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Sample records for 5-minute reaction time

  1. 5 experiments in 5 minutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hut, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Show, don't tell. When kids ask about your research, show, don't tell. We, the ambassadors of science, shouldn't be boring our nieces and nephews at family dinners with parameter distributions, we should make them excited about science. Getting people excited: show, don't tell. In 5 minutes, I will perform 5 experiments that anyone can do using everyday household items to get kids interested in science. Bring safety glasses.

  2. 3- and 5- Minute Oscillatory Behavior in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabro, Brandon; McAteer, James; Pevtsov, Alexander

    2011-10-01

    We study the spatially- and temporally-localized oscillatory behavior of the solar corona using a 6-hour sequence of narrowband 171A (extreme ultraviolet) image from the SWAP instrument onboard Proba2. We use a Morlet wavelet transform to extract oscillation parameters from the temporal evolution of emission in each pixel and study the variation in space and time of oscillatory power in the 3- and 5-minute band. We extract and compare these parameters between active Sun, quiet Sun and coronal hole regions. In each region of the corona studied the 5-minute periodicity is more prevalent than the 3-minute periodicity by a factor of 2--3. All areas of the corona exhibit a similar temporal behavior in the 5-minute band, suggesting a global driving mechanism. However, the dominance of the 5-minute periodicity is stronger in active regions than in other areas of the Sun. The 3-minute periodicity in active regions tends to be localized in the sunspot umbra, whereas the 5-minute is more prevalent in the penumbra.

  3. The Variance Reaction Time Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikstrom, Sverker

    2004-01-01

    The variance reaction time model (VRTM) is proposed to account for various recognition data on reaction time, the mirror effect, receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves, etc. The model is based on simple and plausible assumptions within a neural network: VRTM is a two layer neural network where one layer represents items and one layer…

  4. Operational Solar Forecasting System for DNI and GHI for Horizons Covering 5 Minutes to 72 Hours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coimbra, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    I will describe the methodology used to develop and deploy operationally a comprehensive solar forecasting system for both concentrated and non-concentrated solar technologies. This operational forecasting system ingests data from local telemetry, remote sensing and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models, processes all the diferent types of data (time series, sky images, satellite images, gridded data, etc.) to produce concatenated solar forecasts from 5 minutes out to 72 hours into the future. Each forecast is optimized with stochastic learning techniques that include input selection, model topology optimization, model output statistics, metric fitness optimization and machine learning. These forecasts are used by solar generators (plant managers), utilities and independent system operators for operations, scheduling, dispatching and market participation.

  5. Distress Reduction for Palliative Care Patients and Families With 5-Minute Mindful Breathing: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Beng, Tan Seng; Ahmad, Fazlina; Loong, Lam Chee; Chin, Loh Ee; Zainal, Nor Zuraida; Guan, Ng Chong; Ann, Yee Hway; Li, Lee Mei; Meng, Christopher Boey Chiong

    2016-07-01

    A pilot study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of 5-minute mindful breathing in distress reduction. Twenty palliative care patients and family caregivers with a distress score ≥4 measured by the Distress Thermometer were recruited and randomly assigned to mindful breathing or "listening" (being listened to). Median distress reductions after 5 minutes were 2.5 for the mindful breathing group and 1.0 for the listening group. A significantly larger reduction in the distress score was observed in the mindful breathing group (Mann-Whitney U test: U = 8.0, n1 = n2 = 10, mean rank1 = 6.30, mean rank2 = 14.70, z = -3.208, P = .001). The 5-minute mindful breathing could be useful in distress reduction in palliative care. PMID:25632044

  6. Comparison of 7.5-minute and 1-degree digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaacson, Dennis L.; Ripple, William J.

    1995-01-01

    We compared two digital elevation models (DEM's) for the Echo Mountain SE quadrangle in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Comparisons were made between 7.5-minute (1:24,000-scale) and 1-degree (1:250,000-scale) images using the variables of elevation, slope aspect, and slope gradient. Both visual and statistical differences are presented.

  7. 7.5-MINUTE DIGITAL RASTER GRAPHICS (DRG), VA PORTION OF ALBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    7.5-minute DRG for Virginia portion of Albemarle-Pamlico Estuary watershed. Files obtained from www.runet.edu:8800/~geoserve/Virginia.html at Radford University.
    Digital Raster Graphics (DRGs) come from the US Geological Survey in Universal Trans Mercator (UTM), North American...

  8. Comparison of 7.5-minute and 1-degree digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaacson, Dennis L.; Ripple, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Two digital elevation models are compared for the Echo Mountain SE quadrangle in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Comparisons were made between 7.5-minute (1:24,000-scale) and 1-degree (1:250,000-scale) images using the variables of elevation, slope aspect, and slope gradient. Both visual and statistical differences are presented.

  9. Time scale in quasifission reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Paul, P.; Nestler, J.

    1995-08-01

    The quasifission process arises from the hindrance of the complete fusion process when heavy-ion beams are used. The strong dissipation in the system tends to prevent fusion and lead the system towards reseparation into two final products of similar mass reminiscent of a fission process. This dissipation slows down the mass transfer and shape transformation and allows for the emission of high energy {gamma}-rays during the process, albeit with a low probability. Giant Dipole {gamma} rays emitted during this time have a characteristic spectral shape and may thus be discerned in the presence of a background of {gamma} rays emitted from the final fission-like fragments. Since the rate of GDR {gamma} emission is very well established, the strength of this component may therefore be used to measure the timescale of the quasifission process. In this experiment we studied the reaction between 368-MeV {sup 58}Ni and a {sup 165}Ho target, where deep inelastic scattering and quasifission processes are dominant. Coincidences between fission fragments (detected in four position-sensitive avalanche detectors) and high energy {gamma} rays (measured in a 10{close_quotes} x 10{close_quotes} actively shielded NaI detector) were registered. Beams were provided by the Stony Brook Superconducting Linac. The {gamma}-ray spectrum associated with deep inelastic scattering events is well reproduced by statistical cooling of projectile and target-like fragments with close to equal initial excitation energy sharing. The y spectrum associated with quasifission events is well described by statistical emission from the fission fragments alone, with only weak evidence for GDR emission from the mono-nucleus. A 1{sigma} limit of t{sub ss} < 11 x 10{sup -21} s is obtained for the mono-nucleus lifetime, which is consistent with the lifetime obtained from quasifission fragment angular distributions. A manuscript was accepted for publication.

  10. Geologic map of the Battle Ground 7.5-minute quadrangle, Clark County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, Keith A.

    2002-01-01

    This digital map database, compiled from previously published and unpublished data, and new mapping by the authors, represents the general distribution of bedrock and surficial deposits of the Battle Ground 7.5 minute quadrangle. The database delineates map units that are identified by general age and lithology following the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. The scale of the source maps limits the spatial resolution (scale) of the database to 1:24,000 or smaller.

  11. Geology of the Southeast Durham and Southwest Durham 7. 5-minute Quadrangles, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, C.W.; Gallagher, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Southeast Durham and Southwest Durham 7.5-minute Quadrangles include a 26 kilometer transect of the Durham Triassic basin from the Jonesboro fault on the southeastern side of this half-graben structure to a bounding unconformity on the northwestern side. The basin is filled with non-marine, primarily fluvial, clastic deposits of the Late Triassic Chatham Group. The Chatham Group rocks are intruded by Early Jurassic diabase as dikes and sheets. Bordering rocks are pre-Mesozoic intrusive, metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks of the Carolina slate belt. This paper discusses the geology of the Southeast Durham and Southwest Durham Quadrangles. 37 refs., 17 figs.

  12. Geologic map of the Morena Reservoir 7.5-minute quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, Victoria R.

    2016-01-01

    IntroductionMapping in the Morena Reservoir 7.5-minute quadrangle began in 1980, when the Hauser Wilderness Area, which straddles the Morena Reservoir and Barrett Lake quadrangles, was mapped for the U.S. Forest Service. Mapping was completed in 1993–1994. The Morena Reservoir quadrangle contains part of a regional-scale Late Jurassic(?) to Early Cretaceous tectonic suture that coincides with the western limit of Jurassic metagranites in this part of the Peninsular Ranges batholith (PRB). This suture, and a nearly coincident map unit consisting of metamorphosed Cretaceous and Jurassic back-arc basinal volcanic and sedimentary rocks (unit KJvs), mark the boundary between western, predominantly metavolcanic rocks, and eastern, mainly metasedimentary, rocks. The suture is intruded and truncated by the western margin of middle to Late Cretaceous Granite Mountain and La Posta plutons of the eastern zone of the batholith.

  13. Intensive baseball practice improves the Go/Nogo reaction time, but not the simple reaction time.

    PubMed

    Kida, Noriyuki; Oda, Shingo; Matsumura, Michikazu

    2005-02-01

    Baseball hitters are required to make decisions whether to swing or not as quickly as possible. Therefore, we can assume that skilled baseball players have a quicker response. To verify this hypothesis, we assessed the effect of baseball experience or skill levels on simple reaction times and Go/Nogo reaction times in 82 university students (22 baseball players, 22 tennis players, and 38 nonathletes) and 17 professional baseball players. Also, to clarify whether this ability was innate or acquired, we examined the effects of long-term practice for baseball hitting in 94 senior high school students (26 baseball players and 68 non-baseball players). There were no differences in simple reaction time either for sports experience or for skill levels. On the contrary, the Go/Nogo reaction time for baseball players was significantly shorter than that of the tennis players and nonathletes. The Go/Nogo reaction time of higher-skill baseball players was significantly shorter than that of lower-skill players, while that of the professional baseball players was the shortest. The professional players showed the highest (almost linear) correlation between the Go/Nogo reaction time and simple reaction time. A longitudinal study showed that 2 years of hitting practice improved the Go/Nogo reaction time, while the simple reaction time remained constant. A cross-sectional study of high school non-baseball players showed no differences either in the simple or Go/Nogo reaction times in relation to school year. In conclusion, intensive practice, including Go or Nogo decision making, improved the Go/Nogo reaction time, but not the simple reaction time. PMID:15653298

  14. Time-Dependent Molecular Reaction Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Oehrn, Yngve

    2007-11-29

    This paper is a brief review of a time-dependent, direct, nonadiabatic theory of molecular processes called Electron Nuclear Dynamics (END). This approach to the study of molecular reaction dynamics is a hierarchical theory that can be applied at various levels of approximation. The simplest level of END uses classical nuclei and represents all electrons by a single, complex, determinantal wave function. The wave function parameters such as average nuclear positions and momenta, and molecular orbital coefcients carry the time dependence and serve as dynamical variables. Examples of application are given of the simplest level of END to ion-atom and ion-molecule reactions.

  15. Availability of coal in the Hackett 7.5-minute quadrangle, Washington County, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, L.J.; Neubaum, J.C.

    1996-09-01

    Coal has been extensively mined in Pennsylvania and elsewhere in the Appalachian Basin over the last 100 years. In an attempt to better define what coal is left, a new approach to quantifying resources, rooted in modern environmental and technological constraints, was needed. The Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey in cooperation with the United States Geological Survey, embarked in 1993 upon a series of six quadrangle studies for Pennsylvania to provide information about coal resources still accessible to mining. Using our data residing on the United States Geological Survey`s National Coal Resources Data System computer to compute resources for the Hackett 7.5-minute quadrangle, the available coal for the four principally mined seams in the area (the Pittsburgh, Redstone, Waynesburg, and Waynesburg A coals) could be determined by subtracting out mined-out areas from in-place coal to give remaining coal, and then subtracting land-use and technological restrictions to mining, such as wetlands, and subsidence waivers, respectively, from the remaining coal. Results of the study found that the amount of coal available for mining varied from 26 to 70 percent. it is felt by the authors that this quadrangle is typical of the mature nature of this mining region for this part of the geologic section, and that similar results might be expected for the other quadrangles to be studied in southwestern Pennsylvania.

  16. Evaluating Warning Sound Urgency with Reaction Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suied, Clara; Susini, Patrick; McAdams, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    It is well-established that subjective judgments of perceived urgency of alarm sounds can be affected by acoustic parameters. In this study, the authors investigated an objective measurement, the reaction time (RT), to test the effectiveness of temporal parameters of sounds in the context of warning sounds. Three experiments were performed using a…

  17. IQ, Reaction Time and the Differentiation Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Der, Geoff; Deary, Ian J.

    2003-01-01

    Explored the relationship of both simple and four-choice reaction time to scores for the Alice Heim 4 (AH4) test to assess whether correlations previously reported adequately represented the strength of the relationship and to test for departures from linearity. Findings for 900 adolescents and adult show the correlation to be a good summary for…

  18. Effective Analysis of Reaction Time Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Most analyses of reaction time (RT) data are conducted by using the statistical techniques with which psychologists are most familiar, such as analysis of variance on the sample mean. Unfortunately, these methods are usually inappropriate for RT data, because they have little power to detect genuine differences in RT between conditions. In…

  19. Deciphering Time Scale Hierarchy in Reaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, Yutaka; Maeda, Satoshi; Teramoto, Hiroshi; Horiyama, Takashi; Taketsugu, Tetsuya; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2016-03-01

    Markovian dynamics on complex reaction networks are one of the most intriguing subjects in a wide range of research fields including chemical reactions, biological physics, and ecology. To represent the global kinetics from one node (corresponding to a basin on an energy landscape) to another requires information on multiple pathways that directly or indirectly connect these two nodes through the entire network. In this paper we present a scheme to extract a hierarchical set of global transition states (TSs) over a discrete-time Markov chain derived from first-order rate equations. The TSs can naturally take into account the multiple pathways connecting any pair of nodes. We also propose a new type of disconnectivity graph (DG) to capture the hierarchical organization of different time scales of reactions that can capture changes in the network due to changes in the time scale of observation. The crux is the introduction of the minimum conductance cut (MCC) in graph clustering, corresponding to the dividing surface across the network having the "smallest" transition probability between two disjoint subnetworks (superbasins on the energy landscape) in the network. We present a new combinatorial search algorithm for finding this MCC. We apply our method to a reaction network of Claisen rearrangement of allyl vinyl ether that consists of 23 nodes and 66 links (saddles on the energy landscape) connecting them. We compare the kinetic properties of our DG to those of the transition matrix of the rate equations and show that our graph can properly reveal the hierarchical organization of time scales in a network. PMID:26641663

  20. Geologic map and digital database of the Pinto Mountain 7.5 minute quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    The geologic map and digital database of the Pinto Mountain quadrangle are products of a regional geologic mapping effort undertaken in the eastern Transverse Ranges in and around Joshua Tree National Park. This investigation, part of the Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP), is conducted in cooperation with the California Geologic Survey and the National Park Service. In line with the goals of the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program (NCGMP), mapping of the Pinto Mountain and other quadrangles has been directed toward generating a multipurpose digital geologic map database that is applicable to land-related investigations in the earth and biological sciences. This mapping is conducted to further understanding of bedrock geology and surficial processes in the region and to document evidence for seismotectonic activity in the eastern Transverse Ranges. It is also intended to serve as a base layer suitable for ecosystem and mineral resource assessment and for building a hydrogeologic framework for Pinto Basin. Initial investigations span Pinto Basin from the Hexie and Eagle Mountains northward into the Pinto Mountains. Quadrangles mapped include the Conejo Well 7.5-minute quadrangle (Powell, 2001a), the Porcupine Wash 7.5-minute quadrangle (Powell, 2001b), the Pinto Mountain 7.5-minute quadrangle, and the San Bernardino Wash 7.5-minute quadrangle (Powell, 2002). Parts of the Pinto Mountain quadrangle had been mapped previously at a variety of scales (Weir, and Bader, 1963; Hope, 1966, 1969; Jennings, 1967; Powell, 1981, 1993).

  1. Geologic map and digital database of the San Bernardino Wash 7.5 minute quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Robert E.; digital preparation by Cossette, Pamela M.

    2002-01-01

    The geologic map and digital database of the San Bernardino Wash quadrangle are products of a regional geologic mapping effort undertaken in the eastern Transverse Ranges in and around Joshua Tree National Park. This investigation, part of the Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP), is conducted in cooperation with the California Geologic Survey and the National Park Service. In line with the goals of the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program (NCGMP), mapping of the San Bernardino Wash and other quadrangles has been directed toward generating a multipurpose digital geologic map database that is applicable to land-related investigations in the earth and biological sciences. This mapping is conducted to further understanding of bedrock geology and surficial processes in the region and to document evidence for seismotectonic activity in the eastern Transverse Ranges. It is also intended to serve as a base layer suitable for ecosystem and mineral resource assessment and for building a hydrogeologic framework for Pinto Basin. Initial investigations span Pinto Basin from the Hexie and Eagle Mountains northward into the Pinto Mountains (see fig. 1). Quadrangles mapped include the Conejo Well 7.5-minute quadrangle (Powell, 2001a), the Porcupine Wash 7.5-minute quadrangle (Powell, 2001b), the Pinto Mountain 7.5-minute quadrangle (Powell, 2002), and the San Bernardino Wash 7.5-minute quadrangle. Parts of the San Bernardino Wash quadrangle had been mapped previously at a variety of scales (Weir, and Bader, 1963; Hope, 1966, 1969; Jennings, 1967; Powell, 1981, 1993).

  2. Measurement of Visual Reaction Times Using Hand-held Mobile Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.; Arsintescu, Lucia; Flynn-Evans, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Modern mobile devices provide a convenient platform for collecting research data in the field. But,because the working of these devices is often cloaked behind multiple layers of proprietary system software, it can bedifficult to assess the accuracy of the data they produce, particularly in the case of timing. We have been collecting datain a simple visual reaction time experiment, as part of a fatigue testing protocol known as the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT). In this protocol, subjects run a 5-minute block consisting of a sequence of trials in which a visual stimulus appears after an unpredictable variable delay. The subject is required to tap the screen as soon as possible after the appearance of the stimulus. In order to validate the reaction times reported by our program, we had subjects perform the task while a high-speed video camera recorded both the display screen, and a side view of the finger (observed in a mirror). Simple image-processing methods were applied to determine the frames in which the stimulus appeared and disappeared, and in which the finger made and broke contact with the screen. The results demonstrate a systematic delay between the initial contact by the finger and the detection of the touch by the software, having a value of 80 +- 20 milliseconds.

  3. Typewriting rate as a function of reaction time.

    PubMed

    Hayes, V; Wilson, G D; Schafer, R L

    1977-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the relationship between reaction time and typewriting rate. Subjects were 24 typists ranging in age from 19 to 39 yr. Reaction times (.001 sec) to a light were recorded for each finger and to each alphabetic character and three punctuation marks. Analysis of variance yielded significant differences in reaction time among subjects and fingers. Correlation between typewriting rate and average reaction time to the alphabetic characters and three punctuation marks was --.75. Correlation between typewriting rate and the difference between the reaction time of the hands was --.42. Factors influencing typewriting rate may include reaction time of the fingers, difference between the reaction time of the hands, and reaction time to individual keys on the typewriter. Implications exist for instructional methodology and further research. PMID:604897

  4. No Evidence of Reaction Time Slowing in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferraro, F. Richard

    2016-01-01

    A total of 32 studies comprising 238 simple reaction time and choice reaction time conditions were examined in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (n?=?964) and controls (n?=?1032). A Brinley plot/multiple regression analysis was performed on mean reaction times, regressing autism spectrum disorder performance onto the control performance as…

  5. Challenging the 4- to 5-minute rule: from perimortem cesarean to resuscitative hysterotomy.

    PubMed

    Rose, Carl H; Faksh, Arij; Traynor, Kyle D; Cabrera, Daniel; Arendt, Katherine W; Brost, Brian C

    2015-11-01

    Although perimortem delivery has been recorded in the medical literature for millennia, the procedural intent has evolved to the current fetocentric approach, predicating timing of delivery following maternal cardiopulmonary arrest to optimize neonatal outcome. We suggest a call to action to reinforce the concept that if the uterus is palpable at or above the umbilicus, preparations for delivery should be made simultaneous with initiation of maternal resuscitative efforts; if maternal condition is not rapidly reversible, hysterotomy with delivery should be performed regardless of fetal viability or elapsed time since arrest. Cognizant of the difficulty in determining precise timing of arrest in clinical practice, if fetal status is already compromised further delay while attempting to assess fetal heart rate, locating optimal surgical equipment, or transporting to an operating room will result in unnecessary worsening of both maternal and fetal condition. Even if intrauterine demise has already occurred, maternal resuscitative efforts will typically be markedly improved following delivery with uterine decompression. Consequently we suggest that perimortem cesarean delivery be renamed "resuscitative hysterotomy" to reflect the mutual optimization of resuscitation efforts that would potentially provide earlier and more substantial benefit to both mother and baby. PMID:26212180

  6. SU-E-T-194: From Dicom-RT to Radiobiological Dose Metrics in 5 Minutes

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, B; Holloway, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a flexible and standalone framework for batch calculation of radiobiological dose metrics from Dicom-RT. Methods: Software has been developed which allows (1) The calculation of DVH data from DICOM dose and structure files (DVHgenerator), (2) Calculation of a wide range of radiobiological metrics from this data (CompPlanGui). Both these tools are run via graphical user interface (GUI), making them fast and simple. Part 1 is a new tool which has not previously been published, whilst part 2 is a GUI overlay for the previously published software ‘Comp-Plan’ (Holloway et. al., Medical Dosimetry, 2012), previously reliant on command line interface. The time taken for an experienced user to evaluate a test case of 6 plans with and without CompPlanGUI was quantified. Results: The DVH-generator has been found to be faster, more robust and require far less physical memory then using alternative software solutions for the same purpose. The Comp Plan GUI significantly reduces the amount of time required to set up a base directory, eliminates code crashes arising from typographical errors, and renders the code far more accessible to non-expert users. It took an experienced user of the code around 3 minutes to set up a base directory of 6 plans compared around 8 minutes without, indicating that using CompPlanGUI reduced setup time by over 50%. Conclusion: A standalone GUI based framework has developed which allows for the batch calculation of radiobiological dose metrics directly from Dicom-RT files. As with the original code, this work will be made freely available on request, as well as via matlab file exchange.

  7. Reading and a Diffusion Model Analysis of Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Adam; Katz, Leonard; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2012-01-01

    Processing speed is associated with reading performance. However, the literature is not clear either on the definition of processing speed or on why and how it contributes to reading performance. In this study we demonstrated that processing speed, as measured by reaction time, is not a unitary construct. Using the diffusion model of two-choice reaction time, we assessed processing speed in a series of same-different reaction time tasks for letter and number strings. We demonstrated that the association between reaction time and reading performance is driven by processing speed for reading-related information, but not motor or sensory encoding speed. PMID:22612543

  8. NMDA Receptor Subunits in the Adult Rat Hippocampus Undergo Similar Changes after 5 Minutes in an Open Field and after LTP Induction

    PubMed Central

    Baez, Maria Veronica; Oberholzer, Maria Victoria; Aguirre, Alejandra Ines; Jerusalinsky, Diana Alicia

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptor subunits change during development and their synaptic expression is modified rapidly after synaptic plasticity induction in hippocampal slices. However, there is scarce information on subunits expression after synaptic plasticity induction or memory acquisition, particularly in adults. GluN1, GluN2A and GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits were assessed by western blot in 1) adult rats that had explored an open field (OF) for 5 minutes, a time sufficient to induce habituation, 2) mature rat hippocampal neuron cultures depolarized by KCl and 3) hippocampal slices from adult rats where long term potentiation (LTP) was induced by theta-burst stimulation (TBS). GluN1 and GluN2A, though not GluN2B, were significantly higher 70 minutes –but not 30 minutes- after a 5 minutes session in an OF. GluN1 and GluN2A total immunofluorescence and puncta in neurites increased in cultures, as evaluated 70 minutes after KCl stimulation. Similar changes were found in hippocampal slices 70 minutes after LTP induction. To start to explore underlying mechanisms, hippocampal slices were treated either with cycloheximide (a translation inhibitor) or actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) during electrophysiological assays. It was corroborated that translation was necessary for LTP induction and expression. The rise in GluN1 depends on transcription and translation, while the increase in GluN2A appears to mainly depend on translation, though a contribution of some remaining transcriptional activity during actinomycin D treatment could not be rouled out. LTP effective induction was required for the subunits to increase. Although in the three models same subunits suffered modifications in the same direction, within an apparently similar temporal course, further investigation is required to reveal if they are related processes and to find out whether they are causally related with synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. PMID:23383317

  9. Reaction Time of a Group of Physics Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxena, Charu; Kaur, Rini; Arun, P.

    2008-01-01

    The reaction time of a group of students majoring in physics is reported here. Strong correlation between fatigue, reaction time and performance has been observed and may be useful for academicians and administrators responsible for working out timetables, course structures, student counsellings, etc. (Contains 5 figures, 1 table, and 1 footnote.)

  10. A complex reaction time study (Sternberg) in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W.; Uri, John; Moore, Tom

    1993-01-01

    Simple and complex (Sternberg) reaction time studies were flown on three and seven day Shuttle flights in 1985. Three subjects did selftesting with an onboard handheld calculator without difficulty. There was little change in simple reaction time. One subject demonstrated a decrease in the processing rate during space motion sickness while a second exhibited an increase in complex reaction time without a change in processing rate during a period of high work load. The population was too small to demonstrate significant changes. This study demonstrates the ease and practicality of such measurements and indicates the potential value of such studies in space.

  11. Iris Pigmentation and Fractionated Reaction and Reflex Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Bruce D.; And Others

    Behavioral measures, fractionated reaction and reflex times by means of electromyography, were used to determine if the eye color differences are found in the central or peripheral regions of the nervous system. The purpose of this research was to determine the truth of the hypothesis that dark-eyed individuals have faster reflex and reaction time…

  12. Surficial and bedrock geologic map database of the Kelso 7.5 Minute quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedford, David R.

    2003-01-01

    This geologic map database describes geologic materials for the Kelso 7.5 Minute Quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California. The area lies in eastern Mojave Desert of California, within the Mojave National Preserve (a unit of the National Parks system). Geologic deposits in the area consist of Proterozoic metamorphic rocks, Cambrian-Neoproterozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic plutonic and hypabyssal rocks, Tertiary basin fill, and Quaternary surficial deposits. Bedrock deposits are described by composition, texture, and stratigraphic relationships. Quaternary surficial deposits are classified into soil-geomorphic surfaces based on soil characteristics, inset relationships, and geomorphic expression. The surficial geology presented in this report is especially useful to understand, and extrapolate, physical properties that influence surface conditions, and surface- and soil-water dynamics. Physical characteristics such as pavement development, soil horizonation, and hydraulic characteristics have shown to be some of the primary drivers of ecologic dynamics, including recovery of those ecosystems to anthropogenic disturbance, in the eastern Mojave Desert and other arid and semi-arid environments.

  13. Linking impulse response functions to reaction time: Rod and cone reaction time data and a computational model

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dingcai; Zele, Andrew J.; Pokorny, Joel

    2007-01-01

    Reaction times for incremental and decremental stimuli were measured at five suprathreshold contrasts for six retinal illuminance levels where rods alone (0.002–0.2 Trolands), rods and cones (2–20 Trolands) or cones alone (200 Trolands) mediated detection. A 4-primary photostimulator allowed independent control of rod or cone excitations. This is the first report of reaction times to isolated rod or cone stimuli at mesopic light levels under the same adaptation conditions. The main findings are: 1) For rods, responses to decrements were faster than increments, but cone reaction times were closely similar. 2) At light levels where both systems were functional, rod reaction times were ~20 ms longer. The data were fitted with a computational model that incorporates rod and cone impulse response functions and a stimulus-dependent neural sensory component that triggers a motor response. Rod and cone impulse response functions were derived from published psychophysical two-pulse threshold data and temporal modulation transfer functions. The model fits were accomplished with a limited number of free parameters: two global parameters to estimate the irreducible minimum reaction time for each receptor type, and one local parameter for each reaction time versus contrast function. This is the first model to provide a neural basis for the variation in reaction time with retinal illuminance, stimulus contrast, stimulus polarity, and receptor class modulated. PMID:17346763

  14. Reaction times of young alcohol-impaired drivers.

    PubMed

    Christoforou, Zoi; Karlaftis, Matthew G; Yannis, George

    2013-12-01

    Young individuals who drive under the influence of alcohol have a higher relative risk of crash involvement; as such, the literature has extensively investigated the factors affecting such involvement through both post-accident surveys and simulator experiments. The effects of differentiated breath alcohol concentrations (BrAC) on young driver behavior, however, have been largely unaddressed, mainly as a result of the difficulty in collecting the necessary data. We explore young driver behavior under the influence of alcohol using a driving simulator experiment where 49 participants were subjected to a common pre-defined dose of alcohol consumption. Comparing reaction times before and after consumption allows for interesting insights and suggestions regarding policy interventions. As expected, the results indicate that increased reaction times before consuming alcohol strongly affect post-consumption reaction times, while increased BrAC levels prolong reaction times; a 10% increase in BrAC levels results in a 2% increase in reaction time. Interestingly, individuals with faster alcohol absorption times perform better regardless of absolute BrAC level, while recent meals lead to higher reaction times and regular exercising to lower. PMID:23332180

  15. The Effect of Road Traffic Noise on Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Alimohammadi, Iraj; Zokaei, Mojtaba; Sandrock, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traffic noise is one of the main important sources in urban noise pollution, which causes various physiological and psychological effects that can cause disturbs in performance, sleep disturbances, hearing loss and impact on job performance. This study was conducted to verify the impact of road traffic noise on reaction time in terms of extraversion and sex. Methods: Traffic noise was measured and recorded in 10 arterial streets in Tehran, and then the recorded noise was emitted towards participants in an acoustic room. The participants were 80 (40 cases and 40 controls) students. Personality type was determined by Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) questioner. Reaction time before and after exposure to traffic noise was measured. Results: Reaction time before exposure to traffic noise did not differ (P=0.437) significantly between introverts and extraverts. However, it was increased significantly in both groups after exposure to traffic noise (P<0.01). Introvert’s reaction time was more increased than that of extraverts. Conclusion: Traffic noise augmented reaction time of both males and females. This study also revealed that exposure to traffic noise leads to increase in reaction time. PMID:26634199

  16. Performance stability in simultaneous tasks of pedalling and reaction time.

    PubMed

    Arcelin, R; Brisswalter, J

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the within-subject variability in heart rate, pedal rate, choice reaction time, and error rate during simultaneous tasks of cycling and reaction time. Students in physical education classes exercised a 10-min. submaximal cycloergometer test at a relative power output corresponding to 60% of their own maximal aerobic power, in a replication procedure. Concomitantly, the subjects performed a 2-choice reaction time task from Min. 3 of the exercise bout. No significant differences (p > .05) were found between the individual means in the tests for the diverse parameters. The total intraindividual variability averaged 1.3% for heart rate, 2.2% for pedal rate, and 13.3% for choice reaction time. Because wide within-subject variability was observed (from 7.7 to 16.7%), the reliability of choice reaction time was low. These data suggest that it is necessary to quantify more accurately the intraindividual differences of reaction time measures for the interpretation of exercise-changes in cognitive functioning. PMID:10485101

  17. Geologic map of the Scotts Mills, Silverton, and Stayton Northeast 7.5 minute quadrangles, Northwest Oregon: a digital database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tolan, Terry; Beeson, Marvin; Wheeler, Karen L.

    1999-01-01

    The Scotts Mills, Silverton, and Stayton NE 7.5 minute quadrangles are situated along the eastern margin of the Willamette Valley and adjacent lower foothills (Waldo and Silverton Hills) of the Cascade Range (Fig. 1). The terrain within this area is of low to moderate relief, ranging from 100 to more than 1000 ft above sea level. This area is largely rural, with most of the valley floor and low-relief foothills under cultivation. In the last decade, the rural areas outside the boundaries of established towns have experienced significant growth in new homes built and the expansion of housing subdivisions. This growth has placed an increased demand on existing geologic resources (e.g., groundwater, sand and gravel, crushed stone) and the need to better understand potential geologic hazards within this region. Previous geologic mapping by Piper (1942), Peck and others (1964), Newton (1969), Hampton (1972), Miller and Orr (1984), Orr and Miller (1984), and Miller and Orr (1986, 1988) established and refined the general stratigraphic framework of this region. This mapping identified few faults or folds; earlier investigators were hindered by the lack of reliably identifiable marker horizons within the stratigraphic section. Werner (1991), using available seismic profile lines and well data in the Willamette Valley to locate the top of the Columbia River Basalt Group, was able to identify and map faults within the subsurface. Reconnaissance mapping of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) units in this region in the early 1980’s indicated that these stratigraphic units could serve as a series of unique reference horizons for identifying post-Miocene folding and faulting (Beeson and others, 1985, 1989; Beeson and Tolan, 1990). The major emphasis of this investigation was to identify and map CRBG units within the Scotts Mills, Silverton, and Stayton NE quadrangles and to utilize this detailed CRBG stratigraphy to identify and characterize structural features.

  18. Quantification of reaction time and time perception during Space Shuttle operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratino, D. A.; Repperger, D. W.; Goodyear, C.; Potor, G.; Rodriguez, L. E.

    1988-01-01

    A microprocessor-based test battery containing simple reaction time, choice reaction time, and time perception tasks was flown aboard a 1985 Space Shuttle flight. Data were obtained from four crew members. Individual subject means indicate a correlation between change in reaction time during the flight and the presence of space motion sickness symptoms. The time perception task results indicate that the shortest duration task time (2 s) is progressively overestimated as the mission proceeds and is statistically significant when comparing preflight and postflight baselines. The tasks that required longer periods of time to estimate (8, 12, and 16 s) are less affected.

  19. Assessment of Driver's Reaction Times in Diverisified Research Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzek, Marek; Lozia, Zbigniew; Zdanowicz, Piotr; Jurecki, Rafał S.; Stańczyk, Tomasz L.; Pieniążek, Wiesław

    2012-06-01

    Reaction time is one of the basic parameters that characterize the driver and very important in the analysis of accident situations in road traffic. This paper describes research studies on the reaction time evaluation as conducted in three environments: on a typical device used in the transport psychology labs (the so-called reflexometer), in the driving simulator (autoPW) and on the driving test track (the Kielce Test Track). In all environments, the tests were performed for the same group of drivers. The article presents the characteristics of research in each environment as well as shows and compares exemplary results.

  20. Single-molecule stochastic times in a reversible bimolecular reaction.

    PubMed

    Keller, Peter; Valleriani, Angelo

    2012-08-28

    In this work, we consider the reversible reaction between reactants of species A and B to form the product C. We consider this reaction as a prototype of many pseudobiomolecular reactions in biology, such as for instance molecular motors. We derive the exact probability density for the stochastic waiting time that a molecule of species A needs until the reaction with a molecule of species B takes place. We perform this computation taking fully into account the stochastic fluctuations in the number of molecules of species B. We show that at low numbers of participating molecules, the exact probability density differs from the exponential density derived by assuming the law of mass action. Finally, we discuss the condition of detailed balance in the exact stochastic and in the approximate treatment. PMID:22938217

  1. Finite-time barriers to reaction front propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, Rory; Mahoney, John; Mitchell, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Front propagation in advection-reaction-diffusion systems gives rise to rich geometric patterns. It has been shown for time-independent and time-periodic fluid flows that invariant manifolds, termed burning invariant manifolds (BIMs), serve as one-sided dynamical barriers to the propagation of reaction front. More recently, theoretical work has suggested that one-sided barriers, termed burning Lagrangian Coherent structures (bLCSs), exist for fluid velocity data prescribed over a finite time interval, with no assumption on the time-dependence of the flow. In this presentation, we use a time-varying fluid ``wind'' in a double-vortex channel flow to demonstrate that bLCSs form the (locally) most attracting or repelling fronts.

  2. Geologic map and digital database of the Porcupine Wash 7.5 minute Quadrangle, Riverside County, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    This data set maps and describes the geology of the Porcupine Wash 7.5 minute quadrangle, Riverside County, southern California. The quadrangle, situated in Joshua Tree National Park in the eastern Transverse Ranges physiographic and structural province, encompasses parts of the Hexie Mountains, Cottonwood Mountains, northern Eagle Mountains, and south flank of Pinto Basin. It is underlain by a basement terrane comprising Proterozoic metamorphic rocks, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, and Mesozoic and Mesozoic or Cenozoic hypabyssal dikes. The basement terrane is capped by a widespread Tertiary erosion surface preserved in remnants in the Eagle and Cottonwood Mountains and buried beneath Cenozoic deposits in Pinto Basin. Locally, Miocene basalt overlies the erosion surface. A sequence of at least three Quaternary pediments is planed into the north piedmont of the Eagle and Hexie Mountains, each in turn overlain by successively younger residual and alluvial deposits. The Tertiary erosion surface is deformed and broken by north-northwest-trending, high-angle, dip-slip faults and an east-west trending system of high-angle dip- and left-slip faults. East-west trending faults are younger than and perhaps in part coeval with faults of the northwest-trending set. The Porcupine Wash database was created using ARCVIEW and ARC/INFO, which are geographical information system (GIS) software products of Envronmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI). The database consists of the following items: (1) a map coverage showing faults and geologic contacts and units, (2) a separate coverage showing dikes, (3) a coverage showing structural data, (4) a scanned topographic base at a scale of 1:24,000, and (5) attribute tables for geologic units (polygons and regions), contacts (arcs), and site-specific data (points). The database, accompanied by a pamphlet file and this metadata file, also includes the following graphic and text products: (1) A portable document file (.pdf) containing a

  3. Geologic map and digital database of the Conejo Well 7.5 minute quadrangle, Riverside County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    This data set maps and describes the geology of the Conejo Well 7.5 minute quadrangle, Riverside County, southern California. The quadrangle, situated in Joshua Tree National Park in the eastern Transverse Ranges physiographic and structural province, encompasses part of the northern Eagle Mountains and part of the south flank of Pinto Basin. It is underlain by a basement terrane comprising Proterozoic metamorphic rocks, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, and Mesozoic and Mesozoic or Cenozoic hypabyssal dikes. The basement terrane is capped by a widespread Tertiary erosion surface preserved in remnants in the Eagle Mountains and buried beneath Cenozoic deposits in Pinto Basin. Locally, Miocene basalt overlies the erosion surface. A sequence of at least three Quaternary pediments is planed into the north piedmont of the Eagle Mountains, each in turn overlain by successively younger residual and alluvial deposits. The Tertiary erosion surface is deformed and broken by north-northwest-trending, high-angle, dip-slip faults in the Eagle Mountains and an east-west trending system of high-angle dip- and left-slip faults. In and adjacent to the Conejo Well quadrangle, faults of the northwest-trending set displace Miocene sedimentary rocks and basalt deposited on the Tertiary erosion surface and Pliocene and (or) Pleistocene deposits that accumulated on the oldest pediment. Faults of this system appear to be overlain by Pleistocene deposits that accumulated on younger pediments. East-west trending faults are younger than and perhaps in part coeval with faults of the northwest-trending set. The Conejo Well database was created using ARCVIEW and ARC/INFO, which are geographical information system (GIS) software products of Envronmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI). The database consists of the following items: (1) a map coverage showing faults and geologic contacts and units, (2) a separate coverage showing dikes, (3) a coverage showing structural data, (4) a point coverage

  4. Correction for instrument time constant in determination of reaction kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Chilton, Marie; Clark, Jared; Thomas, Nathan; Nicholson, Allen; Hansen, Lee D.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Hansen, Jaron

    2010-02-01

    Rates of reactions can be expressed as dn/dt = kcf(n) where n is moles of reaction, k is a rate constant, c is a proportionality constant, and f(n) is a function of the properties of the sample. When the instrument time constant, ?, and k are sufficiently comparable that measured rates are significantly affected by instrument response, correction for instrument response must be done to obtain accurate reaction kinetics. Correction for instrument response has previously been done by truncating early data or by use of the Tian equation. Both methods can lead to significant errors. We describe a method for simultaneous determination of ?, k, and c by fitting equations describing the combined instrument response and rate law to rates observed as a function of time. The method was tested with data on the heat rate from acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of sucrose.

  5. Is Reaction Time Variability in ADHD Mainly at Low Frequencies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karalunas, Sarah L.; Huang-Pollock, Cynthia L.; Nigg, Joel T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Intraindividual variability in reaction times (RT variability) has garnered increasing interest as an indicator of cognitive and neurobiological dysfunction in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Recent theory and research has emphasized specific low-frequency patterns of RT variability. However, whether…

  6. Reaction Time, Intelligence and Learning Curve: An Exploratory Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boretz, Harold F.; And Others

    Previous studies indicate increasing, significant univariate and multivariate correlation between reaction time (RT) tasks and intelligence. Using multiple regression analyses, data from an earlier study by Brown and Boretz were reanalyzed to further investigate the relationship between the speed at which an individual is able to process stimuli…

  7. Physiological Evidence for Response Inhibition in Choice Reaction Time Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burle, Boris; Vidal, Frank; Tandonnet, Christophe; Hasbroucq, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    Inhibition is a widely used notion proposed to account for data obtained in choice reaction time (RT) tasks. However, this concept is weakly supported by empirical facts. In this paper, we review a series of experiments using Hoffman reflex, transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography to study inhibition in choice RT tasks. We…

  8. Simulation of between Repeat Variability in Real Time PCR Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Lievens, Antoon; Van Aelst, Stefan; Van den Bulcke, Marc; Goetghebeur, Els

    2012-01-01

    While many decisions rely on real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis few attempts have hitherto been made to quantify bounds of precision accounting for the various sources of variation involved in the measurement process. Besides influences of more obvious factors such as camera noise and pipetting variation, changing efficiencies within and between reactions affect PCR results to a degree which is not fully recognized. Here, we develop a statistical framework that models measurement error and other sources of variation as they contribute to fluorescence observations during the amplification process and to derived parameter estimates. Evaluation of reproducibility is then based on simulations capable of generating realistic variation patterns. To this end, we start from a relatively simple statistical model for the evolution of efficiency in a single PCR reaction and introduce additional error components, one at a time, to arrive at stochastic data generation capable of simulating the variation patterns witnessed in repeated reactions (technical repeats). Most of the variation in values was adequately captured by the statistical model in terms of foreseen components. To recreate the dispersion of the repeats' plateau levels while keeping the other aspects of the PCR curves within realistic bounds, additional sources of reagent consumption (side reactions) enter into the model. Once an adequate data generating model is available, simulations can serve to evaluate various aspects of PCR under the assumptions of the model and beyond. PMID:23189123

  9. Adiposity is associated with improved neuromuscular reaction time.

    PubMed

    Grantham, James; Henneberg, Maciej

    2014-11-01

    Many studies have focused on the detrimental effects of malnourishment to the performance of the brain and peripheral nerves. Undernourished children and adults have been studied extensively to establish these consequences. Little attention has been given to the body habitus that affects optimum neurological performance and the implications for individuals on the spectral extremes of the healthy weight range. This paper examines the association between markers of adiposity and neurological performance, inclusive of all body types. The data were obtained from Cape Coloured youths (5-20 years) in South Africa from the rural district of Klein Karoo and the urban population of Cape Town. In all, the sums of skin-folds were measured for almost 4000 students. The neuromuscular reaction time was also calculated using a ruler drop test. This measure may serve as a gross marker of peripheral and central neurological performance as both are needed to execute the reflex command. There was a direct correlation between adiposity and neuromuscular reaction time. Whilst controlling for age, increasing fatness was associated with a decrease in neuromuscular reaction time amongst both sexes. This relationship remained statistically significant, even when removing the thinnest 40% of participants, eliminating the scope of influence exerted by malnourishment on the correlation. The trend appears to be more prominent amongst boys. These findings indicate that body lipid reserves are integral to the development of the nervous system even amongst children within the healthy weight ranges. Our hypothesis is that the myelination of the nerves, both centrally through oligodendrocytes and peripherally by Schwann cells, is integral to this process as they are predominantly lipid. Amongst thin but not clinically undernourished individuals, the somatic lipid reserves are modest. These fats may be minimally sequestered away for the development of myelin nerve sheath at the expense of saltatory

  10. Threshold units: A correct metric for reaction time?

    PubMed Central

    Zele, Andrew J.; Cao, Dingcai; Pokorny, Joel

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To compare reaction time (RT) to rod incremental and decremental stimuli expressed in physical contrast units or psychophysical threshold units. Methods Rod contrast detection thresholds and suprathreshold RTs were measured for Rapid-On and Rapid-Off ramp stimuli. Results Threshold sensitivity to Rapid-Off stimuli was higher than to Rapid-On stimuli. Suprathreshold RTs specified in Weber contrast for Rapid-Off stimuli were shorter than for Rapid-On stimuli. Reaction time data expressed in multiples of threshold reversed the outcomes: Reaction times for Rapid-On stimuli were shorter than those for Rapid-Off stimuli. The use of alternative contrast metrics also failed to equate RTs. Conclusions A case is made that the interpretation of RT data may be confounded when expressed in threshold units. Stimulus energy or contrast is the only metric common to the response characteristics of the cells underlying speeded responses. The use of threshold metrics for RT can confuse the interpretation of an underlying physiological process. PMID:17240416

  11. Repeated cryostimulation improves position sense and simple reaction time.

    PubMed

    Giemza, Czesław; Bieć, Ewa; Ostrowska, Bożena; Piechaczek, Bogusława; Sitny, Georg; Kuczyński, Michał

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Whole body cryotherapy has been shown to have many benefits, yet nothing is known if and how this modality can improve neuromuscular performance and retain those improvements. [Subjects and Methods] Joint position sense based on the bilateral knee joint matching test and simple reaction time was investigated in 25 young healthy adults who underwent an extended period of whole body cryostimulation. The measurements were taken at baseline and after 10, 20, and 30 whole body cryotherapy sessions, with three days elapsing after the last treatment, and comparing the results with 24 control subjects. [Results] Only when 20 sessions were completed did joint position sense and simple reaction time improve in the intervention group. After 30 sessions, the outcome was similar. Equal results were found at baseline and after 10 sessions in both groups, but the intervention group outstripped controls after 20 and 30 sessions in both joint position sense and simple reaction time. [Conclusion] These results indicate that the common standard of 10 sessions is insufficient, while approximately 20 sessions of whole body cryotherapy may efficiently enhance neuromuscular performance with an ability to sustain the effects for at least three days. PMID:27313369

  12. Repeated cryostimulation improves position sense and simple reaction time

    PubMed Central

    Giemza, Czesław; Bieć, Ewa; Ostrowska, Bożena; Piechaczek, Bogusława; Sitny, Georg; Kuczyński, Michał

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Whole body cryotherapy has been shown to have many benefits, yet nothing is known if and how this modality can improve neuromuscular performance and retain those improvements. [Subjects and Methods] Joint position sense based on the bilateral knee joint matching test and simple reaction time was investigated in 25 young healthy adults who underwent an extended period of whole body cryostimulation. The measurements were taken at baseline and after 10, 20, and 30 whole body cryotherapy sessions, with three days elapsing after the last treatment, and comparing the results with 24 control subjects. [Results] Only when 20 sessions were completed did joint position sense and simple reaction time improve in the intervention group. After 30 sessions, the outcome was similar. Equal results were found at baseline and after 10 sessions in both groups, but the intervention group outstripped controls after 20 and 30 sessions in both joint position sense and simple reaction time. [Conclusion] These results indicate that the common standard of 10 sessions is insufficient, while approximately 20 sessions of whole body cryotherapy may efficiently enhance neuromuscular performance with an ability to sustain the effects for at least three days. PMID:27313369

  13. Effect of reaction time on the formation of disinfection byproducts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of reaction time on the trihalomethane and nonpurgeable total organic-halide formation potentials was determined by chlorinating water samples from the Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers. Samples were collected for three seasons at 12 locations on the Mississippi from Minneapolis, Minnesota, to New Orleans, Louisiana, and on the Missouri and Ohio 1.6 kilometers above their confluences with the Mississippi. Both types of compounds formed rapidly during the initial stages of the reaction-time period, with formation rates decreasing with time. The ratio of the nonpurgeable total organic-halide and trihalomethane concentrations decreased with time, with the nonpurgeable total organic-halide compounds forming faster during the first stages of the time period and the trihalomethane compounds forming faster during the latter stages of the time period. Variation with distance along the Mississippi River of the formation rates approximately paralleled the variation of the dissolved organic carbon concentration, indicating that the rates of formation, as well as the concentrations of the compounds formed, depended on the dissolved organic carbon concentration.

  14. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  15. Comparison of three DNA preparation methods for real-time polymerase chain reaction confirmation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis growth in an automated broth culture system.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Raymond W; Whitlock, Robert H; McAdams, Susan C

    2006-11-01

    Three methods of harvesting DNA from broth culture tubes for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qrtPCR) confirmation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) were evaluated. A commercial DNA extraction kit, the boil method (boiling for 5 minutes), or direct addition of broth culture media to the PCR reaction mix were tested. Samples were evaluated at 8 or 11 days of incubation and at the time of instrument-signal culture-positive. In total, when tested at time to instrument signal positive, 10/10 (100%) of samples extracted by the commercial method were positive on qrtPCR, whereas 9/10 (90%) were positive after the boil method, and 6/10 (60%) were positive after the direct method. Increased volumes of egg-yolk emulsion added to the culture tubes prolonged the number of cycles to threshold positive for the samples that were not subjected to commercial extraction or boiling. Samples were not reliably positive when tested at 8 or 11 days of incubation. The boil method appears to represent a reasonable time- and money-saving method to harvest DNA for qrtPCR confirmation of MAP in broth culture at time to instrument signal positive. PMID:17121088

  16. Reaction times to weak test lights. [psychophysics biological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, B. A.; Ahumada, P.; Welsh, D.

    1984-01-01

    Maloney and Wandell (1984) describe a model of the response of a single visual channel to weak test lights. The initial channel response is a linearly filtered version of the stimulus. The filter output is randomly sampled over time. Each time a sample occurs there is some probability increasing with the magnitude of the sampled response - that a discrete detection event is generated. Maloney and Wandell derive the statistics of the detection events. In this paper a test is conducted of the hypothesis that the reaction time responses to the presence of a weak test light are initiated at the first detection event. This makes it possible to extend the application of the model to lights that are slightly above threshold, but still within the linear operating range of the visual system. A parameter-free prediction of the model proposed by Maloney and Wandell for lights detected by this statistic is tested. The data are in agreement with the prediction.

  17. Critical time scales for advection-diffusion-reaction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellery, Adam J.; Simpson, Matthew J.; McCue, Scott W.; Baker, Ruth E.

    2012-04-01

    The concept of local accumulation time (LAT) was introduced by Berezhkovskii and co-workers to give a finite measure of the time required for the transient solution of a reaction-diffusion equation to approach the steady-state solution [A. M. Berezhkovskii, C. Sample, and S. Y. Shvartsman, Biophys. J.BIOJAU0006-349510.1016/j.bpj.2010.07.045 99, L59 (2010); A. M. Berezhkovskii, C. Sample, and S. Y. Shvartsman, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.83.051906 83, 051906 (2011)]. Such a measure is referred to as a critical time. Here, we show that LAT is, in fact, identical to the concept of mean action time (MAT) that was first introduced by McNabb [A. McNabb and G. C. Wake, IMA J. Appl. Math.IJAMDM0272-496010.1093/imamat/47.2.193 47, 193 (1991)]. Although McNabb's initial argument was motivated by considering the mean particle lifetime (MPLT) for a linear death process, he applied the ideas to study diffusion. We extend the work of these authors by deriving expressions for the MAT for a general one-dimensional linear advection-diffusion-reaction problem. Using a combination of continuum and discrete approaches, we show that MAT and MPLT are equivalent for certain uniform-to-uniform transitions; these results provide a practical interpretation for MAT by directly linking the stochastic microscopic processes to a meaningful macroscopic time scale. We find that for more general transitions, the equivalence between MAT and MPLT does not hold. Unlike other critical time definitions, we show that it is possible to evaluate the MAT without solving the underlying partial differential equation (pde). This makes MAT a simple and attractive quantity for practical situations. Finally, our work explores the accuracy of certain approximations derived using MAT, showing that useful approximations for nonlinear kinetic processes can be obtained, again without treating the governing pde directly.

  18. Short relaxation times but long transient times in both simple and complex reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Henry, Adrien; Martin, Olivier C

    2016-07-01

    When relaxation towards an equilibrium or steady state is exponential at large times, one usually considers that the associated relaxation time τ, i.e. the inverse of the decay rate, is the longest characteristic time in the system. However, that need not be true, other times such as the lifetime of an infinitesimal perturbation can be much longer. In the present work, we demonstrate that this paradoxical property can arise even in quite simple systems such as a linear chain of reactions obeying mass action (MA) kinetics. By mathematical analysis of simple reaction networks, we pin-point the reason why the standard relaxation time does not provide relevant information on the potentially long transient times of typical infinitesimal perturbations. Overall, we consider four characteristic times and study their behaviour in both simple linear chains and in more complex reaction networks taken from the publicly available database 'Biomodels'. In all these systems, whether involving MA rates, Michaelis-Menten reversible kinetics, or phenomenological laws for reaction rates, we find that the characteristic times corresponding to lifetimes of tracers and of concentration perturbations can be significantly longer than τ. PMID:27411726

  19. Reaction Time and Movement Time as Measures of Stimulus Evaluation and Response Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houlihan, Michael; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Three studies involving 16 college students explored cognitive processes reflected by reaction time (RT) and movement time (MT). The hypothesis that correlations of RT and MT with measures of intelligence are due to effects on a common stage of information processing cannot be rejected on the basis of study findings. (SLD)

  20. Short relaxation times but long transient times in both simple and complex reaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Adrien; Martin, Olivier C.

    2016-01-01

    When relaxation towards an equilibrium or steady state is exponential at large times, one usually considers that the associated relaxation time τ, i.e. the inverse of the decay rate, is the longest characteristic time in the system. However, that need not be true, other times such as the lifetime of an infinitesimal perturbation can be much longer. In the present work, we demonstrate that this paradoxical property can arise even in quite simple systems such as a linear chain of reactions obeying mass action (MA) kinetics. By mathematical analysis of simple reaction networks, we pin-point the reason why the standard relaxation time does not provide relevant information on the potentially long transient times of typical infinitesimal perturbations. Overall, we consider four characteristic times and study their behaviour in both simple linear chains and in more complex reaction networks taken from the publicly available database ‘Biomodels’. In all these systems, whether involving MA rates, Michaelis–Menten reversible kinetics, or phenomenological laws for reaction rates, we find that the characteristic times corresponding to lifetimes of tracers and of concentration perturbations can be significantly longer than τ. PMID:27411726

  1. Equilibrium distributions of simple biochemical reaction systems for time-scale separation in stochastic reaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Mélykúti, Bence; Hespanha, João P.; Khammash, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Many biochemical reaction networks are inherently multiscale in time and in the counts of participating molecular species. A standard technique to treat different time scales in the stochastic kinetics framework is averaging or quasi-steady-state analysis: it is assumed that the fast dynamics reaches its equilibrium (stationary) distribution on a time scale where the slowly varying molecular counts are unlikely to have changed. We derive analytic equilibrium distributions for various simple biochemical systems, such as enzymatic reactions and gene regulation models. These can be directly inserted into simulations of the slow time-scale dynamics. They also provide insight into the stimulus–response of these systems. An important model for which we derive the analytic equilibrium distribution is the binding of dimer transcription factors (TFs) that first have to form from monomers. This gene regulation mechanism is compared to the cases of the binding of simple monomer TFs to one gene or to multiple copies of a gene, and to the cases of the cooperative binding of two or multiple TFs to a gene. The results apply equally to ligands binding to enzyme molecules. PMID:24920118

  2. Equilibrium distributions of simple biochemical reaction systems for time-scale separation in stochastic reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Mélykúti, Bence; Hespanha, João P; Khammash, Mustafa

    2014-08-01

    Many biochemical reaction networks are inherently multiscale in time and in the counts of participating molecular species. A standard technique to treat different time scales in the stochastic kinetics framework is averaging or quasi-steady-state analysis: it is assumed that the fast dynamics reaches its equilibrium (stationary) distribution on a time scale where the slowly varying molecular counts are unlikely to have changed. We derive analytic equilibrium distributions for various simple biochemical systems, such as enzymatic reactions and gene regulation models. These can be directly inserted into simulations of the slow time-scale dynamics. They also provide insight into the stimulus-response of these systems. An important model for which we derive the analytic equilibrium distribution is the binding of dimer transcription factors (TFs) that first have to form from monomers. This gene regulation mechanism is compared to the cases of the binding of simple monomer TFs to one gene or to multiple copies of a gene, and to the cases of the cooperative binding of two or multiple TFs to a gene. The results apply equally to ligands binding to enzyme molecules. PMID:24920118

  3. Aging 5 Years in 5 Minutes: The Effect of Taking a Memory Test on Older Adults’ Subjective Age

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Matthew L.; Geraci, Lisa; De Forrest, Ross L.

    2015-01-01

    How old one feels—one’s subjective age—has been shown to predict important psychological and health outcomes. The current studies examined the effect of taking a standard memory test on older adults’ subjective age. Study 1 showed that older adults felt older after taking a standard neuropsychological screening test and participating in a free-recall experiment than they felt at baseline. Study 2 showed that the effect was selective to older adults: Younger adults’ subjective age was not affected by participating in the memory experiment. Study 3 showed that the subjective-aging effect was specific to memory, as taking a vocabulary test for a similar amount of time did not affect older adults’ subjective age. Finally, Study 4 showed that simply expecting to take a memory test subjectively aged older adults. The results indicate that being in a memory-testing context affects older adults’ self-perception by making them feel older. PMID:24100121

  4. Acute Effects of Static and Dynamic Stretching on Balance, Agility, Reaction Time and Movement Time

    PubMed Central

    Chatzopoulos, Dimitris; Galazoulas, Christos; Patikas, Dimitrios; Kotzamanidis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of three different stretching protocols on balance, agility, reaction time and movement time of the upper limbs. Participants were thirty one female high school athletes (age = 17.3 ± 0.5 yr.). All participants performed one of the following protocols on different days: (a) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min static stretching (SS), (b) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min dynamic stretching (DS), and (c) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min of rest (NS). After the protocols participants performed the following tests: dynamic balance, 505 agility test, reaction time (time between a sound stimulus and release of a button) and movement time (movement of the upper extremity over a 0.5 m distance). The order of stretching protocols and performance tests were counterbalanced to avoid carryover effects. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed significant main effects for all variables except reaction time. The DS protocol compared to SS performed significantly better in balance, agility and movement time. Additionally, the DS protocol compared to NS performed significantly better in agility. According to the results of the study, a DS protocol is more appropriate than SS for activities that require balance, rapid change of running direction (agility) and movement time of the upper extremities. Key points Static stretching has a negative effect on balance and agility performance compared to dynamic stretching. There was no effect of the stretching protocols on reaction time. Dynamic stretching was more effective than static stretching for increasing movement time of the upper extremities. PMID:24790497

  5. Reaction time and rhythm of movement in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Martínez Pueyo, A; García-Ruiz, P J; Feliz, C E; Garcia Caldentey, J; Del Val, J; Herranz, A

    2016-03-15

    Huntington disease (HD) is characterized by several hyperkinesias though motor slowness is also another cardinal in this disease. In addition, self-paced timing movements are also disturbed in HD, which may also affect several rhythmic voluntary movements such as gait. Motor slowness can be measured with clinical scales such as the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) and timed tests, but also with the reaction time (RT) paradigm. We evaluated RT as a measure of motor slowness in 30 patients with genetically confirmed Huntington's disease and 24 control subjects. We also evaluated self-paced timing precision (SPTP) by applying a simple software program devised by our group. Clinical assessment was performed according to the UHDRS, including motor section, total functional capacity (TFC) and cognitive section (verbal fluency test, symbol digit, and Stroop test) The mean values obtained for RT and SPTP were statistically different in HD as compared with those from controls (p<0.0005). We observed a statistically significant correlation between RT and TFC scores (rs=-0.57, p<0.005 Spearman's correlation) and also between SPTP values and TFC scores (rs=-0.40, p<0.05 Spearman's correlation). In addition, RT and SPTP significantly correlated with cognitive scores (including digit symbol, verbal fluency and Stroop tests). Simple tests such as RT and SPTP provide an objective evaluation of motor impairment in HD yielding measures that correlate with clinical assessment and functional disability. PMID:26944129

  6. Locus of the intensity effect in simple reaction time tasks.

    PubMed

    Jaśkowski, Piotr; Kurczewska, Marta; Nowik, Agnieszka; van der Lubbe, Rob H J; Verleger, Rolf

    2007-11-01

    Evidence is still inconclusive regarding the locus of the stimulus intensity effect on information processing in reaction tasks. Miller, Ulrich, and Rinkenauer (1999) addressed this question by assessing the intensity effect on stimulus- and response-locked lateralized readiness potentials (LRPs) as indices of the sensory and motor parts of reaction time (RT). In the case of visual stimuli, they observed that application of brighter stimuli resulted in a shortening of RT and stimulus-locked LRP (S-LRP), but not of response-locked LRP (R-LRP). The results for auditory stimuli, however, were unclear. In spite of a clear RT reduction due to increased loudness, neither S-LRP nor R-LRP onset was affected. A reason for this failure might have been a relatively small range of intensity variation and the type of task. To check for this possibility, we performed three experiments in which broader ranges of stimulus intensities and simple, rather than choice, response tasks were used. Although the intensity effect on the R-LRP was negligible, S-LRP followed RT changes, irrespective of stimulus modality. These findings support the conclusion that stimulus intensity exerts its effect before the start of motoric processes. Finally, S-LRP and R-LRP findings are discussed within a broader information-processing perspective to check the validity of the claim that S-LRP and R-LRP can, indeed, be considered as pure estimates of the duration of sensory and motor processes. PMID:18078225

  7. [Peroneal reaction time: study of a normal sample].

    PubMed

    Lipke, K; Tannheimer, M; Benesch, S; Gerngross, H; Becker, H P; Schmidt, R

    2001-12-01

    Chronic functional instability is a residual problem after acute ankle sprain. Reasons may be weak ligaments and/or a deficit in the proprioceptive system. Studies have shown that peroneal reaction time (PRT) can be used to quantify proprioceptive performance. To test the influence of anthropometric data on PRT, an experimental study with 120 healthy volunteers was performed. Surface electrodes recorded the activity of the peroneal muscles after a sudden inversion on a tilting platform. It was found that PRT is not influenced by extrinsic or anthropometric data. Furthermore, the results prove a significant slackening in PRT with increasing age. Therefore, the patient's age must to be considered in judging the PRT. PMID:11803722

  8. Factors influencing the latency of simple reaction time

    PubMed Central

    Woods, David L.; Wyma, John M.; Yund, E. William; Herron, Timothy J.; Reed, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Simple reaction time (SRT), the minimal time needed to respond to a stimulus, is a basic measure of processing speed. SRTs were first measured by Francis Galton in the 19th century, who reported visual SRT latencies below 190 ms in young subjects. However, recent large-scale studies have reported substantially increased SRT latencies that differ markedly in different laboratories, in part due to timing delays introduced by the computer hardware and software used for SRT measurement. We developed a calibrated and temporally precise SRT test to analyze the factors that influence SRT latencies in a paradigm where visual stimuli were presented to the left or right hemifield at varying stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). Experiment 1 examined a community sample of 1469 subjects ranging in age from 18 to 65. Mean SRT latencies were short (231, 213 ms when corrected for hardware delays) and increased significantly with age (0.55 ms/year), but were unaffected by sex or education. As in previous studies, SRTs were prolonged at shorter SOAs and were slightly faster for stimuli presented in the visual field contralateral to the responding hand. Stimulus detection time (SDT) was estimated by subtracting movement initiation time, measured in a speeded finger tapping test, from SRTs. SDT latencies averaged 131 ms and were unaffected by age. Experiment 2 tested 189 subjects ranging in age from 18 to 82 years in a different laboratory using a larger range of SOAs. Both SRTs and SDTs were slightly prolonged (by 7 ms). SRT latencies increased with age while SDT latencies remained stable. Precise computer-based measurements of SRT latencies show that processing speed is as fast in contemporary populations as in the Victorian era, and that age-related increases in SRT latencies are due primarily to slowed motor output. PMID:25859198

  9. Reaction time in ankle movements: a diffusion model analysis

    PubMed Central

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    Reaction time (RT) is one of the most commonly used measures of neurological function and dysfunction. Despite the extensive studies on it, no study has ever examined the RT in the ankle. Twenty-two subjects were recruited to perform simple, 2- and 4-choice RT tasks by visually guiding a cursor inside a rectangular target with their ankle. RT did not change with spatial accuracy constraints imposed by different target widths in the direction of the movement. RT increased as a linear function of potential target stimuli, as would be predicted by Hick–Hyman law. Although the slopes of the regressions were similar, the intercept in dorsal–plantar (DP) direction was significantly smaller than the intercept in inversion–eversion (IE) direction. To explain this difference, we used a hierarchical Bayesian estimation of the Ratcliff's (Psychol Rev 85:59, 1978) diffusion model parameters and divided processing time into cognitive components. The model gave a good account of RTs, their distribution and accuracy values, and hence provided a testimony that the non-decision processing time (overlap of posterior distributions between DP and IE < 0.045), the boundary separation (overlap of the posterior distributions < 0.1) and the evidence accumulation rate (overlap of the posterior distributions < 0.01) components of the RT accounted for the intercept difference between DP and IE. The model also proposed that there was no systematic change in non-decision processing time or drift rate when spatial accuracy constraints were altered. The results were in agreement with the memory drum hypothesis and could be further justified neurophysiologically by the larger innervation of the muscles controlling DP movements. This study might contribute to assessing deficits in sensorimotor control of the ankle and enlighten a possible target for correction in the framework of our on-going effort to develop robotic therapeutic interventions to the ankle of children with cerebral palsy

  10. A Longitudinal Study of Visual Expectation and Reaction Time in the First Year of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Susan A.; Feldman, Judith F.; Jankowski, Jeffery J.; Caro, Donna M.

