoter. On the basis of these results, we conclude that GADD45b may be increased in psychosis compensatory to its inability to access gene promoter regions. PMID:22048458

  16. Biochemical reconstitution of TET1–TDG–BER-dependent active DNA demethylation reveals a highly coordinated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Alain R.; Krawczyk, Claudia; Robertson, Adam B.; Kuśnierczyk, Anna; Vågbø, Cathrine B.; Schuermann, David; Klungland, Arne; Schär, Primo

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine methylation in CpG dinucleotides is an epigenetic DNA modification dynamically established and maintained by DNA methyltransferases and demethylases. Molecular mechanisms of active DNA demethylation began to surface only recently with the discovery of the 5-methylcytosine (5mC)-directed hydroxylase and base excision activities of ten–eleven translocation (TET) proteins and thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG). This implicated a pathway operating through oxidation of 5mC by TET proteins, which generates substrates for TDG-dependent base excision repair (BER) that then replaces 5mC with C. Yet, direct evidence for a productive coupling of TET with BER has never been presented. Here we show that TET1 and TDG physically interact to oxidize and excise 5mC, and proof by biochemical reconstitution that the TET–TDG–BER system is capable of productive DNA demethylation. We show that the mechanism assures a sequential demethylation of symmetrically methylated CpGs, thereby avoiding DNA double-strand break formation but contributing to the mutability of methylated CpGs. PMID:26932196

  17. Biochemical reconstitution of TET1-TDG-BER-dependent active DNA demethylation reveals a highly coordinated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Weber, Alain R; Krawczyk, Claudia; Robertson, Adam B; Kuśnierczyk, Anna; Vågbø, Cathrine B; Schuermann, David; Klungland, Arne; Schär, Primo

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine methylation in CpG dinucleotides is an epigenetic DNA modification dynamically established and maintained by DNA methyltransferases and demethylases. Molecular mechanisms of active DNA demethylation began to surface only recently with the discovery of the 5-methylcytosine (5mC)-directed hydroxylase and base excision activities of ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins and thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG). This implicated a pathway operating through oxidation of 5mC by TET proteins, which generates substrates for TDG-dependent base excision repair (BER) that then replaces 5mC with C. Yet, direct evidence for a productive coupling of TET with BER has never been presented. Here we show that TET1 and TDG physically interact to oxidize and excise 5mC, and proof by biochemical reconstitution that the TET-TDG-BER system is capable of productive DNA demethylation. We show that the mechanism assures a sequential demethylation of symmetrically methylated CpGs, thereby avoiding DNA double-strand break formation but contributing to the mutability of methylated CpGs. PMID:26932196

  18. Cloning, Purification and Initial Characterization of E. coli McrA, a Putative 5-methylcytosine-specific Nuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan,E.; Dunn, J.

    2008-01-01

    Expression strains of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) overproducing the E. coli m5C McrA restriction protein were produced by cloning the mcrA coding sequence behind a T7 promoter. The recombinant mcrA minus BL21(DE3) host produces active McrA as evidenced by its acquired ability to selectively restrict the growth of T7 phage containing DNA methylated in vitro by HpaII methylase. The mcrA coding region contains several non-optimal E. coli triplets. Addition of the pACYC-RIL tRNA encoding plasmid to the BL21(DE3) host increased the yield of recombinant McrA (rMcrA) upon induction about 5- to 10-fold. McrA protein expressed at 37 C is insoluble but a significant fraction is recovered as soluble protein after autoinduction at 20 C. rMcrA protein, which is predicted to contain a Cys4-Zn2+ finger and a catalytically important histidine triad in its putative nuclease domain, binds to several metal chelate resins without addition of a poly-histidine affinity tag. This feature was used to develop an efficient protocol for the rapid purification of nearly homogeneous rMcrA. The native protein is a dimer with a high a-helical content as measured by circular dichroism analysis. Under all conditions tested purified rMcrA does not have measurable nuclease activity on HpaII methylated (Cm5CGG) DNA, although the purified protein does specifically bind HpaII methylated DNA. These results have implications for understanding the in vivo activity of McrA in 'restricting' m5C-containing DNA and suggest that rMcrA may have utility as a reagent for affinity purification of DNA fragments containing m5C residues.

  19. Cloning, purification and initial characterization of E. coli McrA, a putative 5-methylcytosine-specific nuclease.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Elizabeth A; Dunn, John J

    2008-11-01

    Expression strains of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) overproducing the E. coli m(5)C McrA restriction protein were produced by cloning the mcrA coding sequence behind a T7 promoter. The recombinant mcrA minus BL21(DE3) host produces active McrA as evidenced by its acquired ability to selectively restrict the growth of T7 phage containing DNA methylated in vitro by HpaII methylase. The mcrA coding region contains several non-optimal E. coli triplets. Addition of the pACYC-RIL tRNA encoding plasmid to the BL21(DE3) host increased the yield of recombinant McrA (rMcrA) upon induction about 5- to 10-fold. McrA protein expressed at 37 degrees C is insoluble but a significant fraction is recovered as soluble protein after autoinduction at 20 degrees C. rMcrA protein, which is predicted to contain a Cys(4)-Zn(2+) finger and a catalytically important histidine triad in its putative nuclease domain, binds to several metal chelate resins without addition of a poly-histidine affinity tag. This feature was used to develop an efficient protocol for the rapid purification of nearly homogeneous rMcrA. The native protein is a dimer with a high alpha-helical content as measured by circular dichroism analysis. Under all conditions tested purified rMcrA does not have measurable nuclease activity on HpaII methylated (Cm(5)CGG) DNA, although the purified protein does specifically bind HpaII methylated DNA. These results have implications for understanding the in vivo activity of McrA in "restricting" m(5)C-containing DNA and suggest that rMcrA may have utility as a reagent for affinity purification of DNA fragments containing m(5)C residues. PMID:18662788

  20. TET2 Mutations Are Associated with Specific 5-Methylcytosine and 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine Profiles in Patients with Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Cristina; Martínez-Calle, Nicolas; Martín-Subero, José Ignacio; Segura, Victor; Delabesse, Eric; Fernandez-Mercado, Marta; Garate, Leire; Alvarez, Sara; Rifon, José; Varea, Sara; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Wainscoat, James S.; Cigudosa, Juan Cruz; Calasanz, María José; Cross, Nicholas C. P.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) has recently been associated with a high incidence of diverse mutations in genes such as TET2 or EZH2 that are implicated in epigenetic mechanisms. We have performed genome-wide DNA methylation arrays and mutational analysis of TET2, IDH1, IDH2, EZH2 and JAK2 in a group of 24 patients with CMML. 249 genes were differentially methylated between CMML patients and controls. Using Ingenuity pathway analysis, we identified enrichment in a gene network centered around PLC, JNK and ERK suggesting that these pathways, whose deregulation has beenrecently described in CMML, are affected by epigenetic mechanisms. Mutations of TET2, JAK2 and EZH2 were found in 15 patients (65%), 4 patients (17%) and 1 patient (4%) respectively while no mutations in the IDH1 and IDH2 genes were identified. Interestingly, patients with wild type TET2 clustered separately from patients with TET2 mutations, showed a higher degree of hypermethylation and were associated with higher risk karyotypes. Our results demonstrate the presence of aberrant DNA methylation in CMML and identifies TET2 mutant CMML as a biologically distinct disease subtype with a different epigenetic profile. PMID:22328940

  1. Global and Site-Specific Changes in 5-Methylcytosine and 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine after Extended Post-mortem Interval

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Jeffrey A.; Nagy, Corina; Lin, Li; Bonneil, Éric; Maheu, Marissa; Thibault, Pierre; Mechawar, Naguib; Jin, Peng; Turecki, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in the study of epigenetic mechanisms to elucidate the molecular bases of human brain-related diseases and disorders. Frequently, researchers utilize post-mortem tissue with the assumption that post-mortem tissue decay has little or no effect on epigenetic marks. Although previous studies show no effect of post-mortem interval on certain epigenetic marks, no such research has been performed on cytosine modifications. In this study, we use DNA from the brains of adult Sprague Dawley rats subjected to post-mortem intervals at room temperature, ranging from 0 to 96 h, to assess the stability of cytosine modifications, namely 5-methycytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. Our results indicate that neither global nor site-specific levels of 5-methycytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine are affected by the post-mortem intervals we studied. As such, the use of post-mortem tissue to study cytosine modifications in the context of neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders is appropriate. PMID:27446202

  2. Molecular basis for discriminating between normal and damaged bases by the human alkyladenine glycosylase, AAG

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Albert Y.; Wyatt, Michael D.; Glassner, Brian J.; Samson, Leona D.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2000-01-01

    The human 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase [alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG)] catalyzes the first step of base excision repair by cleaving damaged bases from DNA. Unlike other DNA glycosylases that are specific for a particular type of damaged base, AAG excises a chemically diverse selection of substrate bases damaged by alkylation or deamination. The 2.1-Å crystal structure of AAG complexed to DNA containing 1,N6-ethenoadenine suggests how modified bases can be distinguished from normal DNA bases in the enzyme active site. Mutational analyses of residues contacting the alkylated base in the crystal structures suggest that the shape of the damaged base, its hydrogen-bonding characteristics, and its aromaticity all contribute to the selective recognition of damage by AAG. PMID:11106395

  3. Hyperglycemia-induced inflammation caused down-regulation of 8-oxoG-DNA glycosylase levels in murine macrophages is mediated by oxidative-nitrosative stress-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Premranjan; Swain, Mitali Madhusmita; Pal, Arttatrana

    2016-04-01

    High glucose-induced increase in production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) is recognized as a major cause of the clinical complications associated with diabetes. ROS/RNS apart from being redox agents, cause an unwanted severe physiological load to cells, also act as cellular messengers, and play a key role in activation of circulating macrophages. However, the molecular mechanisms of activation of macrophages by hyperglycemic conditions are currently unclear. In the present study, we report that high glucose (HG) causes a dramatic increase in the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, at least in part through enhanced mRNA transcription. The increase in levels of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines corresponds to increased levels of ROS/RNS, which is accompanied by increased activities of Akt, ERK1/2, tuberin, down regulation of 8-oxoG-DNA glycosylase (OGG1), and increase in 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) accumulation in DNA. Elevated levels of ROS/RNS are triggering alteration in antioxidants level, biomolecules damage, cell cycle dysregulation, and apoptosis in macrophage cells. Pretreatment of antioxidants caused decrease in the levels of ROS/RNS leads to an increase in the levels of antioxidants, decrease in biomolecules damage, alterations in Akt, ERK1/2, tuberin, upregulation of OGG1, and decrease in 8-OHdG accumulations in DNA. Further, antioxidants treatments inhibit the effects of HG on the transcriptional activity of cytokines and chemokines. Our results demonstrate that intracellular signaling pathways mediated by ROS/RNS are linked to each other by elevated glucose in macrophages activation leading to inflammation. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation of how ROS/RNS cooperate to conduct inflammatory intracellular signals in macrophages related complications in hyperglycemic conditions. PMID:26860957

  4. Enhancement of Borrelia burgdorferi PCR by uracil N-glycosylase.

    PubMed Central

    Loewy, Z G; Mecca, J; Diaco, R

    1994-01-01

    Uracil DNA glycosylases are DNA repair enzymes present in virtually every organism. These enzymes function by excising from DNA uracil residues resulting from either misincorporation of dUMP residues by a DNA polymerase or deamination of cytosine. Recently, the enzyme has been exploited in PCRs as a means for controlling carryover contamination from previously amplified DNA. When the enzyme is used in amplifications of Borrelia burgdorferi target sequences, we have observed an enhancement in signal detected by a microwell plate DNA hybridization assay. This increase in signal is dependent upon the length of the target, is titratable with enzyme concentration, and has been observed with amplifications performed with both symmetric and asymmetric PCR profiles. The enhancement is shown to occur at the level of the target genomic DNA. PMID:8126168

  5. Advanced uracil DNA glycosylase-supplemented real-time reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (UDG-rRT-LAMP) method for universal and specific detection of Tembusu virus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi; Chen, Hao; Diao, Youxiang

    2016-01-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus which threatens both poultry production and public health. In this study we developed a complete open reading frame alignment-based rRT-LAMP method for the universal detection of TUMV. To prevent false-positive results, the reaction was supplemented with uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) to eliminate carryover contamination. The detection limit of the newly developed UDG-rRT-LAMP for TMUV was as low as 100 copies/reaction of viral RNA and 1 × 10(0.89) - 1 × 10(1.55) tissue culture infectious dose/100 μL of viruses. There were no cross-reactions with other viruses, and the reproducibility of the assay was confirmed by intra- and inter-assay tests with variability ranging from 0.22-3.33%. The new UDG-rRT-LAMP method for TMUV produced the same results as viral isolation combined with RT-PCR as the "gold standard" in 96.88% of cases for 81 clinical samples from subjects with suspected TMUV infection. The addition of UDG can eliminate as much as 1 × 10(-16) g/reaction of contaminants, which can significantly reduce the likelihood of false-positive results during the rRT-LAMP reaction. Our result indicated that our UDG-rRT-LAMP is a rapid, sensitive, specific, and reliable method that can effectively prevent carryover contamination in the detection of TMUV. PMID:27270462

  6. Advanced uracil DNA glycosylase-supplemented real-time reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (UDG-rRT-LAMP) method for universal and specific detection of Tembusu virus

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yi; Chen, Hao; Diao, Youxiang

    2016-01-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus which threatens both poultry production and public health. In this study we developed a complete open reading frame alignment-based rRT-LAMP method for the universal detection of TUMV. To prevent false-positive results, the reaction was supplemented with uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) to eliminate carryover contamination. The detection limit of the newly developed UDG-rRT-LAMP for TMUV was as low as 100 copies/reaction of viral RNA and 1 × 100.89 − 1 × 101.55 tissue culture infectious dose/100 μL of viruses. There were no cross-reactions with other viruses, and the reproducibility of the assay was confirmed by intra- and inter-assay tests with variability ranging from 0.22–3.33%. The new UDG-rRT-LAMP method for TMUV produced the same results as viral isolation combined with RT-PCR as the “gold standard” in 96.88% of cases for 81 clinical samples from subjects with suspected TMUV infection. The addition of UDG can eliminate as much as 1 × 10−16 g/reaction of contaminants, which can significantly reduce the likelihood of false-positive results during the rRT-LAMP reaction. Our result indicated that our UDG-rRT-LAMP is a rapid, sensitive, specific, and reliable method that can effectively prevent carryover contamination in the detection of TMUV. PMID:27270462

  7. Out-of-plane low-frequency vibrations and nonradiative decay in the 1ππ* state of jet-cooled 5-methylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Trachsel, Maria A; Lobsiger, Simon; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2012-09-13

    We investigate the UV vibronic spectrum and excited-state nonradiative processes of jet-cooled 5-methylcytosine (5MCyt) using two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy at 0.3 and 0.05 cm(–1) resolution. In contrast to cytosine, which shows only five bands above its electronic origin, the lowest electronic transition of 5MCyt exhibits about 25 low-frequency vibronic bands that extend to 0(0)(0) + 450 cm(–1), allowing to extract detailed information on the excited-state electronic and nuclear structure. Most bands are overtones and combinations of the out-of-plane vibrations ν'(1), ν'(2), and ν'(3). Their large intensities reflect butterfly-, boat-, and twist-deformations of the 5MCyt framework upon electronic excitation. From the rotational contours of the 0(0)(0), 1(0)(2), 2(0)(2), and 3(0)(2) bands, the transition is found to be polarized along the in-plane a/b axes, characteristic of a (1)ππ* transition. Approximate second-order coupled-cluster (CC2) and time-dependent B3LYP calculations both predict that 5MCyt undergoes an out-of-plane deformation in its (1)ππ* (S(2)) state but both methods overestimate the out-of-plane ν'(1), ν'(2), and ν'(3) vibrational frequencies by a factor of 3–5. The TD-B3LYP (1)ππ* transition dipole moment direction is 10%:90% a:b, in good agreement with experiment. From the Lorentzian line shape contributions needed to fit the rotational contours, a lower limit to the 5MCyt (1)ππ* state lifetime at the 0(0)(0), 1(0)(2), 2(0)(2), and 3(0)(2) bands is determined as τ ≥ 30 ps. These values are in stark contrast to the ultrafast (picosecond) lifetimes measured for jet-cooled cytosine by femtosecond pump–probe techniques. They also confirm the observation from the R2PI spectrum that 5-methylation of cytosine increases its excited-state lifetime. The higher out-of-plane overtone and combination bands disappear from the spectrum by ~460 cm(–1), signaling the onset of lifetimes τ < 0.5 ps, induced by

  8. Studying Epigenetic DNA Modifications in Undergraduate Laboratories Using Complementary Bioinformatic and Molecular Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Militello, Kevin T.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic inheritance is the inheritance of genetic information that is not based on DNA sequence alone. One type of epigenetic information that has come to the forefront in the last few years is modified DNA bases. The most common modified DNA base in nature is 5-methylcytosine. Herein, we describe a laboratory experiment that combines…

  9. Cerebellar Oxidative DNA Damage and Altered DNA Methylation in the BTBR T+tf/J Mouse Model of Autism and Similarities with Human Post Mortem Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Shpyleva, Svitlana; Ivanovsky, Samuil; de Conti, Aline; Melnyk, Stepan; Tryndyak, Volodymyr; Beland, Frederick A.; James, S. Jill; Pogribny, Igor P.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of autism is complex and involves numerous genomic, epigenomic, proteomic, metabolic, and physiological alterations. Elucidating and understanding the molecular processes underlying the pathogenesis of autism is critical for effective clinical management and prevention of this disorder. The goal of this study is to investigate key molecular alterations postulated to play a role in autism and their role in the pathophysiology of autism. In this study we demonstrate that DNA isolated from the cerebellum of BTBR T+tf/J mice, a relevant mouse model of autism, and from human post-mortem cerebellum of individuals with autism, are both characterized by an increased levels of 8-oxo-7-hydrodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), 5-methylcytosine (5mC), and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). The increase in 8-oxodG and 5mC content was associated with a markedly reduced expression of the 8-oxoguanine DNA-glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) and increased expression of de novo DNA methyltransferases 3a and 3b (Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b). Interestingly, a rise in the level of 5hmC occurred without changes in the expression of ten-eleven translocation expression 1 (Tet1) and Tet2 genes, but significantly correlated with the presence of 8-oxodG in DNA. This finding and similar elevation in 8-oxodG in cerebellum of individuals with autism and in the BTBR T+tf/J mouse model warrant future large-scale studies to specifically address the role of OGG1 alterations in pathogenesis of autism. PMID:25423485

  10. RNA-binding protein regulates plant DNA methylation by controlling mRNA processing at the intronic heterochromatin-containing gene IBM1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingang; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Tang, Kai; Wang, Bangshing; Zhang, Huiming; Lei, Mingguang; Lu, Kun; Mangrauthia, Satendra K.; Wang, Pengcheng; Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation-dependent heterochromatin formation is a conserved mechanism of epigenetic silencing of transposons and other repeat elements in many higher eukaryotes. Genes adjacent to repetitive elements are often also subjected to this epigenetic silencing. Consequently, plants have evolved antisilencing mechanisms such as active DNA demethylation mediated by the REPRESSOR OF SILENCING 1 (ROS1) family of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases to protect these genes from silencing. Some transposons and other repeat elements have found residence in the introns of genes. It is unclear how these intronic repeat elements-containing genes are regulated. We report here the identification of ANTI-SILENCING 1 (ASI1), a bromo-adjacent homology domain and RNA recognition motif-containing protein, from a forward genetic screen for cellular antisilencing factors in Arabidopsis thaliana. ASI1 is required to prevent promoter DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing of some transgenes. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis reveals that ASI1 has a similar role to that of the histone H3K9 demethylase INCREASE IN BONSAI METHYLATION 1 (IBM1) in preventing CHG methylation in the bodies of thousands of genes. We found that ASI1 is an RNA-binding protein and ensures the proper expression of IBM1 full-length transcript by associating with an intronic heterochromatic repeat element of IBM1. Through mRNA sequencing, we identified many genes containing intronic transposon elements that require ASI1 for proper expression. Our results suggest that ASI1 associates with intronic heterochromatin and binds the gene transcripts to promote their 3′ distal polyadenylation. The study thus reveals a unique mechanism by which higher eukaryotes deal with the collateral effect of silencing intronic repeat elements. PMID:24003136

  11. Expression of human oxoguanine glycosylase 1 or formamidopyrimidine glycosylase in human embryonic kidney 293 cells exacerbates methylmercury toxicity in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ondovcik, Stephanie L.; Preston, Thomas J.; McCallum, Gordon P.; Wells, Peter G.

    2013-08-15

    Exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) acutely at high levels, or via chronic low-level dietary exposure from daily fish consumption, can lead to adverse neurological effects in both the adult and developing conceptus. To determine the impact of variable DNA repair capacity, and the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidatively damaged DNA in the mechanism of toxicity, transgenic human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells that stably express either human oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (hOgg1) or its bacterial homolog, formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg), which primarily repair the oxidative lesion 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), were used to assess the in vitro effects of MeHg. Western blotting confirmed the expression of hOgg1 or Fpg in both the nuclear and mitochondrial compartments of their respective cell lines. Following acute (1–2 h) incubations with 0–10 μM MeHg, concentration-dependent decreases in clonogenic survival and cell growth accompanied concentration-dependent increases in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, ROS formation, 8-oxodG levels and apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, consistent with the onset of cytotoxicity. Paradoxically, hOgg1- and Fpg-expressing HEK 293 cells were more sensitive than wild-type cells stably transfected with the empty vector control to MeHg across all cellular and biochemical parameters, exhibiting reduced clonogenic survival and cell growth, and increased LDH release and DNA damage. Accordingly, upregulation of specific components of the base excision repair (BER) pathway may prove deleterious potentially due to the absence of compensatory enhancement of downstream processes to repair toxic intermediary abasic sites. Thus, interindividual variability in DNA repair activity may constitute an important risk factor for environmentally-initiated, oxidatively damaged DNA and its pathological consequences. - Highlights: • hOgg1 and Fpg repair oxidatively damaged DNA. • hOgg1- and Fpg-expressing cells are more

  12. Dimerization and opposite base-dependent catalytic impairment of polymorphic S326C OGG1 glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jeff W.; Evans, Michele K.

    2006-01-01

    Human 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (OGG1) is the major enzyme for repairing 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a mutagenic guanine base lesion produced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). A frequently occurring OGG1 polymorphism in human populations results in the substitution of serine 326 for cysteine (S326C). The 326 C/C genotype is linked to numerous cancers, although the mechanism of carcinogenesis associated with the variant is unclear. We performed detailed enzymatic studies of polymorphic OGG1 and found functional defects in the enzyme. S326C OGG1 excised 8-oxoG from duplex DNA and cleaved abasic sites at rates 2- to 6-fold lower than the wild-type enzyme, depending upon the base opposite the lesion. Binding experiments showed that the polymorphic OGG1 binds DNA damage with significantly less affinity than the wild-type enzyme. Remarkably, gel shift, chemical cross-linking and gel filtration experiments showed that S326C both exists in solution and binds damaged DNA as a dimer. S326C OGG1 enzyme expressed in human cells was also found to have reduced activity and a dimeric conformation. The glycosylase activity of S326C OGG1 was not significantly stimulated by the presence of AP-endonuclease. The altered substrate specificity, lack of stimulation by AP-endonuclease 1 (APE1) and anomalous DNA binding conformation of S326C OGG1 may contribute to its linkage to cancer incidence. PMID:16549874

  13. Undetectable levels of N6-methyl adenine in mouse DNA: Cloning and analysis of PRED28, a gene coding for a putative mammalian DNA adenine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ratel, David; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Charles, Marie-Pierre; Platet, Nadine; Breuillaud, Lionel; Lunardi, Joël; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2006-05-29

    Three methylated bases, 5-methylcytosine, N4-methylcytosine and N6-methyladenine (m6A), can be found in DNA. However, to date, only 5-methylcytosine has been detected in mammalian genomes. To reinvestigate the presence of m6A in mammalian DNA, we used a highly sensitive method capable of detecting one N6-methyldeoxyadenosine per million nucleosides. Our results suggest that the total mouse genome contains, if any, less than 10(3) m6A. Experiments were next performed on PRED28, a putative mammalian N6-DNA methyltransferase. The murine PRED28 encodes two alternatively spliced RNA. However, although recombinant PRED28 proteins are found in the nucleus, no evidence for an adenine-methyltransferase activity was detected. PMID:16684535

  14. Chloroethyinitrosourea-derived ethano cytosine and adenine adducts are substrates for escherichia coli glycosylases excising analogous etheno adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Guliaev, Anton B.; Singer, B.; Hang, Bo

    2004-05-05

    Exocyclic ethano DNA adducts are saturated etheno ring derivatives formed mainly by therapeutic chloroethylnitrosoureas (CNUs), which are also mutagenic and carcinogenic. In this work, we report that two of the ethano adducts, 3,N{sup 4}-ethanocytosine (EC) and 1,N{sup 6}-ethanoadenine (EA), are novel substrates for the Escherichia coli mismatch-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase (Mug) and 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II (AlkA), respectively. It has been shown previously that Mug excises 3,N{sup 4}-ethenocytosine ({var_epsilon}C) and AlkA releases 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine ({var_epsilon}A). Using synthetic oligonucleotides containing a single ethano or etheno adduct, we found that both glycosylases had a {approx}20-fold lower excision activity toward EC or EA than that toward their structurally analogous {var_epsilon}C or {var_epsilon}A adduct. Both enzymes were capable of excising the ethano base paired with any of the four natural bases, but with varying efficiencies. The Mug activity toward EC could be stimulated by E. coli endonuclease IV and, more efficiently, by exonuclease III. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed similar structural features of the etheno and ethano derivatives when present in DNA duplexes. However, also as shown by MD, the stacking interaction between the EC base and Phe 30 in the Mug active site is reduced as compared to the {var_epsilon}C base, which could account for the lower EC activity observed in this study.

  15. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of uracil N-glycosylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in complex with a proteinaceous inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Prem; Talawar, Ramappa K.; Krishna, P. D. V.; Varshney, Umesh; Vijayan, M.

    2006-12-01

    Uracil N-glycosylase from M. tuberculosis has been crystallized in complex with a proteinaceous inhibitor (Ugi) and X-ray diffraction data have been collected. Uracil N-glycosylase is an enzyme which initiates the pathway of uracil-excision repair of DNA. The enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was co-expressed with a proteinaceous inhibitor from Bacillus subtilis phage and was crystallized in monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 201.14, b = 64.27, c = 203.68 Å, β = 109.7°. X-ray data from the crystal have been collected for structure analysis.

  16. Designing DNA interstrand lock for locus-specific methylation detection in a nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Insoon; Wang, Yong; Reagan, Corbin; Fu, Yumei; Wang, Michael X.; Gu, Li-Qun

    2013-10-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Locus-specific DNA methylation can be used as biomarkers in various diseases including cancer. Many methods have been developed for genome-wide methylation analysis, but molecular diagnotics needs simple tools to determine methylation states at individual CpG sites in a gene fragment. In this report, we utilized the nanopore single-molecule sensor to investigate a base-pair specific metal ion/nucleic acids interaction, and explored its potential application in locus-specific DNA methylation analysis. We identified that divalent Mercury ion (Hg2+) can selectively bind a uracil-thymine mismatch (U-T) in a dsDNA. The Hg2+ binding creates a reversible interstrand lock, called MercuLock, which enhances the hybridization strength by two orders of magnitude. Such MercuLock cannot be formed in a 5-methylcytosine-thymine mismatch (mC-T). By nanopore detection of dsDNA stability, single bases of uracil and 5-methylcytosine can be distinguished. Since uracil is converted from cytosine by bisulfite treatment, cytosine and 5'-methylcytosine can be discriminated. We have demonstrated the methylation analysis of multiple CpGs in a p16 gene CpG island. This single-molecule assay may have potential in detection of epigenetic cancer biomarkers in biofluids, with an ultimate goal for early diagnosis of cancer.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA: A Blind Spot in Neuroepigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Manev, Hari; Dzitoyeva, Svetlana; Chen, Hu

    2012-01-01

    Neuroepigenetics, which includes nuclear DNA modifications such as 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydoxymethylcytosine and modifications of nuclear proteins such as histones, is emerging as the leading field in molecular neuroscience. Historically, a functional role for epigenetic mechanisms, including in neuroepigenetics, has been sought in the area of the regulation of nuclear transcription. However, one important compartment of mammalian cell DNA, different from nuclear but equally important for physiological and pathological processes (including in the brain), mitochondrial DNA has for the most part not had a systematic epigenetic characterization. The importance of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (particularly its mutations) in central nervous system physiology and pathology has long been recognized. Only recently have mechanisms of mitochondrial DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation, including the discovery of mitochondrial DNA-methyltransferases and the presence and the functionality of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in mitochondrial DNA (e.g., in modifying the transcription of mitochondrial genome), been unequivocally recognized as a part of mammalian mitochondrial physiology. Here we summarize for the first time evidence supporting the existence of these mechanisms and we propose the term “mitochondrial epigenetics” to be used when referring to them. Currently, neuroepigenetics does not include mitochondrial epigenetics - a gap that we expect to close in the near future. PMID:22639700

  18. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-mediated DNA demethylation in stem cells and development.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjia; Guan, Minxin; Li, Xuekun

    2014-05-01

    The pursuit of DNA demethylation has a colorful history, but it was not until 2009 that the stars of this story, the Ten-eleven-translocation (Tet) family of proteins, were really identified. Tet proteins convert 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which can be further oxidized to 5-formylcytosine and 5-cyboxycytosine by Tet proteins to achieve DNA demethylation. Recent studies have revealed that 5hmC-mediated DNA demethylation can play essential roles in diverse biological processes, including development and diseases. Here, we review recent discoveries in 5hmC-mediated DNA demethylation in the context of stem cells and development. PMID:24400731

  19. Dispensability of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in novel homologues of adenine glycosylase MutY.

    PubMed

    Trasviña-Arenas, Carlos H; Lopez-Castillo, Laura M; Sanchez-Sandoval, Eugenia; Brieba, Luis G

    2016-02-01

    7,8-Dihydro-8-deoxyguanine (8oG) is one of the most common oxidative lesions in DNA. DNA polymerases misincorporate an adenine across from this lesion. Thus, 8oG is a highly mutagenic lesion responsible for G:C→T:A transversions. MutY is an adenine glycosylase, part of the base excision repair pathway that removes adenines, when mispaired with 8oG or guanine. Its catalytic domain includes a [4Fe-4S] cluster motif coordinated by cysteinyl ligands. When this cluster is absent, MutY activity is depleted and several studies concluded that the [4Fe-4S] cluster motif is an indispensable component for DNA binding, substrate recognition and enzymatic activity. In the present study, we identified 46 MutY homologues that lack the canonical cysteinyl ligands, suggesting an absence of the [4Fe-4S] cluster. A phylogenetic analysis groups these novel MutYs into two different clades. One clade is exclusive of the order Lactobacillales and another clade has a mixed composition of anaerobic and microaerophilic bacteria and species from the protozoan genus Entamoeba. Structural modeling and sequence analysis suggests that the loss of the [4Fe-4S] cluster is compensated by a convergent solution in which bulky amino acids substitute the [4Fe-4S] cluster. We functionally characterized MutYs from Lactobacillus brevis and Entamoeba histolytica as representative members from each clade and found that both enzymes are active adenine glycosylases. Furthermore, chimeric glycosylases, in which the [4Fe-4S] cluster of Escherichia coli MutY is replaced by the corresponding amino acids of LbY and EhY, are also active. Our data indicates that the [4Fe-4S] cluster plays a structural role in MutYs and evidences the existence of alternative functional solutions in nature. PMID:26613369

  20. DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, M.G.; Løbner-Olesen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication errors, controlling the frequency of initiation of chromosome replication at oriC, and regulation of transcription initiation at promoters containing GATC sequences. In contrast, there is no known function for Dcm methylation although Dcm recognition sites constitute sequence motifs for Very Short Patch repair of T/G base mismatches. In certain bacteria (e.g., Vibrio cholerae, Caulobacter crescentus) adenine methylation is essential and in C. crescentus, it is important for temporal gene expression which, in turn, is required for coordinating chromosome initiation, replication and division. In practical terms, Dam and Dcm methylation can inhibit restriction enzyme cleavage; decrease transformation frequency in certain bacteria; decrease the stability of short direct repeats; are necessary for site-directed mutagenesis; and to probe eukaryotic structure and function. PMID:26442938

  1. Effect of DNA target sequence on triplex formation by oligo-2′-deoxy- and 2′-O-methylribonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Rachel A.; Puri, Nitin; Miller, Paul S.

    2003-01-01

    The interactions of pyrimidine deoxyribo- or 2′-O-methylribo-psoralen-conjugated, triplex-forming oligonucleotides, psTFOs, with a 17-bp env-DNA whose purine tract is 5′-AGAGAGAAAAAAGAG-3′, or an 18-bp gag-DNA whose purine tract is 5′-AGG GGGAAAGAAAAAA-3′, were studied over the pH range 6.0–7.5. The stability of the triplex formed by a deoxy-env-psTFO containing 5-methylcytosines and thymines decreased with increasing pH (Tm = 56°C at pH 6.0; 27°C at pH 7.5). Replacement of 5-methylcytosines with 8-oxo-adenines reduced the pH dependence, but lowered triplex stability. A 2′-O-methyl-env-psTFO containing uracil and cytosine did not form a triplex at pH 7.5. Surprisingly, replacement of the cytosines in this oligomer with 5-methylcytosines dramatically increased triplex stability (Tm = 25°C at pH 7.5), and even greater stability was achieved by selective replacement of uracils with thymines (Tm = 37°C at pH 7.5). Substitution of the contiguous 5-methylcytosines of the deoxy-gag-psTFO with 8-oxo-adenines significantly reduced pH dependence and increased triplex stability. In contrast to the behavior of env-specific TFOs, triplexes formed by 2′-O-methyl-gag-psTFOs did not show enhanced stability. Replacement of the 3′-terminal phosphodiester of the TFO with a methylphosphonate group significantly increased the resistance of both deoxy- and 2′-O-methyl-TFOs to degradation by 3′-exonucleases, while maintaining triplex stability. PMID:12853627

  2. Comparative cytogenetic study on two species of the genus Entedon Dalman, 1820 (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae) using DNA-binding fluorochromes and molecular and immunofluorescent markers

    PubMed Central

    Bolsheva, Nadezhda L.; Gokhman, Vladimir E.; Muravenko, Olga V.; Gumovsky, Alex V.; Zelenin, Alexander V.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Karyotypes of Entedon cionobius Thomson, 1878 and Entedon cioni Thomson, 1878 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) were studied using DNA-binding ligands with different base specificity (propidium iodide, chromomycin A3, methyl green and DAPI; all these ligands, except for the last one, were used for the first time in parasitic wasps), C-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a 45S rDNA probe and 5-methylcytosine immunodetection. Female karyotypes of both species contain five pairs of relatively large metacentric chromosomes and a pair of smaller acrocentric chromosomes (2n = 12). As in many other Hymenoptera, males of both Entedon Dalman, 1820 species have haploid chromosome sets (n = 6). Fluorochrome staining revealed chromosome-specific banding patterns that were similar between the different fluorochromes, except for the CMA3- and PI-positive and DAPI-negative band in the pericentromeric regions of the long arms of both acrocentric chromosomes. The obtained banding patterns were virtually identical in both species and allowed for the identification of each individual chromosome. C-banding revealed a pattern similar to DAPI staining, although centromeric and telomeric regions were stained more intensively using the former technique. FISH detected a single rDNA site in the same position on the acrocentric chromosomes as the bright CMA3-positive band. Immunodetection of 5-methylcytosine that was performed for the first time in the order Hymenoptera revealed 5-methylcytosine-rich sites in the telomeric, centromeric and certain interstitial regions of most of the chromosomes. PMID:24260653

  3. Active DNA demethylation by DNA repair: Facts and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Schuermann, David; Weber, Alain R; Schär, Primo

    2016-08-01

    Pathways that control and modulate DNA methylation patterning in mammalian cells were poorly understood for a long time, although their importance in establishing and maintaining cell type-specific gene expression was well recognized. The discovery of proteins capable of converting 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to putative substrates for DNA repair introduced a novel and exciting conceptual framework for the investigation and ultimate discovery of molecular mechanisms of DNA demethylation. Against the prevailing notion that DNA methylation is a static epigenetic mark, it turned out to be dynamic and distinct mechanisms appear to have evolved to effect global and locus-specific DNA demethylation. There is compelling evidence that DNA repair, in particular base excision repair, contributes significantly to the turnover of 5mC in cells. By actively demethylating DNA, DNA repair supports the developmental establishment as well as the maintenance of DNA methylation landscapes and gene expression patterns. Yet, while the biochemical pathways are relatively well-established and reviewed, the biological context, function and regulation of DNA repair-mediated active DNA demethylation remains uncertain. In this review, we will thus summarize and critically discuss the evidence that associates active DNA demethylation by DNA repair with specific functional contexts including the DNA methylation erasure in the early embryo, the control of pluripotency and cellular differentiation, the maintenance of cell identity, and the nuclear reprogramming. PMID:27247237

  4. Structure and stereochemistry of the base excision repair glycosylase MutY reveal a mechanism similar to retaining glycosidases

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Ryan D.; O'Shea, Valerie L.; Chu, Aurea; Cao, Sheng; Richards, Jody L.; Horvath, Martin P.; David, Sheila S.

