Science.gov

Sample records for 5-mw proton source

  1. 5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

  2. Extrapolation of the Dutch 1 MW tunable free electron maser to a 5 MW ECRH source

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Nelson, S.; Kamin, G.; Antonsen, T. Levush, B.; Urbanus, W.; Tulupov, A.

    1995-04-01

    A Free Electron Maser (FEM) is now under construction at the FOM Institute (Rijnhuizen) Netherlands with the goal of producing 1 MW long pulse to CW microwave output in the range 130 GHz to 250 GHz with wall plug efficiencies of 50% (Verhoeven, et al EC-9 Conference). An extrapolated version of this device is proposed which by scaling up the beam current, would produce microwave power levels of up to 5 MW CW in order to reduce the cost per watt and increase the power per module, thus providing the fusion community with a practical ECRH source.

  3. Demonstration of 5MW PAFC power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Usami, Yutaka; Takae, Toshio

    1996-12-31

    Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Technology Research Association, established in May 1991 by Japanese 10 electric power and 4 gas companies, started a new project in 1991 FY, with the object of PAFC realization and aiming the development of 5MW- class PAFC. power plant for urban energy center and 1 MW- class power plant for onsite use. This project is carried out as 6 years plan jointly with New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization. The targets of the project are to evaluate and resolve the development task, such as a high reliability, compactness and cost reduction throughout the engineering, manufacturing and field testing of PAFC power plants. PAC tests and power generating test operations of 5MW plant were completed in 1994. Conducting the 2 years continuous operations and studies since 1995, the plant operational performance, system control characteristics, waste heat recovery and environmental advantage will be demonstrated.

  4. Raft River 5-MW(e) geothermal pilot plant project

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, T.L.; Whitbeck, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The Raft River 5-MW(e) Pilot Plant Project was started in 1976. Construction is scheduled for completion in July 1980, with three years of engineering and operational testing to follow. The plant utilized a 280/sup 0/F geothermal fluid energy source and a dual boiling isobutane cycle. Developmental efforts are in progress in the areas of down hole pumps and chemical treatment of geothermal fluid for cooling tower makeup.

  5. The 5 MW for solar-chemistry development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, J. T.

    1981-11-01

    The US-DOE, 5MW solar Central Receiver Test Facility (CRTF) operates to develop and proof-test high efficiency solar receivers and collectors (heliostats) for applications such as electricity generation and process heating. The capabilities of CRTF for solar chemical process development studies are described and related to chemical reactant heating rates. A Sun Fuels program is planned to demonstrate a process for upgrading both nonrenewable and renewable feedstocks into conventional fuels. To additionally benefit from the high intensity light source, studies on the direct solar pyrolysis of metal halides and carbonyls to produce high purity, high value metals are recommended.

  6. Development of a 5 MW reference gearbox for offshore wind turbines: 5 MW reference gearbox

    SciTech Connect

    Nejad, Amir Rasekhi; Guo, Yi; Gao, Zhen; Moan, Torgeir

    2015-07-27

    This paper presents detailed descriptions, modeling parameters and technical data of a 5MW high-speed gearbox developed for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory offshore 5MW baseline wind turbine. The main aim of this paper is to support the concept studies and research for large offshore wind turbines by providing a baseline gearbox model with detailed modeling parameters. This baseline gearbox follows the most conventional design types of those used in wind turbines. It is based on the four-point supports: two main bearings and two torque arms. The gearbox consists of three stages: two planetary and one parallel stage gears. The gear ratios among the stages are calculated in a way to obtain the minimum gearbox weight. The gearbox components are designed and selected based on the offshore wind turbine design codes and validated by comparison to the data available from large offshore wind turbine prototypes. All parameters required to establish the dynamic model of the gearbox are then provided. Moreover, a maintenance map indicating components with high to low probability of failure is shown. The 5 MW reference gearbox can be used as a baseline for research on wind turbine gearboxes and comparison studies. It can also be employed in global analysis tools to represent a more realistic model of a gearbox in a coupled analysis.