    2002-01-01

    Examined developmental change and stability of visual expectation and reaction times among 5-, 7-, and 12-month-old term and preterm infants. Found that reaction times declined with age while anticipations increased. Infants with faster reaction times were more likely to anticipate upcoming events; this effect disappeared when time between stimuli…

  11. Time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huot, Alexandrine; Gagnon, Marc-André; Jahjah, Karl-Alexandre; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Fréderick

    2015-05-01

    Thermal infrared imaging is a field of science that evolves rapidly. Scientists have used for years the simplest tool: thermal broadband cameras. This allows to perform target characterization in both the longwave (LWIR) and midwave (MWIR) infrared spectral range. Infrared thermal imaging is used for a wide range of applications, especially in the combustion domain. For example, it can be used to follow combustion reactions, in order to characterize the injection and the ignition in a combustion chamber or even to observe gases produced by a flare or smokestack. Most combustion gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) selectively absorb/emit infrared radiation at discrete energies, i.e. over a very narrow spectral range. Therefore, temperatures derived from broadband imaging are not reliable without prior knowledge about spectral emissivity. This information is not directly available from broadband images. However, spectral information is available using spectral filters. In this work, combustion analysis was carried out using Telops MS-IR MW camera which allows multispectral imaging at a high frame rate. A motorized filter wheel allowing synchronized acquisitions on eight (8) different channels was used to provide time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion products of a candle in which black powder has been burnt to create a burst. It was then possible to estimate the temperature by modeling spectral profile derived from information obtained with the different spectral filters. Comparison with temperatures obtained using conventional broadband imaging illustrates the benefits of time-resolved multispectral imaging for the characterization of combustion processes.

  12. Time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huot, Alexandrine; Gagnon, Marc-André; Jahjah, Karl-Alexandre; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Frédérick

    2015-10-01

    Thermal infrared imaging is a field of science that evolves rapidly. Scientists have used for years the simplest tool: thermal broadband cameras. These allow to perform target characterization in both the longwave (LWIR) and midwave (MWIR) infrared spectral range. Infrared thermal imaging is used for a wide range of applications, especially in the combustion domain. For example, it can be used to follow combustion reactions, in order to characterize the injection and the ignition in a combustion chamber or even to observe gases produced by a flare or smokestack. Most combustion gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), selectively absorb/emit infrared radiation at discrete energies, i.e. over a very narrow spectral range. Therefore, temperatures derived from broadband imaging are not reliable without prior knowledge of spectral emissivity. This information is not directly available from broadband images. However, spectral information is available using spectral filters. In this work, combustion analysis was carried out using a Telops MS-IR MW camera, which allows multispectral imaging at a high frame rate. A motorized filter wheel allowing synchronized acquisitions on eight (8) different channels was used to provide time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion products of a candle in which black powder has been burnt to create a burst. It was then possible to estimate the temperature by modeling spectral profiles derived from information obtained with the different spectral filters. Comparison with temperatures obtained using conventional broadband imaging illustrates the benefits of time-resolved multispectral imaging for the characterization of combustion processes.

  13. Bayesian parametric estimation of stop-signal reaction time distributions.

    PubMed

    Matzke, Dora; Dolan, Conor V; Logan, Gordon D; Brown, Scott D; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2013-11-01

    The cognitive concept of response inhibition can be measured with the stop-signal paradigm. In this paradigm, participants perform a 2-choice response time (RT) task where, on some of the trials, the primary task is interrupted by a stop signal that prompts participants to withhold their response. The dependent variable of interest is the latency of the unobservable stop response (stop-signal reaction time, or SSRT). Based on the horse race model (Logan & Cowan, 1984), several methods have been developed to estimate SSRTs. None of these approaches allow for the accurate estimation of the entire distribution of SSRTs. Here we introduce a Bayesian parametric approach that addresses this limitation. Our method is based on the assumptions of the horse race model and rests on the concept of censored distributions. We treat response inhibition as a censoring mechanism, where the distribution of RTs on the primary task (go RTs) is censored by the distribution of SSRTs. The method assumes that go RTs and SSRTs are ex-Gaussian distributed and uses Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling to obtain posterior distributions for the model parameters. The method can be applied to individual as well as hierarchical data structures. We present the results of a number of parameter recovery and robustness studies and apply our approach to published data from a stop-signal experiment. PMID:23163766

  14. Exploration of Reaction Time: Ideas for an Inquiry Investigation in Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Todd; Brown, Katrina; Barnot, Vickilyn

    2012-01-01

    Reaction time, the time between a stimulus and a person's reaction to it, is a concept familiar to most teenagers, particularly in the context of driving. We describe a simple inexpensive activity that utilizes students' creativity and invokes the scientific method in order to explore reaction time. The goal of the activity is to give students a…

  15. Automatic Activity and Reaction Time in Relation to Extraversion and Behavioral Impulsivity in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahn, Theodore P.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Forty-five children and adolescents had skin conductance recorded during a presentation of tones and a reaction time test and were assessed for extraversion. Found that extraversion was negatively correlated with skin conductance response magnitudes to all stimuli--somewhat more strongly for reaction-time stimuli--and with reaction time. (HTH)

  16. Bivalent task switching and memory load: Similar costs on reaction times, different costs on concurrent timing.

    PubMed

    Viau-Quesnel, Charles; Fortin, Claudette

    2014-09-01

    Some studies suggest that time estimation involves executive control resources. This proposition was challenged recently, however, by results showing simultaneous performance of executive and timing tasks with no cost. The present study examined whether bivalent switching, in which targets may be relevant in more than one task, would interfere with timing. In Experiment 1, the effect of switching between memory search and a classification task was compared with the effect of varying load in memory search. Effects of task switching and of increasing load were similar on reaction times (RTs) in an RT control condition, but drastically different on concurrent timing: Time productions were affected by memory search only. In Experiment 2, the effect of task switching preparation, which involves advance reconfiguration in the switching paradigm, was examined. Preparation to a switch and timing could be performed simultaneously with no cost. These results reveal a fundamental difference between memory search and task switching in terms of dual-task costs, and show that timing and some executive control tasks do not share cognitive resources. PMID:25383477

  17. Exploring Listeners' Real-Time Reactions to Regional Accents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Kevin; Clark, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Evaluative reactions to language stimuli are presumably dynamic events, constantly changing through time as the signal unfolds, yet the tools we usually use to capture these reactions provide us with only a snapshot of this process by recording reactions at a single point in time. This paper outlines and evaluates a new methodology which employs…

  18. Reaction Time in a Visual 4-Choice Reaction Time Task: ERP Effects of Motor Preparation and Hemispheric Involvement.

    PubMed

    Antonova, Ingrida; van Swam, Claudia; Hubl, Daniela; Dierks, Thomas; Griskova-Bulanova, Inga; Koenig, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Reaction time (RT), the most common measure of CNS efficiency, shows intra- and inter-individual variability. This may be accounted for by hemispheric specialization, individual neuroanatomy, and transient functional fluctuations between trials. To explore RT on these three levels, ERPs were measured in a visual 4-choice RT task with lateralized stimuli (left lateral, left middle, right middle, and right lateral) in 28 healthy right-handed subjects. We analyzed behavioral data, ERP microstates (MS), N1 and P3 components, and trial-by-trial variance. Across subjects, the N1 component was contralateral to the stimulation side. N1-MSs were stronger over the left hemisphere, and middle stimulation evoked stronger activation than lateral stimulation in both hemispheres. The P3 was larger for the right visual field stimulation. RTs were shorter for the right visual hemifield stimulation/right hand responses. Within subjects, covariance analysis of single trial ERPs with RTs showed consistent lateralized predictors of RT over the motor cortex (MC) in the 112-248 ms interval. Decreased RTs were related to negativity over the MC contralateral to the stimulation side, an effect that could be interpreted as the lateralized readiness potential (LRP), and which was strongest for right side stimulation. The covariance analysis linking individual mean RTs and individual mean ERPs showed a frontal negativity and an occipital positivity correlating with decreased RTs in the 212-232 ms interval. We concluded that a particular RT is a composite measure that depends on the appropriateness of the motor preparation to a particular response and on stimulus lateralization that selectively involves a particular hemisphere. PMID:26830770

  19. Problem-Solving Test: Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: polymerase chain reaction, DNA amplification, electrophoresis, breast cancer, "HER2" gene, genomic DNA, "in vitro" DNA synthesis, template, primer, Taq polymerase, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] elongation activity, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] exonuclease activity, deoxyribonucleoside…

  20. Analysis of the Escherichia coli genome. V. DNA sequence of the region from 76.0 to 81.5 minutes.

    PubMed Central

    Sofia, H J; Burland, V; Daniels, D L; Plunkett, G; Blattner, F R

    1994-01-01

    The DNA sequence of a 225.4 kilobase segment of the Escherichia coli K-12 genome is described here, from 76.0 to 81.5 minutes on the genetic map. This brings the total of contiguous sequence from the E.coli genome project to 725.1 kb (76.0 to 92.8 minutes). We found 191 putative coding genes (ORFs) of which 72 genes were previously known, and 110 of which remain unidentified despite literature and similarity searches. Seven new genes--arsE, arsF, arsG, treF, xylR, xylG, and xylH--were identified as well as the previously mapped pit and dctA genes. The arrangement of proposed genes relative to possible promoters and terminators suggests 90 potential transcription units. Other features include 19 REP elements, 95 computer-predicted bends, 50 Chi sites, and one grey hole. Thirty-one putative signal peptides were found, including those of thirteen known membrane or periplasmic proteins. One tRNA gene (proK) and two insertion sequences (IS5 and IS150) are located in this segment. The genes in this region are organized with equal numbers oriented with or against replication. PMID:8041620

  1. Estimation of 24-hour thyroid uptake of I-131 sodium iodide using a 5-minute uptake of technetium-99m pertechnetate

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.J.; Croft, B.Y.; Brookeman, V.A.; Teates, C.D. )

    1990-02-01

    The authors have developed a method to estimate the 24-hour sodium iodide thyroid uptake based on a 5-minute Tc-99m pertechnetate thyroid uptake using the equation: Estimated Iodide Uptake = 17.72*In(Pertechnetate Uptake) + 30.40. This estimation has a correlation coefficient of 0.90. It is based on a data pool of 44 patients who underwent I-131 and Tc-99m studies within 2 weeks of each other from 1978-1988, with established diagnoses as follows: 12 euthyroid, 6 hyperthyroid with multinodular goiters, 15 hyperthyroid with diffuse goiters, 4 with subacute thyroiditis, and 7 unknown. The population consisted of 30 women and 14 men with a mean age of 52.0 +/- 17.5 years; this sample was screened for use of thyroid hormone, propylthiouracil, and radiographic contrast. The authors believe this estimation method is of value whenever a 24-hour iodide uptake is desired, and where speed and minimizing radiation dose are factors. This method is strongly recommended for thyroid uptake evaluation before I-131 therapy.

  2. The immediate effects of keyboard-based music therapy on probe reaction time.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Songhuai

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the immediate effects of keyboard-based music therapy on Probe Reaction Time. [Subjects and Methods] Probe Reaction Time was determined in 10 subjects by self-evaluation before and after music therapy intervention. The Probe Reaction Time was separately measured 4 times. [Results] After completion of music therapy intervention, the Probe Reaction Time in the 10 subjects was significantly decreased. [Conclusion] The results suggest that keyboard-based music therapy is an effective and novel treatment, and should be applied in clinical practice. PMID:27512274

  3. The immediate effects of keyboard-based music therapy on probe reaction time

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Songhuai

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the immediate effects of keyboard-based music therapy on Probe Reaction Time. [Subjects and Methods] Probe Reaction Time was determined in 10 subjects by self-evaluation before and after music therapy intervention. The Probe Reaction Time was separately measured 4 times. [Results] After completion of music therapy intervention, the Probe Reaction Time in the 10 subjects was significantly decreased. [Conclusion] The results suggest that keyboard-based music therapy is an effective and novel treatment, and should be applied in clinical practice. PMID:27512274

  4. A Comparative Study on Visual Choice Reaction Time for Different Colors in Females

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Grrishma; Uppinakudru, Gurunandan; Girwar Singh, Gaur; Bangera, Shobith; Dutt Raghavendra, Aswini; Thangavel, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Reaction time is one of the important methods to study a person's central information processing speed and coordinated peripheral movement response. Visual choice reaction time is a type of reaction time and is very important for drivers, pilots, security guards, and so forth. Previous studies were mainly on simple reaction time and there are very few studies on visual choice reaction time. The aim of our study was to compare the visual choice reaction time for red, green, and yellow colors of 60 healthy undergraduate female volunteers. After giving adequate practice, visual choice reaction time was recorded for red, green, and yellow colors using reaction time machine (RTM 608, Medicaid, Chandigarh). Repeated measures of ANOVA and Bonferroni multiple comparison were used for analysis and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The results showed that both red and green had significantly less choice visual choice reaction (P values <0.0001 and 0.0002) when compared with yellow. This could be because individual color mental processing time for yellow color is more than red and green. PMID:25580294

  5. Reaction time in gait initiation depends on the time available for affective processing.

    PubMed

    Gélat, Thierry; Chapus, Carole Ferrel

    2015-11-16

    Previous studies have reported that reaction time in gait initiation was affected by emotion eliciting pictures. This study examined the effect of a change in the delay between image onset and the imperative "go" on reaction time. From a standing posture, 19 young adults had to walk (several steps) toward pleasant or unpleasant images in two conditions. In the short condition, the word "go" appeared 500ms after image onset and participants were instructed to initiate gait as soon as possible after the word go appeared. In the long condition, the same procedure was used but the word "go" appeared 3000ms after image onset. Results demonstrated that motor responses were faster for pleasant pictures than unpleasant ones in the short condition. In contrast, no significant difference was found between both categories of pictures in the long condition. Moreover, we found that self ratings of valence of unpleasant pictures were less unpleasant in the long condition than in the short one whereas there was no difference for pleasant pictures between both conditions. This result reflected a change in the affective significance of unpleasant pictures in the long condition. We also found in the long condition, that the body was inclined forward and to the stance limb during the standing posture and importantly with a similar extent for pleasant and unpleasant pictures. This change clearly reflected a facilitation of the gait initiation process. Overall, results suggested that this gait facilitation when confronted to unpleasant pictures resulted from emotional regulation processes enabling to reappraise these pictures and to override the initial avoidance tendency that they caused. PMID:26455865

  6. Corticospinal excitability is reduced in a simple reaction time task requiring complex timing.

    PubMed

    Kennefick, Michael; Maslovat, Dana; Chua, Romeo; Carlsen, Anthony N

    2016-07-01

    Increasing the complexity of a movement has been shown to result in longer simple reaction time (RT), which has been attributed to sequencing or timing requirements following the go-signal. However, RT differences may also be due to differences in corticospinal excitability (CE) as previous studies have found an enhanced excitatory state of corticospinal neurons in complex tasks. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used in the present study to probe the excitability of the motor pathway during the simple RT interval for single (simple) versus multiple (complex) key press responses. Premotor RT data indicated that participants responded significantly (p<.001) faster in the simple task compared to the complex task, confirming response complexity was manipulated appropriately. Analysis of the CE data indicated that motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes increased with time following the go-signal in both conditions and that MEP amplitudes in the simple task were significantly larger than those in the complex task when evoked within 75ms of movement onset (p=.009). These findings suggest that the rate of increase for initiation-related neural activation is reduced for complex as compared to simple movements, which may partially explain differences in RT. PMID:27064075

  7. A time-indexed reference standard of adverse drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Harpaz, Rave; Odgers, David; Gaskin, Greg; DuMouchel, William; Winnenburg, Rainer; Bodenreider, Olivier; Ripple, Anna; Szarfman, Ana; Sorbello, Alfred; Horvitz, Eric; White, Ryen W.; Shah, Nigam H.

    2014-01-01

    Undetected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) pose a major burden on the health system. Data mining methodologies designed to identify signals of novel ADRs are of deep importance for drug safety surveillance. The development and evaluation of these methodologies requires proper reference benchmarks. While progress has recently been made in developing such benchmarks, our understanding of the performance characteristics of the data mining methodologies is limited because existing benchmarks do not support prospective performance evaluations. We address this shortcoming by providing a reference standard to support prospective performance evaluations. The reference standard was systematically curated from drug labeling revisions, such as new warnings, which were issued and communicated by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2013. The reference standard includes 62 positive test cases and 75 negative controls, and covers 44 drugs and 38 events. We provide usage guidance and empirical support for the reference standard by applying it to analyze two data sources commonly mined for drug safety surveillance. PMID:25632348

  8. The dependence of grain size of silicon from rice husk ash on metallothermic reaction time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malino, Mariana B.; Jimmy, Lapanporo, Boni P.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the influence of metallothermic reaction time on the grain size of silicon from rice husk ash. The silicon was produced by the metallothermic reaction of silica which is isolated from rice husk ash and aluminum at 620°C for reaction time varies at 3 hours, 4 hours, 5 hours and 6 hours and continued with purification of the products using acid hydrolysis method. The results of the crystallite size determination, obtained from profile analysis of XRD peaks, were indicated a tendency that the size increases as the reaction time increase, however, presumably the samples did not experience the grain growth significantly due to impurity contents.

  9. In Reaction to Columbine, "Times" Focuses on Culture of Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donofrio, Leana; Richards, Megan

    1999-01-01

    Describes how "The Lakewood Times" (Lakewood, Ohio) covered the shootings at Columbine High School. Suggests that the newspaper covered the story differently than other media by taking many different angles to the story. (RS)

  10. A genetic investigation of the covariation among inspection time, choice reaction time, and IQ subtest scores.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Michelle; Wright, Margaret J; Geffen, Gina M; Geffen, Laurie B; Smith, Glen A; Martin, Nicholas G

    2004-01-01

    Information processing speed, as measured by elementary cognitive tasks, is correlated with higher order cognitive ability so that increased speed relates to improved cognitive performance. The question of whether the genetic variation in Inspection Time (IT) and Choice Reaction Time (CRT) is associated with IQ through a unitary factor was addressed in this multivariate genetic study of IT, CRT, and IQ subtest scores. The sample included 184 MZ and 206 DZ twin pairs with a mean age of 16.2 years (range 15-18 years). They were administered a visual (pi-figure) IT task, a two-choice RT task, five computerized subtests of the Multidimensional Aptitude Battery, and the digit symbol substitution subtest from the WAIS-R. The data supported a factor model comprising a general, three group (verbal ability, visuospatial ability, broad speediness), and specific genetic factor structure, a shared environmental factor influencing all tests but IT, plus unique environmental factors that were largely specific to individual measures. The general genetic factor displayed factor loadings ranging between 0.35 and 0.66 for the IQ subtests, with IT and CRT loadings of -0.47 and -0.24, respectively. Results indicate that a unitary factor is insufficient to describe the entire relationship between cognitive speed measures and all IQ subtests, with independent genetic effects explaining further covariation between processing speed (especially CRT) and Digit Symbol. PMID:14739695

  11. On the deduction of chemical reaction pathways from measurements of time series of concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilov, Michael; Arkin, Adam; Ross, John

    2001-03-01

    We discuss the deduction of reaction pathways in complex chemical systems from measurements of time series of chemical concentrations of reacting species. First we review a technique called correlation metric construction (CMC) and show the construction of a reaction pathway from measurements on a part of glycolysis. Then we present two new improved methods for the analysis of time series of concentrations, entropy metric construction (EMC), and entropy reduction method (ERM), and illustrate (EMC) with calculations on a model reaction system.

  12. Competitive autocatalytic reactions in chaotic flows with diffusion: Prediction using finite-time Lyapunov exponents

    SciTech Connect

    Schlick, Conor P.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208; The Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems , Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 ; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2014-03-15

    We investigate chaotic advection and diffusion in autocatalytic reactions for time-periodic sine flow computationally using a mapping method with operator splitting. We specifically consider three different autocatalytic reaction schemes: a single autocatalytic reaction, competitive autocatalytic reactions, which can provide insight into problems of chiral symmetry breaking and homochirality, and competitive autocatalytic reactions with recycling. In competitive autocatalytic reactions, species B and C both undergo an autocatalytic reaction with species A such that A+B→2B and A+C→2C. Small amounts of initially spatially localized B and C and a large amount of spatially homogeneous A are advected by the velocity field, diffuse, and react until A is completely consumed and only B and C remain. We find that local finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs) can accurately predict the final average concentrations of B and C after the reaction completes. The species that starts in the region with the larger FTLE has, with high probability, the larger average concentration at the end of the reaction. If B and C start in regions with similar FTLEs, their average concentrations at the end of the reaction will also be similar. When a recycling reaction is added, the system evolves towards a single species state, with the FTLE often being useful in predicting which species fills the entire domain and which is depleted. The FTLE approach is also demonstrated for competitive autocatalytic reactions in journal bearing flow, an experimentally realizable flow that generates chaotic dynamics.

  13. Individual Differences in Components of Reaction Time Distributions and Their Relations to Working Memory and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmiedek, Florian; Oberauer, Klaus; Wilhelm, Oliver; Suss, Heinz-Martin; Wittmann, Werner W.

    2007-01-01

    The authors bring together approaches from cognitive and individual differences psychology to model characteristics of reaction time distributions beyond measures of central tendency. Ex-Gaussian distributions and a diffusion model approach are used to describe individuals' reaction time data. The authors identified common latent factors for each…

  14. A Joint Modeling Approach for Reaction Time and Accuracy in Psycholinguistic Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeys, T.; Rosseel, Y.; Baten, K.

    2011-01-01

    In the psycholinguistic literature, reaction times and accuracy can be analyzed separately using mixed (logistic) effects models with crossed random effects for item and subject. Given the potential correlation between these two outcomes, a joint model for the reaction time and accuracy may provide further insight. In this paper, a Bayesian…

  15. Temporal Frequency Modulates Reaction Time Responses to First-Order and Second-Order Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Claire V.; Ledgeway, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of temporal frequency and modulation depth on reaction times for discriminating the direction of first-order (luminance-defined) and second-order (contrast-defined) motion, equated for visibility using equal multiples of direction-discrimination threshold. Results showed that reaction times were heavily…

  16. Specificity and Differences in Three Methods of Assessing Trainable Mental Retardates' Reaction Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surburg, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    Ss' reaction time was measured from onset of a light stimulus until activiation of a microswitch by three types of buttons. Reaction times were significantly faster with the depressed panel mounted and hand-held buttons than with the released panel mounted button. (Author/DLS)

  17. Space and time-resolved probing of heterogeneous catalysis reactions using lab-on-a-chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navin, Chelliah V.; Krishna, Katla Sai; Theegala, Chandra S.; Kumar, Challa S. S. R.

    2016-03-01

    Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors.Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06752a

  18. Voice reaction times with recognition for Commodore computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, David A.; Putney, R. Thompson

    1990-01-01

    Hardware and software modifications are presented that allow for collection and recognition by a Commodore computer of spoken responses. Responses are timed with millisecond accuracy and automatically analyzed and scored. Accuracy data for this device from several experiments are presented. Potential applications and suggestions for improving recognition accuracy are also discussed.

  19. Geologic map and database of the Salem East and Turner 7.5-minute quadrangles, Marion County, Oregon: a digital database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tolan, Terry L.; Beeson, Marvin H.; Digital Database by DuRoss, Christopher B.

    2000-01-01

    The Salem East and Turner 7.5-minute quadrangles are situated in the center of the Willamette Valley near the western margin of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) distribution. The terrain within the area is of low to moderate relief, ranging from about 150 to almost 1,100-ft elevation. Mill Creek flows northward from the Stayton basin (Turner quadrangle) to the northern Willamette Valley (Salem East quadrangle) through a low that dissects the Columbia River basalt that forms the Salem Hills on the west and the Waldo Hills to the east. Approximately eight flows of CRBG form a thickness of up to 700� in these two quadrangles. The Ginkgo intracanyon flow that extends from east to west through the south half of the Turner quadrangle is exposed in the hills along the southeast part of the quadrangle. Previous geologic mapping by Thayer (1939) and Bela (1981) while providing the general geologic framework did not subdivide the CRBG which limited their ability to delineate structural elements. Reconnaissance mapping of the CRBG units in the Willamette Valley indicated that these stratigraphic units could serve as a series of unique reference horizons for identifying post-Miocene folding and faulting (Beeson and others, 1985,1989; Beeson and Tolan, 1990). Crenna, et al. (1994) compiled previous mapping in the Willamette Valley in a study of the tectonics of the Salem area. The major emphasis of this study was to identify and map CRBG units within the Salem East and Turner Quadrangles and to utilize this detailed CRBG stratigraphy to identify and characterize structural features. Water well logs were used to provide better subsurface stratigraphic control. Three other quadrangles (Scotts Mills, Silverton, and Stayton NE) in the Willamette Valley have been mapped in this way (Tolan and Beeson, 1999). This area was a lowland area of weathered and eroded marine sedimentary when the Columbia River basalts encroached on this area approximately 15-16 m.y. ago. An

  20. Geologic framework, hydrostratigraphy, and ichnology of the Blanco, Payton, and Rough Hollow 7.5-minute quadrangles, Blanco, Comal, Hays, and Kendall Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Golab, James A.; Morris, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the geologic framework, hydro­stratigraphy, and ichnology of the Trinity and Edwards Groups in the Blanco, Payton, and Rough Hollow 7.5-minute quad­rangles in Blanco, Comal, Hays, and Kendall Counties, Texas. Rocks exposed in the study area are of the Lower Cretaceous Trinity Group and lower part of the Fort Terrett Formation of the Lower Cretaceous Edwards Group. The mapped units in the study area are the Hammett Shale, Cow Creek Limestone, Hensell Sand, and Glen Rose Limestone of the Trinity Group and the lower portion of the Fort Terrett Formation of the Edwards Group. The Glen Rose Limestone is composed of the Lower and Upper Members. These Trinity Group rocks con­tain the upper and middle Trinity aquifers. The only remaining outcrops of the Edwards Group are the basal nodular member of the Fort Terrett Formation, which caps several hills in the northern portion of the study area. These rocks were deposited in an open marine to supratidal flats environment. The faulting and fracturing in the study area are part of the Balcones fault zone, an extensional system of faults that generally trends southwest to northeast in south-central Texas.The hydrostratigraphic units of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers were mapped and described using a classification system based on fabric-selective or not-fabric-selective poros­ity types. The only hydrostratigraphic unit of the Edwards aquifer present in the study area is hydrostratigraphic unit VIII. The mapped hydrostratigraphic units of the upper Trinity aquifer are (from top to bottom) the Camp Bullis, upper evaporite, fossiliferous, and lower evaporite which are interval equivalent to the Upper Member of the Glen Rose Limestone. The middle Trinity aquifer encompasses (from top to bottom) the Lower Member of the Glen Rose Limestone, the Hensell Sand Member, and the Cow Creek Limestone Member of the Pearsall Formation. The Lower Member of the Glen Rose Limestone is subdivided into six informal hydro

  1. Stochastic modeling of biochemical systems with multistep reactions using state-dependent time delay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianqian; Tian, Tianhai

    2016-01-01

    To deal with the growing scale of molecular systems, sophisticated modelling techniques have been designed in recent years to reduce the complexity of mathematical models. Among them, a widely used approach is delayed reaction for simplifying multistep reactions. However, recent research results suggest that a delayed reaction with constant time delay is unable to describe multistep reactions accurately. To address this issue, we propose a novel approach using state-dependent time delay to approximate multistep reactions. We first use stochastic simulations to calculate time delay arising from multistep reactions exactly. Then we design algorithms to calculate time delay based on system dynamics precisely. To demonstrate the power of proposed method, two processes of mRNA degradation are used to investigate the function of time delay in determining system dynamics. In addition, a multistep pathway of metabolic synthesis is used to explore the potential of the proposed method to simplify multistep reactions with nonlinear reaction rates. Simulation results suggest that the state-dependent time delay is a promising and accurate approach to reduce model complexity and decrease the number of unknown parameters in the models. PMID:27553753

  2. Stochastic modeling of biochemical systems with multistep reactions using state-dependent time delay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qianqian; Tian, Tianhai

    2016-01-01

    To deal with the growing scale of molecular systems, sophisticated modelling techniques have been designed in recent years to reduce the complexity of mathematical models. Among them, a widely used approach is delayed reaction for simplifying multistep reactions. However, recent research results suggest that a delayed reaction with constant time delay is unable to describe multistep reactions accurately. To address this issue, we propose a novel approach using state-dependent time delay to approximate multistep reactions. We first use stochastic simulations to calculate time delay arising from multistep reactions exactly. Then we design algorithms to calculate time delay based on system dynamics precisely. To demonstrate the power of proposed method, two processes of mRNA degradation are used to investigate the function of time delay in determining system dynamics. In addition, a multistep pathway of metabolic synthesis is used to explore the potential of the proposed method to simplify multistep reactions with nonlinear reaction rates. Simulation results suggest that the state-dependent time delay is a promising and accurate approach to reduce model complexity and decrease the number of unknown parameters in the models. PMID:27553753

  3. Spontaneous Fluctuations in Sensory Processing Predict Within-Subject Reaction Time Variability

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Maria J.; Paiva, Joana S.; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    When engaged in a repetitive task our performance fluctuates from trial-to-trial. In particular, inter-trial reaction time variability has been the subject of considerable research. It has been claimed to be a strong biomarker of attention deficits, increases with frontal dysfunction, and predicts age-related cognitive decline. Thus, rather than being just a consequence of noise in the system, it appears to be under the control of a mechanism that breaks down under certain pathological conditions. Although the underlying mechanism is still an open question, consensual hypotheses are emerging regarding the neural correlates of reaction time inter-trial intra-individual variability. Sensory processing, in particular, has been shown to covary with reaction time, yet the spatio-temporal profile of the moment-to-moment variability in sensory processing is still poorly characterized. The goal of this study was to characterize the intra-individual variability in the time course of single-trial visual evoked potentials and its relationship with inter-trial reaction time variability. For this, we chose to take advantage of the high temporal resolution of the electroencephalogram (EEG) acquired while participants were engaged in a 2-choice reaction time task. We studied the link between single trial event-related potentials (ERPs) and reaction time using two different analyses: (1) time point by time point correlation analyses thereby identifying time windows of interest; and (2) correlation analyses between single trial measures of peak latency and amplitude and reaction time. To improve extraction of single trial ERP measures related with activation of the visual cortex, we used an independent component analysis (ICA) procedure. Our ERP analysis revealed a relationship between the N1 visual evoked potential and reaction time. The earliest time point presenting a significant correlation of its respective amplitude with reaction time occurred 175 ms after stimulus onset

  4. Spontaneous Fluctuations in Sensory Processing Predict Within-Subject Reaction Time Variability.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Maria J; Paiva, Joana S; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    When engaged in a repetitive task our performance fluctuates from trial-to-trial. In particular, inter-trial reaction time variability has been the subject of considerable research. It has been claimed to be a strong biomarker of attention deficits, increases with frontal dysfunction, and predicts age-related cognitive decline. Thus, rather than being just a consequence of noise in the system, it appears to be under the control of a mechanism that breaks down under certain pathological conditions. Although the underlying mechanism is still an open question, consensual hypotheses are emerging regarding the neural correlates of reaction time inter-trial intra-individual variability. Sensory processing, in particular, has been shown to covary with reaction time, yet the spatio-temporal profile of the moment-to-moment variability in sensory processing is still poorly characterized. The goal of this study was to characterize the intra-individual variability in the time course of single-trial visual evoked potentials and its relationship with inter-trial reaction time variability. For this, we chose to take advantage of the high temporal resolution of the electroencephalogram (EEG) acquired while participants were engaged in a 2-choice reaction time task. We studied the link between single trial event-related potentials (ERPs) and reaction time using two different analyses: (1) time point by time point correlation analyses thereby identifying time windows of interest; and (2) correlation analyses between single trial measures of peak latency and amplitude and reaction time. To improve extraction of single trial ERP measures related with activation of the visual cortex, we used an independent component analysis (ICA) procedure. Our ERP analysis revealed a relationship between the N1 visual evoked potential and reaction time. The earliest time point presenting a significant correlation of its respective amplitude with reaction time occurred 175 ms after stimulus onset

  5. Simulation of biochemical reactions with time-dependent rates by the rejection-based algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Thanh, Vo Hong; Priami, Corrado

    2015-08-07

    We address the problem of simulating biochemical reaction networks with time-dependent rates and propose a new algorithm based on our rejection-based stochastic simulation algorithm (RSSA) [Thanh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141(13), 134116 (2014)]. The computation for selecting next reaction firings by our time-dependent RSSA (tRSSA) is computationally efficient. Furthermore, the generated trajectory is exact by exploiting the rejection-based mechanism. We benchmark tRSSA on different biological systems with varying forms of reaction rates to demonstrate its applicability and efficiency. We reveal that for nontrivial cases, the selection of reaction firings in existing algorithms introduces approximations because the integration of reaction rates is very computationally demanding and simplifying assumptions are introduced. The selection of the next reaction firing by our approach is easier while preserving the exactness.

  6. Psychological distance and reaction time in a Stroop task.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Giorgio; Rivero Expósito, María del Prado; Reales Avilés, José Manuel

    2013-11-01

    Several sources of interference may simultaneously affect the onset of the well-known "Stroop effect." Among them is the semantic component, which is reflected in the gradient or semantic effect. This effect consists of an increase in the amount of interference as the semantic distance between the word and the color concept decreases. Shepard (Science 237:1317-1323, 1987) relates psychological space, measured through multidimensional scaling, to mean response times. The present investigation aims to study the function relating the semantic gradient with the psychological distance between the word and the color in a Stroop task. After measuring the gradient, we obtained the subjective rating of the degree of dissimilarity of the gradient words with the concept of "color." In our work, we show that the amount of interference in a Stroop task increases when the semantic distance from the word to the color concept decreases, and it does so exponentially. We replicated the study with different stimuli to test the robustness of the results. PMID:23729236

  7. A distributional analysis of the effect of physical exercise on a choice reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Davranche, Karen; Audiffren, Michel; Denjean, André

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the facilitating effects of physical exercise on the reaction process. Eleven participants with specific expertise in decision-making sports performed a choice reaction time task during moderate sub-maximal exercise (90% of their ventilatory threshold power). Participants were tested at rest and while cycling. During exercise, the participants were faster, without being more variable. We suggest that the effect of exercise on cognitive performance was due to a major generalized improvement of the whole distribution of response time and, although the benefit effect was small, it was consistent throughout the entire range of reaction times. PMID:16368641

  8. Visual reaction times during prolonged angular acceleration parallel the subjective perception of rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattson, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of prolonged angular acceleration on choice reaction time to an accelerating visual stimulus was investigated, with 10 commercial airline pilots serving as subjects. The pattern of reaction times during and following acceleration was compared with the pattern of velocity estimates reported during identical trials. Both reaction times and velocity estimates increased at the onset of acceleration, declined prior to the termination of acceleration, and showed an aftereffect. These results are inconsistent with the torsion-pendulum theory of semicircular canal function and suggest that the vestibular adaptation is of central origin.

  9. Choice-reaction time to visual motion with varied levels of simultaneous rotary motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.; Stewart, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Twelve airline pilots were studied to determine the effects of whole-body rotation on choice-reaction time to the horizontal motion of a line on a cathode-ray tube. On each trial, one of five levels of visual acceleration and five corresponding proportions of rotary acceleration were presented simultaneously. Reaction time to the visual motion decreased with increasing levels of visual motion and increased with increasing proportions of rotary acceleration. The results conflict with general theories of facilitation during double stimulation but are consistent with neural-clock model of sensory interaction in choice-reaction time.

  10. Time resolved emission studies of aluminum and water high pressure reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.A.; Russell, T.P.

    1996-07-01

    The detonation of underwater explosives is a complex problem involving a temporally dependent heterogeneous reaction regime of oxidizer reactions and high pressure metal combustion. For simplicity, underwater explosions may be described as a two stage reaction process. First, the oxidizing material detonates to produce species under extreme conditions of temperature (up to 5,000 K) and pressure (up to 10 GPa). The chemical energy produced from this reaction is transferred to the bulk water as three forms of work: (1) shock, (2) heat, and (3) initial bubble formation. Second, the species produced by the oxidizer detonation form a high pressure and high temperature reactive fluid that surrounds the solid particles. The solid particles are primarily consumed while the pressure is decreasing from 10 GPa to 0.1 GPa at a reaction temperature in excess of 3,200 K. The secondary reaction of the solid particles produces a lower energy shock and a pressure response that reinforces the initial energy delivered to the bulk water medium. The ability to tailor this late energy release between shock and bubble formation is dependent on the reaction time and chemistry of the solid particle under extreme conditions. The authors present a series of single-shot time resolved emission experiments that probe the reaction of aluminum particles under extreme conditions. The temporal behavior of the observed species is used to gain insight into the chemical reaction mechanism that leads to the formation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} during underwater detonations.

  11. Prefrontal D1 dopamine signaling is necessary for temporal expectation during reaction time performance

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Krystal L.; Alberico, Stephanie L.; Miller, Adam D.; Narayanan, Nandakumar S.

    2013-01-01

    Responses during a simple reaction time task are influenced by temporal expectation, or the ability to anticipate when a stimulus occurs in time. Here, we test the hypothesis that prefrontal D1 dopamine signaling is necessary for temporal expectation during simple reaction time task performance. We depleted dopamine projections to the medial prefrontal circuits by infusing 6-hydroxidopamine, a selective neurotoxin, into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of rats, and studied their performance on a simple reaction time task with two delays. VTA dopamine depletion did not change movements or learning of the reaction time task. However, VTA dopamine-depleted animals did not develop delay-dependent speeding of reaction times, suggesting that mesocortical dopamine signaling is required for temporal expectation. Next, we manipulated dopamine signaling within the medial prefrontal cortex using local pharmacology. We found that SCH23390, a D1-type dopamine receptor antagonist, specifically attenuated delay-dependent speeding, while sulpiride, a D2-type receptor antagonist, did not. These data suggest that prefrontal D1 dopamine signaling is necessary for temporal expectation during performance of a simple reaction time task. Our findings provide insight into temporal processing of the prefrontal cortex, and how dopamine signaling influences prefrontal circuits that guide goal-directed behavior. PMID:24120554

  12. Prefrontal D1 dopamine signaling is necessary for temporal expectation during reaction time performance.

    PubMed

    Parker, K L; Alberico, S L; Miller, A D; Narayanan, N S

    2013-01-01

    Responses during a simple reaction time task are influenced by temporal expectation, or the ability to anticipate when a stimulus occurs in time. Here, we test the hypothesis that prefrontal D1 dopamine signaling is necessary for temporal expectation during simple reaction time task performance. We depleted dopamine projections to the medial prefrontal circuits by infusing 6-hydroxidopamine, a selective neurotoxin, into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of rats, and studied their performance on a simple reaction time task with two delays. VTA dopamine depletion did not change movements or learning of the reaction time task. However, VTA dopamine-depleted animals did not develop delay-dependent speeding of reaction times, suggesting that mesocortical dopamine signaling is required for temporal expectation. Next, we manipulated dopamine signaling within the medial prefrontal cortex using local pharmacology. We found that SCH23390, a D1-type dopamine receptor antagonist, specifically attenuated delay-dependent speeding, while sulpiride, a D2-type receptor antagonist, did not. These data suggest that prefrontal D1 dopamine signaling is necessary for temporal expectation during performance of a simple reaction time task. Our findings provide insight into temporal processing of the prefrontal cortex, and how dopamine signaling influences prefrontal circuits that guide goal-directed behavior. PMID:24120554

  13. The Persistence of Solid and Liquid Naive Conceptions: A Reaction Time Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babai, Reuven; Amsterdamer, Anat

    2008-12-01

    The study explores whether the naive concepts of solid and liquid persist in adolescence. Accuracy of responses and reaction times where measured while 41 ninth graders classified different solids (rigid, non-rigid and powders) and different liquids (runny, dense) into solid or liquid. The results show that these naive conceptions affect adolescences' classifications in terms of both accuracy and reaction time. The rate of correct classifications of non-rigid solids and powders was significantly lower than of rigid solids. Lower rate of success was also found for classification of dense liquids compared with runny liquids. In addition, the reaction time results of correct classifications for non-rigid solids and powders were longer than those for rigid solids and, likewise, reaction times for dense liquids were longer than for runny ones. These results suggest that reasoning processes associated with correct classification of objects that are not consistent with the naive conceptions are more demanding.

  14. Anticipatory Heart Rate Deceleration and Reaction Time in Children with and without Referral for Learning Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sroufe, L. Alan; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The finding of major significance in this study concerns the effect of stimulant drug medication on the relationship between heart rate deceleration and reaction time with the clinic children. (Authors)

  15. Effects of d-amphetamine, methaqualone, and phencyclidine on the reaction time of pigeons.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, T; Blakely, E; Poling, A

    1993-06-01

    The effects of acute administrations of d-amphetamine (0.56, 1.0, 1.78, 3.2, and 5.6 mg/kg), methaqualone (5.6, 10, 18, 32, and 56 mg/kg), and phencyclidine (0.3, 0.56, 1.0, and 1.78 mg/kg) on the reaction time of pigeons were examined. In the reaction time assay, birds were trained to depress and hold a foot treadle until a stimulus change occurred. Releases within 2 s of the stimulus change were reinforced with food; premature releases or releases occurring after the 2-s limited hold were not reinforced. At relatively high doses, each of the drugs decreased the percentage of responses that were reinforced. Methaqualone and phencyclidine usually increased median reaction times at these doses, whereas the effects of d-amphetamine on reaction time were less clear. PMID:8327541

  16. The Effects of Augmented Levels of Stress on Reaction Time in the Peripheral Visual Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Harriet L.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if reaction time in the peripheral visual field and size of the functional visual field were altered by augmented levels of physical stress while performing on a bicycle ergometer. (JD)

  17. Design Factors Affecting the Reaction Time for Identifying Toilet Signs: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Lang; Sie, Cai-Cin

    2016-04-01

    This study focused on the manner in which design factors affect the reaction time for identifying toilet signs. Taiwanese university students and staff members (50 men, 50 women; M age = 23.5 year, SD = 5.7) participated in the study. The 36 toilet signs were modified on three factors (six presenting styles, two figure-ground exchanges, and three colors), and the reaction time data of all participants were collected when the signs were presented in a simulation onscreen. Participants were quickest when reading Chinese text, followed by graphics and English texts. The findings also showed that men and women had different reaction times across various design combinations. These findings can serve as a reference for practically designing toilet signs, since design factors can lead to difficulties with comprehension based on reaction time measurements. PMID:27166339

  18. Space and time-resolved probing of heterogeneous catalysis reactions using lab-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Navin, Chelliah V; Krishna, Katla Sai; Theegala, Chandra S; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2016-03-01

    Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors. PMID:26888331

  19. A Diffusion Model Explanation of the Worst Performance Rule for Reaction Time and IQ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliff, Roger; Schmiedek, Florian; McKoon, Gail

    2008-01-01

    The worst performance rule for cognitive tasks [Coyle, T.R. (2003). IQ, the worst performance rule, and Spearman's law: A reanalysis and extension. "Intelligence," 31, 567-587] in which reaction time is measured is the result that IQ scores correlate better with longer (i.e., 0.7 and 0.9 quantile) reaction times than shorter (i.e., 0.1 and 0.3…

  20. Exploiting time-resolved magnetic field effects for determining radical ion reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessmertnykh, A. O.; Borovkov, V. I.; Bagryansky, V. A.; Molin, Yu N.

    2016-07-01

    The capabilities of the method of time-resolved magnetic field effect in determining the rates of charge transfer reactions between radical ions and molecules on a nanosecond time scale have been investigated. The approach relies on the electron spin coherence in radical pair's partners generated by ionizing radiation. The spin evolution of the pair is sensitive to the reaction since the latter results in changing magnetic interactions of the unpaired electron. This process can be monitored by magnetic-field-sensitive fluorescence from an irradiated sample that is illustrated using reactions involving alkane radical cations. The accuracy and limitations of the approach are discussed.

  1. Acute physical exercise under hypoxia improves sleep, mood and reaction time.

    PubMed

    de Aquino-Lemos, Valdir; Santos, Ronaldo Vagner T; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Lira, Fabio S; Luz Bittar, Irene G; Caris, Aline V; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of two sessions of acute physical exercise at 50% VO2peak performed under hypoxia (equivalent to an altitude of 4500 m for 28 h) on sleep, mood and reaction time. Forty healthy men were randomized into 4 groups: Normoxia (NG) (n = 10); Hypoxia (HG) (n = 10); Exercise under Normoxia (ENG) (n = 10); and Exercise under Hypoxia (EHG) (n = 10). All mood and reaction time assessments were performed 40 min after awakening. Sleep was reassessed on the first day at 14 h after the initiation of hypoxia; mood and reaction time were measured 28 h later. Two sessions of acute physical exercise at 50% VO2peak were performed for 60 min on the first and second days after 3 and 27 h, respectively, after starting to hypoxia. Improved sleep efficiency, stage N3 and REM sleep and reduced wake after sleep onset were observed under hypoxia after acute physical exercise. Tension, anger, depressed mood, vigor and reaction time scores improved after exercise under hypoxia. We conclude that hypoxia impairs sleep, reaction time and mood. Acute physical exercise at 50% VO2peak under hypoxia improves sleep efficiency, reversing the aspects that had been adversely affected under hypoxia, possibly contributing to improved mood and reaction time. PMID:26522742

  2. Reaction times of younger and older men and temporal contingencies of reinforcement.

    PubMed Central

    Baron, A; Menich, S R; Perone, M

    1983-01-01

    Influences of extended training and temporal contingencies on reaction time were studied in relation to developmental differences. Older and younger men were trained on a chained schedule in which completion of a variable interval produced a terminal link in which reaction time was measured. The reaction-time procedure involved a conditional discrimination with matching to sample in one component and oddity matching in the other. During baseline training, no time limit was placed on the response to the discrimination choice stimuli. Subsequently, increasingly severe time limits were imposed over a series of sessions. Older and younger men showed increased speeds (decreased reaction times) when temporal contingencies were imposed, and these changes were maintained during post-training baseline sessions when there was unlimited time in which to respond. The younger men generally responded faster than the older ones, and age differences were not appreciably reduced during the course of the experiment. The results indicated the feasibility of studying reaction time in human subjects using operant procedures analogous to those developed for the study of nonverbal organisms. PMID:6655425

  3. Unimolecular diffusion-mediated reactions with a nonrandom time-modulated absorbing barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashford, D.; Weaver, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    A diffusion-reaction model with time-dependent reactivity is formulated and applied to unimolecular reactions. The model is solved exactly numerically and approximately analytically for the unreacted fraction as a function of time. It is shown that the approximate analytical solution is valid even when the system is far from equilibrium, and when the reactivity probability is more complicated than a square-wave function of time. A discussion is also given of an approach to problems of this type using a stochastically fluctuating reactivity, and the first-passage time for a particular example is derived.

  4. Chemical kinetic analysis of hydrogen-air ignition and reaction times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. C.; Schexnayder, C. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An anaytical study of hydrogen air kinetics was performed. Calculations were made over a range of pressure from 0.2 to 4.0 atm, temperatures from 850 to 2000 K, and mixture equivalence ratios from 0.2 to 2.0. The finite rate chemistry model included 60 reactions in 20 species of the H2-O2-N2 system. The calculations also included an assessment of how small amounts of the chemicals H2O, NOx, H2O2, and O3 in the initial mixture affect ignition and reaction times, and how the variation of the third body efficiency of H2O relative of N2 in certain key reactions may affect reaction time. The results indicate that for mixture equivalence ratios between 0.5 and 1.7, ignition times are nearly constant; however, the presence of H2O and NO can have significant effects on ignition times, depending on the mixture temperature. Reaction time is dominantly influenced by pressure but is nearly independent of initial temperature, equivalence ratio, and the addition of chemicals. Effects of kinetics on reaction at supersonic combustor conditions are discussed.

  5. Real-time reaction monitoring by ultrafast 2D NMR on a benchtop spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gouilleux, Boris; Charrier, Benoît; Danieli, Ernesto; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Akoka, Serge; Felpin, François-Xavier; Rodriguez-Zubiri, Mireia; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Reaction monitoring is widely used to follow chemical processes in a broad range of application fields. Recently, the development of robust benchtop NMR spectrometers has brought NMR under the fume hood, making it possible to monitor chemical reactions in a safe and accessible environment. However, these low-field NMR approaches suffer from limited resolution leading to strong peak overlaps, which can limit their application range. Here, we propose an approach capable of recording ultrafast 2D NMR spectra on a compact spectrometer and of following in real time reactions in the synthetic chemistry laboratory. This approach--whose potential is shown here on a Heck-Matsuda reaction--is highly versatile; the duration of the measurement can be optimized to follow reactions whose time scale ranges from between a few tens of seconds to a few hours. It makes it possible to monitor complex reactions in non-deuterated solvents, and to confirm in real time the molecular structure of the compounds involved in the reaction while giving access to relevant kinetic parameters. PMID:26501887

  6. Study on simple reaction and choice times in patients with type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Medina, Jose A; Prado-Olivarez, Juan; Amador-Licona, Norma; Cardona-Torres, Luz M; Galicia-Resendiz, Delia; Diaz-Carmona, Javier

    2013-05-01

    A study on simple reaction time (SRT) and choice reaction time in patients having diabetes is described in this paper. The study was applied to fourteen patients with type I diabetes, as well as to fourteen non-diabetic persons. The research is based on two visual signal perception experiments, both implemented on a computer based environment. The SRT experiment consisted on measuring participants' reaction times to a light change event in a simulated traffic light scenario. The choice reaction time was studied through the performance indexes (d') achieved by participants in a two alternative forced experiment, where a known visual signal is identified from two noisy images. According to the obtained results, the diabetic patients' SRTs were an average of 24% longer than the reaction time of non-diabetic persons, in the same way a significant average difference of 41% was obtained in the efficient index d' too. A positive correlation of 0.6594 between the time periods since diabetes has been diagnosed and the average SRTs of diabetic patients was obtained, also significant correlation differences between age of all experiments participants and resulting variables, SRTs and d', were observed; for instance the correlation factor between participants' ages and their average SRTs was -0.8529 for diabetic patients, meanwhile a value of -0.2905 was obtained for non-diabetic persons. The evidence suggests that the time period since diabetes has been diagnosed notably affects motor and sensorial systems maturity, and consequently conduction speed of sural and peroneal nerves. PMID:23402936

  7. Practice Effects Associated With Repeated Assessment of a Clinical Test of Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Del Rossi, Gianluca; Malaguti, Alfonso; Del Rossi, Samanta

    2014-01-01

    Context: Researchers have confirmed that the ruler-drop test could be included as part of a multifaceted concussion-assessment battery and potentially as a way to track recovery from head injury. However, it is unclear if this clinical test of reaction time would be characterized by inconsistent performance because of practice effects. Objective: To determine if the ruler-drop test is susceptible to practice effects after serial administration. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Forty-three persons (age = 21.8 ± 2.6 years). Intervention(s): Ten sessions were completed over 5 weeks. Participants completed 10 trials of the ruler-drop test during each session. Main Outcome Measure(s): The mean reaction times calculated for all participants from each test session were analyzed to determine if there was any meaningful change (ie, improvement) in reaction time over the course of the investigation. Results: Simple reaction time improved (ie, decreased) after repeated administration of the ruler-drop test, and the most pronounced improvement occurred between the first 2 test sessions. Between the first and second test sessions, reaction time decreased by almost 7 milliseconds, and there was an overall improvement of almost 13 milliseconds between the first and tenth sessions. Although the pairwise comparisons between the first and second and the first and third sessions were not significant, the change in mean reaction time between the first session and most of the other sessions was significant. We noted no differences when successive sessions were compared. Conclusions: To prevent practice-related improvements in reaction time, practitioners should allow at least 1 practice session before recording baseline results on the ruler-drop test. PMID:24673236

  8. Adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media administered at the time of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP).

    PubMed

    Pan, Jen-Jung; Draganov, Peter V

    2009-03-01

    Adverse reactions after intravascular administration of iodine contrast media are common and prophylactic regiments consisting of the use of steroids and low osmolality contrast media are highly effective in significantly decreasing the adverse reactions rate. The same type of contrast media are also used for opacification of the biliary tree and the pancreatic duct at the time of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Systemic absorption of contrast media after ERCP routinely occurs. Although the adverse reaction rate appears to be very low the exact incidence remains unknown due to the retrospective nature of all reports. Despite the lack of formal recommendations, numerous prophylactic regiments are routinely used prior to ERCP in patients with history of prior reaction to intravascular contrast media. Moreover, the use of prophylaxis has even expanded to patients with no prior reaction to intravascular contrast media who are somehow perceived to be at increase risk (e.g. shellfish allergy). Recently, the first large scale prospective study reported exceedingly low incidence of adverse reaction to high oslmolality iodine-containing contrast media administered at the time of ERCP done without prophylactic premedication even in patients considered to be at the highest risk (prior severe reaction to intravascular contrast media administration). These data suggest that the use of prophylactic regiments prior to ERCP appears to be unnecessary. PMID:19275689

  9. Choice reaction time to visual motion during prolonged rotary motion in airline pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, J. D.; Clark, B.

    1975-01-01

    Thirteen airline pilots were studied to determine the effect of preceding rotary accelerations on the choice reaction time to the horizontal acceleration of a vertical line on a cathode-ray tube. On each trial, one of three levels of rotary and visual acceleration was presented with the rotary stimulus preceding the visual by one of seven periods. The two accelerations were always equal and were presented in the same or opposite directions. The reaction time was found to increase with increases in the time the rotary acceleration preceded the visual acceleration, and to decrease with increased levels of visual and rotary acceleration. The reaction time was found to be shorter when the accelerations were in the same direction than when they were in opposite directions. These results suggest that these findings are a special case of a general effect that the authors have termed 'gyrovisual modulation'.

  10. Time-resolved FTIR emission studies of laser photofragmentation and radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, S.R.

    1993-12-01

    Recent studies have focused specifically on collision processes, such as single collision energy transfer, reaction dynamics, and radical reactions. The authors employ novel FTIR techniques in the study of single collision energy transfer processes using translationally fast H atom, as well as radical-radical reactions, e.g. CH{sub 3} + O, CF{sub 3} + H(D), and Cl + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}. The fast atoms permit unique high energy regions of certain transition states of combustion species to be probed for the first time.

  11. The mineralogic evolution of the Martian surface through time: Implications from chemical reaction path modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ridley, W. I.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reaction path calculations were used to model the minerals that might have formed at or near the Martian surface as a result of volcano or meteorite impact driven hydrothermal systems; weathering at the Martian surface during an early warm, wet climate; and near-zero or sub-zero C brine-regolith reactions in the current cold climate. Although the chemical reaction path calculations carried out do not define the exact mineralogical evolution of the Martian surface over time, they do place valuable geochemical constraints on the types of minerals that formed from an aqueous phase under various surficial and geochemically complex conditions.

  12. Direct picosecond time resolution of unimolecular reactions initiated by local mode excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherer, N. F.; Doany, F. E.; Zewail, A. H.; Perry, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the first results of direct, picosec measurements of the Delta-nu(OH) 5 local mode transition of H2O2. These time-resolved studies yield a direct measure of the unimolecular dissociation rate, and furnish a lower limit for the rate of energy redistribution from the OH stretch to the O-O reaction coordinate. The data thus determined may be used to ascertain the domain of validity for statistical unimolecular reaction rate theories.

  13. Speech-Related Reaction Times of Stutterers and Nonstutterers: Diagnostic Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Klaas; Brutten, Gene J.

    1990-01-01

    Speech-related reaction time measures and fluency-related measures of 24 adult stutterers and a like number of nonstutterers were assessed to determine their diagnostic discriminative power. Findings suggested that both fluency failures and the duration of laryngeal adjustment time are useful diagnostic measures for discriminating stutterers from…

  14. Immediate effects of different treatments for the wrist joints of subdominant hands, using electromechanical reaction time

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Cui, Yao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the immediate effects of muscle strength training and neuromuscular joint facilitation distal resistance training on wrist joints by using electromechanical reaction time. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 12 healthy young people (24.2 ± 3.1 years, 169.7 ± 6.5 cm, 65.3 ± 12.6 kg). Two kinds of isotonic contraction techniques were applied on the wrist joint: the wrist joint extension muscle strength training and the wrist joint extension pattern of neuromuscular joint facilitation. The electromechanical reaction time, premotor time, and motor time of the left upper limb were measured before and after each intervention session of muscle strength training and neuromuscular joint facilitation. [Results] The neuromuscular joint facilitation group showed significant shortening of the electromechanical reaction time and motor time after the intervention. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the electromechanical reaction time and motor time of the wrist joint can be improved by neuromuscular joint facilitation together with proximal resistance training, which can be used as a new form of exercise for improving the functions of subdominant hand wrist joints.

  15. Intra-Individual Reaction Time Variability in Schizophrenia, Depression and Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Stefan; Roth, Alexander; Rentrop, Mirjam; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Bender, Stephan; Weisbrod, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Intra-individual reaction time variability (IIV) in neuropsychological task performance reflects short term fluctuations in performance. Increased IIV has been reported in patients with schizophrenia and could be related to a deficient neural timing mechanism, but the role of IIV in adult patients with other psychiatric disorders has not been…

  16. Striatal lesions produce distinctive impairments in reaction time performance in two different operant chambers.

    PubMed

    Brasted, P J; Döbrössy, M D; Robbins, T W; Dunnett, S B

    1998-08-01

    The dorsal striatum plays a crucial role in mediating voluntary movement. Excitotoxic striatal lesions in rats have previously been shown to impair the initiation but not the execution of movement in a choice reaction time task in an automated lateralised nose-poke apparatus (the "nine-hole box"). Conversely, when a conceptually similar reaction time task has been applied in a conventional operant chamber (or "Skinner box"), striatal lesions have been seen to impair the execution rather than the initiation of the lateralised movement. The present study was undertaken to compare directly these two results by training the same group of rats to perform a choice reaction time task in the two chambers and then comparing the effects of a unilateral excitotoxic striatal lesion in both chambers in parallel. Particular attention was paid to adopting similar parameters and contingencies in the control of the task in the two test chambers. After striatal lesions, the rats showed predominantly contralateral impairments in both tasks. However, they showed a deficit in reaction time in the nine-hole box but an apparent deficit in response execution in the Skinner box. This finding confirms the previous studies and indicates that differences in outcome are not simply attributable to procedural differences in the lesions, training conditions or tasks parameters. Rather, the pattern of reaction time deficit after striatal lesions depends critically on the apparatus used and the precise response requirements for each task. PMID:9744285

  17. The Relationship between Cellular Phone Use, Performance, and Reaction Time among College Students: Implications for Cellular Phone Use while Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szyfman, Adam; Wanner, Gregory; Spencer, Leslie

    2003-01-01

    Two studies were performed to determine the relationship between cellular phone use and either reaction time or performance among college students. In the first study 60 undergraduates completed a computerized reaction time test. Mean reaction times were significantly higher when participants were talking on a cellular phone, either handheld or on…

  18. Caffeine Reduces Reaction Time and Improves Performance in Simulated-Contest of Taekwondo

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Victor G. F.; Santos, Vander R. F.; Felippe, Leandro J. C.; Almeida, Jose W.; Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Kiss, Maria A. P. D. M.; Lima-Silva, Adriano E.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine on reaction time during a specific taekwondo task and athletic performance during a simulated taekwondo contest. Ten taekwondo athletes ingested either 5 mg·kg−1 body mass caffeine or placebo and performed two combats (spaced apart by 20 min). The reaction-time test (five kicks “Bandal Tchagui”) was performed immediately prior to the first combat and immediately after the first and second combats. Caffeine improved reaction time (from 0.42 ± 0.05 to 0.37 ± 0.07 s) only prior to the first combat (P = 0.004). During the first combat, break times during the first two rounds were shorter in caffeine ingestion, followed by higher plasma lactate concentrations compared with placebo (P = 0.029 and 0.014, respectively). During the second combat, skipping-time was reduced, and relative attack times and attack/skipping ratio was increased following ingestion of caffeine during the first two rounds (all P < 0.05). Caffeine resulted in no change in combat intensity parameters between the first and second combat (all P > 0.05), but combat intensity was decreased following placebo (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, caffeine reduced reaction time in non-fatigued conditions and delayed fatigue during successive taekwondo combats. PMID:24518826

  19. QRTEngine: An easy solution for running online reaction time experiments using Qualtrics.

    PubMed

    Barnhoorn, Jonathan S; Haasnoot, Erwin; Bocanegra, Bruno R; van Steenbergen, Henk

    2015-12-01

    Performing online behavioral research is gaining increased popularity among researchers in psychological and cognitive science. However, the currently available methods for conducting online reaction time experiments are often complicated and typically require advanced technical skills. In this article, we introduce the Qualtrics Reaction Time Engine (QRTEngine), an open-source JavaScript engine that can be embedded in the online survey development environment Qualtrics. The QRTEngine can be used to easily develop browser-based online reaction time experiments with accurate timing within current browser capabilities, and it requires only minimal programming skills. After introducing the QRTEngine, we briefly discuss how to create and distribute a Stroop task. Next, we describe a study in which we investigated the timing accuracy of the engine under different processor loads using external chronometry. Finally, we show that the QRTEngine can be used to reproduce classic behavioral effects in three reaction time paradigms: a Stroop task, an attentional blink task, and a masked-priming task. These findings demonstrate that QRTEngine can be used as a tool for conducting online behavioral research even when this requires accurate stimulus presentation times. PMID:25407763

  20. Time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godik, V. I.; Blankenship, R. E.; Causgrove, T. P.; Woodbury, N.

    1993-01-01

    Tryptophan fluorescence of reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, both stationary and time-resolved, was studied. Fluorescence kinetics were found to fit best a sum of four discrete exponential components. Half of the initial amplitude was due to a component with a lifetime of congruent to 60 ps, belonging to Trp residues, capable of efficient transfer of excitation energy to bacteriochlorophyll molecules of the reaction center. The three other components seem to be emitted by Trp ground-state conformers, unable to participate in such a transfer. Under the influence of intense actinic light, photooxidizing the reaction centers, the yield of stationary fluorescence diminished by congruent to 1.5 times, while the number of the kinetic components and their life times remained practically unchanged. Possible implications of the observed effects for the primary photosynthesis events are considered.