    2016-01-01

    MutY adenine glycosylases prevent DNA mutations by excising adenine from promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG):A mismatches. Here, we describe structural features of the MutY active site bound to an azaribose transition state analog which indicate a catalytic role for Tyr126 and approach of the water nucleophile on the same side as the departing adenine base. The idea that Tyr126 participates in catalysis, recently predicted by modeling calculations, is strongly supported by mutagenesis and by seeing close contact between the hydroxyl group of this residue and the azaribose moiety of the transition state analog. NMR analysis of MutY methanolysis products corroborates a mechanism for adenine removal with retention of stereochemistry. Based on these results, we propose a revised mechanism for MutY that involves two nucleophilic displacement steps akin to the mechanisms accepted for ‘retaining’ O-glycosidases. This new-for-MutY yet familiar mechanism may also be operative in related base excision repair glycosylases and provides a critical framework for analysis of human MutY (MUTYH) variants associated with inherited colorectal cancer. PMID:26673696

  5. Structure and stereochemistry of the base excision repair glycosylase MutY reveal a mechanism similar to retaining glycosidases.

    PubMed

    Woods, Ryan D; O'Shea, Valerie L; Chu, Aurea; Cao, Sheng; Richards, Jody L; Horvath, Martin P; David, Sheila S

    2016-01-29

    MutY adenine glycosylases prevent DNA mutations by excising adenine from promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG):A mismatches. Here, we describe structural features of the MutY active site bound to an azaribose transition state analog which indicate a catalytic role for Tyr126 and approach of the water nucleophile on the same side as the departing adenine base. The idea that Tyr126 participates in catalysis, recently predicted by modeling calculations, is strongly supported by mutagenesis and by seeing close contact between the hydroxyl group of this residue and the azaribose moiety of the transition state analog. NMR analysis of MutY methanolysis products corroborates a mechanism for adenine removal with retention of stereochemistry. Based on these results, we propose a revised mechanism for MutY that involves two nucleophilic displacement steps akin to the mechanisms accepted for 'retaining' O-glycosidases. This new-for-MutY yet familiar mechanism may also be operative in related base excision repair glycosylases and provides a critical framework for analysis of human MutY (MUTYH) variants associated with inherited colorectal cancer. PMID:26673696

  6. Enforced Presentation of an Extrahelical Guanine to the Lesion Recognition Pocket of Human 8-Oxoguanine Glycosylase, hOGG1*

    PubMed Central

    Crenshaw, Charisse M.; Nam, Kwangho; Oo, Kimberly; Kutchukian, Peter S.; Bowman, Brian R.; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    A poorly understood aspect of DNA repair proteins is their ability to identify exceedingly rare sites of damage embedded in a large excess of nearly identical undamaged DNA, while catalyzing repair only at the damaged sites. Progress toward understanding this problem has been made by comparing the structures and biochemical behavior of these enzymes when they are presented with either a target lesion or a corresponding undamaged nucleobase. Trapping and analyzing such DNA-protein complexes is particularly difficult in the case of base extrusion DNA repair proteins because of the complexity of the repair reaction, which involves extrusion of the target base from DNA followed by its insertion into the active site where glycosidic bond cleavage is catalyzed. Here we report the structure of a human 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) DNA glycosylase, hOGG1, in which a normal guanine from DNA has been forcibly inserted into the enzyme active site. Although the interactions of the nucleobase with the active site are only subtly different for G versus oxoG, hOGG1 fails to catalyze excision of the normal nucleobase. This study demonstrates that even if hOGG1 mistakenly inserts a normal base into its active site, the enzyme can still reject it on the basis of catalytic incompatibility. PMID:22511791

  7. Enforced Presentation of an Extrahelical Guanine to the Lesion Recognition Pocket of Human 8-Oxoguanine Glycosylase, hOGG1

    SciTech Connect

    Crenshaw, Charisse M.; Nam, Kwangho; Oo, Kimberly; Kutchukian, Peter S.; Bowman, Brian R.; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2012-09-05

    A poorly understood aspect of DNA repair proteins is their ability to identify exceedingly rare sites of damage embedded in a large excess of nearly identical undamaged DNA, while catalyzing repair only at the damaged sites. Progress toward understanding this problem has been made by comparing the structures and biochemical behavior of these enzymes when they are presented with either a target lesion or a corresponding undamaged nucleobase. Trapping and analyzing such DNA-protein complexes is particularly difficult in the case of base extrusion DNA repair proteins because of the complexity of the repair reaction, which involves extrusion of the target base from DNA followed by its insertion into the active site where glycosidic bond cleavage is catalyzed. Here we report the structure of a human 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) DNA glycosylase, hOGG1, in which a normal guanine from DNA has been forcibly inserted into the enzyme active site. Although the interactions of the nucleobase with the active site are only subtly different for G versus oxoG, hOGG1 fails to catalyze excision of the normal nucleobase. This study demonstrates that even if hOGG1 mistakenly inserts a normal base into its active site, the enzyme can still reject it on the basis of catalytic incompatibility.

  8. Effect of 8-oxoguanine glycosylase deficiency on aflatoxin B1 tumourigenicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Jeanne E.; Turner, Patricia V.; Massey, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) may initiate cancer by causing oxidatively damaged DNA, specifically by causing 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) lesions. Base excision repair removes these lesions, with 8-oxoguanine glycosylase (OGG1) being the rate-limiting enzyme. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ogg1 deficiency on AFB1-induced oxidatively damaged DNA and tumourigenesis. Female wild-type, heterozygous and homozygous ogg1 null mice were given a single dose of 50mg/kg AFB1 or 40 µl dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) ip. Neither ogg1 genotype nor AFB1 treatment affected levels of oxidised guanine in lung or liver 2h post-treatment. AFB1-treated ogg1 null mice showed exacerbated weight loss and mortality relative to DMSO-treated ogg1 null mice, but AFB1 treatment did not significantly increase lung or liver tumour incidence compared with controls, regardless of ogg1 genotype. Suspect lung masses from three of the AFB1-treated mice were adenomas, and masses from two of the mice were osteosarcomas. No osteosarcomas were observed in DMSO-treated mice. All liver masses from AFB1-treated mice were adenomas, and one also contained a hepatocellular carcinoma. In DNA from the lung tumours, the K-ras mutation pattern was inconsistent with initiation by AFB1. In conclusion, ogg1 status did not have a significant effect on AFB1-induced oxidatively damaged DNA or tumourigenesis, but deletion of one or both alleles of ogg1 did increase susceptibility to other aspects of AFB1 toxicity. PMID:25583175

  9. Methylated DNA-binding protein is present in various mammalian cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Supakar, P.C.; Weist, D.; Zhang, D.; Inamdar, N.; Zhang, Xianyang; Khan, R.; Ehrlich, M. ); Ehrlich, K.C. )

    1988-08-25

    A DNA-binding protein from human placenta, methylated DNA-binding protein (MDBP), binds to certain DNA sequences only when they contain 5-methylcytosine (m{sup 5}C) residues at specific positions. The authors found a very similar DNA-binding activity in nuclear extracts of rat tissues, calf thymus, human embryonal carcinoma cells, HeLa cells, and mouse LTK cells. Like human placental MDBP, the analogous DNA-binding proteins from the above mammalian cell lines formed a number of different low-electrophoretic-mobility complexes with a 14-bp MDBP-specific oligonucleotide duplex. All of these complexes exhibited the same DNA methylation specificity and DNA sequence specificity. Although MDBP activity was found in various mammalian cell types, it was not detected in extracts of cultured mosquito cells and so may be associated only with cells with vertebrate-type DNA methylation.

  10. Designing DNA interstrand lock for locus-specific methylation detection in a nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Insoon; Wang, Yong; Reagan, Corbin; Fu, Yumei; Wang, Michael X.; Gu, Li-Qun

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Locus-specific DNA methylation can be used as biomarkers in various diseases including cancer. Many methods have been developed for genome-wide methylation analysis, but molecular diagnotics needs simple tools to determine methylation states at individual CpG sites in a gene fragment. In this report, we utilized the nanopore single-molecule sensor to investigate a base-pair specific metal ion/nucleic acids interaction, and explored its potential application in locus-specific DNA methylation analysis. We identified that divalent Mercury ion (Hg2+) can selectively bind a uracil-thymine mismatch (U-T) in a dsDNA. The Hg2+ binding creates a reversible interstrand lock, called MercuLock, which enhances the hybridization strength by two orders of magnitude. Such MercuLock cannot be formed in a 5-methylcytosine-thymine mismatch (mC-T). By nanopore detection of dsDNA stability, single bases of uracil and 5-methylcytosine can be distinguished. Since uracil is converted from cytosine by bisulfite treatment, cytosine and 5′-methylcytosine can be discriminated. We have demonstrated the methylation analysis of multiple CpGs in a p16 gene CpG island. This single-molecule assay may have potential in detection of epigenetic cancer biomarkers in biofluids, with an ultimate goal for early diagnosis of cancer. PMID:24135881

  11. Quantifying mammalian genomic DNA hydroxymethylcytosine content using solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Osama K; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; He, Chuan; Hall, Adam R

    2016-01-01

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5 hmC), the oxidized form of 5-methylcytosine (5 mC), is a base modification with emerging importance in biology and disease. However, like most epigenetic elements, it is transparent to many conventional genetic techniques and is thus challenging to probe. Here, we report a rapid solid-state nanopore assay that is capable of resolving 5 hmC with high specificity and sensitivity and demonstrate its utility in assessing global modification abundance in genomic DNA. PMID:27383905

  12. Quantifying mammalian genomic DNA hydroxymethylcytosine content using solid-state nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, Osama K.; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; He, Chuan; Hall, Adam R.

    2016-01-01

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5 hmC), the oxidized form of 5-methylcytosine (5 mC), is a base modification with emerging importance in biology and disease. However, like most epigenetic elements, it is transparent to many conventional genetic techniques and is thus challenging to probe. Here, we report a rapid solid-state nanopore assay that is capable of resolving 5 hmC with high specificity and sensitivity and demonstrate its utility in assessing global modification abundance in genomic DNA. PMID:27383905

  13. Error rates for nanopore discrimination among cytosine, methylcytosine, and hydroxymethylcytosine along individual DNA strands.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Jacob; Wescoe, Zachary L; Abu-Shumays, Robin; Vivian, John T; Baatar, Baldandorj; Karplus, Kevin; Akeson, Mark

    2013-11-19

    Cytosine, 5-methylcytosine, and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine were identified during translocation of single DNA template strands through a modified Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A (M2MspA) nanopore under control of phi29 DNA polymerase. This identification was based on three consecutive ionic current states that correspond to passage of modified or unmodified CG dinucleotides and their immediate neighbors through the nanopore limiting aperture. To establish quality scores for these calls, we examined ~3,300 translocation events for 48 distinct DNA constructs. Each experiment analyzed a mixture of cytosine-, 5-methylcytosine-, and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-bearing DNA strands that contained a marker that independently established the correct cytosine methylation status at the target CG of each molecule tested. To calculate error rates for these calls, we established decision boundaries using a variety of machine-learning methods. These error rates depended upon the identity of the bases immediately 5' and 3' of the targeted CG dinucleotide, and ranged from 1.7% to 12.2% for a single-pass read. We estimate that Q40 values (0.01% error rates) for methylation status calls could be achieved by reading single molecules 5-19 times depending upon sequence context. PMID:24167260

  14. Radiolysis of DNA-protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Běgusová, Marie; Gillard, Nathalie; Sy, Denise; Castaing, Bertrand; Charlier, Michel; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2005-02-01

    We discuss here modifications of DNA and protein radiolysis due to the interaction of these two partners in specific complexes. Experimental patterns of frank strand breaks (FSB) and alkali revealed breaks (ARB) obtained for DNA lac operator bound to the lac repressor and for a DNA containing an abasic site analog bound to the formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase are reported. Experimental data are compared to predicted damage distribution obtained using the theoretical model RADACK.

  15. Air Pollution and DNA Methylation: Interaction by Psychological Factors in the VA Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Madrigano, Jaime; Baccarelli, Andrea; Mittleman, Murray A.; Sparrow, David; Spiro, Avron; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Cantone, Laura; Kubzansky, Laura; Schwartz, Joel

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is a potential pathway linking air pollution to disease. Studies indicate that psychological functioning modifies the association between pollution and morbidity. The authors estimated the association of DNA methylation with ambient particulate matter less than 2.5 µm in diameter (PM2.5) and black carbon, using mixed models. DNA methylation of the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene, iNOS, and the glucocorticoid receptor gene, GCR, was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction pyrosequencing of 1,377 blood samples from 699 elderly male participants in the VA Normative Aging Study (1999–2009). The authors also investigated whether this association was modified by psychological factors including optimism or pessimism, anxiety, and depression. iNOS methylation was decreased after acute exposure to both black carbon and PM2.5. A 1-μg/m3 increase in exposure to black carbon in the 4 hours preceding the clinical examination was associated with a 0.9% decrease in 5-methylcytosine (95% CI: 0.4, 1.4) in iNOS, and a 10-μg/m3 increase in exposure to PM2.5 was associated with a 0.6% decrease in 5-methylcytosine (95% CI: 0.03, 1.1) in iNOS. Participants with low optimism and high anxiety had associations that were 3–4 times larger than those with high optimism or low anxiety. GCR methylation was not associated with particulate air pollution exposure. PMID:22798479

  16. Fluorogenic Labeling of 5-Formylpyrimidine Nucleotides in DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Biswajit; Seikowski, Jan; Höbartner, Claudia

    2016-01-26

    5-Formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-formyluracil (5fU) are natural nucleobase modifications that are generated by oxidative modification of 5-methylcytosine and thymine (or 5-methyluracil). Herein, we describe chemoselective labeling of 5-formylpyrimidine nucleotides in DNA and RNA by fluorogenic aldol-type condensation reactions with 2,3,3-trimethylindole derivatives. Mild and specific reaction conditions were developed for 5fU and 5fC to produce hemicyanine-like chromophores with distinct photophysical properties. Residue-specific detection was established by fluorescence readout as well as primer-extension assays. The reactions were optimized on DNA oligonucleotides and were equally suitable for the modification of 5fU- and 5fC-modified RNA. This direct labeling approach of 5-formylpyrimidines is expected to help in elucidating the occurrence, enzymatic transformations, and functional roles of these epigenetic/epitranscriptomic nucleobase modifications in DNA and RNA. PMID:26679556

  17. Nonspecific DNA Binding and Coordination of the First Two Steps of Base Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Michael R.; O'Brien, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway repairs a wide variety of damaged nucleobases in DNA. This pathway is initiated by a DNA repair glycosylase, which locates the site of damage and catalyzes the excision of the damaged nucleobase. The resulting abasic site is further processed by apurinic/apyrimidinic site endonuclease 1 (APE1) to create a single strand nick with the 3'-hydroxyl that serves as a primer for DNA repair synthesis. Since an abasic site is highly mutagenic it is critical that the steps of the BER pathway be coordinated. Most human glycosylases bind tightly to their abasic product. APE1 displaces the bound glycosylase, thereby stimulating multiple turnover base excision. It has been proposed that direct protein-protein interactions are involved in the stimulation by APE1, but no common interaction motifs have been identified among the glycosylases that are stimulated by APE1. We characterized the APE1 stimulation of alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) using a variety of symmetric and asymmetric lesion-containing oligonucleotides. Efficient stimulation on a wide variety of substrates favors a model whereby both AAG and APE1 can simultaneously bind to DNA, but may not interact directly. Rather, nonspecific DNA binding by both AAG and APE1 enables APE1 to replace AAG at the abasic site. AAG is not displaced into solution, but remains bound to an adjacent undamaged site. We propose that nonspecific DNA binding interactions allow transient exposure of the abasic site so that it can be captured by APE1. PMID:20701268

  18. Sequence-specific microscopic visualization of DNA methylation status at satellite repeats in individual cell nuclei and chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yufeng; Miyanari, Yusuke; Shirane, Kenjiro; Nitta, Hirohisa; Kubota, Takeo; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Methylation-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (MeFISH) was developed for microscopic visualization of DNA methylation status at specific repeat sequences in individual cells. MeFISH is based on the differential reactivity of 5-methylcytosine and cytosine in target DNA for interstrand complex formation with osmium and bipyridine-containing nucleic acids (ICON). Cell nuclei and chromosomes hybridized with fluorescence-labeled ICON probes for mouse major and minor satellite repeats were treated with osmium for crosslinking. After denaturation, fluorescent signals were retained specifically at satellite repeats in wild-type, but not in DNA methyltransferase triple-knockout (negative control) mouse embryonic stem cells. Moreover, using MeFISH, we successfully detected hypomethylated satellite repeats in cells from patients with immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome and 5-hydroxymethylated satellite repeats in male germ cells, the latter of which had been considered to be unmethylated based on anti-5-methylcytosine antibody staining. MeFISH will be suitable for a wide range of applications in epigenetics research and medical diagnosis. PMID:23990328

  19. Sequence-specific microscopic visualization of DNA methylation status at satellite repeats in individual cell nuclei and chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yufeng; Miyanari, Yusuke; Shirane, Kenjiro; Nitta, Hirohisa; Kubota, Takeo; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    Methylation-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (MeFISH) was developed for microscopic visualization of DNA methylation status at specific repeat sequences in individual cells. MeFISH is based on the differential reactivity of 5-methylcytosine and cytosine in target DNA for interstrand complex formation with osmium and bipyridine-containing nucleic acids (ICON). Cell nuclei and chromosomes hybridized with fluorescence-labeled ICON probes for mouse major and minor satellite repeats were treated with osmium for crosslinking. After denaturation, fluorescent signals were retained specifically at satellite repeats in wild-type, but not in DNA methyltransferase triple-knockout (negative control) mouse embryonic stem cells. Moreover, using MeFISH, we successfully detected hypomethylated satellite repeats in cells from patients with immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome and 5-hydroxymethylated satellite repeats in male germ cells, the latter of which had been considered to be unmethylated based on anti-5-methylcytosine antibody staining. MeFISH will be suitable for a wide range of applications in epigenetics research and medical diagnosis. PMID:23990328

  20. Structure of Escherichia coli AlkA in Complex with Undamaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Brian R.; Lee, Seongmin; Wang, Shuyu; Verdine, Gregory L

    2010-11-22

    Because DNA damage is so rare, DNA glycosylases interact for the most part with undamaged DNA. Whereas the structural basis for recognition of DNA lesions by glycosylases has been studied extensively, less is known about the nature of the interaction between these proteins and undamaged DNA. Here we report the crystal structures of the DNA glycosylase AlkA in complex with undamaged DNA. The structures revealed a recognition mode in which the DNA is nearly straight, with no amino acid side chains inserted into the duplex, and the target base pair is fully intrahelical. A comparison of the present structures with that of AlkA recognizing an extrahelical lesion revealed conformational changes in both the DNA and protein as the glycosylase transitions from the interrogation of undamaged DNA to catalysis of nucleobase excision. Modeling studies with the cytotoxic lesion 3-methyladenine and accompanying biochemical experiments suggested that AlkA actively interrogates the minor groove of the DNA while probing for the presence of lesions.

  1. DNA methylation in plants.

    PubMed

    Vanyushin, B F

    2006-01-01

    DNA in plants is highly methylated, containing 5-methylcytosine (m5C) and N6-methyladenine (m6A); m5C is located mainly in symmetrical CG and CNG sequences but it may occur also in other non-symmetrical contexts. m6A but not m5C was found in plant mitochondrial DNA. DNA methylation in plants is species-, tissue-, organelle- and age-specific. It is controlled by phytohormones and changes on seed germination, flowering and under the influence of various pathogens (viral, bacterial, fungal). DNA methylation controls plant growth and development, with particular involvement in regulation of gene expression and DNA replication. DNA replication is accompanied by the appearance of under-methylated, newly formed DNA strands including Okazaki fragments; asymmetry of strand DNA methylation disappears until the end of the cell cycle. A model for regulation of DNA replication by methylation is suggested. Cytosine DNA methylation in plants is more rich and diverse compared with animals. It is carried out by the families of specific enzymes that belong to at least three classes of DNA methyltransferases. Open reading frames (ORF) for adenine DNA methyltransferases are found in plant and animal genomes, and a first eukaryotic (plant) adenine DNA methyltransferase (wadmtase) is described; the enzyme seems to be involved in regulation of the mitochondria replication. Like in animals, DNA methylation in plants is closely associated with histone modifications and it affects binding of specific proteins to DNA and formation of respective transcription complexes in chromatin. The same gene (DRM2) in Arabidopsis thaliana is methylated both at cytosine and adenine residues; thus, at least two different, and probably interdependent, systems of DNA modification are present in plants. Plants seem to have a restriction-modification (R-M) system. RNA-directed DNA methylation has been observed in plants; it involves de novo methylation of almost all cytosine residues in a region of siRNA-DNA

  2. Differential modulation of base excision repair activities during brain ontogeny: implications for repair of transcribed DNA.

    PubMed

    Englander, Ella W; Ma, Huaxian

    2006-01-01

    DNA repair sustains fidelity of genomic replication in proliferating cells and integrity of transcribed sequences in postmitotic tissues. The repair process is critical in the brain, because high oxygen consumption exacerbates the risk for accumulation of oxidative DNA lesions in postmitotic neurons. Most oxidative DNA damage is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway, which is initiated by specialized DNA glycosylases. Because the newly discovered Nei-like mammalian DNA glycosylases (NEIL1/2) proficiently excise oxidized bases from bubble structured DNA, it was suggested that NEILs favor repair of transcribed or replicated DNA. In addition, since NEILs generate 3'-phosphate termini, which are poor targets for AP endonuclease (APE1), it was proposed that APE1-dependent and independent BER sub-pathways exist in mammalian cells. We measured expression and activities of BER enzymes during brain ontogeny, i.e., during a physiologic transition from proliferative to postmitotic differentiated state. While a subset of BER enzymes, exhibited declining expression and excision activities, expression of NEIL1 and NEIL2 glycosylases increased during brain development. Furthermore, the capacity for excision of 5-hydroxyuracil from bubble structured DNA was retained in the mature rat brain suggesting a role for NEIL glycosylases in maintaining the integrity of transcribed DNA in postmitotic brain. PMID:16257035

  3. DNA immunoprecipitation semiconductor sequencing (DIP-SC-seq) as a rapid method to generate genome wide epigenetic signatures.

    PubMed

    Thomson, John P; Fawkes, Angie; Ottaviano, Raffaele; Hunter, Jennifer M; Shukla, Ruchi; Mjoseng, Heidi K; Clark, Richard; Coutts, Audrey; Murphy, Lee; Meehan, Richard R

    2015-01-01

    Modification of DNA resulting in 5-methylcytosine (5 mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has been shown to influence the local chromatin environment and affect transcription. Although recent advances in next generation sequencing technology allow researchers to map epigenetic modifications across the genome, such experiments are often time-consuming and cost prohibitive. Here we present a rapid and cost effective method of generating genome wide DNA modification maps utilising commercially available semiconductor based technology (DNA immunoprecipitation semiconductor sequencing; "DIP-SC-seq") on the Ion Proton sequencer. Focussing on the 5hmC mark we demonstrate, by directly comparing with alternative sequencing strategies, that this platform can successfully generate genome wide 5hmC patterns from as little as 500 ng of genomic DNA in less than 4 days. Such a method can therefore facilitate the rapid generation of multiple genome wide epigenetic datasets. PMID:25985418

  4. DNA immunoprecipitation semiconductor sequencing (DIP-SC-seq) as a rapid method to generate genome wide epigenetic signatures

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, John P.; Fawkes, Angie; Ottaviano, Raffaele; Hunter, Jennifer M.; Shukla, Ruchi; Mjoseng, Heidi K.; Clark, Richard; Coutts, Audrey; Murphy, Lee; Meehan, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    Modification of DNA resulting in 5-methylcytosine (5 mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has been shown to influence the local chromatin environment and affect transcription. Although recent advances in next generation sequencing technology allow researchers to map epigenetic modifications across the genome, such experiments are often time-consuming and cost prohibitive. Here we present a rapid and cost effective method of generating genome wide DNA modification maps utilising commercially available semiconductor based technology (DNA immunoprecipitation semiconductor sequencing; “DIP-SC-seq”) on the Ion Proton sequencer. Focussing on the 5hmC mark we demonstrate, by directly comparing with alternative sequencing strategies, that this platform can successfully generate genome wide 5hmC patterns from as little as 500 ng of genomic DNA in less than 4 days. Such a method can therefore facilitate the rapid generation of multiple genome wide epigenetic datasets. PMID:25985418

  5. Catalysts of DNA Strand Cleavage at Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites.

    PubMed

    Minko, Irina G; Jacobs, Aaron C; de Leon, Arnie R; Gruppi, Francesca; Donley, Nathan; Harris, Thomas M; Rizzo, Carmelo J; McCullough, Amanda K; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are constantly formed in cellular DNA due to instability of the glycosidic bond, particularly at purines and various oxidized, alkylated, or otherwise damaged nucleobases. AP sites are also generated by DNA glycosylases that initiate DNA base excision repair. These lesions represent a significant block to DNA replication and are extremely mutagenic. Some DNA glycosylases possess AP lyase activities that nick the DNA strand at the deoxyribose moiety via a β- or β,δ-elimination reaction. Various amines can incise AP sites via a similar mechanism, but this non-enzymatic cleavage typically requires high reagent concentrations. Herein, we describe a new class of small molecules that function at low micromolar concentrations as both β- and β,δ-elimination catalysts at AP sites. Structure-activity relationships have established several characteristics that appear to be necessary for the formation of an iminium ion intermediate that self-catalyzes the elimination at the deoxyribose ring. PMID:27363485

  6. Catalysts of DNA Strand Cleavage at Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Minko, Irina G.; Jacobs, Aaron C.; de Leon, Arnie R.; Gruppi, Francesca; Donley, Nathan; Harris, Thomas M.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; McCullough, Amanda K.; Lloyd, R. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are constantly formed in cellular DNA due to instability of the glycosidic bond, particularly at purines and various oxidized, alkylated, or otherwise damaged nucleobases. AP sites are also generated by DNA glycosylases that initiate DNA base excision repair. These lesions represent a significant block to DNA replication and are extremely mutagenic. Some DNA glycosylases possess AP lyase activities that nick the DNA strand at the deoxyribose moiety via a β- or β,δ-elimination reaction. Various amines can incise AP sites via a similar mechanism, but this non-enzymatic cleavage typically requires high reagent concentrations. Herein, we describe a new class of small molecules that function at low micromolar concentrations as both β- and β,δ-elimination catalysts at AP sites. Structure-activity relationships have established several characteristics that appear to be necessary for the formation of an iminium ion intermediate that self-catalyzes the elimination at the deoxyribose ring. PMID:27363485

  7. DNA mismatch correction by Very Short Patch repair may have altered the abundance of oligonucleotides in the E. coli genome.

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, A S; McClelland, M

    1992-01-01

    A base mismatch correction process in E. coli K-12 called Very Short Patch (VSP) repair corrects T:G mismatches to C:G when found in certain sequence contexts. Two of the substrate mismatches (5'-CTWGG/3'-GGW'CC; W = A or T) occur in the context of cytosine methylation in DNA and reduce the mutagenic effects of 5-methylcytosine deamination to thymine. However, VSP repair is also known to repair T:G mismatches that are not expected to arise from 5-methylcytosine deamination (example--CTAG/GGT-C). In these cases, if the original base pair were a T:A, VSP repair would cause a T to C transition. We have carried out Markov chain analysis of an E. coli sequence database to determine if repair at the latter class of sites has altered the abundance of the relevant tetranucleotides. The results are consistent with the prediction that VSP repair would tend to deplete the genome of the 'T' containing sequences (example--CTAG), while enriching it for the corresponding 'C' containing sequences (CCAG). Further, they provide an explanation for the known scarcity of CTAG containing restriction enzyme sites among the genomes of enteric bacteria and identify VSP repair as a force in shaping the sequence composition of bacterial genomes. PMID:1579457

  8. TALEored Epigenetics: A DNA-Binding Scaffold for Programmable Epigenome Editing and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Grzegorz; Summerer, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Epigenetic modification of the cytosine 5-position is an important regulator of gene expression with essential roles in genome stability, development, and disease. In addition to 5-methylcytosine (mC), the oxidized mC derivatives 5-hydroxymethyl-, 5-formyl-, and 5-carboxylcytosine (hmC, fC, and caC) have recently been discovered. These are intermediates of an active demethylation pathway but might also represent new epigenetic marks with individual biological roles. This increase in chemical complexity of DNA-encoded information has created a pressing need for new approaches that allow reading and editing of this information. Transcription-activator-like effectors (TALEs) are DNA-binding domains with programmable sequence selectivity that enable the direct reading of epigenetic cytosine modifications but can also guide enzymatic editing domains to genomic loci of choice. Here, we review recent advances in employing TALEs for these applications. PMID:26972580

  9. Planarian MBD2/3 is required for adult stem cell pluripotency independently of DNA methylation☆

    PubMed Central

    Jaber-Hijazi, Farah; Lo, Priscilla J.K.P.; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Foster, Jeremy M.; Benner, Jack S.; Tejada Romero, Belen; Chen, Chen; Malla, Sunir; Solana, Jordi; Ruzov, Alexey; Aziz Aboobaker, A.

    2013-01-01

    Planarian adult stem cells (pASCs) or neoblasts represent an ideal system to study the evolution of stem cells and pluripotency as they underpin an unrivaled capacity for regeneration. We wish to understand the control of differentiation and pluripotency in pASCs and to understand how conserved, convergent or divergent these mechanisms are across the Bilateria. Here we show the planarian methyl-CpG Binding Domain 2/3 (mbd2/3) gene is required for pASC differentiation during regeneration and tissue homeostasis. The genome does not have detectable levels of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and we find no role for a potential DNA methylase. We conclude that MBD proteins may have had an ancient role in broadly controlling animal stem cell pluripotency, but that DNA methylation is not involved in planarian stem cell differentiation. PMID:24063805

  10. 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine is a predominantly stable DNA modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, Martin; Uribe-Lewis, Santiago; Yang, Xiaoping; Williams, Michael; Murrell, Adele; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2014-12-01

    5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC) is an oxidation product of 5-methylcytosine which is present in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of most mammalian cells. Reduction of hmC levels in DNA is a hallmark of cancers. Elucidating the dynamics of this oxidation reaction and the lifetime of hmC in DNA is fundamental to understanding hmC function. Using stable isotope labelling of cytosine derivatives in the DNA of mammalian cells and ultrasensitive tandem liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry, we show that the majority of hmC is a stable modification, as opposed to a transient intermediate. In contrast with DNA methylation, which occurs immediately during replication, hmC forms slowly during the first 30 hours following DNA synthesis. Isotopic labelling of DNA in mouse tissues confirmed the stability of hmC in vivo and demonstrated a relationship between global levels of hmC and cell proliferation. These insights have important implications for understanding the states of chemically modified DNA bases in health and disease.