  7. A Two Frequency 1.5 MW Gyrotron Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tax, David; Guss, William; Shapiro, Michael; Temkin, Richard; Rock, Ben; Vernon, Ronald; Neilson, Jeffrey

    2012-10-01

    Megawatt gyrotrons are an important microwave source for electron cyclotron heating and current drive (ECH/ECCD) in fusion plasmas due to their ability to produce megawatts of power at millimeter wave frequencies. The MIT gyrotron operates nominally at 96 kV and 40 A with 3 μs pulses and has previously demonstrated 1.5 MW of output power with > 50 % efficiency at 110 GHz with a depressed collector. A new cavity has been designed for 1.5 MW operation at two distinct frequencies: 110 GHz in the TE22,6 mode and 124.5 GHz in the TE24,7 mode. A new internal mode converter (IMC) consisting of a dimpled wall launcher and four smooth curved mirrors has also been designed and was optimized for both modes. Simulations of the IMC indicate that > 98 % Gaussian beam content could be achieved for each mode. Cold test results for the components will be presented as well as the current status of the hot test experiment.

  8. The Source of Protons at Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eviatar, A.; Vasyliūnas, V. M.; Johnson, R. E.

    2002-12-01

    The ionosphere of Io is known to be dominated by the molecule ion of sulfur dioxide and the surface and atmosphere are nearly devoid of hydrogen bearing molecules. It is noteworthy, therefore, that electromagnetic waves have been observed near the second and fourth harmonics of the proton gyrofrequency, which is indicative of the presence of a population of pickup protons. We investigate the possible sources of indigenous hydrogen atoms and protons in the exosphere of Io and conclude that charge exchange between incident torus oxygen ions and a population of bound iogenic hydrogen atoms is the only mechanism that can suffice to provide the needed pickup proton source strength and number density. We evaluate various possible sources for such a population.

  9. Aconitase: its source of catalytic protons.

    PubMed

    Kuo, D J; Rose, I A

    1987-12-01

    An ordinary isotope partition experiment was performed to determine the rate of dissociation of the proton from the donor site for the hydration of cis-aconitate. Aconitase in [3H]water was efficiently diluted into well-mixed solutions of cis-aconitate. Citrate and isocitrate that were formed within 2 s were more heavily labeled than could be explained by consideration of an isotope effect in the processing of one proton per enzyme equivalent. Control experiments indicate that mixing was much more rapid than catalytic turnover, ruling out incompletely diluted [3H]water as a significant isotope source. Therefore, it appears that significantly more than one enzyme-bound tritium atom (protons) must have been used in the course of the multiple turnover of the enzyme after the dilution was complete. Isotope incorporation reached values in excess of four proton equivalents as a limit with simple Michaelis dependence on cis-aconitate. From the half-saturation concentration value for trapping, 0.15 mM, the t 1/2 for exchange of each of these protons with solvent appears to be approximately 0.1 s at 0 degrees C. The large number of protons trapped seems to suggest the existence of a structurally stabilized pool of protons, or water, that communicates between the active site base and the medium in the hydration of cis-aconitate. The proton abstracted in the dehydration of [3H]citrate is transferred directly to undissociated cis-aconitate to form isocitrate without dilution, or cis-aconitate having dissociated, the tritium passes to the medium, presumably through the pool of bound protons indicated above. All of the citrate-derived protons can be found in isocitrate if cis-aconitate is added in sufficient concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2827757

  10. The 1.5 MW wind turbine of tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    De Wolff, T.J.; Sondergaard, H.

    1996-12-31

    The Danish company Nordtank is one of the pioneers within the wind turbine industry. Since 1981 Nordtank has installed worldwide more than 2300 wind turbine generators with a total name plate capacity that is exceeding 350 MW. This paper will describe two major wind turbine technology developments that Nordtank has accomplished during the last year: Site Optimization of Nordtank wind turbines: Nordtank has developed a flexible design concept for its WTGs in the 500/600 kW range, in order to offer the optimal WTG solution for any given site and wind regime. Nordtank`s 1.5 MW wind turbine: In September 1995, Nordtank was the first company to install a commercial 1.5 NM WTG. This paper will document the development process, the design as well as operations of the Nordtank 1.5 MW WTG.