  1. Influence of spatial accuracy constraints on reaction time and maximum speed of performance of unilateral movements.

    PubMed

    Gutnik, B; Skurvydas, A; Zuoza, A; Zuoziene, I; Mickevičienė, D; Alekrinskis, B A; Pukenas, K; Nash, D

    2015-04-01

    The goal was to study reaction time and maximal velocity of upper limbs of healthy young adults of both sexes during transition from a simple to a more involved task. Performance of dominant and non-dominant arms was recorded. Participants were 43 healthy, right-handed, untrained men (n=22) and women (n=21), 18-22 years old. The simple task required a single jerk-like movement. The involved task required both speed and accuracy where necessity for high speed of performance was emphasized. The effectiveness of transition between tasks was calculated for both reaction time and maximal velocity. No lateral differences were found. Men usually had a shorter reaction time on both tasks and a higher maximal velocity in the simple task. Women were more effective at modifying velocity. PMID:25799027

  2. Influence of physical exercise on simple reaction time: effect of physical fitness.

    PubMed

    Brisswalter, J; Arcelin, R; Audiffren, M; Delignières, D

    1997-12-01

    The influence of physical fitness and energy expenditure on a simple reaction time task performed during exercise was investigated. Two groups of 10 subjects were used, one was composed of trained middle-distance runners and one of students who had no regular physical training. The subjects performed a simple reaction time task while pedalling on a cycloergometer at different relative power output corresponding to 20, 40, 60, and 80% of their own maximal aerobic power and immediately after exercise. During exercise, the results showed a decrease in cognitive performance for both groups whereas no significant effect was found after exercise. A significant effect of physical fitness on simple reaction time was noted during exercise. The data are interpreted in terms of optimization of performance focusing particularly on the relations between energy cost of the physical task and attentional demand. PMID:9399313

  3. Estimating Reaction Rate Coefficients Within a Travel-Time Modeling Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, R; Lu, C; Luo, Jian; Wu, Wei-min; Cheng, H.; Criddle, Craig; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Brooks, Scott C

    2011-03-01

    A generalized, efficient, and practical approach based on the travel-time modeling framework is developed to estimate in situ reaction rate coefficients for groundwater remediation in heterogeneous aquifers. The required information for this approach can be obtained by conducting tracer tests with injection of a mixture of conservative and reactive tracers and measurements of both breakthrough curves (BTCs). The conservative BTC is used to infer the travel-time distribution from the injection point to the observation point. For advection-dominant reactive transport with well-mixed reactive species and a constant travel-time distribution, the reactive BTC is obtained by integrating the solutions to advective-reactive transport over the entire travel-time distribution, and then is used in optimization to determine the in situ reaction rate coefficients. By directly working on the conservative and reactive BTCs, this approach avoids costly aquifer characterization and improves the estimation for transport in heterogeneous aquifers which may not be sufficiently described by traditional mechanistic transport models with constant transport parameters. Simplified schemes are proposed for reactive transport with zero-, first-, nth-order, and Michaelis-Menten reactions. The proposed approach is validated by a reactive transport case in a two-dimensional synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and a field-scale bioremediation experiment conducted at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field application indicates that ethanol degradation for U(VI)-bioremediation is better approximated by zero-order reaction kinetics than first-order reaction kinetics.

  4. Analysis of liver connexin expression using reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Michaël; Willebrords, Joost; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Summary Although connexin production is mainly regulated at the protein level, altered connexin gene expression has been identified as the underlying mechanism of several pathologies. When studying the latter, appropriate methods to quantify connexin mRNA levels are required. The present chapter describes a well-established reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction procedure optimized for analysis of hepatic connexins. The method includes RNA extraction and subsequent quantification, generation of complementary DNA, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and data analysis. PMID:27207283

  5. Analysis of Liver Connexin Expression Using Reverse Transcription Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; Willebrords, Joost; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Although connexin production is mainly regulated at the protein level, altered connexin gene expression has been identified as the underlying mechanism of several pathologies. When studying the latter, appropriate methods to quantify connexin RNA levels are required. The present chapter describes a well-established reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction procedure optimized for analysis of hepatic connexins. The method includes RNA extraction and subsequent quantification, generation of complementary DNA, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and data analysis. PMID:27207283

  6. Rotary acceleration of a subject inhibits choice reaction time to motion in peripheral vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkenhagen, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Twelve pilots were tested in a rotation device with visual simulation, alone and in combination with rotary stimulation, in experiments with variable levels of acceleration and variable viewing angles, in a study of the effect of S's rotary acceleration on the choice reaction time for an accelerating target in peripheral vision. The pilots responded to the direction of the visual motion by moving a hand controller to the right or left. Visual-plus-rotary stimulation required a longer choice reaction time, which was inversely related to the level of acceleration and directly proportional to the viewing angle.

  7. Effect of reaction time on the characteristics of catalytically grown boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Norani Muti; Ahmad, Pervaiz; Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif

    2014-10-01

    The paper reports on the growth of boron nitride nanotube (BNNTs) on Si substrate by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique and the effect of reaction time and temperature on the size and purity were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed the bamboo-like BNNTs of multiwalled type with interlayer spacing of 0.34 nm. EDX analysis described the presence of a small percentage of Mg in the sample, indicating the combination of base-tip growth model for the sample synthesized at 1200°C. The reaction time has an effect of extending the length of the BNNTs until the catalyst is oxidized or covered by growth precursor.

  8. The Time Dependent Propensity Function for Acceleration of Spatial Stochastic Simulation of Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng; Li, Hong; Petzold, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    The inhomogeneous stochastic simulation algorithm (ISSA) is a fundamental method for spatial stochastic simulation. However, when diffusion events occur more frequently than reaction events, simulating the diffusion events by ISSA is quite costly. To reduce this cost, we propose to use the time dependent propensity function in each step. In this way we can avoid simulating individual diffusion events, and use the time interval between two adjacent reaction events as the simulation stepsize. We demonstrate that the new algorithm can achieve orders of magnitude efficiency gains over widely-used exact algorithms, scales well with increasing grid resolution, and maintains a high level of accuracy. PMID:26609185

  9. Effect of reaction time on the characteristics of catalytically grown boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Norani Muti E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Ahmad, Pervaiz E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my

    2014-10-24

    The paper reports on the growth of boron nitride nanotube (BNNTs) on Si substrate by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique and the effect of reaction time and temperature on the size and purity were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed the bamboo-like BNNTs of multiwalled type with interlayer spacing of 0.34 nm. EDX analysis described the presence of a small percentage of Mg in the sample, indicating the combination of base-tip growth model for the sample synthesized at 1200°C. The reaction time has an effect of extending the length of the BNNTs until the catalyst is oxidized or covered by growth precursor.

  10. The Influence of Ball Velocity and Court Illumination on Reaction Time for Tennis Volley

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jui-hung; Lin, Yaw-feng; Chin, Shu-chen

    2010-01-01

    The he purpose of this study is to examine the effects of ball velocity, court illumination, and volley type on the reaction time (RT) of a tennis athlete for a volley stroke. Eights cases with two different ball velocities (high and low), two volley types (forehand and backhand ) and two court illumination levels (dark and bright) were studied. The 30 participating subjects consisted of 18 male and 12 female college tennis athletes (age: 24 ± 3.2 yr), with a United States Tennis Association (USTA) ranking above 2.5. In order to ensure the validity of real-world correlations, the experiments were designed to simulate real competition situations. Reaction times were measured for volley strokes in response to different approaching ball velocities (high: 25.05 ± 0.37 m/s and low: 17.56 ± 0.92 m·s-1) for several volley types (forehand and backhand) and court illumination levels (55649 ± 4292 lux and 363.24 ± 6.53 lux on the court). During the tests, the signals from an electromyogram sensor and a 3-axis accelerometer (± 50 g) were recorded using an NI DAQ card (NI PXI-6251) and then analyzed to determine reaction time (RT), premotor reaction time (PRT), and motor reaction time (MRT) through the LabVIEW system. Subsequent 3-way ANOVA analysis indicated no RT, PRT, or MRT interaction between ball velocity, volley type and illumination. The ball velocity and illumination parameters did affect RT and PRT values significantly with p < 0.05, no significant variation in MRT was observed across any implemented experimental conditions. All experimental results indicate that ball velocity and illumination levels strongly affect the value of PRT, but have no significant effect on the value of MRT, the changes in RT were dominated by PRT. Key points RT can generally be divided into two components with the help of the electromyogram (EMG) signal - the premotor reaction time (PRT) and the motor reaction time (MRT). The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of ball

  11. An analysis on driver drowsiness based on reaction time and EEG band power.

    PubMed

    Ruyi Foong; Kai Keng Ang; Chai Quek; Cuntai Guan; Aung Aung Phyo Wai

    2015-08-01

    Falling asleep during driving is a serious problem that has resulted in fatal accidents worldwide. Thus, there is a need to detect driver drowsiness to counter it. This study analyzes the changes in the electroencephalography (EEG) collected from 4 subjects driving under monotonous road conditions using a driving simulator. The drowsiness level of the subjects is inferred from the time taken to react to events. The results from the analysis of the reaction time shows that drowsiness occurs in cycles, which correspond to short sleep cycles known as `microsleeps'. The results from a time-frequency analysis of the four frequency bands' power reveals differences between trials with fast and slow reaction times; greater beta band power is present in all subjects, greater alpha power in 2 subjects, greater theta power in 2 subjects, and greater delta power in 3 subjects, for fast reaction trials. Overall, this study shows that reaction time can be used to infer the drowsiness, and subject-specific changes in the EEG band power may be used to infer drowsiness. Thus the study shows a promising prospect of developing Brain-Computer Interface to detect driver drowsiness. PMID:26738144

  12. Psychomotor speed in hypertension: effects of reaction time components, stimulus modality, and phase of the cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Louisa; Ring, Christopher; McIntyre, David; Carroll, Douglas; Martin, Una

    2007-05-01

    Hypertension is characterized by cognitive deficits. As evidence for impaired psychomotor speed, including slower reaction times, is mixed, we aimed to provide a detailed investigation of simple reaction time in hypertension. Pre-motor and motor reaction times were measured across the cardiac cycle in 30 hypertensives and 29 normotensives to determine the effects of phasic and tonic blood pressure on performance. Auditory, visual, and tactile simple reaction time tasks were completed with stimuli presented 0, 300, and 600 ms after the R-wave of the electrocardiogram. Reaction times did not differ between hypertensives and normotensives. Although pre-motor reaction times were faster during the late phase than the early phase of the cardiac cycle whereas motor reaction times were unchanged, this effect was similar for hypertensives and normotensives. No sensory-motor deficits were evident in these hypertensives regardless of baroreceptor activity. PMID:17433098

  13. 9 CFR 147.31 - Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MGLP ReTi). 147.31 Section... Examination Procedures § 147.31 Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction... lp gene. (c) MGLP ReTi. Primers and probe should be utilized in a 25 µl reaction containing 12.5...

  14. 9 CFR 147.31 - Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MGLP ReTi). 147.31 Section... Examination Procedures § 147.31 Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction... lp gene. (c) MGLP ReTi. Primers and probe should be utilized in a 25 µl reaction containing 12.5...

  15. 9 CFR 147.31 - Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MGLP ReTi). 147.31 Section... Examination Procedures § 147.31 Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction... lp gene. (c) MGLP ReTi. Primers and probe should be utilized in a 25 µl reaction containing 12.5...

  16. A parametric duration model of the reaction times of drivers distracted by mobile phone conversations.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Mazharul; Washington, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile phones while driving is more prevalent among young drivers-a less experienced cohort with elevated crash risk. The objective of this study was to examine and better understand the reaction times of young drivers to a traffic event originating in their peripheral vision whilst engaged in a mobile phone conversation. The CARRS-Q advanced driving simulator was used to test a sample of young drivers on various simulated driving tasks, including an event that originated within the driver's peripheral vision, whereby a pedestrian enters a zebra crossing from a sidewalk. Thirty-two licensed drivers drove the simulator in three phone conditions: baseline (no phone conversation), hands-free and handheld. In addition to driving the simulator each participant completed questionnaires related to driver demographics, driving history, usage of mobile phones while driving, and general mobile phone usage history. The participants were 21-26 years old and split evenly by gender. Drivers' reaction times to a pedestrian in the zebra crossing were modelled using a parametric accelerated failure time (AFT) duration model with a Weibull distribution. Also tested where two different model specifications to account for the structured heterogeneity arising from the repeated measures experimental design. The Weibull AFT model with gamma heterogeneity was found to be the best fitting model and identified four significant variables influencing the reaction times, including phone condition, driver's age, license type (provisional license holder or not), and self-reported frequency of usage of handheld phones while driving. The reaction times of drivers were more than 40% longer in the distracted condition compared to baseline (not distracted). Moreover, the impairment of reaction times due to mobile phone conversations was almost double for provisional compared to open license holders. A reduction in the ability to detect traffic events in the periphery whilst distracted

  17. Brain Blood Flow Related to Acoustic Laryngeal Reaction Time in Adult Developmental Stutterers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Ben C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study sought to identify patterns of impaired acoustic laryngeal reaction time as a function of response complexity parallel to metabolic measures of brain function. Findings indicated that the disruption in speech motor control for 16 adult male developmental stutterers was systematically related to metabolic asymmetry in left superior and…

  18. Reaction Time and Accuracy in Individuals with Aphasia during Auditory Vigilance Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laures, Jacqueline S.

    2005-01-01

    Research indicates that attentional deficits exist in aphasic individuals. However, relatively little is known about auditory vigilance performance in individuals with aphasia. The current study explores reaction time (RT) and accuracy in 10 aphasic participants and 10 nonbrain-damaged controls during linguistic and nonlinguistic auditory…

  19. Category Induction via Distributional Analysis: Evidence from a Serial Reaction Time Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Ruskin H.; Aslin, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    Category formation lies at the heart of a number of higher-order behaviors, including language. We assessed the ability of human adults to learn, from distributional information alone, categories embedded in a sequence of input stimuli using a serial reaction time task. Artificial grammars generated corpora of input strings containing a…

  20. Age-Related Differences in Reaction Time Task Performance in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiselev, Sergey; Espy, Kimberlay Andrews; Sheffield, Tiffany

    2009-01-01

    Performance of reaction time (RT) tasks was investigated in young children and adults to test the hypothesis that age-related differences in processing speed supersede a "global" mechanism and are a function of specific differences in task demands and processing requirements. The sample consisted of 54 4-year-olds, 53 5-year-olds, 59 6-year-olds,…

  1. A new Sumudu transform iterative method for time-fractional Cauchy reaction-diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangle; Liu, Sanyang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new Sumudu transform iterative method is established and successfully applied to find the approximate analytical solutions for time-fractional Cauchy reaction-diffusion equations. The approach is easy to implement and understand. The numerical results show that the proposed method is very simple and efficient. PMID:27386314

  2. Use of enrichment real time-Polymerase Chain Reaction to enumerate Salmonella on chicken parts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella that survive cooking and that cross-contaminate other food during meal preparation and serving represent primary routes of consumer exposure to this pathogen from chicken. Consequently, the present study was undertaken to use enrichment real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to enu...

  3. Steps toward an Empirical Evaluation of Robust Regression Applied to Reaction-Time Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Saul; And Others

    Because analyses of reaction-time data are sensitive to aberrant observations and violations of statistical assumptions, a new approach is suggested. In this empirical approach, one applies the same criteria to the problem of selecting a statistical method as one uses to select among alternative experimental procedures. Six criteria are presented…

  4. Effect of musical expertise on visuospatial abilities: evidence from reaction times and mental imagery.

    PubMed

    Brochard, Renaud; Dufour, André; Després, Olivier

    2004-03-01

    Recently, the relationship between music and nonmusical cognitive abilities has been highly debated. It has been documented that formal music training would improve verbal, mathematical or visuospatial performance in children. In the experiments described here, we tested if visual perception and imagery abilities were enhanced in adult musicians compared with nonmusicians. In our main experiment, we measured reaction times of subjects who had to detect on which side of a horizontal or a vertical line a target dot was flashed. In the "imagery" condition the reference line disappeared before the target dot was presented. In order to accomplish the task, subjects had to keep a mental image of the position of the line until the dot appeared. In the "perception" condition, the procedure and stimuli were the same except that the line remained on the screen until the dot was displayed. In both groups, reaction times were shorter for horizontal compared to vertical discrimination, but reaction times were significantly shorter in musicians in all conditions. Moreover, discrimination on the vertical dimension, especially in imaging condition, seemed to be greatly improved on the long term by musical expertise. Simple and choice visual reaction times indicate that this advantage could only be partly explained by better sensorimotor integration in adult musicians. PMID:14980450

  5. The Effect of Intervention on Accuracy of Students' Responses and Reaction Times to Geometry Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babai, Reuven; Zilber, Hanna; Stavy, Ruth; Tirosh, Dina

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effect on student performance in drawing their attention to relevant task variables, focusing on accuracy of responses and reaction times. We chose this methodology in order to better understand how such interventions affect the reasoning process. The study employs a geometry task in which the irrelevant salient…

  6. Processing of Emotion Words by Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Evidence from Reaction Times and EEG

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lartseva, Alina; Dijkstra, Ton; Kan, Cornelis C.; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated processing of emotion words in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) using reaction times and event-related potentials (ERP). Adults with (n = 21) and without (n = 20) ASD performed a lexical decision task on emotion and neutral words while their brain activity was recorded. Both groups showed faster responses to emotion words…

  7. Sentence Processing in High Proficient Kannada--English Bilinguals: A Reaction Time Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravi, Sunil Kumar; Chengappa, Shyamala K.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at exploring the semantic and syntactic processing differences between native and second languages in 20 early high proficient Kannada--English bilingual adults through accuracy and reaction time (RT) measurements. Subjects participated in a semantic judgement task (using 50 semantically correct and 50 semantically…

  8. Cognitive performance and BMI in childhood: Shared genetic influences between reaction time but not response inhibition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this work is to understand whether shared genetic influences can explain the associationbetween obesity and cognitive performance, including slower and more variable reaction times(RTs) and worse response inhibition. RT on a four-choice RT task and the go/no-go task, and commission errors...

  9. Naturally Biased? In Search for Reaction Time Evidence for a Natural Number Bias in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vamvakoussi, Xenia; Van Dooren, Wim; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2012-01-01

    A major source of errors in rational number tasks is the inappropriate application of natural number rules. We hypothesized that this is an instance of intuitive reasoning and thus can persist in adults, even when they respond correctly. This was tested by means of a reaction time method, relying on a dual process perspective that differentiates…

  10. More Symmetrical Children Have Faster and More Consistent Choice Reaction Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, David; Bates, Timothy C.; Dykiert, Dominika; Der, Geoff; Deary, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Greater cognitive ability in childhood is associated with increased longevity, and speedier reaction time (RT) might account for much of this linkage. Greater bodily symmetry is linked to both higher cognitive test scores and faster RTs. It is possible, then, that differences in bodily system integrity indexed by symmetry may underlie the…

  11. Eye Colour and Reaction Time: An Opportunity for Critical Statistical Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jane

    2008-01-01

    This author was surprised to read a short article in "The Mercury" newspaper in Hobart about blue-eyed people being more intelligent and brown-eyed people having faster reaction times. Such an article invites immediate scepticism from the statistically literate. The lack of data in the article should lead the interested reader to a search for…

  12. The Effect of Feedback Schedule Manipulation on Speech Priming Patterns and Reaction Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slocomb, Dana; Spencer, Kristie A.

    2009-01-01

    Speech priming tasks are frequently used to delineate stages in the speech process such as lexical retrieval and motor programming. These tasks, often measured in reaction time (RT), require fast and accurate responses, reflecting maximized participant performance, to result in robust priming effects. Encouraging speed and accuracy in responding…

  13. Placebo Effect upon Complex Reaction Time When Hypnotic Suggestibility is Controlled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eskridge, Veronica L.

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of a placebo (sugar pill) accompanied by suggestions that the pill would either (1) improve performance as a stimulant or (2) cause a deterioration in performance as a depressant when the performance in question was the subjects' complex reaction time to a light stimulus. The Harvard Group Scale of…

  14. The Persistence of "Solid" and "Liquid" Naive Conceptions: A Reaction Time Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babai, Reuven; Amsterdamer, Anat

    2008-01-01

    The study explores whether the naive concepts of "solid" and "liquid" persist in adolescence. Accuracy of responses and reaction times where measured while 41 ninth graders classified different solids (rigid, non-rigid and powders) and different liquids (runny, dense) into solid or liquid. The results show that these naive conceptions affect…

  15. Displaying Special Characters and Symbols in Computer-Controlled Reaction Time Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friel, Brian M.; Kennison, Shelia M.

    A procedure for using MEL2 (Version 2.0 of Microcomputer Experimental Laboratory) and FontWINDOW to present special characters and symbols in computer-controlled reaction time experiments is described. The procedure permits more convenience and flexibility than in tachistocopic and projection techniques. FontWINDOW allows researchers to design…

  16. Agreement and Null Subjects in German L2 Development: New Evidence from Reaction-Time Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clahsen, Harald; Hong, Upyong

    1995-01-01

    Reports on reaction time experiments investigating subject-verb agreement and null subjects in 33 Korean learners of German and a control group of 20 German native speakers. Results found that the two phenomena do not covary in the Korean learners, indicating that properties of agreement and null subjects are acquired separately from one another.…

  17. Relating Derived Relations as a Model of Analogical Reasoning: Reaction Times and Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Regan, Donal; Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne; Commins, Sean; Walsh, Derek; Stewart, Ian; Smeets, Paul M.; Whelan, Robert; Dymond, Simon

    2005-01-01

    The current study aimed to test a Relational Frame Theory (RFT) model of analogical reasoning based on the relating of derived same and derived difference relations. Experiment 1 recorded reaction time measures of similar-similar (e.g., "apple is to orange as dog is to cat") versus different-different (e.g., "he is to his brother as chalk is to…

  18. Changes in basal body temperature and simple reaction times during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Simić, Nataša; Ravlić, Arijana

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown cyclic changes in the activation levels and performance of different tasks throughout the menstrual cycle. The aim of this study was to examine if changes in the reaction time to both light and sound stimuli may be associated with basal body temperature changes and subjective assessments of General and High Activation during the different phases of a menstrual cycle characterized by high (preovulatory and midluteal phase) and low (menstrual and early follicular phase) levels of oestrogen and progesterone. The study included measurements of basal body temperature, simple reaction times to light and sound and self-assessment of General and High Activation during the menstrual, early follicular, late follicular and luteal phase. The sample consisted of 19 female subjects with regular menstrual cycles. The results obtained in this study indicate lower basal body temperature values during phases with low sex hormone levels, while the activation assessments suggest stable levels of both General and High Activation throughout the menstrual cycle. Similar patterns of change have been shown for reaction times in visual and auditory sensory modalities. Reaction times were shorter during phases characterized by high sex hormone levels, while phases with low hormone levels were associated with longer reaction times. From the modified text on correlations in the data analysis section, it is evident that they were calculated from averaged data from all phases of the menstrual cycle. Therefore, they do not reflect intraindividual but rather interindividual variations between the observed variables, and are not related to the hypotheses of this paper. PMID:23585200

  19. Effect of geological reaction time on transformation temperature in zeolitic diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, A.

    1986-01-01

    Zeolites found in the Neogene sediments in northern Japan show a vertical zonal arrangement. The zeolite zones are formed primarily by maximum temperature during burial diagenesis. The effect of geological reaction time on transformation temperature to progress in the zeolitization was studied at eight deeply drilled wells in oil-producing areas of Japan. The strata in these wells have continuously deposited under marine environments until recent time and reach geologically maximum burial depth. The geological reaction time at the upper limit of each zeolite zone was estimated from the sedimentation rate on the basis of micropaleontological datum levels and corresponds to the burial time during which the strata have subsided. The transformation temperature of zeolites was determined from the present subsurface temperature, which was obtained by the correction of bottom-hole temperature measured during a wireline log run. The transformation temperature decreases gradually with increasing geological reaction time. The transformation temperatures of silicic glass to clinoptilolite and clinoptilolite to analcime are 58 and 105/sup 0/C at 1.8 mega-annum (Ma) and 50 and 92/sup 0/C at 5 Ma. respectively. The temperature-time relation on the zeolitization in marine sediments is similar to that in thermal maturation of organic matter in sediments.

  20. Age-related differences in predictive response timing in children: evidence from regularly relative to irregularly paced reaction time performance.

    PubMed

    Debrabant, Julie; Gheysen, Freja; Vingerhoets, Guy; Van Waelvelde, Hilde

    2012-08-01

    Predictive timing refers to the anticipation and precise timing of planned motor responses. This study was performed to investigate children's predictive response timing abilities while accounting for confounding age-related effects of motor speed. Indices of predictive timing were evaluated for their contributions in motor skill proficiency as well. Eighty typically developing children in 4 age groups (5-6, 7-8, 9-10 and 11-12 years) performed a visuomotor reaction time (RT) test. Differences in speed and anticipatory responding at regularly relative to irregularly paced stimuli were evaluated as indices of predictive timing. Also, explicit timing and motor tests (M-ABC-2, VMI tracing, and KTK jumping) were administered. Significant faster responding for regularly versus irregularly paced stimuli was found from the ages of 9-10 years on. Better anticipatory responding behavior for regular in contrast with irregular stimuli was found to be present already at 7-8 years. Overall, predictive timing abilities increased across the 4 age groups. Also, inter-individual differences in the speed indices of predictive timing contributed to predicting VMI tracing and KTK jumping outcomes when controlling for age and overall motor response speed. In conclusion, predictive motor timing abilities increase during age 5 to 12 and correlate with motor skill performance. PMID:22494922

  1. Finite element procedures for time-dependent convection-diffusion-reaction systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Park, Y. J.; Deans, H. A.

    1988-01-01

    New finite element procedures based on the streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin formulations are developed for time-dependent convection-diffusion-reaction equations. These procedures minimize spurious oscillations for convection-dominated and reaction-dominated problems. The results obtained for representative numerical examples are accurate with minimal oscillations. As a special application problem, the single-well chemical tracer test (a procedure for measuring oil remaining in a depleted field) is simulated numerically. The results show the importance of temperature effects on the interpreted value of residual oil saturation from such tests.

  2. Experimental time scale of Gerischer's distribution curves for electron-transfer reactions at semiconductor electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Willig, F.; Eichberger, R.; Sundaresan, N.S. ); Parkinson, B.A. )

    1990-03-28

    Fluorescence decay of adsorbed cresyl violet molecules was measured on n-SnS{sub 2} electrodes where their stationary photoelectrochemical current approached the yield of one electron per absorbed photon. At very low coverage, {theta} {approx} 10{sup {minus}2}, the fluorescence decay was faster than 10 ps and was identified with electron injection from excited dye monomers into the wide conduction band of the semiconductor. The reaction path was adiabatic or at least borderline to the adiabatic case. The measurement provides a time scale for Gerischer's distribution curves that are commonly applied in the discussion of electron-transfer reactions at electrodes.

  3. Application of real-time polymerase chain reaction in the clinical genetic practice

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Bálint

    2013-01-01

    The development of polymerase chain reaction revolutionized the molecular genetics and diagnostics. Technical improvements helped to make more specific and sensitive target determinations. Introduction of real-time polymerase chain reaction makes possible several applications in clinical genetics like detection of gene mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms, deletions, measurement of gene expressions, micro ribonucleic acids, free nucleic acids and microbial genomes. Here I discuss a few examples for specific applications in prenatal clinical genetic practice. These are the detection of microbial genomes, deletions, trisomies, mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms and free nucleic acids.

  4. Delay differential equations and the dose-time dependence of early radiotherapy reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, John D.

    2006-09-15

    The dose-time dependence of early radiotherapy reactions impacts on the design of accelerated fractionation schedules--oral mucositis, for example, can be dose limiting for short treatments designed to avoid tumor repopulation. In this paper a framework for modeling early reaction dose-time dependence is developed. Variation of stem cell number with time after the start of a radiation schedule is modeled using a first-order delay differential equation (DDE), motivated by experimental observations linking the speed of compensatory proliferation in early reacting tissues to the degree of tissue damage. The modeling suggests that two types of early reaction radiation response are possible, stem cell numbers either monotonically approaching equilibrium plateau levels or overshooting before returning to equilibrium. Several formulas have been derived from the delay differential equation, predicting changes in isoeffective total radiation dose with schedule duration for different types of fractionation scheme. The formulas have been fitted to a wide range of published animal early reaction data, the fits all implying a degree of overshoot. Results are presented illustrating the scope of the delay differential model: most of the data are fitted well, although the model struggles with a few datasets measured for schedules with distinctive dose-time patterns. Ways of extending the current model to cope with these particular dose-time patterns are briefly discussed. The DDE approach is conceptually more complex than earlier descriptive dose-time models but potentially more powerful. It can be used to study issues not addressed by simpler models, such as the likely effects of increasing or decreasing the dose-per-day over time, or of splitting radiation courses into intense segments separated by gaps. It may also prove useful for modeling the effects of chemoirradiation.

  5. Can a Clinical Test of Reaction Time Predict a Functional Head-Protective Response?

    PubMed Central

    ECKNER, JAMES T.; LIPPS, DAVID B.; KIM, HOGENE; RICHARDSON, JAMES K.; ASHTON-MILLER, JAMES A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Reaction time is commonly prolonged after a sport-related concussion. Besides being a marker for injury, a rapid reaction time is necessary for protective maneuvers that can reduce the frequency and severity of additional head impacts. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a clinical test of simple visuomotor reaction time predicted the time taken to raise the hands to protect the head from a rapidly approaching ball. Methods Twenty-six healthy adult participants recruited from campus and community recreation and exercise facilities completed two experimental protocols during a single session: a manual visuomotor simple reaction time test (RTclin) and a sport-related head-protective response (RTsprt). RTclin measured the time required to catch a thin vertically oriented device on its release by the tester and was calculated from the distance the device fell before being arrested. RTsprt measured the time required to raise the hands from waist level to block a foam tennis ball fired toward the subject’s face from an air cannon and was determined using an optoelectronic camera system. A correlation coefficient was calculated between RTclin and RTsprt, with linear regression used to assess for effect modification by other covariates. Results A strong positive correlation was found between RTclin and RTsprt (r = 0.725, P < 0.001) independent of age, gender, height, or weight. Conclusions RTclin is predictive of a functional sport-related head-protective response. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a clinical test predicting the ability to protect the head in a simulated sport environment. This correlation with a functional head-protective response is a relevant consideration for the potential use of RTclin as part of a multifaceted concussion assessment program. PMID:20689458

  6. Defining Lagrangian coherent structures for reactions in time-aperiodic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Kevin; Mahoney, John

    2014-11-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations have highlighted the role of invariant manifolds, termed burning invariant manifolds (BIMs), as one-way barriers to reaction fronts propagating through a flowing medium. Originally, BIM theory was restricted to time-independent or time-periodic flows. The present work extends these ideas to flows with a general time-dependence, thereby constructing coherent structures that organize and constrain the propagation of reaction fronts through general flows. This permits a much broader and physically realistic class of problems to be addressed. Our approach follows the recent work of Farazmand, Blazevski, and Haller [Physica D 44, 278 (2014)], in which Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs), relevant to purely advective transport, are characterized as curves of minimal Lagrangian shear. Supported by the US National Science Foundation under Grant CMMI-1201236.

  7. Real-time observations of lithium battery reactions-operando neutron diffraction analysis during practical operation.

    PubMed

    Taminato, Sou; Yonemura, Masao; Shiotani, Shinya; Kamiyama, Takashi; Torii, Shuki; Nagao, Miki; Ishikawa, Yoshihisa; Mori, Kazuhiro; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Onodera, Yohei; Naka, Takahiro; Morishima, Makoto; Ukyo, Yoshio; Adipranoto, Dyah Sulistyanintyas; Arai, Hajime; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ogumi, Zempachi; Suzuki, Kota; Hirayama, Masaaki; Kanno, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Among the energy storage devices for applications in electric vehicles and stationary uses, lithium batteries typically deliver high performance. However, there is still a missing link between the engineering developments for large-scale batteries and the fundamental science of each battery component. Elucidating reaction mechanisms under practical operation is crucial for future battery technology. Here, we report an operando diffraction technique that uses high-intensity neutrons to detect reactions in non-equilibrium states driven by high-current operation in commercial 18650 cells. The experimental system comprising a time-of-flight diffractometer with automated Rietveld analysis was developed to collect and analyse diffraction data produced by sequential charge and discharge processes. Furthermore, observations under high current drain revealed inhomogeneous reactions, a structural relaxation after discharge, and a shift in the lithium concentration ranges with cycling in the electrode matrix. The technique provides valuable information required for the development of advanced batteries. PMID:27357605

  8. Chemical dynamics in the gas phase: Time-dependent quantum mechanics of chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, S.K.

    1993-12-01

    A major goal of this research is to obtain an understanding of the molecular reaction dynamics of three and four atom chemical reactions using numerically accurate quantum dynamics. This work involves: (i) the development and/or improvement of accurate quantum mechanical methods for the calculation and analysis of the properties of chemical reactions (e.g., rate constants and product distributions), and (ii) the determination of accurate dynamical results for selected chemical systems, which allow one to compare directly with experiment, determine the reliability of the underlying potential energy surfaces, and test the validity of approximate theories. This research emphasizes the use of recently developed time-dependent quantum mechanical methods, i.e. wave packet methods.

  9. Effect of hydrothermal reaction time and alkaline conditions on the electrochemical properties of reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermisoglou, E. C.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Romanos, G.; Giannouri, M.; Boukos, N.; Lei, C.; Lekakou, C.; Trapalis, C.

    2015-12-01

    Reduced graphene oxide sheets (rGO) were prepared by hydrothermal treatment of aqueous dispersions of graphite oxide (GtO) applied for short (4 h) and prolonged reaction times (19-24 h). The effect of process duration as well as the alkaline conditions (pH ∼10) by addition of K2CO3 on the quality characteristics of the produced rGO materials was investigated. Both reduction and exfoliation occurred during this process as it was evidenced by FTIR and XRD data. SEM, TEM and HRTEM microscopy displayed highly exfoliated rGO materials. XPS verified that the re-establishment of the conjugated graphene network is more extensive for prolonged times of hydrothermal processing in accordance to Raman spectroscopy measurements. The sample produced under alkaline conditions bore fewer defects and almost 5 times higher BET surface area (∼181 m2/g) than the sample with no pH adjustment (∼34 m2/g) for the same hydrothermal reaction time (19 h), attributed to the developed microporosity. The specific capacitance of this material estimated by electrochemical impedance using three-electrode cell and KCl aqueous solution as an electrolyte was ∼400-500 F/g. When EDLC capacitors were fabricated from rGO materials the electrochemical testing in organic electrolyte i.e. TEABF4 in PC, revealed that the shortest hydrothermal reaction time (4 h) was more efficient resulting in capacitance around 60 F/g.

  10. Analysis of Thermal and Reaction Times for Hydrogen Reduction of Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegde, U.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Gokoglu, S.

    2009-01-01

    System analysis of oxygen production by hydrogen reduction of lunar regolith has shown the importance of the relative time scales for regolith heating and chemical reaction to overall performance. These values determine the sizing and power requirements of the system and also impact the number and operational phasing of reaction chambers. In this paper, a Nusselt number correlation analysis is performed to determine the heat transfer rates and regolith heat up times in a fluidized bed reactor heated by a central heating element (e.g., a resistively heated rod, or a solar concentrator heat pipe). A coupled chemical and transport model has also been developed for the chemical reduction of regolith by a continuous flow of hydrogen. The regolith conversion occurs on the surfaces of and within the regolith particles. Several important quantities are identified as a result of the above analyses. Reactor scale parameters include the void fraction (i.e., the fraction of the reactor volume not occupied by the regolith particles) and the residence time of hydrogen in the reactor. Particle scale quantities include the particle Reynolds number, the Archimedes number, and the time needed for hydrogen to diffuse into the pores of the regolith particles. The analysis is used to determine the heat up and reaction times and its application to NASA s oxygen production system modeling tool is noted.

  11. Analysis of Thermal and Reaction Times for Hydrogen Reduction of Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegde, U.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Gokoglu, S.

    2008-01-01

    System analysis of oxygen production by hydrogen reduction of lunar regolith has shown the importance of the relative time scales for regolith heating and chemical reaction to overall performance. These values determine the sizing and power requirements of the system and also impact the number and operational phasing of reaction chambers. In this paper, a Nusselt number correlation analysis is performed to determine the heat transfer rates and regolith heat up times in a fluidized bed reactor heated by a central heating element (e.g., a resistively heated rod, or a solar concentrator heat pipe). A coupled chemical and transport model has also been developed for the chemical reduction of regolith by a continuous flow of hydrogen. The regolith conversion occurs on the surfaces of and within the regolith particles. Several important quantities are identified as a result of the above analyses. Reactor scale parameters include the void fraction (i.e., the fraction of the reactor volume not occupied by the regolith particles) and the residence time of hydrogen in the reactor. Particle scale quantities include the particle Reynolds number, the Archimedes number, and the time needed for hydrogen to diffuse into the pores of the regolith particles. The analysis is used to determine the heat up and reaction times and its application to NASA s oxygen production system modeling tool is noted.

  12. Time-dependent-S-matrix Hartree-Fock theory of complex reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, James J.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Dworzecka, Maria

    1980-04-01

    Some limitations of the conventional time-dependent Hartree-Fock method for describing complex reactions are noted, and one particular ubiquitous defect is discussed in detail: the post-breakup spurious cross channel correlations which arise whenever several asymptotic reaction channels must be simultaneously described by a single determinant. A reformulated time-dependent-S-matrix Hartree-Fock theory is proposed, which obviates this difficulty. Axiomatic requirements minimal to assure that the time-dependent-S-matrix Hartree-Fock theory represents an unambiguous and physically interpretable asymptotic reaction theory are utilized to prescribe conditions upon the definition of acceptable asymptotic channels. That definition, in turn, defines the physical range of the time-dependent-S-matrix Hartree-Fock theory to encompass the collisions of mathematically well-defined "time-dependent Hartree-Fock droplets." The physical properties of these objects then circumscribe the content of the Hartree-Fock single determinantal description. If their periodic vibrations occur for continuous ranges of energy then the resulting "classical" time-dependent Hartree-Fock droplets are seen to be intrinsically dissipative, and the single determinantal description of their collisions reduces to a "trajectory" theory which can describe the masses and relative motions of the fragments but can provide no information about specific asymptotic excited states beyond their constants of motion, or the average properties of the limit, if it exists, of their equilibrization process. If, on the other hand, the periodic vibrations of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock droplets are discrete in energy, then the time-dependent-S-matrix Hartree-Fock theory can describe asymptotically the time-average properties of the whole spectrum of such periodic vibrations of these "quantized" time-dependent Hartree-Fock droplets which are asymptotically stationary on a time-averaged basis. Such quantized time

  13. The vinyl + NO reaction : determining the products with time-resolved Fourier transform spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, David L; Zou, Peng; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the vinyl + NO reaction using time-resolved Fourier transform emission spectroscopy, complemented by electronic structure and microcanonical RRKM rate coefficient calculations. To unambiguously determine the reaction products, three precursors are used to produce the vinyl radical by laser photolysis: vinyl bromide, methyl vinyl ketone, and vinyl iodide. The emission spectra and theoretical calculations indicate that HCN + CH{sub 2}O is the only significant product channel for the C{sub 2}H{sub 3} + NO reaction near room temperature, in contradiction to several reports in the literature. Although CO emission is observed when vinyl bromide is used as the precursor, it arises from the reaction of NO with photofragments other than vinyl. This conclusion is supported by the absence of CO emission when vinyl iodide or methyl vinyl ketone is used. Prompt emission from vibrationally excited NO is evidence of the competition between back dissociation and isomerization of the initially formed nitrosoethylene adduct, consistent with previous work on the pressure dependence of this reaction. Our calculations indicate that production of products is dominated by the low energy portion of the energy distribution. The calculation also predicts an upper bound of 0.19% for the branching ratio of the H{sub 2}CNH + CO channel, which is consistent with our experimental results.

  14. An examination of factors that could affect choice reaction time in histology technicians

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.; Warshaw, R.; Thornton, J.C.; Husmark, I.

    1989-01-01

    Histology technicians exposed to formaldehyde and solvents have symptoms and objective evidence of neurobehavioral impairment of memory, judgment, and equilibrium. Because reaction time has been prolonged in many groups of workers exposed to toxicants, choice reaction time was measured in 385 female formaldehyde and solvent-exposed histology technicians, and 79 unexposed female laboratory workers. Choice reaction time to a visual stimulus (CRT) is defined, for the purpose of this study, as the time required for discriminated cancellation of two different letters on a microcomputer screen by pressing the matching keys. Initial analysis showed that increases in age, years of cigarette smoking, and hours per day of formaldehyde exposure significantly lengthened CRT, but xylene-toluene exposure had no effect. Since duration of smoking and length of daily formaldehyde exposure were age related, multiple linear regression analysis of CRT was performed using them as independent variables. Increasing age was the only significant factor in lengthening CRT. However, in these female histology technicians, the second measurement one year later was 44 msec faster (p less than .04). The reason for improved performance is unclear, but it may be an effect of training encompassing familiarity, improved attention, or learning.

  15. Time-resolved structural studies of protein reaction dynamics: a smorgasbord of X-ray approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Westenhoff, Sebastian; Nazarenko, Elena; Malmerberg, Erik; Davidsson, Jan; Katona, Gergely; Neutze, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Time-resolved structural studies of proteins have undergone several significant developments during the last decade. Recent developments using time-resolved X-ray methods, such as time-resolved Laue diffraction, low-temperature intermediate trapping, time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering and time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, are reviewed. Proteins undergo conformational changes during their biological function. As such, a high-resolution structure of a protein’s resting conformation provides a starting point for elucidating its reaction mechanism, but provides no direct information concerning the protein’s conformational dynamics. Several X-ray methods have been developed to elucidate those conformational changes that occur during a protein’s reaction, including time-resolved Laue diffraction and intermediate trapping studies on three-dimensional protein crystals, and time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption studies on proteins in the solution phase. This review emphasizes the scope and limitations of these complementary experimental approaches when seeking to understand protein conformational dynamics. These methods are illustrated using a limited set of examples including myoglobin and haemoglobin in complex with carbon monoxide, the simple light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, and the superoxide scavenger superoxide reductase. In conclusion, likely future developments of these methods at synchrotron X-ray sources and the potential impact of emerging X-ray free-electron laser facilities are speculated upon.

  16. Ring-closing metathesis reactions: interpretation of conversion-time data.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Vasco; Wannowius, Klaus-Jürgen; Wolff, Christiane; Thiele, Christina M; Plenio, Herbert

    2013-11-25

    Conversion-time data were recorded for various ring-closing metathesis (RCM) reactions that lead to five- or six-membered cyclic olefins by using different precatalysts of the Hoveyda type. Slowly activated precatalysts were found to produce more RCM product than rapidly activated complexes, but this comes at the price of slower product formation. A kinetic model for the analysis of the conversion-time data was derived, which is based on the conversion of the precatalyst (Pcat) into the active species (Acat), with the rate constant k(act), followed by two parallel reactions: 1) the catalytic reaction, which utilizes Acat to convert reactants into products, with the rate k(cat), and 2) the conversion of Acat into the inactive species (Dcat), with the rate k(dec). The calculations employ two experimental parameters: the concentration of the substrate (c(S)) at a given time and the rate of substrate conversion (-dc(S)/dt). This provides a direct measure of the concentration of Acat and enables the calculation of the pseudo-first-order rate constants k(act), k(cat), and k(dec) and of k(S) (for the RCM conversion of the respective substrate by Acat). Most of the RCM reactions studied with different precatalysts are characterized by fast k(cat) rates and by the k(dec) value being greater than the k(act) value, which leads to quasistationarity for Acat. The active species formed during the activation step was shown to be the same, regardless of the nature of different Pcats. The decomposition of Acat occurs along two parallel pathways, a unimolecular (or pseudo-first-order) reaction and a bimolecular reaction involving two ruthenium complexes. Electron-deficient precatalysts display higher rates of catalyst deactivation than their electron-rich relatives. Slowly initiating Pcats act as a reservoir, by generating small stationary concentrations of Acat. Based on this, it can be understood why the use of different precatalysts results in different substrate conversions in

  17. [Influence of Reaction Time on Titanate Nanomaterials and Its Adsorptioi Capability for Lead in Aqueous Solutions].

    PubMed

    Fan, Gong-duan; Chen, Li-ru; Lin, Ru-jing; Lin, Qian; Su, Zhao-yue; Lin, Xiu-yong

    2016-02-15

    Titanate nanomaterials (TNs) were synthesized via a simple hydrothermal method using TiO2 (ST-01) and NaOH as the raw materials, and presented different morphologies by adjusting the reaction time. The physico-chemical properties of the as-prepared TNs, such as morphology, structure, surface area, and chemical composition were characterized by XRD, SEM and BET. The adsorption capability and rules of Pb(II) in aqueous solutions were tested in the static system. The results showed that the TNs prepared with 12-72 h reaction time were pure monoclinic phase titanate and their specific surface areas were in the range from 243.05 m2 x g(-1) to 286.20 m2 x g(-1). TNs with reaction time between 12-36 h mainly showed sheet structure, and those with reaction time higher than 48 h showed linear structure. The adsorption capacity of Pb(II) by TNs-12, TNs-24, TNs-36, TNs-48, TNs-60 and TNs-72 was 479.40, 504.12, 482.00, 388.10, 364.60 and 399.00 mg x g(-1), respectively. The sheet TNs had a better adsorption capacity than the linear TNs. TNs-24 had the highest adsorbing capacity. The adsorption kinetics of Pb(II) by TNs-24 followed the pseudo-second-order model, and the equilibrium data was best fitted with the Langmuir isotherm model. The equilibrium adsorption time of TNs-24 was 120 min, and the adsorption was an exothermic process, with a high adsorption capacity at low temperature or room temperature; the optimal adsorption pH was 5.0. When pH was 1.0, the desorption rate of TNs-24 could reach 99.00%, and the removal efficiency of Pb(II) by regenerated TNs was still more than 97% after six times of usage. Therefore, TNs could efficiently remove Pb(II) in aqueous solutions, and the optimal reaction time should be controlled to 12-24 h. When Cd(II) or Ni(II) existed in the solution, the equilibrium adsorption capacity and removal rate of TNs-24 were decreased. The adsorption mechanism was mainly ion-exchanged between Pb(II) and H+/Na+ in TNs. PMID:27363159

  18. Real-Time Reverse Transcription–Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for SARS-associated Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Shannon L.; Bowen, Michael D.; Newton, Bruce R.; Winchell, Jonas M.; Meyer, Richard F.; Tong, Suxiang; Cook, Byron T.; Holloway, Brian P.; McCaustland, Karen A.; Rota, Paul A.; Bankamp, Bettina; Lowe, Luis E.; Ksiazek, Tom G.; Bellini, William J.; Anderson, Larry J.

    2004-01-01

    A real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed to rapidly detect the severe acute respiratory syndrome–associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The assay, based on multiple primer and probe sets located in different regions of the SARS-CoV genome, could discriminate SARS-CoV from other human and animal coronaviruses with a potential detection limit of <10 genomic copies per reaction. The real-time RT-PCR assay was more sensitive than a conventional RT-PCR assay or culture isolation and proved suitable to detect SARS-CoV in clinical specimens. Application of this assay will aid in diagnosing SARS-CoV infection. PMID:15030703

  19. Survival is linked with reaction time and spatial memory in African striped mice.

    PubMed

    Maille, Audrey; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-08-01

    Studying the association between fitness and cognition in free-living animals is a fundamental step in the elucidation of the evolution of cognition. We assessed whether survival until the onset of the breeding season was related to reaction time or spatial memory in the African striped mouse Rhabdomys pumilio, a rodent that has to survive summer drought before breeding. We tested a total of 90 individuals at the beginning of summer. Female survival was related to a faster response to predation stimuli. Male survival increased with greater spatial memory, possibly because it is important for males to remember the configuration of the environment during dispersal. This study revealed that individual variation in reaction time and spatial memory can be related to survival probability, which is important for understanding the selection pressures acting on basic cognitive traits. PMID:27484646

  20. Dependecy of the reaction time from the overlap of signal lights with different colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Karsten D.

    2005-02-01

    The rearward signal aspect consists of lights with different colors. With standard technics these signal lights are located at different places. With new technics it is possible to build signal lights with different colors together in one place. The signals overlap. In experiments at the University of Karlsruhe we studied the dependency between reaction time and overlap of signal lights. We can see, that the total overlap from a yellow turn signal and a red brake signal will increase the reaction time. The increase depends of the ratio between the luminance of the turn indicator signal and the luminance of the brake signal. With a ratio from one to one (best case with minimal increase) we found an increase of 300 milli seconds.

  1. Intraindividual reaction time variability affects P300 amplitude rather than latency

    PubMed Central

    Ramchurn, Anusha; de Fockert, Jan W.; Mason, Luke; Darling, Stephen; Bunce, David

    2014-01-01

    The neural correlates of intraindividual response variability were investigated in a serial choice reaction time (CRT) task. Reaction times (RTs) from the faster and slower portions of the RT distribution for the task were separately aggregated and associated P300 event-related potentials computed. Independent behavioral measures of executive function and IQ were also recorded. Across frontal, fronto-central, central, centro-parietal and parietal scalp regions, P300 amplitudes were significantly greater for faster relative to slower behavioral responses. However, P300 peak amplitude latencies did not differ according to the speed of the behavioral RT. Importantly, controlling for select independent measures of executive function attenuated shared variance in P300 amplitude for faster and slower trials. The findings suggest that P300 amplitude rather than latency is associated with the speed of behavioral RTs, and the possibility that fluctuations in executive control underlie variability in speeded responding. PMID:25120458

  2. DHA- Rich Fish Oil Improves Complex Reaction Time in Female Elite Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, José F.; Esteve, Hector; Pablos, Carlos; Pablos, Ana; Blasco, Cristina; Villegas, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3) has shown to improve neuromotor function. This study examined the effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on complex reaction time, precision and efficiency, in female elite soccer players. 24 players from two Spanish female soccer Super League teams were randomly selected and assigned to two experimental groups, then administered, in a double-blind manner, 3.5 g·day-1 of either DHA-rich fish oil (FO =12) or olive oil (OO = 12) over 4 weeks of training. Two measurements (pre- and post-treatment) of complex reaction time and precision were taken. Participants had to press different buttons and pedals with left and right hands and feet, or stop responding, according to visual and auditory stimuli. Multivariate analysis of variance displayed an interaction between supplement administration (pre/post) and experimental group (FO/OO) on complex reaction time (FO pre = 0.713 ± 0.142 ms, FO post = 0.623 ± 0.109 ms, OO pre = 0.682 ± 1.132 ms, OO post = 0.715 ± 0.159 ms; p = 0.004) and efficiency (FO pre = 40.88 ± 17.41, FO post = 57.12 ± 11.05, OO pre = 49.52 ± 14.63, OO post = 49. 50 ± 11.01; p = 0.003). It was concluded that after 4 weeks of supplementation with FO, there was a significant improvement in the neuromotor function of female elite soccer players. Key points The results obtained from the study suggest that supplementation with DHA produced perceptual-motor benefits in female elite athletes. DHA could be a beneficial supplement in sports where decision making and reaction time efficiency are of importance. PMID:24149875

  3. Separable responses to error, ambiguity, and reaction time in cingulo-opercular task control regions.

    PubMed

    Neta, Maital; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Petersen, Steven E

    2014-10-01

    The dorsal anterior cingulate (dACC), along with the closely affiliated anterior insula/frontal operculum, have been demonstrated to show three types of task control signals across a wide variety of tasks. One of these signals, a transient signal that is thought to represent performance feedback, shows greater activity to error than correct trials. Other work has found similar effects for uncertainty/ambiguity or conflict, though some argue that dACC activity is, instead, modulated primarily by other processes more reflected in reaction time. Here, we demonstrate that, rather than a single explanation, multiple information processing operations are crucial to characterizing the function of these brain regions, by comparing operations within a single paradigm. Participants performed two tasks in an fMRI experimental session: (1) deciding whether or not visually presented word pairs rhyme, and (2) rating auditorily presented single words as abstract or concrete. A pilot was used to identify ambiguous stimuli for both tasks (e.g., word pair: BASS/GRACE; single word: CHANGE). We found greater cingulo-opercular activity for errors and ambiguous trials than clear/correct trials, with a robust effect of reaction time. The effects of error and ambiguity remained when reaction time was regressed out, although the differences decreased. Further stepwise regression of response consensus (agreement across participants for each stimulus; a proxy for ambiguity) decreased differences between ambiguous and clear trials, but left error-related differences almost completely intact. These observations suggest that trial-wise responses in cingulo-opercular regions monitor multiple performance indices, including accuracy, ambiguity, and reaction time. PMID:24887509

  4. Analysis of Reaction Times and Aerobic Capacities of Soccer Players According to Their Playing Positions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taskin, Cengiz; Karakoc, Onder; Taskin, Mine; Dural, Murat

    2016-01-01

    70 soccer players in Gaziantep amateur league voluntarily participated in this study, (average of their ages 19,17±1,34years, average of their heights 181,28±5,06 cm, average of their body weights 76,75±4,43 kg and average of their sports experiences 3,78±0,95 years) to analyze visual and auditory reaction times and aerobic capacities of amateur…

  5. Reaction time and onset of psychological distress: the UK Health and Lifestyle Survey

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Catharine R; Harris, Alicia; Deary, Ian J

    2016-01-01

    Background Cross-sectional studies have shown that depression is often accompanied by less efficient cognitive function, as indicated by slower speed of information processing. The direction of effect is unclear. We investigated prospectively whether slower processing speed, as indexed by longer simple or choice reaction time, is associated with an increased risk of psychological distress. Methods Participants were 3088 men and women aged 18 and over who had taken part in the UK Health and Lifestyle Survey. Simple and choice reaction time was measured in the baseline survey. Symptoms of psychological distress were assessed at baseline and at the 7-year follow-up survey with the 30-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Results In unadjusted models, a SD slower simple or choice reaction time at baseline was associated with ORs for psychological distress (≥5 on GHQ) at follow-up of 1.14 (1.06 to 1.23; p<0.001) or 1.13 (1.04 to 1.22; p=0.002), respectively. Further adjustment for age, sex, social class, educational attainment, health behaviours, number of chronic physical illnesses present, neuroticism and GHQ score at baseline had only slight attenuating effects on these associations. In fully adjusted models, a SD slower simple or choice reaction time at baseline was associated with ORs for psychological distress of 1.11 (1.02 to 1.21; p=0.017) or 1.11 (1.00 to 1.24; p=0.048), respectively. Conclusions Slower processing speed may be a risk factor for the development of psychological distress. Future studies should explore the extent to which slower processing speed explains previously demonstrated associations between lower intelligence and poorer mental health. PMID:26847135

  6. Physical exertion in simple reaction time and continuous attention of sport participants.

    PubMed

    Tsorbatzoudis, H; Barkoukis, V; Danis, A; Grouios, G

    1998-04-01

    To investigate the effect of physical exertion on simple reaction time and continuous attention of sport participants, an experiment was conducted with 46 male university students and 12 male cyclists. The subjects were assigned to three experimental and two control groups. The subjects of the experimental groups were asked to perform, following a 5-min, period of warming up, a high intensity exercise protocol for 5 min., on a mechanically braked cycle ergometer (Group A) or a moderate intensity exercise protocol for 30 min, on the same cycle ergometer (Groups B and C). Shortly before and immediately after the physical exercise subjects of all groups were asked to perform a test of simple reaction time and continuous attention. The subjects of the control groups were asked to perform at rest both tests of the simple reaction time and the continuous attention twice, with a 10-min. and a 35-min. interval between the first and second attempts, respectively. The results did not support the notion that exercise of moderate or high intensity influences significantly the cognitive performance of aerobically trained or untrained subjects. The results are discussed in the light of the current research findings concerning exertion and human psychomotor performance. PMID:9638756

  7. Affordance effects in grasping actions for graspable objects: electromyographic reaction time study.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomotaka; Takagi, Mineko; Sugawara, Kenichi

    2012-12-01

    It is unclear whether affordance effects shorten the reaction time in the interaction between objects and actions. This study investigated affordance effects based on compatibility between perception of graspable objects and the act of grasping. The electromyographic reaction time (EMG-RT) was used as the response, and Go/NoGo (Experiment 1) and choice (Experiment 2) reaction-time tasks were performed using combinations of two types of stimulus image (tools and animals) and two types of response task (flexion and extension of all fingers). In Experiment 1, no interaction of stimulus images and response tasks occurred, but the EMG-RT for tools was statistically significantly delayed longer than that for animals. In Experiment 2, the EMG-RT of flexion of all fingers for tools was statistically significantly delayed compared with that for animals, showing interaction. Affordance effects based on compatibility of objects and actions are the basis on human-tool interaction. This interaction induces a goal-directed act and prolongs motor execution of grasping actions for them. PMID:23409599

  8. Analysis of the HindIII-catalyzed reaction by time-resolved crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Takashi; Kobayashi, Tomoki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa

    2015-02-01

    A time-resolved study using the freeze-trap method elucidates the mechanism of the DNA-cleaving reaction of HindIII. In order to investigate the mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by HindIII, structures of HindIII–DNA complexes with varying durations of soaking time in cryoprotectant buffer containing manganese ions were determined by the freeze-trap method. In the crystal structures of the complexes obtained after soaking for a longer duration, two manganese ions, indicated by relatively higher electron density, are clearly observed at the two metal ion-binding sites in the active site of HindIII. The increase in the electron density of the two metal-ion peaks followed distinct pathways with increasing soaking times, suggesting variation in the binding rate constant for the two metal sites. DNA cleavage is observed when the second manganese ion appears, suggesting that HindIII uses the two-metal-ion mechanism, or alternatively that its reactivity is enhanced by the binding of the second metal ion. In addition, conformational change in a loop near the active site accompanies the catalytic reaction.

  9. Changes in Practice Schedule and Functional Task Difficulty: a Study Using the Probe Reaction Time Technique

    PubMed Central

    Akizuki, Kazunori; Ohashi, Yukari

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] Motor learning is accelerated most by optimized task difficulty. When task difficulty is optimized, the amount of information required to complete the task matches the learner's information processing abilities. The practice schedule is one of the factors which changes the amount of task information. We investigated the influence of changes in practice schedule on the amount of task information using the probe reaction time technique. [Methods] Fourteen young male subjects were randomly assigned to a blocked or random practice group. They were required to perform two tasks simultaneously. The primary task consisted of treadmill walking with specific step lengths, and the secondary task consisted of a probe reaction time task. [Results] The blocked practice group was superior to the random practice group in performance during the acquisition phase. In contrast, the random practice group was superior to the blocked practice group in performance during the retention phase. Furthermore, the random practice group had a longer reaction time than the blocked practice group. [Conclusion] From the standpoint of the challenge point framework, motor learning may be accelerated by random practice because random practice probably elicits greater attentional demand than blocked practice. PMID:24259863

  10. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Instrumentation for Real-time Enzymatic Reaction Rate Measurements by NMR.

    PubMed

    Balzan, Riccardo; Fernandes, Laetitia; Comment, Arnaud; Pidial, Laetitia; Tavitian, Bertrand; Vasos, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    The main limitation of NMR-based investigations is low sensitivity. This prompts for long acquisition times, thus preventing real-time NMR measurements of metabolic transformations. Hyperpolarization via dissolution DNP circumvents part of the sensitivity issues thanks to the large out-of-equilibrium nuclear magnetization stemming from the electron-to-nucleus spin polarization transfer. The high NMR signal obtained can be used to monitor chemical reactions in real time. The downside of hyperpolarized NMR resides in the limited time window available for signal acquisition, which is usually on the order of the nuclear spin longitudinal relaxation time constant, T1, or, in favorable cases, on the order of the relaxation time constant associated with the singlet-state of coupled nuclei, TLLS. Cellular uptake of endogenous molecules and metabolic rates can provide essential information on tumor development and drug response. Numerous previous hyperpolarized NMR studies have demonstrated the relevancy of pyruvate as a metabolic substrate for monitoring enzymatic activity in vivo. This work provides a detailed description of the experimental setup and methods required for the study of enzymatic reactions, in particular the pyruvate-to-lactate conversion rate in presence of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), by hyperpolarized NMR. PMID:26967906

  11. Designing Driver Assistance Systems with Crossmodal Signals: Multisensory Integration Rules for Saccadic Reaction Times Apply

    PubMed Central

    Steenken, Rike; Weber, Lars; Colonius, Hans; Diederich, Adele

    2014-01-01

    Modern driver assistance systems make increasing use of auditory and tactile signals in order to reduce the driver's visual information load. This entails potential crossmodal interaction effects that need to be taken into account in designing an optimal system. Here we show that saccadic reaction times to visual targets (cockpit or outside mirror), presented in a driving simulator environment and accompanied by auditory or tactile accessories, follow some well-known spatiotemporal rules of multisensory integration, usually found under confined laboratory conditions. Auditory nontargets speed up reaction time by about 80 ms. The effect tends to be maximal when the nontarget is presented 50 ms before the target and when target and nontarget are spatially coincident. The effect of a tactile nontarget (vibrating steering wheel) was less pronounced and not spatially specific. It is shown that the average reaction times are well-described by the stochastic “time window of integration” model for multisensory integration developed by the authors. This two-stage model postulates that crossmodal interaction occurs only if the peripheral processes from the different sensory modalities terminate within a fixed temporal interval, and that the amount of crossmodal interaction manifests itself in an increase or decrease of second stage processing time. A qualitative test is consistent with the model prediction that the probability of interaction, but not the amount of crossmodal interaction, depends on target–nontarget onset asynchrony. A quantitative model fit yields estimates of individual participants' parameters, including the size of the time window. Some consequences for the design of driver assistance systems are discussed. PMID:24800823

  12. Time-resolved infrared absorption studies of the dynamics of radical reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, R. G.

    2008-01-01

    There is very little information available about the dynamics of radical+radical interactions. These processes are important in combustion being chain termination steps as well as generating new molecular species. To study these processes, a new experimental apparatus has been constructed to investigate radical-radical dynamics. The first radical or atomic species is produced with a known concentration in a microwave discharge flow system. The second is produced by pulsed laser photolysis of a suitable photolyte. The time dependence of individual rovibrational states of the product is followed by absorption of a continuous infrared laser. This approach will allow the reaction of interest to be differentiated from other radical reactions occurring simultaneously. The experimental approach is highly versatile, being able to detect a number of molecular species of particular interest to combustion processes such as water, methane, acetylene etc. at the state specific level. State specific infrared absorption coefficients of radicals can be measured in situ allowing for the determination of the absolute concentrations and hence branching ratios for reactions having multiple reaction pathways.

  13. Development and validation of a Myxoma virus real-time polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Albini, Sarah; Sigrist, Brigitte; Güttinger, Regula; Schelling, Claude; Hoop, Richard K; Vögtlin, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    To aid in the rapid diagnosis of myxomatosis in rabbits, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the specific detection of Myxoma virus is described. Primers and probe were designed to amplify a 147-bp fragment within the Serp2 gene. The assay was able to detect 23 copies of a synthesized oligo indicating a reliable sensitivity. In addition, the real-time PCR did not detect the Rabbit fibroma virus used in myxomatosis vaccines. The novel PCR was shown to be able to detect Myxoma virus in fresh and paraffin-embedded rabbit tissues originating from myxomatosis cases from various regions in Switzerland. PMID:22362943

  14. [Real-time polymerase chain reaction in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Salina, T Iu; Morozova, T I

    2008-01-01

    To enhance the efficiency of diagnosis of oligo- and abacillar pulmonary tuberculosis and its differential diagnosis with other lung diseases, the authors studied the informative value of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) used in 62 patients with different clinical forms of tuberculosis and 108 differentially diagnostic patients. Real-time PCR has been ascertained to be a significantly more sensitive and highly specific tool in tuberculosis diagnosis, which considerably improves the specific recognition of the etiology of a pathogenetic process in oligo- and abacillar patients. Particularly encouraging results have been obtained when examining differentially diagnostic patients with the rounded shadows being formed in the lung. PMID:18710048

  15. Time variation in the reaction-zone structure of two-phase spray detonations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, T. H.; Nicholls, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis of the time-varying detonation structure in a monodisperse spray is presented. The theory identifies experimentally observed reaction-zone overpressures as deriving from blast waves formed therein by the explosive ignition of the spray droplets, and follows in time the motion, change in strength, and interactions of these blast waves with one another, and with the leading shock. The results are compared with experimental data by modeling the motion of a finite-size circular pressure transducer through the theoretical data field in an x-t space.