  11. Association of Global DNA Hypomethylation with Clinicopathological Variables in Colonic Tumors of Iraqi Patients

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Ban J.; Al-Wasiti, Estabraq A.; Azzal, Hayder S.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Colorectal cancer (CRC) ranks sixth among the most common 10 cancers in Iraq. It is a foremost public health dilemma and there is improved interest in understanding the fundamental principles of its molecular biology. DNA methylation in cancer has become the issue of passionate investigation. As compared with normal cells, the malignant cells show major disruptions in their DNA methylation patterns. We aimed to assess the association of global DNA hypomethylation in colonic adenomas and carcinomas of Iraqi patients, measured by immunohistochemistry of 5-methylcytosin, with different clinicopathological variables. Patients and Methods: Thirty tissue paraffin blocks from patients with colorectal adenomas, 30 tissue paraffin blocks from patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, and 30 samples of apparently normal colonic tissue taken from autopsy cases as a control group were included in the present study. From each block, two sections of 5 μm thickness were taken, one section was stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin for revision of histopathological diagnosis and one section was immunohistochemically stained for 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and digitally analyzed by AperioImageScope software. Results: The mean digital value of 5mC immunohistochemical expression was sequentially decreased during neoplastic progression from normal colonic tissue into adenoma and then to carcinoma. The mean digital value of 5mC expression was significantly lower in large size adenomas (≥1 cm), and those with severe dysplasia. Concerning carcinoma cases, 5mC expression was significantly lower in stage C2. Conclusions: The immunohistochemical evaluation of 5mC yields refined information on colorectal tumor biology in adenoma and carcinoma. Global DNA hypomethylation reflected by low immunohistochemical expression of 5-mC is associated with advanced colorectal adenomatous polyps suggesting that it is an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis. Also this hypomethylation can

  12. Methylglyoxal induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and DNA demethylation in the Keap1 promoter of human lens epithelial cells and age-related cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Palsamy, Periyasamy; Bidasee, Keshore R.; Ayaki, Masahiko; Augusteyn, Robert C.; Chan, Jefferson Y.; Shinohara, Toshimichi

    2015-01-01

    Age-related cataracts are a leading cause of blindness. Previously, we have demonstrated the association of unfolded protein response with various cataractogenic stressors. However, DNA methylation alterations leading to suppression of lenticular antioxidant protection remains unclear. Here, we report the methylglyoxal-mediated sequential events responsible for Keap1 promoter DNA demethylation in human lens epithelial cells, because Keap1 is a negative regulatory protein that regulates the Nrf2 antioxidant protein. Methylglyoxal induces the ER stress and activates the unfolded protein response leading to overproduction of ROS prior to human lens epithelial cells death. Methylglyoxal also suppresses the Nrf2 and DNA methyltransferases but activates the DNA demethylation pathway enzyme, TET1. Bisulfite genomic DNA sequencing confirms the methylglyoxal-mediated Keap1 promoter DNA demethylation leading to over-expression of Keap1 mRNA and protein. Similarly, bisulfite genomic DNA sequencing of human clear lenses (n=15) slowly lose 5-methylcytosine in the Keap1 promoter throughout life, at a rate of 1% per year. By contrast, diabetic cataractous lenses (n=21) lose an average of 90% of the 5-methylcytosine regardless of the age. Over-expressed Keap1 protein is responsible for decreasing the Nrf2 by proteasomal degradation, thereby suppressing the Nrf2 dependent stress protection. This study demonstrates for the first time about the associations of unfolded protein response activation, Nrf2 dependent antioxidant system failure and loss of Keap1 promoter methylation because of altered active and passive DNA demethylation pathway enzymes in human lens epithelial cells by methylglyoxal. As an outcome, cellular redox balance is altered towards lens oxidation and cataract formation. PMID:24746615

  13. Base excision DNA repair in the embryonic development of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Torgasheva, Natalya A; Menzorova, Natalya I; Sibirtsev, Yurii T; Rasskazov, Valery A; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2016-06-21

    In actively proliferating cells, such as the cells of the developing embryo, DNA repair is crucial for preventing the accumulation of mutations and synchronizing cell division. Sea urchin embryo growth was analyzed and extracts were prepared. The relative activity of DNA polymerase, apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease, uracil-DNA glycosylase, 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase, and other glycosylases was analyzed using specific oligonucleotide substrates of these enzymes; the reaction products were resolved by denaturing 20% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We have characterized the profile of several key base excision repair activities in the developing embryos (2 blastomers to mid-pluteus) of the grey sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus intermedius. The uracil-DNA glycosylase specific activity sharply increased after blastula hatching, whereas the specific activity of 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase steadily decreased over the course of the development. The AP-endonuclease activity gradually increased but dropped at the last sampled stage (mid-pluteus 2). The DNA polymerase activity was high at the first cleavage division and then quickly decreased, showing a transient peak at blastula hatching. It seems that the developing sea urchin embryo encounters different DNA-damaging factors early in development within the protective envelope and later as a free-floating larva, with hatching necessitating adaptation to the shift in genotoxic stress conditions. No correlation was observed between the dynamics of the enzyme activities and published gene expression data from developing congeneric species, S. purpuratus. The results suggest that base excision repair enzymes may be regulated in the sea urchin embryos at the level of covalent modification or protein stability. PMID:27158700

  14. DNA Modifications: Function and Applications in Normal and Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Liyanage, Vichithra R. B.; Jarmasz, Jessica S.; Murugeshan, Nanditha; Del Bigio, Marc R.; Rastegar, Mojgan; Davie, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to a variety of processes that have heritable effects on gene expression programs without changes in DNA sequence. Key players in epigenetic control are chemical modifications to DNA, histone, and non-histone chromosomal proteins, which establish a complex regulatory network that controls genome function. Methylation of DNA at the fifth position of cytosine in CpG dinucleotides (5-methylcytosine, 5mC), which is carried out by DNA methyltransferases, is commonly associated with gene silencing. However, high resolution mapping of DNA methylation has revealed that 5mC is enriched in exonic nucleosomes and at intron-exon junctions, suggesting a role of DNA methylation in the relationship between elongation and RNA splicing. Recent studies have increased our knowledge of another modification of DNA, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which is a product of the ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins converting 5mC to 5hmC. In this review, we will highlight current studies on the role of 5mC and 5hmC in regulating gene expression (using some aspects of brain development as examples). Further the roles of these modifications in detection of pathological states (type 2 diabetes, Rett syndrome, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and teratogen exposure) will be discussed. PMID:25340699

  15. DNA modifications: function and applications in normal and disease States.

    PubMed

    Liyanage, Vichithra R B; Jarmasz, Jessica S; Murugeshan, Nanditha; Del Bigio, Marc R; Rastegar, Mojgan; Davie, James R

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to a variety of processes that have heritable effects on gene expression programs without changes in DNA sequence. Key players in epigenetic control are chemical modifications to DNA, histone, and non-histone chromosomal proteins, which establish a complex regulatory network that controls genome function. Methylation of DNA at the fifth position of cytosine in CpG dinucleotides (5-methylcytosine, 5mC), which is carried out by DNA methyltransferases, is commonly associated with gene silencing. However, high resolution mapping of DNA methylation has revealed that 5mC is enriched in exonic nucleosomes and at intron-exon junctions, suggesting a role of DNA methylation in the relationship between elongation and RNA splicing. Recent studies have increased our knowledge of another modification of DNA, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which is a product of the ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins converting 5mC to 5hmC. In this review, we will highlight current studies on the role of 5mC and 5hmC in regulating gene expression (using some aspects of brain development as examples). Further the roles of these modifications in detection of pathological states (type 2 diabetes, Rett syndrome, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and teratogen exposure) will be discussed. PMID:25340699

  16. 3CAPS – a structural AP–site analogue as a tool to investigate DNA base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Schuermann, David; Scheidegger, Simon P.; Weber, Alain R.; Bjørås, Magnar; Leumann, Christian J.; Schär, Primo

    2016-01-01

    Abasic sites (AP-sites) are frequent DNA lesions, arising by spontaneous base hydrolysis or as intermediates of base excision repair (BER). The hemiacetal at the anomeric centre renders them chemically reactive, which presents a challenge to biochemical and structural investigation. Chemically more stable AP-site analogues have been used to avoid spontaneous decay, but these do not fully recapitulate the features of natural AP–sites. With its 3′–phosphate replaced by methylene, the abasic site analogue 3CAPS was suggested to circumvent some of these limitations. Here, we evaluated the properties of 3CAPS in biochemical BER assays with mammalian proteins. 3CAPS-containing DNA substrates were processed by APE1, albeit with comparably poor efficiency. APE1-cleaved 3CAPS can be extended by DNA polymerase β but repaired only by strand displacement as the 5′–deoxyribophosphate (dRP) cannot be removed. DNA glycosylases physically and functionally interact with 3CAPS substrates, underlining its structural integrity and biochemical reactivity. The AP lyase activity of bifunctional DNA glycosylases (NTH1, NEIL1, FPG), however, was fully inhibited. Notably, 3CAPS-containing DNA also effectively inhibited the activity of bifunctional glycosylases on authentic substrates. Hence, the chemically stable 3CAPS with its preserved hemiacetal functionality is a potent tool for BER research and a potential inhibitor of bifunctional DNA glycosylases. PMID:26733580

  17. An unprecedented nucleic acid capture mechanism for excision of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinson, Emily H.; Prakasha Gowda, A.S.; Spratt, Thomas E.; Gold, Barry; Eichmanbrand, Brandt F.

    2010-11-18

    DNA glycosylases that remove alkylated and deaminated purine nucleobases are essential DNA repair enzymes that protect the genome, and at the same time confound cancer alkylation therapy, by excising cytotoxic N3-methyladenine bases formed by DNA-targeting anticancer compounds. The basis for glycosylase specificity towards N3- and N7-alkylpurines is believed to result from intrinsic instability of the modified bases and not from direct enzyme functional group chemistry. Here we present crystal structures of the recently discovered Bacillus cereus AlkD glycosylase in complex with DNAs containing alkylated, mismatched and abasic nucleotides. Unlike other glycosylases, AlkD captures the extrahelical lesion in a solvent-exposed orientation, providing an illustration for how hydrolysis of N3- and N7-alkylated bases may be facilitated by increased lifetime out of the DNA helix. The structures and supporting biochemical analysis of base flipping and catalysis reveal how the HEAT repeats of AlkD distort the DNA backbone to detect non-Watson-Crick base pairs without duplex intercalation.

  18. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  19. [DNA degradation during standard alkaline of thermal denaturation].

    PubMed

    Drozhdeniuk, A P; Sulimova, G E; Vaniushin, B F

    1976-01-01

    Essential degradation 8 DNA (up to 10 per cent) with liberation of acid-soluble fragments takes place on the standard alkaline (0,01 M sodium phosphate, pH 12, 60 degrees, 15 min) or thermal (0.06 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8, 102 degrees C, 15 min) denaturation. This degradation is more or less selective: fraction of low molecular weight fragments, isolated by hydroxyapatite cromatography and eluted by 0.06 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8 is rich in adenine and thymine and contains about 2 times less 5-methylcytosine than the total wheat germ DNA. The degree of degradation of DNA on thermal denaturation is higher than on alkaline degradation. Therefore while studying reassociation of various DNA, one and the same standard method of DNA denaturation should be used. Besides, both the level of DNA degradation and the nature of the resulting products (fragments) should be taken into account. PMID:999984

  20. Advances in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Romi; Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    The covalent DNA modification of cytosine at position 5 (5-methylcytosine; 5mC) has emerged as an important epigenetic mark most commonly present in the context of CpG dinucleotides in mammalian cells. In pluripotent stem cells and plants, it is also found in non-CpG and CpNpG contexts, respectively. 5mC has important implications in a diverse set of biological processes, including transcriptional regulation. Aberrant DNA methylation has been shown to be associated with a wide variety of human ailments and thus is the focus of active investigation. Methods used for detecting DNA methylation have revolutionized our understanding of this epigenetic mark and provided new insights into its role in diverse biological functions. Here we describe recent technological advances in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis and discuss their relative utility and drawbacks, providing specific examples from studies that have used these technologies for genome-wide DNA methylation analysis to address important biological questions. Finally, we discuss a newly identified covalent DNA modification, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), and speculate on its possible biological function, as well as describe a new methodology that can distinguish 5hmC from 5mC. PMID:20964631

  1. Conformational Dynamics of DNA Repair by Escherichia coli Endonuclease III*

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Kladova, Olga A.; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A.; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Saparbaev, Murat K.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli endonuclease III (Endo III or Nth) is a DNA glycosylase with a broad substrate specificity for oxidized or reduced pyrimidine bases. Endo III possesses two types of activities: N-glycosylase (hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond) and AP lyase (elimination of the 3′-phosphate of the AP-site). We report a pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of structural rearrangements of the DNA substrates and uncleavable ligands during their interaction with Endo III. Oligonucleotide duplexes containing 5,6-dihydrouracil, a natural abasic site, its tetrahydrofuran analog, and undamaged duplexes carried fluorescent DNA base analogs 2-aminopurine and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine as environment-sensitive reporter groups. The results suggest that Endo III induces several fast sequential conformational changes in DNA during binding, lesion recognition, and adjustment to a catalytically competent conformation. A comparison of two fluorophores allowed us to distinguish between the events occurring in the damaged and undamaged DNA strand. Combining our data with the available structures of Endo III, we conclude that this glycosylase uses a multistep mechanism of damage recognition, which likely involves Gln41 and Leu81 as DNA lesion sensors. PMID:25869130

  2. DNA methyltransferase 1 mutations and mitochondrial pathology: is mtDNA methylated?

    PubMed Central

    Maresca, Alessandra; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Caporali, Leonardo; Carelli, Valerio; Zanna, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia-deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) and Hereditary sensory neuropathy with dementia and hearing loss (HSN1E) are two rare, overlapping neurodegenerative syndromes that have been recently linked to allelic dominant pathogenic mutations in the DNMT1 gene, coding for DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). DNMT1 is the enzyme responsible for maintaining the nuclear genome methylation patterns during the DNA replication and repair, thus regulating gene expression. The mutations responsible for ADCA-DN and HSN1E affect the replication foci targeting sequence domain, which regulates DNMT1 binding to chromatin. DNMT1 dysfunction is anticipated to lead to a global alteration of the DNA methylation pattern with predictable downstream consequences on gene expression. Interestingly, ADCA-DN and HSN1E phenotypes share some clinical features typical of mitochondrial diseases, such as optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and deafness, and some biochemical evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction. The recent discovery of a mitochondrial isoform of DNMT1 and its proposed role in methylating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) suggests that DNMT1 mutations may directly affect mtDNA and mitochondrial physiology. On the basis of this latter finding the link between DNMT1 abnormal activity and mitochondrial dysfunction in ADCA-DN and HSN1E appears intuitive, however, mtDNA methylation remains highly debated. In the last years several groups demonstrated the presence of 5-methylcytosine in mtDNA by different approaches, but, on the other end, the opposite evidence that mtDNA is not methylated has also been published. Since over 1500 mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear genome, the altered methylation of these genes may well have a critical role in leading to the mitochondrial impairment observed in ADCA-DN and HSN1E. Thus, many open questions still remain unanswered, such as why mtDNA should be methylated, and how this process is regulated and

  3. Listeria monocytogenes DNA glycosylase AdiP affects flagellar motility, biofilm formation, virulence, and stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is struct...

  4. TET-mediated oxidation of methylcytosine causes TDG or NEIL glycosylase dependent gene reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Udo; Bauer, Christina; Siegl, Michael; Rottach, Andrea; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of hydroxymethyl-, formyl- and carboxylcytosine, generated through oxidation of methylcytosine by TET dioxygenases, raised the question how these modifications contribute to epigenetic regulation. As they are subjected to complex regulation in vivo, we dissected links to gene expression with in vitro modified reporter constructs. We used an Oct4 promoter-driven reporter gene and demonstrated that in vitro methylation causes gene silencing while subsequent oxidation with purified catalytic domain of TET1 leads to gene reactivation. To identify proteins involved in this pathway we screened for TET interacting factors and identified TDG, PARP1, XRCC1 and LIG3 that are involved in base-excision repair. Knockout and rescue experiments demonstrated that gene reactivation depended on the glycosylase TDG, but not MBD4, while NEIL1, 2 and 3 could partially rescue the loss of TDG. These results clearly show that oxidation of methylcytosine by TET dioxygenases and subsequent removal by TDG or NEIL glycosylases and the BER pathway results in reactivation of epigenetically silenced genes. PMID:24948610

  5. DNA methylation markers in the postnatal developing rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Rebecca K.; Stringfellow, Sara A.; Glover, Matthew E.; Wagle, Anjali A.; Clinton, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    In spite of intense interest in how altered epigenetic processes including DNA methylation may contribute to psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders, there is a limited understanding of how methylation processes change during early postnatal brain development. The present study used in situ hybridization to assess mRNA expression for the three major DNA methyltranserases (DNMTs) – DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b – in the developing rat brain at seven developmental timepoints: postnatal days (P) 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 75. We also assessed 5-methylcytosine levels (an indicator of global DNA methylation) in selected brain regions during the first three postnatal weeks. DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b mRNAs are widely expressed throughout the adult and postnatal developing rat brain. Overall, DNMT mRNA levels reached their highest point in the first week of life and gradually decreased over the first three postnatal weeks within the hippocampus, amygdala, striatum, cingulate and lateral septum. Global DNA methylation levels did not follow this developmental pattern; methylation levels gradually increased over the first three postnatal weeks in the hippocampus, and remained stable in the developing amygdala and prefrontal cortex. Our results contribute to a growing understanding of how DNA methylation markers unfold in the developing brain, and highlight how these developmental processes may differ within distinct brain regions. PMID:23954679

  6. Hippocampal adult neurogenesis is maintained by Neil3-dependent repair of oxidative DNA lesions in neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Regnell, Christine Elisabeth; Hildrestrand, Gunn Annette; Sejersted, Yngve; Medin, Tirill; Moldestad, Olve; Rolseth, Veslemøy; Krokeide, Silje Zandstra; Suganthan, Rajikala; Luna, Luisa; Bjørås, Magnar; Bergersen, Linda H

    2012-09-27

    Accumulation of oxidative DNA damage has been proposed as a potential cause of age-related cognitive decline. The major pathway for removal of oxidative DNA base lesions is base excision repair, which is initiated by DNA glycosylases. In mice, Neil3 is the main DNA glycosylase for repair of hydantoin lesions in single-stranded DNA of neural stem/progenitor cells, promoting neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis is crucial for maintenance of hippocampus-dependent functions involved in behavior. Herein, behavioral studies reveal learning and memory deficits and reduced anxiety-like behavior in Neil3(-/-) mice. Neural stem/progenitor cells from aged Neil3(-/-) mice show impaired proliferative capacity and reduced DNA repair activity. Furthermore, hippocampal neurons in Neil3(-/-) mice display synaptic irregularities. It appears that Neil3-dependent repair of oxidative DNA damage in neural stem/progenitor cells is required for maintenance of adult neurogenesis to counteract the age-associated deterioration of cognitive performance. PMID:22959434

  7. Base excision repair enzymes protect abasic sites in duplex DNA from interstrand cross-links.

    PubMed

    Admiraal, Suzanne J; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2015-03-10

    Hydrolysis of the N-glycosyl bond between a nucleobase and deoxyribose leaves an abasic site within duplex DNA. The abasic site can react with exocyclic amines of nucleobases on the complementary strand to form interstrand DNA-DNA cross-links (ICLs). We find that several enzymes from the base excision repair (BER) pathway protect an abasic site on one strand of a DNA duplex from cross-linking with an amine on the opposing strand. Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) and Escherichia coli 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II (AlkA) accomplish this by binding tightly to the abasic site and sequestering it. AAG protects an abasic site opposite T, the product of its canonical glycosylase reaction, by a factor of ∼10-fold, as estimated from its inhibition of the reaction of an exogenous amine with the damaged DNA. Human apurinic/apyrimidinic site endonuclease 1 and E. coli endonuclease III both decrease the amount of ICL at equilibrium by generating a single-strand DNA nick at the abasic position as it is liberated from the cross-link. The reversibility of the reaction between amines and abasic sites allows BER enzymes to counter the potentially disruptive effects of this type of cross-link on DNA transactions. PMID:25679877

  8. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  9. Cistrome and Epicistrome Features Shape the Regulatory DNA Landscape.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Ronan C; Huang, Shao-Shan Carol; Song, Liang; Lewsey, Mathew G; Bartlett, Anna; Nery, Joseph R; Galli, Mary; Gallavotti, Andrea; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-05-19

    The cistrome is the complete set of transcription factor (TF) binding sites (cis-elements) in an organism, while an epicistrome incorporates tissue-specific DNA chemical modifications and TF-specific chemical sensitivities into these binding profiles. Robust methods to construct comprehensive cistrome and epicistrome maps are critical for elucidating complex transcriptional networks that underlie growth, behavior, and disease. Here, we describe DNA affinity purification sequencing (DAP-seq), a high-throughput TF binding site discovery method that interrogates genomic DNA with in-vitro-expressed TFs. Using DAP-seq, we defined the Arabidopsis cistrome by resolving motifs and peaks for 529 TFs. Because genomic DNA used in DAP-seq retains 5-methylcytosines, we determined that >75% (248/327) of Arabidopsis TFs surveyed were methylation sensitive, a property that strongly impacts the epicistrome landscape. DAP-seq datasets also yielded insight into the biology and binding site architecture of numerous TFs, demonstrating the value of DAP-seq for cost-effective cistromic and epicistromic annotation in any organism. PMID:27203113

  10. Coordination of DNA repair by NEIL1 and PARP-1: a possible link to aging

    PubMed Central

    Noren Hooten, Nicole; Fitzpatrick, Megan; Kompaniez, Kari; Jacob, Kimberly D.; Moore, Brittany R.; Nagle, Julia; Barnes, Janice; Lohani, Althaf; Evans, Michele K.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative DNA damage accumulates with age and is repaired primarily via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. This process is initiated by DNA glycosylases, which remove damaged bases in a substrate-specific manner. The DNA glycosylases human 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and NEIL1, a mammalian homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease VIII, have overlapping yet distinct substrate specificity. Recently, we reported that OGG1 binds to the Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a DNA damage sensor protein that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ates nuclear proteins in response to DNA damage and other cellular signals. Here, we show that NEIL1 and PARP-1 bind both in vitro and in vivo. PARP-1 binds to the C-terminal-100 amino acids of NEIL1 and NEIL1 binds to the BRCT domain of PARP-1. NEIL1 stimulates the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation activity of PARP-1. Furthermore, NEIL-deficient fibroblasts have impaired poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of cellular proteins after DNA damage, which can be rescued by NEIL1 expression. Additionally, PARP-1 inhibits NEIL1 incision activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Consistent with the idea of impaired DNA repair during aging, we observed differential binding of PARP-1 to recombinant NEIL1 in older mice compared to younger mice. These data further support the idea that dynamic interplay between different base excision repair proteins is important for efficient BER. PMID:23104860

  11. Methylomic analysis of salivary DNA in childhood ADHD identifies altered DNA methylation in VIPR2

    PubMed Central

    Wilmot, Beth; Fry, Rebecca; Smeester, Lisa; Musser, Erica D.; Mill, Jonathan; Nigg, Joel T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Peripheral epigenetic marks hold promise for understanding psychiatric illness and may represent fingerprints of gene–environment interactions. We conducted an initial examination of CpG methylation variation in children with or without attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods Children age 7–12 were recruited, screened, evaluated and assigned to ADHD or non-ADHD groups by defined research criteria. Two independent age-matched samples were examined, a discovery set (n = 92, all boys, half control, half ADHD) and a confirmation set (n = 20, half ADHD, all boys). 5-methylcytosine levels were quantified in salivary DNA using the Illumina 450 K HumanMethylation array. Genes for which multiple probes were nominally significant and had a beta difference of at least 2% were evaluated for biological relevance and prioritized for confirmation and sequence validation. Gene pathways were explored and described. Results Two genes met the criteria for confirmation testing, VIPR2 and MYT1L; both had multiple probes meeting cutoffs and strong biological relevance. Probes on VIPR2 passed FDR correction in the confirmation set and were confirmed through bisulfite sequencing. Enrichment analysis suggested involvement of gene sets or pathways related to inflammatory processes and modulation of monoamine and cholinergic neurotransmission. Conclusions Although it is unknown to what extent CpG methylation seen in peripheral tissue reflect transcriptomic changes in the brain, these initial results indicate that peripheral DNA methylation markers in ADHD may be promising and suggest targeted hypotheses for future study in larger samples. PMID:26304033

  12. DNA repair in bacterial cultures and plasmid DNA exposed to infrared laser for treatment of pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Marciano, R. S.; Guimarães, O. R.; Polignano, G. A. C.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2013-06-01

    Biostimulation of tissues by low intensity lasers has been described on a photobiological basis and clinical protocols are recommended for treatment of various diseases, but their effects on DNA are controversial. The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of low intensity infrared laser exposure on survival and bacterial filamentation in Escherichia coli cultures, and induction of DNA lesions in bacterial plasmids. In E. coli cultures and plasmids exposed to an infrared laser at fluences used to treat pain, bacterial survival and filamentation and DNA lesions in plasmids were evaluated by electrophoretic profile. Data indicate that the infrared laser (i) increases survival of E. coli wild type in 24 h of stationary growth phase, (ii) induces bacterial filamentation, (iii) does not alter topological forms of plasmids and (iv) does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. A low intensity infrared laser at the therapeutic fluences used to treat pain can alter survival of E. coli wild type, induce filamentation in bacterial cells, depending on physiologic conditions and DNA repair, and induce DNA lesions other than single or double DNA strand breaks or alkali-labile sites, which are not targeted by exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase.

  13. Finding and Producing Probiotic Glycosylases for the Biocatalysis of Ginsenosides: A Mini Review.

    PubMed

    Ku, Seockmo

    2016-01-01

    Various microorganisms have been widely applied in nutraceutical industries for the processing of phytochemical conversion. Specifically, in the Asian food industry and academia, notable attention is paid to the biocatalytic process of ginsenosides (ginseng saponins) using probiotic bacteria that produce high levels of glycosyl-hydrolases. Multiple groups have conducted experiments in order to determine the best conditions to produce more active and stable enzymes, which can be applicable to produce diverse types of ginsenosides for commercial applications. In this sense, there are various reviews that cover the biofunctional effects of multiple types of ginsenosides and the pathways of ginsenoside deglycosylation. However, little work has been published on the production methods of probiotic enzymes, which is a critical component of ginsenoside processing. This review aims to investigate current preparation methods, results on the discovery of new glycosylases, the application potential of probiotic enzymes and their use for biocatalysis of ginsenosides in the nutraceutical industry. PMID:27196878

  14. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sequencing (MeDIP-seq) using low amounts of genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming-Tao; Whyte, Jeffrey J; Hopkins, Garrett M; Kirk, Mark D; Prather, Randall S

    2014-06-01

    DNA modifications, such as methylation and hydroxymethylation, are pivotal players in modulating gene expression, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and silencing repetitive sequences during embryonic development. Aberrant DNA modifications lead to embryonic and postnatal abnormalities and serious human diseases, such as cancer. Comprehensive genome-wide DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation studies provide a way to thoroughly understand normal development and to identify potential epigenetic mutations in human diseases. Here we established a working protocol for methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with next-generation sequencing [methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP)-seq] for low starting amounts of genomic DNA. By using spike-in control DNA sets with standard cytosine, 5-methylcytosine (5mC), and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), we demonstrate the preferential binding of antibodies to 5mC and 5hmC, respectively. MeDIP-PCRs successfully targeted highly methylated genomic loci with starting genomic DNA as low as 1 ng. The enrichment efficiency declined for constant spiked-in controls but increased for endogenous methylated regions. A MeDIP-seq library was constructed starting with 1 ng of DNA, with the majority of fragments between 250 bp and 600 bp. The MeDIP-seq reads showed higher quality than the Input control. However, after being preprocessed by Cutadapt, MeDIP (97.53%) and Input (94.98%) reads showed comparable alignment rates. SeqMonk visualization tools indicated MeDIP-seq reads were less uniformly distributed across the genome than Input reads. Several commonly known unmethylated and methylated genomic loci showed consistent methylation patterns in the MeDIP-seq data. Thus, we provide proof-of-principle that MeDIP-seq technology is feasible to profile genome-wide DNA methylation in minute DNA samples, such as oocytes, early embryos, and human biopsies. PMID:24773292

  15. Isolation of Human Genomic DNA Sequences with Expanded Nucleobase Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Preeti; Maurer, Sara; Kubik, Grzegorz; Summerer, Daniel

    2016-08-10

    We report the direct isolation of user-defined DNA sequences from the human genome with programmable selectivity for both canonical and epigenetic nucleobases. This is enabled by the use of engineered transcription-activator-like effectors (TALEs) as DNA major groove-binding probes in affinity enrichment. The approach provides the direct quantification of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) levels at single genomic nucleotide positions in a strand-specific manner. We demonstrate the simple, multiplexed typing of a variety of epigenetic cancer biomarker 5mC with custom TALE mixes. Compared to antibodies as the most widely used affinity probes for 5mC analysis, i.e., employed in the methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) protocol, TALEs provide superior sensitivity, resolution and technical ease. We engineer a range of size-reduced TALE repeats and establish full selectivity profiles for their binding to all five human cytosine nucleobases. These provide insights into their nucleobase recognition mechanisms and reveal the ability of TALEs to isolate genomic target sequences with selectivity for single 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and, in combination with sodium borohydride reduction, single 5-formylcytosine nucleobases. PMID:27429302

  16. Gibberellic Acid Enhancement of DNA Turnover in Barley Aleurone Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Taiz, Lincoln; Starks, Jayum E.

    1977-01-01

    When imbibed, deembryonated halfseeds from barley (Hordeum vulgare L., var. Himalaya) are incubated in buffer, the DNA content of the aleurone layer increases 25 to 40% over a 24-hour period. In contrast, the DNA of isolated aleurone layers declines by 20% over the same time period. Gibberellic acid (GA) causes a reduction in DNA levels in both halfseed aleurone layers and isolated aleurone layers. GA also increases the specific radioactivity of [3H]thymidine-labeled halfseed aleurone layer DNA during the first 12 hours of treatment. Pulse-chase studies demonstrated that the newly synthesized DNA is metabolically labile. The buoyant density on CsCl density gradients of hormone-treated aleurone DNA is identical with that of DNA extracted from whole seedlings. After density-labeling halfseed DNA with 5-bromodeoxyuridine, a bimodal absorption profile is obtained in neutral CsCl. The light band (1.70 g/ml) corresponds to unsubstituted DNA, while the heavy band (1.725-1.74 g/ml) corresponds to a hybrid density-labeled species. GA increases the relative amount of the heavy (hybrid) peak in halfseed aleurone layer DNA, further suggesting that the hormone enhances semiconservative replication in halfseeds. DNA methylation was also demonstrated. Over 60% of the radioactivity from [3H-Me]methionine is incorporated into 5-methylcytosine. GA has no effect on the percentage distribution of label among the bases. It was concluded that GA enhances the rate of DNA degradation and DNA synthesis (turnover) in halfseeds, but primarily DNA degradation in isolated aleurone layers. Incorporation by isolated aleurone layers is due to DNA repair. Semiconservative replication apparently plays no physiological role in the hormone response, since both isolated aleurone layers and gamma-irradiated halfseeds respond normally. The hypothesis was advanced that endoreduplication and DNA degradation are means by which the seed stores and mobilizes deoxyribonucleotides for the embryo during

  17. An interplay of the base excision repair and mismatch repair pathways in active DNA demethylation.

    PubMed

    Grin, Inga; Ishchenko, Alexander A

    2016-05-01

    Active DNA demethylation (ADDM) in mammals occurs via hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) by TET and/or deamination by AID/APOBEC family enzymes. The resulting 5mC derivatives are removed through the base excision repair (BER) pathway. At present, it is unclear how the cell manages to eliminate closely spaced 5mC residues whilst avoiding generation of toxic BER intermediates and whether alternative DNA repair pathways participate in ADDM. It has been shown that non-canonical DNA mismatch repair (ncMMR) can remove both alkylated and oxidized nucleotides from DNA. Here, a phagemid DNA containing oxidative base lesions and methylated sites are used to examine the involvement of various DNA repair pathways in ADDM in murine and human cell-free extracts. We demonstrate that, in addition to short-patch BER, 5-hydroxymethyluracil and uracil mispaired with guanine can be processed by ncMMR and long-patch BER with concomitant removal of distant 5mC residues. Furthermore, the presence of multiple mispairs in the same MMR nick/mismatch recognition region together with BER-mediated nick formation promotes proficient ncMMR resulting in the reactivation of an epigenetically silenced reporter gene in murine cells. These findings suggest cooperation between BER and ncMMR in the removal of multiple mismatches that might occur in mammalian cells during ADDM. PMID:26843430

  18. Effects of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility and nucleosome mechanical stability

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Thuy T. M.; Yoo, Jejoong; Dai, Qing; Zhang, Qiucen; He, Chuan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine can undergo modifications, forming 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and its oxidized products 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Despite their importance as epigenetic markers and as central players in cellular processes, it is not well understood how these modifications influence physical properties of DNA and chromatin. Here we report a comprehensive survey of the effect of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility. We find that even a single copy of 5-fC increases DNA flexibility markedly. 5-mC reduces and 5-hmC enhances flexibility, and 5-caC does not have a measurable effect. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these modifications promote or dampen structural fluctuations, likely through competing effects of base polarity and steric hindrance, without changing the average structure. The increase in DNA flexibility increases the mechanical stability of the nucleosome and vice versa, suggesting a gene regulation mechanism where cytosine modifications change the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA through their effects on DNA flexibility. PMID:26905257

  19. An interplay of the base excision repair and mismatch repair pathways in active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Grin, Inga; Ishchenko, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation (ADDM) in mammals occurs via hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) by TET and/or deamination by AID/APOBEC family enzymes. The resulting 5mC derivatives are removed through the base excision repair (BER) pathway. At present, it is unclear how the cell manages to eliminate closely spaced 5mC residues whilst avoiding generation of toxic BER intermediates and whether alternative DNA repair pathways participate in ADDM. It has been shown that non-canonical DNA mismatch repair (ncMMR) can remove both alkylated and oxidized nucleotides from DNA. Here, a phagemid DNA containing oxidative base lesions and methylated sites are used to examine the involvement of various DNA repair pathways in ADDM in murine and human cell-free extracts. We demonstrate that, in addition to short-patch BER, 5-hydroxymethyluracil and uracil mispaired with guanine can be processed by ncMMR and long-patch BER with concomitant removal of distant 5mC residues. Furthermore, the presence of multiple mispairs in the same MMR nick/mismatch recognition region together with BER-mediated nick formation promotes proficient ncMMR resulting in the reactivation of an epigenetically silenced reporter gene in murine cells. These findings suggest cooperation between BER and ncMMR in the removal of multiple mismatches that might occur in mammalian cells during ADDM. PMID:26843430

  20. Different Levels of DNA Methylation Detected in Human Sperms after Morphological Selection Using High Magnification Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cassuto, Nino Guy; Montjean, Debbie; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Bouret, Dominique; Marzouk, Flora; Copin, Henri; Benkhalifa, Moncef

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To analyze DNA methylation levels between two groups of spermatozoa taken from the same sample, following morphological selection by high magnification (HM) at 6100x microscopy. A prospective study was conducted and studied 876 spermatozoa from 10 randomly selected men. Sperm morphology was characterized at HM according to criteria previously established. High-scoring Score 6 and low-scoring Score 0 sperm were selected. Sperm DNA methylation level was assessed using an immunoassay method targeting 5-methylcytosine residues by fluorescence microscopy with imaging analysis system to detect DNA methylation in single spermatozoon. Results. In total, 448 S6 spermatozoa and 428 S0 spermatozoa were analyzed. A strong relationship was found between sperm DNA methylation levels and sperm morphology observed at HM. Sperm DNA methylation level in the S6 group was significantly lower compared with that in the S0 group (p < 10−6), OR = 2.4; and p < 0.001, as determined using the Wilcoxon test. Conclusion. Differences in DNA methylation levels are associated with sperm morphology variations as observed at HM, which allows spermatozoa with abnormal levels to be discarded and ultimately decrease birth defects, malformations, and epigenetic diseases that may be transmitted from sperm to offspring in ICSI. PMID:27148551

  1. Feasibility study of molecular memory device based on DNA using methylation to store information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liming; Qiu, Wanzhi; Al-Dirini, Feras; Hossain, Faruque M.; Evans, Robin; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-07-01

    DNA, because of its robustness and dense information storage capability, has been proposed as a potential candidate for next-generation storage media. However, encoding information into the DNA sequence requires molecular synthesis technology, which to date is costly and prone to synthesis errors. Reading the DNA strand information is also complex. Ideally, DNA storage will provide methods for modifying stored information. Here, we conduct a feasibility study investigating the use of the DNA 5-methylcytosine (5mC) methylation state as a molecular memory to store information. We propose a new 1-bit memory device and study, based on the density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method, the feasibility of electrically reading the information. Our results show that changes to methylation states lead to changes in the peak of negative differential resistance which can be used to interrogate memory state. Our work demonstrates a new memory concept based on methylation state which can be beneficial in the design of next generation DNA based molecular electronic memory devices.