  11. Proton emission from a laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, L.; Cavallaro, S.; Gammino, S.; Cutroneo, M.; Margarone, D.

    2012-02-15

    At intensities of the order of 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2}, ns pulsed lasers can be employed to ablate solid bulk targets in order to produce high emission of ions at different charge state and kinetic energy. A special interest is devoted to the production of protons with controllable energy and current from a roto-translating target irradiated in repetition rate at 1-10 Hz by a Nd:Yag pulsed laser beam. Different hydrogenated targets based on polymers and hydrates were irradiated in high vacuum. Special nanostrucutres can be embedded in the polymers in order to modify the laser absorption properties and the amount of protons to be accelerated in the plasma. For example, carbon nanotubes may increase the laser absorption and the hydrogen absorption to generate high proton yields from the plasma. Metallic nanostrucutres may increase the electron density of the plasma and the kinetic energy of the accelerated protons. Ion collectors, ion energy analyzer, and mass spectrometers, used in time-of-flight configuration, were employed to characterize the ion beam properties. A comparison with traditional proton ion source is presented and discussed.

  12. Catalytic asymmetric protonation of lithium enolates using amino acid derivatives as chiral proton sources.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Kaori; Ito, Rie; Arai, Takayoshi; Yanagisawa, Akira

    2006-04-13

    [reaction: see text] Asymmetric protonation of lithium enolates was examined using commercially available amino acid derivatives as chiral proton sources. Among the amino acid derivatives tested, Nbeta-l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine methyl ester was found to cause significant asymmetric induction in the protonation of lithium enolates. The enantiomeric excess (up to 88% ee) of the products obtained in the presence of a catalytic amount of the chiral proton source was higher than those obtained in the stoichiometric reaction. PMID:16597150

  13. Catalytic asymmetric protonation of lithium enolates using amino acid derivatives as chiral proton sources.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Kaori; Ito, Rie; Arai, Takayoshi; Yanagisawa, Akira

    2006-04-13

    [reaction: see text] Asymmetric protonation of lithium enolates was examined using commercially available amino acid derivatives as chiral proton sources. Among the amino acid derivatives tested, Nbeta-l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine methyl ester was found to cause significant asymmetric induction in the protonation of lithium enolates. The enantiomeric excess (up to 88% ee) of the products obtained in the presence of a catalytic amount of the chiral proton source was higher than those obtained in the stoichiometric reaction.

  14. Ultrafast laser-driven proton sources and dynamic proton imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nickles, Peter V.; Schnuerer, Matthias; Sokollik, Thomas; Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis; Sandner, Wolfgang; Amin, Munib; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald; Andreev, Alexander

    2008-07-15

    Ion bursts, accelerated by an ultrafast (40 fs) laser-assisted target normal sheath acceleration mechanism, can be adjusted so as to deliver a nearly pure proton beam. Such laser-driven proton bursts have predominantly a low transverse emittance and a broad kinetic spectrum suitable for continuous probing of the temporal evolution of spatially extended electric fields that arise after laser irradiation of thin foils. Fields with a strength of up to 10{sup 10} V/m were measured with a new streaklike proton deflectometry setup. The data show the temporal and spatial evolution of electric fields that are due to target charge-up and ion-front expansion following intense laser-target interaction at intensities of 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. Measurement of the field evolution is important to gain further insight into lateral electron-transport processes and the influence of field dynamics on ion beam properties.

  15. Fermilab HINS Proton Ion Source Beam Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, W.M.; Apollinari, G.; Chaurize, S.; Hays, S.; Romanov, G.; Scarpine, V.; Schmidt, C.; Webber, R.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The proton ion source for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Linac front-end at Fermilab has been successfully commissioned. It produces a 50 keV, 3 msec beam pulse with a peak current greater than 20mA at 2.5Hz. The beam is transported to the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) by a low energy beam transport (LEBT) that consists of two focusing solenoids, four steering dipole magnets and a beam current transformer. To understand beam transmission through the RFQ, it is important to characterize the 50 keV beam before connecting the LEBT to the RFQ. A wire scanner and a Faraday cup are temporarily installed at the exit of the LEBT to study the beam parameters. Beam profile measurements are made for different LEBT settings and results are compared to those from computer simulations. In lieu of direct emittance measurements, solenoid variation method based on profile measurements is used to reconstruct the beam emittance.