  16. Choice stepping reaction time test using exergame technology for fall risk assessment in older people.

    PubMed

    Ejupi, Andreas; Brodie, Matthew; Gschwind, Yves J; Schoene, Daniel; Lord, Stephen; Delbaere, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Accidental falls remain an important problem in older people. Stepping is a common task to avoid a fall and requires good interplay between sensory functions, central processing and motor execution. Increased choice stepping reaction time has been associated with recurrent falls in older people. The aim of this study was to examine if a sensor-based Exergame Choice Stepping Reaction Time test can successfully discriminate older fallers from non-fallers. The stepping test was conducted in a cohort of 104 community-dwelling older people (mean age: 80.7 ± 7.0 years). Participants were asked to step laterally as quickly as possible after a light stimulus appeared on a TV screen. Spatial and temporal measurements of the lower and upper body were derived from a low-cost and portable 3D-depth sensor (i.e. Microsoft Kinect) and 3D-accelerometer. Fallers had a slower stepping reaction time (970 ± 228 ms vs. 858 ± 123 ms, P = 0.001) and a slower reaction of their upper body (719 ± 289 ms vs. 631 ± 166 ms, P = 0.052) compared to non-fallers. It took fallers significantly longer than non-fallers to recover their balance after initiating the step (2147 ± 800 ms vs. 1841 ± 591 ms, P = 0.029). This study demonstrated that a sensor-based, low-cost and easy to administer stepping test, with the potential to be used in clinical practice or regular unsupervised home assessments, was able to identify significant differences between performances by fallers and non-fallers. PMID:25571596

  17. The Effects of Repeated Testing, Simulated Malingering, and Traumatic Brain Injury on Visual Choice Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Woods, David L.; Wyma, John M.; Yund, E. W.; Herron, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Choice reaction time (CRT), the time required to discriminate and respond appropriately to different stimuli, is a basic measure of attention and processing speed. Here, we describe the reliability and clinical sensitivity of a new CRT test that presents lateralized visual stimuli and adaptively adjusts stimulus onset asynchronies using a staircase procedure. Experiment 1 investigated the test–retest reliability in three test sessions performed at weekly intervals. Performance in the first test session was accurately predicted from age and computer-use regression functions obtained in a previously studied normative cohort. Central processing time (CentPT), the difference between the CRTs and simple reaction time latencies measured in a separate experiment, accounted for 55% of CRT latency and more than 85% of CRT latency variance. Performance improved significantly across the three test sessions. High intraclass correlation coefficients were seen for CRTs (0.90), CentPTs (0.87), and an omnibus performance measure (0.81) that combined CRT and minimal SOA z-scores. Experiment 2 investigated performance in the same participants when instructed to feign symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI): 87% produced abnormal omnibus z-scores. Simulated malingerers showed greater elevations in simple reaction times than CRTs, and hence reduced CentPTs. Latency-consistency z-scores, based on the difference between the CRTs obtained and those predicted based on CentPT latencies, discriminated malingering participants from controls with high sensitivity and specificity. Experiment 3 investigated CRT test performance in military veterans who had suffered combat-related TBI and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, and revealed small but significant deficits in performance in the TBI population. The results indicate that the new CRT test shows high test–retest reliability, can assist in detecting participants performing with suboptimal effort, and is sensitive to the

  18. The Effects of Repeated Testing, Simulated Malingering, and Traumatic Brain Injury on Visual Choice Reaction Time.

    PubMed

    Woods, David L; Wyma, John M; Yund, E W; Herron, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Choice reaction time (CRT), the time required to discriminate and respond appropriately to different stimuli, is a basic measure of attention and processing speed. Here, we describe the reliability and clinical sensitivity of a new CRT test that presents lateralized visual stimuli and adaptively adjusts stimulus onset asynchronies using a staircase procedure. Experiment 1 investigated the test-retest reliability in three test sessions performed at weekly intervals. Performance in the first test session was accurately predicted from age and computer-use regression functions obtained in a previously studied normative cohort. Central processing time (CentPT), the difference between the CRTs and simple reaction time latencies measured in a separate experiment, accounted for 55% of CRT latency and more than 85% of CRT latency variance. Performance improved significantly across the three test sessions. High intraclass correlation coefficients were seen for CRTs (0.90), CentPTs (0.87), and an omnibus performance measure (0.81) that combined CRT and minimal SOA z-scores. Experiment 2 investigated performance in the same participants when instructed to feign symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI): 87% produced abnormal omnibus z-scores. Simulated malingerers showed greater elevations in simple reaction times than CRTs, and hence reduced CentPTs. Latency-consistency z-scores, based on the difference between the CRTs obtained and those predicted based on CentPT latencies, discriminated malingering participants from controls with high sensitivity and specificity. Experiment 3 investigated CRT test performance in military veterans who had suffered combat-related TBI and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, and revealed small but significant deficits in performance in the TBI population. The results indicate that the new CRT test shows high test-retest reliability, can assist in detecting participants performing with suboptimal effort, and is sensitive to the effects of

  19. Reaction mechanisms and their interaction time in dissipative heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    De Rosa, A.; Fioretto, E.; Inglima, G.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.; Setola, R. ); Cardella, G.; Papa, M.; Pappalardo, G.; Rizzo, F.; Wang, Q. ); Napoli, D.R.; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.F.; Signorini, C.; Stefanini, A.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Angular distributions of fragments emitted in the reaction {sup 19}F+{sup 63}Cu measured in the range {theta}{sub lab}=10{degree} to 120{degree} at incident energy between 100 to 108 MeV (lab) have been analyzed according to available models for deep inelastic collisions with the aim to evidence different mechanisms contributing to such reactions. The analysis was performed in the framework of Strutinsky model taking into account both the development of Kun and of Abul-Magd and Simbel. To determine the interaction times, previously published excitation functions were also analyzed in the framework of Kun's model of cross section statistical fluctuations and near-side and far-side scattering were taken into account separately. It was pointed out that the rotational energy dissipation occurs in a limited angular range around the grazing angle. The presence of two distinct reaction mechanisms, each of them characterized by an interaction time, was also evidenced by comparing the energy averaged angular distributions to the Abul-Magd and Simbel model for dissipative collisions.

  20. Mathematical Modeling and Dynamic Simulation of Metabolic Reaction Systems Using Metabolome Time Series Data

    PubMed Central

    Sriyudthsak, Kansuporn; Shiraishi, Fumihide; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2016-01-01

    The high-throughput acquisition of metabolome data is greatly anticipated for the complete understanding of cellular metabolism in living organisms. A variety of analytical technologies have been developed to acquire large-scale metabolic profiles under different biological or environmental conditions. Time series data are useful for predicting the most likely metabolic pathways because they provide important information regarding the accumulation of metabolites, which implies causal relationships in the metabolic reaction network. Considerable effort has been undertaken to utilize these data for constructing a mathematical model merging system properties and quantitatively characterizing a whole metabolic system in toto. However, there are technical difficulties between benchmarking the provision and utilization of data. Although, hundreds of metabolites can be measured, which provide information on the metabolic reaction system, simultaneous measurement of thousands of metabolites is still challenging. In addition, it is nontrivial to logically predict the dynamic behaviors of unmeasurable metabolite concentrations without sufficient information on the metabolic reaction network. Yet, consolidating the advantages of advancements in both metabolomics and mathematical modeling remain to be accomplished. This review outlines the conceptual basis of and recent advances in technologies in both the research fields. It also highlights the potential for constructing a large-scale mathematical model by estimating model parameters from time series metabolome data in order to comprehensively understand metabolism at the systems level. PMID:27200361

  1. Mathematical Modeling and Dynamic Simulation of Metabolic Reaction Systems Using Metabolome Time Series Data.

    PubMed

    Sriyudthsak, Kansuporn; Shiraishi, Fumihide; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2016-01-01

    The high-throughput acquisition of metabolome data is greatly anticipated for the complete understanding of cellular metabolism in living organisms. A variety of analytical technologies have been developed to acquire large-scale metabolic profiles under different biological or environmental conditions. Time series data are useful for predicting the most likely metabolic pathways because they provide important information regarding the accumulation of metabolites, which implies causal relationships in the metabolic reaction network. Considerable effort has been undertaken to utilize these data for constructing a mathematical model merging system properties and quantitatively characterizing a whole metabolic system in toto. However, there are technical difficulties between benchmarking the provision and utilization of data. Although, hundreds of metabolites can be measured, which provide information on the metabolic reaction system, simultaneous measurement of thousands of metabolites is still challenging. In addition, it is nontrivial to logically predict the dynamic behaviors of unmeasurable metabolite concentrations without sufficient information on the metabolic reaction network. Yet, consolidating the advantages of advancements in both metabolomics and mathematical modeling remain to be accomplished. This review outlines the conceptual basis of and recent advances in technologies in both the research fields. It also highlights the potential for constructing a large-scale mathematical model by estimating model parameters from time series metabolome data in order to comprehensively understand metabolism at the systems level. PMID:27200361

  2. Pattern formation on networks with reactions: A continuous-time random-walk approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angstmann, C. N.; Donnelly, I. C.; Henry, B. I.

    2013-03-01

    We derive the generalized master equation for reaction-diffusion on networks from an underlying stochastic process, the continuous time random walk (CTRW). The nontrivial incorporation of the reaction process into the CTRW is achieved by splitting the derivation into two stages. The reactions are treated as birth-death processes and the first stage of the derivation is at the single particle level, taking into account the death process, while the second stage considers an ensemble of these particles including the birth process. Using this model we have investigated different types of pattern formation across the vertices on a range of networks. Importantly, the CTRW defines the Laplacian operator on the network in a non-ad hoc manner and the pattern formation depends on the structure of this Laplacian. Here we focus attention on CTRWs with exponential waiting times for two cases: one in which the rate parameter is constant for all vertices and the other where the rate parameter is proportional to the vertex degree. This results in nonsymmetric and symmetric CTRW Laplacians, respectively. In the case of symmetric Laplacians, pattern formation follows from the Turing instability. However in nonsymmetric Laplacians, pattern formation may be possible with or without a Turing instability.

  3. Effect of Salivary Reaction Time on Flow Properties of Commercial Food Thickeners Used for Dysphagic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwa-Young; Yoon, Seung-Ro; Yoo, Whachun

    2016-01-01

    The effect of human saliva on the flow properties of pudding-like thickened water prepared with commercial food thickeners was investigated, and their viscosity differences were also compared as a function of salivary reaction time (0-60 min after the addition of saliva). Food thickeners used in this study were starch-based (SB), gum-containing starch-based (GSB), and gumbased (GB) commercial thickeners marketed in Korea. GB showed no significant reduction in viscosity upon contact with human saliva during the salivary reaction. In contrast, SB almost completely lost its viscosity shortly after the addition of saliva, and GSB significantly reduced its viscosity after 20 min of reaction time but retained its viscosity. The results of this study indicate that GB can enhance the swallowing safety of dysphagic patients by retaining a stable viscosity level without the reduction of viscosity during consumption of thickened fluids, whereas SB may increase the possibility of aspiration owing to a rapid decrease of viscosity upon contact with human saliva. PMID:26839877

  4. Preconditioned time-difference methods for advection-diffusion-reaction equations

    SciTech Connect

    Aro, C.; Rodrigue, G.; Wolitzer, D.

    1994-12-31

    Explicit time differencing methods for solving differential equations are advantageous in that they are easy to implement on a computer and are intrinsically very parallel. The disadvantage of explicit methods is the severe restrictions placed on stepsize due to stability. Stability bounds for explicit time differencing methods on advection-diffusion-reaction problems are generally quite severe and implicit methods are used instead. The linear systems arising from these implicit methods are large and sparse so that iterative methods must be used to solve them. In this paper the authors develop a methodology for increasing the stability bounds of standard explicit finite differencing methods by combining explicit methods, implicit methods, and iterative methods in a novel way to generate new time-difference schemes, called preconditioned time-difference methods.

  5. Acute aerobic exercise and information processing: energizing motor processes during a choice reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Audiffren, Michel; Tomporowski, Phillip D; Zagrodnik, James

    2008-11-01

    The immediate and short-term after effects of a bout of aerobic exercise on young adults' information processing were investigated. Seventeen participants performed an auditory two-choice reaction time (RT) task before, during, and after 40 min of ergometer cycling. In a separate session, the same sequence of testing was completed while seated on an ergometer without pedalling. Results indicate that exercise (1) improves the speed of reactions by energizing motor outputs; (2) interacts with the arousing effect of a loud auditory signal suggesting a direct link between arousal and activation; (3) gradually reduces RT and peaks between 15 and 20 min; (4) effects on RT disappear very quickly after exercise cessation; and (5) effects on motor processes cannot be explained by increases in body temperature caused by exercise. Taken together, these results support a selective influence of acute aerobic exercise on motor adjustment stage. PMID:18930445

  6. Monitoring Acidophilic Microbes with Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Frank F. Roberto

    2008-08-01

    Many techniques that are used to characterize and monitor microbial populations associated with sulfide mineral bioleaching require the cultivation of the organisms on solid or liquid media. Chemolithotrophic species, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, or thermophilic chemolithotrophs, such as Acidianus brierleyi and Sulfolobus solfataricus can grow quite slowly, requiring weeks to complete efforts to identify and quantify these microbes associated with bioleach samples. Real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assays in which DNA targets are amplified in the presence of fluorescent oligonucleotide primers, allowing the monitoring and quantification of the amplification reactions as they progress, provide a means of rapidly detecting the presence of microbial species of interest, and their relative abundance in a sample. This presentation will describe the design and use of such assays to monitor acidophilic microbes in the environment and in bioleaching operations. These assays provide results within 2-3 hours, and can detect less than 100 individual microbial cells.

  7. Effect of red bull energy drink on auditory reaction time and maximal voluntary contraction.

    PubMed

    Goel, Vartika; Manjunatha, S; Pai, Kirtana M

    2014-01-01

    The use of "Energy Drinks" (ED) is increasing in India. Students specially use these drinks to rejuvenate after strenuous exercises or as a stimulant during exam times. The most common ingredient in EDs is caffeine and a popular ED available and commonly used is Red Bull, containing 80 mg of caffeine in 250 ml bottle. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Red Bull energy drink on Auditory reaction time and Maximal voluntary contraction. A homogeneous group containing twenty medical students (10 males, 10 females) participated in a crossover study in which they were randomized to supplement with Red Bull (2 mg/kg body weight of caffeine) or isoenergetic isovolumetric noncaffeinated control drink (a combination of Appy Fizz, Cranberry juice and soda) separated by 7 days. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was recorded as the highest of the 3 values of maximal isometric force generated from the dominant hand using hand grip dynamometer (Biopac systems). Auditory reaction time (ART) was the average of 10 values of the time interval between the click sound and response by pressing the push button using hand held switch (Biopac systems). The energy and control drinks after one hour of consumption significantly reduced the Auditory reaction time in males (ED 232 ± 59 Vs 204 ± 34 s and Control 223 ± 57 Vs 210 ± 51 s; p < 0.05) as well as in females (ED 227 ± 56 Vs 214 ± 48 s and Control 224 ± 45 Vs 215 ± 36 s; p < 0.05) but had no effect on MVC in either sex (males ED 381 ± 37 Vs 371 ± 36 and Control 375 ± 61 Vs 363 ± 36 Newton, females ED 227 ± 23 Vs 227 ± 32 and Control 234 ± 46 Vs 228 ± 37 Newton). When compared across the gender groups, there was no significant difference between males and females in the effects of any of the drinks on the ART but there was an overall significantly lower MVC in females compared to males. Both energy drink and the control drink significantly improve the reaction time but may not have any effect

  8. Effect of red bull energy drink on auditory reaction time and maximal voluntary contraction.

    PubMed

    Goel, Vartika; Manjunatha, S; Pai, Kirtana M

    2014-01-01

    The use of "Energy Drinks" (ED) is increasing in India. Students specially use these drinks to rejuvenate after strenuous exercises or as a stimulant during exam times. The most common ingredient in EDs is caffeine and a popular ED available and commonly used is Red Bull, containing 80 mg of caffeine in 250 ml bottle. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Red Bull energy drink on Auditory reaction time and Maximal voluntary contraction. A homogeneous group containing twenty medical students (10 males, 10 females) participated in a crossover study in which they were randomized to supplement with Red Bull (2 mg/kg body weight of caffeine) or isoenergetic isovolumetric noncaffeinated control drink (a combination of Appy Fizz, Cranberry juice and soda) separated by 7 days. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was recorded as the highest of the 3 values of maximal isometric force generated from the dominant hand using hand grip dynamometer (Biopac systems). Auditory reaction time (ART) was the average of 10 values of the time interval between the click sound and response by pressing the push button using hand held switch (Biopac systems). The energy and control drinks after one hour of consumption significantly reduced the Auditory reaction time in males (ED 232 ± 59 Vs 204 ± 34 s and Control 223 ± 57 Vs 210 ± 51 s; p < 0.05) as well as in females (ED 227 ± 56 Vs 214 ± 48 s and Control 224 ± 45 Vs 215 ± 36 s; p < 0.05) but had no effect on MVC in either sex (males ED 381 ± 37 Vs 371 ± 36 and Control 375 ± 61 Vs 363 ± 36 Newton, females ED 227 ± 23 Vs 227 ± 32 and Control 234 ± 46 Vs 228 ± 37 Newton). When compared across the gender groups, there was no significant difference between males and females in the effects of any of the drinks on the ART but there was an overall significantly lower MVC in females compared to males. Both energy drink and the control drink significantly improve the reaction time but may not have any effect

  9. Secular Slowing of Auditory Simple Reaction Time in Sweden (1959–1985)

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Guy; Woodley of Menie, Michael A.; Sänger, Justus

    2016-01-01

    There are indications that simple reaction time might have slowed in Western populations, based on both cohort- and multi-study comparisons. A possible limitation of the latter method in particular is measurement error stemming from methods variance, which results from the fact that instruments and experimental conditions change over time and between studies. We therefore set out to measure the simple auditory reaction time (SRT) of 7,081 individuals (2,997 males and 4,084 females) born in Sweden 1959–1985 (subjects were aged between 27 and 54 years at time of measurement). Depending on age cut-offs and adjustment for aging related slowing of SRT, the data indicate that SRT has increased by between 3 and 16 ms in the 27 birth years covered in the present sample. This slowing is unlikely to be explained by attrition, which was evaluated by comparing the general intelligence × birth-year interactions and standard deviations for both male participants and dropouts, utilizing military conscript cognitive ability data. The present result is consistent with previous studies employing alternative methods, and may indicate the operation of several synergistic factors, such as recent micro-evolutionary trends favoring lower g in Sweden and the effects of industrially produced neurotoxic substances on peripheral nerve conduction velocity. PMID:27588000

  10. Secular Slowing of Auditory Simple Reaction Time in Sweden (1959-1985).

    PubMed

    Madison, Guy; Woodley Of Menie, Michael A; Sänger, Justus

    2016-01-01

    There are indications that simple reaction time might have slowed in Western populations, based on both cohort- and multi-study comparisons. A possible limitation of the latter method in particular is measurement error stemming from methods variance, which results from the fact that instruments and experimental conditions change over time and between studies. We therefore set out to measure the simple auditory reaction time (SRT) of 7,081 individuals (2,997 males and 4,084 females) born in Sweden 1959-1985 (subjects were aged between 27 and 54 years at time of measurement). Depending on age cut-offs and adjustment for aging related slowing of SRT, the data indicate that SRT has increased by between 3 and 16 ms in the 27 birth years covered in the present sample. This slowing is unlikely to be explained by attrition, which was evaluated by comparing the general intelligence × birth-year interactions and standard deviations for both male participants and dropouts, utilizing military conscript cognitive ability data. The present result is consistent with previous studies employing alternative methods, and may indicate the operation of several synergistic factors, such as recent micro-evolutionary trends favoring lower g in Sweden and the effects of industrially produced neurotoxic substances on peripheral nerve conduction velocity. PMID:27588000

  11. Expression profiling by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR).

    PubMed

    Lech, Maciej; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR is a variation of the standard PCR technique that is commonly used to quantify nucleic acid. However, in this technique the amount of amplified specific sequence can be quantified at each stage of the PCR cycle. If investigated sequence is present in large number of copies in particular sample, amplification product is detected already in earlier cycles; if the sequence is rare, amplification is observed in later cycles. Quantification of amplified product is acquired using fluorescent probes or fluorescent DNA-binding dyes. Accumulation of fluorescent signal can be measured by real-time PCR instruments during each of 35-45 cycwwles of the PCR reaction, which simplify the procedure by eliminating the visualization of the amplified products using gel electrophoresis. Real-time-PCR allows quantifying the amount of product already during the PCR reaction as soon as it is detectable. Correctly performed, this method may be used for precise gene expression analysis in life science, medicine, and diagnostics and has become the standard method of choice for the quantification of mRNA. However in the past few years it became obvious that real-time PCR is complex and variability of RNA templates, assay designs, inappropriate data normalization, and data interpretation may cause diverse analytical problems. PMID:24957236

  12. Corpus Callosum Size, Reaction Time Speed and Variability in Mild Cognitive Disorders and in a Normative Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anstey, Kaarin J.; Mack, Holly A.; Christensen, Helen; Li, Shu-Chen; Reglade-Meslin, Chantal; Maller, Jerome; Kumar, Rajeev; Dear, Keith; Easteal, Simon; Sachdev, Perminder

    2007-01-01

    Intra-individual variability in reaction time increases with age and with neurological disorders, but the neural correlates of this increased variability remain uncertain. We hypothesized that both faster mean reaction time (RT) and less intra-individual RT variability would be associated with larger corpus callosum (CC) size in older adults, and…

  13. A Reaction Time Advantage for Calculating Beliefs over Public Representations Signals Domain Specificity for "Theory of Mind"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Adam S.; German, Tamsin C.

    2010-01-01

    In a task where participants' overt task was to track the location of an object across a sequence of events, reaction times to unpredictable probes requiring an inference about a social agent's beliefs about the location of that object were obtained. Reaction times to false belief situations were faster than responses about the (false) contents of…

  14. Measuring Metacognition and Reaction Time: Further Findings on the Performances of General Education, Low-Achieving, and Institutionally Raised Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.; Abdullah, Ahmad A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the picture format to examine in depth the metacognitive performances and reaction time in general education, low-achieving, and institutionally raised students. Results revealed that institutionally raised students, unlike low-achieving students, took significantly the longest reaction time to finish the test…

  15. Rare reaction channels in real-time time-dependent density functional theory: the test case of electron attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Lionel; Dinh, P. Huong Mai; Reinhard, Paul-Gerhard; Suraud, Eric; Sanche, Leon

    2015-08-01

    We present an extension of standard time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to include the evaluation of rare reaction channels, taking as an example of application the theoretical modelling of electron attachment to molecules. The latter process is of great importance in radiation-induced damage of biological tissue for which dissociative electron attachment plays a decisive role. As the attachment probability is very low, it cannot be extracted from the TDDFT propagation whose mean field provides an average over various reaction channels. To extract rare events, we augment TDDFT by a perturbative treatment to account for the occasional jumps, namely electron capture in our test case. We apply the modelling to electron attachment to H2O, H3O+, and (H2O)2. Dynamical calculations have been done at low energy (3-16 eV). We explore, in particular, how core-excited states of the targets show up as resonances in the attachment probability. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene Surdutovich.

  16. Eye Exercises Enhance Accuracy and Letter Recognition, but Not Reaction Time, in a Modified Rapid Serial Visual Presentation Task

    PubMed Central

    Di Noto, Paula; Uta, Sorin; DeSouza, Joseph F. X.

    2013-01-01

    Eye exercises have been prescribed to resolve a multitude of eye-related problems. However, studies on the efficacy of eye exercises are lacking, mainly due to the absence of simple assessment tools in the clinic. Because similar regions of the brain are responsible for eye movements and visual attention, we used a modified rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) to assess any measurable effect of short-term eye exercise in improvements within these domains. In the present study, twenty subjects were equally divided into control and experimental groups, each of which performed a pre-training RSVP assessment where target letters, to which subjects were asked to respond to by pressing a spacebar, were serially and rapidly presented. Response time to target letters, accuracy of correctly responding to target letters, and correct identification of target letters in each of 12 sessions was measured. The experimental group then performed active eye exercises, while the control group performed a task that minimized eye movements for 18.5 minutes. A final post-training RSVP assessment was performed by both groups and response time, accuracy, and letter identification were compared between and within subject groups both pre- and post-training. Subjects who performed eye exercises were more accurate in responding to target letters separated by one distractor and in letter identification in the post-training RSVP assessment, while latency of responses were unchanged between and within groups. This suggests that eye exercises may prove useful in enhancing cognitive performance on tasks related to attention and memory over a very brief course of training, and RSVP may be a useful measure of this efficacy. Further research is needed on eye exercises to determine whether they are an effective treatment for patients with cognitive and eye-related disorders. PMID:23527146

  17. Horizontal geometrical reaction time model for two-beam nacelle LiDARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuth, Thorsten; Fox, Maik; Stork, Wilhelm

    2015-06-01

    Wind energy is one of the leading sustainable energies. To attract further private and state investment in this technology, a broad scaled drop of the cost of energy has to be enforced. There is a trend towards using Laser Doppler Velocimetry LiDAR systems for enhancing power output and minimizing downtimes, fatigue and extreme forces. Since most used LiDARs are horizontally setup on a nacelle and work with two beams, it is important to understand the geometrical configuration which is crucial to estimate reaction times for the actuators to compensate wind gusts. In the beginning of this article, the basic operating modes of wind turbines are explained and the literature on wind behavior is analyzed to derive specific wind speed and wind angle conditions in relation to the yaw angle of the hub. A short introduction to the requirements for the reconstruction of the wind vector length and wind angle leads to the problem of wind shear detection of angled but horizontal homogeneous wind fronts due to the spatial separation of the measuring points. A distance is defined in which the wind shear of such homogeneous wind fronts is not present which is used as a base to estimate further distance calculations. The reaction time of the controller and the actuators are having a negative effect on the effective overall reaction time for wind regulation as well. In the end, exemplary calculations estimate benefits and disadvantages of system parameters for wind gust regulating LiDARs for a wind turbine of typical size. An outlook shows possible future improvements concerning the vertical wind behavior.

  18. Effector-specific visual information influences kinesthesis and reaction time performance in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Byblow, Winston D; Lewis, Gwyn N; Stinear, James W

    2003-06-01

    Twelve patients diagnosed with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 11 age-matched control participants performed a continuous bimanual wrist flexion-extension tracking task while vision of their hands was manipulated. Participants were required to match the frequency and amplitude of movements of 1 limb that was driven at 0.6 Hz by a torque motor by actively moving the contralateral limb. In half the trials, the more affected limb (subdominant for controls) was driven, and in the other half, the less affected limb (dominant for controls) was driven. Vision of both hands, vision of the driven hand only, vision of the active hand only, or no vision of the hands was allowed. Simple and probe reaction times were assessed. Parkinson's disease patients performed the tracking task to a reasonable level of temporal and spatial accuracy as compared with control participants in terms of hand phasing and root mean square error. Patients demonstrated a marked posture deviation (toward flexion), which was exaggerated when the less affected limb was active. Amplitude deviations were smaller in both groups when the less affected (dominant) limb was active and when participants had vision of the driven hand. Overall, patients delivered slower responses in both simple and probe conditions. Reaction times of Parkinson's disease patients who were allowed vision of only the active hand were longer than were those of patients in all other visual conditions, whereas visual conditions did not affect the reaction times of control participants. The authors conclude that central demands increase when movement regulation must be based solely on kinesthetic information and when vision directs attention away from the most relevant source of kinesthetic information. PMID:12711581

  19. Emerging Object Representations in the Visual System Predict Reaction Times for Categorization

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, J. Brendan; Tovar, David A.; Carlson, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing an object takes just a fraction of a second, less than the blink of an eye. Applying multivariate pattern analysis, or “brain decoding”, methods to magnetoencephalography (MEG) data has allowed researchers to characterize, in high temporal resolution, the emerging representation of object categories that underlie our capacity for rapid recognition. Shortly after stimulus onset, object exemplars cluster by category in a high-dimensional activation space in the brain. In this emerging activation space, the decodability of exemplar category varies over time, reflecting the brain’s transformation of visual inputs into coherent category representations. How do these emerging representations relate to categorization behavior? Recently it has been proposed that the distance of an exemplar representation from a categorical boundary in an activation space is critical for perceptual decision-making, and that reaction times should therefore correlate with distance from the boundary. The predictions of this distance hypothesis have been born out in human inferior temporal cortex (IT), an area of the brain crucial for the representation of object categories. When viewed in the context of a time varying neural signal, the optimal time to “read out” category information is when category representations in the brain are most decodable. Here, we show that the distance from a decision boundary through activation space, as measured using MEG decoding methods, correlates with reaction times for visual categorization during the period of peak decodability. Our results suggest that the brain begins to read out information about exemplar category at the optimal time for use in choice behaviour, and support the hypothesis that the structure of the representation for objects in the visual system is partially constitutive of the decision process in recognition. PMID:26107634

  20. Comparison of Reaction Response Time between Hand and Foot Controlled Devices in Simulated Microsurgical Testing

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Marcel; Lue, Jaw-Chyng L.; Stefanini, Francisco R.; Dustin, Laurie; Koss, Michael J.; Humayun, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We hypothesized that reaction times (RTs) for a switch release are faster for hand-controlled than for foot-controlled switches for physiological and anatomical reasons (e.g., nerve conduction speed). The risk of accidental trauma could be reduced if the surgeon reacted quicker and therefore improve the surgical outcome. Method. We included 47 medical professionals at USC. Demographics and handedness were recorded. Under a microscope, a simple reaction time test was performed, testing all extremities multiple times in a random order. Additionally, a subjective questionnaire was administered. Results. The mean RTs for hands are 318.24 ms ± 51.13 and feet 328.69 ± 48.70. The comparison of hand versus foot showed significant shorter RTs for the hand (P = 0.025). Partially significant differences between and within the experience level groups could be demonstrated by level of education (LE) and microscopic surgeries/week (MSW) (P = 0.57–0.02). In the subjective questionnaire, 91.5% (n = 43/47) of test subjects prefer to use hand controls. Conclusion. Our data show that the RT for hands is faster than feet. Similarly the subjective questionnaire showed a greater preference for hand actuation. This data suggest a hand-controlled ophthalmic instrument might have distinct advantages; however, clinical correlation is required. PMID:25136619

  1. A mathematical model of saccadic reaction time as a function of the fixation point brightness gain.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Tula, Antonio; Morimoto, Carlos H; Ranvaud, Ronald D

    2015-08-01

    The gap effect refers to a reduction in saccadic reaction time (SRT) to an eccentric target, when the fixation point is removed before the target onset. Though it is known that the gap effect peaks when the fixation point is offset about 200 ms before the onset of the eccentric target, it is unknown how this effect is modulated by stimulus variations. In this paper, we propose and investigate a model of saccadic reaction time as a function of the fixation point brightness gain. The brightness gain is defined as the ratio of the final and initial intensities of the stimulus. We have conducted a typical gap effect experiment with 15 participants, where the brightness of the fixation point was manipulated under four conditions and two gap intervals, at the same time and 200 ms before the onset of the eccentric target. The conditions included removing the fixation point (offset), leaving it with constant brightness (overlap), reducing, and increasing its brightness (lower and higher brightness conditions). Experimental data showed a significant gap effect in the offset and lower brightness conditions when compared to the overlap condition. On the other hand, the SRT was significantly longer for the higher brightness condition than the SRT for the overlap condition. Linear regression analysis using ten values of brightness gain shows that our model fits the data well for the 0- and 200-ms gap, with a coefficient of determination of .89 and .94, respectively. PMID:25962456

  2. Integrating impairments in reaction time and executive function using a diffusion model framework.

    PubMed

    Karalunas, Sarah L; Huang-Pollock, Cynthia L

    2013-07-01

    Using Ratcliff's diffusion model and ex-Gaussian decomposition, we directly evaluate the role individual differences in reaction time (RT) distribution components play in the prediction of inhibitory control and working memory (WM) capacity in children with and without ADHD. Children with (n = 91, [Formula: see text] age = 10.2 years, 67 % male) and without ADHD (n = 62, [Formula: see text] age = 10.6 years, 46 % male) completed four tasks of WM and a stop signal reaction time (SSRT) task. Children with ADHD had smaller WM capacities and less efficient inhibitory control. Diffusion model analyses revealed that children with ADHD had slower drift rates (v) and faster non-decision times (Ter), but there were no group differences in boundary separations (a). Similarly, using an ex-Gaussian approach, children with ADHD had larger τ values than non-ADHD controls, but did not differ in μ or σ distribution components. Drift rate mediated the association between ADHD status and performance on both inhibitory control and WM capacity. τ also mediated the ADHD-executive function impairment associations; however, models were a poorer fit to the data. Impaired performance on RT and executive functioning tasks has long been associated with childhood ADHD. Both are believed to be important cognitive mechanisms to the disorder. We demonstrate here that drift rate, or the speed at which information accumulates towards a decision, is able to explain both. PMID:23334775

  3. Prediction of motor imagery based brain computer interface performance using a reaction time test.

    PubMed

    Darvishi, Sam; Abbott, Derek; Baumert, Mathias

    2015-08-01

    Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) enable human brains to interact directly with machines. Motor imagery based BCI (MI-BCI) encodes the motor intentions of human agents and provides feedback accordingly. However, 15-30% of people are not able to perform vivid motor imagery. To save time and monetary resources, a number of predictors have been proposed to screen for users with low BCI aptitude. While the proposed predictors provide some level of correlation with MI-BCI performance, simple, objective and accurate predictors are currently not available. Thus, in this study we have examined the utility of a simple reaction time (SRT) test for predicting MI-BCI performance. We enrolled 10 subjects and measured their motor imagery performance with either visual or proprioceptive feedback. Their reaction time was also measured using a SRT test. The results show a significant negative correlation (r ≈ -0.67) between SRT and MI-BCI performance. Therefore SRT may be used as a simple and reliable predictor of MI-BCI performance. PMID:26736893

  4. Integrating impairments in reaction time and executive function using a diffusion model framework

    PubMed Central

    Karalunas, Sarah L.; Huang-Pollock, Cynthia L.

    2013-01-01

    Using Ratcliff’s diffusion model and ex-Gaussian decomposition, we directly evaluate the role individual differences in reaction time (RT) distribution components play in the prediction of inhibitory control and working memory (WM) capacity in children with and without ADHD. Children with (n=92, x̄ age= 10.2 years, 67% male) and without ADHD (n=62, x̄ age=10.6 years, 46% male) completed four tasks of WM and a stop signal reaction time (SSRT) task. Children with ADHD had smaller WM capacities and less efficient inhibitory control. Diffusion model analyses revealed that children with ADHD had slower drift rates (v) and faster non-decision times (Ter), but there were no group differences in boundary separations (a). Similarly, using an ex-Gaussian approach, children with ADHD had larger τ values than non-ADHD controls, but did not differ in µ or σ distribution components. Drift rate mediated the association between ADHD status and performance on both inhibitory control and WM capacity. τ also mediated the ADHD-executive function impairment associations; however, models were a poorer fit to the data. Impaired performance on RT and executive functioning tasks has long been associated with childhood ADHD. Both are believed to be important cognitive mechanisms to the disorder. We demonstrate here that drift rate, or the speed at which information accumulates towards a decision, is able to explain both. PMID:23334775

  5. The benefits of errorless learning for serial reaction time performance in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Xavier; Bier, Nathalie; Joubert, Sven; Lejeune, Caroline; Salmon, Eric; Rouleau, Isabelle; Meulemans, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the conditions favoring new procedural skill learning in Alzheimer's disease (AD) could be important for patients' autonomy. It has been suggested that error elimination is beneficial during skill learning, but no study has explored the advantage of this method in sequential learning situations. In this study, we examined the acquisition of a 6-element perceptual-motor sequence by AD patients and healthy older adults (control group). We compared the impact of two preliminary sequence learning conditions (Errorless versus Errorful) on Serial Reaction Time performance at two different points in the learning process. A significant difference in reaction times for the learned sequence and a new sequence was observed in both conditions in healthy older participants; in AD patients, the difference was significant only in the errorless condition. The learning effect was greater in the errorless than the errorful condition in both groups. However, while the errorless advantage was found at two different times in the learning process in the AD group, in the control group this advantage was observed only at the halfway point. These results support the hypothesis that errorless learning allows for faster automation of a procedure than errorful learning in both AD and healthy older subjects. PMID:24157724

  6. Barriers to reaction front propagation in a spatially random, time-independent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargteil, Dylan; Solomon, Tom; Mahoney, John; Mitchell, Kevin

    2011-11-01

    We present experimental studies of barriers, called burning invariant manifolds (BIMs), to front propagation in a spatially random, time-independent flow. We generate the flow with a magnetohydrodynamic technique that uses a DC current and a disordered pattern of permanent magnets. The velocity field is determined from this flow using particle tracking velocimetry, and reaction fronts are produced using the Ferroin-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) chemical reaction. We use the experimental velocity field and a three-dimensional set of ODEs to predict from theory the location and orientation of BIMs. These predicted BIMs are found to match up well with the propagation barriers observed experimentally in the same flow using the BZ reaction. We explore the nature of BIMs as one-sided barriers, in contrast to invariant manifolds that act as barriers for passive transport in all directions. We also explore the role of projection singularities in the theory and how these singularities affect front behavior. Supported by NSF Grants DMR-0703635, DMR-1004744, PHY-0552790 and PHY-0748828.

  7. Real-Time and Post-Reaction Microscopic Structural Analysis of Biomass Undergoing Pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, T. J.; Nimlos, M. R.; Donohoe, B. S.

    2009-01-01

    The structural complexity of unprocessed plant tissues used for thermochemical conversion of biomass to fuels and energy impedes heat and mass transfer and may increase the occurrence of tar-forming secondary chemical reactions. At industrial scales, gas and liquid products trapped within large biomass particles may reduce net fuel yields and increase tars, impacting industrial operations and increasing overall costs. Real-time microscopic analysis of poplar (Populus sp.) wood samples undergoing anoxic, pyrolytic heat treatment has revealed a pattern of tissue and macropore expansion and collapse. Post-reaction structural analyses of biomass char (biochar) by light and transmission electron microscopy have provided direct structural evidence of pyrolysis product mass-transfer issues, including trapped pyrolysis products and cell wall compression, and have demonstrated the impact of heat-transfer problems on biomass particles. Finally, microscopic imaging has revealed that pyrolyzed/gasified biochars recovered from a fluidized bed reactor retain a similar pre-reaction basic plant tissue structure as the samples used in this study, suggesting that the phenomena observed here are representative of those that occur in larger scale reactors.

  8. Emotions over time: synchronicity and development of subjective, physiological, and facial affective reactions to music.

    PubMed

    Grewe, Oliver; Nagel, Frederik; Kopiez, Reinhard; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2007-11-01

    Most people are able to identify basic emotions expressed in music and experience affective reactions to music. But does music generally induce emotion? Does it elicit subjective feelings, physiological arousal, and motor reactions reliably in different individuals? In this interdisciplinary study, measurement of skin conductance, facial muscle activity, and self-monitoring were synchronized with musical stimuli. A group of 38 participants listened to classical, rock, and pop music and reported their feelings in a two-dimensional emotion space during listening. The first entrance of a solo voice or choir and the beginning of new sections were found to elicit interindividual changes in subjective feelings and physiological arousal. Quincy Jones' "Bossa Nova" motivated movement and laughing in more than half of the participants. Bodily reactions such as "goose bumps" and "shivers" could be stimulated by the "Tuba Mirum" from Mozart's Requiem in 7 of 38 participants. In addition, the authors repeated the experiment seven times with one participant to examine intraindividual stability of effects. This exploratory combination of approaches throws a new light on the astonishing complexity of affective music listening. PMID:18039047

  9. Monitoring Enzymatic Reactions in Real Time Using Venturi Easy Ambient Sonic-Spray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We developed a technique to monitor spatially confined surface reactions with mass spectrometry under ambient conditions, without the need for voltage or organic solvents. Fused-silica capillaries immersed in an aqueous solution, positioned in close proximity to each other and the functionalized surface, created a laminar flow junction with a resulting reaction volume of ∼5 pL. The setup was operated with a syringe pump, delivering reagents to the surface through a fused-silica capillary. The other fused-silica capillary was connected to a Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization source, sampling the resulting analytes at a slightly higher flow rate compared to the feeding capillary. The combined effects of the inflow and outflow maintains a chemical microenvironment, where the rate of advective transport overcomes diffusion. We show proof-of-concept where acetylcholinesterase was immobilized on an organosiloxane polymer through electrostatic interactions. The hydrolysis of acetylcholine by acetylcholinesterase into choline was monitored in real-time for a range of acetylcholine concentrations, fused-silica capillary geometries, and operating flow rates. Higher reaction rates and conversion yields were observed with increasing acetylcholine concentrations, as would be expected. PMID:27249533

  10. Monitoring Enzymatic Reactions in Real Time Using Venturi Easy Ambient Sonic-Spray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Erik T; Dulay, Maria T; Zare, Richard N

    2016-06-21

    We developed a technique to monitor spatially confined surface reactions with mass spectrometry under ambient conditions, without the need for voltage or organic solvents. Fused-silica capillaries immersed in an aqueous solution, positioned in close proximity to each other and the functionalized surface, created a laminar flow junction with a resulting reaction volume of ∼5 pL. The setup was operated with a syringe pump, delivering reagents to the surface through a fused-silica capillary. The other fused-silica capillary was connected to a Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization source, sampling the resulting analytes at a slightly higher flow rate compared to the feeding capillary. The combined effects of the inflow and outflow maintains a chemical microenvironment, where the rate of advective transport overcomes diffusion. We show proof-of-concept where acetylcholinesterase was immobilized on an organosiloxane polymer through electrostatic interactions. The hydrolysis of acetylcholine by acetylcholinesterase into choline was monitored in real-time for a range of acetylcholine concentrations, fused-silica capillary geometries, and operating flow rates. Higher reaction rates and conversion yields were observed with increasing acetylcholine concentrations, as would be expected. PMID:27249533

  11. Factors Affecting the Timing of Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Masayuki; Imai, Shungo; Uehara, Keiko; Maruyama, Junya; Shimizu, Mikiko; Mochizuki, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting the timing of signal detection by comparing variations in reporting time of known and unknown ADRs after initial drug release in the USA. Data on adverse event reactions (AERs) submitted to U.S. FDA was used. Six ADRs associated with 6 drugs (rosuvastatin, aripiprazole, teriparatide, telithromycin, exenatide, varenicline) were investigated: Changes in the proportional reporting ratio, reporting odds ratio, and information component as indexes of signal detection were followed every 3 months after each drugs release, and the time for detection of signals was investigated. The time for the detection of signal to be detected after drug release in the USA was 2-10 months for known ADRs and 19-44 months for unknown ones. The median lag time for known and unknown ADRs was 99.0-122.5 days and 185.5-306.0 days, respectively. When the FDA released advisory information on rare but potentially serious health risks of an unknown ADR, the time lag to report from the onset of ADRs to the FDA was shorter. This study suggested that one factor affecting signal detection time is whether an ADR was known or unknown at release. PMID:26641634

  12. Threshold dynamics of a time periodic reaction-diffusion epidemic model with latent period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Wang, Zhi-Cheng; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we first propose a time-periodic reaction-diffusion epidemic model which incorporates simple demographic structure and the latent period of infectious disease. Then we introduce the basic reproduction number R0 for this model and prove that the sign of R0 - 1 determines the local stability of the disease-free periodic solution. By using the comparison arguments and persistence theory, we further show that the disease-free periodic solution is globally attractive if R0 < 1, while there is an endemic periodic solution and the disease is uniformly persistent if R0 > 1.

  13. The Visual and Auditory Reaction Time of Adolescents with Respect to Their Academic Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taskin, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine in visual and auditory reaction time of adolescents with respect to their academic achievement level. Five hundred adolescent children from the Turkey, (age=15.24±0.78 years; height=168.80±4.89 cm; weight=65.24±4.30 kg) for two hundred fifty male and (age=15.28±0.74; height=160.40±5.77 cm; weight=55.32±4.13 kg)…

  14. Zoster ... "a lmost" ... sine herpete: diagnostic utility of real time-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Vena, Gino A; Apruzzi, Doriana; Vestita, Michelangelo; Calvario, Agata; Foti, Caterina; Cassano, Nicoletta

    2010-10-01

    Zoster sine herpete is a particular form of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection characterized by segmental pain and dysesthesia, without any cutaneous lesions ever becoming perceptible. This report describes the case of a female patient, presenting with intercostal pain associated with a single papulo-vesicular lesion localized within the same area. Thanks to such a lesion, real time-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis on vesicle fluid swab was possible, thus revealing a significant number of VZV genome copies. This innovative tool has proven essential to diagnose this abortive form of herpes zoster, which would otherwise have remained unidentified. PMID:21213602

  15. Quantum yields and reaction times of photochromic diarylethenes: nonadiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics for normal- and inverse-type.

    PubMed

    Wiebeler, Christian; Schumacher, Stefan

    2014-09-11

    Photochromism is a light-induced molecular process that is likely to find its way into future optoelectronic devices. In further optimization of photochromic materials, light-induced conversion efficiencies as well as reaction times can usually only be determined once a new molecule was synthesized. Here we use nonadiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics to study the electrocyclic reaction of diarylethenes, comparing normal- and inverse-type systems. Our study highlights that reaction quantum yields can be successfully predicted in accord with experimental findings. In particular, we find that inverse-type diarylethenes show a significantly higher reaction quantum yield and cycloreversion on times typically as short as 100 fs. PMID:25140609

  16. Moments of action provide insight into critical times for advection-diffusion-reaction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellery, Adam J.; Simpson, Matthew J.; McCue, Scott W.; Baker, Ruth E.

    2012-09-01

    Berezhkovskii and co-workers introduced the concept of local accumulation time as a finite measure of the time required for the transient solution of a reaction-diffusion equation to effectively reach steady state [Biophys J.BIOJAU0006-349510.1016/j.bpj.2010.07.045 99, L59 (2010); Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.83.051906 83, 051906 (2011)]. Berezhkovskii's approach is a particular application of the concept of mean action time (MAT) that was introduced previously by McNabb [IMA J. Appl. Math.IJAMDM0272-496010.1093/imamat/47.2.193 47, 193 (1991)]. Here, we generalize these previous results by presenting a framework to calculate the MAT, as well as the higher moments, which we call the moments of action. The second moment is the variance of action time, the third moment is related to the skew of action time, and so on. We consider a general transition from some initial condition to an associated steady state for a one-dimensional linear advection-diffusion-reaction partial differential equation (PDE). Our results indicate that it is possible to solve for the moments of action exactly without requiring the transient solution of the PDE. We present specific examples that highlight potential weaknesses of previous studies that have considered the MAT alone without considering higher moments. Finally, we also provide a meaningful interpretation of the moments of action by presenting simulation results from a discrete random-walk model together with some analysis of the particle lifetime distribution. This work shows that the moments of action are identical to the moments of the particle lifetime distribution for certain transitions.

  17. [Methods Used for Monitoring Cure Reactions in Real-time in an Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John B.; Wise, Kent L.; Jensen, Brian J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the research was to investigate methods for monitoring cure reactions in real-time in an autoclave. This is of particular importance to NASA Langley Research Center because polyimides were proposed for use in the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) program. Understanding the cure chemistry behind the polyimides would allow for intelligent processing of the composites made from their use. This work has led to two publications in peer-reviewed journals and a patent. The journal articles are listed as Appendix A which is on the instrument design of the research and Appendix B which is on the cure chemistry. Also, a patent has been awarded for the instrumental design developed under this grant which is given as Appendix C. There has been a significant amount of research directed at developing methods for monitoring cure reactions in real-time within the autoclave. The various research efforts can be categorized as methods providing either direct chemical bonding information or methods that provide indirect chemical bonding information. Methods falling into the latter category are fluorescence, dielectric loss, ultrasonic and similar type methods. Correlation of such measurements with the underlying chemistry is often quite difficult since these techniques do not allow monitoring of the curing chemistry which is ultimately responsible for material properties. Direct methods such as vibrational spectroscopy, however, can often be easily correlated with the underlying chemistry of a reaction. Such methods include Raman spectroscopy, mid-IR absorbance, and near-IR absorbance. With the recent advances in fiber-optics, these spectroscopic techniques can be applied to remote on-line monitoring.

  18. Task modulation of the effects of brightness on reaction time and response force.

    PubMed

    Jaśkowski, Piotr; Włodarczyk, Dariusz

    2006-08-01

    Van der Molen and Keuss [van der Molen, M.W., Keuss, P.J.G., 1979. The relationship between reaction time and intensity in discrete auditory tasks. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 31, 95-102; van der Molen, M.W., Keuss, P.J.G., 1981. Response selection and the processing of auditory intensity. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 33, 177-184] showed that paradoxically long reaction times (RT) occur with extremely loud auditory stimuli when the task is difficult (e.g. needs a response choice). It was argued that this paradoxical behavior of RT is due to active suppression of response prompting to prevent false responses. In the present experiments, we demonstrated that such an effect can also occur for visual stimuli provided that they are large enough. Additionally, we showed that response force exerted by participants on response keys monotonically grew with intensity for large stimuli but was independent of intensity for small visual stimuli. Bearing in mind that only large stimuli are believed to be arousing this pattern of results supports the arousal interpretation of the negative effect of loud stimuli on RT given by van der Molen and Keuss. PMID:16198013

  19. Response variability of the red-green color vision system using reaction times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2011-05-01

    We have studied the intrinsic variability of color coding by examining the temporal fluctuations of chromatic-opponent neurons at the large scale. Simple reaction times were measured for stimuli selected along the red-green direction in the isoluminant plane of the human color space (S-cone constant or L-M axis). Stimulus size also changed from 8 minutes of arc to 10 degrees. Fluctuations increased as the mean reaction time increased and showed a bi-linear scaling function. The coefficient of variation was always lower than predicted by a Poisson process. The variability decreased as a function of the chromatic contrast and as a function of the stimulus size. The analysis of the hazard functions was consistent with power-law dominant random processes at low stimulus size and low contrasts and log-normal dominant processes at high contrasts. Our results conclude that response variability is signal-dependent and evidence for a random multiplicative process in human color vision. We suggest that multiplicative internal noise modulates red-green spatial summation and chromatic contrast processing and may represent a fundamental limit in spatially disordered networks.

  20. Inhibitory processes relate differently to balance/reaction time dual tasks in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Mendelson, David N.; Redfern, Mark S.; Nebes, Robert D.; Jennings, J. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory processes have been suggested to be involved in maintaining balance in older adults, specifically in the integration of sensory information. This study investigated the association between inhibition and the ability to shift attention between auditory and visual modalities during a balance challenge. Young (21–35 yrs; n=24) and older (70–85 yrs; n=22) healthy subjects completed tasks assessing perceptual inhibition and motor inhibition. Subjects then performed dual-task paradigms pairing auditory and visual choice reaction time tasks with different postural conditions. Sensory channel switch cost was quantified as the difference between visual and auditory reaction times. Results showed that better perceptual and motor inhibition capabilities were associated with less sensory switch cost in the old (perceptual inhibition: r=0.51; motor inhibition: r=0.48). In the young, neither perceptual nor motor inhibition was associated with sensory switch cost. Inhibitory skills appear particularly important in the elderly for processing events from multiple sensory channels while maintaining balance. PMID:19526388

  1. Monitoring transcranial direct current stimulation induced changes in cortical excitability during the serial reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, Géza Gergely; Chaieb, Leila; Stilling, Roman; Rothkegel, Holger; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2016-03-11

    The measurement of the motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a common method to observe changes in motor cortical excitability. The level of cortical excitability has been shown to change during motor learning. Conversely, motor learning can be improved by using anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). In the present study, we aimed to monitor cortical excitability changes during an implicit motor learning paradigm, a version of the serial reaction time task (SRTT). Responses from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and forearm flexor (FLEX) muscles were recorded before, during and after the performance of the SRTT. Online measurements were combined with anodal, cathodal or sham tDCS for the duration of the SRTT. Negative correlations between the amplitude of online FDI MEPs and SRTT reaction times (RTs) were observed across the learning blocks in the cathodal condition (higher average MEP amplitudes associated with lower RTs) but no significant differences in the anodal and sham conditions. tDCS did not have an impact on SRTT performance, as would be predicted based on previous studies. The offline before-after SRTT MEP amplitudes showed an increase after anodal and a tendency to decrease after cathodal stimulation, but these changes were not significant. The combination of different interventions during tDCS might result in reduced efficacy of the stimulation that in future studies need further attention. PMID:26826607

  2. Development of dispersive XAFS system for analysis of time-resolved spatial distribution of electrode reaction.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Misaki; Miyahara, Ryota; Watanabe, Toshiki; Yamagishi, Hirona; Yamashita, Shohei; Kizaki, Terue; Sugawara, Yoshimi; Inada, Yasuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Apparatus for a technique based on the dispersive optics of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) has been developed at beamline BL-5 of the Synchrotron Radiation Center of Ritsumeikan University. The vertical axis of the cross section of the synchrotron light is used to disperse the X-ray energy using a cylindrical polychromator and the horizontal axis is used for the spatially resolved analysis with a pixel array detector. The vertically dispersive XAFS (VDXAFS) instrument was designed to analyze the dynamic changeover of the inhomogeneous electrode reaction of secondary batteries. The line-shaped X-ray beam is transmitted through the electrode sample, and then the dispersed transmitted X-rays are detected by a two-dimensional detector. An array of XAFS spectra in the linear footprint of the transmitted X-ray on the sample is obtained with the time resolution of the repetition frequency of the detector. Sequential measurements of the space-resolved XAFS data are possible with the VDXAFS instrument. The time and spatial resolutions of the VDXAFS instrument depend on the flux density of the available X-ray beam and the size of the light source, and they were estimated as 1 s and 100 µm, respectively. The electrode reaction of the LiFePO4 lithium ion battery was analyzed during the constant current charging process and during the charging process after potential jumping. PMID:26289274

  3. Detection of the Pinewood Nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, Using a Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay.

    PubMed

    Cao, A X; Liu, X Z; Zhu, S F; Lu, B S

    2005-05-01

    ABSTRACT The pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, has caused significant damage to pine plantations both in East Asia and North America and is an important quarantine organism. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to detect B. xylophilus. A set of primers and probe specific for B. xylophilus was designed to target the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region. Optimal primer concentration, Mg(2+) concentration, and extension temperature were 400 nM, 3.0 mM, and 60 degrees C, respectively. The assay was highly specific and sensitive, detecting as little as 0.01 ng of B. xylophilus DNA. The real-time PCR assay also successfully detected B. xylophilus in field samples, and it should be very useful for quarantine purposes. PMID:18943323

  4. Effects of angular acceleration on man - Choice reaction time using visual and rotary motion information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.; Stewart, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    This experiment was concerned with the effects of rotary acceleration on choice reaction time (RTc) to the motion of a luminous line on a cathode-ray tube. Specifically, it compared the (RTc) to rotary acceleration alone, visual acceleration alone, and simultaneous, double stimulation by both rotary and visual acceleration. Thirteen airline pilots were rotated about an earth-vertical axis in a precision rotation device while they observed a vertical line. The stimuli were 7 rotary and visual accelerations which were matched for rise time. The pilot responded as quickly as possible by displacing a vertical controller to the right or left. The results showed a decreasing (RTc) with increasing acceleration for all conditions, while the (RTc) to rotary motion alone was substantially longer than for all other conditions. The (RTc) to the double stimulation was significantly longer than that for visual acceleration alone.

  5. Indirect Measurement of Sexual Orientation: Comparison of the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure, Viewing Time, and Choice Reaction Time Tasks.

    PubMed

    Rönspies, Jelena; Schmidt, Alexander F; Melnikova, Anna; Krumova, Rosina; Zolfagari, Asadeh; Banse, Rainer

    2015-07-01

    The present study was conducted to validate an adaptation of the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) as an indirect latency-based measure of sexual orientation. Furthermore, reliability and criterion validity of the IRAP were compared to two established indirect measures of sexual orientation: a Choice Reaction Time task (CRT) and a Viewing Time (VT) task. A sample of 87 heterosexual and 35 gay men completed all three indirect measures in an online study. The IRAP and the VT predicted sexual orientation nearly perfectly. Both measures also showed a considerable amount of convergent validity. Reliabilities (internal consistencies) reached satisfactory levels. In contrast, the CRT did not tap into sexual orientation in the present study. In sum, the VT measure performed best, with the IRAP showing only slightly lower reliability and criterion validity, whereas the CRT did not yield any evidence of reliability or criterion validity in the present research. The results were discussed in the light of specific task properties of the indirect latency-based measures (task-relevance vs. task-irrelevance). PMID:25690445

  6. Age-related slowing of response selection and production in a visual choice reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Woods, David L; Wyma, John M; Yund, E William; Herron, Timothy J; Reed, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with delayed processing in choice reaction time (CRT) tasks, but the processing stages most impacted by aging have not been clearly identified. Here, we analyzed CRT latencies in a computerized serial visual feature-conjunction task. Participants responded to a target letter (probability 40%) by pressing one mouse button, and responded to distractor letters differing either in color, shape, or both features from the target (probabilities 20% each) by pressing the other mouse button. Stimuli were presented randomly to the left and right visual fields and stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) were adaptively reduced following correct responses using a staircase procedure. In Experiment 1, we tested 1466 participants who ranged in age from 18 to 65 years. CRT latencies increased significantly with age (r = 0.47, 2.80 ms/year). Central processing time (CPT), isolated by subtracting simple reaction times (SRT) (obtained in a companion experiment performed on the same day) from CRT latencies, accounted for more than 80% of age-related CRT slowing, with most of the remaining increase in latency due to slowed motor responses. Participants were faster and more accurate when the stimulus location was spatially compatible with the mouse button used for responding, and this effect increased slightly with age. Participants took longer to respond to distractors with target color or shape than to distractors with no target features. However, the additional time needed to discriminate the more target-like distractors did not increase with age. In Experiment 2, we replicated the findings of Experiment 1 in a second population of 178 participants (ages 18-82 years). CRT latencies did not differ significantly in the two experiments, and similar effects of age, distractor similarity, and stimulus-response spatial compatibility were found. The results suggest that the age-related slowing in visual CRT latencies is largely due to delays in response selection and

  7. Age-related slowing of response selection and production in a visual choice reaction time task

    PubMed Central

    Woods, David L.; Wyma, John M.; Yund, E. William; Herron, Timothy J.; Reed, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with delayed processing in choice reaction time (CRT) tasks, but the processing stages most impacted by aging have not been clearly identified. Here, we analyzed CRT latencies in a computerized serial visual feature-conjunction task. Participants responded to a target letter (probability 40%) by pressing one mouse button, and responded to distractor letters differing either in color, shape, or both features from the target (probabilities 20% each) by pressing the other mouse button. Stimuli were presented randomly to the left and right visual fields and stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) were adaptively reduced following correct responses using a staircase procedure. In Experiment 1, we tested 1466 participants who ranged in age from 18 to 65 years. CRT latencies increased significantly with age (r = 0.47, 2.80 ms/year). Central processing time (CPT), isolated by subtracting simple reaction times (SRT) (obtained in a companion experiment performed on the same day) from CRT latencies, accounted for more than 80% of age-related CRT slowing, with most of the remaining increase in latency due to slowed motor responses. Participants were faster and more accurate when the stimulus location was spatially compatible with the mouse button used for responding, and this effect increased slightly with age. Participants took longer to respond to distractors with target color or shape than to distractors with no target features. However, the additional time needed to discriminate the more target-like distractors did not increase with age. In Experiment 2, we replicated the findings of Experiment 1 in a second population of 178 participants (ages 18–82 years). CRT latencies did not differ significantly in the two experiments, and similar effects of age, distractor similarity, and stimulus-response spatial compatibility were found. The results suggest that the age-related slowing in visual CRT latencies is largely due to delays in response selection and

  8. A solution for measuring accurate reaction time to visual stimuli realized with a programmable microcontroller.

    PubMed

    Ohyanagi, Toshio; Sengoku, Yasuhito

    2010-02-01

    This article presents a new solution for measuring accurate reaction time (SMART) to visual stimuli. The SMART is a USB device realized with a Cypress Programmable System-on-Chip (PSoC) mixed-signal array programmable microcontroller. A brief overview of the hardware and firmware of the PSoC is provided, together with the results of three experiments. In Experiment 1, we investigated the timing accuracy of the SMART in measuring reaction time (RT) under different conditions of operating systems (OSs; Windows XP or Vista) and monitor displays (a CRT or an LCD). The results indicated that the timing error in measuring RT by the SMART was less than 2 msec, on average, under all combinations of OS and display and that the SMART was tolerant to jitter and noise. In Experiment 2, we tested the SMART with 8 participants. The results indicated that there was no significant difference among RTs obtained with the SMART under the different conditions of OS and display. In Experiment 3, we used Microsoft (MS) PowerPoint to present visual stimuli on the display. We found no significant difference in RTs obtained using MS DirectX technology versus using the PowerPoint file with the SMART. We are certain that the SMART is a simple and practical solution for measuring RTs accurately. Although there are some restrictions in using the SMART with RT paradigms, the SMART is capable of providing both researchers and health professionals working in clinical settings with new ways of using RT paradigms in their work. PMID:20160303

  9. Validating the Accuracy of Reaction Time Assessment on Computer-Based Tablet Devices.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Philip; Ybarra, Vincent; Leitner, Donald

    2015-08-01

    Computer-based assessment has evolved to tablet-based devices. Despite the availability of tablets and "apps," there is limited research validating their use. We documented timing delays between stimulus presentation and (simulated) touch response on iOS devices (3rd- and 4th-generation Apple iPads) and Android devices (Kindle Fire, Google Nexus, Samsung Galaxy) at response intervals of 100, 250, 500, and 1,000 milliseconds (ms). Results showed significantly greater timing error on Google Nexus and Samsung tablets (81-97 ms), than Kindle Fire and Apple iPads (27-33 ms). Within Apple devices, iOS 7 obtained significantly lower timing error than iOS 6. Simple reaction time (RT) trials (250 ms) on tablet devices represent 12% to 40% error (30-100 ms), depending on the device, which decreases considerably for choice RT trials (3-5% error at 1,000 ms). Results raise implications for using the same device for serial clinical assessment of RT using tablets, as well as the need for calibration of software and hardware. PMID:25612627

  10. After-training emotional interference may modulate sequence awareness in a serial reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Onal-Hartmann, Cigdem; Fiorio, Mirta; Gentner, Reinhard; Zeller, Daniel; Pauli, Paul; Classen, Joseph

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to investigate the effects of emotional interference on consolidation of sequential learning. In different sessions, 6 groups of subjects were initially trained on a serial reaction time task (SRTT). To modulate consolidation of the newly learned skill, subjects were exposed, after the training, to 1 of 3 (positive, negative or neutral) different classes of emotional stimuli which consisted of a set of emotional pictures combined with congruent emotional musical pieces or neutral sound. Emotional intervention for each subject group was done in 2 different time intervals (either directly after the training session or 6 h later). After a 72 h post-training interval, each group was retested on the SRTT. Re-test performance was evaluated in terms of response times and accuracy during execution of a target sequence. Emotional intervention did not influence either response times or accuracy of re-testing SRTT target task performance, both variables sensitive to implicit knowledge acquired during SRTT training. However, explicit awareness of sequence knowledge after 72 h was enhanced when negative stimuli had been applied at 0 h after training. These findings suggest that consolidation of explicit aspects of procedural learning may be more responsive toward emotional interference than implicit aspects. PMID:22430186

  11. A Time-Dependent Quantum Dynamics Study of the H2 + CH3 yields H + CH4 Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a time-dependent wave-packet propagation calculation for the H2 + CH3 yields H + CH4 reaction in six degrees of freedom and for zero total angular momentum. Initial state selected reaction probability for different initial rotational-vibrational states are presented in this study. The cumulative reaction probability (CRP) is obtained by summing over initial-state-selected reaction probability. The energy-shift approximation to account for the contribution of degrees of freedom missing in the 6D calculation is employed to obtain an approximate full-dimensional CRP. Thermal rate constant is compared with different experiment results.