  2. Different Levels of DNA Methylation Detected in Human Sperms after Morphological Selection Using High Magnification Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cassuto, Nino Guy; Montjean, Debbie; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Bouret, Dominique; Marzouk, Flora; Copin, Henri; Benkhalifa, Moncef

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To analyze DNA methylation levels between two groups of spermatozoa taken from the same sample, following morphological selection by high magnification (HM) at 6100x microscopy. A prospective study was conducted and studied 876 spermatozoa from 10 randomly selected men. Sperm morphology was characterized at HM according to criteria previously established. High-scoring Score 6 and low-scoring Score 0 sperm were selected. Sperm DNA methylation level was assessed using an immunoassay method targeting 5-methylcytosine residues by fluorescence microscopy with imaging analysis system to detect DNA methylation in single spermatozoon. Results. In total, 448 S6 spermatozoa and 428 S0 spermatozoa were analyzed. A strong relationship was found between sperm DNA methylation levels and sperm morphology observed at HM. Sperm DNA methylation level in the S6 group was significantly lower compared with that in the S0 group (p < 10(-6)), OR = 2.4; and p < 0.001, as determined using the Wilcoxon test. Conclusion. Differences in DNA methylation levels are associated with sperm morphology variations as observed at HM, which allows spermatozoa with abnormal levels to be discarded and ultimately decrease birth defects, malformations, and epigenetic diseases that may be transmitted from sperm to offspring in ICSI. PMID:27148551

  3. Effects of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility and nucleosome mechanical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Thuy T. M.; Yoo, Jejoong; Dai, Qing; Zhang, Qiucen; He, Chuan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-02-01

    Cytosine can undergo modifications, forming 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and its oxidized products 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Despite their importance as epigenetic markers and as central players in cellular processes, it is not well understood how these modifications influence physical properties of DNA and chromatin. Here we report a comprehensive survey of the effect of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility. We find that even a single copy of 5-fC increases DNA flexibility markedly. 5-mC reduces and 5-hmC enhances flexibility, and 5-caC does not have a measurable effect. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these modifications promote or dampen structural fluctuations, likely through competing effects of base polarity and steric hindrance, without changing the average structure. The increase in DNA flexibility increases the mechanical stability of the nucleosome and vice versa, suggesting a gene regulation mechanism where cytosine modifications change the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA through their effects on DNA flexibility.

  4. Deposition of 5-Methylcytosine on Enhancer RNAs Enables the Coactivator Function of PGC-1α.

    PubMed

    Aguilo, Francesca; Li, SiDe; Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Sancho, Ana; Benko, Sabina; Zhang, Fan; Vashisht, Ajay; Rengasamy, Madhumitha; Andino, Blanca; Chen, Chih-hung; Zhou, Felix; Qian, Chengmin; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Wohlschlegel, James A; Zhang, Weijia; Suchy, Frederick J; Walsh, Martin J

    2016-01-26

    The Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional co-activator that plays a central role in adapted metabolic responses. PGC-1α is dynamically methylated and unmethylated at the residue K779 by the methyltransferase SET7/9 and the Lysine Specific Demethylase 1A (LSD1), respectively. Interactions of methylated PGC-1α[K779me] with the Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex, the Mediator members MED1 and MED17, and the NOP2/Sun RNA methytransferase 7 (NSUN7) reinforce transcription, and are concomitant with the m(5)C mark on enhancer RNAs (eRNAs). Consistently, loss of Set7/9 and NSun7 in liver cell model systems resulted in depletion of the PGC-1α target genes Pfkl, Sirt5, Idh3b, and Hmox2, which was accompanied by a decrease in the eRNAs levels associated with these loci. Enrichment of m(5)C within eRNA species coincides with metabolic stress of fasting in vivo. Collectively, these findings illustrate the complex epigenetic circuitry imposed by PGC-1α at the eRNA level to fine-tune energy metabolism. PMID:26774474

  5. DEPOSITION OF 5-METHYLCYTOSINE ON ENHANCER RNAs ENABLES THE COACTIVATOR FUNCTION OF PGC-1α

    PubMed Central

    Aguilo, Francesca; Li, SiDe; Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Sancho, Ana; Benko, Sabina; Zhang, Fan; Vashisht, Ajay; Rengasamy, Madhumitha; Andino, Blanca; Chen, Chih-hung; Zhou, Felix; Qian, Chengmin; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Zhang, Weijia; Suchy, Frederick J.; Walsh, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional co-activator that plays a central role in adapted metabolic responses. PGC-1α is dynamically methylated and unmethylated at the residue K779 by the methyltransferase SET7/9 and the Lysine Specific Demethylase 1A (LSD1), respectively. Interactions of methylated PGC-1α[K779me] with the Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex, the Mediator members MED1 and MED17, and the NOP2/Sun RNA methytransferase 7 (NSUN7) reinforce transcription, and are concomitant with the m5C mark on enhancer RNAs (eRNAs). Consistently, loss of Set7/9 and NSun7 in liver cell model systems resulted in depletion of the PGC-1α target genes Pfkl, Sirt5, Idh3b and Hmox2, which was accompanied with a decrease in the eRNAs levels associated to these loci. Enrichment of m5C within eRNA species coincides with metabolic stress of fasting in vivo. Collectively, these findings illustrate the complex epigenetic circuitry imposed by PGC-1α at the eRNA level to fine-tune energy metabolism. PMID:26774474

  6. Tautomerization-dependent recognition and excision of oxidation damage in base-excision DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chenxu; Lu, Lining; Zhang, Jun; Yue, Zongwei; Song, Jinghui; Zong, Shuai; Liu, Menghao; Stovicek, Olivia; Gao, Yi Qin; Yi, Chengqi

    2016-07-12

    NEIL1 (Nei-like 1) is a DNA repair glycosylase guarding the mammalian genome against oxidized DNA bases. As the first enzymes in the base-excision repair pathway, glycosylases must recognize the cognate substrates and catalyze their excision. Here we present crystal structures of human NEIL1 bound to a range of duplex DNA. Together with computational and biochemical analyses, our results suggest that NEIL1 promotes tautomerization of thymine glycol (Tg)-a preferred substrate-for optimal binding in its active site. Moreover, this tautomerization event also facilitates NEIL1-catalyzed Tg excision. To our knowledge, the present example represents the first documented case of enzyme-promoted tautomerization for efficient substrate recognition and catalysis in an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. PMID:27354518

  7. Structure and mutagenesis of the DNA modification-dependent restriction endonuclease AspBHI

    PubMed Central

    Horton, John R.; Nugent, Rebecca L.; Li, Andrew; Mabuchi, Megumu Yamada; Fomenkov, Alexey; Cohen-Karni, Devora; Griggs, Rose M.; Zhang, Xing; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Zheng, Yu; Xu, Shuang-yong; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    The modification-dependent restriction endonuclease AspBHI recognizes 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in the double-strand DNA sequence context of (C/T)(C/G)(5mC)N(C/G) (N = any nucleotide) and cleaves the two strands a fixed distance (N12/N16) 3′ to the modified cytosine. We determined the crystal structure of the homo-tetrameric AspBHI. Each subunit of the protein comprises two domains: an N-terminal DNA-recognition domain and a C-terminal DNA cleavage domain. The N-terminal domain is structurally similar to the eukaryotic SET and RING-associated (SRA) domain, which is known to bind to a hemi-methylated CpG dinucleotide. The C-terminal domain is structurally similar to classic Type II restriction enzymes and contains the endonuclease catalytic-site motif of DX20EAK. To understand how specific amino acids affect AspBHI recognition preference, we generated a homology model of the AspBHI-DNA complex, and probed the importance of individual amino acids by mutagenesis. Ser41 and Arg42 are predicted to be located in the DNA minor groove 5′ to the modified cytosine. Substitution of Ser41 with alanine (S41A) and cysteine (S41C) resulted in mutants with altered cleavage activity. All 19 Arg42 variants resulted in loss of endonuclease activity. PMID:24604015

  8. Sensitivity to methylmercury toxicity is enhanced in oxoguanine glycosylase 1 knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts and is dependent on cellular proliferation capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Ondovcik, Stephanie L.; Tamblyn, Laura; McPherson, John Peter; Wells, Peter G.

    2013-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a persistent environmental contaminant with potent neurotoxic action for which the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be conclusively delineated. Our objectives herein were twofold: first, to corroborate our previous findings of an increased sensitivity of spontaneously-immortalized oxoguanine glycosylase 1-null (Ogg1{sup −/−}) murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to MeHg through generation of Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen-immortalized wild-type and Ogg1{sup −/−} MEFs; and second, to determine whether MeHg toxicity is proliferation-dependent. As with the spontaneously-immortalized cells used previously, the SV40 large T antigen-immortalized cells exhibited similar tendencies to undergo MeHg-initiated cell cycle arrest, with increased sensitivity in the Ogg1{sup −/−} MEFs as measured by clonogenic survival and DNA damage. Compared to exponentially growing cells, those seeded at a higher density exhibited compromised proliferation, which proved protective against MeHg-mediated cell cycle arrest and induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), measured by phosphorylation of the core histone H2A variant (H2AX) on serine 139 (γH2AX), and by its functional confirmation by micronucleus assessment. This enhanced sensitivity of Ogg1{sup −/−} MEFs to MeHg toxicity using discrete SV40 immortalization corroborates our previous studies, and suggests a novel role for OGG1 in minimizing MeHg-initiated DNA lesions that trigger replication-associated DSBs. Furthermore, proliferative capacity may determine MeHg toxicity in vivo and in utero. Accordingly, variations in cellular proliferative capacity and interindividual variability in repair activity may modulate the risk of toxicological consequences following MeHg exposure. - Highlights: • SV40 large T antigen-immortalized Ogg1{sup −/−} cells are more sensitive to MeHg. • Sensitivity to MeHg is dependent on cellular proliferation capacity. • OGG1 maintains genomic

  9. Association of Global DNA Methylation and Global DNA Hydroxymethylation with Metals and Other Exposures in Human Blood DNA Samples

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wan-yee; Shang, Yan; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Ledesma, Marta; Leon, Montserrat; Laclaustra, Martin; Pollak, Jonathan; Guallar, Eliseo; Cole, Shelley A.; Fallin, M. Dani; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between human blood DNA global methylation and global hydroxymethylation has not been evaluated in population-based studies. No studies have evaluated environmental determinants of global DNA hydroxymethylation, including exposure to metals. Objective: We evaluated the association between global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation in 48 Strong Heart Study participants for which selected metals had been measured in urine at baseline and DNA was available from 1989–1991 (visit 1) and 1998–1999 (visit 3). Methods: We measured the percentage of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) in samples using capture and detection antibodies followed by colorimetric quantification. We explored the association of participant characteristics (i.e., age, adiposity, smoking, and metal exposure) with both global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation. Results: The Spearman’s correlation coefficient for 5-mC and 5-hmC levels was 0.32 (p = 0.03) at visit 1 and 0.54 (p < 0.001) at visit 3. Trends for both epigenetic modifications were consistent across potential determinants. In cross-sectional analyses, the odds ratios of methylated and hydroxymethylated DNA were 1.56 (95% CI: 0.95, 2.57) and 1.76 (95% CI: 1.07, 2.88), respectively, for the comparison of participants above and below the median percentage of dimethylarsinate. The corresponding odds ratios were 1.64 (95% CI: 1.02, 2.65) and 1.16 (95% CI: 0.70, 1.94), respectively, for the comparison of participants above and below the median cadmium level. Arsenic exposure and metabolism were consistently associated with both epigenetic markers in cross-sectional and prospective analyses. The positive correlation of 5-mC and 5-hmC levels was confirmed in an independent study population. Conclusions: Our findings support that both epigenetic measures are related at the population level. The consistent trends in the associations between these two epigenetic

  10. qDNAmod: a statistical model-based tool to reveal intercellular heterogeneity of DNA modification from SMRT sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhixing; Li, Jing; Zhang, Jing-Ren; Zhang, Xuegong

    2014-01-01

    In an isogenic cell population, phenotypic heterogeneity among individual cells is common and critical for survival of the population under different environment conditions. DNA modification is an important epigenetic factor that can regulate phenotypic heterogeneity. The single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing technology provides a unique platform for detecting a wide range of DNA modifications, including N6-methyladenine (6-mA), N4-methylcytosine (4-mC) and 5-methylcytosine (5-mC). Here we present qDNAmod, a novel bioinformatic tool for genome-wide quantitative profiling of intercellular heterogeneity of DNA modification from SMRT sequencing data. It is capable of estimating proportion of isogenic haploid cells, in which the same loci of the genome are differentially modified. We tested the reliability of qDNAmod with the SMRT sequencing data of Streptococcus pneumoniae strain ST556. qDNAmod detected extensive intercellular heterogeneity of DNA methylation (6-mA) in a clonal population of ST556. Subsequent biochemical analyses revealed that the recognition sequences of two type I restriction–modification (R-M) systems are responsible for the intercellular heterogeneity of DNA methylation initially identified by qDNAmod. qDNAmod thus represents a valuable tool for studying intercellular phenotypic heterogeneity from genome-wide DNA modification. PMID:25404133

  11. Direct detection of DNA methylation during single-molecule, real-time sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Flusberg, Benjamin A.; Webster, Dale; Lee, Jessa; Travers, Kevin; Olivares, Eric; Clark, Tyson A.; Korlach, Jonas; Turner, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the direct detection of DNA methylation, without bisulfite conversion, through single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing. In SMRT sequencing, DNA polymerases catalyze the incorporation of fluorescently labeled nucleotides into complementary nucleic acid strands. The arrival times and durations of the resulting fluorescence pulses yield information about polymerase kinetics and allow direct detection of modified nucleotides in the DNA template, including N6-methyladenosine, 5-methylcytosine, and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. Measurement of polymerase kinetics is an intrinsic part of SMRT sequencing and does not adversely affect determination of the primary DNA sequence. The various modifications affect polymerase kinetics differently, allowing discrimination between them. We utilize these kinetic signatures to identify adenosine methylation in genomic samples and show that, in combination with circular consensus sequencing, they can enable single-molecule identification of epigenetic modifications with base-pair resolution. This method is amenable to long read lengths and will likely enable mapping of methylation patterns within even highly repetitive genomic regions. PMID:20453866

  12. Chromatin organisation in duckweed interphase nuclei in relation to the nuclear DNA content.

    PubMed

    Cao, H X; Vu, G T H; Wang, W; Messing, J; Schubert, I

    2015-01-01

    The accessibility of DNA during fundamental processes, such as transcription, replication and DNA repair, is tightly modulated through a dynamic chromatin structure. Differences in large-scale chromatin structure at the microscopic level can be observed as euchromatic and heterochromatic domains in interphase nuclei. Here, key epigenetic marks, including histone H3 methylation and 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) as a DNA modification, were studied cytologically to describe the chromatin organisation of representative species of the five duckweed genera in the context of their nuclear DNA content, which ranged from 158 to 1881 Mbp. All studied duckweeds, including Spirodela polyrhiza with a genome size and repeat proportion similar to that of Arabidopsis thaliana, showed dispersed distribution of heterochromatin signatures (5mC, H3K9me2 and H3K27me1). This immunolabelling pattern resembles that of early developmental stages of Arabidopsis nuclei, with less pronounced heterochromatin chromocenters and heterochromatic marks weakly dispersed throughout the nucleus. PMID:24853858

  13. Epigenetic Modification of Mitochondrial DNA in the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Manish; Kowluru, Renu A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Retinal mitochondria are dysfunctional in diabetes, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is damaged and its transcription is compromised. Our aim was to investigate the role of mtDNA methylation in the development of diabetic retinopathy. Methods Effect of high glucose (20 mM) on mtDNA methylation was analyzed in retinal endothelial cells by methylation-specific PCR and by quantifying 5-methylcytosine (5mC). Dnmt1 binding at the D-loop and Cytb regions of mtDNA was analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. The role of mtDNA methylation in transcription and cell death was confirmed by quantifying transcripts of mtDNA-encoded genes (Cytb, ND6, and CoxII) and apoptosis, using cells transfected with Dnmt1-small interfering RNA (siRNA), or incubated with a Dnmt inhibitor. The key parameters were validated in the retinal microvasculature from human donors with diabetic retinopathy. Results High glucose increased mtDNA methylation, and methylation was significantly higher at the D-loop than at the Cytb and CoxII regions. Mitochondrial accumulation of Dnmt1 and its binding at the D-loop were also significantly increased. Inhibition of Dnmt by its siRNA or pharmacologic inhibitor ameliorated glucose-induced increase in 5mC levels and cell apoptosis. Retinal microvasculature from human donors with diabetic retinopathy presented similar increase in D-loop methylation and decrease in mtDNA transcription. Conclusions Hypermethylation of mtDNA in diabetes impairs its transcription, resulting in dysfunctional mitochondria and accelerated capillary cell apoptosis. Regulation of mtDNA methylation has potential to restore mitochondrial homeostasis and inhibit/retard the development of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26241401

  14. DNA methylation profiling in the thalamus and hippocampus of postnatal malnourished mice, including effects related to long-term potentiation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background DNA methylation has been viewed as the most highly characterized epigenetic mark for genome regulation and development. Postnatal brains appear to exhibit stimulus-induced methylation changes because of factors such as environment, lifestyle, and diet (nutrition). The purpose of this study was to examine how extensively the brain DNA methylome is regulated by nutrition in early life. Results By quantifying the total amount of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in the thalamus and the hippocampus of postnatal malnourished mice and normal mice, we found the two regions showed differences in global DNA methylation status. The methylation level in the thalamus was much higher than that in the hippocampus. Then, we used a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based method (MSCC) to detect the whole genome methylation of the two regions in malnourished mice and normal mice. Notably, we found that in the thalamus, 500 discriminable variations existed and that approximately 60% were related to neuronal development or psychiatric diseases. Pathway analyses of the corresponding genes highlighted changes for 9 genes related to long-term potentiation (5.3-fold enrichment, P = 0.033). Conclusions Our findings may help to indicate the genome-wide DNA methylation status of different brain regions and the effects of malnutrition on brain DNA methylation. The results also indicate that postnatal malnutrition may increase the risk of psychiatric disorders. PMID:24555847

  15. Role of base excision repair in maintaining the genetic and epigenetic integrity of CpG sites

    PubMed Central

    Bellacosa, Alfonso; Drohat, Alexander C.

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides is a central component of epigenetic regulation in vertebrates, and the base excision repair (BER) pathway is important for maintaining both the genetic stability and the methylation status of CpG sites. This perspective focuses on two enzymes that are of particular importance for the genetic and epigenetic integrity of CpG sites, Methyl Binding Domain 4 (MBD4) and Thymine DNA Glycosylase (TDG). We discuss their capacity for countering C to T mutations at CpG sites, by initiating base excision repair of G·T mismatches generated by deamination of 5-methylcytosine (5mC). We also consider their role in active DNA demethylation, including pathways that are initiated by oxidation and/or deamination of 5mC. PMID:26021671

  16. Large conserved domains of low DNA methylation maintained by Dnmt3a

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Mira; Sun, Deqiang; Luo, Min; Huang, Yun; Challen, Grant A.; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Zhang, Xiaotian; Chavez, Lukas; Wang, Hui; Hannah, Rebecca; Kim, Sang-Bae; Yang, Liubin; Ko, Myunggon; Chen, Rui; Göttgens, Berthold; Lee, Ju-Seog; Gunaratne, Preethi; Godley, Lucy A.; Darlington, Gretchen J.; Rao, Anjana; Li, Wei; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Gains and losses in DNA methylation are prominent features of mammalian cell types. To gain insight into mechanisms that could promote shifts in DNA methylation and contribute to cell fate changes, including malignant transformation, we performed genome-wide mapping of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in purified murine hematopoietic stem cells. We discovered extended regions of low methylation (Canyons) that span conserved domains frequently containing transcription factors and are distinct from CpG islands and shores. The genes in about half of these methylation Canyons are coated with repressive histone marks while the remainder are covered by activating histone marks and are highly expressed in HSCs. Canyon borders are demarked by 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and become eroded in the absence of DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a). Genes dysregulated in human leukemias are enriched for Canyon-associated genes. The novel epigenetic landscape we describe may provide a mechanism for the regulation of hematopoiesis and may contribute to leukemia development. PMID:24270360

  17. Quantitative sequencing of 5-formylcytosine in DNA at single-base resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Michael J.; Marsico, Giovanni; Bachman, Martin; Beraldi, Dario; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the cytosine modifications 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and 5-formylcytosine (5fC) were found to exist in the genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of a wide range of mammalian cell types. It is now important to understand their role in normal biological function and disease. Here we introduce reduced bisulfite sequencing (redBS-Seq), a quantitative method to decode 5fC in DNA at single-base resolution, based on a selective chemical reduction of 5fC to 5hmC followed by bisulfite treatment. After extensive validation on synthetic and genomic DNA, we combined redBS-Seq and oxidative bisulfite sequencing (oxBS-Seq) to generate the first combined genomic map of 5-methylcytosine, 5hmC and 5fC in mouse embryonic stem cells. Our experiments revealed that in certain genomic locations 5fC is present at comparable levels to 5hmC and 5mC. The combination of these chemical methods can quantify and precisely map these three cytosine derivatives in the genome and will help provide insights into their function.

  18. Depletion of CG-Specific Methylation in Mycoplasma hyorhinis Genomic DNA after Host Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chernov, Andrei V.; Reyes, Leticia; Peterson, Scott; Strongin, Alex Y.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation to the environment requires pathogenic bacteria to alter their gene expression in order to increase long-term survival in the host. Here, we present the first experimental evidence that bacterial DNA methylation affects the intracellular survival of pathogenic Mycoplasma hyorhinis. Using bisulfite sequencing, we identified that the M. hyorhinis DNA methylation landscape was distinct in free-living M. hyorhinis relative to the internalized bacteria surviving in the infected human cells. We determined that genomic GATC sites were consistently highly methylated in the bacterial chromosome suggesting that the bacterial GATC-specific 5-methylcytosine DNA methyltransferase was fully functional both pre- and post-infection. In contrast, only the low CG methylation pattern was observed in the mycoplasma genome in the infective bacteria that invaded and then survived in the host cells. In turn, two distinct populations, with either high or low CG methylation, were detected in the M. hyorhinis cultures continually grown in the rich medium independently of host cells. We also identified that M. hyorhinis efficiently evaded endosomal degradation and uses exocytosis to exit infected human cells enabling re-infection of additional cells. The well-orchestrated changes in the chromosome methylation landscape play a major regulatory role in the mycoplasma life cycle. PMID:26544880

  19. Suppression of TET1-Dependent DNA Demethylation is Essential for KRAS-Mediated Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bo-Kuan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hypermethylation-mediated tumor suppressor gene (TSG) silencing is a central epigenetic alteration in RAS-dependent tumorigenesis. Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes can depress DNA methylation by hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) bases to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). Here we report that suppression of TET1 is required for KRAS-induced DNA hypermethylation and cellular transformation. In distinct non-malignant cell lines, oncogenic KRAS promotes transformation by inhibiting TET1 expression via the ERK signaling pathway. This reduces chromatin occupancy of TET1 at TSG promoters, lowers levels of 5hmC, and increases levels of 5mC and 5mC-dependent transcriptional silencing. Restoration of TET1 expression by ERK pathway inhibition or ectopic TET1 reintroduction in KRAS-transformed cells reactivates TSGs and inhibits colony formation. KRAS knockdown increases TET1 expression and diminishes colony-forming ability, while KRAS/TET1 double knockdown bypasses the KRAS dependence of KRAS-addicted cancer cells. Thus, suppression of TET1-dependent DNA demethylation is critical for KRAS-mediated transformation. PMID:25466250

  20. Analysis of TET Expression/Activity and 5mC Oxidation during Normal and Malignant Germ Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Nettersheim, Daniel; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Fronhoffs, Florian; Grewe, Marc J.; Haas, Natalie; Waha, Anke; Honecker, Friedemann; Waha, Andreas; Kristiansen, Glen; Schorle, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    During mammalian development the fertilized zygote and primordial germ cells lose their DNA methylation within one cell cycle leading to the concept of active DNA demethylation. Recent studies identified the TET hydroxylases as key enzymes responsible for active DNA demethylation, catalyzing the oxidation of 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. Further oxidation and activation of the base excision repair mechanism leads to replacement of a modified cytosine by an unmodified one. In this study, we analyzed the expression/activity of TET1-3 and screened for the presence of 5mC oxidation products in adult human testis and in germ cell cancers. By analyzing human testis sections, we show that levels of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine are decreasing as spermatogenesis proceeds, while 5-methylcytosine levels remain constant. These data indicate that during spermatogenesis active DNA demethylation becomes downregulated leading to a conservation of the methylation marks in mature sperm. We demonstrate that all carcinoma in situ and the majority of seminomas are hypomethylated and hypohydroxymethylated compared to non-seminomas. Interestingly, 5-formylcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine were detectable in all germ cell cancer entities analyzed, but levels did not correlate to the 5-methylcytosine or 5-hydroxymethylcytosine status. A meta-analysis of gene expression data of germ cell cancer tissues and corresponding cell lines demonstrates high expression of TET1 and the DNA glycosylase TDG, suggesting that germ cell cancers utilize the oxidation pathway for active DNA demethylation. During xenograft experiments, where seminoma-like TCam-2 cells transit to an embryonal carcinoma-like state DNMT3B and DNMT3L where strongly upregulated, which correlated to increasing 5-methylcytosine levels. Additionally, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels were elevated, demonstrating that de novo methylation and active demethylation accompanies this transition

  1. Determination of DNA and RNA Methylation in Circulating Tumor Cells by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Qi, Chu-Bo; Lv, Song-Wei; Xie, Min; Feng, Yu-Qi; Huang, Wei-Hua; Yuan, Bi-Feng

    2016-01-19

    DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine, 5-mC) is the best characterized epigenetic mark that has regulatory roles in diverse biological processes. Recent investigation of RNA modifications also raises the possible functions of RNA adenine and cytosine methylations on gene regulation in the form of "RNA epigenetics." Previous studies demonstrated global DNA hypomethylation in tumor tissues compared to healthy controls. However, DNA and RNA methylation in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that are derived from tumors are still a mystery due to the lack of proper analytical methods. In this respect, here we established an effective CTCs capture system conjugated with a combined strategy of sample preparation for the captured CTCs lysis, nucleic acids digestion, and nucleosides extraction in one tube. The resulting nucleosides were then further analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). With the developed method, we are able to detect DNA and RNA methylation (5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-methylcytidine, and N(6)-methyladenosine) in a single cell. We then further successfully determined DNA and RNA methylation in CTCs from lung cancer patients. Our results demonstrated, for the first time, a significant decrease of DNA methylation (5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine) and increase of RNA adenine and cytosine methylations (N(6)-methyladenosine and 5-methylcytidine) in CTCs compared with whole blood cells. The discovery of DNA hypomethylation and RNA hypermethylation in CTCs in the current study together with previous reports of global DNA hypomethylation in tumor tissues suggest that nucleic acid modifications play important roles in the formation and development of cancer cells. This work constitutes the first step for the investigation of DNA and RNA methylation in CTCs, which may facilitate uncovering the metastasis mechanism of cancers in the future. PMID:26707930

  2. Selective enzymatic cleavage and labeling for sensitive capillary electrophoresis laser-induced fluorescence analysis of oxidized DNA bases.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiping; Wang, Hailin

    2015-08-01

    Oxidatively generated DNA damage is considered to be a significant contributing factor to cancer, aging, and age-related human diseases. It is important to detect oxidatively generated DNA damage to understand and clinically diagnosis diseases caused by oxidative damage. In this study, using selective enzymatic cleavage and quantum dot (QD) labeling, we developed a novel capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence method for the sensitive detection of oxidized DNA bases. First, oxidized DNA bases are recognized and removed by one DNA base excision repair glycosylase, leaving apurinic and apyrimidinic sites (AP sites) at the oxidized positions. The AP sites are further excised by the AP nicking activity of the chosen glycosylase, generating a nucleotide gap with 5'- and 3'- phosphate groups. After dephosphorylation with one alkaline phosphatase, a biotinylated ddNTP is introduced into the nucleotide space within the DNA strand by DNA polymerase I. The biotin-tagged DNA is further labeled with a QD-streptavidin conjugate via non-covalent interactions. The DNA-bound QD is well-separated from excess DNA-unbound QD by highly efficient capillary electrophoresis and is sensitively detected by online coupled laser-induced fluorescence analysis. Using this method, we can assess the trace levels of oxidized DNA bases induced by the Fenton reaction and UV irradiation. Interestingly, the use of the formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) protein and endonuclease VIII enables the detection of oxidized purine and pyrimidine bases, respectively. Using the synthesized standard DNA, the approach has low limits of detection of 1.1×10(-19)mol in mass and 2.9pM in concentration. PMID:26105778

  3. Cell-Wide DNA De-Methylation and Re-Methylation of Purkinje Neurons in the Developing Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng C; Resendiz, Marisol; Lo, Chiao-Ling; Chen, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Global DNA de-methylation is thought to occur only during pre-implantation and gametogenesis in mammals. Scalable, cell-wide de-methylation has not been demonstrated beyond totipotent stages. Here, we observed a large scale de-methylation and subsequent re-methylation (CDR) (including 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxylmethylcytosine (5hmC)) in post-mitotic cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC) through the course of normal development. Through single cell immuno-identification and cell-specific quantitative methylation assays, we demonstrate that the CDR event is an intrinsically scheduled program, occurring in nearly every PC. Meanwhile, cerebellar granule cells and basket interneurons adopt their own DNA methylation program, independent of PCs. DNA de-methylation was further demonstrated at the gene level, on genes pertinent to PC development. The PC, being one of the largest neurons in the brain, may showcase an amplified epigenetic cycle which may mediate stage transformation including cell cycle arrest, vast axonal-dendritic growth, and synaptogenesis at the onset of neuronal specificity. This discovery is a key step toward better understanding the breadth and role of DNA methylation and de-methylation during neural ontology. PMID:27583369

  4. The dynamics of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation during amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Hirotaka; Minamizaki, Tomoko; Yoshiko, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    Amelogenesis is a multistep process that relies on specific temporal and spatial signaling networks between the dental epithelium and mesenchymal tissues. Epigenetic modifications of key developmental genes in this process may be closely linked to a network of molecular events. However, the role of epigenetic regulation in amelogenesis remains unclear. Here, we have uncovered the spatial distributions of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) to determine epigenetic events in the mandibular incisors of mice. Immunohistochemistry and dot blotting showed that 5-hmC in ameloblasts increased from the secretory stage to the later maturation stage. We also demonstrated the distribution of 5-mC-positive ameloblasts with punctate nuclear labeling from sometime after the initiation of the secretory stage to the later maturation stage; however, dot blotting failed to detect this change. No obvious alteration of 5-mC/5-hmC staining in odontoblasts and dental pulp cells was observed. Concomitant with quantitative expression data, immunohistochemistry showed that maintenance DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 was highly expressed in immature dental epithelial cells and subsequently decreased at later stages of development. Meanwhile, de novo DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b and DNA demethylase Tet family genes were universally expressed, except Tet1 that was highly expressed in immature dental epithelial cells. Thus, DNMT1 may sustain the undifferentiated status of dental epithelial cells through the maintenance of DNA methylation, while the hydroxylation of 5-mC may occur through the whole differentiation process by TET activity. Taken together, these data indicate that the dynamic changes of 5-mC and 5-hmC may be critical for the regulation of amelogenesis. PMID:26209269

  5. Zebrafish as a model to study the role of DNA methylation in environmental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, Jorke H; Aleström, Peter; Kooter, Jan M; Legler, Juliette

    2015-11-01

    Environmental epigenetics is a rapidly growing field which studies the effects of environmental factors such as nutrition, stress, and exposure to compounds on epigenetic gene regulation. Recent studies have shown that exposure to toxicants in vertebrates is associated with changes in DNA methylation, a major epigenetic mechanism affecting gene transcription. Zebra fish, a well-known model in toxicology and developmental biology, are emerging as a model species in environmental epigenetics despite their evolutionary distance to rodents and humans. In this review, recent insights in DNA methylation during zebra fish development are discussed and compared to mammalian models in order to evaluate zebra fish as a model to study the role of DNA methylation in environmental toxicology. Differences exist in DNA methylation reprogramming during early development, whereas in later developmental stages, tissue distribution of both 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine seems more conserved between species, as well as basic DNA (de)methylation mechanisms. All DNA methyl transferases identified so far in mammals are present in zebra fish, as well as a number of major demethylation pathways. However, zebra fish appear to lack some methylation pathways present in mammals, such as parental imprinting. Several studies report effects on DNA methylation in zebra fish following exposure to environmental contaminants, such as arsenic, benzo[a]pyrene, and tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate. Though more research is needed to examine heritable effects of contaminant exposure on DNA methylation, recent data suggests the usefulness of the zebra fish as a model in environmental epigenetics. PMID:25172464

  6. Methods for Efficient Elimination of Mitochondrial DNA from Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Nataliya; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Kousoulas, Konstantin G.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we document that persistent mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) damage due to mitochondrial overexpression of the Y147A mutant uracil-N-glycosylase as well as mitochondrial overexpression of bacterial Exonuclease III or Herpes Simplex Virus protein UL12.5M185 can induce a complete loss of mtDNA (ρ0 phenotype) without compromising the viability of cells cultured in media supplemented with uridine and pyruvate. Furthermore, we use these observations to develop rapid, sequence-independent methods for the elimination of mtDNA, and demonstrate utility of these methods for generating ρ0 cells of human, mouse and rat origin. We also demonstrate that ρ0 cells generated by each of these three methods can serve as recipients of mtDNA in fusions with enucleated cells. PMID:27136098

  7. DNA methylation on N(6)-adenine in mammalian embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao P; Wang, Tao; Seetin, Matthew G; Lai, Yongquan; Zhu, Shijia; Lin, Kaixuan; Liu, Yifei; Byrum, Stephanie D; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Zhong, Mei; Tackett, Alan; Wang, Guilin; Hon, Lawrence S; Fang, Gang; Swenberg, James A; Xiao, Andrew Z

    2016-04-21

    It has been widely accepted that 5-methylcytosine is the only form of DNA methylation in mammalian genomes. Here we identify N(6)-methyladenine as another form of DNA modification in mouse embryonic stem cells. Alkbh1 encodes a demethylase for N(6)-methyladenine. An increase of N(6)-methyladenine levels in Alkbh1-deficient cells leads to transcriptional silencing. N(6)-methyladenine deposition is inversely correlated with the evolutionary age of LINE-1 transposons; its deposition is strongly enriched at young (<1.5 million years old) but not old (>6 million years old) L1 elements. The deposition of N(6)-methyladenine correlates with epigenetic silencing of such LINE-1 transposons, together with their neighbouring enhancers and genes, thereby resisting the gene activation signals during embryonic stem cell differentiation. As young full-length LINE-1 transposons are strongly enriched on the X chromosome, genes located on the X chromosome are also silenced. Thus, N(6)-methyladenine developed a new role in epigenetic silencing in mammalian evolution distinct from its role in gene activation in other organisms. Our results demonstrate that N(6)-methyladenine constitutes a crucial component of the epigenetic regulation repertoire in mammalian genomes. PMID:27027282

  8. De novo DNA methylation drives 5hmC accumulation in mouse zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Amouroux, Rachel; Hill, Peter WS; D’Souza, Zelpha; Nakayama, Manabu; Matsuda, Masashi; Turp, Aleksandra; Ndjetehe, Elodie; Encheva, Vesela; Kudo, Nobuaki R; Koseki, Haruhiko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Hajkova, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Zygotic epigenetic reprogramming entails genome-wide DNA demethylation that is accompanied by Ten-Eleven Translocation 3 (Tet3)-driven oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC)1-4. Here we demonstrate using detailed immunofluorescence analysis and ultra-sensitive LC/MS based quantitative measurements that the initial loss of paternal 5mC does not require 5hmC formation. Small molecule inhibition of Tet3 activity as well as genetic ablation impedes 5hmC accumulation in zygotes without affecting the early loss of paternal 5mC. Instead, 5hmC accumulation is dependent on the activity of zygotic Dnmt3a and Dnmt1, documenting a role for Tet3 driven hydroxylation in targeting de novo methylation activities present in the early embryo. Our data thus provide further insights into the dynamics of zygotic reprogramming revealing intricate interplay between DNA demethylation, de novo methylation and Tet3 driven hydroxylation. PMID:26751286