  16. Tomography of an ultrafast laser driven proton source

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Borghesi, M.; Schnuerer, M.; Sandner, W.; Nickles, P. V.; Nakamura, T.; Mima, K.

    2010-06-15

    Using a multichannel Thomson spectrometer we have implemented a tomographic approach allowing the reconstruction of the emission characteristic of a laser driven proton source with high energy and spatial resolution. The results demonstrate the complexity of the temporal and spatial characteristics of such a source. The emitted proton beam, which is laminar and divergent at high energies, becomes convergent at low energies. This implies that a fraction of the proton beam having this kinetic energy is emitted in a collimated way from the target at the ''turning point'' between these two behaviors. Only a finite fraction of the target surface is contributing to the ion spectrum, which is measured at a specific angle within the beam cone. Therefore the momentum distribution of the protons in the emitted beam at any point in space can be controlled by determining the proton source area.

  17. Design and construction of a compact microwave proton source for a proton linac.

    PubMed

    Hong, I S; Park, B S; Jang, J H; Kwon, H J; Cho, Y S; Hwang, Y S

    2010-02-01

    A 100 MeV, 20 mA proton linear accelerator is being developed by the Proton Engineering Frontier Project at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. 20 MeV acceleration system using radio frequency quadrupole and drift tube linac was already developed and has been tested. To operate this acceleration system with a long time, more reliable proton source is needed. A compact microwave proton source was proposed and has been designed and constructed as a prototype ion source for the 100 MeV proton linear accelerator. The design of microwave power injection system is based on the microwave proton injector at LANL and CEA. The wave power from a 2.45 GHz, 2 kW magnetron source is introduced into a compact plasma chamber with 7 cm diameter and 5 cm length through a standard tapered, double-ridged waveguide (WRD250) and a quartz window. The microwave power supply is installed on high voltage platform. Axial magnetic fields up to 1 kG can be provided with a water-cooled solenoid coil. A single-hole three electrode extraction system is designed for an extraction current up to 30 mA at a 50 kV extraction voltage. The design and initial operations of the proton source are presented.

  18. Design and construction of a compact microwave proton source for a proton linac

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, I. S.; Park, B. S.; Jang, J. H.; Kwon, H. J.; Cho, Y. S.; Hwang, Y. S.

    2010-02-15

    A 100 MeV, 20 mA proton linear accelerator is being developed by the Proton Engineering Frontier Project at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. 20 MeV acceleration system using radio frequency quadrupole and drift tube linac was already developed and has been tested. To operate this acceleration system with a long time, more reliable proton source is needed. A compact microwave proton source was proposed and has been designed and constructed as a prototype ion source for the 100 MeV proton linear accelerator. The design of microwave power injection system is based on the microwave proton injector at LANL and CEA. The wave power from a 2.45 GHz, 2 kW magnetron source is introduced into a compact plasma chamber with 7 cm diameter and 5 cm length through a standard tapered, double-ridged waveguide (WRD250) and a quartz window. The microwave power supply is installed on high voltage platform. Axial magnetic fields up to 1 kG can be provided with a water-cooled solenoid coil. A single-hole three electrode extraction system is designed for an extraction current up to 30 mA at a 50 kV extraction voltage. The design and initial operations of the proton source are presented.

  19. Emittance and proton fraction measurement in High current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Gharat, S.; Rajawat, R. K.

    2015-09-01

    The beam characterization studies in terms of emittance and proton fraction have been carried out in the high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source developed for Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA). The beam emittance was measured using two slit emittance measurement units (EMU). The emittance was measured at three locations (1) after beam extraction at ion source end, (2) after focusing the beam using solenoid magnet and (3) after focusing and separating H+ using solenoid magnet and analyzing magnet. The beam emittance measured in all three cases was found to be less than 0.2π mm-mrad (rms-normalized). The proton fraction in the beam measured using analyzing magnet was found to be more than 90%. The variations of beam emittance and proton fraction have been studied as a function of microwave power and neutral gas pressure.