  12. Simultaneous comparison of thrombogenic reactions to different combinations of anticoagulants, activated clotting times, and materials.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Mirei; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka; Umezu, Mitsuo; Ozaki, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    Thrombogenic reactions under multiple interactions of pharmacological agents, doses, and materials have not been well understood yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability to simultaneously compare thrombogenic reactions to different combinations of anticoagulants, doses, and blood-contacting materials, in a single human blood using an in vitro test method. Four venous blood samples were drawn from each of six healthy volunteers into syringes that contained two different amounts of heparin and argatroban to set the activated clotting time (ACT) to approximately 200 or 500 s, respectively. The four blood samples from each volunteer were immediately poured into two clinical-grade extracorporeal circulation tubes: a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tube and a poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate)-coated (PMEA) PVC tube. These tubes with an inner diameter of 12.7 mm were rotated at 183 rpm in a 37°C chamber for 10 min. The results indicated that the in vitro thrombogenicity test method was capable of assessing differences in platelet factor 4 and β-thromboglobulin increases among different combinations of the two materials, two anticoagulants, and two ACTs. Higher amounts of total plasma proteins were absorbed on PVC tubes than on PMEA-coated tubes when using the same anticoagulant and dose. These data elucidate that the in vitro thrombogenicity test method is useful for the simultaneous quantitative evaluation of the influences of various combinations of materials, pharmacological agents, and doses on thrombogenicity in a single human blood. PMID:24652689

  13. Time-resolved analysis of biological reactions based on heterogeneous assays in liquid plugs of nanoliter volume.

    PubMed

    Rendl, Martin; Brandstetter, Thomas; Rühe, Jürgen

    2013-10-15

    In this article, we present a concept which uses liquid plugs as reaction volumes for heterogeneous assay reactions to facilitate time-resolved analysis of biomolecular reactions. For this purpose, the reaction is first compartmentalized to a train of many identical plugs. Therefore, we established a simple fluidic setup build from off-the-shelf available tubing and connectors. It permits reliable formation of plugs and successive dosing of further assay reagents to these compartments (plug volume <5% CV). The time course of the reaction is obtained by routing the plugs successively through a detector. Thereby, the arrival time of a given plug at the detector represents the reaction time of the overall reaction at that moment. Thus, each analyzed plug represents a discrete state of the overall reaction. With this approach, we can achieve a temporal resolution as small as one second, which hardly can be met by conventional analytical methods for analysis of endogenous biological compounds. For analysis of the content of the plugs, we developed a method which allows for heterogeneous assays in two-phase flow. For this purpose, functionalized superparamagnetic beads are enclosed in the plugs for specific binding of the assay product. Purification from supernatant species is achieved by transferring the beads with bound analyte across the phase boundary between aqueous plugs and water-immiscible carrier fluid. We demonstrate this assay principle exemplarily for a sandwich immunoassay (cytokine IL-8). Time-resolved analysis is validated by monitoring a cell-free in vitro expression reaction (turboGFP) in plugs and conventionally in bulk solution. We show that our approach allows for analyzing the entire course of a reaction in a single run. It permits kinetic studies of biological processes with significantly reduced experimental effort and consumption of costly reagents. PMID:24083685

  14. Influence of cup stacking on hand-eye coordination and reaction time of second-grade students.

    PubMed

    Udermann, Brian E; Murray, Steven R; Mayer, John M; Sagendorf, Kenneth

    2004-04-01

    Cup stacking has been adopted recently by many physical education programs to enhance rudimentary motor skills such as hand-eye coordination and ambidexterity as well as quickness and concentration; however, no empirical evidence has been published to support these claims. We examined the influence of cup stacking on hand-eye coordination and reaction time of 24 boys and 18 girls in second grade as measured by the Soda Pop and Yardstick tests, respectively. Two physical education classes were randomly assigned as treatment and control groups and were pre- and posttested for hand-eye coordination and reaction time. The treatment group participated in a 5-wk. cup-stacking program. Significant improvements were noted for both hand-eye coordination and reaction time between the pre- and posttest scores for this group but not for the control group. Therefore, cup stacking is indeed effective in enhancing hand-eye coordination and reaction time. PMID:15141904

  15. Effect of Buddhist meditation on serum cortisol and total protein levels, blood pressure, pulse rate, lung volume and reaction time.

    PubMed

    Sudsuang, R; Chentanez, V; Veluvan, K

    1991-09-01

    Serum cortisol and total protein levels, blood pressure, heart rate, lung volume, and reaction time were studied in 52 males 20-25 years of age practicing Dhammakaya Buddhist meditation, and in 30 males of the same age group not practicing meditation. It was found that after meditation, serum cortisol levels were significantly reduced, serum total protein level significantly increased, and systolic pressure, diastolic pressure and pulse rate significantly reduced. Vital capacity, tidal volume and maximal voluntary ventilation were significantly lower after meditation than before. There were also significant decreases in reaction time after mediation practice. The percentage decrease in reaction time during meditation was 22%, while in subjects untrained in meditation, the percentage decrease was only 7%. Results from these studies indicate that practising Dhammakaya Buddhist meditation produces biochemical and physiological changes and reduces the reaction time. PMID:1801007

  16. Redundant sensory information does not enhance sequence learning in the serial reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Abrahamse, Elger L; van der Lubbe, Rob H J; Verwey, Willem B; Szumska, Izabela; Jaśkowski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    In daily life we encounter multiple sources of sensory information at any given moment. Unknown is whether such sensory redundancy in some way affects implicit learning of a sequence of events. In the current paper we explored this issue in a serial reaction time task. Our results indicate that redundant sensory information does not enhance sequence learning when all sensory information is presented at the same location (responding to the position and/or color of the stimuli; Experiment 1), even when the distinct sensory sources provide more or less similar baseline response latencies (responding to the shape and/or color of the stimuli; Experiment 2). These findings support the claim that sequence learning does not (necessarily) benefit from sensory redundancy. Moreover, transfer was observed between various sets of stimuli, indicating that learning was predominantly response-based. PMID:22679466

  17. Redundant sensory information does not enhance sequence learning in the serial reaction time task

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamse, Elger L.; van der Lubbe, Rob H. J.; Verwey, Willem B.; Szumska, Izabela; Jaśkowski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    In daily life we encounter multiple sources of sensory information at any given moment. Unknown is whether such sensory redundancy in some way affects implicit learning of a sequence of events. In the current paper we explored this issue in a serial reaction time task. Our results indicate that redundant sensory information does not enhance sequence learning when all sensory information is presented at the same location (responding to the position and/or color of the stimuli; Experiment 1), even when the distinct sensory sources provide more or less similar baseline response latencies (responding to the shape and/or color of the stimuli; Experiment 2). These findings support the claim that sequence learning does not (necessarily) benefit from sensory redundancy. Moreover, transfer was observed between various sets of stimuli, indicating that learning was predominantly response-based. PMID:22679466

  18. Effect of loudness on reaction time and response force in different motor tasks.

    PubMed

    Jaśkowski, Piotr; Włodarczyk, Dariusz

    2005-12-01

    Van der Molen and Keuss, in 1979 and 1981, showed that paradoxically long reaction times occur with extremely strong auditory stimuli when the task is difficult, e.g., choice-by-location or Simon paradigm. It was argued that this paradoxical behavior of RT is due to active inhibition of an arousal-dependent bypassing mechanism to prevent false responses. As the peak force, i.e., maximal force exerted by participants on a response key, is considered to be related to immediate arousal, we predicted that for extremely loud stimuli and for difficult tasks, lengthening of RT should be associated with reduction of peak force. Moreover, these effects should be enhanced when emphasis is on accuracy rather than speed. Although the relation between RT and intensity depended on task difficulty, no increase in RT was found for the loudest tones. Moreover, peak force increased monotonically with loudness, showing no tendency to be suppressed for loudest tones and difficult tasks. PMID:16491701

  19. Attentional disengagement is modulated by the offset of unpleasant pictures: a saccadic reaction time study.

    PubMed

    Machado-Pinheiro, Walter; Faria, Aydamari; Braga, Filipe; Guerra, Pedro; Perakakis, Pandelis; Caldas, Ariane Leão; Mocaiber, Izabela; Oliveira, Letícia; Pereira, Mirtes Garcia; Volchan, Eliane; Vila, Jaime

    2013-12-01

    We studied the influence of passively viewing a picture on saccade latencies to peripheral targets. Thirty-two volunteers were instructed to look at a central picture, wait for the onset of a peripheral target, and execute a saccade toward it as quickly as possible - saccadic reaction time (SRT). The central picture (neutral or unpleasant) could be turned off simultaneously with target onset (the no-gap condition) or 200ms prior to target onset (the gap-200 condition). We found that saccade latencies were influenced by emotional valence and condition. In the no-gap condition, SRTs were longer after viewing unpleasant pictures. In the gap-200 condition, the pattern was reversed, and unpleasant pictures induced shorter SRTs in relation to neutral pictures. Furthermore, the influence of unpleasant pictures gradually decreased when images were re-exposed to the participants - affective habituation. The results are discussed in terms of attentional avoidance and disengagement from unpleasant emotional pictures. PMID:24177247

  20. 7Li-induced reactions for fast-timing with LaBr3:Ce detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, P. J. R.; Podolyàk, Zs.; Mǎrginean, N.; Regan, P. H.; Alexander, T.; Algora, A.; Alharbi, T.; Bowry, M.; Britton, R.; Bucurescu, D.; Bruce, A. M.; Bunce, M.; Cǎta-Danil, G.; Cǎta-Danil, I.; Cooper, N.; Deleanu, D.; Delion, D.; Filipescu, D.; Gelletly, W.; Glodariu, T.; Gheorghe, I.; Ghiťǎ, D.; Ilie, G.; Ivanova, D.; Kisyov, S.; Lalkovski, S.; Lica, R.; Liddick, S. N.; Mǎrginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Mulholland, K.; Negret, A.; Nita, C. R.; Rice, S.; Roberts, O. J.; Sava, T.; Smith, J. F.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stevenson, P. D.; Stroe, L.; Toma, S.; Townsley, C.; Werner, V.; Wilson, E.; Wood, R. T.; Zamfir, N. V.; Zhekova, M.

    2012-10-01

    7Li induced-reactions have been used with a 186W target to populate nuclei around A˜180-190 at the National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering in Bucharest, Romania. An array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) and cerium-doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) detectors have been used to measure sub-nanosecond half-lives with fast-timing techniques. The yrast 2+ state in 190Os was measured to be t1/2 = 375(20)ps, in excellent agreement with the literature value. The previously unreported half-life of the 564-keV state in 189Ir has also been measured and a value of t1/2 = 540(100)ps ps obtained.

  1. Rethinking spontaneous giving: Extreme time pressure and ego-depletion favor self-regarding reactions

    PubMed Central

    Capraro, Valerio; Cococcioni, Giorgia

    2016-01-01

    Previous experimental studies suggest that cooperation in one-shot anonymous interactions is, on average, spontaneous, rather than calculative. To explain this finding, it has been proposed that people internalize cooperative heuristics in their everyday life and bring them as intuitive strategies in new and atypical situations. Yet, these studies have important limitations, as they promote intuitive responses using weak time pressure or conceptual priming of intuition. Since these manipulations do not deplete participants’ ability to reason completely, it remains unclear whether cooperative heuristics are really automatic or they emerge after a small, but positive, amount of deliberation. Consistent with the latter hypothesis, we report two experiments demonstrating that spontaneous reactions in one-shot anonymous interactions tend to be egoistic. In doing so, our findings shed further light on the cognitive underpinnings of cooperation, as they suggest that cooperation in one-shot interactions is not automatic, but appears only at later stages of reasoning. PMID:27251762

  2. How Does the Driver’s Perception Reaction Time Affect the Performances of Crash Surrogate Measures?

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Yan; Qu, Xiaobo; Weng, Jinxian; Etemad-Shahidi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    With the merit on representing traffic conflict through examining the crash mechanism and causality proactively, crash surrogate measures have long been proposed and applied to evaluate the traffic safety. However, the driver’s Perception-Reaction Time (PRT), an important variable in crash mechanism, has not been considered widely into surrogate measures. In this regard, it is important to know how the PRT affects the performances of surrogate indicators. To this end, three widely used surrogate measures are firstly modified by involving the PRT into their crash mechanisms. Then, in order to examine the difference caused by the PRT, a comparative study is carried out on a freeway section of the Pacific Motorway, Australia. This result suggests that the surrogate indicators’ performances in representing rear-end crash risks are improved with the incorporating of the PRT for the investigated section. PMID:26398416

  3. Left anterior cingulate activity predicts intra-individual reaction time variability in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Beth P; Pinar, Ari; Fornito, Alex; Nandam, L Sanjay; Hester, Robert; Bellgrove, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    Within-subject, or intra-individual, variability in reaction time (RT) is increasingly recognised as an important indicator of the efficiency of attentional control, yet there have been few investigations of the neural correlates of trial-to-trial RT variability in healthy adults. We sought to determine the neural correlates of intra-individual RT variability during a go/no-go response inhibition task in 27 healthy, male participants. We found that reduced trial-to-trial RT variability (i.e. greater response stability) was significantly associated with greater activation in the left pregenual anterior cingulate. These results support the role of the left anterior cingulate in the dynamic control of attention and efficient response selection. Greater understanding of intra-individual RT variability and top-down attentional control in healthy adults may help to inform disorders that impact executive/attentional control, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. PMID:25791710

  4. The structure of motor programming: evidence from reaction times and lateralized readiness potentials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Sommer, Werner; Masaki, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    There is a widely accepted notion that movement elements are assembled prior to movement execution in a central motor programming stage. However, it is not clear how this stage is structured-whether it is a unitary stage allowing different motor parameters to cross talk or whether there are several independent processes dealing with each motor parameter. We addressed this question by orthogonally manipulating two movement-related factors: response sequence complexity and movement duration. Both factors yielded main effects on reaction time but no interaction. Additive effects of both factors on the onsets of response- but not stimulus-synchronized lateralized readiness potentials suggest separable motoric loci of sequence complexity and duration. These findings are at variance with the notion of a unitary movement programming stage. PMID:25082470

  5. Rethinking spontaneous giving: Extreme time pressure and ego-depletion favor self-regarding reactions.

    PubMed

    Capraro, Valerio; Cococcioni, Giorgia

    2016-01-01

    Previous experimental studies suggest that cooperation in one-shot anonymous interactions is, on average, spontaneous, rather than calculative. To explain this finding, it has been proposed that people internalize cooperative heuristics in their everyday life and bring them as intuitive strategies in new and atypical situations. Yet, these studies have important limitations, as they promote intuitive responses using weak time pressure or conceptual priming of intuition. Since these manipulations do not deplete participants' ability to reason completely, it remains unclear whether cooperative heuristics are really automatic or they emerge after a small, but positive, amount of deliberation. Consistent with the latter hypothesis, we report two experiments demonstrating that spontaneous reactions in one-shot anonymous interactions tend to be egoistic. In doing so, our findings shed further light on the cognitive underpinnings of cooperation, as they suggest that cooperation in one-shot interactions is not automatic, but appears only at later stages of reasoning. PMID:27251762

  6. 1/f Noise Through Retino-Cortical Pathways Assessed By Reaction Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2009-04-01

    Certain process in the brain exhibits intrinsic fluctuations that follow flicker noise close to 1/f Fourier spectra. Examples are found from ion-channels to visual psychophysics. In the latter, modern mental chronometry plays a central role by reaction times (RT). Here we examine the existence of flicker noise in RT taking into account the first stages of color coding. Stimuli were isolated along the cardinal directions in the color space. Although the power spectral density of the RT series scales inversely with the cell size, in all cases the exponent was close to unity. Our results suggest that 1/f long-term correlations share a common mechanism from photoreceptors to the visual cortex.

  7. The Relationship between Saccadic Choice and Reaction Times with Manipulations of Target Value.

    PubMed

    Milstein, David M; Dorris, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    Choosing the option with the highest expected value (EV; reward probability × reward magnitude) maximizes the intake of reward under conditions of uncertainty. However, human economic choices indicate that our value calculation has a subjective component whereby probability and reward magnitude are not linearly weighted. Using a similar economic framework, our goal was to characterize how subjective value influences the generation of simple motor actions. Specifically, we hypothesized that attributes of saccadic eye movements could provide insight into how rhesus monkeys, a well-studied animal model in cognitive neuroscience, subjectively value potential visual targets. In the first experiment, monkeys were free to choose by directing a saccade toward one of two simultaneously displayed targets, each of which had an uncertain outcome. In this task, choices were more likely to be allocated toward the higher valued target. In the second experiment, only one of the two possible targets appeared on each trial. In this task, saccadic reaction times (SRTs) decreased toward the higher valued target. Reward magnitude had a much stronger influence on both choices and SRTs than probability, whose effect was observed only when reward magnitude was similar for both targets. Across EV blocks, a strong relationship was observed between choice preferences and SRTs. However, choices tended to maximize at skewed values whereas SRTs varied more continuously. Lastly, SRTs were unchanged when all reward magnitudes were 1×, 1.5×, and 2× their normal amount, indicating that saccade preparation was influenced by the relative value of the targets rather than the absolute value of any single-target. We conclude that value is not only an important factor( )for deliberative decision making in primates, but also for the selection and preparation of simple motor actions, such as saccadic eye movements. More precisely, our results indicate that, under conditions of uncertainty

  8. Cybersickness provoked by head-mounted display affects cutaneous vascular tone, heart rate and reaction time.

    PubMed

    Nalivaiko, Eugene; Davis, Simon L; Blackmore, Karen L; Vakulin, Andrew; Nesbitt, Keith V

    2015-11-01

    Evidence from studies of provocative motion indicates that motion sickness is tightly linked to the disturbances of thermoregulation. The major aim of the current study was to determine whether provocative visual stimuli (immersion into the virtual reality simulating rides on a rollercoaster) affect skin temperature that reflects thermoregulatory cutaneous responses, and to test whether such stimuli alter cognitive functions. In 26 healthy young volunteers wearing head-mounted display (Oculus Rift), simulated rides consistently provoked vection and nausea, with a significant difference between the two versions of simulation software (Parrot Coaster and Helix). Basal finger temperature had bimodal distribution, with low-temperature group (n=8) having values of 23-29 °C, and high-temperature group (n=18) having values of 32-36 °C. Effects of cybersickness on finger temperature depended on the basal level of this variable: in subjects from former group it raised by 3-4 °C, while in most subjects from the latter group it either did not change or transiently reduced by 1.5-2 °C. There was no correlation between the magnitude of changes in the finger temperature and nausea score at the end of simulated ride. Provocative visual stimulation caused prolongation of simple reaction time by 20-50 ms; this increase closely correlated with the subjective rating of nausea. Lastly, in subjects who experienced pronounced nausea, heart rate was elevated. We conclude that cybersickness is associated with changes in cutaneous thermoregulatory vascular tone; this further supports the idea of a tight link between motion sickness and thermoregulation. Cybersickness-induced prolongation of reaction time raises obvious concerns regarding the safety of this technology. PMID:26340855

  9. Using Reaction Time and Equal Latency Contours to Derive Auditory Weighting Functions in Sea Lions and Dolphins.

    PubMed

    Finneran, James J; Mulsow, Jason; Schlundt, Carolyn E

    2016-01-01

    Subjective loudness measurements are used to create equal-loudness contours and auditory weighting functions for human noise-mitigation criteria; however, comparable direct measurements of subjective loudness with animal subjects are difficult to conduct. In this study, simple reaction time to pure tones was measured as a proxy for subjective loudness in a Tursiops truncatus and Zalophus californianus. Contours fit to equal reaction-time curves were then used to estimate the shapes of auditory weighting functions. PMID:26610970

  10. Temporal evolution of oscillatory activity predicts performance in a choice-reaction time reaching task.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, Bernardo; Moisello, Clara; Landsness, Eric C; Kvint, Svetlana; Pruski, April; Onofrj, Marco; Tononi, Giulio; Ghilardi, M Felice

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we characterized the patterns and timing of cortical activation of visually guided movements in a task with critical temporal demands. In particular, we investigated the neural correlates of motor planning and on-line adjustments of reaching movements in a choice-reaction time task. High-density electroencephalography (EEG, 256 electrodes) was recorded in 13 subjects performing reaching movements. The topography of the movement-related spectral perturbation was established across five 250-ms temporal windows (from prestimulus to postmovement) and five frequency bands (from theta to beta). Nine regions of interest were then identified on the scalp, and their activity was correlated with specific behavioral outcomes reflecting motor planning and on-line adjustments. Phase coherence analysis was performed between selected sites. We found that motor planning and on-line adjustments share similar topography in a fronto-parietal network, involving mostly low frequency bands. In addition, activities in the high and low frequency ranges have differential function in the modulation of attention with the former reflecting the prestimulus, top-down processes needed to promote timely responses, and the latter the planning and control of sensory-motor processes. PMID:21047934

  11. Cost-effectiveness of one-time genetic testing to minimize lifetime adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Alagoz, O; Durham, D; Kasirajan, K

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of one-time pharmacogenomic testing for preventing adverse drug reactions (ADRs) over a patient's lifetime. We developed a Markov-based Monte Carlo microsimulation model to represent the ADR events in the lifetime of each patient. The base-case considered a 40-year-old patient. We measured health outcomes in life years (LYs) and quality-adjusted LYs (QALYs) and estimated costs using 2013 US$. In the base-case, one-time genetic testing had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $43 165 (95% confidence interval (CI) is ($42 769,$43 561)) per additional LY and $53 680 per additional QALY (95% CI is ($53 182,$54 179)), hence under the base-case one-time genetic testing is cost-effective. The ICER values were most sensitive to the average probability of death due to ADR, reduction in ADR rate due to genetic testing, mean ADR rate and cost of genetic testing. PMID:25987241

  12. Multi-capillary-column proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry☆

    PubMed Central

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Fischer, Lukas; Herbig, Jens; Ager, Clemes; Amann, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (PTR-TOFMS) exhibits high selectivity with a resolution of around 5000 m/Δm. While isobars can be separated with this resolution, discrimination of isomeric compounds is usually not possible. The coupling of a multi-capillary column (MCC) with a PTR-TOFMS overcomes these problems as demonstrated in this paper for the ketone isomers 3-heptanone and 2-methyl-3-hexanone and for different aldehydes. Moreover, fragmentation of compounds can be studied in detail which might even improve the identification. LODs for compounds tested are in the range of low ppbv and peak positions of the respective separated substances show good repeatability (RSD of the peak positions <3.2%). Due to its special characteristics, such as isothermal operation, compact size, the MCC setup is suitable to be installed inside the instrument and the overall retention time for a complete spectrum is only a few minutes: this allows near real-time measurements in the optional MCC mode. In contrast to other methods that yield additional separation, such as the use of pre-cursor ions other than H3O+, this method yields additional information without increasing complexity. PMID:24119758

  13. Cortical Components of Reaction-Time during Perceptual Decisions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dmochowski, Jacek P.; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of perceptual decision-making are frequently studied through measurements of reaction time (RT). Classical sequential-sampling models (SSMs) of decision-making posit RT as the sum of non-overlapping sensory, evidence accumulation, and motor delays. In contrast, recent empirical evidence hints at a continuous-flow paradigm in which multiple motor plans evolve concurrently with the accumulation of sensory evidence. Here we employ a trial-to-trial reliability-based component analysis of encephalographic data acquired during a random-dot motion task to directly image continuous flow in the human brain. We identify three topographically distinct neural sources whose dynamics exhibit contemporaneous ramping to time-of-response, with the rate and duration of ramping discriminating fast and slow responses. Only one of these sources, a parietal component, exhibits dependence on strength-of-evidence. The remaining two components possess topographies consistent with origins in the motor system, and their covariation with RT overlaps in time with the evidence accumulation process. After fitting the behavioral data to a popular SSM, we find that the model decision variable is more closely matched to the combined activity of the three components than to their individual activity. Our results emphasize the role of motor variability in shaping RT distributions on perceptual decision tasks, suggesting that physiologically plausible computational accounts of perceptual decision-making must model the concurrent nature of evidence accumulation and motor planning. PMID:26599741

  14. The effects of baseball bat mass properties on swing mechanics, ground reaction forces, and swing timing.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Walter A; Fleisig, Glenn S; Aune, Kyle T; Diffendaffer, Alek Z

    2016-01-01

    Swing trajectory and ground reaction forces (GRF) of 30 collegiate baseball batters hitting a pitched ball were compared between a standard bat, a bat with extra weight about its barrel, and a bat with extra weight in its handle. It was hypothesised that when compared to a standard bat, only a handle-weighted bat would produce equivalent bat kinematics. It was also hypothesised that hitters would not produce equivalent GRFs for each weighted bat, but would maintain equivalent timing when compared to a standard bat. Data were collected utilising a 500 Hz motion capture system and 1,000 Hz force plate system. Data between bats were considered equivalent when the 95% confidence interval of the difference was contained entirely within ±5% of the standard bat mean value. The handle-weighted bat had equivalent kinematics, whereas the barrel-weighted bat did not. Both weighted bats had equivalent peak GRF variables. Neither weighted bat maintained equivalence in the timing of bat kinematics and some peak GRFs. The ability to maintain swing kinematics with a handle-weighted bat may have implications for swing training and warm-up. However, altered timings of kinematics and kinetics require further research to understand the implications on returning to a conventionally weighted bat. PMID:26836969

  15. Photochemical dissolution of Turkish lignites in tetralin at different irradiation power and reaction times

    SciTech Connect

    F. Karacan; T. Torul

    2007-08-15

    The effect of the power of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the tetrahydrofuran (THF) solubles yield (the total soluble product) and the soluble product distribution of the dissolution of Turkish lignites (Beypazari and Tuncbilek lignite) in tetralin at ambient temperatures has been investigated. The lignite samples were exposed to UV irradiation for 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10 days in the power of irradiation ranging from 0 to 180 W at 60 W intervals. The yields of THF solubles and oils increased with increasing irradiation power and time. The optimum irradiation power depends on the irradiation time to obtain the highest degradation products. However, the yield of degradation products depends also on the lignite type. The largest fraction obtained from lignites by photochemical energy is oil. While the yields of THF solubles and oils sharply increased with irradiation power at longer reaction times, the yields of asphaltenes (AS) slightly decreased. Increasing oil yields is relatively larger when AS yields tend to decrease. These trends of AS and oil yields are ascribable to conversion of AS to oils at higher power. Small changes were observed in the PAS yields under all conditions. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Adsorption, thermal reaction, and desorption of disilane on Ge(111)-[ital c](2[times]8)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.; Hirschorn, E.S.; Miller, T.; Chiang, T. Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, 104 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801-2902 )

    1994-01-15

    Room-temperature adsorption of disilane (Si[sub 2]H[sub 6]) on Ge(111)-[ital c](2[times]8) and subsequent thermal reactions and desorption at elevated temperatures were studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and core-level photoemission. The initial adsorption results in the formation of various surface radicals, and the reacted areas on the surface grow laterally for increasing exposures. The sticking coefficient is rather low, and an exposure greater than about 30 000 langmuirs is needed to saturate the surface. The net amount of Si deposited for the saturated surface is about one-half of an atomic layer. Thermal annealing causes the hydrogen atoms to desorb and the Si atoms to move below the surface. For annealing temperatures beyond about 630 K, the desorption of hydrogen becomes complete, all of the Si atoms move below the surface, and the resulting surface resembles the starting clean Ge(111)-[ital c](2[times]8) surface except that the [ital c](2[times]8) long-range order is partially destroyed. Step flow and island coarsening, similar to growth by molecular-beam epitaxy, are observed.

  17. Site selectivity in the reaction of Si(111)-(7 times 7) with Si sub 2 H sub 6

    SciTech Connect

    Avouris, Ph.; Bozso, F. )

    1990-03-22

    We find that the reaction of disilane with the Si(111)-(7{times}7) surface shows strong site selectivity. The reaction involves the fission of the Si-Si bond of Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} even at low temperatures and occurs preferentially at rest-atom sites of the 7{times}7 surface. The reaction of the products of the thermal dissociation of the surface-bound SiH{sub x} groups with surface dangling-bond sites is also site selective. We propose mechanisms to explain the above observations.

  18. Time-dependent insulin oligomer reaction pathway prior to fibril formation: Cooling and seeding

    PubMed Central

    Sorci, Mirco; Grassucci, Robert A.; Hahn, Ingrid; Frank, Joachim; Belfort, Georges

    2009-01-01

    The difficulty in identifying the toxic agents in all amyloid-related diseases is likely due to the complicated kinetics and thermodynamics of the nucleation process and subsequent fibril formation. The slow progression of these diseases suggests that the formation, incorporation and/or action of toxic agents is possibly rate limiting. Candidate toxic agents include precursors (some at very low concentrations), also called oligomers and protofibrils, and the fibrils. Here, we investigate the kinetic and thermodynamic behavior of human insulin oligomers (imaged by cryo-EM) under fibril forming conditions (pH 1.6 and 65°C) by probing the reaction pathway to insulin fibril formation using two different types of experiments – cooling and seeding – and confirm the validity of the nucleation model and its effect on fibril growth. The results from both the cooling and seeding studies confirm the existence of a time-changing oligomer reaction process prior to fibril formation that likely involves a rate-limiting nucleation process followed by structural rearrangements of intermediates (into β-sheet rich entities) to form oligomers that then form fibrils. The latter structural rearrangement step occurs even in the absence of nuclei (i.e. with added heterologous seeds). Nuclei are formed at the fibrillation conditions (pH 1.6 and 65°C) but are also continuously formed during cooling at pH 1.6 and 25°C. Within the time-scale of the experiments, only after increasing the temperature to 65°C are the trapped insulin nuclei and resultant structures able to induce the structural rearrangement step and overcome the energy barrier to form fibrils. This delay in fibrillation and accumulation of nuclei at low temperature (25°C), result in a decrease in the mean length of the fibers when placed at 65°C. Fits of an empirical model to the data provide quantitative measures of the delay in the lag-time during the nucleation process and subsequent reduction in fibril growth rate

  19. Comparative Study of Cl-Atom Reactions in Solution Using Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Yoon; Case, Amanda S; Crim, F Fleming

    2016-04-28

    A Cl atom can react with 2,3-dimethylbutane (DMB), 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene (DMBE), and 2,5-dimethyl-2,4-hexadiene (DMHD) in solution via a hydrogen-abstraction reaction. The large exoergicity of the reaction between a Cl atom and alkenes (DMBE and DMHD) makes vibrational excitation of the HCl product possible, and we observe the formation of vibrationally excited HCl (v = 1) for both reactions. In CCl4, the branching fractions of HCl (v = 1), Γ (v = 1), for the Cl-atom reactions with DMBE and DMHD are 0.14 and 0.23, respectively, reflecting an increased amount of vibrational excitation in the products of the more exoergic reaction. In addition, Γ (v = 1) for both reactions is larger in the solvent CDCl3, being 0.23 and 0.40, as the less viscous solvent apparently dampens the vibrational excitation of the nascent HCl less effectively. The bimolecular reaction rates for the Cl reactions with DMB, DMBE, and DMHD in CCl4 are diffusion limited (having rate constants of 1.5 × 10(10), 3.6 × 10(10), and 17.5 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), respectively). In fact, the bimolecular reaction rate for Cl + DMHD exceeds a typical diffusion-limited reaction rate, implying that the attractive intermolecular forces between a Cl atom and a C═C bond increase the rate of favorable encounters. The 2-fold increase in the reaction rate of the Cl + DMBE reaction from that of the Cl + DMB reaction likely reflects the effect of the C═C bond, while both the number of C═C bonds and the molecular geometry likely play a role in the large reaction rate of the Cl + DMHD reaction. PMID:27046419

  20. Production-passage-time approximation: a new approximation method to accelerate the simulation process of enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Myers, Chris J

    2008-09-01

    Given the substantial computational requirements of stochastic simulation, approximation is essential for efficient analysis of any realistic biochemical system. This paper introduces a new approximation method to reduce the computational cost of stochastic simulations of an enzymatic reaction scheme which in biochemical systems often includes rapidly changing fast reactions with enzyme and enzyme-substrate complex molecules present in very small counts. Our new method removes the substrate dissociation reaction by approximating the passage time of the formation of each enzyme-substrate complex molecule which is destined to a production reaction. This approach skips the firings of unimportant yet expensive reaction events, resulting in a substantial acceleration in the stochastic simulations of enzymatic reactions. Additionally, since all the parameters used in our new approach can be derived by the Michaelis-Menten parameters which can actually be measured from experimental data, applications of this approximation can be practical even without having full knowledge of the underlying enzymatic reaction. Here, we apply this new method to various enzymatic reaction systems, resulting in a speedup of orders of magnitude in temporal behavior analysis without any significant loss in accuracy. Furthermore, we show that our new method can perform better than some of the best existing approximation methods for enzymatic reactions in terms of accuracy and efficiency. PMID:18662102

  1. Switching between hands in a serial reaction time task: a comparison between young and old adults

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Maike; Trapp, Sabrina; Kaminski, Elisabeth; Sehm, Bernhard; Steele, Christopher J.; Villringer, Arno; Ragert, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Healthy aging is associated with a variety of functional and structural brain alterations. These age-related brain alterations have been assumed to negatively impact cognitive and motor performance. Especially important for the execution of everyday activities in older adults (OA) is the ability to perform movements that depend on both hands working together. However, bimanual coordination is typically deteriorated with increasing age. Hence, a deeper understanding of such age-related brain-behavior alterations might offer the opportunity to design future interventional studies in order to delay or even prevent the decline in cognitive and/or motor performance over the lifespan. Here, we examined to what extent the capability to acquire and maintain a novel bimanual motor skill is still preserved in healthy OA as compared to their younger peers (YA). For this purpose, we investigated performance of OA (n = 26) and YA (n = 26) in a bimanual serial reaction time task (B-SRTT), on two experimental sessions, separated by 1 week. We found that even though OA were generally slower in global response times, they showed preserved learning capabilities in the B-SRTT. However, sequence specific learning was more pronounced in YA as compared to OA. Furthermore, we found that switching between hands during B-SRTT learning trials resulted in increased response times (hand switch costs), a phenomenon that was more pronounced in OA. These hand switch costs were reduced in both groups over the time course of learning. More interestingly, there were no group differences in hand switch costs on the second training session. These results provide novel evidence that bimanual motor skill learning is capable of reducing age-related deficits in hand switch costs, a finding that might have important implications to prevent the age-related decline in sensorimotor function. PMID:26441638

  2. Changes in Vietnamese Male Smokers' Reactions Towards New Pictorial Cigarette Pack Warnings Over Time.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Tran Thu; Anh, Le Vu; My, Nguyen Thi Tuyet; Bich, Nguyen Ngoc

    2016-01-01

    Printing of pictorial health warnings (PHWs) on cigarette packages became obligatory by the Vietnam Law on Prevention and Control of Tobacco Harm in May 2013. Literature from high-income countries suggests that PHWs motivate smokers to quit smoking although their long-term effects have been questioned due to reduction of impact over time. This study aimed to assess the salience of PHWs and smokers' reactions towards PHWs over time. In May 2014 and May 2015, a cross-sectional questionnaire-based household survey was administered to respectively 1,462 and 1,509 Vietnamese male smokers aged 18 to 35. The result showed that salience of the PHWs 2 years after the implementation was higher than at the point of 1 year after the implementation. The proportion of respondents who tried to avoid noting the PHWs was reduced from 35% in wave 1 to 23% in wave 2. However, "Tried to avoid looking/thinking about the PHWs" increased 1.5 times the odds of presenting quit intention compared to those respondents who did not try to avoid looking/thinking about the PHWs (OR=1.5; 95%CI: 1.2-2.0). In conclusion, avoidance regarding PHWs may not work as a barrier when aiming at a higher level of quit intention. Salience of the PHWs may increase in the period shortly after their introduction onto packs but can be expected to decrease with time. In other words, it might be advisable to change or renew PHWs after a period of implementation to maintain their beneficial effects. PMID:27087186

  3. Fast but not intuitive, slow but not reflective: Decision conflict drives reaction times in social dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Evans, Anthony M; Dillon, Kyle D; Rand, David G

    2015-10-01

    When people have the chance to help others at a cost to themselves, are cooperative decisions driven by intuition or reflection? To answer this question, recent studies have tested the relationship between reaction times (RTs) and cooperation, reporting both positive and negative correlations. To reconcile this apparent contradiction, we argue that decision conflict (rather than the use of intuition vs. reflection) drives response times, leading to an inverted-U shaped relationship between RT and cooperation. Studies 1 through 3 show that intermediate decisions take longer than both extremely selfish and extremely cooperative decisions. Studies 4 and 5 find that the conflict between self-interested and cooperative motives explains individual differences in RTs. Manipulating conflictedness causes longer RTs and more intermediate decisions, and RTs mediate the relationship between conflict and intermediate decisions. Finally, Studies 6 and 7 demonstrate that conflict is distinct from reflection by manipulating the use of intuition (vs. reflection). Experimentally promoting reliance on intuition increases cooperation, but has no effects on decision extremity or feelings of conflictedness. In sum, we provide evidence that RTs should not be interpreted as a direct proxy for the use of intuitive or reflective processes, and dissociate the effects of conflict and reflection in social decision making. PMID:26413891

  4. A real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for detection and quantification of Vesiculovirus.

    PubMed

    Tolardo, Aline Lavado; Souza, William Marciel de; Romeiro, Marilia Farignoli; Vieira, Luiz Carlos; Luna, Luciano Kleber de Souza; Henriques, Dyana Alves; Araujo, Jansen de; Siqueira, Carlos Eduardo Hassegawa; Colombo, Tatiana Elias; Aquino, Victor Hugo; Fonseca, Benedito Antonio Lopes da; Bronzoni, Roberta Vieira de Morais; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda; Durigon, Edison Luiz; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2016-06-01

    Vesiculoviruses (VSV) are zoonotic viruses that cause vesicular stomatitis disease in cattle, horses and pigs, as well as sporadic human cases of acute febrile illness. Therefore, diagnosis of VSV infections by reliable laboratory techniques is important to allow a proper case management and implementation of strategies for the containment of virus spread. We show here a sensitive and reproducible real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection and quantification of VSV. The assay was evaluated with arthropods and serum samples obtained from horses, cattle and patients with acute febrile disease. The real-time RT-PCR amplified the Piry, Carajas, Alagoas and Indiana Vesiculovirus at a melting temperature 81.02 ± 0.8ºC, and the sensitivity of assay was estimated in 10 RNA copies/mL to the Piry Vesiculovirus. The viral genome has been detected in samples of horses and cattle, but not detected in human sera or arthropods. Thus, this assay allows a preliminary differential diagnosis of VSV infections. PMID:27276185

  5. Rapid enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes in artificially contaminated cabbage using real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Hough, Angela J; Harbison, Sally-Ann; Savill, Marion G; Melton, Laurence D; Fletcher, Graham

    2002-08-01

    A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection method specific for Listeria monocytogenes was developed, and studies involving pure culture showed that the response of the assay was linear over 7 log10 (log) cycles. The method was then applied to the detection of L. monocytogenes artificially inoculated onto cabbage, a vegetable chosen because it is a major component of coleslaw, which has been associated with an outbreak of listeriosis. After being allowed to attach to the food, cells were washed from the cabbage leaf surface and recovered by centrifugation. The DNA was purified by an organic solvent extraction technique and analyzed by real-time PCR. In this matrix, the method again produced a linear response over 7 log cycles from 1.4 x 10(2) to 1.4 x 10(9) CFU of L. monocytogenes in 25 g of cabbage, and analysis of the reproducibility of the system showed that log differences in L. monocytogenes numbers added to cabbage could be reliably distinguished. The system allowed quantitative results to be obtained within 8 h and was relatively inexpensive, showing good potential for routine analytical use. PMID:12182489

  6. Trends and advances in food analysis by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Salihah, Nur Thaqifah; Hossain, Mohammad Mosharraf; Lubis, Hamadah; Ahmed, Minhaz Uddin

    2016-05-01

    Analyses to ensure food safety and quality are more relevant now because of rapid changes in the quantity, diversity and mobility of food. Food-contamination must be determined to maintain health and up-hold laws, as well as for ethical and cultural concerns. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), a rapid and inexpensive quantitative method to detect the presence of targeted DNA-segments in samples, helps in determining both accidental and intentional adulterations of foods by biological contaminants. This review presents recent developments in theory, techniques, and applications of RT-PCR in food analyses, RT-PCR addresses the limitations of traditional food analyses in terms of sensitivity, range of analytes, multiplexing ability, cost, time, and point-of-care applications. A range of targets, including species of plants or animals which are used as food ingredients, food-borne bacteria or viruses, genetically modified organisms, and allergens, even in highly processed foods can be identified by RT-PCR, even at very low concentrations. Microfluidic RT-PCR eliminates the separate sample-processing step to create opportunities for point-of-care analyses. We also cover the challenges related to using RT-PCR for food analyses, such as the need to further improve sample handling. PMID:27407185

  7. White and grey matter relations to simple, choice, and cognitive reaction time in spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Maureen; Cirino, Paul T; Simic, Nevena; Juranek, Jenifer; Taylor, W Pat; Fletcher, Jack M

    2016-03-01

    Elevated reaction time (RT) is common in brain disorders. We studied three forms of RT in a neurodevelopmental disorder, spina bifida myelomeningocele (SBM), characterized by regional alterations of both white and grey matter, and typically developing individuals aged 8 to 48 years, in order to establish the nature of the lifespan-relations of RT and brain variables. Cognitive accuracy and RT speed and variability were all impaired in SBM relative to the typically developing group, but the most important effects of SBM on RT are seen on tasks that require a cognitive decision rule. Individuals with SBM are impaired not only in speeded performance, but also in the consistency of their performance on tasks that extend over time, which may contribute to poor performance on a range of cognitive tasks. The group with SBM showed smaller corrected corpus callosum proportions, larger corrected cerebellar white matter proportions, and larger corrected proportions for grey matter in the Central Executive and Salience networks. There were clear negative relations between RT measures and corpus callosum, Central Executive, and Default Mode networks in the group with SBM; relations were not observed in typically developing age peers. Statistical mediation analyses indicated that corpus callosum and Central Executive Network were important mediators. While RT is known to rely heavily on white matter under conditions of typical development and in individuals with adult-onset brain injury, we add the new information that additional involvement of grey matter may be important for a key neuropsychological function in a common neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:26040977

  8. A real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for detection and quantification of Vesiculovirus

    PubMed Central

    Tolardo, Aline Lavado; de Souza, William Marciel; Romeiro, Marilia Farignoli; Vieira, Luiz Carlos; Luna, Luciano Kleber de Souza; Henriques, Dyana Alves; de Araujo, Jansen; Siqueira, Carlos Eduardo Hassegawa; Colombo, Tatiana Elias; Aquino, Victor Hugo; da Fonseca, Benedito Antonio Lopes; Bronzoni, Roberta Vieira de Morais; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda; Durigon, Edison Luiz; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Vesiculoviruses (VSV) are zoonotic viruses that cause vesicular stomatitis disease in cattle, horses and pigs, as well as sporadic human cases of acute febrile illness. Therefore, diagnosis of VSV infections by reliable laboratory techniques is important to allow a proper case management and implementation of strategies for the containment of virus spread. We show here a sensitive and reproducible real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection and quantification of VSV. The assay was evaluated with arthropods and serum samples obtained from horses, cattle and patients with acute febrile disease. The real-time RT-PCR amplified the Piry, Carajas, Alagoas and Indiana Vesiculovirus at a melting temperature 81.02 ± 0.8ºC, and the sensitivity of assay was estimated in 10 RNA copies/mL to the Piry Vesiculovirus. The viral genome has been detected in samples of horses and cattle, but not detected in human sera or arthropods. Thus, this assay allows a preliminary differential diagnosis of VSV infections. PMID:27276185

  9. Solid-state reaction between p-benzoquinone and 4,4'-biphenol: a THz time-domain spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guifeng; Zhao, Hongwei; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Wenfeng

    2011-07-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) was employed to record the progress of the reaction between p-benzoquinone (BQ) and 4,4'-biphenol (4BP) in the solid state. Through the THz-TDS, distinct absorption peaks of reactants and products were obtained. Sample preparations in the solid state, with and without grinding, influenced the conversion kinetics. Several kinetic equations or models were tried to fit the reaction data. A kinetic rate constant was obtained, with the reaction observed to be consistent with diffusion-controlled mechanisms. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffraction analyses were also used to characterize the solid-state reaction and products. The study shows that THz spectroscopy is a promising tool in evaluating the complex formation through solid-state reactions.

  10. Effect of Acute Exercise on Clinically Measured Reaction Time in Collegiate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Shailesh; Eckner, James T.; Kutcher, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We have developed a reliable and valid clinical test of reaction time (RTclin) that is sensitive to the acute effects of concussion. If RTclin is to be used as a sideline concussion assessment tool then the acute effects of exercise on RTclin may need to be controlled for. The purpose of this study is therefore to determine the effect of exercise on RTclin. Methods A gender balanced group of 42 collegiate athletes were assigned to an exercise (n=28) and a control (n=14) group using 2:1 block randomization. The exercise group completed a graded 4-stage exercise protocol on a stationary bicycle (100W × 5min; 150W × 5min; 200W × 5min; sprint × 2min) while the control group was tested at identical time periods without exercising. Mean RTclin was calculated over 8 trials as the fall time of a vertically-suspended rigid shaft after its release by the examiner before being caught by the athlete; RTclin was measured at baseline and after each of the 4 stages. Results As both heart rate and rate of perceived exertion significantly increased over the 4 stages in the exercise group (p<.001), mean RTclin showed a significant overall decline during repeated test administration (p<.008). However, there were no significant group (exercise vs. control, p=0.822) or group-by-stage interaction (p=0.169) effects on RTclin as assessed by repeated measures analysis of variance. Conclusion Exercise did not appear to affect RTclin performance in this study. This suggests that RTclin measured during a sideline concussion assessment does not need to be adjusted to account for the acute effects of exercise. PMID:24002343

  11. On the Implications of a Sex Difference in the Reaction Times of Sprinters at the Beijing Olympics

    PubMed Central

    Lipps, David B.; Galecki, Andrzej T.; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Elite sprinters offer insights into the fastest whole body auditory reaction times. When, however, is a reaction so fast that it represents a false start? Currently, a false start is awarded if an athlete increases the force on their starting block above a given threshold before 100 ms has elapsed after the starting gun. To test the hypothesis that the fastest valid reaction times of sprinters really is 100 ms and that no sex difference exists in that time, we analyzed the fastest reaction times achieved by each of the 425 male and female sprinters who competed at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. After power transformation of the skewed data, a fixed effects ANOVA was used to analyze the effects of sex, race, round and lane position. The lower bounds of the 95, 99 and 99.9% confidence intervals were then calculated and back transformed. The mean fastest reaction time recorded by men was significantly faster than women (p<0.001). At the 99.9% confidence level, neither men nor women can react in 100 ms, but they can react in as little as 109 ms and 121 ms, respectively. However, that sex difference in reaction time is likely an artifact caused by using the same force threshold in women as men, and it permits a woman to false start by up to 21 ms without penalty. We estimate that female sprinters would have similar reaction times to male sprinters if the force threshold used at Beijing was lowered by 22% in order to account for their lesser muscle strength. PMID:22039438

  12. Placing Inspection Time, Reaction Time, and Perceptual Speed in the Broader Context of Cognitive Ability: The VPR Model in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; Deary, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    The idea that information processing speed is related to cognitive ability has a long history. Much evidence has been amassed in its support, with respect to both individual differences in general intelligence and developmental trajectories. Two so-called elementary cognitive tasks, reaction time and inspection time, have been used to compile this…

  13. Semen characteristics and reaction time of Yankasa rams experimentally infected with Trypanosoma evansi infection.

    PubMed

    Ogundele, Francis Abidemi; Okubanjo, Oluyinka Oluseyi; Ajanusi, Olagunju Joseph; Fadason, Samuel Tanko

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosomosis is a serious, often fatal disease of domestic animals and humans, and a major constraint to livestock productivity and agricultural development in areas of Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and Asia. It is caused by hemoflagelate protozoan of the genus Trypanosoma. Several species of Trypanosoma such as Trypanosoma congolense, Trypanosoma vivax, Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma evansi are known to infect domestic animals. Trypanosoma evansi is one of the most widespread pathogenic trypanosomes in the world causing disease known as "Surra" in animals. The effects of experimental T evansi infection on some aspects of reproduction in Yankasa rams were investigated over a 108-day period. Rams in the infected group A (n = 7) were each inoculated with 1 × 10(6) trypanosomes in 1 mL of donor blood via the jugular vein, whereas the control group B (n = 5) were administered 1 mL of normal saline. Semen volume, gross motility, live and/or dead sperm ratio, sperm morphologic abnormalities, and concentration as well as reaction time of infected and control rams were evaluated on a weekly basis. The results showed a nonsignificant (P > 0.05) decrease in semen volume and a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in concentration compared to the control rams. Reaction time showed considerable significant (P < 0.05) increase from preinfection values 26.7 ± 4.54 to 94.7 ± 7.54 seconds compared to control 32.9 ± 2.64 to 33.4 ± 4.78 seconds. Furthermore, semen gross motility for infected rams differed significantly (P < 0.05) from those of the control. There was a significant surge (P < 0.05) in the total sperm morphologic abnormalities in the infected rams to 90.75 ± 2.73% by week 20 (14 weeks after infection), compared to preinfection value of 20.9 ± 0.52%. The outcome of this study suggests that infection with T evansi in Yankasa rams has far reaching severe effects on their reproductive performance. PMID:27188633

  14. In situ and real-time monitoring of mechanochemical milling reactions using synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Halasz, Ivan; Kimber, Simon A J; Beldon, Patrick J; Belenguer, Ana M; Adams, Frank; Honkimäki, Veijo; Nightingale, Richard C; Dinnebier, Robert E; Friščić, Tomislav

    2013-09-01

    We describe the only currently available protocol for in situ, real-time monitoring of mechanochemical reactions and intermediates by X-ray powder diffraction. Although mechanochemical reactions (inducing transformations by mechanical forces such as grinding and milling) are normally performed in commercially available milling assemblies, such equipment does not permit direct reaction monitoring. We now describe the design and in-house modification of milling equipment that allows the reaction jars of the operating mill to be placed in the path of a high-energy (∼90 keV) synchrotron X-ray beam while the reaction is taking place. Resulting data are analyzed using conventional software, such as TOPAS. Reaction intermediates and products are identified using the Cambridge Structural Database or Inorganic Crystal Structure Database. Reactions are analyzed by fitting the time-resolved diffractograms using structureless Pawley refinement for crystalline phases that are not fully structurally characterized (such as porous frameworks with disordered guests), or the Rietveld method for solids with fully determined crystal structures (metal oxides, coordination polymers). PMID:23949378

  15. Stabilization strategies of a general nonlinear car-following model with varying reaction-time delay of the drivers.

    PubMed

    Li, Shukai; Yang, Lixing; Gao, Ziyou; Li, Keping

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the stabilization strategies of a general nonlinear car-following model with reaction-time delay of the drivers are investigated. The reaction-time delay of the driver is time varying and bounded. By using the Lyapunov stability theory, the sufficient condition for the existence of the state feedback control strategy for the stability of the car-following model is given in the form of linear matrix inequality, under which the traffic jam can be well suppressed with respect to the varying reaction-time delay. Moreover, by considering the external disturbance for the running cars, the robust state feedback control strategy is designed, which ensures robust stability and a smaller prescribed H∞ disturbance attenuation level for the traffic flow. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:25441220

  16. Improvement of attention span and reaction time with hyperbaric oxygen treatment in patients with toxic injury due to mold exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ezra, N.; Dang, K.

    2010-01-01

    It is, by now, well established that mold toxins (mycotoxins) can cause significant adverse health effects. In this study, 15 subjects who developed an attention deficit disorder (ADD) and slowing of reaction time at the time of exposure to mold toxins were identified. Deficits in attention span and reaction time were documented not only by taking a careful history, but also by performing a Test of Variables of Attention (TOVA). The TOVA test provides an objective measure of these two variables. It was found that mold-exposed subjects show statistically significant decreases in attention span and significant increases in reaction time to stimuli compared to controls. After ten sessions of hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT), a statistically significant improvement was seen in both measures. This preliminary study suggests promising outcomes in treating mold-exposed patients with hyperbaric oxygen. PMID:20978814

  17. Fusion and neutron transfer reactions with weakly bound nuclei within time-dependent and coupled channel approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarin, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation and the coupled channel approach based on the method of perturbed stationary two-center states are used to describe nucleon transfers and fusion in low-energy nuclear reactions. Results of the cross sections calculation for the formation of the 198Au and fusion in the 6He+197Au reaction and for the formation of the 65Zn in 6He+64Zn reaction agree satisfactorily with the experimental data near the barrier. The Feynman's continual integrals calculations for a few-body systems were used for the proposal of the new form of the shell model mean field for helium isotopes.

  18. Kinetic Analysis of Parallel-Consecutive First-Order Reactions with a Reversible Step: Concentration-Time Integrals Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mucientes, A. E.; de la Pena, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The concentration-time integrals method has been used to solve kinetic equations of parallel-consecutive first-order reactions with a reversible step. This method involves the determination of the area under the curve for the concentration of a given species against time. Computer techniques are used to integrate experimental curves and the method…

  19. Dose-related effect of alcohol on mismatch negativity and reaction time performance.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, I P; Pekkonen, E; Alho, K; Sinclair, J D; Sillanaukee, P; Näätänen, R

    1995-01-01

    In a recent study, the mismatch negativity (MMN) component of auditory event-related potential, elicited by occasional frequency changes in a repetitive tone, was strongly attenuated by a low dosage of alcohol. We investigated the phenomenon in nine subjects with two different dosages of ethanol (0.35 and 0.55 g/kg), and with two magnitudes of frequency changes (5% and 10%), in a single-blind, placebo-controlled paradigm. Ethanol had no observable effect on the N1 and P2 deflections, nor on the reaction time to frequency changes measured in a separate session. However, the MMN was attenuated after administration of the larger dosage of alcohol, suggesting impaired preconscious processing of stimulus features outside the scope of attention. The results support the view according to which the automatic functions of human information processing are more sensitive than the controlled functions to the detrimental effects of alcohol. The fact that the MMN suppression was stronger when stimulus deviation was smaller indicates that at relatively low blood alcohol concentrations the detection of small deviations is especially hampered. PMID:8590608

  20. Rethinking fast and slow based on a critique of reaction-time reverse inference

    PubMed Central

    Krajbich, Ian; Bartling, Björn; Hare, Todd; Fehr, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Do people intuitively favour certain actions over others? In some dual-process research, reaction-time (RT) data have been used to infer that certain choices are intuitive. However, the use of behavioural or biological measures to infer mental function, popularly known as ‘reverse inference', is problematic because it does not take into account other sources of variability in the data, such as discriminability of the choice options. Here we use two example data sets obtained from value-based choice experiments to demonstrate that, after controlling for discriminability (that is, strength-of-preference), there is no evidence that one type of choice is systematically faster than the other. Moreover, using specific variations of a prominent value-based choice experiment, we are able to predictably replicate, eliminate or reverse previously reported correlations between RT and selfishness. Thus, our findings shed crucial light on the use of RT in inferring mental processes and strongly caution against using RT differences as evidence favouring dual-process accounts. PMID:26135809

  1. Single-trial prediction of reaction time variability from MEG brain activity.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Ryu; Ogawa, Kenji; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Neural activity prior to movement onset contains essential information for predictive assistance for humans using brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs). Even though previous studies successfully predicted different goals for upcoming movements, it is unclear whether non-invasive recording signals contain the information to predict trial-by-trial behavioral variability under the same movement. In this paper, we examined the predictability of subsequent short or long reaction times (RTs) from magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in a delayed-reach task. The difference in RTs was classified significantly above chance from 550 ms before the go-signal onset using the cortical currents in the premotor cortex. Significantly above-chance classification was performed in the lateral prefrontal and the right inferior parietal cortices at the late stage of the delay period. Thus, inter-trial variability in RTs is predictable information. Our study provides a proof-of-concept of the future development of non-invasive BMIs to prevent delayed movements. PMID:27250872

  2. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the seagrass pathogen Labyrinthula zosterae.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Nina; Fricke, Birgit; Schmidt, Martina C; Tams, Verena; Beining, Katrin; Schwitte, Hildegard; Boettcher, Anne A; Martin, Daniel L; Bockelmann, Anna-Christina; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Rauch, Gisep

    2011-11-01

    The protist Labyrinthula zosterae (Phylum Bigyra, sensu Tsui et al. 2009) has been identified as a causative agent of wasting disease in eelgrass (Zostera marina), of which the most intense outbreak led to the destruction of 90% of eelgrass beds in eastern North America and western Europe in the 1930s. Outbreaks still occur today, albeit at a smaller scale. Traditionally, L. zosterae has been quantified by measuring the necrotic area of Z. marina leaf tissue. This indirect method can however only lead to a very rough estimate of pathogen load. Here, we present a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) approach to directly detect and quantify L. zosterae in eelgrass tissue. Based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of rRNA genes, species-specific primers were designed. Using our qPCR, we were able to quantify accurately and specifically L. zosterae load both from culture and eelgrass leaves using material from Europe and North America. Our detection limit was less than one L. zosterae cell. Our results demonstrate the potential of this qPCR assay to provide rapid, accurate and sensitive molecular identification and quantification of L. zosterae. In view of declining seagrass populations worldwide, this method will provide a valuable tool for seagrass ecologists and conservation projects. PMID:21777400

  3. Determination of SFC, FFA, and equivalent reaction time for enzymatically interestified oils using NIRS.

    PubMed

    Houmøller, Lars P; Kristensen, Dorthe; Rosager, Helle

    2007-02-15

    The use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for rapid determination of the degree of interesterification of blends of palm stearin, coconut oil, and rapeseed oil obtained using an immobilized Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase at 70 degrees C was investigated. Interesterification was carried out by applying both fixed bed and batch reactors. Calibrations were developed for quantitative determination of solid fat content (SFC) at 10, 20, 30, 35, and 40 degrees C and free fatty acid (FFA) resulting in root mean square errors of prediction of 1.0, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6, 1.7, and 0.19% (w/w), respectively. The data showed that NIRS could be used to replace the traditional methods for determining FFA and SFC in vegetable oils. It was possible to monitor the activity of the immobilized enzyme for interesterification of margarine oils by predicting the equivalent reaction time in a batch reactor from NIR spectra. Root mean square errors of prediction for two different oil blends interesterified for 300 and 170min were 21 and 12min, respectively. PMID:19071387

  4. Effects of expectation and caffeine on arousal, well-being, and reaction time.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Rainer; Grüner, Mauritz; Heiland, Alexandra; Keller, Martina; Kujanová, Zuzana; Peper, Martin; Riegl, Maximilian; Schmidt, Stefan; Volz, Petra; Walach, Harald

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the impact of expectation associated with placebo and caffeine ingestion. We used a three-armed, randomized, double-blind design. Two three-armed experiments varying instruction (true, false, control) investigated the role of expectations of changes in arousal (blood pressure, heart rate), subjective well-being, and reaction time (RT). In Experiment 1 (N = 45), decaffeinated coffee was administered, and expectations were produced in one group by making them believe they had ingested caffeinated coffee. In Experiment 2 (N = 45), caffeinated orange juice was given in both experimental groups, but only one was informed about the true content. In Experiment 1, a significant effect for subjective alertness was found in the placebo treatment compared to the control group. However, for RT and well-being no significant effects were found. In Experiment 2, no significant expectancy effects were found. Caffeine produced large effects for blood pressure in both treatments compared to the control group, but the effects were larger for the false information group. For subjective well-being (alertness, calmness), considerable but nonsignificant changes were found for correctly informed participants, indicating possible additivity of pharmacologic effect and expectations. The results tentatively indicate that placebo and expectancy effects primarily show through introspection. PMID:17228991

  5. Skill-specific changes in somatosensory-evoked potentials and reaction times in baseball players.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Koya; Sato, Daisuke; Onishi, Hideaki; Yoshida, Takuya; Horiuchi, Yoko; Nakazawa, Sho; Maruyama, Atsuo

    2013-03-01

    Athletic training is known to induce neuroplastic alterations in specific somatosensory circuits, which are reflected by changes in short-latency somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs). The aim of this study is to clarify whether specific training in athletes affects the long-latency SEPs related to information processing of stimulation. The long-latency SEPs P100 and N140 were recorded at midline cortical electrode positions (Fz, Cz, and Pz) in response to stimulation of the index finger of the dominant hand in fifteen baseball players (baseball group) and in fifteen athletes in sports such as swimming, track and field events, and soccer (sports group) that do not require fine somatosensory discrimination or motor control of the hand. The long-latency SEPs were measured under a passive condition (no response required) and a reaction time (RT) condition in which subjects were instructed to rapidly push a button in response to stimulus presentation. The peak P100 and peak N140 latencies and RT were significantly shorter in the baseball group than the sports group. Moreover, there were significant positive correlations between RT and both the peak P100 and the peak N140 latencies. Specific athletic training regimens that involve the hand may induce neuroplastic alterations in the cortical hand representation areas playing a vital role in rapid sensory processing and initiation of motor responses. PMID:23224701

  6. Atomoxetine reduces anticipatory responding in a 5-choice serial reaction time task for adult zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Matthew O.; Brock, Alistair J.; Sudwarts, Ari; Brennan, Caroline H.