  9. Neurofilament-labeled pyramidal neurons and astrocytes are deficient in DNA methylation marks in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Andrew J; Vickers, James C; Taberlay, Phillippa C; Woodhouse, Adele

    2016-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that epigenetic alterations may play a role in Alzheimer's disease (AD); yet, there is little information regarding epigenetic modifications in specific cell types. We assessed DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine [5mC]) and hydroxymethylation (5-hydroxymethylcytosine [5hmC]) marks specifically in neuronal and glial cell types in the inferior temporal gyrus of human AD cases and age-matched controls. Interestingly, neurofilament (NF)-labeled pyramidal neurons that are vulnerable to AD pathology are deficient in extranuclear 5mC in AD cases compared with controls. We also found that fewer astrocytes exhibited nuclear 5mC and 5hmC marks in AD cases compared with controls. However, there were no alterations in 5mC and 5hmC in disease-resistant calretinin interneurons or microglia in AD, and there was no alteration in the density of 5mC- or 5hmC-labeled nuclei in near-plaque versus plaque-free regions in late-AD cases. 5mC and 5hmC were present in a high proportion of neurofibrillary tangles, suggesting no loss of DNA methylation marks in tangle bearing neurons. We provide evidence that epigenetic dysregulation may be occurring in astrocytes and NF-positive pyramidal neurons in AD. PMID:27459923

  10. Insights into DNA hydroxymethylation in the honeybee from in-depth analyses of TET dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Wojciechowski, Marek; Rafalski, Dominik; Kucharski, Robert; Misztal, Katarzyna; Maleszka, Joanna; Bochtler, Matthias; Maleszka, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, a family of TET enzymes producing oxidized forms of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) plays an important role in modulating DNA demethylation dynamics. In contrast, nothing is known about the function of a single TET orthologue present in invertebrates. Here, we show that the honeybee TET (AmTET) catalytic domain has dioxygenase activity and converts 5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in a HEK293T cell assay. In vivo, the levels of 5hmC are condition-dependent and relatively low, but in testes and ovaries 5hmC is present at approximately 7–10% of the total level of 5mC, which is comparable to that reported for certain mammalian cells types. AmTET is alternatively spliced and highly expressed throughout development and in adult tissues with the highest expression found in adult brains. Our findings reveal an additional level of flexible genomic modifications in the honeybee that may be important for the selection of multiple pathways controlling contrasting phenotypic outcomes in this species. In a broader context, our study extends the current, mammalian-centred attention to TET-driven DNA hydroxymethylation to an easily manageable organism with attractive and unique biology. PMID:25100549

  11. Bacteriophage orphan DNA methyltransferases: insights from their bacterial origin, function, and occurrence.

    PubMed

    Murphy, James; Mahony, Jennifer; Ainsworth, Stuart; Nauta, Arjen; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-12-01

    Type II DNA methyltransferases (MTases) are enzymes found ubiquitously in the prokaryotic world, where they play important roles in several cellular processes, such as host protection and epigenetic regulation. Three classes of type II MTases have been identified thus far in bacteria which function in transferring a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to a target nucleotide base, forming N-6-methyladenine (class I), N-4-methylcytosine (class II), or C-5-methylcytosine (class III). Often, these MTases are associated with a cognate restriction endonuclease (REase) to form a restriction-modification (R-M) system protecting bacterial cells from invasion by foreign DNA. When MTases exist alone, which are then termed orphan MTases, they are believed to be mainly involved in regulatory activities in the bacterial cell. Genomes of various lytic and lysogenic phages have been shown to encode multi- and mono-specific orphan MTases that have the ability to confer protection from restriction endonucleases of their bacterial host(s). The ability of a phage to overcome R-M and other phage-targeting resistance systems can be detrimental to particular biotechnological processes such as dairy fermentations. Conversely, as phages may also be beneficial in certain areas such as phage therapy, phages with additional resistance to host defenses may prolong the effectiveness of the therapy. This minireview will focus on bacteriophage-encoded MTases, their prevalence and diversity, as well as their potential origin and function. PMID:24123737

  12. De novo DNA methylation drives 5hmC accumulation in mouse zygotes.

    PubMed

    Amouroux, Rachel; Nashun, Buhe; Shirane, Kenjiro; Nakagawa, Shoma; Hill, Peter W S; D'Souza, Zelpha; Nakayama, Manabu; Matsuda, Masashi; Turp, Aleksandra; Ndjetehe, Elodie; Encheva, Vesela; Kudo, Nobuaki R; Koseki, Haruhiko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Hajkova, Petra

    2016-02-01

    Zygotic epigenetic reprogramming entails genome-wide DNA demethylation that is accompanied by Tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 3 (Tet3)-driven oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC; refs 1-4). Here we demonstrate using detailed immunofluorescence analysis and ultrasensitive LC-MS-based quantitative measurements that the initial loss of paternal 5mC does not require 5hmC formation. Small-molecule inhibition of Tet3 activity, as well as genetic ablation, impedes 5hmC accumulation in zygotes without affecting the early loss of paternal 5mC. Instead, 5hmC accumulation is dependent on the activity of zygotic Dnmt3a and Dnmt1, documenting a role for Tet3-driven hydroxylation in targeting de novo methylation activities present in the early embryo. Our data thus provide further insights into the dynamics of zygotic reprogramming, revealing an intricate interplay between DNA demethylation, de novo methylation and Tet3-driven hydroxylation. PMID:26751286

  13. Epigenetic DNA Demethylation Causes Inner Ear Stem Cell Differentiation into Hair Cell-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Hu, Zhengqing

    2016-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor 5-azacytidine (5-aza) causes genomic demethylation to regulate gene expression. However, it remains unclear whether 5-aza affects gene expression and cell fate determination of stem cells. In this study, 5-aza was applied to mouse utricle sensory epithelia-derived progenitor cells (MUCs) to investigate whether 5-aza stimulated MUCs to become sensory hair cells. After treatment, MUCs increased expression of hair cell genes and proteins. The DNA methylation level (indicated by percentage of 5-methylcytosine) showed a 28.57% decrease after treatment, which causes significantly repressed DNMT1 protein expression and DNMT activity. Additionally, FM1-43 permeation assays indicated that the permeability of 5-aza-treated MUCs was similar to that of sensory hair cells, which may result from mechanotransduction channels. This study not only demonstrates a possible epigenetic approach to induce tissue specific stem/progenitor cells to become sensory hair cell-like cells, but also provides a cell model to epigenetically modulate stem cell fate determination. PMID:27536218

  14. Genetic Variability in DNA Repair Proteins in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Blasiak, Janusz; Synowiec, Ewelina; Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is complex and involves interactions between environmental and genetic factors, with oxidative stress playing an important role inducing damage in biomolecules, including DNA. Therefore, genetic variability in the components of DNA repair systems may influence the ability of the cell to cope with oxidative stress and in this way contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD. However, few reports have been published on this subject so far. We demonstrated that the c.977C>G polymorphism (rs1052133) in the hOGG1 gene and the c.972G>C polymorphism (rs3219489) in the MUTYH gene, the products of which play important roles in the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA, might be associated with the risk of AMD. Oxidative stress may promote misincorporation of uracil into DNA, where it is targeted by several DNA glycosylases. We observed that the g.4235T>C (rs2337395) and c.–32A>G (rs3087404) polymorphisms in two genes encoding such glycosylases, UNG and SMUG1, respectively, could be associated with the occurrence of AMD. Polymorphisms in some other DNA repair genes, including XPD (ERCC2), XRCC1 and ERCC6 (CSB) have also been reported to be associated with AMD. These data confirm the importance of the cellular reaction to DNA damage, and this may be influenced by variability in DNA repair genes, in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:23202958

  15. Both the folate cycle and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase contribute methyl groups for DNA methylation in mouse blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baohua; Denomme, Michelle M; White, Carlee R; Leung, Kit-Yi; Lee, Martin B; Greene, Nicholas D E; Mann, Mellissa R W; Trasler, Jacquetta M; Baltz, Jay M

    2015-03-01

    The embryonic pattern of global DNA methylation is first established in the inner cell mass (ICM) of the mouse blastocyst. The methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is produced in most cells through the folate cycle, but only a few cell types generate SAM from betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) via betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), which is expressed in the mouse ICM. Here, mean ICM cell numbers decreased from 18-19 in controls to 11-13 when the folate cycle was inhibited by the antifolate methotrexate and to 12-14 when BHMT expression was knocked down by antisense morpholinos. Inhibiting both pathways, however, much more severely affected ICM development (7-8 cells). Total SAM levels in mouse blastocysts decreased significantly only when both pathways were inhibited (from 3.1 to 1.6 pmol/100 blastocysts). DNA methylation, detected as 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC) immunofluorescence in isolated ICMs, was minimally affected by inhibition of either pathway alone but decreased by at least 45-55% when both BHMT and the folate cycle were inhibited simultaneously. Effects on cell numbers and 5-MeC levels in the ICM were completely rescued by methionine (immediate SAM precursor) or SAM. Both the folate cycle and betaine/BHMT appear to contribute to a methyl pool required for normal ICM development and establishing initial embryonic DNA methylation. PMID:25466894

  16. Tissue-Specific Differences in DNA Modifications (5-Hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-Formylcytosine, 5-Carboxylcytosine and 5-Hydroxymethyluracil) and Their Interrelationships

    PubMed Central

    Starczak, Marta; Modrzejewska, Martyna; Olinski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Background Replication-independent active/enzymatic demethylation may be an important process in the functioning of somatic cells. The most plausible mechanisms of active 5-methylcytosine demethylation, leading to activation of previously silenced genes, involve ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins that participate in oxidation of 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine which can be further oxidized to 5-formylcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine. Recently, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine was demonstrated to be a relatively stable modification, and the previously observed substantial differences in the level of this modification in various murine tissues were shown to depend mostly on cell proliferation rate. Some experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that 5-hydroxymethyluracil may be also generated by TET enzymes and has epigenetic functions. Results Using an isotope-dilution automated online two-dimensional ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, we have analyzed, for the first time, all the products of active DNA demethylation pathway: 5-methyl-2′-deoxycytidine, 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine, 5-formyl-2′-deoxycytidine and 5-carboxyl-2′-deoxycytidine, as well as 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine, in DNA isolated from various rat and porcine tissues. A strong significant inverse linear correlation was found between the proliferation rate of cells and the global level of 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine in both porcine (R2 = 0.88) and rat tissues (R2 = 0.83); no such relationship was observed for 5-formyl-2′-deoxycytidine and 5-carboxyl-2′-deoxycytidine. Moreover, a substrate-product correlation was demonstrated for the two consecutive steps of iterative oxidation pathway: between 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine and its product 5-formyl-2′-deoxycytidine, as well as between 5-formyl-2′-deoxycytidine and 5-carboxyl-2′-deoxycytidine (R2 = 0.60 and R2 = 0.71, respectively). Conclusions Good correlations within

  17. Cytosine methylation of sperm DNA in horse semen after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Aurich, Christine; Schreiner, Bettina; Ille, Natascha; Alvarenga, Marco; Scarlet, Dragos

    2016-09-15

    Semen processing may contribute to epigenetic changes in spermatozoa. We have therefore addressed changes in sperm DNA cytosine methylation induced by cryopreservation of stallion semen. The relative amount of 5-methylcytosine relative to the genomic cytosine content of sperm DNA was analyzed by ELISA. In experiment 1, raw semen (n = 6 stallions, one ejaculate each) was shock-frozen. Postthaw semen motility and membrane integrity were completely absent, whereas DNA methylation was similar in raw (0.4 ± 0.2%) and shock-frozen (0.3 ± 0.1%) semen (not significant). In experiment 2, three ejaculates per stallion (n = 6) were included. Semen quality and DNA methylation was assessed before addition of the freezing extender and after freezing-thawing with either Ghent (G) or BotuCrio (BC) extender. Semen motility, morphology, and membrane integrity were significantly reduced by cryopreservation but not influenced by the extender (e.g., total motility: G 69.5 ± 2.0, BC 68.4 ± 2.2%; P < 0.001 vs. centrifugation). Cryopreservation significantly (P < 0.01) increased the level of DNA methylation (before freezing 0.6 ± 0.1%, postthaw G 6.4 ± 3.7, BC 4.4 ± 1.5%; P < 0.01), but no differences between the freezing extenders were seen. The level of DNA methylation was not correlated to semen motility, morphology, or membrane integrity. The results demonstrate that semen processing for cryopreservation increases the DNA methylation level in stallion semen. We conclude that assessment of sperm DNA methylation allows for evaluation of an additional parameter characterizing semen quality. The lower fertility rates of mares after insemination with frozen-thawed semen may at least in part be explained by cytosine methylation of sperm-DNA induced by the cryopreservation procedure. PMID:27242182

  18. Structural basis for recognition of hemi-methylated DNA by the SRA domain of human UHRF1.

    SciTech Connect

    Avvakumov, George V.; Walker, John R.; Xue, Sheng; Li, Yanjun; Duan, Shili; Bronner, Christian; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2008-11-17

    Epigenetic inheritance in mammals is characterized by high-fidelity replication of CpG methylation patterns during development. UHRF1 (also known as ICBP90 in humans and Np95 in mouse) is an E3 ligase important for the maintenance of global and local DNA methylation in vivo. The preferential affinity of UHRF1 for hemi-methylated DNA over symmetrically methylated DNA by means of its SET and RING-associated (SRA) domain and its association with the maintenance DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) suggests a role in replication of the epigenetic code. Here we report the 1.7 {angstrom} crystal structure of the apo SRA domain of human UHRF1 and a 2.2 {angstrom} structure of its complex with hemi-methylated DNA, revealing a previously unknown reading mechanism for methylated CpG sites (mCpG). The SRA-DNA complex has several notable structural features including a binding pocket that accommodates the 5-methylcytosine that is flipped out of the duplex DNA. Two specialized loops reach through the resulting gap in the DNA from both the major and the minor grooves to read the other three bases of the CpG duplex. The major groove loop confers both specificity for the CpG dinucleotide and discrimination against methylation of deoxycytidine of the complementary strand. The structure, along with mutagenesis data, suggests how UHRF1 acts as a key factor for DNMT1 maintenance methylation through recognition of a fundamental unit of epigenetic inheritance, mCpG.

  19. Cloning and Characterization of a New Site-Specific Methyl-Directed ElmI Endonuclease Recognizing and Cleaving C5-methylated DNA Sequence 5'-G(5mC)^NG(5mC)-3'.

    PubMed

    Chernukhin, V A; Gonchar, D A; Abdurashitov, M A; Belichenko, O A; Dedkov, V S; Mikhnenkova, N A; Lomakovskaya, E N; Udal'yeva, S G; Degtyarev, S Kh

    2016-01-01

    Putative open reading frames of MD-endonucleases have been identified in Enterobacteria genomes as a result of the search for amino acid sequences homologous to MD-endonuclease BisI. A highly conserved DNA primary structure of these open reading frames in different genera of Enterobacteria (Escherichia, Klebsiella and Cronobacter) has allowed researchers to create primers for PCR screening, which was carried out on Enterobacteria DNA collected from natural sources. The DNA fragment, about 440 bp in length, was amplified by use of the genomic DNA of a wild E.coli LM N17 strain as a template and was inserted into the pMTL22 vector. Endonuclease activity was detected in an E.coli ER 2267 strain transformed with the obtained construction. A new enzyme named ElmI was purified by chromatographic techniques from the recombinant strain biomass. It was discovered that similarly to BisI this enzyme specifically cleaves the methylated DNA sequence 5'-GCNGC- 3' before the central nucleotide "N" if this sequence contains two 5-methylcytosines. However, unlike BisI, ElmI more efficiently cleaves this sequence if more than two cytosine residues are methylated. PMID:27099792

  20. Cloning and Characterization of a New Site-Specific Methyl-Directed ElmI Endonuclease Recognizing and Cleaving C5-methylated DNA Sequence 5’-G(5mC)^NG(5mC)-3’

    PubMed Central

    Chernukhin, V. A.; Gonchar, D. A.; Abdurashitov, M. A.; Belichenko, O. A.; Dedkov, V. S.; Mikhnenkova, N. A.; Lomakovskaya, E. N.; Udal’yeva, S. G.; Degtyarev, S. Kh.

    2016-01-01

    Putative open reading frames of MD-endonucleases have been identified in Enterobacteria genomes as a result of the search for amino acid sequences homologous to MD-endonuclease BisI. A highly conserved DNA primary structure of these open reading frames in different genera of Enterobacteria (Escherichia, Klebsiella and Cronobacter) has allowed researchers to create primers for PCR screening, which was carried out on Enterobacteria DNA collected from natural sources. The DNA fragment, about 440 bp in length, was amplified by use of the genomic DNA of a wild E.coli LM N17 strain as a template and was inserted into the pMTL22 vector. Endonuclease activity was detected in an E.coli ER 2267 strain transformed with the obtained construction. A new enzyme named ElmI was purified by chromatographic techniques from the recombinant strain biomass. It was discovered that similarly to BisI this enzyme specifically cleaves the methylated DNA sequence 5’-GCNGC- 3’ before the central nucleotide “N” if this sequence contains two 5-methylcytosines. However, unlike BisI, ElmI more efficiently cleaves this sequence if more than two cytosine residues are methylated. PMID:27099792

  1. Complexities of the DNA Base Excision Repair Pathway for Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sankar; Boldogh, Istvan; Izumi, Tadahide; Hazra, Tapas K.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative damage represents the most significant insult to organisms because of continuous production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo. Oxidative damage in DNA, a critical target of ROS, is repaired primarily via the base excision repair (BER) pathway which appears to be the simplest among the three excision repair pathways. However, it is now evident that although BER can be carried with four or five enzymes in vitro, a large number of proteins, including some required for nucleotide excision repair (NER), are needed for in vivo repair of oxidative damage. Furthermore, BER in transcribed vs. nontranscribed DNA regions requires distinct sets of proteins, as in the case of NER. We propose an additional complexity in repair of replicating vs. nonreplicating DNA. Unlike DNA bulky adducts, the oxidized base lesions could be incorporated in the nascent DNA strand, repair of which may share components of the mismatch repair process. Distinct enzyme specificities are thus warranted for repair of lesions in the parental vs. nascent DNA strand. Repair synthesis may be carried out by DNA polymerase β or replicative polymerases δ and ε. Thus, multiple subpathways are needed for repairing oxidative DNA damage, and the pathway decision may require coordination of the successive steps in repair. Such coordination includes transfer of the product of a DNA glycosylase to AP-endonuclease, the next enzyme in the pathway. Interactions among proteins in the pathway may also reflect such coordination, characterization of which should help elucidate these subpathways and their in vivo regulation. PMID:11746753

  2. The mechanism of M.HhaI DNA C5 cytosine methyltransferase enzyme: A quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Bruice, Thomas C.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism of DNA cytosine-5-methylation catalyzed by the bacterial M.HhaI enzyme has been considered as a stepwise nucleophilic addition of Cys-81-S− to cytosine C6 followed by C5 nucleophilic replacement of the methyl of S-adenosyl-l-methionine to produce 5-methyl-6-Cys-81-S-5,6-dihydrocytosine. In this study, we show that the reaction is concerted from a series of energy calculations by using the quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical hybrid method. Deprotonation of 5-methyl-6-Cys-81-S-5,6-dihydrocytosine and expulsion of Cys-81-S− provides the product DNA 5-methylcytosine. A required base catalyst for this deprotonation is not available as a member of the active site structure. A water channel between the active site and bulk water allows entrance of solvent to the active site. Hydroxide at 10−7 mole fraction (pH = 7) is shown to be sufficient for the required catalysis. We also show that Glu-119-CO2H can divert the reaction by protonating cytosine N3 when Cys-81-S− attacks cytosine, to form the 6-Cys-81-S-3-hydrocytosine. The reactants and 6-Cys-81-S-3-hydrocytosine product are in rapid equilibrium, and this explains the observed hydrogen exchange of cytosine with solvent. PMID:16606828

  3. Oxidative DNA adducts and DNA-protein cross-links are the major DNA lesions induced by arsenite.

    PubMed

    Bau, Da-Tian; Wang, Tsu-Shing; Chung, Chiao-Hui; Wang, Alexander S S; Wang, Alexander S S; Jan, Kun-Yan

    2002-10-01

    Arsenic is recognized to be a nonmutagenic carcinogen because it induces DNA damage only at very high concentrations. However, many more DNA strand breaks could be detected by digesting the DNA of arsenite-treated cells with endonuclease III, formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase, and proteinase K. By doing so, arsenite could be shown to induce DNA damage in human cells within a pathologically meaningful concentration range. Oxidized guanine products were detected in all arsenite-treated human cells examined. DNA-protein cross-links were also detected in arsenite-treated NB4 and HL60 cells. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells, the induction of oxidized guanine products by arsenite was sensitive to inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthase but not to oxidant modulators, whereas the opposite result was obtained in vascular smooth muscle cells. On the other hand, the arsenite-induced oxidized guanine products and DNA-protein cross-links in NB4 and HL60 cells were sensitive to modulators of calcium, NO synthase, oxidant, and myeloperoxidase. Therefore, although oxidized guanine products were detected in all the human cells treated with arsenite, the pathways could be different in different cell types. Because the sensitivity and the mechanism of arsenic intoxication are cell specific, it is important that target tissues and target cells are used for investigations. It is also important that pathologically or pharmacologically meaningful concentrations of arsenic are used. This is because in most cases we are dealing with the chronic effect rather than acute toxicity. PMID:12426126

  4. DNA binding of the p21 repressor ZBTB2 is inhibited by cytosine hydroxymethylation

    SciTech Connect

    Lafaye, Céline; Barbier, Ewa; Miscioscia, Audrey; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Gasparutto, Didier; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • 5-hmC epigenetic modification is measurable in HeLa, SH-SY5Y and UT7-MPL cell lines. • ZBTB2 binds to DNA probes containing 5-mC but not to sequences containing 5-hmC. • This differential binding is verified with DNA sequences involved in p21 regulation. - Abstract: Recent studies have demonstrated that the modified base 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) is detectable at various rates in DNA extracted from human tissues. This oxidative product of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) constitutes a new and important actor of epigenetic mechanisms. We designed a DNA pull down assay to trap and identify nuclear proteins bound to 5-hmC and/or 5-mC. We applied this strategy to three cancerous cell lines (HeLa, SH-SY5Y and UT7-MPL) in which we also measured 5-mC and 5-hmC levels by HPLC-MS/MS. We found that the putative oncoprotein Zinc finger and BTB domain-containing protein 2 (ZBTB2) is associated with methylated DNA sequences and that this interaction is inhibited by the presence of 5-hmC replacing 5-mC. As published data mention ZBTB2 recognition of p21 regulating sequences, we verified that this sequence specific binding was also alleviated by 5-hmC. ZBTB2 being considered as a multifunctional cell proliferation activator, notably through p21 repression, this work points out new epigenetic processes potentially involved in carcinogenesis.

  5. Infrared laser effects at fluences used for treatment of dentin hypersensitivity on DNA repair in Escherichia coli and plasmids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha Teixeira, Gleica; da Silva Marciano, Roberta; da Silva Sergio, Luiz Philippe; Castanheira Polignano, Giovanni Augusto; Roberto Guimarães, Oscar; Geller, Mauro; de Paoli, Flavia; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2014-12-01

    Low-intensity infrared lasers are proposed in clinical protocols based on biostimulative effects, yet dosimetry is inaccurate and their effects on DNA at therapeutic doses are controversial. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of low-intensity infrared laser on survival and induction of filamentation of Escherichia coli cells, and induction of DNA lesions in bacterial plasmids. E. coli cultures were exposed to laser (808 nm, 100 mW, 40 and 60 J/cm2) to study bacterial survival and filamentation. Also, bacterial plasmids were exposed to laser to study DNA lesions by electrophoretic profile and action of DNA repair enzymes. Data indicate low-intensity infrared laser has no effect on survival of E. coli wild type and exonuclease III, but decreases the survival of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein and endonuclease III deficient cells in stationary growth phase, induces bacterial filamentation, does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids in agarose gels and does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with endonuclease III, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein and exonuclease III. Our findings show that low-intensity laser exposure causes DNA lesions at sub-lethal level and induces cellular mechanisms involved in repair of oxidative lesions in DNA. Studies about laser dosimetry and safety strategies are necessary for professionals and patients exposed to low-intensity lasers at therapeutic doses.

  6. Replacement of Oct4 by Tet1 during iPSC induction reveals an important role of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yawei; Chen, Jiayu; Li, Ke; Wu, Tong; Huang, Bo; Liu, Wenqiang; Kou, Xiaochen; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Hua; Jiang, Yonghua; Yao, Chao; Liu, Xiaolei; Lu, Zhiwei; Xu, Zijian; Kang, Lan; Chen, Jun; Wang, Hailin; Cai, Tao; Gao, Shaorong

    2013-04-01

    DNA methylation and demethylation have been proposed to play an important role in somatic cell reprogramming. Here, we demonstrate that the DNA hydroxylase Tet1 facilitates pluripotent stem cell induction by promoting Oct4 demethylation and reactivation. Moreover, Tet1 (T) can replace Oct4 and initiate somatic cell reprogramming in conjunction with Sox2 (S), Klf4 (K), and c-Myc (M). We established an efficient TSKM secondary reprogramming system and used it to characterize the dynamic profiles of 5-methylcytosine (5mC), 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), and gene expression during reprogramming. Our analysis revealed that both 5mC and 5hmC modifications increased at an intermediate stage of the process, correlating with a transition in the transcriptional profile. We also found that 5hmC enrichment is involved in the demethylation and reactivation of genes and regulatory regions that are important for pluripotency. Our data indicate that changes in DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation play important roles in genome-wide epigenetic remodeling during reprogramming. PMID:23499384

  7. Impact of ribonucleotide incorporation by DNA polymerases β and λ on oxidative base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Crespan, Emmanuele; Furrer, Antonia; Rösinger, Marcel; Bertoletti, Federica; Mentegari, Elisa; Chiapparini, Giulia; Imhof, Ralph; Ziegler, Nathalie; Sturla, Shana J.; Hübscher, Ulrich; van Loon, Barbara; Maga, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a very frequent source of DNA damage. Many cellular DNA polymerases (Pols) can incorporate ribonucleotides (rNMPs) during DNA synthesis. However, whether oxidative stress-triggered DNA repair synthesis contributes to genomic rNMPs incorporation is so far not fully understood. Human specialized Pols β and λ are the important enzymes involved in the oxidative stress tolerance, acting both in base excision repair and in translesion synthesis past the very frequent oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G). We found that Pol β, to a greater extent than Pol λ can incorporate rNMPs opposite normal bases or 8-oxo-G, and with a different fidelity. Further, the incorporation of rNMPs opposite 8-oxo-G delays repair by DNA glycosylases. Studies in Pol β- and λ-deficient cell extracts suggest that Pol β levels can greatly affect rNMP incorporation opposite oxidative DNA lesions. PMID:26917111

  8. Seasonal variations of DNA damage in human lymphocytes: correlation with different environmental variables.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Lisa; Pitozzi, Vanessa; Moretti, Silvia; Boddi, Vieri; Dolara, Piero

    2006-01-29

    Several types of DNA damage, including DNA breaks and DNA base oxidation, display a seasonal trend. In the present work, a sample of 79 healthy subjects living in the city of Florence, Italy, was used to analyse this effect. Three possible causative agents were taken into consideration: solar radiation, air temperature and air ozone level. DNA damage was measured in isolated human lymphocytes at different times during the year and the observed damage was correlated with the levels of these three agents in the days preceding blood sampling. Three time windows were chosen: 3, 7 and 30 days before blood sampling. DNA strand breaks and the oxidized purinic bases cleaved by the formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG sites) were measured by means of the comet assay. The results of multivariate regression analysis showed a positive correlation between lymphocyte DNA damage and air temperature, and a less strong correlation with global solar radiation and air ozone levels. PMID:16095632

  9. OGG1 is essential in oxidative stress induced DNA demethylation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Zhuang, Ziheng; Wang, Wentao; He, Lingfeng; Wu, Huan; Cao, Yan; Pan, Feiyan; Zhao, Jing; Hu, Zhigang; Sekhar, Chandra; Guo, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    DNA demethylation is an essential cellular activity to regulate gene expression; however, the mechanism that triggers DNA demethylation remains unknown. Furthermore, DNA demethylation was recently demonstrated to be induced by oxidative stress without a clear molecular mechanism. In this manuscript, we demonstrated that 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) is the essential protein involved in oxidative stress-induced DNA demethylation. Oxidative stress induced the formation of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). We found that OGG1, the 8-oxoG binding protein, promotes DNA demethylation by interacting and recruiting TET1 to the 8-oxoG lesion. Downregulation of OGG1 makes cells resistant to oxidative stress-induced DNA demethylation, while over-expression of OGG1 renders cells susceptible to DNA demethylation by oxidative stress. These data not only illustrate the importance of base excision repair (BER) in DNA demethylation but also reveal how the DNA demethylation signal is transferred to downstream DNA demethylation enzymes. PMID:27251462

  10. Single-molecule and population probing of chromatin structure using DNA methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Kilgore, Jessica A.; Hoose, Scott A.; Gustafson, Tanya L.; Porter, Weston; Kladde, Michael P.

    2007-01-01

    Probing chromatin structure with DNA methyltransferases offers advantages over more commonly used nuclease-based and chromatin immunoprecipitation methods for detection of nucleosomes and non-histone protein-DNA interactions. Here we describe two related methods in which the readout of MTase accessibility is obtained by assaying 5-methylcytosine in DNA through the PCR-based technique of bisulfite genomic sequencing. The methyltransferase accessibility protocol (MAP) determines the relative frequency at which the enzyme accesses each of its target sites over an entire population of PCR amplified product. While MAP yields much quantitative information about relative accessibility of a region of chromatin, a complementary single-molecule view of methyltransferase accessibility, termed MAP for individual templates (MAP-IT), is provided by analysis of cloned PCR products. Absolute rather than relative methylation frequencies in a region are obtained by summing the methylation status at each site over a cohort of clones. Moreover, as the integrity of individual molecules is maintained in MAP-IT, unique information about the distribution of multiple footprints along continuous regions is gleaned. In principle, the population MAP and single-molecule MAP-IT strategies can be used to analyze chromatin structure in a variety of model systems. Here we describe the application of MAP in living S. cerevisiae cells and MAP-IT in the analysis of a mammalian tumor suppressor gene in nuclei. This application of MAP-IT provides the first means to simultaneously determine CpG methylation of mammalian genes and their overlying chromatin structure in the same single DNA molecule. PMID:17309843

  11. Reversibility of Aberrant Global DNA and Estrogen Receptor-α Gene Methylation Distinguishes Colorectal Precancer from Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Rulong; Tao, Lianhui; Xu, Yiqing; Chang, Shi; Van Brocklyn, James; Gao, Jian-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in the global methylation of DNA and in specific regulatory genes are two epigenetic alterations found in cancer. However, the significance of epigenetic changes for diagnosis and/or prognosis of colorectal cancer have not been established, although it has been extensively investigated. Recently we have identified a new type of cancer cell called precancerous stem cells (pCSCs) and proposed that cancer may arise from a lengthy development process of tumor initiating cells (TICs) → pCSCs → cancer stem cells (CSCs) → cancer, which is in parallel to histological changes of hyperplasia (TICs) → precancer (pCSCs) → carcinoma (CSCs/cancer cells), accompanied by clonal evolutionary epigenetic and genetic alterations. In this study, we investigated whether aberrant DNA methylation can be used as a biomarker for the differentiation between premalignant and malignant lesions in the colorectum. The profile of global DNA and estrogen receptor (ER)-α gene methylation during cancer development was determined by analysis of 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC) using immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, dot blot analysis or a quantitative gene methylation assay (QGMA). Herein we show that global DNA hypomethylation and ER-α gene hypermethylation are progressively enhanced from hyperplastic polyps (HPs) → adenomatous polyps (APs) → adenomatous carcinoma (AdCa). The aberrant methylation can be completely reversed in APs, but not in AdCa by a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) celecoxib, which is a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), suggesting that the epigenetic alterations between colorectal precancer (AP) and cancer (AdCa) are fundamentally different in response to anti-cancer therapy. In normal colorectal mucosa, while global DNA methylation was not affected by aging, ER-α gene methylation was significantly increased with aging. However, this increase did not reach the level observed in colorectal APs. Taken together, reversibility of

  12. Presymptomatic Alterations in Amino Acid Metabolism and DNA Methylation in the Cerebellum of a Murine Model of Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Barry E; Hundert, Amos S; Goguen, Donna; Weaver, Ian C G; Karten, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    The fatal neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) is caused in most cases by mutations in NPC1, which encodes the late endosomal NPC1 protein. Loss of NPC1 disrupts cholesterol trafficking from late endosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane, causing cholesterol accumulation in late endosomes/lysosomes. Neurons are particularly vulnerable to this cholesterol trafficking defect, but the pathogenic mechanisms through which NPC1 deficiency causes neuronal dysfunction remain largely unknown. Herein, we have investigated amino acid metabolism in cerebella of NPC1-deficient mice at different stages of NPC disease. Imbalances in amino acid metabolism were evident from increased branched chain amino acid and asparagine levels and altered expression of key enzymes of glutamine/glutamate metabolism in presymptomatic and early symptomatic NPC1-deficient cerebellum. Increased levels of several amino acid intermediates of one-carbon metabolism indicated disturbances in folate and methylation pathways. Alterations in DNA methylation were apparent in decreased expression of DNA methyltransferase 3a and methyl-5'-cytosine-phosphodiester-guanine-domain binding proteins, reduced 5-methylcytosine immunoreactivity in the molecular and Purkinje cell layers, demethylation of genome-wide repetitive LINE-1 elements, and hypermethylation in specific promoter regions of single-copy genes in NPC1-deficient cerebellum at early stages of the disease. Alterations in amino acid metabolism and epigenetic changes in the cerebellum at presymptomatic stages of NPC disease represent previously unrecognized mechanisms of NPC pathogenesis. PMID:27083515

  13. The function of cux1 in oxidative dna damage repair is needed to prevent premature senescence of mouse embryo fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ramdzan, Zubaidah M.; Pal, Ranjana; Kaur, Simran; Leduy, Lam; Bérubé, Ginette; Davoudi, Sayeh; Vadnais, Charles; Nepveu, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Despite having long telomeres, mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) senesce more rapidly than human diploid fibroblasts because of the accumulation of oxidative DNA damage. The CUX1 homeodomain protein was recently found to prevent senescence in RAS-driven cancer cells that produce elevated levels of reactive-oxygen species. Here we show that Cux1−/− MEFs are unable to proliferate in atmospheric (20%) oxygen although they can proliferate normally in physiological (3%) oxygen levels. CUX1 contains three domains called Cut repeats. Structure/function analysis established that a single Cut repeat domain can stimulate the DNA binding, Schiff-base formation, glycosylase and AP-lyase activities of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, OGG1. Strikingly and in contrast to previous reports, OGG1 exhibits efficient AP-lyase activity in the presence of a Cut repeat. Repair of oxidative DNA damage and proliferation in 20% oxygen were both rescued in Cux1−/− MEFs by ectopic expression of CUX1 or of a recombinant Cut repeat protein that stimulates OGG1 but is devoid of transcription activation potential. These findings reinforce the causal link between oxidative DNA damage and cellular senescence and suggest that the role of CUX1 as an accessory factor in DNA repair will be critical in physiological situations that generate higher levels of reactive oxygen species. PMID:25682875