  20. TRIPS: The high intensity proton source for the TRASCO project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Gobin, R.; Ferdinand, R.

    2000-02-01

    The TRASCO project (trasmutazione scorie) is a R&D program whose goal is the design of an accelerator driving system for nuclear waste transmutation. The high current continuous wave proton linear accelerator will drive a subcritical system to transmutate nuclear wastes, while producing energy. The proton source TRIPS is a high intensity microwave source, which should be highly reliable and that should provide a minimum proton current of 50 mA with a r-r' root mean square normalized emittance lower than 0.2 π mm mrad. A program of cooperation has been entered into with CEA-Saclay, where the IPHI project is in progress and the proton source SILHI has been designed and built using goals close to those of TRIPS. The construction of TRIPS is underway and the first beam is scheduled for the first half of 2000. The main features of this source and the results of the optics calculations are presented.

  1. Proton Ratio of HL-2A Bucket Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li-Ming; Lei, Guang-Jiu; Cao, Jian-Yong; Yang, Li-Mei; Jiang, Shao-Feng; Han, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Sun, Ping; Zou, Gui-Qing; Lu, Da-Lun; Liu, He; Jiang, Tao; Duan, Xu-Ru

    2010-04-01

    For heating the tokamak plasma effectively, the ion source must be capable of producing ions with high proton ratio. The proton ratio, which is found to be more than 65.6% at the ion current of 19.6 A with the extraction voltage of 39.6 kV, is measured with an image spectrograph by Doppler shift effect of Balmer-α-radiation spectrum emitted from fast hydrogen particles. The tendency of proton ratio with the ion density in experiment is almost the same as the mode devised by Zhang et al. Okumura et al. only gave the affection of the plasma volume and ion loss area on the proton ratio, but the relationship between the ion density in chamber and the proton ratio was not presented. We give the relationship.

  2. A beam source model for scanned proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimstrand, Peter; Traneus, Erik; Ahnesjö, Anders; Grusell, Erik; Glimelius, Bengt; Tilly, Nina

    2007-06-01

    A beam source model, i.e. a model for the initial phase space of the beam, for scanned proton beams has been developed. The beam source model is based on parameterized particle sources with characteristics found by fitting towards measured data per individual beam line. A specific aim for this beam source model is to make it applicable to the majority of the various proton beam systems currently available or under development, with the overall purpose to drive dose calculations in proton beam treatment planning. The proton beam phase space is characterized by an energy spectrum, radial and angular distributions and deflections for the non-modulated elementary pencil beam. The beam propagation through the scanning magnets is modelled by applying experimentally determined focal points for each scanning dimension. The radial and angular distribution parameters are deduced from measured two-dimensional fluence distributions of the elementary beam in air. The energy spectrum is extracted from a depth dose distribution for a fixed broad beam scan pattern measured in water. The impact of a multi-slab range shifter for energy modulation is calculated with an own Monte Carlo code taking multiple scattering, energy loss and straggling, non-elastic and elastic nuclear interactions in the slab assembly into account. Measurements for characterization and verification have been performed with the scanning proton beam system at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Both in-air fluence patterns and dose points located in a water phantom were used. For verification, dose-in-water was calculated with the Monte Carlo code GEANT 3.21 instead of using a clinical dose engine with approximations of its own. For a set of four individual pencil beams, both with the full energy and range shifted, 96.5% (99.8%) of the tested dose points satisfied the 1%/1 mm (2%/2 mm) gamma criterion.

  3. A beam source model for scanned proton beams.

    PubMed

    Kimstrand, Peter; Traneus, Erik; Ahnesjö, Anders; Grusell, Erik; Glimelius, Bengt; Tilly, Nina