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in impulse control are related to a number of psychiatric diagnoses, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, addiction, and pathological gambling. Despite increases in our knowledge about the underlying neurochemical and neuroanatomical correlates, understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms is less well established. Understanding these mechanisms is essential in order to move towards individualized treatment programs and increase efficacy of interventions. Zebrafish are a very useful vertebrate model for exploring molecular processes underlying disease owing to their small size and genetic tractability. Their utility in terms of behavioral neuroscience, however, hinges on the validation and publication of reliable assays with adequate translational relevance. Here, we report an initial pharmacological validation of a fully automated zebrafish version of the commonly used five-choice serial reaction time task using a variable interval pre-stimulus interval. We found that atomoxetine reduced anticipatory responses (0.6 mg/kg), whereas a high-dose (4 mg/kg) methylphenidate increased anticipatory responses and the number of trials completed in a session. On the basis of these results, we argue that similar neurochemical processes in fish as in mammals may control impulsivity, as operationally defined by anticipatory responses on a continuous performance task such as this, making zebrafish potentially a good model for exploring the molecular basis of impulse control disorders and for first-round drug screening. PMID:24481568

  7. S-cone excitation ratios for reaction times to blue-yellow suprathreshold changes at isoluminance.

    PubMed

    Medina, José M; Díaz, José A

    2010-09-01

    We examined different contrast metrics to scale visual latencies for suprathreshold stimuli modulated along tritan confusion lines. S-cone increments ('blue') and decrements ('yellow') were isolated along two different tritan confusion lines, each one having a different luminance value. Reaction times (RT) were evaluated as a function of the Weber contrast and the S-cone excitation ratio between the test stimulus and the background. RTs were described using a model that generalizes Piéron's law and incorporates the notion of threshold units and power law scaling. Our results show that RTs for S-cone increments and decrements equate better when using the S-cone excitation ratio. However, a single function did not describe all RT data. S-cone RTs are better described by separate functions. We conclude that S-cone increments and decrements do not scale in the same manner. Both Weber contrast and the S-cone excitation ratio are plausible metrics at isoluminance. The implications for the S-cone pathways are discussed. PMID:20883334

  8. Energetics of growth of Aspergillus tamarii in a biological real-time reaction calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, Balaji; Mahadevan, Surianarayanan; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2012-03-01

    Fungal cultivation in a biological real-time reaction calorimeter (BioRTCal) is arduous due to the heterogeneous nature of the system and difficulty in optimizing the process variables. The aim of this investigation is to monitor the growth of fungi Aspergillus tamarii MTCC 5152 in a calorimeter. Experiments carried out with a spore concentration of 10(5) spores/mL indicate that the growth based on biomass and heat generation profiles was comparable to those obtained hitherto. Heat yield due to biomass growth, substrate uptake, and oxygen uptake rate was estimated from calorimetric experiments. The results would be useful in fermenter design and scale-up. Heat of combustion of fungal biomass was determined experimentally and compared to the four models reported so far. The substrate concentration had significant effects on pellet formation with variation in pellet porosity and apparent density. Metabolic heat generation is an online process variable portraying the instantaneous activity of monitoring fungal growth and BioRTCal is employed to measure the exothermic heat in a noninvasive way. PMID:22113563

  9. Intraindividual Variability in Basic Reaction Time Predicts Middle-Aged and Older Pilots’ Flight Simulator Performance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Intraindividual variability (IIV) is negatively associated with cognitive test performance and is positively associated with age and some neurological disorders. We aimed to extend these findings to a real-world task, flight simulator performance. We hypothesized that IIV predicts poorer initial flight performance and increased rate of decline in performance among middle-aged and older pilots. Method. Two-hundred and thirty-six pilots (40–69 years) completed annual assessments comprising a cognitive battery and two 75-min simulated flights in a flight simulator. Basic and complex IIV composite variables were created from measures of basic reaction time and shifting and divided attention tasks. Flight simulator performance was characterized by an overall summary score and scores on communication, emergencies, approach, and traffic avoidance components. Results. Although basic IIV did not predict rate of decline in flight performance, it had a negative association with initial performance for most flight measures. After taking into account processing speed, basic IIV explained an additional 8%–12% of the negative age effect on initial flight performance. Discussion. IIV plays an important role in real-world tasks and is another aspect of cognition that underlies age-related differences in cognitive performance. PMID:23052365

  10. Single-trial prediction of reaction time variability from MEG brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Ohata, Ryu; Ogawa, Kenji; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Neural activity prior to movement onset contains essential information for predictive assistance for humans using brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs). Even though previous studies successfully predicted different goals for upcoming movements, it is unclear whether non-invasive recording signals contain the information to predict trial-by-trial behavioral variability under the same movement. In this paper, we examined the predictability of subsequent short or long reaction times (RTs) from magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in a delayed-reach task. The difference in RTs was classified significantly above chance from 550 ms before the go-signal onset using the cortical currents in the premotor cortex. Significantly above-chance classification was performed in the lateral prefrontal and the right inferior parietal cortices at the late stage of the delay period. Thus, inter-trial variability in RTs is predictable information. Our study provides a proof-of-concept of the future development of non-invasive BMIs to prevent delayed movements. PMID:27250872

  11. Identification of four squid species by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jian; Feng, Junli; Liu, Shasha; Zhang, Yanping; Jiang, Xiaona; Dai, Zhiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Squids are distributed worldwide, including many species of commercial importance, and they are often made into varieties of flavor foods. The rapid identification methods for squid species especially their processed products, however, have not been well developed. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) systems based on specific primers and TaqMan probes have been established for rapid and accurate identification of four common squid species (Ommastrephes bartramii, Dosidicus gigas, Illex argentinus, Todarodes pacificus) in Chinese domestic market. After analyzing mitochondrial genes reported in GenBank, the mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cytb) gene was selected for O. bartramii detection, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene for D. gigas and T. Pacificus detection, ATPase subunit 6 (ATPase 6) gene for I. Argentinus detection, and 12S ribosomal RNA (12S rDNA) gene for designing Ommastrephidae-specific primers and probe. As a result, all the TaqMan systems are of good performance, and efficiency of each reaction was calculated by making standard curves. This method could detect target species either in single or mixed squid specimen, and it was applied to identify 12 squid processed products successfully. Thus, it would play an important role in fulfilling labeling regulations and squid fishery control. PMID:26772407

  12. Choice reaction time to movement of eccentric visual targets during concurrent rotary acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamerman, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of concurrent rotary acceleration on choice reaction time (RT) to a small, accelerating visual cursor on a cathode-ray tube. Subjects sat in an enclosed rotating device at the center of rotation and observed a 3-mm dot accelerating at different rates across a cathode-ray tube. The dot was viewed at various eccentricities under conditions of visual stimulation alone and with concurrent rotary acceleration. Subjects responded to both vertical and horizontal dot movements. There was a significant inverse relationship between choice RT and level of dot acceleration (p less than .001), and a significant direct relationship between choice RT and eccentricity (p less than .001). There was no significant difference between choice RT to vertical or horizontal dot motion (p greater than .25), and choice RT was not significantly affected by concurrent rotary acceleration (p greater than .10). The results are discussed in terms of the effects of vestibular stimulation on choice RT to visual motion.

  13. A simulation and time series analysis of reaction- diffusion equations in biological pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Crystal Diane

    A computer program was modified to model the dynamics of morphogen concentrations in a developing eye of a Xenopus laevis frog. The dynamics were modelled because it is believed that the behavior of the morphogen concentrations determine how the developing eye maps to the brain. The eye in the xenophus grows as a series of rings, and thus this is the model used. The basis for the simulation are experiments done by Sullivan et al. Following the experiment, aIl eye ring is 'split' in half, inverted, and then 'pasted' onto a donor half. The purpose of the program is to replicate and analyze the results that were found experimentally: a graft made on a north to south axis (dorsal to ventral) produces a change in vision along the east to west axis (anterior to posterior). Four modified Gierer-Meinhardt reaction- diffusion equations are used to simulate the operation. In the second part of the research, the program was further modified and a time series analysis was done on the results. It was found that the modified Gierer- Meinhardt equations demonstrated chaotic behavior under certain conditions. The dynamics included fixed points, limit cycles, transient chaos, intermittent chaos, and strange attractors. The creation and destruction of fractal torii was found.

  14. Real-time polymerase chain reaction for the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun-Xin; Wang, Lin-Nong; Zhou, Ru-Xia; Yu, Yang; Du, Tong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To design, optimize and validate a rapid, internally controlled real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis. METHODS Tears alone or together with corneal epithelium scrapings from 30 patients (30 eyes) suspected of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis were tested for HSV DNA by RT-PCR. The samples were collected during the first visit and then on the subsequent 7, 14, 28, 42, and 56d. The symptoms of the patients were scored before treatment to determine the correlation between HSV concentration in the corneal epithelium scrapings and clinical scores. RESULTS The positive rate (46.4%) in the corneal epithelium group before the therapy was significantly higher than that (13.3%) in the tears group (P=0.006). There were 13 positive HSV patients before the therapy, the concentration of HSV DNA in corneal epithelium scrapings group was significantly higher than that in the tears group (paired t-test, P=0.0397). Multilevel mixed-effects model analysis showed that the difference between the corneal epithelium scrapings group and the tears group was statistically significant (P=0.0049). The Spearman rank correlation analysis indicated a positive correlation between the HSV concentration in the corneal epithelium scrapings and clinical scores before the treatment (r=0.844, P<0.0001). CONCLUSION RT-PCR appears to be a powerful molecular tool for the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis. PMID:27275421

  15. Real-time studies of battery electrochemical reactions inside a transmission electron microscope.

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kevin; Hudak, Nicholas S.; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xiaohua H.; Fan, Hongyou; Subramanian, Arunkumar; Shaw, Michael J.; Sullivan, John Patrick; Huang, Jian Yu

    2012-01-01

    We report the development of new experimental capabilities and ab initio modeling for real-time studies of Li-ion battery electrochemical reactions. We developed three capabilities for in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies: a capability that uses a nanomanipulator inside the TEM to assemble electrochemical cells with ionic liquid or solid state electrolytes, a capability that uses on-chip assembly of battery components on to TEM-compatible multi-electrode arrays, and a capability that uses a TEM-compatible sealed electrochemical cell that we developed for performing in-situ TEM using volatile battery electrolytes. These capabilities were used to understand lithiation mechanisms in nanoscale battery materials, including SnO{sub 2}, Si, Ge, Al, ZnO, and MnO{sub 2}. The modeling approaches used ab initio molecular dynamics to understand early stages of ethylene carbonate reduction on lithiated-graphite and lithium surfaces and constrained density functional theory to understand ethylene carbonate reduction on passivated electrode surfaces.

  16. Psychosocial influences on central and peripheral vision and reaction time during demanding tasks.

    PubMed

    Williams, J M; Andersen, M B

    1997-01-01

    We examined perceptual deficits hypothesized in a model of stress and injury relationships. An ophthalmologic perimeter was used to measure peripheral and central vision during baseline and demanding task situations for 201 intercollegiate athletes from 10 sports. We conducted analyses of covariance with the stress measures as dependent variables and their appropriate baseline measures as covariates. Performance under demanding tasks deteriorated significantly on all the perceptual variables. Individuals with high negative life events scores experienced greater peripheral narrowing and slower central vision reaction time during stress than did those with life events scores that were low. Men with low social support had more failures to detect cues, and men with high negative life events, low social support, and low coping skills had the lowest perceptual sensitivity. Women with high negative life events and low coping skills had more failures to detect cues. We discuss the findings in terms of how stress responsivity may influence injury risk through changes in perception and attention. PMID:9138624

  17. Identification of five highly priced tuna species by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shasha; Xu, Kunhua; Wu, Zhigang; Xie, Xiao; Feng, Junli

    2016-09-01

    Tunas are economically important fishery worldwide, and are often used for commercial processed production. For effective fishery management and protection of consumers' rights, it is important to develop a molecular method to identify species in canned tuna products rapidly and reliably. Here, we have developed a duplex quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) for identification of five highly priced tuna species (Thunnus maccoyii, Thunnus obesus, Thunnus albacares, Thunnus alalunga and Katsuwonus pelamis) from processed as well as fresh fish. After amplification and sequencing of seven genetic markers commonly used for species identification, 16S rDNA and control region (CR) of mitochondrial DNA were selected as the reference gene markers for genus Thunnus and tuna species identification, respectively. Subsequently, a 73 bp fragment of 16S rDNA and 85-99 bp fragment of CR were simultaneously amplified from each target species by qPCR. The qPCR efficiency of each reaction was calculated according to the standard curves, and the method was validated by amplification DNA extracted from single or mixed tuna specimen. The developed duplex qPCR system was applied to authenticate species of 14 commercial tuna products successfully, which demonstrated it was really a useful and academic technique to identify highly priced tuna species. PMID:25714139

  18. Loudness perception in the domestic cat: reaction time estimates of equal loudness contours and recruitment effects.

    PubMed

    May, Bradford J; Little, Nicole; Saylor, Stephanie

    2009-06-01

    The domestic cat is the primary physiological model of loudness coding and recruitment. At present, there are no published descriptions of loudness perception in this species. This study used a reaction time task to characterize loudness perception in six behaviorally trained cats. The psychophysical approach was based on the assumption that sounds of equal loudness elicit responses of equal latency. The resulting equal latency contours reproduced well-known features of human equal loudness contours. At the completion of normal baseline measures, the cats were exposed to intense sound to investigate the behavioral correlates of loudness recruitment, the abnormally rapid growth of loudness that is commonly associated with hearing loss. Observed recruitment effects were similar in magnitude to those that have been reported in hearing-impaired humans. Linear hearing aid amplification is known to improve speech intelligibility but also exacerbate recruitment in impaired listeners. The effects of speech spectra and amplification on recruitment were explored by measuring the growth of loudness for natural and amplified vowels before and after sound exposure. Vowels produced more recruitment than tones, and the effect was exacerbated by the selective amplification of formant structure. These findings support the adequacy of the domestic cat as a model system for future investigations of the auditory processes that underlie loudness perception, recruitment, and hearing aid design. PMID:19198944

  19. Simultaneity and Temporal Order Judgments Exhibit Distinct Reaction Times and Training Effects.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Nestor; Welch, Leslie; Achtman, Rebecca; Fenton, Rachel; FitzGerald, Brynn

    2016-01-01

    A considerable body of sensory research has addressed the rules governing simultaneity judgments (SJs) and temporal order judgments (TOJs). In principle, neural events that register stimulus-arrival-time differences at an early sensory stage could set the limit on SJs and TOJs alike. Alternatively, distinct limits on SJs and TOJs could arise from task-specific neural events occurring after the stimulus-driven stage. To distinguish between these possibilities, we developed a novel reaction-time (RT) measure and tested it in a perceptual-learning procedure. The stimuli comprised dual-stream Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP) displays. Participants judged either the simultaneity or temporal order of red-letter and black-number targets presented in opposite lateral hemifield streams of black-letter distractors. Despite identical visual stimulation across-tasks, the SJ and TOJ tasks generated distinct RT patterns. SJs exhibited significantly faster RTs to synchronized targets than to subtly asynchronized targets; TOJs exhibited the opposite RT pattern. These task-specific RT patterns cannot be attributed to the early, stimulus-driven stage and instead match what one would predict if the limits on SJs and TOJs arose from task-specific decision spaces. That is, synchronized targets generate strong evidence for simultaneity, which hastens SJ RTs. By contrast, synchronized targets provide no information about temporal order, which slows TOJ RTs. Subtly asynchronizing the targets reverses this information pattern, and the corresponding RT patterns. In addition to investigating RT patterns, we also investigated training-transfer between the tasks. Training to improve SJ precision failed to improve TOJ precision, and vice versa, despite identical visual stimulation across tasks. This, too, argues against early, stimulus-driven limits on SJs and TOJs. Taken together, the present study offers novel evidence that distinct rules set the limits on SJs and TOJs. PMID:26756716

  20. Comparison of Motor Inhibition in Variants of the Instructed-Delay Choice Reaction Time Task.

    PubMed

    Quoilin, Caroline; Lambert, Julien; Jacob, Benvenuto; Klein, Pierre-Alexandre; Duque, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Using instructed-delay choice reaction time (RT) paradigms, many previous studies have shown that the motor system is transiently inhibited during response preparation: motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the primary motor cortex are typically suppressed during the delay period. This effect has been observed in both selected and non-selected effectors, although MEP changes in selected effectors have been more inconsistent across task versions. Here, we compared changes in MEP amplitudes in three different variants of an instructed-delay choice RT task. All variants required participants to choose between left and right index finger movements but the responses were either provided "in the air" (Variant 1), on a regular keyboard (Variant 2), or on a response device designed to control from premature responses (Variant 3). The task variants also differed according to the visual layout (more concrete in Variant 3) and depending on whether participants received a feedback of their performance (absent in Variant 1). Behavior was globally comparable between the three variants of the task although the propensity to respond prematurely was highest in Variant 2 and lowest in Variant 3. MEPs elicited in a non-selected hand were similarly suppressed in the three variants of the task. However, significant differences emerged when considering MEPs elicited in the selected hand: these MEPs were suppressed in Variants 1 and 3 whereas they were often facilitated in Variant 2, especially in the right dominant hand. In conclusion, MEPs elicited in selected muscles seem to be more sensitive to small variations to the task design than those recorded in non-selected effectors, probably because they reflect a complex combination of inhibitory and facilitatory influences on the motor output system. Finally, the use of a standard keyboard seems to be particularly inappropriate because it encourages participants to respond promptly with no

  1. Characterizing Olfactory Binary Mixture Interactions in Fischer 344 Rats Using Behavioral Reaction Times

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Wendy M.; Gaynor, Leslie; Windham, Ethan; Lyman, Michelle; Munizza, Olivia; Setlow, Barry; Bizon, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Response times provide essential subthreshold perceptual data that extend beyond accuracy alone. Behavioral reaction times (RTs) were used to characterize rats’ ability to detect individual odorants in a series of complimentary binary odorant mixture ratios. We employed an automated, liquid-dilution olfactometer to train Fischer 344 rats (N = 8) on an odor identification task using nonreinforced probe trials. Binary mixture ratios composed of aliphatic odorants (citral and octanol) were arranged such that relative contributions of the 2 components varied systematically by a factor of 1% (v/v). Odorant concentrations for the target (S+), control (S−), and mixture (S+:S−) odorants were presented relative to threshold for each rat. Rats were initially trained to respond by licking at a spout to obtain liquid reward for either citral or octanol as the reinforced target (S+) odorant. After achieving 100% accuracy, rats were transferred to variable ratio (VR 2) reinforcement for correct responding. Nonreinforced probe trials (2 per block of 22 trials) were tested for each mixture ratio and recorded as either S+ (rats lick-responded in the presence of the mixture) or S− (rats refrained from licking), thereby indicating detection of the trained, S+ odorant. To determine the perceived salience for each ratio, RTs (latency from odorant onset to lick response) were recorded for each trial. Consistent with previous studies, RTs for both odorants were shortest (~150–200ms) when the probe trials consisted of a single, monomolecular component. Binary mixtures that contained as little as 1% of the S−, nontarget odorant, however, were sufficiently different perceptually to increase behavioral RTs (i.e., rats hesitated longer before responding); RTs changed systematically as a function of the binary ratio. Interestingly, the rate of RT change was dependent on which odorant served as the S+, suggesting an asymmetric interaction between the 2 odorants. The data demonstrate

  2. Characterizing olfactory binary mixture interactions in Fischer 344 rats using behavioral reaction times.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Wendy M; Gaynor, Leslie; Windham, Ethan; Lyman, Michelle; Munizza, Olivia; Setlow, Barry; Bizon, Jennifer L; Smith, David W

    2015-06-01

    Response times provide essential subthreshold perceptual data that extend beyond accuracy alone. Behavioral reaction times (RTs) were used to characterize rats' ability to detect individual odorants in a series of complimentary binary odorant mixture ratios. We employed an automated, liquid-dilution olfactometer to train Fischer 344 rats (N = 8) on an odor identification task using nonreinforced probe trials. Binary mixture ratios composed of aliphatic odorants (citral and octanol) were arranged such that relative contributions of the 2 components varied systematically by a factor of 1% (v/v). Odorant concentrations for the target (S+), control (S-), and mixture (S+:S-) odorants were presented relative to threshold for each rat. Rats were initially trained to respond by licking at a spout to obtain liquid reward for either citral or octanol as the reinforced target (S+) odorant. After achieving 100% accuracy, rats were transferred to variable ratio (VR 2) reinforcement for correct responding. Nonreinforced probe trials (2 per block of 22 trials) were tested for each mixture ratio and recorded as either S+ (rats lick-responded in the presence of the mixture) or S- (rats refrained from licking), thereby indicating detection of the trained, S+ odorant. To determine the perceived salience for each ratio, RTs (latency from odorant onset to lick response) were recorded for each trial. Consistent with previous studies, RTs for both odorants were shortest (~150-200ms) when the probe trials consisted of a single, monomolecular component. Binary mixtures that contained as little as 1% of the S-, nontarget odorant, however, were sufficiently different perceptually to increase behavioral RTs (i.e., rats hesitated longer before responding); RTs changed systematically as a function of the binary ratio. Interestingly, the rate of RT change was dependent on which odorant served as the S+, suggesting an asymmetric interaction between the 2 odorants. The data demonstrate the value

  3. Widely applicable MATLAB routines for automated analysis of saccadic reaction times.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, Jukka M; Forssman, Linda; Kaatiala, Jussi; Yrttiaho, Santeri; Wass, Sam

    2015-06-01

    Saccadic reaction time (SRT) is a widely used dependent variable in eye-tracking studies of human cognition and its disorders. SRTs are also frequently measured in studies with special populations, such as infants and young children, who are limited in their ability to follow verbal instructions and remain in a stable position over time. In this article, we describe a library of MATLAB routines (Mathworks, Natick, MA) that are designed to (1) enable completely automated implementation of SRT analysis for multiple data sets and (2) cope with the unique challenges of analyzing SRTs from eye-tracking data collected from poorly cooperating participants. The library includes preprocessing and SRT analysis routines. The preprocessing routines (i.e., moving median filter and interpolation) are designed to remove technical artifacts and missing samples from raw eye-tracking data. The SRTs are detected by a simple algorithm that identifies the last point of gaze in the area of interest, but, critically, the extracted SRTs are further subjected to a number of postanalysis verification checks to exclude values contaminated by artifacts. Example analyses of data from 5- to 11-month-old infants demonstrated that SRTs extracted with the proposed routines were in high agreement with SRTs obtained manually from video records, robust against potential sources of artifact, and exhibited moderate to high test-retest stability. We propose that the present library has wide utility in standardizing and automating SRT-based cognitive testing in various populations. The MATLAB routines are open source and can be downloaded from http://www.uta.fi/med/icl/methods.html . PMID:24788324

  4. Empowering or Disabling? Emotional Reactions to Assessment amongst Part-Time Adult Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramp, Andy; Lamond, Catherine; Coleyshaw, Liz; Beck, Sue

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on emotional reactions to learning and assessment. It draws on a qualitative research project involving first-generation adult students on a foundation degree programme. Endorsing the notion of emotional reactions as situated in participants' lived power relations, we map out emotional patterns to Semester 1 and then explore…

  5. Analysis of Reaction Products and Conversion Time in the Pyrolisis of Cellulose and Wood Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. S.; Bellan, J.

    1996-01-01

    A detailed mathematical model is presented for the temporal and spatial accurate modeling of solid-fluid reactions in porous particles for which volumetric reaction rate data is known a priori and both the porosity and the permeability of the particle are large enough to allow for continuous gas flow.

  6. Between-Seasons Test-Retest Reliability of Clinically Measured Reaction Time in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Eckner, James T.; Kutcher, Jeffrey S.; Richardson, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Reaction time is typically impaired after concussion. A clinical test of reaction time (RTclin) that does not require a computer to administer may be a valuable tool to assist in concussion diagnosis and management. Objective: To determine the test-retest reliability of RTclin measured over successive seasons in competitive collegiate athletes and to compare these results with a computerized measure of reaction time (RTcomp). Design: Case series with repeated measures. Setting: Preparticipation physical examinations for the football, women's soccer, and wrestling teams at a single university. Patients or Other Participants: 102 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletes. Interventions : The RTclin was measured using a measuring stick embedded in a weighted rubber disk that was released and caught as quickly as possible. The RTcomp was measured using the simple reaction time component of CogState Sport. Main Outcome Measure(s): Data were collected at 2 time points, 1 season apart, during preparticipation physical examinations. Outcomes were mean simple RTclin and RTcomp. Results: The intraclass correlation coefficient estimates from season 1 to season 2 were 0.645 for RTclin (n = 102, entire sample) and 0.512 for RTcomp (n = 62 athletes who had 2 consecutive valid baseline CogState Sport test sessions). Conclusions: The test-retest reliability of RTclin over consecutive seasons compared favorably with that of a concurrently tested computerized measure of reaction time and with literature-based estimates of computerized reaction time measures. This finding supports the potential use of RTclin as part of a multifaceted concussion assessment battery. Further prospective study is warranted. PMID:21944073

  7. Reaction time, impulse speed, overall synaptic delay and number of synapses in tactile reaction neuronal circuits of normal subjects and thinner sniffers.

    PubMed

    Chentanez, T; Keatisuwan, W; Akaraphan, A; Chaunchaiyakul, R; Lechanavanich, C; Hiranrat, S; Chaiwatcharaporn, C; Glinsukon, T

    1988-01-01

    In control subjects, warned auditory reaction time (RT) for a given effector organ was less than the warned visual RT for the same organ. The RT of the circuits between eye or ear or sites of tactile stimulation (SOS) and the index fingers were significantly shorter than that between eye or ear or the same SOS and the right or left big toes. The greater the distance between the SOS and the brain the longer the RT of the response by a given effector organ. The overall signal speed (OASS) from the neck to the index finger was less than that from the neck to the big toe. The OASS from the neck to a given effector was less than that from the toe to the same effector. Sensory nerve impulse speed was slightly faster than motor nerve impulse speed. The overall synaptic delay and estimated number of synapses (ENOS) of simple tactile reaction neuronal circuits of normal subjects did not significantly vary with site of tactile stimulation or effector organ. The mean number of synapses of various tactile reaction neuronal circuits of normal subjects was estimated to be between 69 and 77, which is far greater than the number of synapses in the touch-tactile and motor pathways combined. The overall synaptic delay in the tactile reaction neuronal circuits between SOS and the left and right big toes were significantly lower in sniffers than in control subjects. This may be due to a decrease in either the average synaptic delay, the number of synapses, or both in the tactile reaction neuronal circuits between sites of stimulation and big toes (but not index fingers) in sniffers. PMID:3393601

  8. On the time dependence of rate coefficients of irreversible reactions between reactants with anisotropic reactivity in liquid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Lukzen, Nikita N.; Doktorov, Alexander B.

    2016-08-01

    Time dependence of the rate coefficients of sterically specific reactions is analyzed theoretically. Generally, such reactions exhibit a non-trivial dependence of their rate constant on the steric factor, f < 1, which is defined as the fraction of reactive surface area. Notably, the rate constant of a diffusion-controlled reaction is proportional not to f but, counter-intuitively, to √{ f } due to partial averaging of the reaction anisotropy by translational diffusion. Here we demonstrate that the effective steric factor of a diffusion-influenced reaction is strongly time-dependent, increasing from f to √{ f } . When reactants have several active sites, these sites "interfere" each other in the sense that the rate constant depends on their relative positions. We demonstrate that such an interference effect is strongly time-dependent as well: it is absent at t = 0 but builds up with time. We argue that the outlined effects are also of importance for calculating the fluorescence quenching rate constants.

  9. Effect of inhaled crystalline silica in a rat model: time course of pulmonary reactions.

    PubMed

    Castranova, Vincent; Porter, Dale; Millecchia, Lyndell; Ma, Jane Y C; Hubbs, Ann F; Teass, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    Numerous investigations have been conducted to elucidate mechanisms involved in the initiation and progression of silicosis. However, most of these studies involved bolus exposure of rats to silica, i.e. intratracheal instillation or a short duration inhalation exposure to a high dose of silica. Therefore, the question of pulmonary overload has been an issue in these studies. The objective of the current investigation was to monitor the time course of pulmonary reactions of rats exposed by inhalation to a non-overload level of crystalline silica. To accomplish this, rats were exposed to 15 mg/m3 silica, 6 h/day, 5 days/week for up to 116 days of exposure. At various times (5-116 days exposure), animals were sacrificed and silica lung burden, lung damage, inflammation, NF-KB activation, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production, cytokine production, alveolar type II epithelial cell activity, and fibrosis were monitored. Activation of NF-KB/DNA binding in BAL cells was evident after 5 days of silica inhalation and increased linearly with continued exposure. Parameters of pulmonary damage, inflammation and alveolar type II epithelial cell activity rapidly increased to a significantly elevated but stable new level through the first 41 days of exposure and increased at a steep rate thereafter. Pulmonary fibrosis was measurable only after this explosive rise in lung damage and inflammation, as was the steep increase in TNF-alpha and IL-1 production from BAL cells and the dramatic rise in lavageable alveolar macrophages. Indicators of oxidant stress and pulmonary production of nitric oxide exhibited a time course which was similar to that for lung damage and inflammation with the steep rise correlating with initiation of pulmonary fibrosis. Staining for iNOS and nitrotyrosine was localized in granulomatous regions of the lung and bronchial associated lymphoid tissue. Therefore, these data demonstrate that the generation of oxidants and nitric oxide, in

  10. Type I photosensitized reactions of oxopurines. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the reaction with triplet benzophenone by time-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgida, Daniel H.; Erra Balsells, Rosa; Crippa, Pier Raimondo; Viappiani, Cristiano

    1998-09-01

    Benzophenone photosensitized reactions of caffeine, theophylline and theobromine were investigated in acetonitrile by time-resolved laser-induced photoacoustics. In the three cases global quenching rate constants of triplet benzophenone were measured as a function of temperature and it was observed that this is a non-activated process. Besides, for theobromine and theophylline heats for NH hydrogen abstraction reactions were determined. In agreement with semiempirical calculation predictions, hydrogen abstraction is thermodynamically more favorable and faster for theophylline (Δ H=-265 kJ mol -1, kr=9.6×10 8 M -1 s -1) than for theobromine (Δ H=-168 kJ mol -1, kr=3.7×10 8 M -1 s -1).

  11. Interference between postural control and spatial vs. non-spatial auditory reaction time tasks in older adults.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, Susan I; Redfern, Mark S; Jennings, J Richard; Furman, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether spatial aspects of an information processing task influence dual-task interference. Two groups (Older/Young) of healthy adults participated in dual-task experiments. Two auditory information processing tasks included a frequency discrimination choice reaction time task (non-spatial task) and a lateralization choice reaction time task (spatial task). Postural tasks included combinations of standing with eyes open or eyes closed on either a fixed floor or a sway-referenced floor. Reaction times and postural sway via center of pressure were recorded. Baseline measures of reaction time and sway were subtracted from the corresponding dual-task results to calculate reaction time task costs and postural task costs. Reaction time task cost increased with eye closure (p = 0.01), sway-referenced flooring (p < 0.0001), and the spatial task (p = 0.04). Additionally, a significant (p = 0.05) task x vision x age interaction indicated that older subjects had a significant vision X task interaction whereas young subjects did not. However, when analyzed by age group, the young group showed minimal differences in interference for the spatial and non-spatial tasks with eyes open, but showed increased interference on the spatial relative to non-spatial task with eyes closed. On the contrary, older subjects demonstrated increased interference on the spatial relative to the non-spatial task with eyes open, but not with eyes closed. These findings suggest that visual-spatial interference may occur in older subjects when vision is used to maintain posture. PMID:26410669

  12. Measuring time of flight of fusion products in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device for spatial profiling of fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D. C.; Boris, D. R.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.; Piefer, G. R.

    2013-03-01

    A new diagnostic has been developed that uses the time of flight (TOF) of the products from a nuclear fusion reaction to determine the location where the fusion reaction occurred. The TOF diagnostic uses charged particle detectors on opposing sides of the inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device that are coupled to high resolution timing electronics to measure the spatial profile of fusion reactions occurring between the two charged particle detectors. This diagnostic was constructed and tested by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion Group in the IEC device, HOMER, which accelerates deuterium ions to fusion relevant energies in a high voltage (˜100 kV), spherically symmetric, electrostatic potential well [J. F. Santarius, G. L. Kulcinski, R. P. Ashley, D. R. Boris, B. B. Cipiti, S. K. Murali, G. R. Piefer, R. F. Radel, T. E. Radel, and A. L. Wehmeyer, Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 1238 (2005)]. The TOF diagnostic detects the products of D(d,p)T reactions and determines where along a chord through the device the fusion event occurred. The diagnostic is also capable of using charged particle spectroscopy to determine the Doppler shift imparted to the fusion products by the center of mass energy of the fusion reactants. The TOF diagnostic is thus able to collect spatial profiles of the fusion reaction density along a chord through the device, coupled with the center of mass energy of the reactions occurring at each location. This provides levels of diagnostic detail never before achieved on an IEC device.

  13. A Flight-Calibrated Methodology for Determination of Cassini Thruster On-Times for Reaction Wheel Biases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarani, Sam

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft, the largest and most complex interplanetary spacecraft ever built, continues to undertake unique scientific observations of planet Saturn, Titan, Enceladus, and other moons of the ring world. In order to maintain a stable attitude during the course of its mission, this three-axis stabilized spacecraft uses two different control systems: the Reaction Control System (or RCS) and the Reaction Wheel Assembly (RWA) control system. In the course of its mission, Cassini performs numerous reaction wheel momentum biases (or unloads) using its reaction control thrusters. The use of the RCS thrusters often imparts undesired velocity changes (delta Vs) on the spacecraft and it is crucial for Cassini navigation and attitude control teams to be able to, quickly but accurately, predict the hydrazine usage and delta V vector in Earth Mean Equatorial (J2000) inertial coordinates for reaction wheel bias events, without actually having to spend time and resources simulating the event in a dynamic or hardware-in-the-loop simulation environments. The flight-calibrated methodology described in this paper, and the ground software developed thereof, are designed to provide the RCS thruster on-times, with acceptable accuracy and without any form of dynamic simulation, for reaction wheel biases, along with the hydrazine usage and the delta V in EME-2000 inertial frame.

  14. On the time behaviour of the concentration of pyrazinium radical cations in the early stage of the Maillard reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoesser, Reinhard; Klein, Jeannette; Peschke, Simone; Zehl, Andrea; Cämmerer, Bettina; Kroh, Lothar W.

    2007-08-01

    During the early stage of the Maillard reaction pyrazinium radical cations were detected by ESR within the reaction system D-glucose/glycine. The spectra were characterized by completely resolved hyperfine structure. The partial pressure of oxygen and the radical concentrations were measured directly in the reaction mixture by ESR using solutions of the spin probe TEMPOL and of DPPH, respectively. There are quantitative and qualitative relations of the actual concentration of the radical ions to the partial pressure of oxygen, the temperature-time regime and the mechanical mixing of the reaction system. These macroscopic parameters significantly affect both the induction period and the velocity of the time-dependent formation of free radicals. From in situ variations of p(O 2) and p(Ar) including the connected mixing effects caused by the passing the gases through the reaction mixture, steric and chemical effects of the stabilization of the radical ions were established. The determination of suitable and relevant conditions for stabilization and subsequent radical reactions contributes to the elucidation of the macroscopically known antioxidant activity of Maillard products.

  15. Measuring time of flight of fusion products in an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device for spatial profiling of fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, D. C.; Boris, D. R.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.; Piefer, G. R.

    2013-03-15

    A new diagnostic has been developed that uses the time of flight (TOF) of the products from a nuclear fusion reaction to determine the location where the fusion reaction occurred. The TOF diagnostic uses charged particle detectors on opposing sides of the inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device that are coupled to high resolution timing electronics to measure the spatial profile of fusion reactions occurring between the two charged particle detectors. This diagnostic was constructed and tested by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion Group in the IEC device, HOMER, which accelerates deuterium ions to fusion relevant energies in a high voltage ({approx}100 kV), spherically symmetric, electrostatic potential well [J. F. Santarius, G. L. Kulcinski, R. P. Ashley, D. R. Boris, B. B. Cipiti, S. K. Murali, G. R. Piefer, R. F. Radel, T. E. Radel, and A. L. Wehmeyer, Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 1238 (2005)]. The TOF diagnostic detects the products of D(d,p)T reactions and determines where along a chord through the device the fusion event occurred. The diagnostic is also capable of using charged particle spectroscopy to determine the Doppler shift imparted to the fusion products by the center of mass energy of the fusion reactants. The TOF diagnostic is thus able to collect spatial profiles of the fusion reaction density along a chord through the device, coupled with the center of mass energy of the reactions occurring at each location. This provides levels of diagnostic detail never before achieved on an IEC device.

  16. [Development of a real-time polymerase chain reaction method for the identification of Candida species].

    PubMed

    Ağca, Harun; Dalyan Cilo, Burcu; Özmerdiven, Gülşah Ece; Sağlam, Sezcan; Ener, Beyza

    2015-01-01

    Candida species are one of the major causes of nosocomial infections and are the fourth most common agent involved in bloodstream infections. The impact of non-albicans Candida species is increasing, however C.albicans is still the most common species. Since the antifungal susceptibility pattern among Candida spp. may be different, rapid diagnosis and identification of non-albicans Candida spp. are important for the determination of antifungal agents that will be used for treatment. The aim of the study was to describe a real-time polymerase chain reaction (Rt-PCR) assay that rapidly detects, identifies and quantitates Candida species from blood culture samples. A total of 50 consecutive positive blood culture bottles (BACTEC, Beckton Dickinson, USA) identified at our laboratory between June-November 2013, were included in the study. Reference strains of Candida spp. (C.albicans ATCC 10231, C.glabrata ATCC 90030, C.tropicalis ATCC 1021, C.krusei ATCC 6258, C.parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and C. dubliniensis CD36) grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar were used for quality control. BACTEC bottles that were positive for Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were also studied to search the cross-reactivity. A commercial kit (Zymo Research, USA) was used for DNA extraction. Real-time PCR was performed on LightCycler 480 (Roche, Germany) with primers and probes specific for 18S rRNA of Candida species. Twenty microlitres of the reaction mix contained 2 μl of extracted DNA, 2 μl of LightCycler Fast Start DNA Master Probe (Roche Diagnostics, Germany), 2 μl of MgCl(2) (5 mmol), 2 μl of 10x PCR buffer (Roche Diagnostics, Germany), 0.5 μl of each primer (0.01 nmol/μl) and 1 μl of each probe (0.1 μmol/μl) (TibMolBiol, Germany). Amplification was performed using the following conditions; 95°C for 10 mins and 50 cycles of denaturation at 95°C for 10 secs, annealing at 62°C for 10 secs and polymerisation at 72°C for 20 secs. A melting curve was

  17. Differential effects of parietal and frontal inactivations on reaction times distributions in a visual search task

    PubMed Central

    Wardak, Claire; Ben Hamed, Suliann; Olivier, Etienne; Duhamel, Jean-René

    2012-01-01

    The posterior parietal cortex participates to numerous cognitive functions, from perceptual to attentional and decisional processes. However, the same functions have also been attributed to the frontal cortex. We previously conducted a series of reversible inactivations of the lateral intraparietal area (LIP) and of the frontal eye field (FEF) in the monkey which showed impairments in covert visual search performance, characterized mainly by an increase in the mean reaction time (RT) necessary to detect a contralesional target. Only subtle differences were observed between the inactivation effects in both areas. In particular, the magnitude of the deficit was dependant of search task difficulty for LIP, but not for FEF. In the present study, we re-examine these data in order to try to dissociate the specific involvement of these two regions, by considering the entire RT distribution instead of mean RT. We use the LATER model to help us interpret the effects of the inactivations with regard to information accumulation rate and decision processes. We show that: (1) different search strategies can be used by monkeys to perform visual search, either by processing the visual scene in parallel, or by combining parallel and serial processes; (2) LIP and FEF inactivations have very different effects on the RT distributions in the two monkeys. Although our results are not conclusive with regards to the exact functional mechanisms affected by the inactivations, the effects we observe on RT distributions could be accounted by an involvement of LIP in saliency representation or decision-making, and an involvement of FEF in attentional shifts and perception. Finally, we observe that the use of the LATER model is limited in the context of a visual search as it cannot fit all the behavioral strategies encountered. We propose that the diversity in search strategies observed in our monkeys also exists in individual human subjects and should be considered in future experiments. PMID

  18. Domain-Specific and Unspecific Reaction Times in Experienced Team Handball Goalkeepers and Novices.

    PubMed

    Helm, Fabian; Reiser, Mathias; Munzert, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    In our everyday environments, we are constantly having to adapt our behavior to changing conditions. Hence, processing information is a fundamental cognitive activity, especially the linking together of perceptual and action processes. In this context, expertise research in the sport domain has concentrated on arguing that superior processing performance is driven by an advantage to be found in anticipatory processes (see Williams et al., 2011, for a review). This has resulted in less attention being paid to the benefits coming from basic internal perceptual-motor processing. In general, research on reaction time (RT) indicates that practicing a RT task leads to an increase in processing speed (Mowbray and Rhoades, 1959; Rabbitt and Banerji, 1989). Against this background, the present study examined whether the speed of internal processing is dependent on or independent from domain-specific motor expertise in unpredictable stimulus-response tasks and in a double stimulus-response paradigm. Thirty male participants (15 team handball goalkeepers and 15 novices) performed domain-unspecific simple or choice stimulus-response (CSR) tasks as well as CSR tasks that were domain-specific only for goalkeepers. As expected, results showed significantly faster RTs for goalkeepers on domain-specific tasks, whereas novices' RTs were more frequently excessively long. However, differences between groups in the double stimulus-response paradigm were not significant. It is concluded that the reported expertise advantage might be due to recalling stored perceptual-motor representations for the domain-specific tasks, implying that experience with (practice of) a motor task explicitly enhances the internal processing of other related domain-specific tasks. PMID:27445879

  19. Differential effects of parietal and frontal inactivations on reaction times distributions in a visual search task.

    PubMed

    Wardak, Claire; Ben Hamed, Suliann; Olivier, Etienne; Duhamel, Jean-René

    2012-01-01

    The posterior parietal cortex participates to numerous cognitive functions, from perceptual to attentional and decisional processes. However, the same functions have also been attributed to the frontal cortex. We previously conducted a series of reversible inactivations of the lateral intraparietal area (LIP) and of the frontal eye field (FEF) in the monkey which showed impairments in covert visual search performance, characterized mainly by an increase in the mean reaction time (RT) necessary to detect a contralesional target. Only subtle differences were observed between the inactivation effects in both areas. In particular, the magnitude of the deficit was dependant of search task difficulty for LIP, but not for FEF. In the present study, we re-examine these data in order to try to dissociate the specific involvement of these two regions, by considering the entire RT distribution instead of mean RT. We use the LATER model to help us interpret the effects of the inactivations with regard to information accumulation rate and decision processes. We show that: (1) different search strategies can be used by monkeys to perform visual search, either by processing the visual scene in parallel, or by combining parallel and serial processes; (2) LIP and FEF inactivations have very different effects on the RT distributions in the two monkeys. Although our results are not conclusive with regards to the exact functional mechanisms affected by the inactivations, the effects we observe on RT distributions could be accounted by an involvement of LIP in saliency representation or decision-making, and an involvement of FEF in attentional shifts and perception. Finally, we observe that the use of the LATER model is limited in the context of a visual search as it cannot fit all the behavioral strategies encountered. We propose that the diversity in search strategies observed in our monkeys also exists in individual human subjects and should be considered in future experiments. PMID

  20. Labile sleep promotes awareness of abstract knowledge in a serial reaction time task

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, Roumen; Kolev, Vasil; Verleger, Rolf; Yordanova, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Sleep has been identified as a critical brain state enhancing the probability of gaining insight into covert task regularities. Both non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep have been implicated with offline re-activation and reorganization of memories supporting explicit knowledge generation. According to two-stage models of sleep function, offline processing of information during sleep is sequential requiring multiple cycles of NREM and REM sleep stages. However, the role of overnight dynamic sleep macrostructure for insightfulness has not been studied so far. In the present study, we test the hypothesis that the frequency of interactions between NREM and REM sleep stages might be critical for awareness after sleep. For that aim, the rate of sleep stage transitions was evaluated in 53 participants who learned implicitly a serial reaction time task (SRTT) in which a determined sequence was inserted. The amount of explicit knowledge about the sequence was established by verbal recall after a night of sleep following SRTT learning. Polysomnography was recorded in this night and in a control night before and was analyzed to compare the rate of sleep-stage transitions between participants who did or did not gain awareness of task regularity after sleep. Indeed, individual ability of explicit knowledge generation was strongly associated with increased rate of transitions between NREM and REM sleep stages and between light sleep stages and slow wave sleep. However, the rate of NREM–REM transitions specifically predicted the amount of explicit knowledge after sleep in a trait-dependent way. These results demonstrate that enhanced lability of sleep goes along with individual ability of knowledge awareness. Observations suggest that facilitated dynamic interactions between sleep stages, particularly between NREM and REM sleep stages play a role for offline processing which promotes rule extraction and awareness. PMID:26441730

  1. Domain-Specific and Unspecific Reaction Times in Experienced Team Handball Goalkeepers and Novices

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Fabian; Reiser, Mathias; Munzert, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    In our everyday environments, we are constantly having to adapt our behavior to changing conditions. Hence, processing information is a fundamental cognitive activity, especially the linking together of perceptual and action processes. In this context, expertise research in the sport domain has concentrated on arguing that superior processing performance is driven by an advantage to be found in anticipatory processes (see Williams et al., 2011, for a review). This has resulted in less attention being paid to the benefits coming from basic internal perceptual-motor processing. In general, research on reaction time (RT) indicates that practicing a RT task leads to an increase in processing speed (Mowbray and Rhoades, 1959; Rabbitt and Banerji, 1989). Against this background, the present study examined whether the speed of internal processing is dependent on or independent from domain-specific motor expertise in unpredictable stimulus–response tasks and in a double stimulus–response paradigm. Thirty male participants (15 team handball goalkeepers and 15 novices) performed domain-unspecific simple or choice stimulus–response (CSR) tasks as well as CSR tasks that were domain-specific only for goalkeepers. As expected, results showed significantly faster RTs for goalkeepers on domain-specific tasks, whereas novices’ RTs were more frequently excessively long. However, differences between groups in the double stimulus-response paradigm were not significant. It is concluded that the reported expertise advantage might be due to recalling stored perceptual-motor representations for the domain-specific tasks, implying that experience with (practice of) a motor task explicitly enhances the internal processing of other related domain-specific tasks. PMID:27445879

  2. Tail effect in gravitational radiation reaction: Time nonlocality and renormalization group evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galley, Chad R.; Leibovich, Adam K.; Porto, Rafael A.; Ross, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We use the effective field theory (EFT) framework to calculate the tail effect in gravitational radiation reaction, which enters at the fourth post-Newtonian order in the dynamics of a binary system. The computation entails a subtle interplay between the near (or potential) and far (or radiation) zones. In particular, we find that the tail contribution to the effective action is nonlocal in time and features both a dissipative and a "conservative" term. The latter includes a logarithmic ultraviolet (UV) divergence, which we show cancels against an infrared (IR) singularity found in the (conservative) near zone. The origin of this behavior in the long-distance EFT is due to the point-particle limit—shrinking the binary to a point—which transforms a would-be infrared singularity into an ultraviolet divergence. This is a common occurrence in an EFT approach, which furthermore allows us to use renormalization group (RG) techniques to resum the resulting logarithmic contributions. We then derive the RG evolution for the binding potential and total mass/energy, and find agreement with the results obtained imposing the conservation of the (pseudo) stress-energy tensor in the radiation theory. While the calculation of the leading tail contribution to the effective action involves only one diagram, five are needed for the one-point function. This suggests logarithmic corrections may be easier to incorporate in this fashion. We conclude with a few remarks on the nature of these IR/UV singularities, the (lack of) ambiguities recently discussed in the literature, and the completeness of the analytic post-Newtonian framework.

  3. Computational models of the Posner simple and choice reaction time tasks

    PubMed Central

    Feher da Silva, Carolina; Baldo, Marcus V. C.

    2015-01-01

    The landmark experiments by Posner in the late 1970s have shown that reaction time (RT) is faster when the stimulus appears in an expected location, as indicated by a cue; since then, the so-called Posner task has been considered a “gold standard” test of spatial attention. It is thus fundamental to understand the neural mechanisms involved in performing it. To this end, we have developed a Bayesian detection system and small integrate-and-fire neural networks, which modeled sensory and motor circuits, respectively, and optimized them to perform the Posner task under different cue type proportions and noise levels. In doing so, main findings of experimental research on RT were replicated: the relative frequency effect, suboptimal RTs and significant error rates due to noise and invalid cues, slower RT for choice RT tasks than for simple RT tasks, fastest RTs for valid cues and slowest RTs for invalid cues. Analysis of the optimized systems revealed that the employed mechanisms were consistent with related findings in neurophysiology. Our models predict that (1) the results of a Posner task may be affected by the relative frequency of valid and neutral trials, (2) in simple RT tasks, input from multiple locations are added together to compose a stronger signal, and (3) the cue affects motor circuits more strongly in choice RT tasks than in simple RT tasks. In discussing the computational demands of the Posner task, attention has often been described as a filter that protects the nervous system, whose capacity is limited, from information overload. Our models, however, reveal that the main problems that must be overcome to perform the Posner task effectively are distinguishing signal from external noise and selecting the appropriate response in the presence of internal noise. PMID:26190997

  4. Decreased reaction time variability is associated with greater cardiovascular responses to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Andrew J; Hamer, Mark; Steptoe, Andrew; Endrighi, Romano

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) responses to mental stress are prospectively associated with poor CV outcomes. The association between CV responses to mental stress and reaction times (RTs) in aging individuals may be important but warrants further investigation. The present study assessed RTs to examine associations with CV responses to mental stress in healthy, older individuals using robust regression techniques. Participants were 262 men and women (mean age = 63.3 ± 5.5 years) from the Whitehall II cohort who completed a RT task (Stroop) and underwent acute mental stress (mirror tracing) to elicit CV responses. Blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability were measured at baseline, during acute stress, and through a 75-min recovery. RT measures were generated from an ex-Gaussian distribution that yielded three predictors: mu-RT, sigma-RT, and tau-RT, the mean, standard deviation, and mean of the exponential component of the normal distribution, respectively. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was marginally associated with greater systolic (B = -.009, SE = .005, p = .09) and diastolic (B = -.004, SE = .002, p = .08) blood pressure reactivity. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was associated with impaired systolic blood pressure recovery (B = -.007, SE = .003, p = .03) and impaired vagal tone (B = -.0047, SE = .0024, p = .045). Study findings offer tentative support for an association between RTs and CV responses. Despite small effect sizes and associations not consistent across predictors, these data may point to a link between intrinsic neuronal plasticity and CV responses. PMID:26894967

  5. Decreased reaction time variability is associated with greater cardiovascular responses to acute stress

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Mark; Steptoe, Andrew; Endrighi, Romano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular (CV) responses to mental stress are prospectively associated with poor CV outcomes. The association between CV responses to mental stress and reaction times (RTs) in aging individuals may be important but warrants further investigation. The present study assessed RTs to examine associations with CV responses to mental stress in healthy, older individuals using robust regression techniques. Participants were 262 men and women (mean age = 63.3 ± 5.5 years) from the Whitehall II cohort who completed a RT task (Stroop) and underwent acute mental stress (mirror tracing) to elicit CV responses. Blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability were measured at baseline, during acute stress, and through a 75‐min recovery. RT measures were generated from an ex‐Gaussian distribution that yielded three predictors: mu‐RT, sigma‐RT, and tau‐RT, the mean, standard deviation, and mean of the exponential component of the normal distribution, respectively. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was marginally associated with greater systolic (B = −.009, SE = .005, p = .09) and diastolic (B = −.004, SE = .002, p = .08) blood pressure reactivity. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was associated with impaired systolic blood pressure recovery (B = −.007, SE = .003, p = .03) and impaired vagal tone (B = −.0047, SE = .0024, p = .045). Study findings offer tentative support for an association between RTs and CV responses. Despite small effect sizes and associations not consistent across predictors, these data may point to a link between intrinsic neuronal plasticity and CV responses. PMID:26894967

  6. Complexity of Central Processing in Simple and Choice Multilimb Reaction-Time Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Boisgontier, Matthieu P.; Wittenberg, George F.; Fujiyama, Hakuei; Levin, Oron; Swinnen, Stephan P.

    2014-01-01

    The default mode of the motor system is a coupling between limbs. However, in some movements, a decoupling is required and thus calls for selection and facilitation/inhibition processes. Here, we investigate the relative contribution of recruitment versus selection processes to the overall processing complexity. To this aim we proposed a new multilimb reaction-time task (MUL-RT). Simple, choice and normalized (choice minus simple) RT were analysed together with error rates in thirty-six young adults for 15 coordination modes including all possible configuration of limb recruitment. Simple and normalized RTs were respectively assumed to be indicative of the recruitment and selection processes. Results supported a model of coupling/decoupling interactions respectively reporting weak, intermediate and strong interaction for selecting diagonal, ipsilateral and homologous limbs. Movement laterality (left vs. right) had no effect on selection complexity, whereas selecting upper limbs was less challenging than selecting lower limbs. Results in the different coordination modes suggested that recruitment complexity decreased as follows: 3 limbs = 4 limbs>2 limbs (homologous, ipsilateral and diagonal)>1 limb, and selection complexity as follows: 2 diagonal limbs>3 limbs>2 ipsilateral limbs>1 limb = 2 homologous limbs>4 limbs. Based on these ordinal scales of recruitment and selection complexity, we extrapolated the overall processing complexity of the simple and choice MUL-RT. This method was efficient in reproducing the absolute results we obtained on a ratio scale (ms) and demonstrated that processing complexity in simple RT was mainly governed by the ‘recruitment principle’ (the more limbs recruited the lower the performance), whereas contributions of recruitment and ‘selection principle’ (nature of the coordination determines performance) to overall processing complexity were similar in choice RT. PMID:24587371

  7. Dual Task Performance in Normal Aging: A Comparison of Choice Reaction Time Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Vaportzis, Eleftheria; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Stout, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined dual task performance in 28 younger (18–30 years) and 28 older (>60 years) adults using two sets of choice reaction time (RT) tasks paired with digit tasks. Set one paired simple choice RT with digit forward; set two paired complex choice RT with digit backward. Each task within each set had easy and hard conditions. For the simple choice RT, participants viewed single letters and pressed a specified keyboard key if the letter was X or Z or a different key for other letters (easy). For the hard condition, there were 4 target letters (X, Z, O, Y). Digit forward consisted of 4 (easy) or 5 (hard) digits. For the complex choice RT, participants viewed 4×4 matrices of Xs and Os, and indicated whether four Xs (easy) or four Xs or four Os (hard) appeared in a row. Digit backward consisted of 3 (easy) or 4 (hard) digits. Within each set, participants performed every possible combination of tasks. We found that in the simple choice RT tasks older adults were significantly slower than, but as accurate as younger adults. In the complex choice RT tasks, older adults were significantly less accurate, but as fast as younger adults. For both age groups and both dual task sets, RT decreased and error rates increased with greater task difficulty. Older adults had greater dual task costs for error rates in the simple choice RT, whereas in the complex choice RT, it was the younger group that had greater dual task costs. Findings suggest that younger and older adults may adopt differential behavioral strategies depending on complexity and difficulty of dual tasks. PMID:23555937

  8. Impact of reagent infiltration time on reaction patterns and pasting properties of modified maize and wheat starches.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jung Sun; BeMiller, James N; Huber, Kerry C

    2016-10-20

    The impact of granular and molecular reaction patterns on modified starch properties was investigated as a function of the length of time allowed for reagent to infiltrate starch granules. A fluorescent reagent [5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl)aminofluorescein] was dispersed in aqueous normal maize or wheat starch slurries (35%, w/v) for 0, 5, 10, 30, or 60min, after which reaction was initiated by increasing the pH to 11.5 and allowing reaction to proceed for 3h. With increasing lengths of infiltration, the reaction became increasingly homogeneous within the granule interior (matrix) and the AM:AP reactivity ratio increased (wheat starch), as assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and size-exclusion chromatography (refractive index and fluorescence detection), respectively. A longer reagent infiltration time also led to a more inhibited (i.e., cross-linked) pasting viscosity, suggesting that both granular and/or molecular reaction patterns were altered by varied reagent infiltration times to ultimately impact modified starch properties. PMID:27474633

  9. Time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations for multinucleon transfer and quasifission processes in the 238U+64Ni reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekizawa, Kazuyuki; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    Background: Multinucleon transfer (MNT) and quasifission (QF) processes are dominant processes in low-energy collisions of two heavy nuclei. They are expected to be useful to produce neutron-rich unstable nuclei. Nuclear dynamics leading to these processes depends sensitively on nuclear properties such as deformation and shell structure. Purpose: We elucidate reaction mechanisms of MNT and QF processes involving heavy deformed nuclei, making detailed comparisons between microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations and measurements for the 238U+64Ni reaction. Methods: Three-dimensional Skyrme-TDHF calculations are performed. Particle-number projection method is used to evaluate MNT cross sections from the TDHF wave function after collision. Results: Fragment masses, total kinetic energy (TKE), scattering angle, contact time, and MNT cross sections are investigated for the 238U+64Ni reaction. They show reasonable agreements with measurements. At small impact parameters, collision dynamics depends sensitively on the orientation of deformed 238U. In tip (side) collisions, we find a larger (smaller) TKE and a shorter (longer) contact time. In tip collisions, we find a strong influence of quantum shells around 208Pb. Conclusions: It is confirmed that the TDHF calculations reasonably describe both MNT and QF processes in the 238U64Ni reaction. Analyses of this system indicate the significance of the nuclear structure effects such as deformation and quantum shells in nuclear reaction dynamics at low energies.

  10. Time-resolved chemiluminescence study of the TiO2 photocatalytic reaction and its induced active oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Min, Lingyue; Wu, Xing-Zheng; Tetsuya, Shimada; Inoue, Haruo

    2007-01-01

    The time-resolved chemiluminescence (CL) method has been applied to study the TiO(2) photocatalytic reaction on a micros-ms timescale. The experimental set-up for time-resolved CL was improved for confirmation of the unique luminol CL induced by the photocatalytic reaction. The third harmonic light (355 nm) from an Nd:YAG laser was used for the light source of the TiO(2) photocatalytic reaction. Luminol CL induced by this reaction was detected by a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a preamplifier was used for amplifying the CL signal. Experimental conditions affecting the photocatalytically induced CL were discussed in detail. The involvement of active oxygen species such as .OH, O(2) (.-) and H(2)O(2) in the CL was examined by adding their scavengers. It is concluded that .OH was greatly involved in the CL on a micros-ms timescale, especially in time periods <100 micros after illumination of the pulse laser. On the other hand, CL generated by O(2) (.-) began to increase after 100 micros and became dominant after 2.5 ms. A small part of the CL might be generated by H(2)O(2) on the whole micros-ms timescale. A CL reaction mechanism related with .OH and dissolved oxygen was proposed to explain the photocatalytically induced luminol CL on a micros-ms timescale, especially in periods <100 micros. PMID:17089368

  11. The Effect of Mechanical Vibration Stimulation of Perception Subthreshold on the Muscle Force and Muscle Reaction Time of Lower Leg

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Huigyun; Kwak, Kiyoung; Kim, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of mechanical vibration stimulation on the muscle force and muscle reaction time of lower leg according to perception threshold and vibration frequency. A vibration stimulation with perception threshold intensity was applied on the Achilles tendon and tibialis anterior tendon. EMG measurement and analysis system were used to analyze the change of muscle force and muscle reaction time according to perception threshold and vibration frequency. A root-mean-square (RMS) value was extracted using analysis software and Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC) and Premotor Time (PMT) were analyzed. The measurement results showed that perception threshold was different from application sites of vibration frequency. Also, the muscle force and muscle reaction time showed difference according to the presence of vibration, frequency, and intensity. This result means that the vibration stimulation causes the change on the muscle force and muscle reaction time and affects the muscles of lower leg by the characteristics of vibration stimulation. PMID:27382244

  12. EEG alpha spindles and prolonged brake reaction times during auditory distraction in an on-road driving study.

    PubMed

    Sonnleitner, Andreas; Treder, Matthias Sebastian; Simon, Michael; Willmann, Sven; Ewald, Arne; Buchner, Axel; Schrauf, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Driver distraction is responsible for a substantial number of traffic accidents. This paper describes the impact of an auditory secondary task on drivers' mental states during a primary driving task. N=20 participants performed the test procedure in a car following task with repeated forced braking on a non-public test track. Performance measures (provoked reaction time to brake lights) and brain activity (EEG alpha spindles) were analyzed to describe distracted drivers. Further, a classification approach was used to investigate whether alpha spindles can predict drivers' mental states. Results show that reaction times and alpha spindle rate increased with time-on-task. Moreover, brake reaction times and alpha spindle rate were significantly higher while driving with auditory secondary task opposed to driving only. In single-trial classification, a combination of spindle parameters yielded a median classification error of about 8% in discriminating the distracted from the alert driving. Reduced driving performance (i.e., prolonged brake reaction times) during increased cognitive load is assumed to be indicated by EEG alpha spindles, enabling the quantification of driver distraction in experiments on public roads without verbally assessing the drivers' mental states. PMID:24144496

  13. Estimating diffusivity along a reaction coordinate in the high friction limit: Insights on pulse times in laser-induced nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Brandon C.; Duff, Nathan; Doherty, Michael F.; Peters, Baron

    2009-12-01

    In the high friction limit of Kramers' theory, the diffusion coefficient for motion along the reaction coordinate is a crucial parameter in determining reaction rates from mean first passage times. The Einstein relation between mean squared displacement, time, and diffusivity is inaccurate at short times because of ballistic motion and inaccurate at long times because trajectories drift away from maxima in the potential of mean force. Starting from the Smoluchowski equation for a downward parabolic barrier, we show how drift induced by the potential of mean force can be included in estimating the diffusivity. A modified relation between mean squared displacement, time, and diffusivity now also includes a dependence on the barrier curvature. The new relation provides the diffusivity at the top of the barrier from a linear regression that is analogous to the procedure commonly used with Einstein's relation. The new approach has particular advantages over previous approaches when evaluations of the reaction coordinate are costly or when the reaction coordinate cannot be differentiated to compute restraining forces or velocities. We use the new method to study the dynamics of barrier crossing in a Potts lattice gas model of nucleation from solution. Our analysis shows that some current hypotheses about laser-induced nucleation mechanisms lead to a nonzero threshold laser pulse duration below which a laser pulse will not affect nucleation. We therefore propose experiments that might be used to test these hypotheses.

  14. The effects of arm movement on reaction time in patients with latent and active upper trapezius myofascial trigger point

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Marzieh; Talebian, Saeed; Ebrahimi Takamjani, Ismail; Maroufi, Nader; Ahmadi, Amir; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Emrani, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Myofascial pain syndrome is a significant source of mechanical pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of arm movement on reaction time in females with latent and active upper trapezius myofascial trigger point. Methods: In this interventional study, a convenience sample of fifteen women with one active MTP, fifteen women with one latent MTP in the upper trapezius, and fifteen normal healthy women were participated. Participants were asked to stand for 10 seconds in an erect standing position. Muscle reaction times were recorded including anterior deltoid (AD), cervical paraspinal (CP) lumbar paraspinal (LP), both of upper trapezius (UT), sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and medial head of gastrocnemius (GcM). Participants were asked to flex their arms in response to a sound stimulus preceded by a warning sound stimulus. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA Test. Results: There was significant differences in motor time and reaction time between active and control groups (p< 0.05) except for GcM. There was no significant difference in motor time between active and passive groups except for UT without MTP and SCM (p< 0.05). Also, there were no significant differences in motor times between latent MTP and control groups. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in premotor times between the three groups. Conclusion: The present study shows that patients with active MTP need more time to react to stimulus, but patients with latent MTP are similar to healthy subjects in the reaction time. Patients with active MTP had less compatibility with environmental stimulations, and they responded to a specific stimulation with variability in Surface Electromyography (SEMG). PMID:26913258

  15. Evaluation of a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Scala, Alessia; Tagliabue, Claudia; Zampiero, Alberto; Bianchini, Sonia; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal swabs from 424 children were used to compare the performances of the new multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) RIDA®GENE Flu & RSV kit and monospecific RT-PCR assays in detecting respiratory syncytial and influenza viruses. The easy-to-use kit was highly sensitive and specific and is recommended for routine practice. PMID:26458277

  16. Reaction Time of Facial Affect Recognition in Asperger's Disorder for Cartoon and Real, Static and Moving Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyahara, Motohide; Bray, Anne; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Fujita, Chikako; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2007-01-01

    This study used a choice reaction-time paradigm to test the perceived impairment of facial affect recognition in Asperger's disorder. Twenty teenagers with Asperger's disorder and 20 controls were compared with respect to the latency and accuracy of response to happy or disgusted facial expressions, presented in cartoon or real images and in…

  17. The Effects of Challenging Goal Instructions upon Goal Setting and Performance on a Reaction-Time Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strang, Harold R.

    1981-01-01

    Forty-eight female university students participated in a reaction-time experiment in which challenging goal instructions were manipulated under conditions of minimal feedback. Findings extend Locke's views of the effects of personal goals on subsequent performance to applications involving minimal implicit knowlege of results. (Author/MP)

  18. 9 CFR 147.31 - Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MGLP ReTi). 147.31 Section 147.31 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT AUXILIARY...

  19. 9 CFR 147.31 - Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MGLP ReTi). 147.31 Section 147.31 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT AUXILIARY...

  20. [THE HIGHLY EFFECTIVE DETECTION OF DNA RICKETTSIA USING TECHNIQUE OF POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION IN REAL-TIME].

    PubMed

    Kartashov, M Yu; Mikryukova, T P; Ternovoi, V A; Moskvitina, N S; Loktev, V B

    2015-12-01

    The article considers development of highly effective technique of detection of genetic material of ricketsia based on polymerase chain reaction in real-time using original primers to the most conservative sites of gene of citrate synthase (gItA). The analytical sensitivity of the developed polymerase chain reaction in real-time test permits to detect from 80 genome equivalents in analyzed sample during three hours. The high specificity of test-system is substantiated by detection of nucleotide sequences of amplificated fragments of gene gltA. The approbation ofthe polymerase chain reaction in real-time test is carried out on collection of 310 ticks of species I. persulcatus, I. pavlovskyi, D. reticulatus. It is demonstrated that the developed alternate ofprimers and probe permits with high degree of sensitivity and specifcity to detect DNA of different species of ricketsia widespread on territory of Russia (R. sibirica, R. raoultii, R. helvetica, R. tarasevichiae). The proposed polymerase chain reaction in real-time test can be appliedfor isolation of fragment of gene gltA with purpose for detecting nucleotide sequence and subsequent genetic typing of ricketsia. The application ofthe proposed technique can facilitate task of monitoring hot spots of ricketsiosis. PMID:27032252

  1. On the Locus of Speed-Accuracy Trade-Off in Reaction Time: Inferences From the Lateralized Readiness Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinkenauer, Gerhard; Osman, Allen; Ulrich, Rolf; Muller-Gethmann, Hiltraut; Mattes, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Lateralized readiness potentials (LRPs) were used to determine the stage(s) of reaction time (RT) responsible for speed-accuracy trade-offs (SATs). Speeded decisions based on several types of information were examined in 3 experiments, involving, respectively, a line discrimination task, lexical decisions, and an Erikson flanker task. Three levels…

  2. Age Differences in Reaction Time and Attention in a National Telephone Sample of Adults: Education, Sex, and Task Complexity Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tun, Patricia A.; Lachman, Margie E.