  14. NEIL1 Binding to DNA containing 2′-Fluorothymidine Glycol Stereoisomers and the Effect of Editing

    PubMed Central

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Yeo, Jongchan

    2012-01-01

    Thymine glycol (Tg), one of the oxidized bases formed in DNA by reactive oxygen species, is repaired by the DNA glycosylases such as NEIL1, NTH1 and Endo III. In our recent studies, we showed that NEIL1’s catalytic efficiency and lesion specificity are regulated by an RNA editing adenosine deamination reaction. In this study, we synthesized oligodeoxynucleotides containing 2′-fluorothymidine glycol with either ribo or arabino configuration and investigated the binding of these modified DNAs with the unedited and edited forms of human NEIL1 along with E. coli Endo III. For the two forms of hNEIL1, binding affinities to FTg-containing DNA were similar indicating the editing effect is more subtle than to simply alter substrate affinity. While the NEIL1 binding to FTg-containing DNAs was largely insensitive to C5 and 2′ stereochemistry, a preference was observed for the FTg-G pair over the FTg-A pair. In addition, we found that optimal binding is observed with Endo III and duplex DNA with riboFTg (5S) paired with dG. The modified DNAs reported here will provide useful tools for further characterizing the interaction between DNA repair glycosylases and thymine glycol containing DNA. PMID:22639086

  15. Structural basis for the substrate selectivity of PvuRts1I, a 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA restriction endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chen; Wang, Chengliang; Zang, Jianye

    2014-01-01

    5-Hydroxymethylation is a curious modification of cytosine that was discovered some decades ago, but its functional role in eukaryotes still awaits elucidation. 5-Hydroxymethyl­cytosine is an epigenetic marker that is crucial for multiple biological processes. The profile is altered under certain disease conditions such as cancer, Huntington’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Using the DNA-modification-dependent restriction endonuclease AbaSI coupled with sequencing (Aba-seq), the hydroxymethylome can be deciphered at the resolution of individual bases. The method is based on the enzymatic properties of AbaSI, a member of the PvuRts1I family of endonucleases. PvuRts1I is a modification-dependent endonuclease with high selectivity for 5-hydroxymethyl­cytosine over 5-methylcytosine and cytosine. In this study, the crystal structure of PvuRts1I was determined in order to understand and improve the substrate selectivity. A nuclease domain and an SRA-like domain are located at the N- and C-termini, respectively. Through comparison with other SRA-domain structures, the SRA-like domain was proposed to be the 5-hmC recognition module. Several mutants of PvuRts1I with enzymatic activity restricted to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine only were generated based on the structural analysis, and these enzyme variants are appropriate for separating the hydroxymethylome from the wider methylome. PMID:25195760

  16. Tandem virtual screening targeting the SRA domain of UHRF1 identifies a novel chemical tool modulating DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Myrianthopoulos, Vassilios; Cartron, Pierre Francois; Liutkevičiūtė, Zita; Klimašauskas, Saulius; Matulis, Daumantas; Bronner, Christian; Martinet, Nadine; Mikros, Emmanuel

    2016-05-23

    Ubiquitin-like protein UHRF1 that contains PHD and RING finger domain 1 is a key epigenetic protein enabling maintenance of the DNA methylation status through replication. A tandem virtual screening approach was implemented for identifying small molecules able to bind the 5-methylcytosine pocket of UHRF1 and inhibit its functionality. The NCI/DTP small molecules Repository was screened in silico by a combined protocol implementing structure-based and ligand-based methodologies. Consensus ranking was utilized to select a set of 27 top-ranked compounds that were subsequently evaluated experimentally in a stepwise manner for their ability to demethylate DNA in cellulo using PCR-MS and HPLC-MS/MS. The most active molecules were further assessed in a cell-based setting by the Proximity Ligation In Situ Assay and the ApoTome technology. Both evaluations confirmed that the DNMT1/UHRF1 interactions were significantly reduced after 4 h of incubation of U251 glioma cells with the most potent compound NSC232003, showing a 50% interaction inhibition at 15 μM as well as induction of global DNA cytosine demethylation as measured by ELISA. This is the first report of a chemical tool that targets UHRF1 and modulates DNA methylation in a cell context by potentially disrupting DNMT1/UHRF1 interactions. Compound NSC232003, a uracil derivative freely available by the NCI/DTP Repository, provides a versatile lead for developing highly potent and cell-permeable UHRF1 inhibitors that will enable dissection of DNA methylation inheritance. PMID:27049577

  17. Fluorogenic DNA ligase and base excision repair enzyme assays using substrates labeled with single fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Theo T; Roman, Steven

    2015-05-15

    Continuing our work on fluorogenic substrates labeled with single fluorophores for nucleic acid modifying enzymes, here we describe the development of such substrates for DNA ligases and some base excision repair enzymes. These substrates are hairpin-type synthetic DNA molecules with a single fluorophore located on a base close to the 3' ends, an arrangement that results in strong fluorescence quenching. When such substrates are subjected to an enzymatic reaction, the position of the dyes relative to that end of the molecules is altered, resulting in significant fluorescence intensity changes. The ligase substrates described here were 5' phosphorylated and either blunt-ended or carrying short, self-complementary single-stranded 5' extensions. The ligation reactions resulted in the covalent joining of the ends of the molecules, decreasing the quenching effect of the terminal bases on the dyes. To generate fluorogenic substrates for the base excision repair enzymes formamido-pyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG), human 8-oxo-G DNA glycosylase/AP lyase (hOGG1), endonuclease IV (EndoIV), and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), we introduced abasic sites or a modified nucleotide, 8-oxo-dG, at such positions that their enzymatic excision would result in the release of a short fluorescent fragment. This was also accompanied by strong fluorescence increases. Overall fluorescence changes ranged from approximately 4-fold (ligase reactions) to more than 20-fold (base excision repair reactions). PMID:25728944

  18. The role of DNA methylation during anoxia tolerance in a freshwater turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    PubMed

    Wijenayake, Sanoji; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen deprivation is a lethal stress that only a few animals can tolerate for extended periods. This study focuses on analyzing the role of DNA methylation in aiding natural anoxia tolerance in a champion vertebrate anaerobe, the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans). We examined the relative expression and total enzymatic activity of four DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT2, DNMT3a and DNMT3b), two methyl-binding domain proteins (MBD1 and MBD2), and relative genomic levels of 5-methylcytosine under control, 5 h anoxic, and 20 h anoxic conditions in liver, heart, and white skeletal muscle (n = 4, p < 0.05). In liver, protein expression of DNMT1, DNMT2, MBD1, and MBD2 rose significantly by two- to fourfold after 5 h anoxic submergence compared to normoxic-control conditions. In heart, 5 h anoxia submergence resulted in a 1.4-fold increase in DNMT3a levels and a significant decrease in MBD1 and MBD2 levels to ~30 % of control values. In white muscle, DNMT3a and DNMT3b increased threefold and MBD1 levels increased by 50 % in response to 5 h anoxia. Total DNMT activity rose by 0.6-2.0-fold in liver and white muscle and likewise global 5mC levels significantly increased in liver and white muscle under 5 and 20 h anoxia. The results demonstrate an overall increase in DNA methylation, DNMT protein expression and enzymatic activity in response to 5 and 20 h anoxia in liver and white muscle indicating a potential downregulation of gene expression via this epigenetic mechanism during oxygen deprivation. PMID:26843075

  19. Enzymatic DNA oxidation: mechanisms and biological significance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guo-Liang; Walsh, Colum P.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation at cytosines (5mC) is a major epigenetic modification involved in the regulation of multiple biological processes in mammals. How methylation is reversed was until recently poorly understood. The family of dioxygenases commonly known as Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) proteins are responsible for the oxidation of 5mC into three new forms, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC). Current models link Tet-mediated 5mC oxidation with active DNA demethylation. The higher oxidation products (5fC and 5caC) are recognized and excised by the DNA glycosylase TDG via the base excision repair pathway. Like DNA methyltransferases, Tet enzymes are important for embryonic development. We will examine the mechanism and biological significance of Tet-mediated 5mC oxidation in the context of pronuclear DNA demethylation in mouse early embryos. In contrast to its role in active demethylation in the germ cells and early embryo, a number of lines of evidence suggest that the intragenic 5hmC present in brain may act as a stable mark instead. This short review explores mechanistic aspects of TET oxidation activity, the impact Tet enzymes have on epigenome organization and their contribution to the regulation of early embryonic and neuronal development. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(11): 609-618] PMID:25341925

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of DNA Minor Groove Binding Alkylating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Prema; Srinivasan, Ajay; Singh, Sreelekha K.; Mascara, Gerard P.; Zayitova, Sevara; Sidone, Brian; Fouquerel, Elise; Svilar, David; Sobol, Robert W.; Bobola, Michael S.; Silber, John R.; Gold, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Derivatives of methyl 3-(1-methyl-5-(1-methyl-5-(propylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylamino)-3-oxopropane-1-sulfonate (1), a peptide-based DNA minor groove binding methylating agent, were synthesized and characterized. In all cases the N-terminus was appended with a O-methyl sulfonate ester while the C-terminus group was varied with non-polar and polar sidechains. In addition, the number of pyrrole rings was varied from 2 (dipeptide) to 3 (tripeptide). The ability of the different analogues to efficiently generate N3-methyladenine was demonstrated as was their selectivity for minor groove (N3-methyladenine) vs. major groove (N7-methylguanine) methylation. Induced circular dichroism studies were used to measure the DNA equilibrium binding properties of the stable sulfone analogues; the tripeptide binds with affinity that is > 10-fold higher than the dipeptide. The toxicities of the compounds were evaluated in alkA/tag glycosylase mutant E. coli and in human WT glioma cells and in cells over-expressing and under-expressing N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase, which excises N3-methyladenine from DNA. The results show that equilibrium binding correlates with the levels of N3-methyladenine produced and cellular toxicity. The toxicity of 1 was inversely related to expression of MPG in both the bacterial and mammalian cell lines. The enhanced toxicity parallels the reduced activation of PARP and diminished rate of formation of aldehyde reactive sites observed in the MPG knockdown cells. It is proposed that unrepaired N3-methyladenine is toxic due to its ability to directly block DNA polymerization. PMID:23234400

  1. Synthesis and characterization of DNA minor groove binding alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Prema; Srinivasan, Ajay; Singh, Sreelekha K; Mascara, Gerard P; Zayitova, Sevara; Sidone, Brian; Fouquerel, Elise; Svilar, David; Sobol, Robert W; Bobola, Michael S; Silber, John R; Gold, Barry

    2013-01-18

    Derivatives of methyl 3-(1-methyl-5-(1-methyl-5-(propylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylcarbamoyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-ylamino)-3-oxopropane-1-sulfonate (1), a peptide-based DNA minor groove binding methylating agent, were synthesized and characterized. In all cases, the N-terminus was appended with an O-methyl sulfonate ester, while the C-terminus group was varied with nonpolar and polar side chains. In addition, the number of pyrrole rings was varied from 2 (dipeptide) to 3 (tripeptide). The ability of the different analogues to efficiently generate N3-methyladenine was demonstrated as was their selectivity for minor groove (N3-methyladenine) versus major groove (N7-methylguanine) methylation. Induced circular dichroism studies were used to measure the DNA equilibrium binding properties of the stable sulfone analogues; the tripeptide binds with affinity that is >10-fold higher than that of the dipeptide. The toxicities of the compounds were evaluated in alkA/tag glycosylase mutant E. coli and in human WT glioma cells and in cells overexpressing and under-expressing N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase, which excises N3-methyladenine from DNA. The results show that equilibrium binding correlates with the levels of N3-methyladenine produced and cellular toxicity. The toxicity of 1 was inversely related to the expression of MPG in both the bacterial and mammalian cell lines. The enhanced toxicity parallels the reduced activation of PARP and the diminished rate of formation of aldehyde reactive sites observed in the MPG knockdown cells. It is proposed that unrepaired N3-methyladenine is toxic due to its ability to directly block DNA polymerization. PMID:23234400

  2. Simultaneous quantitative determination of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine genomic incorporation and DNA demethylation by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry as exposure-response measures of nucleoside analog DNA methyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Anders, Nicole M; Liu, Jianyong; Wanjiku, Teresia; Giovinazzo, Hugh; Zhou, Jianya; Vaghasia, Ajay; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Rudek, Michelle A

    2016-06-01

    The epigenetic and anti-cancer activities of the nucleoside analog DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors decitabine (5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, DAC), azacitidine, and guadecitabine are thought to require cellular uptake, metabolism to 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine triphosphate, and incorporation into DNA. This genomic incorporation can then lead to trapping and degradation of DNMT enzymes, and ultimately, passive loss of DNA methylation. To facilitate measurement of critical exposure-response relationships of nucleoside analog DNMT inhibitors, a sensitive and reliable method was developed to simultaneously quantitate 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine genomic incorporation and genomic 5-methylcytosine content using LC-MS/MS. Genomic DNA was extracted and digested into single nucleosides. Chromatographic separation was achieved with a Thermo Hyperpcarb porous graphite column (100mm×2.1mm, 5μm) and isocratic elution with a 10mM ammonium acetate:acetonitrile with 0.1% formic acid (70:30, v/v) mobile phase over a 5min total analytical run time. An AB Sciex 5500 triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in positive electrospray ionization mode was used for the detection of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, 2'-deoxycytidine, and 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine. The assay range was 2-400ng/mL for 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, 50-10,000ng/mL for 2'-deoxycytidine, and was 5-1000ng/mL for 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine. The assay proved to be accurate (93.0-102.2%) and precise (CV≤6.3%) across all analytes. All analytes exhibited long-term frozen digest matrix stability at -70°C for at least 117 days. The method was applied for the measurement of genomic 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine content following exposure of in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal models to decitabine. PMID:27082761

  3. Specificity of damage recognition and catalysis of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Osman, R; Fuxreiter, M; Luo, N

    2000-05-01

    A common feature of DNA repair enzymes is their ability to recognize the damage independently of sequence in which they are found. The presence of a flipped out base inserted into the protein in several DNA-enzyme complexes suggests a contribution to enzyme specificity. Molecular simulations of damaged DNA indicate that the damage produces changes in DNA structure and changes the dynamics of DNA bending. The reduced bending force constant can be used by the enzyme to induce DNA bending and facilitate base flipping. We show that a thymine dimer (TD) containing DNA requires less energy to bend, lowering the barrier for base flipping. On the other hand, bending in DNA with U-G mismatch is affected only by a small amount and flipping is not enhanced significantly. T4 endonuclease V (endoV), which recognizes TD, utilizes the reduced barrier for flipping as a specific recognition element. In uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG), which recognizes U-G mismatches, base flipping is not enhanced and recognition is encoded in a highly specific binding pocket for the flipped base. Simulations of UDG and endoV in complex with damaged DNA provide insight into the essential elements of the catalytic mechanism. Calculations of pKas of active site residues in endoV and endoV-DNA complex show that the pKa, of the N-terminus is reduced from 8.01 to 6.52 while that of Glu-23 increases from 1.52 to 7.82. Thus, the key catalytic residues are in their neutral form. The simulations also show that Glu-23 is also H-bonded to O4' of the 5'-TD enhancing the nucleophilic attack on Cl and that Arg-26 enhances the hydrolysis by electrostatic stabilization but does not participate in proton transfer. In the enzyme-substrate complex of UDG, the role of electrostatic stabilization is played by His-268, whose pKa increases to 7.1 from 4.9 in the free enzyme. The pKa of Asp-145, the other important catalytic residue, remains around 4.2 in the free enzyme and in the complex. Thus, it can not act as a proton

  4. Repair of DNA-containing pyrimidine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, L.; Caron, P.R.; Mazur, S.J.; Oh, E.Y.

    1988-08-01

    Ultraviolet light-induced pyrimidine dimers in DNA are recognized and repaired by a number of unique cellular surveillance systems. The most direct biochemical mechanism responding to this kind of genotoxicity involves direct photoreversal by flavin enzymes that specifically monomerize pyrimidine:pyrimidine dimers monophotonically in the presence of visible light. Incision reactions are catalyzed by a combined pyrimidine dimer DNA-glycosylase:apyrimidinic endonuclease found in some highly UV-resistant organisms. At a higher level of complexity, Escherichia coli has a uvr DNA repair system comprising the UvrA, UvrB, and UvrC proteins responsible for incision. There are several preincision steps governed by this pathway, which includes an ATP-dependent UvrA dimerization reaction required for UvrAB nucleoprotein formation. This complex formation driven by ATP binding is associated with localized topological unwinding of DNA. This same protein complex can catalyze an ATPase-dependent 5'----3'-directed strand displacement of D-loop DNA or short single strands annealed to a single-stranded circular or linear DNA. This putative translocational process is arrested when damaged sites are encountered. The complex is now primed for dual incision catalyzed by UvrC. The remainder of the repair process involves UvrD (helicase II) and DNA polymerase I for a coordinately controlled excision-resynthesis step accompanied by UvrABC turnover. Furthermore, it is proposed that levels of repair proteins can be regulated by proteolysis. UvrB is converted to truncated UvrB* by a stress-induced protease that also acts at similar sites on the E. coli Ada protein. Although UvrB* can bind with UvrA to DNA, it cannot participate in helicase or incision reactions. It is also a DNA-dependent ATPase.21 references.

  5. Persistent damage induces mitochondrial DNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Shokolenko, Inna N.; Wilson, Glenn L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made recently toward understanding the processes of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and repair. However, a paucity of information still exists regarding the physiological effects of persistent mtDNA damage. This is due, in part, to experimental difficulties associated with targeting mtDNA for damage, while sparing nuclear DNA. Here, we characterize two systems designed for targeted mtDNA damage based on the inducible (Tet-ON) mitochondrial expression of the bacterial enzyme, exonuclease III, and the human enzyme, uracil-N-glyosylase containing the Y147A mutation. In both systems, damage was accompanied by degradation of mtDNA, which was detectable by six hours after induction of mutant uracil-N-glycosylase and by twelve hours after induction of exoIII. Unexpectedly, increases in the steady-state levels of single-strand lesions, which led to degradation, were small in absolute terms indicating that both abasic sites and single-strand gaps may be poorly tolerated in mtDNA. mtDNA degradation was accompanied by the loss of expression of mtDNA-encoded COX2. After withdrawal of the inducer, recovery from mtDNA depletion occurred faster in the system expressing exonuclease III, but in both systems reduced mtDNA levels persisted longer than 144h after doxycycline withdrawal. mtDNA degradation was followed by reduction and loss of respiration, decreased membrane potential, reduced cell viability, reduced intrinsic reactive oxygen species production, slowed proliferation, and changes in mitochondrial morphology (fragmentation of the mitochondrial network, rounding and “foaming” of the mitochondria). The mutagenic effects of abasic sites in mtDNA were low, which indicates that damaged mtDNA molecules may be degraded if not rapidly repaired. This study establishes, for the first time, that mtDNA degradation can be a direct and immediate consequence of persistent mtDNA damage and that increased ROS production is not an invariant consequence

  6. Surviving the sun: Repair and bypass of DNA UV lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Structural studies of UV-induced lesions and their complexes with repair proteins reveal an intrinsic flexibility of DNA at lesion sites. Reduced DNA rigidity stems primarily from the loss of base stacking, which may manifest as bending, unwinding, base unstacking, or flipping out. The intrinsic flexibility at UV lesions allows efficient initial lesion recognition within a pool of millions to billions of normal DNA base pairs. To bypass the damaged site by translesion synthesis, the specialized DNA polymerase η acts like a molecular “splint” and reinforces B-form DNA by numerous protein–phosphate interactions. Photolyases and glycosylases that specifically repair UV lesions interact directly with UV lesions in bent DNA via surface complementation. UvrA and UvrB, which recognize a variety of lesions in the bacterial nucleotide excision repair pathway, appear to exploit hysteresis exhibited by DNA lesions and conduct an ATP-dependent stress test to distort and separate DNA strands. Similar stress tests are likely conducted in eukaryotic nucleotide excision repair. PMID:21898645

  7. Structure of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-specific restriction enzyme, AbaSI, in complex with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, John R.; Borgaro, Janine G.; Griggs, Rose M.; Quimby, Aine; Guan, Shengxi; Zhang, Xing; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Zheng, Yu; Zhu, Zhenyu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2014-07-03

    AbaSI, a member of the PvuRts1I-family of modification-dependent restriction endonucleases, cleaves DNA containing 5-hydroxymethylctosine (5hmC) and glucosylated 5hmC (g5hmC), but not DNA containing unmodified cytosine. AbaSI has been used as a tool for mapping the genomic locations of 5hmC, an important epigenetic modification in the DNA of higher organisms. Here we report the crystal structures of AbaSI in the presence and absence of DNA. These structures provide considerable, although incomplete, insight into how this enzyme acts. AbaSI appears to be mainly a homodimer in solution, but interacts with DNA in our structures as a homotetramer. Each AbaSI subunit comprises an N-terminal, Vsr-like, cleavage domain containing a single catalytic site, and a C-terminal, SRA-like, 5hmC-binding domain. Two N-terminal helices mediate most of the homodimer interface. Dimerization brings together the two catalytic sites required for double-strand cleavage, and separates the 5hmC binding-domains by ~ 70 Å, consistent with the known activity of AbaSI which cleaves DNA optimally between symmetrically modified cytosines ~ 22 bp apart. The eukaryotic SET and RING-associated (SRA) domains bind to DNA containing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in the hemi-methylated CpG sequence. They make contacts in both the major and minor DNA grooves, and flip the modified cytosine out of the helix into a conserved binding pocket. In contrast, the SRA-like domain of AbaSI, which has no sequence specificity, contacts only the minor DNA groove, and in our current structures the 5hmC remains intra-helical. A conserved, binding pocket is nevertheless present in this domain, suitable for accommodating 5hmC and g5hmC. We consider it likely, therefore, that base-flipping is part of the recognition and cleavage mechanism of AbaSI, but that our structures represent an earlier, pre-flipped stage, prior to actual recognition.

  8. Whole-genome DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation profiling for HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chao; Tao, Ran; Cao, Qingyi; Zhu, Danhua; Wang, Yini; Wang, Jie; Lu, Juan; Chen, Ermei; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common solid tumor worldwide with a poor prognosis. Accumulating evidence has implicated important regulatory roles of epigenetic modifications in the occurrence and progression of HCC. In the present study, we analyzed 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) levels in the tumor tissues and paired adjacent peritumor tissues (APTs) from four individual HCC patients using a (hydroxy)methylated DNA immunoprecipitation approach combined with deep sequencing [(h)MeDIP-Seq]. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the 5-mC levels in the promoter regions of 2796 genes and the 5-hmC levels in 507 genes differed significantly between HCC tissues and APTs. These differential genes were grouped into various clusters and pathways and found to be particularly enriched in the 'metabolic pathways' that include 'Glycolysis/gluconeogenesis', 'Oxidative phosphorylation' and 'Citrate cycle (TCA cycle)', implicating a potential role of metabolic alterations in HCC. Furthermore, 144 genes had both 5-mC and 5-hmC changes in HCC patients, and 10 of them (PCNA, MDM2, STAG1, E2F4, FGF4, FGF19, RHOBTB2, UBE2QL1, DCN and HSP90AA1) were enriched and interconnected in five pathways including the 'Cell cycle', 'Pathway in cancer', 'Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis', 'Melanoma' and 'Prostate cancer' pathways. The genome-wide mapping of 5-mC and 5-hmC in HCC tissues and APTs indicated that both 5-mC and 5-hmC epigenetic modifications play important roles in the regulation of HCC, and there may be some interconnections between them. Taken together, in the present study we conducted the first genome-wide mapping of DNA methylation combined with hydroxymethylation in HBV-related HCC and provided a series of potential novel epigenetic biomarkers for HCC. PMID:27221337

  9. Pro-oxidant Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells: Homeostatic Mechanisms of Genotoxic Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Seager, Anna L.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to many disease etiologies including ageing, neurodegeneration, and cancer, partly through DNA damage induction (genotoxicity). Understanding the i nteractions of free radicals with DNA is fundamental to discern mutation risks. In genetic toxicology, regulatory authorities consider that most genotoxins exhibit a linear relationship between dose and mutagenic response. Yet, homeostatic mechanisms, including DNA repair, that allow cells to tolerate low levels of genotoxic exposure exist. Acceptance of thresholds for genotoxicity has widespread consequences in terms of understanding cancer risk and regulating human exposure to chemicals/drugs. Three pro-oxidant chemicals, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), potassium bromate (KBrO3), and menadione, were examined for low dose-response curves in human lymphoblastoid cells. DNA repair and antioxidant capacity were assessed as possible threshold mechanisms. H2O2 and KBrO3, but not menadione, exhibited thresholded responses, containing a range of nongenotoxic low doses. Levels of the DNA glycosylase 8-oxoguanine glycosylase were unchanged in response to pro- oxidant stress. DNA repair–focused gene expression arrays reported changes in ATM and BRCA1, involved in double-strand break repair, in response to low-dose pro-oxidant exposure; however, these alterations were not substantiated at the protein level. Determination of oxidatively induced DNA damage in H2O2-treated AHH-1 cells reported accumulation of thymine glycol above the genotoxic threshold. Further, the H2O2 dose-response curve was shifted by modulating the antioxidant glutathione. Hence, observed pro- oxidant thresholds were due to protective capacities of base excision repair enzymes and antioxidants against DNA damage, highlighting the importance of homeostatic mechanisms in “genotoxic tolerance.” PMID:22539617

  10. DNA oxidation as triggered by H3K9me2 demethylation drives estrogen-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Perillo, Bruno; Ombra, Maria Neve; Bertoni, Alessandra; Cuozzo, Concetta; Sacchetti, Silvana; Sasso, Annarita; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Malorni, Antonio; Abbondanza, Ciro; Avvedimento, Enrico V

    2008-01-11

    Modifications at the N-terminal tails of nucleosomal histones are required for efficient transcription in vivo. We analyzed how H3 histone methylation and demethylation control expression of estrogen-responsive genes and show that a DNA-bound estrogen receptor directs transcription by participating in bending chromatin to contact the RNA polymerase II recruited to the promoter. This process is driven by receptor-targeted demethylation of H3 lysine 9 at both enhancer and promoter sites and is achieved by activation of resident LSD1 demethylase. Localized demethylation produces hydrogen peroxide, which modifies the surrounding DNA and recruits 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase 1 and topoisomeraseIIbeta, triggering chromatin and DNA conformational changes that are essential for estrogen-induced transcription. Our data show a strategy that uses controlled DNA damage and repair to guide productive transcription. PMID:18187655

  11. TET2 Mutations Affect Non-CpG Island DNA Methylation at Enhancers and Transcription Factor-Binding Sites in Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Jumpei; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Lu, Yue; Cesaroni, Matteo; Madzo, Jozef; Neumann, Frank; He, Rong; Taby, Rodolphe; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Macrae, Trisha; Ostler, Kelly R; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Liang, Shoudan; Estecio, Marcos R; Godley, Lucy A; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2015-07-15

    TET2 enzymatically converts 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine as well as other covalently modified cytosines and its mutations are common in myeloid leukemia. However, the exact mechanism and the extent to which TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation remain in question. Here, we report on DNA methylomes in TET2 wild-type (TET2-WT) and mutant (TET2-MT) cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). We analyzed 85,134 CpG sites [28,114 sites in CpG islands (CGI) and 57,020 in non-CpG islands (NCGI)]. TET2 mutations do not explain genome-wide differences in DNA methylation in CMML, and we found few and inconsistent differences at CGIs between TET2-WT and TET2-MT cases. In contrast, we identified 409 (0.71%) TET2-specific differentially methylated CpGs (tet2-DMCs) in NCGIs, 86% of which were hypermethylated in TET2-MT cases, suggesting a strikingly different biology of the effects of TET2 mutations at CGIs and NCGIs. DNA methylation of tet2-DMCs at promoters and nonpromoters repressed gene expression. Tet2-DMCs showed significant enrichment at hematopoietic-specific enhancers marked by H3K4me1 and at binding sites for the transcription factor p300. Tet2-DMCs showed significantly lower 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in TET2-MT cases. We conclude that leukemia-associated TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation at NCGI regions containing hematopoietic-specific enhancers and transcription factor-binding sites. PMID:25972343

  12. Circadian Modulation of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Damage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Manzella, Nicola; Bracci, Massimo; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Ledda, Caterina; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Tomasetti, Marco; Stevens, Richard G.; Santarelli, Lory

    2015-01-01

    The DNA base excision repair pathway is the main system involved in the removal of oxidative damage to DNA such as 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) primarily via the 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1). Our goal was to investigate whether the repair of 8-oxoG DNA damage follow a circadian rhythm. In a group of 15 healthy volunteers, we found a daily variation of Ogg1 expression and activity with higher levels in the morning compared to the evening hours. Consistent with this, we also found lower levels of 8-oxoG in morning hours compared to those in the evening hours. Lymphocytes exposed to oxidative damage to DNA at 8:00 AM display lower accumulation of 8-oxoG than lymphocytes exposed at 8:00 PM. Furthermore, altered levels of Ogg1 expression were also observed in a group of shift workers experiencing a deregulation of circadian clock genes compared to a control group. Moreover, BMAL1 knockdown fibroblasts with a deregulated molecular clock showed an abolishment of circadian variation of Ogg1 expression and an increase of OGG1 activity. Our results suggest that the circadian modulation of 8-oxoG DNA damage repair, according to a variation of Ogg1 expression, could render humans less susceptible to accumulate 8-oxoG DNA damage in the morning hours. PMID:26337123

  13. Circadian Modulation of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Manzella, Nicola; Bracci, Massimo; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Ledda, Caterina; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Tomasetti, Marco; Stevens, Richard G; Santarelli, Lory

    2015-01-01

    The DNA base excision repair pathway is the main system involved in the removal of oxidative damage to DNA such as 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) primarily via the 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1). Our goal was to investigate whether the repair of 8-oxoG DNA damage follow a circadian rhythm. In a group of 15 healthy volunteers, we found a daily variation of Ogg1 expression and activity with higher levels in the morning compared to the evening hours. Consistent with this, we also found lower levels of 8-oxoG in morning hours compared to those in the evening hours. Lymphocytes exposed to oxidative damage to DNA at 8:00 AM display lower accumulation of 8-oxoG than lymphocytes exposed at 8:00 PM. Furthermore, altered levels of Ogg1 expression were also observed in a group of shift workers experiencing a deregulation of circadian clock genes compared to a control group. Moreover, BMAL1 knockdown fibroblasts with a deregulated molecular clock showed an abolishment of circadian variation of Ogg1 expression and an increase of OGG1 activity. Our results suggest that the circadian modulation of 8-oxoG DNA damage repair, according to a variation of Ogg1 expression, could render humans less susceptible to accumulate 8-oxoG DNA damage in the morning hours. PMID:26337123

  14. Base-resolution detection of N 4-methylcytosine in genomic DNA using 4mC-Tet-assisted-bisulfite-sequencing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Miao; Ji, Lexiang; Neumann, Drexel A.; Chung, Dae -Hwan; Groom, Joseph; Westpheling, Janet; He, Chuan; Schmitz, Robert J.

    2015-07-15

    Restriction-modification (R-M) systems pose a major barrier to DNA transformation and genetic engineering of bacterial species. Systematic identification of DNA methylation in R-M systems, including N6-methyladenine (6mA), 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and N4-methylcytosine (4mC), will enable strategies to make these species genetically tractable. Although single-molecule, real time (SMRT) sequencing technology is capable of detecting 4mC directly for any bacterial species regardless of whether an assembled genome exists or not, it is not as scalable to profiling hundreds to thousands of samples compared with the commonly used next-generation sequencing technologies. Here, we present 4mC-Tet-assisted bisulfite-sequencing (4mC-TAB-seq), a next-generation sequencing method that rapidly andmore » cost efficiently reveals the genome-wide locations of 4mC for bacterial species with an available assembled reference genome. In 4mC-TAB-seq, both cytosines and 5mCs are read out as thymines, whereas only 4mCs are read out as cytosines, revealing their specific positions throughout the genome. We applied 4mC-TAB-seq to study the methylation of a member of the hyperthermophilc genus, Caldicellulosiruptor, in which 4mC-related restriction is a major barrier to DNA transformation from other species. Lastly, in combination with MethylC-seq, both 4mC- and 5mC-containing motifs are identified which can assist in rapid and efficient genetic engineering of these bacteria in the future.« less

  15. Base-resolution detection of N4-methylcytosine in genomic DNA using 4mC-Tet-assisted-bisulfite- sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Miao; Ji, Lexiang; Neumann, Drexel A.; Chung, Dae-hwan; Groom, Joseph; Westpheling, Janet; He, Chuan; Schmitz, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Restriction-modification (R-M) systems pose a major barrier to DNA transformation and genetic engineering of bacterial species. Systematic identification of DNA methylation in R-M systems, including N6-methyladenine (6mA), 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and N4-methylcytosine (4mC), will enable strategies to make these species genetically tractable. Although single-molecule, real time (SMRT) sequencing technology is capable of detecting 4mC directly for any bacterial species regardless of whether an assembled genome exists or not, it is not as scalable to profiling hundreds to thousands of samples compared with the commonly used next-generation sequencing technologies. Here, we present 4mC-Tet-assisted bisulfite-sequencing (4mC-TAB-seq), a next-generation sequencing method that rapidly and cost efficiently reveals the genome-wide locations of 4mC for bacterial species with an available assembled reference genome. In 4mC-TAB-seq, both cytosines and 5mCs are read out as thymines, whereas only 4mCs are read out as cytosines, revealing their specific positions throughout the genome. We applied 4mC-TAB-seq to study the methylation of a member of the hyperthermophilc genus, Caldicellulosiruptor, in which 4mC-related restriction is a major barrier to DNA transformation from other species. In combination with MethylC-seq, both 4mC- and 5mC-containing motifs are identified which can assist in rapid and efficient genetic engineering of these bacteria in the future. PMID:26184871

  16. Base-resolution profiling of active DNA demethylation using MAB-seq and caMAB-seq.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Wu, Xiaoji; Zhang, Yi

    2016-06-01

    A complete understanding of the function of the ten-eleven translocation (TET) family of dioxygenase-mediated DNA demethylation requires new methods to quantitatively map oxidized 5-methylcytosine (5mC) bases at high resolution. We have recently developed a methylase-assisted bisulfite sequencing (MAB-seq) method that allows base-resolution mapping of 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC), two oxidized 5mC bases indicative of active DNA demethylation events. In standard bisulfite sequencing (BS-seq), unmodified C, 5fC and 5caC are read as thymine; thus 5fC and 5caC cannot be distinguished from C. In MAB-seq, unmodified C is enzymatically converted to 5mC, allowing direct mapping of rare modifications such as 5fC and 5caC. By combining MAB-seq with chemical reduction of 5fC to 5hmC, we also developed caMAB-seq, a method for direct 5caC mapping. Compared with subtraction-based mapping methods, MAB-seq and caMAB-seq require less sequencing effort and enable robust statistical calling of 5fC and/or 5caC. MAB-seq and caMAB-seq can be adapted to map 5fC/5caC at the whole-genome scale (WG-MAB-seq), within specific genomic regions enriched for enhancer-marking histone modifications (chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-MAB-seq), or at CpG-rich sequences (reduced-representation (RR)-MAB-seq) such as gene promoters. The full protocol, including DNA preparation, enzymatic treatment, library preparation and sequencing, can be completed within 6-8 d. PMID:27172168

  17. Base-resolution detection of N4-methylcytosine in genomic DNA using 4mC-Tet-assisted-bisulfite-sequencing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Miao; Ji, Lexiang; Neumann, Drexel A.; Chung, Dae -Hwan; Groom, Joseph; Westpheling, Janet; He, Chuan; Schmitz, Robert J.