    2007-06-01

    A beam source model, i.e. a model for the initial phase space of the beam, for scanned proton beams has been developed. The beam source model is based on parameterized particle sources with characteristics found by fitting towards measured data per individual beam line. A specific aim for this beam source model is to make it applicable to the majority of the various proton beam systems currently available or under development, with the overall purpose to drive dose calculations in proton beam treatment planning. The proton beam phase space is characterized by an energy spectrum, radial and angular distributions and deflections for the non-modulated elementary pencil beam. The beam propagation through the scanning magnets is modelled by applying experimentally determined focal points for each scanning dimension. The radial and angular distribution parameters are deduced from measured two-dimensional fluence distributions of the elementary beam in air. The energy spectrum is extracted from a depth dose distribution for a fixed broad beam scan pattern measured in water. The impact of a multi-slab range shifter for energy modulation is calculated with an own Monte Carlo code taking multiple scattering, energy loss and straggling, non-elastic and elastic nuclear interactions in the slab assembly into account. Measurements for characterization and verification have been performed with the scanning proton beam system at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Both in-air fluence patterns and dose points located in a water phantom were used. For verification, dose-in-water was calculated with the Monte Carlo code GEANT 3.21 instead of using a clinical dose engine with approximations of its own. For a set of four individual pencil beams, both with the full energy and range shifted, 96.5% (99.8%) of the tested dose points satisfied the 1%/1 mm (2%/2 mm) gamma criterion.

  4. Status of the Trasco Intense Proton Source and emittance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Chines, F.; Presti, M.; Andò, L.; Guo, X. H.; Gobin, R.; Ferdinand, R.

    2004-05-01

    The Trasco Intense Proton Source (TRIPS) was installed at INFN-LNS in May 2000 and has been fully operational since the Fall of 2000; now the source fulfills all the requirements of the TRASCO (Trasmutazione Scorie) project. The proton beam intensity easily exceeds 40 mA at the operating voltage of 80 kV. A set of emittance measurements was carried out for different source conditions and confirmed the simulations performed with the AXCEL code: in all the cases the rms normalized emittance is well lower than the value required for the injection into the RFQ (0.2 π mm mrad); the results will be shown and discussed. Finally a beam reliability of 99.8% has been found during a long run test lasting over 142 h.

  5. Direct observation of the CRAND proton radiation belt source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2013-12-01

    Observations of geomagnetically trapped 27-45 MeV protons following the November 2003 magnetic storm show a gradual intensity rise that is interpreted as a direct measurement of the cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND) source strength. The intensity rise is simulated by combining the detector response function with a model CRAND source, obtained by drift-averaging neutron intensity from Monte Carlo simulation of cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere. The simulation, for 2.4proton trapping and other known radiation belt processes. It further shows that the CRAND source was predominant, while radial diffusion and magnetic storm losses effected minor corrections in certain L ranges.

  6. H- Ion Sources for High Intensity Proton Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rolland P.; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F; Dudnikova, Galina

    2010-01-01

    Spallation neutron source user facilities require reliable, intense beams of protons. The technique of H- charge exchange injection into a storage ring or synchrotron can provide the needed beam currents, but may be limited by the ion sources that have currents and reliability that do not meet future requirements and emittances that are too large for efficient acceleration. In this project we are developing an H- source which will synthesize the most important developments in the field of negative ion sources to provide high current, small emittance, good lifetime, high reliability, and power efficiency. We describe planned modifications to the present external antenna source at SNS that involve: 1) replacing the present 2 MHz plasma-forming solenoid antenna with a 60 MHz saddle-type antenna and 2) replacing the permanent multicusp magnet with a weaker electromagnet, in order to increase the plasma density near the outlet aperture. The SNS test stand will then be used to verify simulations of this approach that indicate significant improvements in H- output current and efficiency, where lower RF power will allow higher duty factor, longer source lifetime, and/or better reliability.

  7. Proton Driver Linac for the Frankfurt Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, C.; Chau, L. P.; Dinter, H.; Droba, M.; Heilmann, M.; Joshi, N.; Maeder, D.; Metz, A.; Meusel, O.; Noll, D.; Podlech, H.; Ratzinger, U.; Reichau, H.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt, S.; Schweizer, W.; Volk, K.; Wagner, C.; Mueller, I.