    2008-01-01

    This study demonstrated effects of age, education, and sex on complex reaction time in a large national sample (N = 3,616) with a wide range in age (32-85) and education. Participants completed speeded auditory tasks (from the MIDUS [Midlife in the U.S.] Stop and Go Switch Task) by telephone. Complexity ranged from a simple repeated task to an…

  3. A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay differentiates between Bolbphorus damnificus and Bolbophorus type II sp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A duplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed to differentiate between Bolbophorus damnificus and Bolbophorus type II species cercariae. Both trematode species are prevalent throughout the commercial catfish industry,.as both infect the ram’s horn snail, Plano...

  4. Persistence of the Intuitive Conception That Heavier Objects Sink More: A Reaction Time Study with Different Levels of Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potvin, Patrice; Masson, Steve; Lafortune, Stéphanie; Cyr, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Recent research efforts have argued for the "persistence" of some of students' frequent scientific misconceptions, even after correct answers are produced. Some of these studies, based on the analysis of reaction times, have recorded latencies for counter-intuitive or incongruent stimuli compared to intuitive or congruent ones. The…

  5. Contribution of Temporal Preparation and Processing Speed to Simple Reaction Time in Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvain-Roy, Stephanie; Bherer, Louis; Belleville, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Temporal preparation was assessed in 15 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, 20 persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 28 healthy older adults. Participants completed a simple reaction time task in which the preparatory interval duration varied randomly within two blocks (short versus long temporal window). Results indicated that AD and…

  6. The Fixed-Links Model in Combination with the Polynomial Function as a Tool for Investigating Choice Reaction Time Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweizer, Karl

    2006-01-01

    A model with fixed relations between manifest and latent variables is presented for investigating choice reaction time data. The numbers for fixation originate from the polynomial function. Two options are considered: the component-based (1 latent variable for each component of the polynomial function) and composite-based options (1 latent…

  7. Effects of Age, Intelligence and Executive Control Function on Saccadic Reaction Time in Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haishi, Koichi; Okuzumi, Hideyuki; Kokubun, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    The current research aimed to clarify the influence of age, intelligence and executive control function on the central tendency and intraindividual variability of saccadic reaction time in persons with intellectual disabilities. Participants were 44 persons with intellectual disabilities aged between 13 and 57 years whose IQs were between 14 and…

  8. OSP Parameters and the Cognitive Component of Reaction Time to a Missing Stimulus: Linking Brain and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Oscar H.; Vogel-Sprott, Muriel

    2009-01-01

    This within-subjects experiment tested the relationship between the premotor (cognitive) component of reaction time (RT) to a missing stimulus and parameters of the omitted stimulus potential (OSP) brain wave. Healthy young men (N = 28) completed trials with an auditory stimulus that recurred at 2 s intervals and ceased unpredictably. Premotor RT…

  9. A Tutorial for Analyzing Human Reaction Times: How to Filter Data, Manage Missing Values, and Choose a Statistical Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lachaud, Christian Michel; Renaud, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    This tutorial for the statistical processing of reaction times collected through a repeated-measure design is addressed to researchers in psychology. It aims at making explicit some important methodological issues, at orienting researchers to the existing solutions, and at providing them some evaluation tools for choosing the most robust and…

  10. A Developmental Study of Choice Reaction Time: The Effect of Two Forms of Stimulus Degradation on Encoding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maisto, Labert A.; Baumeister, Alfred A.

    1975-01-01

    Preschool, third grade and fifth grade children were presented with two choice-reaction time experiments in which probe stimulus quality was manipulated, to measure the effects of probe stimulus degradation at three developmental levels. Results support the hypothesis that children and adults employ similar strategies in preprocessing degraded…

  11. Demonstration of Nondeclarative Sequence Learning in Mice: Development of an Animal Analog of the Human Serial Reaction Time Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Michael A.; Hersch, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate nondeclarative sequence learning in mice using an animal analog of the human serial reaction time task (SRT) that uses a within-group comparison of behavior in response to a repeating sequence versus a random sequence. Ten female B6CBA mice performed eleven 96-trial sessions containing 24 repetitions of a 4-trial…

  12. Reaction Times in a Sentence-Picture Verification Test and Intelligence: Individual Strategies and Effects of Extended Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neubauer, Aljoscha C.; Freudenthaler, Heribert H.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between psychometric intelligence and reaction times (RT) was studied in 60 undergraduates using an elementary cognitive task, the Sentence-Picture Verification Test. Results, which show that psychometric intelligence is substantially correlated with RTs even after practice, support the mental speed hypothesis of general…

  13. Speech Planning Happens before Speech Execution: Online Reaction Time Methods in the Study of Apraxia of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Edwin; Mailend, Marja-Liisa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to present an argument for the use of online reaction time (RT) methods to the study of apraxia of speech (AOS) and to review the existing small literature in this area and the contributions it has made to our fundamental understanding of speech planning (deficits) in AOS. Method: Following a brief…

  14. Real-time monitoring of single-molecule reactions in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Xiao; Xu, N.; Yeung, E.S. |

    1997-12-31

    Direct measurement of dynamics of single molecules, e.g., rhodamine 6G (R-6G) and single R-6G tagged with single biological molecules in aqueous solution, was achieved by using thin-layer laser-induced total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TLTIRFM). Single-molecule reactions can be directly and simultaneously monitored with spatial resolution down to 0.2 {mu}m and temporal resolution down to 0.2 ms. Dynamics of single-molecule reactions, for example, single dye molecules reacting with a proton and single proteins adsorbing on an active surface, are investigated and evident by monitoring their reaction environment, e.g., temperature and pH. Novel approaches and applications of these studies will be prospected in this presentation.

  15. Time-Resolved Structural Analysis of Cation Exchange Reactions in Birnessite Using Synchrotron XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopano, C. L.; Heaney, P. J.; Post, J. E.; Hanson, J. C.; Lee, Y.; Komarneni, S.

    2002-12-01

    Birnessite ((Na,Ca,Mn2+) Mn7O142.8H2O) is a layered Mn-oxide with a 7.2Å spacing between the Mn octahedral sheets. Since birnessite is an abundant phase in soils, desert varnishes, and ocean nodules, it plays a significant role in soil and groundwater chemistry. Experiments by Golden et al. (1986,1987) have demonstrated that Na-buserite (hydrated birnessite) readily exchanges Na+ for a variety of other cations, including K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Ba2+, Ni2+, and Sr2+. In light of its high cation exchange capacity, birnessite is industrially important for ion and molecular sieves and cathodic materials. In addition, birnessite serves as a precursor in the synthesis of todorokite, which has a 3x3 tunnel structure and is used as an octahedral sieve. We monitored cation-exchange reactions in birnessite by time-resolved X-ray powder diffraction with a simple flow-through cell at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The flow-through cell was developed by Lee and Parise at SUNY-Stony Brook, and this work represents its first application to Mn oxides. A series of synthetic Na-birnessite samples were saturated with chloride solutions containing dissolved K+, Mg2+, and Ba2+, ranging from 0.1M to 0.001M. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns were collected every ~ 3 minutes. The synchrotron experiments revealed that complete cation exchange occurs within three hours, and significant modifications of the arrangements of interlayer cations and water molecules accompany the exchange. Specifically, the replacement of Na by Mg resulted in the continuous growth of a discrete buserite-like phase with a 10Å layer spacing, while replacement of Na by K and Ba retained the 7Å spacing. K replacement of Na resulted in gradually decreasing peak intensity and peak merging. The Ba exchange yielded an abrupt decrease in diffraction intensities followed by a more gradual lattice change over the last 2 hours. Rietveld analysis led to the first determination of the structure of Ba-birnessite in space

  16. Positive feedback produces broad distributions in maximum activation attained within a narrow time window in stochastic biochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayajit

    2013-01-01

    How do single cell fate decisions induced by activation of key signaling proteins above threshold concentrations within a time interval are affected by stochastic fluctuations in biochemical reactions? We address this question using minimal models of stochastic chemical reactions commonly found in cell signaling and gene regulatory systems. Employing exact solutions and semi-analytical methods we calculate distributions of the maximum value (N) of activated species concentrations (Pmax(N)) and the time (t) taken to reach the maximum value (Pmax(t)) within a time interval in the minimal models. We find, the presence of positive feedback interactions make Pmax(N) more spread out with a higher "peakedness" in Pmax(t). Thus positive feedback interactions may help single cells to respond sensitively to a stimulus when cell decision processes require upregulation of activated forms of key proteins to a threshold number within a time window.

  17. Accurate Time-Dependent Wave Packet Calculations for the O(+) + H2 → OH(+) + H Ion-Molecule Reaction.

    PubMed

    Bulut, N; Castillo, J F; Jambrina, P G; Kłos, J; Roncero, O; Aoiz, F J; Bañares, L

    2015-12-17

    Accurate quantum reactive scattering time-dependent wave packet close-coupling calculations have been carried out to determine total reaction probabilities and integral cross sections for the O(+) + H2 → OH(+) + H reaction in a range of collision energies from 10(-3) eV up to 1.0 eV for the H2 rovibrational states (v = 0; j = 0, 1, 2) and (v = 1; j = 0) using the potential energy surface (PES) by Martı́nez et al. As expected for a barrierless reaction, the reaction cross section decays rapidly with collision energy, Ec, following a behavior that nearly corresponds to that predicted by the Langevin model. Rotational excitation of H2 into j = 1, 2 has a very moderate effect on reactivity, similarly to what happens with vibrational excitation below Ec ≈ 0.3 eV. However, at higher collision energies the cross section increases notably when H2 is promoted to v = 1. This effect is explained by resorting to the effective potentials in the entrance channel. The integral cross sections have been used to calculate rate constants in the temperature range 200-1000 K. A good overall agreement has been found with the available experimental data on integral cross sections and rate constants. In addition, time-independent quantum mechanical and quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations have been performed on the same PES aimed to compare the various methodologies and to discern the detailed mechanism of the title reaction. In particular, the analysis of individual trajectories has made it possible to explain, in terms of the coupling between reagent relative velocity and the topography of the PES, the presence of a series of alternating maxima and minima in the collision energy dependence of the QCT reaction probabilities for the reactions with H2(v=0,1,j=0), which are absent in the quantum mechanical calculations. PMID:25822338

  18. Fission Time of α-INDUCED Reactions Measured by the Crystal Blocking Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, V. A.; Eremenko, D. O.; Fotina, O. V.; Platonov, S. Yu.; Yuminov, O. A.; Giardina, G.; Fazio, G.; Malaguti, F.; Olivo, P.; Togo, V.

    A large set of experimental observables for the 232Th, 235U(α, xnf) reactions has been analyzed within the dynamic-statistical approach with allowance for the nuclear dissipation phenomenon, the double humped structure of fission barrier, and also the temperature damping of shell effects. The energy dependences of the lifetime effect (experimentally measured by the crystal blocking technique) along the corresponding data on the fission fragment angular anisotropy and also fission probabilities of U and Pu isotopes produced in the reactions were chosen for the analysis. Reliable information on the nuclear viscosity at the low excitation energies (< 30 MeV) was obtained.

  19. Iterative time independent calculation of the cumulative reaction probability within a basis adapted preconditioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woittequand, F.; Monnerville, M.; Briquez, S.

    2006-01-01

    A band preconditioner matrix coupled to an iterative approach based on the generalized minimal residual (GMRes) method is presented to determine the cumulative reaction probability (CRP) N( E). The CRP is calculated using the Seideman, Manthe and Miller Lanczos-based boundary condition method [J. Chem. Phys. 96 (1992) 4412; 99 (1993) 3411]. Using this basis adapted preconditioner, the iterative GMRes scheme is found to be more efficient than a direct method based on the LU decomposition. The efficiency of this approach is illustrated by calculating the CRP for the H + O 2 → HO + O reaction, assuming zero total angular momentum.

  20. Glaucomatous Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Loss is associated with Slower Reaction Times under a Divided Attention Task

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Andrew J.; Boer, Erwin R.; Rosen, Peter N.; Penna, Mauro Della; Meira-Freitas, Daniel; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.; Medeiros, Felipe A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relationship between glaucomatous structural damage and ability to divide attention during simulated driving. Design Cross-sectional observational study. Methods Setting Hamilton Glaucoma Center, University of California San Diego. Patient Population 158 subjects from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study, including 82 with glaucoma and 76 similarly aged controls. Observation Procedure Ability to divide attention was investigated by measuring reaction times to peripheral stimuli (at low, medium or high contrast) while concomitantly performing a central driving task (car following or curve negotiation). All subjects had standard automated perimetry (SAP) and optical coherence tomography was used to measured retinal nerve fiber (RNFL) thickness. Cognitive ability was assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and subjects completed a driving history questionnaire. Main outcome measures Reaction times to the driving simulator divided attention task. Results The mean reaction times to the low contrast stimulus were 1.05 s and 0.64 s in glaucoma and controls respectively during curve negotiation (P <0.001), and 1.19 s and 0.77 s (P = 0.025) respectively during car following. There was a non-linear relationship between reaction times and RNFL thickness in the better eye. RNFL thickness remained significantly associated with reaction times even after adjusting for age, SAP mean deviation in the better eye, cognitive ability and central driving task performance. Conclusions Although worse SAP sensitivity was associated with worse ability to divide attention, RNFL thickness measurements provided additional information. Information from structural tests may improve our ability to determine which patients are likely to have problems performing daily activities, such as driving. PMID:25068641

  1. Muscle Reaction Time During a Simulated Lateral Ankle Sprain After Wet-Ice Application or Cold-Water Immersion

    PubMed Central

    Thain, Peter K.; Bleakley, Christopher M.; Mitchell, Andrew C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Context Cryotherapy is used widely in sport and exercise medicine to manage acute injuries and facilitate rehabilitation. The analgesic effects of cryotherapy are well established; however, a potential caveat is that cooling tissue negatively affects neuromuscular control through delayed muscle reaction time. This topic is important to investigate because athletes often return to exercise, rehabilitation, or competitive activity immediately or shortly after cryotherapy. Objective To compare the effects of wet-ice application, cold-water immersion, and an untreated control condition on peroneus longus and tibialis anterior muscle reaction time during a simulated lateral ankle sprain. Design Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting University of Hertfordshire human performance laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 54 physically active individuals (age = 20.1 ± 1.5 years, height = 1.7 ± 0.07 m, mass = 66.7 ± 5.4 kg) who had no injury or history of ankle sprain. Intervention(s) Wet-ice application, cold-water immersion, or an untreated control condition applied to the ankle for 10 minutes. Main Outcome Measure(s) Muscle reaction time and muscle amplitude of the peroneus longus and tibialis anterior in response to a simulated lateral ankle sprain were calculated. The ankle-sprain simulation incorporated a combined inversion and plantar-flexion movement. Results We observed no change in muscle reaction time or muscle amplitude after cryotherapy for either the peroneus longus or tibialis anterior (P > .05). Conclusions Ten minutes of joint cooling did not adversely affect muscle reaction time or muscle amplitude in response to a simulated lateral ankle sprain. These findings suggested that athletes can safely return to sporting activity immediately after icing. Further evidence showed that ice can be applied before ankle rehabilitation without adversely affecting dynamic neuromuscular control. Investigation in patients with acute ankle sprains is

  2. Real-time analysis of conformational control in electron transfer reactions of human cytochrome P450 reductase with cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Hedison, Tobias M; Hay, Sam; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2015-11-01

    Protein domain dynamics and electron transfer chemistry are often associated, but real-time analysis of domain motion in enzyme-catalysed reactions and the elucidation of mechanistic schemes that relate these motions to the reaction chemistry are major challenges for biological catalysis research. Previously we suggested that reduction of human cytochrome P450 reductase with the reducing coenzyme NADPH is accompanied by major structural re-orientation of the FMN- and FAD-binding domains through an inferred dynamic cycle of 'open' and 'closed' conformations of the enzyme (PLoS Biol, 2011, e1001222). However, these studies were restricted to stopped-flow/FRET analysis of the reductive half-reaction, and were compromised by fluorescence quenching of the acceptor by the flavin cofactors. Here we have improved the design of the FRET system, by using dye pairs with near-IR fluorescence, and extended studies on human cytochrome P450 reductase to the oxidative half-reaction using a double-mixing stopped-flow assay, thereby analysing in real-time conformational dynamics throughout the complete catalytic cycle. We correlate redox changes accompanying the reaction chemistry with protein dynamic changes observed by FRET, and show that redox chemistry drives a major re-orientation of the protein domains in both the reductive and oxidative half-reactions. Our studies using the tractable (soluble) surrogate electron acceptor cytochrome c provide a framework for analysing mechanisms of electron transfer in the endoplasmic reticulum between cytochrome P450 reductase and cognate P450 enzymes. More generally, our work emphasizes the importance of protein dynamics in intra- and inter-protein electron transfer, and establishes methodology for real-time analysis of structural changes throughout the catalytic cycle of complex redox proteins. PMID:26307151

  3. General model of a cascade of reactions with time delays: Global stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, Marek

    2015-07-01

    The problem considered in this paper consists of a cascade of reactions with discrete as well as distributed delays, which arose in the context of Hes1 gene expression. For the abstract general model sufficient conditions for global stability are presented. Then the abstract result is applied to the Hes1 model.

  4. Comparison of Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction with Parasitological Methods for Detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in Human Fecal Samples.

    PubMed

    Sharifdini, Meysam; Mirhendi, Hossein; Ashrafi, Keyhan; Hosseini, Mostafa; Mohebali, Mehdi; Khodadadi, Hossein; Kia, Eshrat Beigom

    2015-12-01

    This study was performed to evaluate nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR methods for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in fecal samples compared with parasitological methods. A total of 466 stool samples were examined by conventional parasitological methods (formalin ether concentration [FEC] and agar plate culture [APC]). DNA was extracted using an in-house method, and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 18S ribosomal genes were amplified by nested PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. Among 466 samples, 12.7% and 18.2% were found infected with S. stercoralis by FEC and APC, respectively. DNA of S. stercoralis was detected in 18.9% and 25.1% of samples by real-time PCR and nested PCR, respectively. Considering parasitological methods as the diagnostic gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of nested PCR were 100% and 91.6%, respectively, and that of real-time PCR were 84.7% and 95.8%, respectively. However, considering sequence analyzes of the selected nested PCR products, the specificity of nested PCR is increased. In general, molecular methods were superior to parasitological methods. They were more sensitive and more reliable in detection of S. stercoralis in comparison with parasitological methods. Between the two molecular methods, the sensitivity of nested PCR was higher than real-time PCR. PMID:26350449

  5. The equilibrium assumption is valid for the kinetic treatment of most time-dependent protein-modification reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Brocklehurst, K

    1979-01-01

    To facilitate mechanistic interpretation of the kinetics of time-dependent inhibition of enzymes and of similar protein modification reactions, it is important to know when the equilibrium assumption may be applied to the model: formula: (see text). The conventional criterion of quasi-equilibrium, k + 2 less than k-1, is not always easy to assess, particularly when k + 2 cannot be separately determined. It is demonstrated that the condition k + 2 less than k-1 is necessarily true, however, when the value of the apparent second-order rate constant for the modification reaction is much smaller than the value of k + 1. Since k + 1 is commonly at least 10(7)M-1.S-1 for substrates, it is probable that the equilibrium assumption may be properly applied to most irreversible inhibitions and modification reactions. PMID:518556

  6. Directional errors of movements and their correction in a discrete tracking task. [pilot reaction time and sensorimotor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeger, R. J.; Agarwal, G. C.; Gottlieb, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    Subjects can correct their own errors of movement more quickly than they can react to external stimuli by using three general categories of feedback: (1) knowledge of results, primarily visually mediated; (2) proprioceptive or kinaesthetic such as from muscle spindles and joint receptors, and (3) corollary discharge or efference copy within the central nervous system. The effects of these feedbacks on simple reaction time, choice reaction time, and error correction time were studied in four normal human subjects. The movement used was plantarflexion and dorsiflexion of the ankle joint. The feedback loops were modified, by changing the sign of the visual display to alter the subject's perception of results, and by applying vibration at 100 Hz simultaneously to both the agonist and antagonist muscles of the ankle joint. The central processing was interfered with when the subjects were given moderate doses of alcohol (blood alcohol concentration levels of up to 0.07%). Vibration and alcohol increase both the simple and choice reaction times but not the error correction time.

  7. Real-time trace detection and identification of chemical warfare agent simulants using recent advances in proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Fredrik; Sulzer, Philipp; Mayhew, Chris A; Watts, Peter; Jordan, Alfons; Märk, Lukas; Märk, Tilmann D

    2009-12-01

    This work demonstrates for the first time the potential of using recent developments in proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry for the rapid detection and identification of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in real-time. A high-resolution (m/Deltam up to 8000) and high-sensitivity (approximately 50 cps/ppbv) proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF 8000 from Ionicon Analytik GmBH) has been successfully used to detect a number of CWA simulants at room temperature; namely dimethyl methylphosphonate, diethyl methylphosphonate, diisopropyl methylphosphonate, dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide. Importantly, we demonstrate in this paper the potential to identify CWAs with a high level of confidence in complex chemical environments, where multiple threat agents and interferents could also be present in trace amounts, thereby reducing the risk of false positives. Instantaneous detection and identification of trace quantities of chemical threats using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry could form the basis for a timely warning system capability with greater precision and accuracy than is currently provided by existing analytical technologies. PMID:19902419

  8. The influence of temporal factors on automatic priming and conscious expectancy in a simple reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Destrebecqz, Arnaud; Perruchet, Pierre; Cleeremans, Axel; Laureys, Steven; Maquet, Pierre; Peigneux, Philippe

    2010-02-01

    In a previous study, we reported a dissociation between subjective expectancy and motor behaviour in a simple associative learning task (Perruchet, Cleeremans, & Destrebecqz, 2006). According to previous conditioning studies (Clark, Manns, & Squire, 2001), this dissociation is observed when the to-be-associated events coterminate and thus overlap in time (a training regimen called delay conditioning), but not when they are separated by a temporal delay (trace conditioning). In this latter situation indeed, there tends to be a direct relationship between subjective expectancy and behaviour. In this study, we further investigated this issue in a series of experiments where conscious and unconscious components of performance were pitted against each other. In Experiments 1-3, participants performed a simple reaction time task in which a preparatory signal (a tone) either overlapped with or terminated earlier than the imperative stimulus (a visual target presented in 50% of the trials). After each response, participants also had to state how much they expected the imperative stimulus to be displayed on the next trial. Results indicate that reaction times tend to decrease when the tone is consistently followed by the visual target across successive trials, whereas conscious expectancy for the target decreases at the same time. Importantly, we systematically found that the temporal relationship between the tone and the target failed to influence performance. In a fourth experiment, we examined whether these results extend to a two-choice reaction time task. To our surprise, we observed a direct relationship between subjective expectancies and reaction time in that situation. We nevertheless observed that the introduction of a delay between the tone and the target had, once again, no effect on performance. PMID:19526437

  9. Mechanism of the nucleotidyl-transfer reaction in DNA polymerase revealed by time-resolved protein crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Teruya; Zhao, Ye; Yamagata, Yuriko; Hua, Yue-jin; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotidyl-transfer reaction catalyzed by DNA polymerase is a fundamental enzymatic reaction for DNA synthesis. Until now, a number of structural and kinetic studies on DNA polymerases have proposed a two-metalion mechanism of the nucleotidyl-transfer reaction. However, the actual reaction process has never been visualized. Recently, we have followed the nucleotidyl-transfer reaction process by human DNA polymerase η using time-resolved protein crystallography. In sequence, two Mg2+ ions bind to the active site, the nucleophile 3′-OH is deprotonated, the deoxyribose at the primer end converts from C2′-endo to C3′-endo, and the nucleophile and the α-phosphate of the substrate dATP approach each other to form the new bond. In this process, we observed transient elements, which are a water molecule to deprotonate the 3′-OH and an additional Mg2+ ion to stabilize the intermediate state. Particularly, the third Mg2+ ion observed in this study may be a general feature of the two-metalion mechanism.

  10. The use of associated particle timing based on the D + D reaction for imaging a solid object.

    PubMed

    Evans, C J; Mutamba, Q B

    2002-05-01

    Associated particle timing based on the D + D reaction has been applied for imaging a bulk sample, namely an aluminium box. The relatively low neutron energy, 2.8 MeV, allows a better spatial resolution from time-of-flight measurements. A combination of a Si detector for charged particles and an NaI(Tl) scintillator for inelastic-scatter gamma rays yielded an overall time resolution of 0.4 ns, giving a spatial resolution of better than 1 cm. A new reconstruction program was developed, yielding an image free from major artefacts. PMID:11993946

  11. Development of an FTIR in situ reactor for real time study of surface reactions in photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauchecorne, Birger

    For many years, photocatalysis has been proposed as one of the promising techniques to abate environmental pollutants. To improve the catalytic efficiency, it is vital to know the reaction mechanisms of the photocatalytic degradation. Different methods are therefore described in literature to study these mechanisms at the gaseous phase/photocatalyst interface with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as a commonly used method. The reactors described in literature and/or available on the market experience some technical and scientific difficulties. Generally, the catalyst can only be investigated after the reactions have occurred, or it is only possible to look at the changes in the gas phase concentrations while the reactions are taking place. It is thus a major challenge to develop a reactor which makes it possible to detect changes on the catalyst surface at the moment the reactions are happening. In this work, a new reactor is developed that makes it possible to study the catalytic surface at the moment the reactions occur, by means of transmission-absorption FTIR spectroscopy. Moreover, by using UV LEDs, it was possible to install the UV light inside the reactor area, so that no harmful UV light can leave the reactor, inherently making it a safer method. It was also opted to construct the reactor in a modular way, so that every part was interchangeable and could easily be replaced according to the needs of the researcher. A special screw cap is designed to hold the UV LEDs on a printed circuit board and to fit in every standard FTIR spectrometer. This study provides exciting new insights in the photocatalytic degradation mechanism of ethylene and acetaldehyde. It is for instance found that OH radicals are used as the oxidising agents to abate these pollutants. For ethylene it was proven that the molecular orbitals play an important role, resulting in the formation of both formaldehyde and formic acid as intermediates before complete mineralisation

  12. Real-Time Measurement Of Polyurethane Foam Reactions And Hydrogen-Bonding By FT-IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Bradley L.; Harthcock, Matthew A.; Christenson, C. P.; Turner, R. B.

    1989-12-01

    The reaction and hydrogen-bond formation kinetics which occur in polyurethane foams will have an ultimate effect on the properties of these materials. Measurement of several urethane and urea carbonyl absorptions (free and hydrogen-bonded) provides two important pieces of information: (1) the chemical reactions which occur and (2) the progression of hydrogen-bond formation after reaction has completed. An attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic technique has been previously developed which allows real-time data to be obtained during the foaming reaction 1,2. The authors have adapted a similar system to studying foams in order to more quantitatively interpret the real-time data in terms of the complex hydrogen-bonding structure. The vibrational assignments used for the carbonyl region of polyurethane foam spectra are as follows: 1732 cm-1 free urethane 1712 free urea 1701 ordered hydrogen-bonded urethane 1699-1653 monodentate hydrogen-bonded urea (Fig. 1) 1641 bidentate/ordered hydrogen-bonded urea. (Fig. 1)

  13. Studying Chemical Reactions, One Bond at a Time, with Single Molecule AFM Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Julio M.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanisms by which mechanical forces regulate the kinetics of a chemical reaction are unknown. In my lecture I will demonstrate how we use single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy and protein engineering to study the effect of force on the kinetics of thiol/disulfide exchange. Reduction of disulfide bond via the thiol/disulfide exchange chemical reaction is crucial in regulating protein function and is of common occurrence in mechanically stressed proteins. While reduction is thought to proceed through a substitution nucleophilic bimolecular (SN2) reaction, the role of a mechanical force in modulating this chemical reaction is unknown. We apply a constant stretching force to single engineered disulfide bonds and measure their rate of reduction by dithiothreitol (DTT). We find that while the reduction rate is linearly dependent on the concentration of DTT, it is exponentially dependent on the applied force, increasing 10-fold over a 300 pN range. This result predicts that the disulfide bond lengthens by 0.34 å at the transition state of the thiol/disulfide exchange reaction. In addition to DTT, we also study the reduction of the engineered disulfide bond by the E. coli enzyme thioredoxin (Trx). Thioredoxins are enzymes that catalyze disulfide bond reduction in all organisms. As before, we apply a mechanical force in the range of 25-450 pN to the engineered disulfide bond substrate and monitor the reduction of these bonds by individual enzymes. In sharp contrast with the data obtained with DTT, we now observe two alternative forms of the catalytic reaction, the first requiring a reorientation of the substrate disulfide bond, causing a shortening of the substrate polypeptide by 0.76±0.07 å, and the second elongating the substrate disulfide bond by 0.21±0.01 å. These results support the view that the Trx active site regulates the geometry of the participating sulfur atoms, with sub-ångström precision, in order to achieve efficient catalysis. Single molecule

  14. Are improved rater reliability results associated with faster reaction times after rater training for judgments of laryngeal mucus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilha, Heather S.; Dawson, Amy; McGrattan, Katlyn

    2012-02-01

    Mucus aggregation on the vocal folds, a common complaint amongst persons with voice disorders, has been visually rated on four parameters: type, pooling, thickness, and location. Rater training is used to improve the reliability and accuracy of these ratings. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of training on rater reliability, accuracy and response time. Two raters scored mucus aggregation from 120 stroboscopic exams after a brief introductory session and again after a thorough training session. Reliability and accuracy were calculated in percent agreement. Two-tail paired t-tests were used to assess differences in reaction time for ratings before and after training. Inter-rater reliability improved from 79% pre-training to 92% post-training. Intra-rater reliability improved from 77% to 91% for Rater 1 and 80% to 88% for Rater 2 following training. Accuracy improved from 80% to 96% for Rater 1 and 76% to 95% for Rater 2 from pre- to post-training. Reaction time decreased for both raters (p=0.025). These findings further our understanding of observer performance on judgments of laryngeal mucus. These results suggest that rater training increases reliability and accuracy while decreasing reaction time. Future studies should assess the relationship of these judgments and voice changes.

  15. A TaqMan-based real-time polymerase chain reaction for the detection of porcine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Ying; Li, Xiao-Kang; Cui, Bao-An; Wei, Zhan-Yong; Li, Xin-Sheng; Wang, Yan-Bin; Zhao, Li; Wang, Zhen-Ya

    2009-03-01

    A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a TaqMan probe was developed to detect porcine parvovirus (PPV). Real-time PCR was optimized to quantify PPV using a detection system (Rotor Gene 2000 detector) and a dual-labeled fluorogenic probe. The gene-specific labeled fluorogenic probe for the VP2 gene of PPV was used to detect PPV. Quantitation of PPV was accomplished by a standard curve plotting cycle threshold values (Ct) against each dilution of standard plasmids. When the specificity of the assay using specific PPV primers was evaluated by testing the PPV standard strain and other viruses, no cross-reactions were detected with non-PPV reference viruses. The detection limit of real-time PCR for PPV was 2.08log10 genome copy equivalent (gce). In this study, a real-time PCR assay was performed on 80 clinical samples and compared with a conventional PCR assay. In 48 of 80 samples, PPV DNA was detected by the conventional PCR assay. All samples positive for PPV DNA by the conventional PCR assay were also positive by the real-time PCR assay, and 12 of 32 samples that tested negative for PPV DNA by the conventional method tested positive by the real-time PCR assay. Using the real-time PCR assay, the number of samples in which PPV was detected increased by 15%. Therefore, it is considered to be a useful tool for the detection of PPV. PMID:19041671

  16. A method for correcting standard-based real-time PCR DNA quantitation when the standard's polymerase reaction efficiency is significantly different from that of the unknown's

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Standard-based real-time, or quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) quantitation of an unknown sample’s DNA concentration (i.e., [DNA]-unk) assumes that the concentration dependence of the standard and unknown reactions (related to reaction efficiency, E) are equivalent. In our work with ba...

  17. Real-time ligation chain reaction for DNA quantification and identification on the FO-SPR.

    PubMed

    Knez, Karel; Spasic, Dragana; Delport, Filip; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2015-05-15

    Different assays have been developed in the past years to meet point-of-care diagnostic tests requirements for fast and sensitive quantification and identification of targets. In this paper, we developed the ligation chain reaction (LCR) assay on the Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance (FO-SPR) platform, which enabled simultaneous quantification and cycle-to-cycle identification of DNA during amplification. The newly developed assay incorporated FO-SPR DNA melting assay, previously developed by our group. This required establishment of several assay parameters, including buffer ionic strength and thermal ramping speed as these parameters both influence the ligation enzyme performance and the hybridization yield of the gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) on the FO-SPR sensor. Quantification and identification of DNA targets was achieved over a wide concentration range with a calibration curve spanning 7 orders of magnitude and LOD of 13.75 fM. Moreover, the FO-SPR LCR assay could discriminate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) without any post reaction analysis, featuring thus all the essential requirements of POC tests. PMID:25212376

  18. A Flight-Calibrated Methodology for Determination of Cassini Thruster On-Times for Reaction Wheel Biases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarani, Siamak

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for accurate and flight-calibrated determination of the on-times of the Cassini spacecraft Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters, without any form of dynamic simulation, for the reaction wheel biases. The hydrazine usage and the delta V vector in body frame are also computed from the respective thruster on-times. The Cassini spacecraft, the largest and most complex interplanetary spacecraft ever built, continues to undertake ambitious and unique scientific observations of planet Saturn, Titan, Enceladus, and other moons of Saturn. In order to maintain a stable attitude during the course of its mission, this three-axis stabilized spacecraft uses two different control systems: the RCS and the reaction wheel assembly control system. The RCS is used to execute a commanded spacecraft slew, to maintain three-axis attitude control, control spacecraft's attitude while performing science observations with coarse pointing requirements, e.g. during targeted low-altitude Titan and Enceladus flybys, bias the momentum of reaction wheels, and to perform RCS-based orbit trim maneuvers. The use of RCS often imparts undesired delta V on the spacecraft. The Cassini navigation team requires accurate predictions of the delta V in spacecraft coordinates and inertial frame resulting from slews using RCS thrusters and more importantly from reaction wheel bias events. It is crucial for the Cassini spacecraft attitude control and navigation teams to be able to, quickly but accurately, predict the hydrazine usage and delta V for various reaction wheel bias events without actually having to spend time and resources simulating the event in flight software-based dynamic simulation or hardware-in-the-loop simulation environments. The methodology described in this paper, and the ground software developed thereof, are designed to provide just that. This methodology assumes a priori knowledge of thrust magnitudes and thruster pulse rise and tail-off time

  19. Positive feedback produces broad distributions in maximum activation attained within a narrow time window in stochastic biochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayajit

    2013-03-01

    Stochastic fluctuations in biochemical reactions can regulate single cell decision processes. Using exact solutions and semi-analytical methods we calculate distributions of the maximum value (N) of species concentrations (Pmax (N)) and the time (t) taken to reach the maximum value (Pmax (t)) in minimal models of stochastic chemical reactions commonly found in cell signaling systems. We find, the presence of positive feedback interactions make Pmax (N) more spread out with a higher ``peakedness'' in Pmax (t) . Thus positive feedback interactions may help single cells to respond sensitively to a stimulus when cell decision processes require upregulation of activated forms of key proteins to a threshold number within a time window. Moreover, unlike other models of strongly correlated random variables such as Brownian walks or fluctuating interfaces, the extreme value distributions for the chemical reactions display multiscaling behavior emphasizing the presence of many time scales in cell signaling kinetics. This work was funded by the Research Institute at the Nationwide Children's Hospital and a grant (1R56AI090115-01A1) from the NIH.

  20. Effect of Various Eye Exercise Techniques along with Pranayama on Visual Reaction Time: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gosewade, Nitin B.; Shende, Vinod S.; Kashalikar, Shriniwas J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We depend on eyesight more than any other of our senses to maneuver through the space around us. In a fraction of a second, our eyes work with our brain to tell us the size, shape, colour, and texture of an object. Our eyes are body’s most highly developed sensory organs. The use of computers and television in the era of information technology has given new heights to the professional success rate and it saves time but on the other hand, it has led to an increase in the number of patients with ocular complaints. Aims: The objective of the study was to study the effect of eye exercise techniques along with kapalbhati pranayama on Visual Reaction Time (VRT). Material & Methods: Total 60 subjects in an age group of 18–30 were recruited in the study. All the subjects were divided into two equal groups (study group and control group) containing 30 subjects (18 male & 12 female) each. Both the male and female subjects were selected on the basis of their voluntary involvement. Visual reaction time for red and green light was recorded from all 60 subjects before the start of the study. Study group subjects were trained to practice various eye exercise techniques and kapalbhati pranayama for 8 weeks regularly whereas control group were busy with their routine activities. After 8 weeks, visual reaction time was measured for red and green light from all 60 subjects. Statistical Analysis: Data expressed as Mean ± S.D, Student t –test was applied for analysis of data, p value <0.05 is taken as statistically significant. Results: Statistical analysis of data shows that there is a significant decrease in the visual reaction time for red and green light after intervention in study group (p value <0.05). Whereas there is no significant decrease in VRT in control group (p value >0.05). Conclusion: The results of our study suggest that simple eye exercises along with pranayama helps in improvement of visual reaction time. PMID:24179885

  1. Rapid detection of sacbrood virus in honeybee using ultra-rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Mi-Sun; Thi, Kim Cuc Nguyen; Van Nguyen, Phu; Han, Sang-Hoon; Kwon, Soon-Hwan; Yoon, Byoung-Su

    2012-01-01

    A real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay was developed for the fast and highly sensitive detection of the sacbrood virus (SBV) genome and applied to honeybee samples. Using plasmid DNA containing a partial SBV genome and diluted serially, as few as 1×10(2)copies/μl (correlation co-efficiency >0.99) were detected by the qRT-PCR assay, whereas 1×10(3)copies/μl were detected by the conventional RT-PCR assay. As a rapid detection method, ultra-rapid real-time PCR (URRT-PCR) was carried out with a GenSpector TMC-1000 silicon-glass chip-based thermal cycler, which has a 6μl micro-chamber volume and a fast outstandingly heating/cooling rate. Using this method, 10(3)copies of pBX-SBV3.8 clone were detected within 17 min after 40 PCR cycles, including melting point analysis. To reduce the detection time for SBV, synthesis of the cDNA of the SBV genome from a honeybee sample was attempted for different reaction times and the cDNA was used as the template for URRT-PCR assays. The results indicated that a 5 min reaction time was sufficient to synthesize cDNA as the template for the SBV URRT-PCR assay. This study described a novel PCR-based method that is able to detect an RNA virus in environmental samples within 22 min, including reverse transcription, PCR detection and melting point analysis in real-time. PMID:22079620

  2. Combining direct residence time measurements and biogeochemistry to calculate in-situ reaction rates in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittroff, Marco; Gilfedder, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    The hyporheic zone is an active interface between groundwater, riparian and surface water systems. Exchange and reaction of water, nutrients, and organic matter occur due to variations in surface and groundwater flow regimes, bed topography and active biogeochemistry fuelled by bioavailable carbon. There has been an increasing focus on coupling the residence time of surface water in the hyporheic zone with biogeochemical reactions. However, there are very few tracers that can be used to measure residence times in-situ, especially in complex groundwater-surface water settings. In this work we have used the natural radioisotope Radon (222Rn) as an in-situ tracer for river water residence time in a riffle-pool sequence (Rote Main River), and combined this information with biogeochemical parameters (DOC and C quality, O3, NO3, CO2). We can clearly observe a dependence of reaction progress on the water residence times, with oxygen and nitrate reduction following inverse logarithmic trends as a function of time. By comparing with initial concentrations (the river end member) with riverbed levels we have estimated first-order in-situ reduction rates for nitrate and oxygen. Nitrate reduction rates are at the higher end of published values, which is likely due to the continual supply of bioavailable carbon from the river system. This work helps to better understand the function and efficiency of the hyporheic zone as a natural filter for redox sensitive species such as nitrate at the groundwater - steam interface. It also provides a useful method for estimating residence times in complex, higher order river systems.

  3. Predominant Time Scales in Fission Processes in Reactions of S, Ti and Ni with W: Zeptosecond versus Attosecond

    SciTech Connect

    Du Rietz, R.; Hinde, D. J.; Dasgupta, M.; Thomas, R. G.; Gasques, L. R.; Evers, M.; Lobanov, N.; Wakhle, A.

    2011-02-04

    The inhibition of fusion by quasifission is crucial in limiting the formation of superheavy elements in collisions of heavy nuclei. Time scales of {approx}10{sup -18} s inferred for fissionlike events from recent crystal blocking measurements were interpreted to show either that quasifission itself is slower than previously believed, or that the fraction of slow fusion-fission is higher than expected. New measurements of mass-angle distributions for {sup 48}Ti and {sup 64}Ni bombarding W targets show that in these reactions quasifission is the dominant process, typically occurring before the system formed after contact has made a single rotation, corresponding to time scales of {<=}10{sup -20} s.

  4. Rapid and inexpensive species differentiation using a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction high-resolution melt assay.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Kelly M; Perez, Anjelica C U; Sweetin, Katherine C

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a method for developing real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) high-resolution melt (HRM) assays to identify multiple species present in a mixture simultaneously using LCGreen Plus and melt temperatures. Highly specific PCR primers are designed to yield amplicons with different melt temperatures for simple routine species identification compared with differentiating melt curve kinetics traces or difference plots. This method is robust and automatable, and it leads to savings in time and reagent costs, is easily modified to probe any species of interest, eliminates the need for post-PCR gel or capillary electrophoresis in routine assays, and requires no expensive dye-labeled primers. PMID:26836486

  5. Does Occupational Exposure of Shahid Dastghieb International Airport Workers to Radiofrequency Radiation Affect Their Short Term Memory and Reaction Time?

    PubMed Central

    Jarideh, S.; Taeb, S.; Pishva, S. M.; Haghani, M.; Sina, S.; Mortazavi, S. A. R.; Hosseini, M. A.; Nematollahi, S.; Shokrpour, N.; Hassan Shahi, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Airport workers are continuously exposed to different levels of radiofrequency microwave (RF/MW) radiation emitted by radar equipments. Radars are extensively used in military and aviation industries. Over the past several years, our lab has focused on the health effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as cellular phones, mobile base stations, mobile phone jammers, laptop computers, radars, dentistry cavitrons and MRI. The main goal of this study was to investigate if occupational exposure of Shahid Dastghieb international airport workers to radiofrequency radiation affects their short term memory and reaction time. Methods Thirty two airport workers involved in duties at control and approach tower (21 males and 11 females), with the age range of 27-67 years old (mean age of 37.38), participated voluntary in this study. On the other hand, 29 workers (13 males, and 16 females) whose offices were in the city with no exposure history to radar systems were also participated in this study as the control group. The employees’ reaction time and short term memory were analyzed using a standard visual reaction time (VRT) test software and the modified Wechsler memory scale test, respectively. Results The mean± SD values for the reaction times of the airport employees (N=32) and the control group (N=29) were 0.45±0.12 sec and 0.46±0.17 sec, respectively.  Moreover, in the four subset tests; i.e. paired words, forward digit span, backward digit span and word recognition, the following points were obtained for the airport employees and the control group, respectively: (i) pair words test: 28.00±13.13 and 32.07±11.65, (ii) forward digit span: 8.38±1.40 and 9.03±1.32, (iii) backward digit span: 5.54±1.87 and 6.31±1.46, and (iv) word recognition: 5.73±2.36 and 6.50±1.93. These differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion The occupational exposure of the employees to the RF radiation in Shahid Dastghieb

  6. Premotor and Motor Reaction Time as a Function of Response Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christina, Robert W.; Rose, Debra J.

    1985-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to identify response elements responsible for the complexity effect found by Henry and Rogers. Results suggest that, as the number of movement parts and the accuracy demands increase, programing time increases, supporting the hypothesis that response initiation time becomes longer as programing becomes more complex.…

  7. Conversation Effects on Neural Mechanisms Underlying Reaction Time to Visual Events while Viewing a Driving Scene using MEG

    PubMed Central

    Bowyer, Susan M.; Hsieh, Li; Moran, John E.; Young, Richard A.; Manoharan, Arun; Liao, Chia-cheng Jason; Malladi, Kiran; Yu, Ya-Ju; Chiang, Yow-Ren; Tepley, Norman

    2009-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) imaging examined the neural mechanisms that modulate reaction times to visual events while viewing a driving video, with and without a conversation. Twenty-four subjects ages 18–65 were monitored by whole-head MEG. The primary tasks were to monitor a driving video and to depress a foot pedal in response to a small red light presented to the left or below the driving scene at unpredictable times. The behavioral reaction time (RT) to the lights was recorded. The secondary task was a hands-free conversation. The subject pressed a button to answer a ring tone, and then covertly answered pre-recorded non-emotional questions such as “What is your birth date?” RTs for the conversation task (1043ms, SE=65ms) were slightly longer than for the primary task (baseline no conversation (944ms, SE=48ms). During the primary task RTs were inversely related to the amount of brain activity detected by MEG in the right superior parietal lobe (Brodmann’s Area 7). Brain activity was seen in the 200 to 300 ms range after the onset of the red light and in the visual cortex (BA 19) about 85 ms after the red light. Conversation reduced the strengths of these regression relationships and increased mean RT. Conversation may contribute to increased reaction times by (1) damping brain activation in specific regions during specific time windows, or (2) reducing facilitation from attention inputs into those areas. These laboratory findings should not be interpreted as indicative of real-world driving, without on-road validation, and comparison to other in-vehicle tasks. PMID:18992728

  8. Detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum DNA in salmonid tissues by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, D.M.; Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is an important salmonid pathogen that is difficult to culture. We developed and assessed a real-time, quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for the detection and enumeration of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR is based on TaqMan technology and amplifies a 69-base pair (bp) region of the gene encoding the major soluble antigen (MSA) of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR assay consistently detected as few as 5 R. salmoninarum cells per reaction in kidney tissue. The specificity of the qPCR was confirmed by testing the DNA extracts from a panel of microorganisms that were either common fish pathogens or reported to cause false-positive reactions in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Kidney samples from 38 juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in a naturally infected population were examined by real-time qPCR, a nested PCR, and ELISA, and prevalences of R. salmoninarum detected were 71, 66, and 71%, respectively. The qPCR should be a valuable tool for evaluating the R. salmoninarum infection status of salmonids.

  9. Detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum DNA in salmonid tissues by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Chase, Dorothy M; Elliott, Diane G; Pascho, Ronald J

    2006-07-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is an important salmonid pathogen that is difficult to culture. We developed and assessed a real-time, quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for the detection and enumeration of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR is based on TaqMan technology and amplifies a 69-base pair (bp) region of the gene encoding the major soluble antigen (MSA) of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR assay consistently detected as few as 5 R. salmoninarum cells per reaction in kidney tissue. The specificity of the qPCR was confirmed by testing the DNA extracts from a panel of microorganisms that were either common fish pathogens or reported to cause false-positive reactions in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Kidney samples from 38 juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in a naturally infected population were examined by real-time qPCR, a nested PCR, and ELISA, and prevalences of R. salmoninarum detected were 71, 66, and 71%, respectively. The qPCR should be a valuable tool for evaluating the R. salmoninarum infection status of salmonids. PMID:16921877

  10. Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of chemical reactions in solution using a focal plane array detector.

    PubMed

    Kaun, N; Vellekoop, M J; Lendl, B

    2006-11-01

    A Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microscope equipped with a single as well as a 64 x 64 element focal plane array MCT detector was used to measure chemical reaction taking place in a microstructured flow cell designed for time-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy. The flow cell allows transmission measurements through aqueous solutions and incorporates a microstructured mixing unit. This unit achieves lamination of the two input streams with a cross-section of 300 x 5 microm each, resulting in fast diffusion-controlled mixing of the two input streams. Microscopic measurement at defined positions along the outlet channel allows time-resolved information of the reaction taking place in the flow cell to be obtained. In this paper we show experimental results on the model reaction between formaldehyde and sulfite. Using the single-point MCT detector, high-quality FT-IR spectra could be obtained from a spot size of 80 x 200 microm whereas the FPA detector allowed recording light from an area of 260 x 260 microm focused on its 64 x 64 detector elements. Therefore, more closely spaced features could be discerned at the expense of a significantly lower signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio per spectrum. Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares was used to extract concentration profiles of the reacting species along the outlet channel axis. PMID:17132444

  11. Alteration of the Martian Surface Through Time: A Reaction Path Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, W. I.; Plumlee, G. S.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1995-09-01

    We have performed preliminary geochemical reaction path calculations [1] that attempt to model reasonable martian geologic processes under various climatic conditions postulated for Mars during its planetary evolution [2]. Weathering and fluid evaporation and freezing are discussed here. Under current Earth conditions, 25 degrees C rainwater in equilibrium with the atmosphere has a calculated pH=5.66, dissolved O2=2.5x10^-4 mole/kg, and dissolved CO2=1.3x10^-5 mole/kg. In contrast, martian rainwater in a postulated early, warm and wet climate would have lower pH,, higher dissolved CO2, and lower dissolved oxygen. For instance, in a martian atmosphere with pCO2=2.2 bar [3] and pO2=10^-5 bar, rainwater is calculated to have pH=3.96, dissolved CO2 of 7.5x10^-2 mole/kg, and dissolved O2=1.3x10^-8 mole/kg. If, under these climatic conditions, there was also extensive basaltic volcanism, then rainwater would be further modified chemically by solution of volcanic gases to form acid rain. For example, we can model this process using a Kilauea gas composition, in mole percent (H2O=57.8; HCl=0.9; SO2=17.4; CO2=21.6; H2S=0.2; H2=1.0), and assume the resultant fluid is buffered by atmospheric CO2. Addition of only 0.1 gram of gas to 1 kgram of ancient rainwater reduces the pH to 3.07 and dramatically increases dissolved SO4- (3.8x10^-4 mole/kg), H2S[aq] (1.3x10^-4 mole/kg) and Cl- (4.4x10^-5 mole/kg). Weathering minerals formed by reaction of the above fluid types with martian basalts can vary significantly depending upon initial fluid acidity and solute content. Acid rain and "normal" rain (buffered under high pCO2 conditions) initially alter martian basalt (modeled as the Chassigny parent composition [4]) to, in order of decreasing abundance: Fe-smectite (+/- ferrihydrite), Mn hydroxide, kaolinite, apatite, chalcedony at pH < 5. As pH increase to > 5 then dolomite, calcite, K-feldspar, and dawsonite also precipitate. An important aspect of this modeling is that acid rain can

  12. Effect of roasting time of buckwheat groats on the formation of Maillard reaction products and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Małgorzata, Wronkowska; Konrad, Piskuła Mariusz; Zieliński, Henryk

    2016-04-01

    Changes in the formation of Maillard reaction products and antioxidant capacity of buckwheat, induced by roasting at 160 °C for 30, 40 and 50 min, were evaluated in the study. Furozine, was detected after roasting, in all buckwheat samples. Increase of FIC, the presence of significant amounts of CML and enhanced browning were observed, along with increasing times of roasting. The formation of acrylamide in the obtained buckwheat products was also significantly connected with the time of roasting. A significant degradation was observed in natural antioxidants, as affected by heat treatment time. The colour parameter changed significantly with the increasing of roasting time. Overall, 30min of roasting was beneficial from a nutritional point of view for the obtained buckwheat product. PMID:26593501

  13. A pentaplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of four species of soil-transmitted helminths.

    PubMed

    Basuni, Madihah; Muhi, Jamail; Othman, Nurulhasanah; Verweij, Jaco J; Ahmad, Maimunah; Miswan, Noorizan; Rahumatullah, Anizah; Aziz, Farhanah Abdul; Zainudin, Nurul Shazalina; Noordin, Rahmah

    2011-02-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth infections remain a major public health burden in low- and middle-income countries. The traditional diagnosis by microscopic examination of fecal samples is insensitive and time-consuming. In this study, a pentaplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was evaluated for the simultaneous detection of Ancylostoma, Necator americanus, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis. The results were compared with those obtained by conventional parasitological diagnostic methods. Real-time PCR was positive in 48 of 77 samples (62.3%) and microscopic examination was positive in six samples (7.8%) only (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the real-time PCR assay described in this study provides a specific and sensitive diagnostic tool for the detection of these four helminth species in epidemiological studies and monitoring of treatment programs. PMID:21292911

  14. Multiemission wavelength picosecond time-resolved fluorescence decay data obtained on the millisecond time scale: application to protein:DNA interactions and protein-folding reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beechem, Joseph M.

    1992-04-01

    One of the major aspects of fluorescence spectroscopy which differentiates this technique from many other spectroscopic approaches is the inherent multidimensional nature of the data. For instance, the basic pulsed-laser fluorescence data set is characterized by fluorescence versus: emission wavelength, polarization state (parallel and perpendicular intensities), time of emission (picoseconds to nanoseconds), and time of biological reaction (milliseconds to minutes). Usually, this six-dimensional data set is obtained piecemeal, single dimension at a time; often complete data sets are not even collected. This is especially true of the biological time scale axis. Data acquisition times for picosecond decay data are typically seconds to minutes, and, therefore, it has not been generally possible to perform this experiment in a kinetic mode. What is described in this report is the construction of a parallel multichannel time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) fluorometer which is capable of simultaneous collection of: fluorescence vs. picosecond to nanosecond time vs. emission wavelength vs. polarization state vs. millisecond to second time. Use is made of two multi-anode microchannel plate detectors, each obtaining data at two different polarization states, six different emission wavelengths, along 12 independent TCSPC channels. This instrument is interfaced to a three-syringe stepper motor controlled stop-flow apparatus, and picosecond decay data along all of these channels is stored and collected by two 33 MHz 80486 computers at rates approaching 1200 - 12000 data sets per second.

  15. In Site Analysis of a High Temperature Cure Reaction in Real Time Using Modulated Fiber-Optic FT-Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John; Aust, Jeffrey F.; Wise, Kent L.; Jensen, Brian J.

    1999-01-01

    The vibrational spectrum of a high temperature (330 C) polymerization reaction was successfully monitored in real time using a modulated fiber-optic FT-Raman spectrometer. A phenylethynyl terminated monomer was cured, and spectral evidence for two different reaction products was acquired. The products are a conjugated polyene chain and a cyclized trimer. This is the first report describing the use of FT-Raman spectroscopy to monitor a high temperature (greater than 250 C) reaction in real time.

  16. Development of ESI-MS-based continuous enzymatic assay for real-time monitoring of enzymatic reactions of acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Tang, Jun; Cui, Meng; Zheng, Zhong; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2015-05-15

    The continuous enzymatic assay based on ESI-MS was developed to real-time monitoring of enzymatic reactions of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The changes of product concentrations were continuously measured. Calibration curves were established for quantitative calculation. By this method, the Michaelis constant (Km) of acetylcholinesterase was determined to be 70.60±0.93μM and Huperzine A as an effective inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase displayed a mixed inhibition with competitive and noncompetitive inhibition behaviors. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) and inhibition constant (Ki) value of Huperzine A were also calculated as 48.51±1.16nM and 26.73±0.27nM, respectively. This method provides the rapid and accurate ways to monitor enzyme reactions. PMID:25875590

  17. Quantum reaction rate from higher derivatives of the thermal flux-flux autocorrelation function at time zero.

    PubMed

    Ceotto, Michele; Yang, Sandy; Miller, William H

    2005-01-22

    A quantum theory of thermal reaction rates is presented which may be viewed as an extension of the recently developed "quantum instanton" (QI) model [W. H. Miller, Y. Zhao, M. Ceotto, and S. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 1329 (2003)]. It is based on using higher derivatives of the flux-flux autocorrelation function C(t) (as given by Miller, Schwartz, and Tromp) at t=0 to construct a short time approximation for C(t). Tests of this theory on 1d and collinear reactions, both symmetric and asymmetric, show it to be more accurate than the original QI model, giving rate constants to approximately 5% for a wide range of temperature. PMID:15740237

  18. Quantum reaction rate from higher derivatives of the thermal flux-flux autocorrelation function at time zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceotto, Michele; Yang, Sandy; Miller, William H.

    2005-01-01

    A quantum theory of thermal reaction rates is presented which may be viewed as an extension of the recently developed "quantum instanton" (QI) model [W. H. Miller, Y. Zhao, M. Ceotto, and S. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 1329 (2003)]. It is based on using higher derivatives of the flux-flux autocorrelation function C(t) (as given by Miller, Schwartz, and Tromp) at t=0 to construct a short time approximation for C(t). Tests of this theory on 1d and collinear reactions, both symmetric and asymmetric, show it to be more accurate than the original QI model, giving rate constants to ˜5% for a wide range of temperature.

  19. Near-IR absorbance changes and electrogenic reactions in the microsecond-to-second time domain in Photosystem I.

    PubMed Central

    Vassiliev, I R; Jung, Y S; Mamedov, M D; Semenov AYu; Golbeck, J H

    1997-01-01

    The back-reaction kinetics in Photosystem I (PS I) were studied on the microsecond-to-s time scale in cyanobacterial preparations, which differed in the number of iron-sulfur clusters to assess the contributions of particular components to the reduction of P700+. In membrane fragments and in trimeric P700-FA/FB complexes, the major contribution to the absorbance change at 820 nm (delta A820) was the back-reaction of FA- and/or FB- with lifetimes of approximately 10 and 80 ms (approximately 10% and 40% relative amplitude). The decay of photoinduced electric potential (delta psi) across a membrane with directionally incorporated P700-FA/FB complexes had similar kinetics. HgCl2-treated PS I complexes, which contain FA but no FB, retain both of these kinetic components, indicating that neither can be assigned uniquely to a specific acceptor. These results suggest that FA- reduces P700+ directly and argue for a rapid electron equilibration between FA and FB, which would eliminate their kinetic distinction in a back-reaction. In PsaC-depleted P700-Fx cores, as well as in P700-FA/FB complexes with chemically reduced FA and FB, the major contribution to the delta A820 and the delta psi decay is a biphasic back-reaction of F-X (approximately 400 microseconds and 1.5 ms) with some contribution from A-1 (approximately 10 microseconds and 100 microseconds), the latter of which is variable depending on experimental conditions. The delta A820 decay in a P700-A1 core devoid of all iron-sulfur clusters comprises two phases with lifetimes of 10 microseconds and 130 microseconds (2.7:1 ratio). The biexponential back-reaction kinetics found for each of the electron acceptors may be related to existence of different conformational states of the PS I complex. In all preparations studied, excitation at 532 nm with flash energies exceeding 10 mJ gives rise to formation of antenna 3Chl, which also contributes to delta A820 decay on the tens-of-microsecond time scale. A distinction between

  20. Communication: Transition state trajectory stability determines barrier crossing rates in chemical reactions induced by time-dependent oscillating fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, Galen T.; Bartsch, Thomas; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2014-07-01

    When a chemical reaction is driven by an external field, the transition state that the system must pass through as it changes from reactant to product—for example, an energy barrier—becomes time-dependent. We show that for periodic forcing the rate of barrier crossing can be determined through stability analysis of the non-autonomous transition state. Specifically, strong agreement is observed between the difference in the Floquet exponents describing stability of the transition state trajectory, which defines a recrossing-free dividing surface [G. T. Craven, T. Bartsch, and R. Hernandez, "Persistence of transition state structure in chemical reactions driven by fields oscillating in time," Phys. Rev. E 89, 040801(R) (2014)], and the rates calculated by simulation of ensembles of trajectories. This result opens the possibility to extract rates directly from the intrinsic stability of the transition state, even when it is time-dependent, without requiring a numerically expensive simulation of the long-time dynamics of a large ensemble of trajectories.

  1. Evaluation of a Homemade SYBR® Green I Reaction Mixture for Real-Time PCR Quantification of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Karsai, Albert; Müller, Sabine; Platz, Stefan; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2015-01-01

    Real-time PCR is an accurate method that can be used for the quantification of specific DNA molecules. Here we provide a protocol for SYBR® Green I in real-time PCR applications using plastic reaction tubes. We report that SYBR Green I is alkali labile and once degraded inhibits the PCR. In our optimized protocol, diluted aliquots of SYBR Green I remain stable for at least two weeks. We also evaluated different cDNA synthesis protocols for the quantification of multiple genes from the same cDNA preparation. The best result was obtained with cDNAs synthesized by OmniScript™ reverse transcriptase from 2.5 μg total RNA using oligo d(T)18 primers. The cDNA reactions could be diluted 1:25, allowing the quantification of up to 125 different medium expressed genes of Arabidopsis. Extension times ranged between 20 and 40 bp/s for accurate quantification of PCR products up to approximately 400 bp in the Rotor-Gene 2000 system. Using our optimized real-time PCR protocol, the reproducibility and amplification efficiency was high and comparable to a commercially available SYBR Green I kit. Furthermore, the sensitivity allowed us to quantify 10–20 copies of mRNA and dsDNA. Thus, the protocol eliminates the need for expensive pre-made kits. PMID:11962601

  2. A Comparison of Reaction Time and Interpersonal Communication Tasks for Testing the Effectiveness of a Matching Strategy in Reducing Attack Instigated Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertilson, H. S.; Lien, S. K.

    Certain characteristics of a Taylor (1965) competitive reaction time task contribute to a lack of awareness of contingencies that exist between two aggressors. The opponent's contingent response to the subject's specific shock setting may be obscured by the reaction time competition, thus concealing the matching contingency. Nine separate steps…

  3. "Anniversary Reaction": Important Events and Timing of Death in a Group of Roman Catholic Priests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Lee; Walker, Lawrence D.

    1990-01-01

    Compared death dates of 1,038 Roman Catholic priests with dates of Christmas, Easter, birthday, and day of ordination. Found no meaningful patterns of death around any anniversary, suggesting either no association between time of death and important anniversaries or that important event may be so extraordinary to each individuals that it is not…

  4. Reaction time to changes in the tempo of acoustic pulse trains.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. P.; Warm, J. S.; Westendorf, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the ability of human observers to detect accelerations and decelerations in the rate of presentation of pulsed stimuli, i.e., changes in the tempo of acoustic pulse trains. Response times to accelerations in tempo were faster than to decelerations. Overall speed of response was inversely related to the pulse repetition rate.

  5. On-chip real-time single-copy polymerase chain reaction in picoliter droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Hindson, B; Wheeler, E; Hall, S B; Rose, K A; Kennedy, I; Colston, B

    2007-04-20

    The first lab-on-chip system for picoliter droplet generation and PCR amplification with real-time fluorescence detection has performed PCR in isolated droplets at volumes 10{sup 6} smaller than commercial real-time PCR systems. The system utilized a shearing T-junction in a silicon device to generate a stream of monodisperse picoliter droplets that were isolated from the microfluidic channel walls and each other by the oil phase carrier. An off-chip valving system stopped the droplets on-chip, allowing them to be thermal cycled through the PCR protocol without droplet motion. With this system a 10-pL droplet, encapsulating less than one copy of viral genomic DNA through Poisson statistics, showed real-time PCR amplification curves with a cycle threshold of {approx}18, twenty cycles earlier than commercial instruments. This combination of the established real-time PCR assay with digital microfluidics is ideal for isolating single-copy nucleic acids in a complex environment.