    2015-07-15

    Restriction-modification (R-M) systems pose a major barrier to DNA transformation and genetic engineering of bacterial species. Systematic identification of DNA methylation in R-M systems, including N6-methyladenine (6mA), 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and N4-methylcytosine (4mC), will enable strategies to make these species genetically tractable. Although single-molecule, real time (SMRT) sequencing technology is capable of detecting 4mC directly for any bacterial species regardless of whether an assembled genome exists or not, it is not as scalable to profiling hundreds to thousands of samples compared with the commonly used next-generation sequencing technologies. Here, we present 4mC-Tet-assisted bisulfite-sequencing (4mC-TAB-seq), a next-generation sequencing method that rapidly andmore » cost efficiently reveals the genome-wide locations of 4mC for bacterial species with an available assembled reference genome. In 4mC-TAB-seq, both cytosines and 5mCs are read out as thymines, whereas only 4mCs are read out as cytosines, revealing their specific positions throughout the genome. We applied 4mC-TAB-seq to study the methylation of a member of the hyperthermophilc genus, Caldicellulosiruptor, in which 4mC-related restriction is a major barrier to DNA transformation from other species. Lastly, in combination with MethylC-seq, both 4mC- and 5mC-containing motifs are identified which can assist in rapid and efficient genetic engineering of these bacteria in the future.« less

  18. Real-time dynamics of methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 3 and its role in DNA demethylation by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yi; Cho, Il-Hoon; Chowdhury, Basudev; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    With unprecedented development in technology, epigenetics is recognized as a substantial and flexible regulatory pathway for phenotyping. Cytosine methylation and its subsequent oxidization have attracted significant attention due to their direct impact on gene regulation, in association with methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins (MBDs) and transcription related factors. In this study we record the dynamics of DNA demethylation using the recombinant MBD3-GFP protein in living cells under hypoxia and Decitabine treatment using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) by monitoring the diffusion dynamics of MBD3. Our study shows a DNA-replication-independent decrease of 5-methylcytosine (5mC)/5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) under hypoxia vs. a dependent decrease under Decitabine treatment. Further, we define a significantly faster diffusion of MBD3 in the nucleus as a precursory event for active demethylation rather than the Decitabine induced passive demethylation. By monitoring the diffusion of bound and unbound MBD3 in the nucleus we were able to identify and characterize hypoxia-sensitive cells from insensitive/tolerant cells, as well as the respective contribution to active demethylation in a time-dependent manner. Last, we quantitatively describe the concurrent decreasing trend in all of the three oxidized products of 5mC, which points to the potential involvement of ten-eleven-translocation proteins (TETs) in hypoxia induced active demethylation. Overall, for the first time we correlate the dynamic process of DNA demethylation with the biophysical properties of the corresponding DNA binding proteins in live single cells by single molecule spectroscopy. PMID:23974971

  19. Diversity of two forms of DNA methylation in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Damayanti, Nur P.; Irudayaraj, Joseph; Dunn, Kenneth; Zhou, Feng C.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation 5-methylcytosine (5mC) predicts a compacting chromatin inaccessible to transcription. The discovery of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which is derived from 5mC, adds a new dimension to the mechanism and role of DNA methylation in epigenetics. Genomic evidence indicates that the 5hmC is located in the alternate regions to 5mC. However, the nature of 5hmC, as compared with classical 5mC remains unclear. Observing the mouse brain through embryonic development to the adult, first, we found that 5hmC is not merely an intermediate metabolite of demethylation, but is long lasting, chromatically distinct, and dynamically changing during neurodevelopment. Second, we found that 5hmC distinctly differs from 5mC in its chromatin affiliation during neural stem cell (NSC) development. Thirdly, we found both 5mC and 5hmC to be uniquely polarized and dynamic through the NSC development. 5mC was found to progressively polarize with MBD1 and MeCP2, and recruits H3K9me3 and H3K27me3; while 5hmC progressively co-localizes with MBD3 and recruits H3K4me2. Critical differential binding of 5mC with MBD1, and 5hmC with MBD3 was validated by Resonance Energy Transfer technique FLIM-FRET. This transition and polarization coincides with neuroprogenitor differentiation. Finally, at the time of synaptogenesis, 5mC gradually accumulates in the heterochromatin while 5hmC accumulates in the euchromatin, which is consistent with the co-localization of 5hmC with PolII, which mediates RNA transcription. Our data indicate that 5mC and 5hmC are diverse in their functional interactions with chromatin. This diversity is likely to contribute to the versatile epigenetic control of transcription mediating brain development and functional maintenance of adult brain. PMID:24653733

  20. Bifilar enzyme-sensitive sites in ultraviolet-irradiated DNA are indicative of closely opposed cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, L H; Reynolds, R J

    1986-01-01

    Incubation of UV-irradiated DNA with pyrimidine dimer-DNA glycosylase in cell-free lysates prepared from Micrococcus luteus results in the appearance of double-strand breaks. It has previously been assumed that such double-strand breaks result from cleavage at closely opposed dimers. We have used hybrid molecules of bacteriophage T7 DNA comprised of two unirradiated strands, two UV-irradiated strands, or one unirradiated and one UV-irradiated strand to test this hypothesis. Bifilar cleavage was observed only with molecules consisting of two irradiated strands and no bifilar cleavage was observed after the monomerization of pyrimidine dimers by enzymatic photoreactivation. Our results indicate that at least 80% of the double-strand breaks result from cleavage at closely opposed dimers and that the induction of dimers in one strand does not influence the induction of dimers at closely opposed positions in the complementary strand of a DNA double helix. PMID:3527288

  1. The antileishmanial drug miltefosine (Impavido(®)) causes oxidation of DNA bases, apoptosis, and necrosis in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Castelo Branco, Patrícia Valéria; Soares, Rossy-Eric Pereira; de Jesus, Luís Cláudio Lima; Moreira, Vanessa Ribeiro; Alves, Hugo José; de Castro Belfort, Marta Regina; Silva, Vera Lucia Maciel; Ferreira Pereira, Silma Regina

    2016-08-01

    Miltefosine was developed to treat skin cancer; further studies showed that the drug also has activity against Leishmania. Miltefosine is the first oral agent for treating leishmaniasis. However, its mechanism of action is not completely understood. We have evaluated the induction of DNA damage by miltefosine. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity (comet assay) tests were performed on human leukocytes exposed to the drug in vitro. Apoptosis and necrosis were also evaluated. In vivo tests were conducted in Swiss male mice (Mus musculus) treated orally with miltefosine. Oxidation of DNA bases in peripheral blood cells was measured using the comet assay followed by digestion with formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG), which removes oxidized guanine bases. The micronucleus test was performed on bone marrow erythrocytes. Miltefosine caused DNA damage, apoptosis, and necrosis in vitro. Mice treated with miltefosine showed an increase in the DNA damage score, which was further increased following FPG digestion. The micronucleus test was also positive. PMID:27476333

  2. Modular Nuclease-Responsive DNA Three-Way Junction-Based Dynamic Assembly of a DNA Device and Its Sensing Application.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Lei; Xu, Xiaowen; Wei, Haiping; Jiang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Here, we explored a modular strategy for rational design of nuclease-responsive three-way junctions (TWJs) and fabricated a dynamic DNA device in a "plug-and-play" fashion. First, inactivated TWJs were designed, which contained three functional domains: the inaccessible toehold and branch migration domains, the specific sites of nucleases, and the auxiliary complementary sequence. The actions of different nucleases on their specific sites in TWJs caused the close proximity of the same toehold and branch migration domains, resulting in the activation of the TWJs and the formation of a universal trigger for the subsequent dynamic assembly. Second, two hairpins (H1 and H2) were introduced, which could coexist in a metastable state, initially to act as the components for the dynamic assembly. Once the trigger initiated the opening of H1 via TWJs-driven strand displacement, the cascade hybridization of hairpins immediately switched on, resulting in the formation of the concatemers of H1/H2 complex appending numerous integrated G-quadruplexes, which were used to obtain label-free signal readout. The inherent modularity of this design allowed us to fabricate a flexible DNA dynamic device and detect multiple nucleases through altering the recognition pattern slightly. Taking uracil-DNA glycosylase and CpG methyltransferase M.SssI as models, we successfully realized the butt joint between the uracil-DNA glycosylase and M.SssI recognition events and the dynamic assembly process. Furthermore, we achieved ultrasensitive assay of nuclease activity and the inhibitor screening. The DNA device proposed here will offer an adaptive and flexible tool for clinical diagnosis and anticancer drug discovery. PMID:26943244

  3. Atomic structure of the DNA repair [4Fe-4S] enzyme endonuclease III.

    PubMed

    Kuo, C F; McRee, D E; Fisher, C L; O'Handley, S F; Cunningham, R P; Tainer, J A

    1992-10-16

    The crystal structure of the DNA repair enzyme endonuclease III, which recognizes and cleaves DNA at damaged bases, has been solved to 2.0 angstrom resolution with an R factor of 0.185. This iron-sulfur [4Fe-4S] enzyme is elongated and bilobal with a deep cleft separating two similarly sized domains: a novel, sequence-continuous, six-helix domain (residues 22 to 132) and a Greek-key, four-helix domain formed by the amino-terminal and three carboxyl-terminal helices (residues 1 to 21 and 133 to 211) together with the [4Fe-4S] cluster. The cluster is bound entirely within the carboxyl-terminal loop with a ligation pattern (Cys-X6-Cys-X2-Cys-X5-Cys) distinct from all other known [4Fe-4S] proteins. Sequence conservation and the positive electrostatic potential of conserved regions identify a surface suitable for binding duplex B-DNA across the long axis of the enzyme, matching a 46 angstrom length of protected DNA. The primary role of the [4Fe-4S] cluster appears to involve positioning conserved basic residues for interaction with the DNA phosphate backbone. The crystallographically identified inhibitor binding region, which recognizes the damaged base thymine glycol, is a seven-residue beta-hairpin (residues 113 to 119). Location and side chain orientation at the base of the inhibitor binding site implicate Glu112 in the N-glycosylase mechanism and Lys120 in the beta-elimination mechanism. Overall, the structure reveals an unusual fold and a new biological function for [4Fe-4S] clusters and provides a structural basis for studying recognition of damaged DNA and the N-glycosylase and apurinic/apyrimidinic-lyase mechanisms. PMID:1411536

  4. The Arabidopsis acetylated histone-binding protein BRAT1 forms a complex with BRP1 and prevents transcriptional silencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cui-Jun; Hou, Xiao-Mei; Tan, Lian-Mei; Shao, Chang-Rong; Huang, Huan-Wei; Li, Yong-Qiang; Li, Lin; Cai, Tao; Chen, She; He, Xin-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements and other repetitive DNA sequences are usually subject to DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing. However, anti-silencing mechanisms that promote transcription in these regions are not well understood. Here, we describe an anti-silencing factor, Bromodomain and ATPase domain-containing protein 1 (BRAT1), which we identified by a genetic screen in Arabidopsis thaliana. BRAT1 interacts with an ATPase domain-containing protein, BRP1 (BRAT1 Partner 1), and both prevent transcriptional silencing at methylated genomic regions. Although BRAT1 mediates DNA demethylation at a small set of loci targeted by the 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylase ROS1, the involvement of BRAT1 in anti-silencing is largely independent of DNA demethylation. We also demonstrate that the bromodomain of BRAT1 binds to acetylated histone, which may facilitate the prevention of transcriptional silencing. Thus, BRAT1 represents a potential link between histone acetylation and transcriptional anti-silencing at methylated genomic regions, which may be conserved in eukaryotes. PMID:27273316

  5. Alterations in DNA methylation corresponding with lung inflammation and as a biomarker for disease development after MWCNT exposure.

    PubMed

    Brown, Traci A; Lee, Joong Won; Holian, Andrij; Porter, Virginia; Fredriksen, Harley; Kim, Minju; Cho, Yoon Hee

    2016-05-01

    Use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) is growing which increases occupational exposures to these materials. Their toxic potential makes it important to have an in-depth understanding of the inflammation and disease that develops due to exposure. Epigenetics is one area of interest that has been quickly developing to assess disease processes due to its ability to change gene expression and thus the lung environment after exposure. In this study, promoter methylation of inflammatory genes (IFN-γ and TNF-α) was measured after MWCNT exposure using the pyrosequencing assay and found to correlate with initial cytokine production. In addition, methylation of a gene involved in tissue fibrosis (Thy-1) was also altered in a way that matched collagen deposition. In addition to using epigenetics to better understand disease processes, it has also been used as a biomarker of exposure and disease. In this study, global methylation was determined in the lung to ascertain whether MWCNT alter global methylation at the site of exposure and if those alterations coincide with disease development. Then, global methylation levels were determined in the blood to ascertain whether global methylation could be used as a biomarker of exposure in a more easily accessible tissue. Using the LuUminometric Methylation Assay (LUMA) and 5-Methylcytosine (5-mC) Quantification assay, we found that MWCNT lead to DNA hypomethylation in the lung and blood, which coincided with disease development. This study provides initial data showing that alterations in gene-specific methylation correspond with an inflammatory response to MWCNT exposure. In addition, global DNA methylation in the lung and blood coincides with MWCNT-induced disease development, suggesting its potential as a biomarker of both exposure and disease development. PMID:26375518

  6. DNA damage and repair kinetics of the Alternaria mycotoxins alternariol, altertoxin II and stemphyltoxin III in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Stefanie C; Sauter, Friederike; Pfeiffer, Erika; Metzler, Manfred; Hartwig, Andrea; Köberle, Beate

    2016-03-01

    The Alternaria mycotoxins alternariol (AOH) and altertoxin II (ATX II) have previously been shown to elicit mutagenic and genotoxic effects in bacterial and mammalian cells, although with vastly different activities. For example, ATX II was about 50 times more mutagenic than AOH. We now report that stemphyltoxin III (STTX III) is also highly mutagenic. The more pronounced effects of the perylene quinones ATX II and STTX III at lower concentrations compared to the dibenzo-α-pyrone AOH indicate a marked dependence of the genotoxic potential on the chemical structure and furthermore suggest that the underlying modes of action may be different. We have now further investigated the type of DNA damage induced by AOH, ATX II and STTX III, as well as the repair kinetics and their dependence on the status of nucleotide excision repair (NER). DNA double strand breaks induced by AOH due to poisoning of topoisomerase IIα were completely repaired in less than 2h. Under cell-free conditions, inhibition of topoisomerase IIα could also be measured for ATX II and STTX III at low concentrations, but the perylene quinones were catalytic inhibitors rather than topoisomerase poisons and did not induce DSBs. DNA strand breaks induced by ATX II and STTX III were more persistent and not completely repaired within 24h. A dependence of the repair rate on the NER status could only be demonstrated for STTX III, resulting in an accumulation of DNA damage in NER-deficient cells. Together with the finding that the DNA glycosylase formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), but not T4 endonuclease V, is able to generate additional DNA strand breaks measurable by the alkaline unwinding assay, we conclude that the genotoxicity of the perylene quinones with an epoxide group is probably caused by the formation of DNA adducts which may be converted to Fpg sensitive sites. PMID:26994491

  7. Nanopore DNA sequencing and epigenetic detection with a MspA nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laszlo, Andrew H.

    epigenetic base modifications such as DNA methylation and describe challenges in detecting such modifications. I then introduce nanopore sequencing and discuss how it has potential to address challenges in both sequencing and modified base detection. Chapter 1 concludes with a summary of previous nanopore work that has formed the foundation for this thesis. Chapter 2 describes our work using a DNA polymerase to control DNA translocation through the pore. Chapter 3 discusses how the DNA polymerase/MspA based system developed in Chapter 2 can be used to detect epigenetically modified bases 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. In Chapter 4 I describe our work to generate and decode long nanopore reads of DNA. Homemade alignment algorithms are used to align nanopore reads to known sequence with applications ranging from species identification to hybrid genome assembly. Chapter 5 concludes the thesis and lays out a road map for the ultimate realization of de novo nanopore DNA sequencing and commercialization of an MspA-based device.

  8. Quantification of 8-oxodGuo lesions in double-stranded DNA using a photoelectrochemical DNA sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bintian; Guo, Liang-Hong; Greenberg, Marc M

    2012-07-17

    Exposure of DNA to oxidative stress conditions results in the generation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo). 8-OxodGuo is genotoxic if left unrepaired. We quantified 8-oxodGuo lesions in double-stranded DNA films by using a photoelectrochemical DNA sensor in conjunction with a specific covalent labeling method. A lesion-containing DNA film was assembled on a SnO(2) nanoparticle modified indium tin oxide electrode through layer-by-layer electrostatic adsorption. The lesions were covalently labeled with a biotin conjugated spermine derivative, and ruthenium tris(bipyridine) labeled streptavidin was introduced as the signal reporter molecule. Photocurrent increased with the number of lesions in the strand and decreased as the film was diluted with intact DNA. Quantification of 8-oxodGuo was achieved with an estimated detection limit of ∼1 lesion in 650 bases or 1.6 fmol of 8-oxodGuo on the electrode. Incubation of the film with a DNA base excision repair enzyme, E. coli formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), resulted in complete loss of the signal, indicating efficient excision of the isolated lesions in the nucleotide. Oxidatively generated DNA damage to a double-stranded calf thymus DNA film by the Fenton reaction was then assessed. One 8-oxodGuo lesion in 520 bases was detected in DNA exposed to 50 μM Fe(2+)/200 μM H(2)O(2). Treatment with Fpg reduced the photocurrent by 50%, indicating only partial excision of 8-oxodGuo. This suggests that tandem lesions, which are resistant to Fpg excision, are generated by the Fenton reaction. Unlike repair enzyme dependent methods, the sensor recognizes 8-oxodGuo in tandem lesions and can avoid underestimating DNA damage. PMID:22746252

  9. Programmable editing of a target base in genomic DNA without double-stranded DNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Komor, Alexis C; Kim, Yongjoo B; Packer, Michael S; Zuris, John A; Liu, David R

    2016-05-19

    Current genome-editing technologies introduce double-stranded (ds) DNA breaks at a target locus as the first step to gene correction. Although most genetic diseases arise from point mutations, current approaches to point mutation correction are inefficient and typically induce an abundance of random insertions and deletions (indels) at the target locus resulting from the cellular response to dsDNA breaks. Here we report the development of 'base editing', a new approach to genome editing that enables the direct, irreversible conversion of one target DNA base into another in a programmable manner, without requiring dsDNA backbone cleavage or a donor template. We engineered fusions of CRISPR/Cas9 and a cytidine deaminase enzyme that retain the ability to be programmed with a guide RNA, do not induce dsDNA breaks, and mediate the direct conversion of cytidine to uridine, thereby effecting a C→T (or G→A) substitution. The resulting 'base editors' convert cytidines within a window of approximately five nucleotides, and can efficiently correct a variety of point mutations relevant to human disease. In four transformed human and murine cell lines, second- and third-generation base editors that fuse uracil glycosylase inhibitor, and that use a Cas9 nickase targeting the non-edited strand, manipulate the cellular DNA repair response to favour desired base-editing outcomes, resulting in permanent correction of ~15-75% of total cellular DNA with minimal (typically ≤1%) indel formation. Base editing expands the scope and efficiency of genome editing of point mutations. PMID:27096365

  10. Erasure of DNA methylation, genomic imprints, and epimutations in a primordial germ-cell model derived from mouse pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Stel, Jente M.; Shioda, Keiko; Qu, Na; Odahima, Junko; Mitsunaga, Shino; Zhang, Xiangfan; Nagano, Makoto; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Isselbacher, Kurt J.; Shioda, Toshi

    2016-01-01

    The genome-wide depletion of 5-methylcytosines (5meCs) caused by passive dilution through DNA synthesis without daughter strand methylation and active enzymatic processes resulting in replacement of 5meCs with unmethylated cytosines is a hallmark of primordial germ cells (PGCs). Although recent studies have shown that in vitro differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to PGC-like cells (PGCLCs) mimics the in vivo differentiation of epiblast cells to PGCs, how DNA methylation status of PGCLCs resembles the dynamics of 5meC erasure in embryonic PGCs remains controversial. Here, by differential detection of genome-wide 5meC and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmeC) distributions by deep sequencing, we show that PGCLCs derived from mouse PSCs recapitulated the process of genome-wide DNA demethylation in embryonic PGCs, including significant demethylation of imprint control regions (ICRs) associated with increased mRNA expression of the corresponding imprinted genes. Although 5hmeCs were also significantly diminished in PGCLCs, they retained greater amounts of 5hmeCs than intragonadal PGCs. The genomes of both PGCLCs and PGCs selectively retained both 5meCs and 5hmeCs at a small number of repeat sequences such as GSAT_MM, of which the significant retention of bisulfite-resistant cytosines was corroborated by reanalysis of previously published whole-genome bisulfite sequencing data for intragonadal PGCs. PSCs harboring abnormal hypermethylation at ICRs of the Dlk1-Gtl2-Dio3 imprinting cluster diminished these 5meCs upon differentiation to PGCLCs, resulting in transcriptional reactivation of the Gtl2 gene. These observations support the usefulness of PGCLCs in studying the germline epigenetic erasure including imprinted genes, epimutations, and erasure-resistant loci, which may be involved in transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. PMID:27486249

  11. Base-resolution detection of N4-methylcytosine in genomic DNA using 4mC-Tet-assisted-bisulfite-sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Miao; Ji, Lexiang; Neumann, Drexel A.; Chung, Dae -Hwan; Groom, Joseph; Westpheling, Janet; He, Chuan; Schmitz, Robert J.

    2015-07-15

    Restriction-modification (R-M) systems pose a major barrier to DNA transformation and genetic engineering of bacterial species. Systematic identification of DNA methylation in R-M systems, including N6-methyladenine (6mA), 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and N4-methylcytosine (4mC), will enable strategies to make these species genetically tractable. Although single-molecule, real time (SMRT) sequencing technology is capable of detecting 4mC directly for any bacterial species regardless of whether an assembled genome exists or not, it is not as scalable to profiling hundreds to thousands of samples compared with the commonly used next-generation sequencing technologies. Here, we present 4mC-Tet-assisted bisulfite-sequencing (4mC-TAB-seq), a next-generation sequencing method that rapidly and cost efficiently reveals the genome-wide locations of 4mC for bacterial species with an available assembled reference genome. In 4mC-TAB-seq, both cytosines and 5mCs are read out as thymines, whereas only 4mCs are read out as cytosines, revealing their specific positions throughout the genome. We applied 4mC-TAB-seq to study the methylation of a member of the hyperthermophilc genus, Caldicellulosiruptor, in which 4mC-related restriction is a major barrier to DNA transformation from other species. Lastly, in combination with MethylC-seq, both 4mC- and 5mC-containing motifs are identified which can assist in rapid and efficient genetic engineering of these bacteria in the future.

  12. Gadd45a promotes DNA demethylation through TDG.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Gu, Tian-Peng; Weber, Alain R; Shen, Jia-Zhen; Li, Bin-Zhong; Xie, Zhi-Guo; Yin, Ruichuan; Guo, Fan; Liu, Xiaomeng; Tang, Fuchou; Wang, Hailin; Schär, Primo; Xu, Guo-Liang

    2015-04-30

    Growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 (Gadd45) family members have been implicated in DNA demethylation in vertebrates. However, it remained unclear how they contribute to the demethylation process. Here, we demonstrate that Gadd45a promotes active DNA demethylation through thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) which has recently been shown to excise 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) generated in Ten-eleven-translocation (Tet)-initiated oxidative demethylation. The connection of Gadd45a with oxidative demethylation is evidenced by the enhanced activation of a methylated reporter gene in HEK293T cells expressing Gadd45a in combination with catalytically active TDG and Tet. Gadd45a interacts with TDG physically and increases the removal of 5fC and 5caC from genomic and transfected plasmid DNA by TDG. Knockout of both Gadd45a and Gadd45b from mouse ES cells leads to hypermethylation of specific genomic loci most of which are also targets of TDG and show 5fC enrichment in TDG-deficient cells. These observations indicate that the demethylation effect of Gadd45a is mediated by TDG activity. This finding thus unites Gadd45a with the recently defined Tet-initiated demethylation pathway. PMID:25845601

  13. Gadd45a promotes DNA demethylation through TDG

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Gu, Tian-Peng; Weber, Alain R.; Shen, Jia-Zhen; Li, Bin-Zhong; Xie, Zhi-Guo; Yin, Ruichuan; Guo, Fan; Liu, Xiaomeng; Tang, Fuchou; Wang, Hailin; Schär, Primo; Xu, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 (Gadd45) family members have been implicated in DNA demethylation in vertebrates. However, it remained unclear how they contribute to the demethylation process. Here, we demonstrate that Gadd45a promotes active DNA demethylation through thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) which has recently been shown to excise 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) generated in Ten-eleven-translocation (Tet)—initiated oxidative demethylation. The connection of Gadd45a with oxidative demethylation is evidenced by the enhanced activation of a methylated reporter gene in HEK293T cells expressing Gadd45a in combination with catalytically active TDG and Tet. Gadd45a interacts with TDG physically and increases the removal of 5fC and 5caC from genomic and transfected plasmid DNA by TDG. Knockout of both Gadd45a and Gadd45b from mouse ES cells leads to hypermethylation of specific genomic loci most of which are also targets of TDG and show 5fC enrichment in TDG-deficient cells. These observations indicate that the demethylation effect of Gadd45a is mediated by TDG activity. This finding thus unites Gadd45a with the recently defined Tet-initiated demethylation pathway. PMID:25845601

  14. Involvement of mammalian OGG1(MMH) in excision of the 8-hydroxyguanine residue in DNA.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Susumu

    2002-05-01

    8-Hydroxyguanine (7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine, abbreviated as 8-OH-G or 8-oxoG) is the site of a frequent mutagenic DNA lesion produced by oxidative damage. MutM of E. coli and OGG1 of Saccharomyces cervisiae are known to possess 8-OH-G glycosylase and apurinic (AP) site lyase activity. cDNA clones of four isoforms (types 1a, 1b, 1c, and 2) of human OGG1 homologs (hMMH) were isolated. In order to examine whether expression of hMMH (hOGG1) protein actually occurs in human cells, we prepared type 1a specific antibody, and by using this antibody, we showed that type 1a protein isolated from HeLaS3 has 8-OH-G glycosylase/lyase activity. Furthermore, we showed that type 1a protein is a major enzyme for repair of the 8-OH-G lesion in human cells. In our second study, we generated a mouse line carrying an inactivated mutant Mmh allele by targeted gene disruption. Liver extracts of Mmh homozygous mutant mice were found to have loss of the nicking activity for the 8-OH-G site. In addition, the amount of endogenous 8-OH-G in liver DNA of the homozygous mice increased linearly with age, reaching 7-fold increase in 14 week old mice, over that of wild-type or heterozygous mice. Furthermore, when homozygous mice were fed the oxygen radical-forming agent KBrO3, to provide oxidative stress, the level of 8-OH-G in kidney DNA was tremendously increased: more than 200-fold as that of control mice without oxidative stress after 12 weeks of age. These results indicate that Ogg1/Mmh plays an essential role in the repair of the 8-OH-G residue in DNA produced by oxidative stress. PMID:11978483

  15. An immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, S.S.; Erlanger, B.F. . Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; Columbia Univ., New York, NY . Dept. of Microbiology)

    1989-01-01

    The most studied radiation-induced modified DNA base is thymine glycol. Thymine glycols are produced in relatively high yields in irradiated DNA and are also formed as a consequence of oxidative stress. Thymine glycol has been shown to be an in vitro replicative block to DNA polymerases as well as a cytotoxic lesion. DNA glycosylases that remove thymine glycol from damaged DNA are found in both prokaryotes an deukaryotes. Thus this lesion provides a good model for studying the potential biological consequences of pyrimidine ring saturation products. In order to elicit antibodies that would react with unique modified base on a damaged DNA molecule, we have chosen to chemically synthesize the hapten of interest and conjugate it to a protein carrier. Thymine glycol monophosphate was synthesized, conjugated by the carbodiimide method to bovine serum albumin (BSA), and used as an immunogen. Initially, polyclonal antibodies were produced in rabbits. These antibodies had high affinity and specificity as measured by both albumin (RSA) and by enzyme immunoassay using either the conjugate or DNA oxidized inhibited by thymine glycol, thymidine glycol and thymine glycol monophosphate determinants for the phosphate group in addition to the thymidine glycol. In both the direct and competitive assays, this antibody reacts with osmium tetroxide-treated DNA containing cis-thymine glycols and DNA X-irradiated in vitro at a femtomole level of sensitivity. 24 refs.

  16. Low intensity infrared laser effects on Escherichia coli cultures and plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Teixeira, A. F.; Presta, G. A.; Geller, M.; Valença, S. S.; Paoli, F.

    2012-10-01

    Biostimulative effect of low intensity laser in tissues has been described on a photobiological basis and clinical protocols are recommended for treatment of various diseases. The aim of this work was to evaluate effects of laser exposure on the survival of Escherichia coli cultures and plasmid topological forms. Escherichia coli cultures and plasmids were exposed to infrared laser to study bacterial survival and electrophoretic profile, respectively. Data indicate low intensity infrared laser: (i) had no effect on E. coli wild type, endonuclease IV, exonuclease III, formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein and endonuclease III deficient cultures, but decreased the survival of E. coli UvrA protein deficient cultures; (ii) there was no alteration in the electrophoretic profile of plasmids. Exposure to low intensity infrared laser decreases survival of Escherichia coli cultures deficient in nucleotide excision repair of DNA and this effect could depend on fluences, wavelength and tissues conditions.

  17. SUMO-modification and elimination of the active DNA demethylation enzyme TDG in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Taishi; Fujimitsu, Yuka; Yoshikai, Yushi; Sasano, Takashi; Yamada, Koji; Murakami, Masataka; Urano, Takeshi; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2014-05-01

    Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) is a base excision repair enzyme that interacts with the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase RNF4 and functions in the active DNA demethylation pathway. Here we showed that both SUMOylated and non-modified forms of endogenous TDG fluctuated during the cell cycle and in response to drugs that perturbed cell cycle progression, including hydroxyurea and nocodazole. Additionally, we detected a SUMOylation-independent association between TDG and RNF4 in vitro as well as in vivo, and observed that both forms of TDG were efficiently degraded in RNF4-depleted cells when arrested at S phase. Our findings provide insights into the in vivo dynamics of TDG SUMOylation and further clarify the TDG-RNF4 interaction. PMID:24727457

  18. Biomarkers of oxidative damage to DNA and repair.

    PubMed

    Loft, Steffen; Høgh Danielsen, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Lone; Risom, Lotte; Forchhammer, Lykke; Møller, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Oxidative-stress-induced damage to DNA includes a multitude of lesions, many of which are mutagenic and have multiple roles in cancer and aging. Many lesions have been characterized by MS-based methods after extraction and digestion of DNA. These preparation steps may cause spurious base oxidation, which is less likely to occur with methods such as the comet assay, which are based on nicking of the DNA strand at modified bases, but offer less specificity. The European Standards Committee on Oxidative DNA Damage has concluded that the true levels of the most widely studied lesion, 8-oxodG (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine), in cellular DNA is between 0.5 and 5 lesions per 10(6) dG bases. Base excision repair of oxidative damage to DNA can be assessed by nicking assays based on oligonucleotides with lesions or the comet assay, by mRNA expression levels or, in the case of, e.g., OGG1 (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1), responsible for repair of 8-oxodG, by genotyping. Products of repair in DNA or the nucleotide pool, such as 8-oxodG, excreted into the urine can be assessed by MS-based methods and generally reflects the rate of damage. Experimental and population-based studies indicate that many environmental factors, including particulate air pollution, cause oxidative damage to DNA, whereas diets rich in fruit and vegetables or antioxidant supplements may reduce the levels and enhance repair. Urinary excretion of 8-oxodG, genotype and expression of OGG1 have been associated with risk of cancer in cohort settings, whereas altered levels of damage, repair or urinary excretion in case-control settings may be a consequence rather than the cause of the disease. PMID:18793191

  19. Use of the comet assay to measure DNA damage in cells exposed to photosensitizers and gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouget, J.-P.; Ravanat, J.-L.; Douki, T.; Richard, M.-J.; Cadet, J.

    1999-01-01

    We used the comet assay associated with DNA-glycosylases to estimate DNA damage in cells exposed to gamma irradiation or photosensitized either with methylene blue or orange acridine. A calibration performed using irradiation allowed the measurement of the steady-state level and the yield of 8-oxodGuo as well as strand breaks and alkali-labile sites. Nous avons utilisé la méthode des comètes associée à des ADN-glycosylases, pour estimer les dommages de l'ADN dans des cellules après l'exposition à un rayonnement gamma ou après photosensibilisation par le bleu de méthylène ou l'acridine orange. Une calibration de la méthode des comètes a permis de mesurer le niveau basal et les taux de formation de 8-oxodGuo ainsi que le nombre de cassures de brins et de sites alcali labiles.