  6. Quantitation of Bacillus clausii in biological samples by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Perotti, Mario; Mancini, Nicasio; Cavallero, Annalisa; Carletti, Silvia; Canducci, Filippo; Burioni, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo

    2006-06-01

    A real-time PCR assay targeting the highly specific erm34 sequence of Bacillus clausii DNA was developed and optimized. The quantitative assay showed a sensitivity level of 10(2) CFU/microl of sample. The method may represent a useful tool for monitoring the role of B. clausii as probiotic in vivo. PMID:16318892

  7. Use of short-term (5-Minute) and long-term (18-Hour) leaching tests to characterize, fingerprint, and rank mine-waste material from historical mines in the Deer Creek, Snake River, and Clear Creek Watersheds in and around the Montezuma Mining District, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hageman, Philip L.

    2004-01-01

    Precipitation-induced runoff from historical mine-waste located adjacent to the headwaters of the Snake River, Deer Creek, Saints John Creek, Grizzly Gulch, Stevens Gulch, and Leavenworth Creek contributes to the degradation of water quality in these streams. Because historical mine-waste piles have had long-term exposure to the atmosphere, it is surmised that runoff from these piles, induced by meteorological events such as cloudbursts and snowmelt, may cause mobility of acid and metals into a watershed due to dissolution of soluble minerals. For this study, 13 mine-waste composite samples from various mine-wastes in these drainage basins were leached using both a short-term and a long-term leach test. Analytical results from this combination of leach tests are tools that allow the investigator to quantify (fingerprint) which geochemical components could be expected in runoff from these piles if they were leached by a cloudburst (5-minute leach test), as well as what the ?worst-case? geochemical profile would look like if the material were subject to extended leaching and breakdown of the mine-waste material (18-hour leach test). Also, this combination of leach tests allows the geoscientist the ability to see geochemical changes in the mine-waste leachate over time. That is, does the leachate become more or less acidic over time; does the specific conductance increase or decrease; and are there changes in the concentrations of major or trace elements? Further, use of a ranking scheme described herein will aid in prediction of which historical mine-waste piles have the greatest potential for impact on a watershed should runoff occur. Because of long-term weathering of these historical mine-waste piles, geochemical profiles, leachate time-trends, and relative ranking of the mine-wastes produced from analysis of the leachates are Hageman_SIR_2508.doc 1 7/21/2004 2:50 PM indicative of how the mine-waste piles can be expected to act in the environment and may help to

  8. Real-time polymerase chain reaction of immunoglobulin rearrangements for quantitative evaluation of minimal residual disease in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Compagno, Mara; Mantoan, Barbara; Astolfi, Monica; Boccadoro, Mario; Ladetto, Marco

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation of minimal residual disease (MRD) is critical in the evaluation of treatments aimed at maximal cytoreduction in multiple myeloma (MM). Qualitative evaluation of MRD now has a 10-yr-long history, but it remains a relatively sophisticated procedure. More recently, real-time quantitative approaches have also been developed. These approaches allow a very effective monitoring of disease but introduce additional complexity and costs to the procedure. This chapter describes how we currently perform real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in MM. Compared to the first description of the assay in June 2000, significant improvements have been made. Although real-time PCR is the main focus of the chapter, most of the information suitable for a proper setup of a qualitative approach is also provided. PMID:15968100

  9. Finite difference/spectral approximations for the distributed order time fractional reaction-diffusion equation on an unbounded domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hu; Lü, Shujuan; Chen, Wenping

    2016-06-01

    The numerical approximation of the distributed order time fractional reaction-diffusion equation on a semi-infinite spatial domain is discussed in this paper. A fully discrete scheme based on finite difference method in time and spectral approximation using Laguerre functions in space is proposed. The scheme is unconditionally stable and convergent with order O (τ2 + Δα2 +N (1 - m) / 2), where τ, Δα, N, and m are the time-step size, step size in distributed-order variable, polynomial degree, and regularity in the space variable of the exact solution, respectively. A pseudospectral scheme is also proposed and analyzed. Some numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed scheme.

  10. Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shafarman, William N.

    2015-10-12

    This project “Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells”, completed by the Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC) at the University of Delaware in collaboration with the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Florida, developed the fundamental understanding and technology to increase module efficiency and improve the manufacturability of Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 films using the precursor reaction approach currently being developed by a number of companies. Key results included: (1) development of a three-step H2Se/Ar/H2S reaction process to control Ga distribution through the film and minimizes back contact MoSe2 formation; (2) Ag-alloying to improve precursor homogeneity by avoiding In phase agglomeration, faster reaction and improved adhesion to allow wider reaction process window; (3) addition of Sb, Bi, and Te interlayers at the Mo/precursor junction to produce more uniform precursor morphology and improve adhesion with reduced void formation in reacted films; (4) a precursor structure containing Se and a reaction process to reduce processing time to 5 minutes and eliminate H2Se usage, thereby increasing throughput and reducing costs. All these results were supported by detailed characterization of the film growth, reaction pathways, thermodynamic assessment and device behavior.

  11. Finite Element Analysis of the Time-Dependent Smoluchowski Equation for Acetylcholinesterase Reaction Rate Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuhui; Suen, Jason K.; Zhang, Deqiang; Bond, Stephen D.; Zhang, Yongjie; Song, Yuhua; Baker, Nathan A.; Bajaj, Chandrajit L.; Holst, Michael J.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the numerical solution of the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation to study diffusion in biomolecular systems. Specifically, finite element methods have been developed to calculate ligand binding rate constants for large biomolecules. The resulting software has been validated and applied to the mouse acetylcholinesterase (mAChE) monomer and several tetramers. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE were calculated at various ionic strengths with several different time steps. Calculated rates show very good agreement with experimental and theoretical steady-state studies. Furthermore, these finite element methods require significantly fewer computational resources than existing particle-based Brownian dynamics methods and are robust for complicated geometries. The key finding of biological importance is that the rate accelerations of the monomeric and tetrameric mAChE that result from electrostatic steering are preserved under the non-steady-state conditions that are expected to occur in physiological circumstances. PMID:17307827

  12. Age-related differences in the neural correlates of trial-to-trial variations of reaction time.

    PubMed

    Adleman, Nancy E; Chen, Gang; Reynolds, Richard C; Frackman, Anna; Razdan, Varun; Weissman, Daniel H; Pine, Daniel S; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2016-06-01

    Intra-subject variation in reaction time (ISVRT) is a developmentally-important phenomenon that decreases from childhood through young adulthood in parallel with the development of executive functions and networks. Prior work has shown a significant association between trial-by-trial variations in reaction time (RT) and trial-by-trial variations in brain activity as measured by the blood-oxygenated level-dependent (BOLD) response in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. It remains unclear, however, whether such "RT-BOLD" relationships vary with age. Here, we determined whether such trial-by-trial relationships vary with age in a cross-sectional design. We observed an association between age and RT-BOLD relationships in 11 clusters located in visual/occipital regions, frontal and parietal association cortex, precentral/postcentral gyrus, and thalamus. Some of these relationships were negative, reflecting increased BOLD associated with decreased RT, manifesting around the time of stimulus presentation and positive several seconds later. Critically for present purposes, all RT-BOLD relationships increased with age. Thus, RT-BOLD relationships may reflect robust, measurable changes in the brain-behavior relationship across development. PMID:27239972

  13. Combining Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Using SYBR Green I Detection and Sequencing to Identify Vertebrate Bloodmeals in Fleas

    PubMed Central

    GRAHAM, CHRISTINE B.; BLACK, WILLIAM C.; BOEGLER, KAREN A.; MONTENIERI, JOHN A.; HOLMES, JENNIFER L.; GAGE, KENNETH L.; EISEN, REBECCA J.

    2015-01-01

    Programs that aim to control vector-borne zoonotic diseases require information on zoonotic hosts and on the feeding behavior of bridging vectors that are capable of transmitting pathogens from those hosts to humans. Here we describe an assay developed to identify bloodmeals in field-collected cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis Bouché) to assess this species’ potential role as a Yersinia pestis bridging vector in a plague-endemic region of Uganda. Our assay uses a single primer set and SYBR Green I-based real-time polymerase chain reaction to amplify a segment of the 12S mitochondrial ribosomal RNA gene for identification by sequencing. The assay capitalizes on the sensitivity of real-time polymerase chain reaction and the specificity of sequencing and can be used to differentiate vertebrate bloodmeals to the genus or species level without a priori knowledge of the host community. Because real-time assays that detect vertebrate DNA are highly sensitive to human DNA contamination, we analyzed detection in artificially fed and unfed fleas to establish a Ct cutoff that optimized specificity without completely sacrificing sensitivity. Using the established cutoff, our assay detected human, rat, and goat DNA in artificially fed C. felis up to 72 h postfeeding. PMID:23270174

  14. Determination of the primary charge separation rate in isolated photosystem II reaction centers with 500-fs time resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Johnson, D.G. ); Seibert, M. ); Govindjee )

    1989-01-01

    The authors have measured directly the rate of formation of the oxidized chlorophyll a electron donor (P680+) and the reduced electron acceptor pheophytin a{sup {minus}} (Pheoa{sup {minus}}) following excitation of isolated spinach photosystem II reaction centers at 4{degree}C. The reaction-center complex consists of D{sub 1}, D{sub 2}, and cytochrome b-559 proteins and was prepared by a procedure that stabilizes the protein complex. Transient absorption difference spectra were measured from 440 to 850 nm as a function of time with 500-fs resolution following 610-nm laser excitation. The formation of P680+-Pheoa{sup {minus}} is indicated by the appearance of a band due to P680+ at 820 nm and corresponding absorbance changes at 505 and 540 nm due to formation of Pheoa{sup {minus}}. The appearance of the 820-nm band is monoexponential with {tau} = 3.0 {plus minus} 0.6 ps. Treatment of the photosystem II reaction centers with sodium dithionite and methyl viologen followed by exposure to laser excitation, conditions known to result in accumulation of Pheoa{sup {minus}}, results in formation of a transient absorption spectrum due to {sup 1*}P680. They find no evidence for an electron acceptor that precedes the formation of Pheoa{sup {minus}}.

  15. Event Timing in Associative Learning: From Biochemical Reaction Dynamics to Behavioural Observations

    PubMed Central

    Yarali, Ayse; Nehrkorn, Johannes; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Herz, Andreas V. M.

    2012-01-01

    Associative learning relies on event timing. Fruit flies for example, once trained with an odour that precedes electric shock, subsequently avoid this odour (punishment learning); if, on the other hand the odour follows the shock during training, it is approached later on (relief learning). During training, an odour-induced Ca++ signal and a shock-induced dopaminergic signal converge in the Kenyon cells, synergistically activating a Ca++-calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase, which likely leads to the synaptic plasticity underlying the conditioned avoidance of the odour. In Aplysia, the effect of serotonin on the corresponding adenylate cyclase is bi-directionally modulated by Ca++, depending on the relative timing of the two inputs. Using a computational approach, we quantitatively explore this biochemical property of the adenylate cyclase and show that it can generate the effect of event timing on associative learning. We overcome the shortage of behavioural data in Aplysia and biochemical data in Drosophila by combining findings from both systems. PMID:22493657

  16. Time-resolved electrochromism associated with the formation of quinone anions in the rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Tiede, D.M.; Vazquez, J.; Cordova, J.; Marone, P.A.

    1996-08-20

    The bacterial photosynthetic reaction center contains bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) and bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) and bacteriopheophytin (Bph) cofactors that provide natural probes of electrostatic fields within this protein. We have examined the electrochromic responses of these cofactors, resolved during the lifetimes of the quinone anion states, P{sup +}Q{sub A}{sup -Q}{sub B} and P{sup +}Q{sub A}Q{sub B}{sup -}, and measured as a function of temperature. These measurements provide information on the time-dependent variation in electrostatic field strength on the Bchl and Bph cofactors. Measurements in the near-infrared absorbance bands are described. 60 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Interlaboratory validation data on real-time polymerase chain reaction detection for unauthorized genetically modified papaya line PRSV-YK.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takumi; Noguchi, Akio; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Takasaki, Kazuto; Futo, Satoshi; Sakata, Kozue; Fukuda, Nozomi; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi; Tanaka, Hidenori; Akashi, Ryo; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko

    2016-06-01

    This article is referred to research article entitled "Whole genome sequence analysis of unidentified genetically modified papaya for development of a specific detection method" (Nakamura et al., 2016) [1]. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection method for unauthorized genetically modified (GM) papaya (Carica papaya L.) line PRSV-YK (PRSV-YK detection method) was developed using whole genome sequence data (DDBJ Sequenced Read Archive under accession No. PRJDB3976). Interlaboratory validation datasets for PRSV-YK detection method were provided. Data indicating homogeneity of samples prepared for interlaboratory validation were included. Specificity and sensitivity test data for PRSV-YK detection method were also provided. PMID:27408919

  18. Description of nucleon-transfer and fusion reactions within time-dependent approaches and coupled-channel method

    SciTech Connect

    Samarin, V. V.

    2015-01-15

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation and the method of perturbed stationary states that is based on the expansion of the total wave function for the system of two nuclear cores and a nucleon in a set of nucleon two-center functions are used to describe nucleon transfers and fusion in low-energy nuclear reactions. A set of multichannel equations that couple the relative motion of nuclei to the motion of the nucleon is obtained. The kinetic-energy coupling matrix is similar to the coupling matrix for collective excitations of nuclei.

  19. Effect of acute L-Alanyl-L-Glutamine and electrolyte ingestion on cognitive function and reaction time following endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Pruna, Gabriel J; Hoffman, Jay R; McCormack, William P; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Bohner, Jonathan D; La Monica, Michael B; Wells, Adam J; Stout, Jeffrey R; Fragala, Maren S; Fukuda, David H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the L-Alanyl-L-Glutamine dipeptide (AG) on cognitive function and reaction time (RT) following endurance exercise. Twelve male endurance athletes (23.5 ± 3.7 y; 175.5 ± 5.4 cm; 70.7 ± 7.6 kg) performed four trials, each consisting of running on a treadmill at 70% of VO2max for 1h, then at 90% of VO2max until exhaustion. One trial consisted of no hydration (DHY), another required ingestion of only a sports electrolyte drink (ED) and two trials required ingestion of a low dose (LD; 300 mg·500 ml(-1)) and high dose (HD) of AG (1 g·500ml(-1)) added to the ED. Cognitive function and reaction tests were administered pre- and post-exercise. Magnitude based inferences were used to analyze ∆ cognitive function and ∆ reaction test data. Results indicated that DHY had a possible negative effect on number of hits in a 60-sec reaction test compared to LD and HD, while ED appeared to have a negative effect compared to HD. Analysis of lower body quickness indicated that LD and HD were likely improved in comparison to DHY. Performance on the serial subtraction test appeared to be possibly better in ED than DHY, while other comparisons between groups regarding cognitive function were unclear. In conclusion, rehydrating with AG during submaximal exercise may maintain or enhance subsequent RT in upper and lower body activities compared to DHY. These same effects were not apparent when participants consumed ED. PMID:25321847

  20. Applications of proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the sensitive and rapid real-time detection of solid high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayhew, C. A.; Sulzer, P.; Petersson, F.; Haidacher, S.; Jordan, A.; Märk, L.; Watts, P.; Märk, T. D.

    2010-01-01

    Using recent developments in proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, proof-of-principle investigations are reported here to illustrate the capabilities of detecting solid explosives in real-time. Two proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometers (Ionicon Analytik) have been used in this study. One has an enhanced mass resolution (m/[Delta]m up to 8000) and high sensitivity (~50 cps/ppbv). The second has enhanced sensitivity (~250 cps/ppbv) whilst still retaining high resolution capabilities (m/[Delta]m up to 2000). Both of these instruments have been successfully used to identify solid explosives (RDX, TNT, HMX, PETN and Semtex A) by analyzing the headspace above small quantities of samples at room temperature and from trace quantities not visible to the naked eye placed on surfaces. For the trace measurements a simple pre-concentration and thermal desorption technique was devised and used. Importantly, we demonstrate the unambiguous identification of threat agents in complex chemical environments, where multiple threat agents and interferents may be present, thereby eliminating false positives. This is of considerable benefit to security and for the fight against terrorism.

  1. On the Way to Experimental Test of the Time Reversal Invariance in the Nuclear Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Skoy, Vadim R.; Ino, Takashi; Masuda, Yasuhiro; Muto, Suguru; Kim, Guinyun

    2005-01-01

    Time (T) violation can be related with charge-parity (CP) violation through the CPT theorem. The CP violation was discovered experimentally in the K0-meson decays about 35 years ago. The T violating interaction related with the CP violation violates parity as well. However, an extension of the theory beyond the locality of the interactions might violate the CPT theorem. The result of the CPLEAR experiment [1], which has given direct evidence of T violation in the elementary-particle phenomena, could be considered under assumption of the CPT invariance. PMID:27308170

  2. Characterization of self-propagating formation reactions in Ni/Zr multilayered foils using reaction heats, velocities, and temperature-time profiles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barron, S. C.; Knepper, R.; Walker, N.; Weihs, T. P.

    2011-01-11

    We report on intermetallic formation reactions in vapor-deposited multilayered foils of Ni/Zr with 70 nm bilayers and overall atomic ratios of Ni:Zr, 2 Ni:Zr, and 7 Ni:2 Zr. The sequence of alloy phase formation and the stored energy is evaluated at slow heating rates (~1 K/s) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) traces to 725ºC. All three chemistries initially form a Ni-Zr amorphous phase which crystallizes first to the intermetallic NiZr. The heat of reaction to the final phase is 34-36 kJ/mol atom for all chemistries. Intermetallic formation reactions are also studied at rapid heating rates (greater than 105 K/s) inmore » high temperature, self-propagating reactions which can be ignited in these foils by an electric spark. We find that reaction velocities and maximum reaction temperatures (Tmax) are largely independent of foil chemistry at 0.6 ± 0.1 m/s and 1220 ± 50 K, respectively, and that the measured Tmax is more than 200 K lower than predicted adiabatic temperatures (Tad). The difference between Tmax and Tad is explained by the prediction that transformation to the final intermetallic phases occurs after Tmax and results in the release of 20-30 % of the total heat of reaction and a delay in rapid cooling.« less

  3. Characterization of self-propagating formation reactions in Ni/Zr multilayered foils using reaction heats, velocities, and temperature-time profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, S. C.; Knepper, R.; Walker, N.; Weihs, T. P.

    2011-01-01

    We report on intermetallic formation reactions in vapor-deposited multilayered foils of Ni/Zr with 70 nm bilayers and overall atomic ratios of Ni:Zr, 2 Ni:Zr, and 7 Ni:2 Zr. The sequence of alloy phase formation and the stored energy is evaluated at slow heating rates ({approx}1 K/s) using differential scanning calorimetry traces to 725 deg. C. All three chemistries initially form a Ni-Zr amorphous phase which crystallizes first to the intermetallic NiZr. The heat of reaction to the final phase is 34-36 kJ/mol atom for all chemistries. Intermetallic formation reactions are also studied at rapid heating rates (greater than 10{sup 5} K/s) in high temperature, self-propagating reactions which can be ignited in these foils by an electric spark. We find that reaction velocities and maximum reaction temperatures (T{sub max}) are largely independent of foil chemistry at 0.6{+-}0.1 m/s and 1220{+-}50 K, respectively, and that the measured T{sub max} is more than 200 K lower than predicted adiabatic temperatures (T{sub ad}). The difference between T{sub max} and T{sub ad} is explained by the prediction that transformation to the final intermetallic phases occurs after T{sub max} and results in the release of 20%-30% of the total heat of reaction and a delay in rapid cooling.

  4. Nanosecond Time-Resolved Polarization Spectroscopies: Tools for Probing Protein Reaction Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Eefei; Goldbeck, Robert A.; Kliger, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Polarization methods, introduced in the 1800’s, offered one of the earliest ways to examine protein structure. Since then, many other structure-sensitive probes have been developed, but circular dichroism (CD) remains a powerful technique because of its versatility and the specificity of protein structural information that can be explored. With improvements in time-resolution, from millisecond to picosecond CD measurements, it has proven to be an important tool for studying the mechanism of folding and function in many biomolecules. For example, nanosecond time-resolved CD (TRCD) studies of the sub-microsecond events of reduced cytochrome c folding have provided direct experimental evidence of kinetic heterogeneity, which is an inherent property of the diffusional nature of early folding dynamics on the energy landscape. In addition, TRCD has been applied to the study of many biochemical processes, such as ligand rebinding in hemoglobin and myoglobin and signaling state formation in photoactive yellow protein and prototropin 1 LOV2. The basic approach to TRCD has also been extended to include a repertoire of nanosecond polarization spectroscopies: optical rotatory dispersion (ORD), magnetic CD and ORD, and linear dichroism. This article will discuss the details of the polarization methods used in this laboratory, as well as the coupling of timeresolved ORD with the temperature-jump trigger so that protein folding can be studied in a larger number of proteins. PMID:20438842

  5. In-situ time resolved synchrotron powder diffraction studies of synthesis and chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Norby, P.

    1995-09-01

    Equipment for time and temperature dependent powder diffraction has been developed, especially in order to be able to study hydrothermal syntheses of zeolites. The system is very versatile and has so far been used to study e.g. hydrothermal syntheses of zeolites and aluminophosphates, syntheses of layered phosphates, formation of Sorel cements, dehydration and phase transformations of zeolites, solid state synthesis of lanthanum manganites, ion exchange of zeolites using molten salt, and oxidation/reduction of lanthanum manganites at high temperatures. The sample is contained in quartz capillaries and is heated using a stream of hot air. External pressure can be applied allowing hydrothermal syntheses at temperatures up to 200 C to be performed. Controlled atmosphere is obtained by flowing gas or a mixture of gases through the capillary.

  6. Ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer reactions: Comparative theoretical studies on time- and frequency-domain data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luxia; Willig, Frank; May, Volkhard

    2006-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies on linear absorption spectra of dye-semiconductor systems [perylene attached to nanostructured TiO2, L. Wang et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 9589 (2005)] are extended here in different respects. Since the systems show ultrafast photoinduced heterogeneous electron transfer the time-dependent formulation used to compute the absorbance is also applied to calculate the temporal evolution of the sub-100fs charge injection dynamics after a 10fs laser-pulse excitation. These studies complement our recent absorption spectra fit for two perylene bridge-anchor group TiO2 systems. Moreover, the time-dependent formulation of the absorbance is confronted with a frequency-domain description. The latter underlines the central importance of the self-energy caused by the coupling of the dye levels to the semiconductor band continuum. The used model is further applied to study the effect of different parameters such as (1) the dependence on the reorganization energies of the involved intramolecular transitions, (2) the effect of changing the transfer integral which couples the excited dye state with the band continuum, and (3) the effect of the concrete form of the semiconductor band density of states. Emphasis is also put on the case where the charge injection level of the dye is near or somewhat below the band edge. This nicely demonstrates the change from a structureless absorption to a well-resolved vibrational progression including characteristic shifts of the absorption lines which are a direct measure for the dye-semiconductor coupling.

  7. Faster Synthesis of Beta-Diketonate Ternary Europium Complexes: Elapsed Times & Reaction Yields

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Nathalia B. D.; Silva, Anderson I. S.; Gerson, P. C.; Gonçalves, Simone M. C.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2015-01-01

    β-diketonates are customary bidentate ligands in highly luminescent ternary europium complexes, such as Eu(β-diketonate)3(L)2, where L stands for a nonionic ligand. Usually, the syntheses of these complexes start by adding, to an europium salt such as EuCl3(H2O)6, three equivalents of β-diketonate ligands to form the complexes Eu(β-diketonate)3(H2O)2. The nonionic ligands are subsequently added to form the target complexes Eu(β-diketonate)3(L)2. However, the Eu(β-diketonate)3(H2O)2 intermediates are frequently both difficult and slow to purify by recrystallization, a step which usually takes a long time, varying from days to several weeks, depending on the chosen β-diketonate. In this article, we advance a novel synthetic technique which does not use Eu(β-diketonate)3(H2O)2 as an intermediate. Instead, we start by adding 4 equivalents of a monodentate nonionic ligand L straight to EuCl3(H2O)6 to form a new intermediate: EuCl3(L)4(H2O)n, with n being either 3 or 4. The advantage is that these intermediates can now be easily, quickly, and efficiently purified. The β-diketonates are then carefully added to this intermediate to form the target complexes Eu(β-diketonate)3(L)2. For the cases studied, the 20-day average elapsed time reduced to 10 days for the faster synthesis, together with an improvement in the overall yield from 42% to 69%. PMID:26710103

  8. A farewell to brake reaction times? Kinematics-dependent brake response in naturalistic rear-end emergencies.

    PubMed

    Markkula, Gustav; Engström, Johan; Lodin, Johan; Bärgman, Jonas; Victor, Trent

    2016-10-01

    Driver braking behavior was analyzed using time-series recordings from naturalistic rear-end conflicts (116 crashes and 241 near-crashes), including events with and without visual distraction among drivers of cars, heavy trucks, and buses. A simple piecewise linear model could be successfully fitted, per event, to the observed driver decelerations, allowing a detailed elucidation of when drivers initiated braking and how they controlled it. Most notably, it was found that, across vehicle types, driver braking behavior was strongly dependent on the urgency of the given rear-end scenario's kinematics, quantified in terms of visual looming of the lead vehicle on the driver's retina. In contrast with previous suggestions of brake reaction times (BRTs) of 1.5s or more after onset of an unexpected hazard (e.g., brake light onset), it was found here that braking could be described as typically starting less than a second after the kinematic urgency reached certain threshold levels, with even faster reactions at higher urgencies. The rate at which drivers then increased their deceleration (towards a maximum) was also highly dependent on urgency. Probability distributions are provided that quantitatively capture these various patterns of kinematics-dependent behavioral response. Possible underlying mechanisms are suggested, including looming response thresholds and neural evidence accumulation. These accounts argue that a naturalistic braking response should not be thought of as a slow reaction to some single, researcher-defined "hazard onset", but instead as a relatively fast response to the visual looming cues that build up later on in the evolving traffic scenario. PMID:27450793

  9. Are there right hemisphere contributions to visually-guided movement? Manipulating left hand reaction time advantages in dextrals

    PubMed Central

    Carey, David P.; Otto-de Haart, E. Grace; Buckingham, Gavin; Dijkerman, H. Chris; Hargreaves, Eric L.; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have argued for distinct but complementary contributions from each hemisphere in the control of movements to visual targets. Investigators have attempted to extend observations from patients with unilateral left- and right-hemisphere damage, to those using neurologically-intact participants, by assuming that each hand has privileged access to the contralateral hemisphere. Previous attempts to illustrate right hemispheric contributions to the control of aiming have focussed on increasing the spatial demands of an aiming task, to attenuate the typical right hand advantages, to try to enhance a left hand reaction time advantage in right-handed participants. These early attempts have not been successful. The present study circumnavigates some of the theoretical and methodological difficulties of some of the earlier experiments, by using three different tasks linked directly to specialized functions of the right hemisphere: bisecting, the gap effect, and visuospatial localization. None of these tasks were effective in reducing the magnitude of left hand reaction time advantages in right handers. Results are discussed in terms of alternatives to right hemispheric functional explanations of the effect, the one-dimensional nature of our target arrays, power and precision given the size of the left hand RT effect, and the utility of examining the proportions of participants who show these effects, rather than exclusive reliance on measures of central tendency and their associated null hypothesis significance tests. PMID:26379572

  10. Age and physical activity effects on reaction time and digit symbol substitution performance in cognitively active adults.

    PubMed

    Lupinacci, N S; Rikli, R E; Jones, C J; Ross, D

    1993-06-01

    University professors (N = 56), divided into two age groups (< 50 years and > 50 years) and two physical activity level groups (high and low), were tested on three tasks requiring increasingly complex cognitive processing--simple reaction time (SRT), choice reaction time (CRT), and on a digit symbol substitution test (DSST). A significant main effect for exercise, with high active subjects performing better than low active subjects, was found for SRT (p < .001) and CRT (p < .01) but not for DSST (p < .09). Significant main effects for age, with younger subjects performing better than older subjects, were found on DSST (p < .01) and CRT (p < .05) but not for SRT (p < .09). The observation that the effect of age was more pronounced with increasing task complexity is consistent with previous research. However, the tendency for exercise effects to decrease with increasing task complexity is not consistent with former findings, suggesting that perhaps the controlled high level of cognitive activity of subjects in this study may have offset the usual effects of exercise on information processing speed. No significant Age x Activity Level interactions were found on any of the dependent raw score data. However, compared to normative scores of the population at large, there was a slight increase in DSST percentile ranks with age for the older aerobically active professors, whereas a decrease occurred for the inactive subjects. PMID:8341837

  11. Simulation of reaction diffusion processes over biologically relevant size and time scales using multi-GPU workstations

    PubMed Central

    Hallock, Michael J.; Stone, John E.; Roberts, Elijah; Fry, Corey; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of in vivo cellular processes with the reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a computationally expensive task. Our previous software enabled simulation of inhomogeneous biochemical systems for small bacteria over long time scales using the MPD-RDME method on a single GPU. Simulations of larger eukaryotic systems exceed the on-board memory capacity of individual GPUs, and long time simulations of modest-sized cells such as yeast are impractical on a single GPU. We present a new multi-GPU parallel implementation of the MPD-RDME method based on a spatial decomposition approach that supports dynamic load balancing for workstations containing GPUs of varying performance and memory capacity. We take advantage of high-performance features of CUDA for peer-to-peer GPU memory transfers and evaluate the performance of our algorithms on state-of-the-art GPU devices. We present parallel e ciency and performance results for simulations using multiple GPUs as system size, particle counts, and number of reactions grow. We also demonstrate multi-GPU performance in simulations of the Min protein system in E. coli. Moreover, our multi-GPU decomposition and load balancing approach can be generalized to other lattice-based problems. PMID:24882911

  12. Discrete infinite-dimensional type-K monotone dynamical systems and time-periodic reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xing; Jiang, Jifa

    The asymptotic behavior of discrete type-K monotone dynamical systems and reaction-diffusion equations is investigated. The studying content includes the index theory for fixed points, permanence, global stability, convergence everywhere and coexistence. It is shown that the system has a globally asymptotically stable fixed point if every fixed point is locally asymptotically stable with respect to the face it belongs to and at this point the principal eigenvalue of the diagonal partial derivative about any component not belonging to the face is not one. A nice result presented is the sufficient and necessary conditions for the system to have a globally asymptotically stable positive fixed point. It can be used to establish the sufficient conditions for the system to persist uniformly and the convergent result for all orbits. Applications are made to time-periodic Lotka-Volterra systems with diffusion, and sufficient conditions for such systems to have a unique positive periodic solution attracting all positive initial value functions are given. For more general time-periodic type-K monotone reaction-diffusion systems with spatial homogeneity, a simple condition is given to guarantee the convergence of all positive solutions.

  13. Clinical validation of a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for rapid detection of Acinetobacter baumannii colonization.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Lobo, P; González-Galán, V; García-Quintanilla, M; Valencia, R; Cazalla, A; Martín, C; Alonso, I; Pérez-Romero, P; Cisneros, J M; Aznar, J; McConnell, M J

    2016-09-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approaches have not been assessed in terms of their ability to detect patients colonized by Acinetobacter baumannii during active surveillance. This prospective, double-blind study demonstrated that a real-time PCR assay had high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (91.2%) compared with conventional culture for detecting A. baumannii in 397 active surveillance samples, and provided results within 3h. Receiver-operator curve analyses demonstrated that the technique has diagnostic accuracy of 97.7% (95% confidence interval 96.0-99.3%). This method could facilitate the rapid implementation of infection control measures for preventing the transmission of A. baumannii. PMID:27206968

  14. Predominant time scales in fission processes in reactions of S, Ti and Ni with W: zeptosecond versus attosecond.

    PubMed

    du Rietz, R; Hinde, D J; Dasgupta, M; Thomas, R G; Gasques, L R; Evers, M; Lobanov, N; Wakhle, A

    2011-02-01

    The inhibition of fusion by quasifission is crucial in limiting the formation of superheavy elements in collisions of heavy nuclei. Time scales of ∼10(-18)  s inferred for fissionlike events from recent crystal blocking measurements were interpreted to show either that quasifission itself is slower than previously believed, or that the fraction of slow fusion-fission is higher than expected. New measurements of mass-angle distributions for (48)Ti and (64)Ni bombarding W targets show that in these reactions quasifission is the dominant process, typically occurring before the system formed after contact has made a single rotation, corresponding to time scales of ≤10(-20)  s. PMID:21405390

  15. Virtual Hand Feedback Reduces Reaction Time in an Interactive Finger Reaching Task.

    PubMed

    Brand, Johannes; Piccirelli, Marco; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Morari, Manfred; Michels, Lars; Eng, Kynan

    2016-01-01

    Computer interaction via visually guided hand or finger movements is a ubiquitous part of daily computer usage in work or gaming. Surprisingly, however, little is known about the performance effects of using virtual limb representations versus simpler cursors. In this study 26 healthy right-handed adults performed cued index finger flexion-extension movements towards an on-screen target while wearing a data glove. They received each of four different types of real-time visual feedback: a simple circular cursor, a point light pattern indicating finger joint positions, a cartoon hand and a fully shaded virtual hand. We found that participants initiated the movements faster when receiving feedback in the form of a hand than when receiving circular cursor or point light feedback. This overall difference was robust for three out of four hand versus circle pairwise comparisons. The faster movement initiation for hand feedback was accompanied by a larger movement amplitude and a larger movement error. We suggest that the observed effect may be related to priming of hand information during action perception and execution affecting motor planning and execution. The results may have applications in the use of body representations in virtual reality applications. PMID:27144927

  16. Virtual Hand Feedback Reduces Reaction Time in an Interactive Finger Reaching Task

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Johannes; Piccirelli, Marco; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Morari, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Computer interaction via visually guided hand or finger movements is a ubiquitous part of daily computer usage in work or gaming. Surprisingly, however, little is known about the performance effects of using virtual limb representations versus simpler cursors. In this study 26 healthy right-handed adults performed cued index finger flexion-extension movements towards an on-screen target while wearing a data glove. They received each of four different types of real-time visual feedback: a simple circular cursor, a point light pattern indicating finger joint positions, a cartoon hand and a fully shaded virtual hand. We found that participants initiated the movements faster when receiving feedback in the form of a hand than when receiving circular cursor or point light feedback. This overall difference was robust for three out of four hand versus circle pairwise comparisons. The faster movement initiation for hand feedback was accompanied by a larger movement amplitude and a larger movement error. We suggest that the observed effect may be related to priming of hand information during action perception and execution affecting motor planning and execution. The results may have applications in the use of body representations in virtual reality applications. PMID:27144927

  17. Night-time thoughts in high and low worriers: reaction to caffeine-induced sleeplessness.

    PubMed

    Omvik, Siri; Pallesen, Ståle; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Thayer, Julian; Nordhus, Inger Hilde

    2007-04-01

    There is ample evidence for the existence of an association between sleeplessness and worry. Not much is known, however, concerning the nature of this relationship. Therefore, a study was conducted investigating the causal relationship between sleeplessness and nocturnal worry. A 2 x 2 (Worry x Induced sleeplessness) analysis of covariance design was used. The first factor consisted of a subject variable defined by scoring either high or low on a trait measure of worry (the Penn State Worry Questionnaire) and the second factor consisted of 300 mg caffeine or placebo. A total of 96 female undergraduate students participated. The dependent variables comprised measures of nocturnal worry (the Night-Time Thoughts Questionnaire) and subjective and objective sleep parameters. Overall, caffeine caused an increase in nocturnal worry and sleeplessness. A significant interaction effect occurred between Worry and Induced sleeplessness on one of the objective sleep parameters, but no other interaction effects were significant. The results suggest that worry may occur as an epiphenomenon of sleeplessness. PMID:16949554

  18. Time-Resolved O3 Chemical Chain Reaction Kinetics Via High-Resolution IR Laser Absorption Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulcke, Axel; Blackmon, Brad; Chapman, William B.; Kim, In Koo; Nesbitt, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Excimer laser photolysis in combination with time-resolved IR laser absorption detection of OH radicals has been used to study O3/OH(v = 0)/HO2 chain reaction kinetics at 298 K, (i.e.,(k(sub 1) is OH + 03 yields H02 + 02 and (k(sub 2) is H02 + 03 yields OH + 202). From time-resolved detection of OH radicals with high-resolution near IR laser absorption methods, the chain induction kinetics have been measured at up to an order of magnitude higher ozone concentrations ([03] less than or equal to 10(exp 17) molecules/cu cm) than accessible in previous studies. This greater dynamic range permits the full evolution of the chain induction, propagation, and termination process to be temporally isolated and measured in real time. An exact solution for time-dependent OH evolution under pseudo- first-order chain reaction conditions is presented, which correctly predicts new kinetic signatures not included in previous OH + 03 kinetic analyses. Specifically, the solutions predict an initial exponential loss (chain "induction") of the OH radical to a steady-state level ([OH](sub ss)), with this fast initial decay determined by the sum of both chain rate constants, k(sub ind) = k(sub 1) + k(sub 2). By monitoring the chain induction feature, this sum of the rate constants is determined to be k(sub ind) = 8.4(8) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/molecule/s for room temperature reagents. This is significantly higher than the values currently recommended for use in atmospheric models, but in excellent agreement with previous results from Ravishankara et al.

  19. Detection of equine herpesvirus type 1 using a real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Diallo, Ibrahim S; Hewitson, Glen; Wright, Lucia; Rodwell, Barry J; Corney, Bruce G

    2006-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus 1 (EHV1) is a major disease of equids worldwide causing considerable losses to the horse industry. A variety of techniques, including PCR have been used to diagnose EHV1. Some of these PCRs were used in combination with other techniques such as restriction enzyme analysis (REA) or hybridisation, making them cumbersome for routine diagnostic testing and increasing the chances of cross-contamination. Furthermore, they involve the use of suspected carcinogens such as ethidium bromide and ultraviolet light. In this paper, we describe a real-time PCR, which uses minor groove-binding probe (MGB) technology for the diagnosis of EHV1. This technique does not require post-PCR manipulations thereby reducing the risk of cross-contamination. Most importantly, the technique is specific; it was able to differentiate EHV1 from the closely related member of the Alphaherpesvirinae, equid herpesvirus 4 (EHV4). It was not reactive with common opportunistic pathogens such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter agglomerans often involved in abortion. Similarly, it did not react with equine pathogens such as Streptococcus equi, Streptococcus equisimilis, Streptococcus zooepidemicus, Taylorella equigenitalis and Rhodococcus equi, which also cause abortion. The results obtained with this technique agreed with results from published PCR methods. The assay was sensitive enough to detect EHV1 sequences in paraffin-embedded tissues and clinical samples. When compared to virus isolation, the test was more sensitive. This test will be useful for the routine diagnosis of EHV1 based on its specificity, sensitivity, ease of performance and rapidity. PMID:16137772

  20. Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis DNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Eosinophilic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Xayavong, Maniphet; da Silva, Ana Cristina Aramburu; Park, Sarah Y; Whelen, A Christian; Calimlim, Precilia S; Sciulli, Rebecca H; Honda, Stacey A A; Higa, Karen; Kitsutani, Paul; Chea, Nora; Heng, Seng; Johnson, Stuart; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Fox, LeAnne M; da Silva, Alexandre J

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the most common infectious cause of eosinophilic meningitis. Timely diagnosis of these infections is difficult, partly because reliable laboratory diagnostic methods are unavailable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of A. cantonensis DNA in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens. A total of 49 CSF specimens from 33 patients with eosinophilic meningitis were included: A. cantonensis DNA was detected in 32 CSF specimens, from 22 patients. Four patients had intermittently positive and negative real-time PCR results on subsequent samples, indicating that the level of A. cantonensis DNA present in CSF may fluctuate during the course of the illness. Immunodiagnosis and/or supplemental PCR testing supported the real-time PCR findings for 30 patients. On the basis of these observations, this real-time PCR assay can be useful to detect A. cantonensis in the CSF from patients with eosinophilic meningitis. PMID:26526920

  1. Influence of storage time on DNA of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae for accurate detection by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Rong, C Z; Zhao, J Y; Lao, X J; Xie, L; Li, S; Qin, X

    2016-01-01

    The shipment and storage conditions of clinical samples pose a major challenge to the detection accuracy of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) when using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The aim of the present study was to explore the influence of storage time at 4°C on the DNA of these pathogens and its effect on their detection by qRT-PCR. CT, NG, and UU positive genital swabs from 70 patients were collected, and DNA of all samples were extracted and divided into eight aliquots. One aliquot was immediately analyzed with qRT-PCR to assess the initial pathogen load, whereas the remaining samples were stored at 4°C and analyzed after 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. No significant differences in CT, NG, and UU DNA loads were observed between baseline (day 0) and the subsequent time points (days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28) in any of the 70 samples. Although a slight increase in DNA levels was observed at day 28 compared to day 0, paired sample t-test results revealed no significant differences between the mean DNA levels at different time points following storage at 4°C (all P>0.05). Overall, the CT, UU, and NG DNA loads from all genital swab samples were stable at 4°C over a 28-day period. PMID:27580005

  2. Influence of storage time on DNA of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae for accurate detection by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y.; Rong, C.Z.; Zhao, J.Y.; Lao, X.J.; Xie, L.; Li, S.; Qin, X.

    2016-01-01

    The shipment and storage conditions of clinical samples pose a major challenge to the detection accuracy of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) when using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The aim of the present study was to explore the influence of storage time at 4°C on the DNA of these pathogens and its effect on their detection by qRT-PCR. CT, NG, and UU positive genital swabs from 70 patients were collected, and DNA of all samples were extracted and divided into eight aliquots. One aliquot was immediately analyzed with qRT-PCR to assess the initial pathogen load, whereas the remaining samples were stored at 4°C and analyzed after 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. No significant differences in CT, NG, and UU DNA loads were observed between baseline (day 0) and the subsequent time points (days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28) in any of the 70 samples. Although a slight increase in DNA levels was observed at day 28 compared to day 0, paired sample t-test results revealed no significant differences between the mean DNA levels at different time points following storage at 4°C (all P>0.05). Overall, the CT, UU, and NG DNA loads from all genital swab samples were stable at 4°C over a 28-day period. PMID:27580005

  3. Development and Evaluation of a Multiplex Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Procedure to Clinically Type Prevalent Salmonella enterica Serovars

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Nélida; Diaz-Osorio, Miguel; Moreno, Jaime; Sánchez-Jiménez, Miryan; Cardona-Castro, Nora

    2010-01-01

    A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction procedure was developed to identify the most prevalent clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica. Genes from the rfb, fliC, fljB, and viaB groups that encode the O, H, and Vi antigens were used to design 15 primer pairs and TaqMan probes specific for the genes rfbJ, wzx, fliC, fljB, wcdB, the sdf-l sequence, and invA, which was used as an internal amplification control. The primers and probes were variously combined into six sets. The first round of reactions used two of these sets to detect Salmonella O:4, O:9, O:7, O:8, and O:3,10 serogroups. Once the serogroups were identified, the results of a second round of reactions that used primers and probes for the flagellar antigen l genes, 1,2; e,h; g,m; d; e,n,x; and z10, and the Vi gene were used to identify individual serovars. The procedure was standardized using 18 Salmonella reference strains and other enterobacteria. The procedure's reliability and sensitivity was evaluated using 267 randomly chosen serotyped Salmonella clinical isolates. The procedure had a sensitivity of 95.5% and was 100% specific. Thus, our technique is a quick, sensitive, reliable, and specific means of identifying S. enterica serovars and can be used in conjunction with traditional serotyping. Other primer and probe combinations could be used to increase the number of identifiable serovars. PMID:20110454

  4. Dual Combined Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for the Diagnosis of Lyssavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lavenir, Rachel; Lepelletier, Anthony; Faouzi, Abdellah; Troupin, Cécile; Nourlil, Jalal; Buchy, Philippe; Bourhy, Herve

    2016-01-01

    The definitive diagnosis of lyssavirus infection (including rabies) in animals and humans is based on laboratory confirmation. The reference techniques for post-mortem rabies diagnosis are still based on direct immunofluorescence and virus isolation, but molecular techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods, are increasingly being used and now constitute the principal tools for diagnosing rabies in humans and for epidemiological analyses. However, it remains a key challenge to obtain relevant specificity and sensitivity with these techniques while ensuring that the genetic diversity of lyssaviruses does not compromise detection. We developed a dual combined real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (combo RT-qPCR) method for pan-lyssavirus detection. This method is based on two complementary technologies: a probe-based (TaqMan) RT-qPCR for detecting the RABV species (pan-RABV RT-qPCR) and a second reaction using an intercalating dye (SYBR Green) to detect other lyssavirus species (pan-lyssa RT-qPCR). The performance parameters of this combined assay were evaluated with a large panel of primary animal samples covering almost all the genetic variability encountered at the viral species level, and they extended to almost all lyssavirus species characterized to date. This method was also evaluated for the diagnosis of human rabies on 211 biological samples (positive n = 76 and negative n = 135) including saliva, skin and brain biopsies. It detected all 41 human cases of rabies tested and confirmed the sensitivity and the interest of skin biopsy (91.5%) and saliva (54%) samples for intra-vitam diagnosis of human rabies. Finally, this method was successfully implemented in two rabies reference laboratories in enzootic countries (Cambodia and Morocco). This combined RT-qPCR method constitutes a relevant, useful, validated tool for the diagnosis of rabies in both humans and animals, and represents a promising tool for lyssavirus

  5. Dual Combined Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for the Diagnosis of Lyssavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Dacheux, Laurent; Larrous, Florence; Lavenir, Rachel; Lepelletier, Anthony; Faouzi, Abdellah; Troupin, Cécile; Nourlil, Jalal; Buchy, Philippe; Bourhy, Herve

    2016-07-01

    The definitive diagnosis of lyssavirus infection (including rabies) in animals and humans is based on laboratory confirmation. The reference techniques for post-mortem rabies diagnosis are still based on direct immunofluorescence and virus isolation, but molecular techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods, are increasingly being used and now constitute the principal tools for diagnosing rabies in humans and for epidemiological analyses. However, it remains a key challenge to obtain relevant specificity and sensitivity with these techniques while ensuring that the genetic diversity of lyssaviruses does not compromise detection. We developed a dual combined real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (combo RT-qPCR) method for pan-lyssavirus detection. This method is based on two complementary technologies: a probe-based (TaqMan) RT-qPCR for detecting the RABV species (pan-RABV RT-qPCR) and a second reaction using an intercalating dye (SYBR Green) to detect other lyssavirus species (pan-lyssa RT-qPCR). The performance parameters of this combined assay were evaluated with a large panel of primary animal samples covering almost all the genetic variability encountered at the viral species level, and they extended to almost all lyssavirus species characterized to date. This method was also evaluated for the diagnosis of human rabies on 211 biological samples (positive n = 76 and negative n = 135) including saliva, skin and brain biopsies. It detected all 41 human cases of rabies tested and confirmed the sensitivity and the interest of skin biopsy (91.5%) and saliva (54%) samples for intra-vitam diagnosis of human rabies. Finally, this method was successfully implemented in two rabies reference laboratories in enzootic countries (Cambodia and Morocco). This combined RT-qPCR method constitutes a relevant, useful, validated tool for the diagnosis of rabies in both humans and animals, and represents a promising tool for lyssavirus

  6. Time response of electrical conduction block in novel cardiomyocyte wire by extra-cellular photosensitization reaction at various irradiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurotsu, Mariko; Ogawa, Emiyu; Arai, Tsunenori

    2015-03-01

    We studied time response of electrical conduction (EC) block in a novel cardiomyocyte wire by extra-cellular photosensitization reaction (EPR) at various irradiances. This EC block using the EPR has been studied to develop a non-thermal arrhythmia therapeutic methodology. Despite the EC block in acute phase is needed to judge therapeutic endpoint in clinical arrhythmia therapy, time response of the EC block by the EPR in acute phase hasn't been studied. We measured the time to EC block occurrence by the EPR with intra-cellular Ca2+ concentration change using Fluo-4 AM fluorescence measurement by a confocal laser microscope system. The pattern cultivation cover glass with 10 mm Φ which had 60 μm width cultivation areas with 300 μm separations was used to form the cardiomyocyte wires. Rat cardiomyocyte with 10.8×105 cells was disseminated to the cover glasses installed in a 35 mmΦ dish. After 3 days from the dissemination, the EPR was operated to the cardiomyocyte wires for 10 min varying 3-120 mW/cm2 in 663 nm laser irradiances with 20 μg/ml talaporfin sodium. An irradiation area was approximately 60×340 μm2 on each wires. Cross correlation functions (CCF) in measured fluorescence images in every 10 s were calculated across the irradiation area. The time to EC block occurrence was defined as the time of the max difference between adjacent CCFs. By decreasing irradiances in 30-6 mW/cm2, the time to EC block occurrence became longer from 294 to 434 s. In 30-120 mW/cm2, the time to EC block occurrence was nearly constant in 300 s.

  7. Real-Time Optical Monitoring of Flow Kinetics and Gas Phase Reactions Under High-Pressure OMCVD Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, N.; McCall, S.; Bachmann, K. J.

    2001-01-01

    This contribution addresses the real-time optical characterization of gas flow and gas phase reactions as they play a crucial role for chemical vapor phase depositions utilizing elevated and high pressure chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) conditions. The objectives of these experiments are to validate on the basis of results on real-time optical diagnostics process models simulation codes, and provide input parameter sets needed for analysis and control of chemical vapor deposition at elevated pressures. Access to microgravity is required to retain high pressure conditions of laminar flow, which is essential for successful acquisition and interpretation of the optical data. In this contribution, we describe the design and construction of the HPCVD system, which include access ports for various optical methods of real-time process monitoring and to analyze the initial stages of heteroepitaxy and steady-state growth in the different pressure ranges. To analyze the onset of turbulence, provisions are made for implementation of experimental methods for in-situ characterization of the nature of flow. This knowledge will be the basis for the design definition of experiments under microgravity, where gas flow conditions, gas phase and surface chemistry, might be analyzed by remote controlled real-time diagnostics tools, developed in this research project.

  8. Detection of Avian bornavirus in multiple tissues of infected psittacine birds using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Delnatte, Pauline; Mak, Matthew; Ojkic, Davor; Raghav, Raj; DeLay, Josepha; Smith, Dale A

    2014-03-01

    Avian bornavirus (ABV), the cause of proventricular dilation disease in psittacine birds, has been detected in multiple tissues of infected birds using immunohistochemical staining (IHC) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the current study, real-time RT-PCR, using primers targeting the ABV matrix gene, was used to detect ABV in 146 tissues from 7 ABV-infected psittacine birds. Eighty-six percent of the samples tested positive, with crossing point values ranging from 13.82 to 37.82 and a mean of 22.3. These results were compared to the findings of a previous study using gel-based RT-PCR and IHC on the same samples. The agreement between the 2 RT-PCR techniques was 91%; when tests disagreed it was because samples were negative using gel-based RT-PCR but positive on real-time RT-PCR. Agreement with IHC was 77%; 16 out of 74 samples were negative using IHC but positive on real-time RT-PCR. The results suggest that real-time RT-PCR is a more sensitive technique than gel-based RT-PCR and IHC to detect ABV in tissues. The tissues that were ranked most frequently as having a high amount of viral RNA were proventriculus, kidney, colon, cerebrum, and cerebellum. Skeletal muscle, on the other hand, was found to have a consistently low amount of viral RNA. PMID:24518276

  9. A novel mechanism for direct real-time polymerase chain reaction that does not require DNA isolation from prokaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Soejima, Takashi; Xiao, Jin-zhong; Abe, Fumiaki

    2016-01-01

    Typically, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is performed after DNA isolation. Real-time PCR (qPCR), also known as direct qPCR in mammalian cells with weak membranes, is a common technique using crude samples subjected to preliminary boiling to elute DNA. However, applying this methodology to prokaryotic cells, which have solid cell walls, in contrast to mammalian cells which immediately burst in water, can result in poor detection. We successfully achieved PCR elongation with the addition of 1.3 cfu of Cronobacter muytjensii to a newly developed direct qPCR master mix without performing any crude DNA extraction (detection limit of 1.6 × 100 cfu/ml for the test sample compared with a detection limit of 1.6 × 103 cfu/ml primarily for crude (boiling) or classical DNA isolation). We revealed that the chromosomal DNA retained in prokaryotic cells can function as a PCR template, similarly to the mechanism in in situ PCR. Elucidating this reaction mechanism may contribute to the development of an innovative master mix for direct qPCR to detect genes in a single bacterium with solid cell walls and might lead to numerous novel findings in prokaryotic genomics research. PMID:27334801

  10. A novel mechanism for direct real-time polymerase chain reaction that does not require DNA isolation from prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Takashi; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Abe, Fumiaki

    2016-01-01

    Typically, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is performed after DNA isolation. Real-time PCR (qPCR), also known as direct qPCR in mammalian cells with weak membranes, is a common technique using crude samples subjected to preliminary boiling to elute DNA. However, applying this methodology to prokaryotic cells, which have solid cell walls, in contrast to mammalian cells which immediately burst in water, can result in poor detection. We successfully achieved PCR elongation with the addition of 1.3 cfu of Cronobacter muytjensii to a newly developed direct qPCR master mix without performing any crude DNA extraction (detection limit of 1.6 × 10(0) cfu/ml for the test sample compared with a detection limit of 1.6 × 10(3) cfu/ml primarily for crude (boiling) or classical DNA isolation). We revealed that the chromosomal DNA retained in prokaryotic cells can function as a PCR template, similarly to the mechanism in in situ PCR. Elucidating this reaction mechanism may contribute to the development of an innovative master mix for direct qPCR to detect genes in a single bacterium with solid cell walls and might lead to numerous novel findings in prokaryotic genomics research. PMID:27334801

  11. ACCURATE TIME-DEPENDENT WAVE PACKET STUDY OF THE H{sup +}+LiH REACTION AT EARLY UNIVERSE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Aslan, E.; Bulut, N.; Castillo, J. F.; Banares, L.; Aoiz, F. J.; Roncero, O.

    2012-11-01

    The dynamics and kinetics of the H{sup +} + LiH reaction have been studied using a quantum reactive time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) coupled-channel quantum mechanical method on an ab initio potential energy surface at conditions of the early universe. The total reaction probabilities for the H{sup +} + LiH(v = 0, j = 0) {yields} H{sup +} {sub 2} + Li process have been calculated from 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV up to 1 eV for total angular momenta J from 0 to 110. Using a Langevin model, integral cross sections have been calculated in that range of collision energies and extrapolated for energies below 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV. The calculated rate constants are found to be nearly independent of temperature in the 10-1000 K interval with a value of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -9} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}, which is in good agreement with estimates used in evolutionary models of the early universe lithium chemistry.

  12. Use of proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry for quantitative monitoring of toxic nitramines in the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisthaler, A.; Zhu, L.; Stenstrøm, Y.; Nielsen, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Naturally occurring aliphatic amines and industrially emitted aromatic amines and alkanolamines produce toxic nitramines, (R1R2)-N-NO2, when photo-oxidized in the atmosphere in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NOx). Particular concerns arise from amine-based CO2 capture where the amine solution may get nitrated by NOx in the flue gas. An on-line analytical technique for measuring nitramines in industrial emissions and in ambient air is thus in high demand. Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a state-of-the-art technique for on-line measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. Herein, we report on the use of high mass resolution proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) for on-line analysis of nitramines. We generated a mass spectral library from a series of nitramines and investigated the analytical performance of PTR-ToF-MS in terms of sensitivity, precision, accuracy and detection limit. We will discuss limitations of the innovative technique and propose measurement strategies for future emission and ambient measurements.

  13. Nanosilver-based surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic determination of DNA methyltransferase activity through real-time hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping Ping; Liu, Hui; Zhen, Shu Jun; Li, Chun Mei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-11-15

    In this manuscript, a nanosilver enhanced SERS strategy was successfully constructed for the determination of DNA methyltransferase activity in soulution combined with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The proposed method was mainly on the basis of excellent separation ability of magnetic microparticles (MMPs), HCR as signal amplification unit and assembled AgNPs as enhancement substrate. In the presence of M. SssI MTase, the duplex sequence (5'-CCGG-3') tethered to MMPs was methylated, which cannot be cleaved by HpaII endonuclease. The resulted DNA skeleton captured on MMPs then triggered the HCR reaction, generated a polymerized and extended symmetrical sequence, in which more biotin terminal was available for the conjugation of AgNPs-SA, leading to significantly amplified SERS response. When it was used to analyze M. SssI activity, a linear equation ∆ISERS=1215.32+446.80 cM.SssI was obtained with the M. SssI activity ranged from 0.1 to 10.0 U with the correlation coefficient (r(2)) of 0.97. The most important advantage of this method is the combination of SERS and HCR in solution for the first time and its good selectivity, which enabled the detection of even one-base mismatched sequence. The new assay method holds great promising application to be a versatile platform for sensitive, high-throughput detection, and the screening of new anticancer drugs on DNA MTase. PMID:26086442

  14. Evaluation of gold nanoparticles as the additive in real-time polymerase chain reaction with SYBR Green I dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchao; Mi, Lijuan; Cao, Xueyan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Fan, Chunhai; Hu, Jun

    2008-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been proven to be able to improve the specificity or increase the efficiency of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) when a suitable amount of AuNPs was used. However, there is still a lack of systematic evaluation of AuNPs in real-time PCR. In this study, DNA degradation and the fluorescence quenching effect of AuNPs were first tested in real-time PCR. Then two different kinds of Taq DNA polymerase, native and recombinant Taq polymerase, were employed to evaluate the AuNPs' effect on the threshold cycle (CT) values, standard curves and melting curves in real-time PCR. Different ratios of the amount of native Taq DNA polymerase to the amount of AuNPs were also tested. It was found that AuNPs could be applied in real-time PCR with correlation coefficient R2>0.989. The combination of 2.09 nM AuNPs with 3.75 U of native Taq DNA polymerase could make the amplification curves shift to the left and enhance the efficiency of the real-time PCR (0.628 39 without AuNPs compared with 0.717 89 with 2.09 nM AuNPs), thus enabling faster detection in comparison with those of control samples. However, no improvement ability of AuNPs was found in real-time PCR based on recombinant rTaq DNA polymerase. Besides, the results suggest that a complex interaction exists between AuNPs and native Taq DNA polymerase.

  15. Rapid identification of Aedes albopictus, Aedes scutellaris, and Aedes aegypti life stages using real-time polymerase chain reaction assays.

    PubMed

    Hill, Lydia A; Davis, Joseph B; Hapgood, George; Whelan, Peter I; Smith, Greg A; Ritchie, Scott A; Cooper, R D; van den Hurk, Andrew F

    2008-12-01

    In 2005, a widespread infestation of Aedes albopictus was discovered in the Torres Strait, the region between northern Australia and New Guinea. To contain this species, an eradication program was implemented in 2006. However, the progress of this program is impeded by the difficulty of morphologically separating Ae. albopictus larvae from the endemic species Aedes scutellaris. In this study, three real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction assays that target the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 region were developed to rapidly identify Aedes aegypti, Ae. albopictus, and Ae. scutellaris from northern Australia. Individual eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults, as well as the species composition of mixed pools were accurately identified. The assay method was validated using 703 field-collected specimens from the Torres Strait. PMID:19052295

  16. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods for four genetically modified maize varieties and maize DNA content in food.

    PubMed

    Brodmann, Peter D; Ilg, Evelyn C; Berthoud, Hélène; Herrmann, Andre

    2002-01-01

    Quantitative detection methods are needed for enforcement of the recently introduced labeling threshold for genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food ingredients. This labeling threshold, which is set to 1% in the European Union and Switzerland, must be applied to all approved GMOs. Four different varieties of maize are approved in the European Union: the insect-resistant Bt176 maize (Maximizer), Btl 1 maize, Mon810 (YieldGard) maize, and the herbicide-tolerant T25 (Liberty Link) maize. Because the labeling must be considered individually for each ingredient, a quantitation system for the endogenous maize content is needed in addition to the GMO-specific detection systems. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction detection methods were developed for the 4 approved genetically modified maize varieties and for an endogenous maize (invertase) gene system. PMID:12083257

  17. The effect of attention loading on the inhibition of choice reaction time to visual motion by concurrent rotary motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looper, M.

    1976-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of attention loading on the established intersensory effects of passive bodily rotation on choice reaction time (RT) to visual motion. Subjects sat at the center of rotation in an enclosed rotating chamber and observed an oscilloscope on which were, in the center, a tracking display and, 10 deg left of center, a RT line. Three tracking tasks and a no-tracking control condition were presented to all subjects in combination with the RT task, which occurred with and without concurrent cab rotations. Choice RT to line motions was inhibited (probability less than .001) both when there was simultaneous vestibular stimulation and when there was a tracking task; response latencies lengthened progressively with increased similarity between the RT and tracking tasks. However, the attention conditions did not affect the intersensory effect; the significance of this for the nature of the sensory interaction is discussed.

  18. Regulating emotions uniquely modifies reaction time, rate of force production, and accuracy of a goal-directed motor action.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Garrett F; Fawver, Bradley; Hancock, Gabriella M; Janelle, Christopher M

    2014-02-01

    We investigated how emotion regulation (ER) strategies influence the execution of a memory guided, ballistic pinch grip. Participants (N=33) employed ER strategies (expressive suppression, emotional expression, and attentional deployment) while viewing emotional stimuli (IAPS images). Upon stimulus offset, participants produced a targeted pinch force aimed at 10% of their maximum voluntary contraction. Performance measures included reaction time (RT), rate of force production, and performance accuracy. As hypothesized, attentional deployment resulted in the slowest RT, largest rate of force production, and poorest performance accuracy. In contrast, expressive suppression reduced the rate of force production and increased performance accuracy relative to emotional expression and attentional deployment. Findings provide evidence that emotion regulation strategies uniquely influence human movement. Future work should further delineate the interacting role that emotion regulation strategies have in modulating both affective experience and motor performance. PMID:24576703

  19. Combining Reaction Time and Accuracy: The Relationship Between Working Memory Capacity and Task Switching as a Case Example.

    PubMed

    Draheim, Christopher; Hicks, Kenny L; Engle, Randall W

    2016-01-01

    It is generally agreed upon that the mechanisms underlying task switching heavily depend on working memory, yet numerous studies have failed to show a strong relationship between working memory capacity (WMC) and task-switching ability. We argue that this relationship does indeed exist but that the dependent variable used to measure task switching is problematic. To support our claim, we reanalyzed data from two studies with a new scoring procedure that combines reaction time (RT) and accuracy into a single score. The reanalysis revealed a strong relationship between task switching and WMC that was not present when RT-based switch costs were used as the dependent variable. We discuss the theoretical implications of this finding along with the potential uses and limitations of the scoring procedure we used. More broadly, we emphasize the importance of using measures that incorporate speed and accuracy in other areas of research, particularly in comparisons of subjects differing in cognitive and developmental levels. PMID:26817730

  20. Independent Component Analysis of Functional Networks for Response Inhibition: Inter-Subject Variation in Stop Signal Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Tsai, Shang-Jui; Hu, Sien; Xu, Jiansong; Chao, Herta H.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Li, Chiang-Shan R.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive control is a critical executive function. Many studies have combined general linear modeling and the stop signal task (SST) to delineate the component processes of cognitive control. For instance, by contrasting stop success (SS) and stop error (SE) trials in the SST, investigators examined regional responses to stop signal inhibition. In contrast to this parameterized approach, independent component analysis (ICA) elucidates brain networks subserving cognitive control. In our earlier work of 59 adults performing the SST during fMRI, we characterized six independent components (ICs). However, none of these ICs correlated with stop signal performance, raising questions about their behavioral validity. Here, in a larger sample (n=100), we identified and explored 23 ICs for correlation with the stop signal reaction time (SSRT), a measure of the efficiency of response inhibition. At a corrected threshold (P < 0.0005), a paracentral lobule-midcingulate network and a left inferior parietal-supplementary motor-somatomotor network showed a positive correlation between SE beta weight and SSRT. In contrast, a midline cerebellum–thalamus–pallidum network showed a negative correlation between SE beta weight and SSRT. These findings suggest that motor preparation and execution prolongs the SSRT, likely via an interaction between the go and stop processes as suggested by the race model. Behaviorally, consistent with this hypothesis, the difference in G and SE reaction times is positively correlated with SSRT across subjects. These new results highlight the importance of cognitive motor regions in response inhibition and support the utility of ICA in uncovering functional networks for cognitive control in the SST. PMID:26089095