  20. The Role of Mitochondrial DNA in Mediating Alveolar Epithelial Cell Apoptosis and Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Jo; Cheresh, Paul; Jablonski, Renea P.; Williams, David B.; Kamp, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Convincing evidence has emerged demonstrating that impairment of mitochondrial function is critically important in regulating alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) programmed cell death (apoptosis) that may contribute to aging-related lung diseases, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and asbestosis (pulmonary fibrosis following asbestos exposure). The mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes for 13 proteins, including several essential for oxidative phosphorylation. We review the evidence implicating that oxidative stress-induced mtDNA damage promotes AEC apoptosis and pulmonary fibrosis. We focus on the emerging role for AEC mtDNA damage repair by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO-2) in maintaining mtDNA integrity which is important in preventing AEC apoptosis and asbestos-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model. We then review recent studies linking the sirtuin (SIRT) family members, especially SIRT3, to mitochondrial integrity and mtDNA damage repair and aging. We present a conceptual model of how SIRTs modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven mitochondrial metabolism that may be important for their tumor suppressor function. The emerging insights into the pathobiology underlying AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis is suggesting novel therapeutic targets that may prove useful for the management of age-related diseases, including pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer. PMID:26370974

  1. Ochratoxin A induces oxidative DNA damage in liver and kidney after oral dosing to rats.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Hennicke G; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Janzowski, Christine; Kiossev, Jetchko; Latendresse, John R; Schlatter, Josef; Turesky, Robert J

    2005-12-01

    The nephrotoxic/carcinogenic mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) occurs as a contaminant in food and feed and may be linked to human endemic Balkan nephropathy. The mechanism of OTA-derived carcinogenicity is still under debate, since reactive metabolites of OTA and DNA adducts have not been unambiguously identified. Oxidative DNA damage, however, has been observed in vitro after incubation of mammalian cells with OTA. In this study, we investigated whether OTA induces oxidative DNA damage in vivo as well. Male F344 rats were dosed with 0, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3 mg/kg bw per day OTA for 4 wk (gavage, 7 days/wk, five animals per dose group). Subsequently, oxidative DNA damage was determined in liver and kidney by the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) with/without use of the repair enzyme formamido-pyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase (FPG). The administration of OTA had no effect on basic DNA damage (determined without FPG); however, OTA-mediated oxidative damage was detected with FPG treatment in kidney and liver DNA of all dose groups. Since the doses were in a range that had caused kidney tumors in a 2-year carcinogenicity study with rats, the oxidative DNA damage induced by OTA may help to explain its mechanism of carcinogenicity. For the selective induction of tumors in the kidney, increased oxidative stress in connection with severe cytotoxicity and increased cell proliferation might represent driving factors. PMID:16302199

  2. Structure of Naegleria Tet-like dioxygenase (NgTet1) in complexes with a reaction intermediate 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Pais, June E.; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Ivan R.; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    The family of ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases is widely distributed across the eukaryotic tree of life, from mammals to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Like mammalian Tet proteins, the Naegleria Tet-like protein, NgTet1, acts on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and generates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in three consecutive, Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxidation reactions. The two intermediates, 5hmC and 5fC, could be considered either as the reaction product of the previous enzymatic cycle or the substrate for the next cycle. Here we present a new crystal structure of NgTet1 in complex with DNA containing a 5hmC. Along with the previously solved NgTet1–5mC structure, the two complexes offer a detailed picture of the active site at individual stages of the reaction cycle. In the crystal, the hydroxymethyl (OH-CH2-) moiety of 5hmC points to the metal center, representing the reaction product of 5mC hydroxylation. The hydroxyl oxygen atom could be rotated away from the metal center, to a hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala212, Val293 and Phe295. Such rotation turns the hydroxyl oxygen atom away from the product conformation, and exposes the target CH2 towards the metal-ligand water molecule, where a dioxygen O2 molecule would occupy to initiate the next round of reaction by abstracting a hydrogen atom from the substrate. The Ala212-to-Val (A212V) mutant profoundly limits the product to 5hmC, probably because the reduced hydrophobic pocket size restricts the binding of 5hmC as a substrate. PMID:26323320

  3. Structure of Naegleria Tet-like dioxygenase (NgTet1) in complexes with a reaction intermediate 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Pais, June E.; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Jr., Ivan R.; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-08-31

    The family of ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases is widely distributed across the eukaryotic tree of life, from mammals to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Like mammalian Tet proteins, the Naegleria Tet-like protein, NgTet1, acts on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and generates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in three consecutive, Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxidation reactions. The two intermediates, 5hmC and 5fC, could be considered either as the reaction product of the previous enzymatic cycle or the substrate for the next cycle. Here we present a new crystal structure of NgTet1 in complex with DNA containing a 5hmC. Along with the previously solvedmore » NgTet1–5mC structure, the two complexes offer a detailed picture of the active site at individual stages of the reaction cycle. In the crystal, the hydroxymethyl (OH-CH2-) moiety of 5hmC points to the metal center, representing the reaction product of 5mC hydroxylation. The hydroxyl oxygen atom could be rotated away from the metal center, to a hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala212, Val293 and Phe295. Such rotation turns the hydroxyl oxygen atom away from the product conformation, and exposes the target CH2 towards the metal-ligand water molecule, where a dioxygen O2 molecule would occupy to initiate the next round of reaction by abstracting a hydrogen atom from the substrate. The Ala212-to-Val (A212V) mutant profoundly limits the product to 5hmC, probably due to the reduced hydrophobic pocket size restricts the binding of 5hmC as a substrate.« less

  4. Structure of Naegleria Tet-like dioxygenase (NgTet1) in complexes with a reaction intermediate 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Pais, June E; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Ivan R; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-12-15

    The family of ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases is widely distributed across the eukaryotic tree of life, from mammals to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Like mammalian Tet proteins, the Naegleria Tet-like protein, NgTet1, acts on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and generates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in three consecutive, Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxidation reactions. The two intermediates, 5hmC and 5fC, could be considered either as the reaction product of the previous enzymatic cycle or the substrate for the next cycle. Here we present a new crystal structure of NgTet1 in complex with DNA containing a 5hmC. Along with the previously solved NgTet1-5mC structure, the two complexes offer a detailed picture of the active site at individual stages of the reaction cycle. In the crystal, the hydroxymethyl (OH-CH2-) moiety of 5hmC points to the metal center, representing the reaction product of 5mC hydroxylation. The hydroxyl oxygen atom could be rotated away from the metal center, to a hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala212, Val293 and Phe295. Such rotation turns the hydroxyl oxygen atom away from the product conformation, and exposes the target CH2 towards the metal-ligand water molecule, where a dioxygen O2 molecule would occupy to initiate the next round of reaction by abstracting a hydrogen atom from the substrate. The Ala212-to-Val (A212V) mutant profoundly limits the product to 5hmC, probably because the reduced hydrophobic pocket size restricts the binding of 5hmC as a substrate. PMID:26323320

  5. A Study of Alterations in DNA Epigenetic Modifications (5mC and 5hmC) and Gene Expression Influenced by Simulated Microgravity in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Basudev; Seetharam, Arun; Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Yunlong; Lossie, Amy C; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Cells alter their gene expression in response to exposure to various environmental changes. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are believed to regulate the alterations in gene expression patterns. In vitro and in vivo studies have documented changes in cellular proliferation, cytoskeletal remodeling, signal transduction, bone mineralization and immune deficiency under the influence of microgravity conditions experienced in space. However microgravity induced changes in the epigenome have not been well characterized. In this study we have used Next-generation Sequencing (NGS) to profile ground-based "simulated" microgravity induced changes on DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine or 5mC), hydroxymethylation (5-hydroxymethylcytosine or 5hmC), and simultaneous gene expression in cultured human lymphoblastoid cells. Our results indicate that simulated microgravity induced alterations in the methylome (~60% of the differentially methylated regions or DMRs are hypomethylated and ~92% of the differentially hydroxymethylated regions or DHMRs are hyperhydroxymethylated). Simulated microgravity also induced differential expression in 370 transcripts that were associated with crucial biological processes such as oxidative stress response, carbohydrate metabolism and regulation of transcription. While we were not able to obtain any global trend correlating the changes of methylation/ hydroxylation with gene expression, we have been able to profile the simulated microgravity induced changes of 5mC over some of the differentially expressed genes that includes five genes undergoing differential methylation over their promoters and twenty five genes undergoing differential methylation over their gene-bodies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first NGS-based study to profile epigenomic patterns induced by short time exposure of simulated microgravity and we believe that our findings can be a valuable resource for future explorations. PMID:26820575

  6. Scriptaid Treatment Decreases DNA Methyltransferase 1 Expression by Induction of MicroRNA-152 Expression in Porcine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Choi, Jeong-woo; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Cui, Xiang-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal epigenetic reprogramming of donor nuclei after somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is thought to be the main cause of low cloning efficiencies. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated a positive role of Scriptaid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) that belongs to an existing class of hydroxamic acid-containing HDACis, on the development competence of cloned embryos in many species. The present study investigated the effects of Scriptaid on the development of porcine SCNT embryos in vitro and its mechanism. Treatment with 300 or 500 nM Scriptaid for 20 h after activation significantly increased the percentage of SCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage and the total number of cells per blastocyst and significantly decreased the percentage of apoptotic cells in blastocysts. Scriptaid treatment significantly increased the level of histone H3 acetylated at K9 and the conversion of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and significantly decreased the level of histone H3 trimethylated at K9 at the pronuclear stage. As a potential mechanism for the DNA methylation changes, our results showed that the expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 was frequently down-regulated in Scriptaid-treated embryos in comparison with untreated embryos and was inversely correlated to endogenous microRNA-152 (miR-152). Taken together, these findings illustrated a crucial functional crosstalk between miR-152 and DNMT1. Meanwhile, mRNA and protein levels of POU5F1 and CDX2 were increased in Scriptaid-treated embryos. mRNA levels of Caspase3, and Bax were significantly decreased and that of Bcl-xL was significantly increased in Scriptaid-treated embryos. In conclusion, these observations would contribute to uncover the nuclear reprogramming mechanisms underlying the effects of Scriptaid on the improvement of porcine SCNT embryos. PMID:26261994

  7. A Study of Alterations in DNA Epigenetic Modifications (5mC and 5hmC) and Gene Expression Influenced by Simulated Microgravity in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Yunlong; Lossie, Amy C.; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Cells alter their gene expression in response to exposure to various environmental changes. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are believed to regulate the alterations in gene expression patterns. In vitro and in vivo studies have documented changes in cellular proliferation, cytoskeletal remodeling, signal transduction, bone mineralization and immune deficiency under the influence of microgravity conditions experienced in space. However microgravity induced changes in the epigenome have not been well characterized. In this study we have used Next-generation Sequencing (NGS) to profile ground-based “simulated” microgravity induced changes on DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine or 5mC), hydroxymethylation (5-hydroxymethylcytosine or 5hmC), and simultaneous gene expression in cultured human lymphoblastoid cells. Our results indicate that simulated microgravity induced alterations in the methylome (~60% of the differentially methylated regions or DMRs are hypomethylated and ~92% of the differentially hydroxymethylated regions or DHMRs are hyperhydroxymethylated). Simulated microgravity also induced differential expression in 370 transcripts that were associated with crucial biological processes such as oxidative stress response, carbohydrate metabolism and regulation of transcription. While we were not able to obtain any global trend correlating the changes of methylation/ hydroxylation with gene expression, we have been able to profile the simulated microgravity induced changes of 5mC over some of the differentially expressed genes that includes five genes undergoing differential methylation over their promoters and twenty five genes undergoing differential methylation over their gene-bodies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first NGS-based study to profile epigenomic patterns induced by short time exposure of simulated microgravity and we believe that our findings can be a valuable resource for future explorations. PMID:26820575

  8. Sequence-specific DNA damage induced by ultraviolet A-irradiated folic acid via its photolysis product.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Oikawa, Shinji; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2003-02-15

    DNA damage mediated by photosensitizers participates in solar carcinogenesis. Fluorescence measurement and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated that photoirradiated folic acid, one of the photosensitizers in cells, generates pterine-6-carboxylic acid (PCA). Experiments using 32P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from a human gene showed that ultraviolet A-irradiated folic acid or PCA caused DNA cleavage specifically at consecutive G residues in double-stranded DNA after Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase or piperidine treatment. The amount of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2(')-deoxyguanosine formed through this DNA photoreaction in double-stranded DNA exceeded that in single-stranded DNA. Kinetic studies suggested that DNA damage is caused mainly by photoexcited PCA generated from folic acid rather than by folic acid itself. In conclusion, photoirradiated folic acid generates PCA, which induces DNA photooxidation specifically at consecutive G residues through electron transfer. Excess intake of folic acid supplements may increase a risk of skin cancer by solar ultraviolet light. PMID:12573286

  9. Artifacts associated with the measurement of oxidized DNA bases.

    PubMed Central

    Cadet, J; Douki, T; Ravanat, J L

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we review recent aspects of the measurement of oxidized DNA bases, currently a matter of debate. There has long been an interest in the determination of the level of oxidized bases in cellular DNA under both normal and oxidative stress conditions. In this respect, the situation is confusing because variations that may be as large as two orders of magnitude have been reported for the yield of the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua) in similar DNA samples. However, recent findings clearly show that application of several assays like gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and -32P--postlabeling may lead to a significant overestimation of the level of oxidized bases in cellular DNA. In particular, the silylation step, which is required to make the samples volatile for the GC-MS analysis, has been shown to induce oxidation of normal bases at the level of about one oxidized base per 10(4) normal bases. This has been found to be a general process that applies in particular to 8-oxoGua, 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydroadenine,5-hydroxycytosine, 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, and 5-formyluracil. Interestingly, prepurification of the oxidized bases from DNA hydrolysate prior to the derivatization reaction prevents artefactual oxidation. Under these conditions, the level of oxidized bases measured by GC-MS is similar to that obtained by HPLC associated with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC). It should be added that the level of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2;-deoxyguanosine in control cellular DNA has been found to be about fivefold lower than in earlier HPLC-EC measurements by using appropriate conditions of extraction and enzymatic digestion of DNA. Similar conclusions were reached by measuring formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase sensitive sites as revealed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Images Figure 1. PMID:9349826

  10. DNA damage induced by the direct effect of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoya, A.; Shikazono, N.; Fujii, K.; Urushibara, A.; Akamatsu, K.; Watanabe, R.

    2008-10-01

    We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced by the direct effect of radiation. The yields of single- (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DSB), base lesions and clustered damage were measured using the agarose gel electrophoresis method after exposing to various kinds of radiations to a simple model DNA molecule, fully hydrated closed-circular plasmid DNA (pUC18). The yield of SSB does not show significant dependence on linear energy transfer (LET) values. On the other hand, the yields of base lesions revealed by enzymatic probes, endonuclease III (Nth) and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg), which excise base lesions and leave a nick at the damage site, strongly depend on LET values. Soft X-ray photon (150 kVp) irradiation gives a maximum yield of the base lesions detected by the enzymatic probes as SSB and clustered damage, which is composed of one base lesion and proximate other base lesions or SSBs. The clustered damage is visualized as an enzymatically induced DSB. The yields of the enzymatically additional damages strikingly decrease with increasing levels of LET. These results suggest that in higher LET regions, the repair enzymes used as probes are compromised because of the dense damage clustering. The studies using simple plasmid DNA as a irradiation sample, however, have a technical difficulty to detect multiple SSBs in a plasmid DNA. To detect the additional SSBs induced in opposite strand of the first SSB, we have also developed a novel technique of DNA-denaturation assay. This allows us to detect multiply induced SSBs in both strand of DNA, but not induced DSB.

  11. Mechanism of maltal hydration catalyzed by. beta. -amylase: Role of protein structure in controlling the steric outcome of reactions catalyzed by a glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahata, Sumio ); Chiba, S. ); Brewer, C.F.; Hehre, E.J. )

    1991-07-09

    Crystalline (monomeric) soybean and (tetrameric) sweet potato {beta}-amylase were shown to catalyze the cis hydration of maltal ({alpha}-D-glucopyranosyl-2-deoxy-D-arabino-hex-1-enitol) to form {beta}-2-deoxymaltose. As reported earlier with the sweet potato enzyme, maltal hydration in D{sub 2}O by soybean {beta}-amylase was found to exhibit an unusually large solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effect (V{sub H}/V{sub D}=6.5), a reaction rate linearly dependent on the mole fraction of deuterium, and 2-deoxy-(2(a)-{sup 2}H)maltose as product. These results indicate (for each {beta}-amylase) that protonation is the rate-limiting step in a reaction involving a nearly symmetric one-proton transition state and that maltal is specifically protonated from above the double bond. That maltal undergoes cis hydration provides evidence in support of a general-acid-catalyzed, carbonium ion mediated reaction. Of fundamental significance is that {beta}-amylase protonates maltal from a direction opposite that assumed for protonating strach, yet creates products of the same anomeric configuration from both. Such stereochemical dichotomy argues for the overriding role of protein structures is dictating the steric outcome of reactions catalyzed by a glycosylase, by limiting the approach and orientation of water or other acceptors to the reaction center.

  12. Beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage and alteration in the expression patterns of DNA repair-related genes.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry M; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Hassan, Memy H; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2013-09-01

    Beryllium metal has physical properties that make its use essential for very specific applications, such as medical diagnostics, nuclear/fusion reactors and aerospace applications. Because of the widespread human exposure to beryllium metals and the discrepancy of the genotoxic results in the reported literature, detail assessments of the genetic damage of beryllium are warranted. Mice exposed to beryllium chloride at an oral dose of 23mg/kg for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in the level of DNA-strand breaking and micronuclei formation as detected by a bone marrow standard comet assay and micronucleus test. Whereas slight beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage was detected following formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase digestion, digestion with endonuclease III resulted in considerable increases in oxidative DNA damage after the 11.5 and 23mg/kg/day treatment as detected by enzyme-modified comet assays. Increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was also directly correlated with increased bone marrow micronuclei formation and DNA strand breaks, which further confirm the involvement of oxidative stress in the induction of bone marrow genetic damage after exposure to beryllium chloride. Gene expression analysis on the bone marrow cells from beryllium chloride-exposed mice showed significant alterations in genes associated with DNA damage repair. Therefore, beryllium chloride may cause genetic damage to bone marrow cells due to the oxidative stress and the induced unrepaired DNA damage is probably due to the down-regulation in the expression of DNA repair genes, which may lead to genotoxicity and eventually cause carcinogenicity. PMID:23793613

  13. Cleaving DNA with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmi, Nir; Balkhi, Shameelah R.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    1998-03-01

    A DNA structure is described that can cleave single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides in the presence of ionic copper. This ``deoxyribozyme'' can self-cleave or can operate as a bimolecular complex that simultaneously makes use of duplex and triplex interactions to bind and cleave separate DNA substrates. Bimolecular deoxyribozyme-mediated strand scission proceeds with a kobs of 0.2 min-1, whereas the corresponding uncatalyzed reaction could not be detected. The duplex and triplex recognition domains can be altered, making possible the targeted cleavage of single-stranded DNAs with different nucleotide sequences. Several small synthetic DNAs were made to function as simple ``restriction enzymes'' for the site-specific cleavage of single-stranded DNA.

  14. Dichromatic laser radiation effects on DNA of Escherichia coli and plasmids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, W. A.; Polignano, G. A. C.; Guimarães, O. R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Dichromatic and consecutive laser radiations have attracted increased attention for clinical applications as offering new tools for the treatment of dysfunctional tissues in situations where monochromatic radiation is not effective. This work evaluated the survival, filamentation and morphology of Escherichia coli cells, and the induction of DNA lesions, in plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity consecutive dichromatic laser radiation. Exponential and stationary wild type and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein deficient E. coli cultures were exposed to consecutive low-intensity dichromatic laser radiation (infrared laser immediately after red laser) to study the survival, filamentation and morphology of bacterial cells. Plasmid DNA samples were exposed to dichromatic radiation to study DNA lesions by electrophoretic profile. Dichromatic laser radiation affects the survival, filamentation and morphology of E. coli cultures depending on the growth phase and the functional repair mechanism of oxidizing lesions in DNA, but does not induce single/double strands breaks or alkali-labile DNA lesions. Results show that low-intensity consecutive dichromatic laser radiation induces biological effects that differ from those induced by monochromatic laser radiation, suggesting that other therapeutic effects could be obtained using dichromatic radiation.

  15. DNA damage in human skin keratinocytes caused by multiwalled carbon nanotubes with carboxylate functionalization.

    PubMed

    McShan, Danielle; Yu, Hongtao

    2014-07-01

    Water-soluble carbon nanotubes have been found to be one of the most promising nanomaterials in biological- and biomedical-based applications. However, there have been major concerns on their ability to cause cellular and DNA damages upon exposure. In this work, we explore the toxic effects of three multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs: nonpurified, purified and carboxylate-functionalized) on human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT). Cytotoxicity tests using the conventional thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and the water-soluble tetrazolium (WST-1) assays for 0.5 or 24 h exposure to 20 μg/mL of MWCNTs show that all three caused minimum cytotoxicity that is generally not statistically significant. Assessment of direct and oxidative DNA damages using both alkaline Comet assay and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase-modified Comet assay reveals that the treatment with 20 μg/mL of MWCNTs does not cause significant direct DNA damages, but causes great amount of oxidative DNA damages in HaCaT cells. The oxidative DNA damage reaches the maximum amount at 4 h of incubation in Dulbecco's minimum essential medium, but decreases to the minimum at 8 and 24 h of incubation, indicating repair of the oxidative damages by the intrinsic DNA repair mechanism of the cells. PMID:23012341

  16. DNA Damage Responses Are Induced by tRNA Anticodon Nucleases and Hygromycin B.

    PubMed

    Wemhoff, Sabrina; Klassen, Roland; Beetz, Anja; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed DNA damage to occur during the toxic action of PaT, a fungal anticodon ribonuclease (ACNase) targeting the translation machinery via tRNA cleavage. Here, we demonstrate that other translational stressors induce DNA damage-like responses in yeast as well: not only zymocin, another ACNase from the dairy yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also translational antibiotics, most pronouncedly hygromycin B (HygB). Specifically, DNA repair mechanisms BER (base excision repair), HR (homologous recombination) and PRR (post replication repair) provided protection, whereas NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) aggravated toxicity of all translational inhibitors. Analysis of specific BER mutants disclosed a strong HygB, zymocin and PaT protective effect of the endonucleases acting on apurinic sites. In cells defective in AP endonucleases, inactivation of the DNA glycosylase Ung1 increased tolerance to ACNases and HygB. In addition, Mag1 specifically contributes to the repair of DNA lesions caused by HygB. Consistent with DNA damage provoked by translation inhibitors, mutation frequencies were elevated upon exposure to both fungal ACNases and HygB. Since polymerase ζ contributed to toxicity in all instances, error-prone lesion-bypass probably accounts for the mutagenic effects. The finding that differently acting inhibitors of protein biosynthesis induce alike cellular responses in DNA repair mutants is novel and suggests the dependency of genome stability on translational fidelity. PMID:27472060

  17. Mitochondrial Targeted Endonuclease III DNA Repair Enzyme Protects against Ventilator Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Masahiro; Mouner, Marc; Chouteau, Joshua M; Gorodnya, Olena M; Ruchko, Mykhaylo V; Wilson, Glenn L; Gillespie, Mark N; Parker, James C

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, was previously reported to protect against mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). In the present study we determined whether mitochondrial targeted endonuclease III (EndoIII) which cleaves oxidized pyrimidines rather than purines from damaged DNA would also protect the lung. Minimal injury from 1 h ventilation at 40 cmH2O peak inflation pressure (PIP) was reversed by EndoIII pretreatment. Moderate lung injury due to ventilation for 2 h at 40 cmH2O PIP produced a 25-fold increase in total extravascular albumin space, a 60% increase in W/D weight ratio, and marked increases in MIP-2 and IL-6. Oxidative mtDNA damage and decreases in the total tissue glutathione (GSH) and the GSH/GSSH ratio also occurred. All of these indices of injury were attenuated by mitochondrial targeted EndoIII. Massive lung injury caused by 2 h ventilation at 50 cmH2O PIP was not attenuated by EndoIII pretreatment, but all untreated mice died prior to completing the two hour ventilation protocol, whereas all EndoIII-treated mice lived for the duration of ventilation. Thus, mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzymes were protective against mild and moderate lung damage and they enhanced survival in the most severely injured group. PMID:25153040

  18. DNA Damage Responses Are Induced by tRNA Anticodon Nucleases and Hygromycin B

    PubMed Central

    Beetz, Anja; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed DNA damage to occur during the toxic action of PaT, a fungal anticodon ribonuclease (ACNase) targeting the translation machinery via tRNA cleavage. Here, we demonstrate that other translational stressors induce DNA damage-like responses in yeast as well: not only zymocin, another ACNase from the dairy yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also translational antibiotics, most pronouncedly hygromycin B (HygB). Specifically, DNA repair mechanisms BER (base excision repair), HR (homologous recombination) and PRR (post replication repair) provided protection, whereas NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) aggravated toxicity of all translational inhibitors. Analysis of specific BER mutants disclosed a strong HygB, zymocin and PaT protective effect of the endonucleases acting on apurinic sites. In cells defective in AP endonucleases, inactivation of the DNA glycosylase Ung1 increased tolerance to ACNases and HygB. In addition, Mag1 specifically contributes to the repair of DNA lesions caused by HygB. Consistent with DNA damage provoked by translation inhibitors, mutation frequencies were elevated upon exposure to both fungal ACNases and HygB. Since polymerase ζ contributed to toxicity in all instances, error-prone lesion-bypass probably accounts for the mutagenic effects. The finding that differently acting inhibitors of protein biosynthesis induce alike cellular responses in DNA repair mutants is novel and suggests the dependency of genome stability on translational fidelity. PMID:27472060

  19. DNA polymerase X from Deinococcus radiodurans implicated in bacterial tolerance to DNA damage is characterized as a short patch base excision repair polymerase.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Misra, Hari S

    2009-09-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans R1 genome encodes an X-family DNA repair polymerase homologous to eukaryotic DNA polymerase beta. The recombinant deinococcal polymerase X (PolX) purified from transgenic Escherichia coli showed deoxynucleotidyltransferase activity. Unlike the Klenow fragment of E. coli, this enzyme showed short patch DNA synthesis activity on heteropolymeric DNA substrate. The recombinant enzyme showed 5'-deoxyribose phosphate (5'-dRP) lyase activity and base excision repair function in vitro, with the help of externally supplied glycosylase and AP endonuclease functions. A polX disruption mutant of D. radiodurans expressing 5'-dRP lyase and a truncated polymerase domain was comparatively less sensitive to gamma-radiation than a polX deletion mutant. Both mutants showed higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Excision repair mutants of E. coli expressing this polymerase showed functional complementation of UV sensitivity. These results suggest the involvement of deinococcal polymerase X in DNA-damage tolerance of D. radiodurans, possibly by contributing to DNA double-strand break repair and base excision repair. PMID:19542005

  20. Manufactured silver nanoparticles of different sizes induced DNA strand breaks and oxidative DNA damage in hepatoma and leukaemia cells and in dermal and pulmonary fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ávalos, A; Haza, A I; Morales, P

    2015-01-01

    Many classes of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been synthesized and widely applied, but no conclusive information on their potential cytotoxicity and genotoxicity mechanisms is available. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the potential genotoxic effects (DNA strand breaks and oxidative DNA damage) of 4.7 nm coated and 42 nm uncoated AgNPs, using the comet assay, in four relevant human cell lines (hepatoma, leukaemia, and dermal and pulmonary fibroblasts) in order to understand the impact of such nanomaterials on cellular DNA. The results indicated that in all cell lines tested, 4.7 nm coated (0.1-1.6 μg ml⁻¹) and 42 nm uncoated (0.1-6.7 μg ml⁻¹) AgNPs increased DNA strand breaks in a dose- and size-dependent manner following 24 h treatment, the smaller AgNPs being more genotoxic. Human pulmonary fibroblasts showed the highest sensitivity to the AgNPs. A modified comet assay using endonuclease III and formamidopyrimidine- DNA glycosylase restriction enzymes showed that in tumoral and normal human dermal fibroblasts, pyrimidines and purines were oxidatively damaged by both AgNPs, but the damage was not size-dependent. However, in human pulmonary fibroblasts, no oxidative damage was observed after treatment with 42 nm AgNPs. In conclusion, both AgNP sizes induced DNA damage in human cells, and this damage could be related to oxidative stress. PMID:25958309

  1. Race/Ethnicity-Specific Association of Vitamin D and Global DNA Methylation: Cross-Sectional and Interventional Findings

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haidong; Bhagatwala, Jigar; Huang, Ying; Pollock, Norman K.; Parikh, Samip; Raed, Anas; Gutin, Bernard; Harshfield, Gregory A.; Dong, Yanbin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Understanding of the influence of vitamin D deficiency on epigenome will provide novel insights into the chronic disease risk. We tested our hypotheses that 1) vitamin D deficiency is associated with global hypomethylation and this association may be race/ethnicity dependent; and 2) vitamin D supplementation will increase global DNA methylation level. Methods A two-stage design, cross-sectional observation followed by a 16 week randomized, double- blinded, placebo-controlled trial (RCT) of vitamin D3 supplementation, was undertaken. Global DNA methylation level (percentage of 5-methylcytosine, %5-mC) was quantified using leukocyte DNA with the MethylFlashTM Methylated DNA Quantification kit (Epigentek). Global methylation data was obtained from 454 Caucasians and African Americans (42%) in the observation cohort and 58 African Americans with vitamin D deficiency in the dose responsive RCT. Results In the cross-sectional study, African Americans had lower %5-mC than Caucasians (P = 0.04). A significant interaction was detected between plasma 25(OH)D and race on %5-mC (P = 0.05), as a positive association was observed between plasma 25(OH)D and %5-mC in African Americans (β = 0.20, p<0.01), but not in Caucasians (β = 0.03, p = 0.62). In the 16-week RCT, a dose-response benefit of vitamin D3 supplementation was observed for %5-mC, as indicated by a significant linear upward trend (-0.01 ± 0.01%, placebo; 0.11 ± 0.01%, ~600 IU/day; 0.30 ± 0.01%, ~2,000 IU/day; and 0.65 ± 0.01%, ~4,000 IU/day group; P-trend = 0.04). Conclusions Vitamin D deficiency is associated with global hypomethylation in African Americans. Vitamin D3 supplementation increases global DNA methylation in a dose-response manner in African Americans with vitamin D deficiency. PMID:27049643

  2. Dynamics of uracil and 5-fluorouracil in DNA.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jared B; Stivers, James T

    2011-02-01

    The prodrug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), after activation into 5-F-dUMP, is an extensively used anticancer agent that inhibits thymidylate synthase and leads to increases in dUTP and 5-F-dUTP levels in cells. One mechanism for 5-FU action involves DNA polymerase mediated incorporation of dUTP and 5-F-dUTP into genomic DNA leading to U/A, 5-FU/A, or 5-FU/G base pairs. These uracil-containing lesions are recognized and excised by several human uracil excision repair glycosylases (hUNG2, hSMUG2, and hTDG) leading to toxic abasic sites in DNA that may precipitate cell death. Each of these enzymes uses an extrahelical base recognition mechanism, and previous studies with UNG have shown that extrahelical recognition is facilitated by destabilized base pairs possessing kinetically enhanced base pair opening rates. Thus, the dynamic properties of base pairs containing 5-FU and U are an important unknown in understanding the role of these enzymes in damage recognition and prodrug activation. The pH dependence of the (19)F NMR chemical shift of 5-FU imbedded in a model trinucleotide was used to obtain a pK(a) = 8.1 for its imino proton (10 °C). This is about 1.5 units lower than the imino protons of uracil or thymine and indicates that at neutral pH 5-FU exists significantly as an ionized tautomer that can mispair with guanine during DNA replication. NMR imino proton exchange measurements show that U/A and 5-FU/A base pairs open with rate constants (k(op)) that are 6- and 13-fold faster than a T/A base pair in the same sequence context. In contrast, these same base pairs have apparent opening equilibrium constants (αK(op)) that differ by less than a factor of 2, indicating that the closing rates (k(cl)) are enhanced by nearly equal amounts as k(op). These dynamic measurements are consistent with the previously proposed kinetic trapping model for extrahelical recognition by UNG. In this model, the enhanced intrinsic opening rates of destabilized base pairs allow the bound

  3. Transient accumulation of 5-carboxylcytosine indicates involvement of active demethylation in lineage specification of neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wheldon, Lee M; Abakir, Abdulkadir; Ferjentsik, Zoltan; Dudnakova, Tatiana; Strohbuecker, Stephanie; Christie, Denise; Dai, Nan; Guan, Shengxi; Foster, Jeremy M; Corrêa, Ivan R; Loose, Matthew; Dixon, James E; Sottile, Virginie; Johnson, Andrew D; Ruzov, Alexey

    2014-06-12

    5-Methylcytosine (5mC) is an epigenetic modification involved in regulation of gene activity during differentiation. Tet dioxygenases oxidize 5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC). Both 5fC and 5caC can be excised from DNA by thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) followed by regeneration of unmodified cytosine via the base excision repair pathway. Despite evidence that this mechanism is operative in embryonic stem cells, the role of TDG-dependent demethylation in differentiation and development is currently unclear. Here, we demonstrate that widespread oxidation of 5hmC to 5caC occurs in postimplantation mouse embryos. We show that 5fC and 5caC are transiently accumulated during lineage specification of neural stem cells (NSCs) in culture and in vivo. Moreover, 5caC is enriched at the cell-type-specific promoters during differentiation of NSCs, and TDG knockdown leads to increased 5fC/5caC levels in differentiating NSCs. Our data suggest that active demethylation contributes to epigenetic reprogramming determining lineage specification in embryonic brain. PMID:24882006

  4. Oxidative DNA damage and its repair in rat spleen following subchronic exposure to aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Huaxian; Wang Jianling; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.; Boor, Paul J.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2008-12-01

    The mechanisms by which aniline exposure elicits splenotoxic response, especially the tumorigenic response, are not well-understood. Splenotoxicity of aniline is associated with iron overload and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can cause oxidative damage to DNA, proteins and lipids (oxidative stress). 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is one of the most abundant oxidative DNA lesions resulting from ROS, and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1), a specific DNA glycosylase/lyase enzyme, plays a key role in the removal of 8-OHdG adducts. This study focused on examining DNA damage (8-OHdG) and repair (OGG1) in the spleen in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. To achieve that, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subchronically exposed to aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water for 30 days), while controls received drinking water only. Aniline treatment led to a significant increase in splenic oxidative DNA damage, manifested as a 2.8-fold increase in 8-OHdG levels. DNA repair activity, measured as OGG1 base excision repair (BER) activity, increased by {approx} 1.3 fold in the nuclear protein extracts (NE) and {approx} 1.2 fold in the mitochondrial protein extracts (ME) of spleens from aniline-treated rats as compared to the controls. Real-time PCR analysis for OGG1 mRNA expression in the spleen revealed a 2-fold increase in expression in aniline-treated rats than the controls. Likewise, OGG1 protein expression in the NEs of spleens from aniline-treated rats was {approx} 1.5 fold higher, whereas in the MEs it was {approx} 1.3 fold higher than the controls. Aniline treatment also led to stronger immunostaining for both 8-OHdG and OGG1 in the spleens, confined to the red pulp areas. It is thus evident from our studies that aniline-induced oxidative stress is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage. The BER pathway was also activated, but not enough to prevent the accumulation of oxidative DNA damage (8-OHdG). Accumulation of

  5. DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, E.C.; Hanawalt, P.C. )

    1988-01-01

    Topics covered in this book included: Eukaryote model systems for DNA repair study; Sensitive detection of DNA lesions and their repair; and Defined DNA sequence probes for analysis of mutagenesis and repair.

  6. Molecular Dynamics of 8-oxoguanine Lesioned B-DNA Molecule — Structure and Energy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinak, M.; O'Neill, P.; Fujimoto, H.; Nemoto, T.

    2004-04-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of DNA mutagenic oxidative lesion — 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), complexed with the repair enzyme — human oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) was performed for 1 nanosecond (ns) in order to describe the dynamical process of DNA-enzyme complex formation. After 900 picoseconds of MD the lesioned DNA and enzyme formed a complex that lasted until the end of the simulation at 1 ns. The amino group of arginine 324 was located close to the phosphodiester bond of nucleotide with 8-oxoG enabling chemical reactions between amino acid and lesion. Phosphodiester bond at C5' of 8-oxoG was displaced to the position close to the amino group of arginine 324. In the background simulation of the identical molecular system with the native DNA, neither the complex nor the water mediated hydrogen bond network were observed. The electrostatic energy is supposed to be significant factor causing the disruption of DNA base stacking in DNA duplex and may also to serve as a signal toward the repair enzyme informing on the presence of the lesion.

  7. An enzymatic activity isolated from Brassica oleracea specific for UV-irradiated DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, P.E.; Lenhart, J.R.; Weiss, R.B. )

    1991-03-11