    2010-08-04

    The Frankfurt Neutron Source at the Stern-Gerlach-Zentrum (FRANZ) will deliver high neutron fluxes in the energy range of 1 to 500 keV. The Activation Mode provides a high averaged neutron flux created by a cw proton beam of up to 5 mA, while in the Compressor Mode intense neutron pulses of 1 ns length are formed with a repetition rate of up to 250 kHz. The Compressor Mode is well-suited for energy-dependent neutron capture measurements using the Time-of-Flight method in combination with a 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} detector array. The design of the proton driver linac for both operation modes is presented. This includes the volume type ion source, the ExB chopper located in the low energy section, the RFQ-IH combination for beam acceleration and the bunch compressor. Finally, the neutron production at the lithium-7 target and the resulting energy spectrum is described.

  8. Flux and source of energetic protons in Saturn's inner magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Schardt, A.W.; McDonald, F.B.

    1983-11-01

    The flux of energetic protons in Saturn's inner magnetosphere was observed in two channels from 48--63 and 63--160 MeV. Absorption features caused by the G ring and the satellites Enceladus and Mimas were easily identifiable. The flux observed in the absorption slot of Mimas can be maintained by the decay of a cosmic ray albedo neutron flux of 7 x 10/sup -3/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/ sr/sup -1/. This flux is entirely consistent with calculations of the neutron flux produced by galactic cosmic ray interactions with the rings of Saturn. the ominidirectional proton flux of 8.2 x 10/sup 3/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/ at 2.734 R/sub S/ requires a residence time of 30 years. Both the residence time and the energy spectrum are comparable to those found in the inner radiation belt of earth. The angular distributions is nearly isotropic in the Mimas slot and beyond 4 R/sub S/. Otherwise the pitch angle distribution is pancake and has been approximated by sin/sup n/ 0 with n in the range 2.7. This distribution is consistent with an isotropic neutron source in the ring plane.

  9. Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Shaber, C.R.; Thurow, T.L.

    1981-11-17

    The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

  10. 1.5 MW, 110 GHz Gyrotron with a Depressed Collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunmi; Anderson, James; Shapiro, Michael; Jagadishwar, Sirigiri; Temkin, Richard

    2004-11-01

    A 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron is under development for electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating at DIII-D. Research conducted at MIT in short pulse operation is aimed at providing data on the operation of the gyrotron at very high efficiency. The 1.5 MW gyrotron design is based on previous successful results from the 1 MW gyrotrons built by Communication and Power Industries (CPI). A TE_22,6 mode cavity is utilized with an electron beam voltage of 96 kV and a beam current of 40 A. Recently we have successfully run the gyrotron in the axial configuration, and the experimental peak power was 1.44 MW at 37 % efficiency, when operating in the TE_22,6 mode. We have rebuilt this experiment in a configuration which has an internal mode converter and depressed collector, which should enhance the efficiency (> 50 %). The internal mode converter of the TE_22,6 mode to a Gaussian beam consists of an irregular waveguide launcher and four quasi-optical mirrors. A new cavity that provides greatly reduced Ohmic heating on the wall has been designed to enhance the gyrotron efficiency. This cavity will be tested in the next stage of the experiment.

  11. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A.; Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Gozzo, A.; Lega, L.; Ciavola, G.

    2014-02-01

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  12. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Neri, L; Celona, L; Gammino, S; Mascali, D; Castro, G; Torrisi, G; Cheymol, B; Ponton, A; Galatà, A; Patti, G; Gozzo, A; Lega, L; Ciavola, G

    2014-02-01

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  13. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, L. Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Ciavola, G.; Torrisi, G.; Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A.; Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Gozzo, A.; Lega, L.

    2014-02-15

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  14. Definition of a 5MW/61.5m wind turbine blade reference model.

    SciTech Connect

    Resor, Brian Ray

    2013-04-01

    A basic structural concept of the blade design that is associated with the frequently utilized %E2%80%9CNREL offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine%E2%80%9D is needed for studies involving blade structural design and blade structural design tools. The blade structural design documented in this report represents a concept that meets basic design criteria set forth by IEC standards for the onshore turbine. The design documented in this report is not a fully vetted blade design which is ready for manufacture. The intent of the structural concept described by this report is to provide a good starting point for more detailed and targeted investigations such as blade design optimization, blade design tool verification, blade materials and structures investigations, and blade design standards evaluation. This report documents the information used to create the current model as well as the analyses used to verify that the blade structural performance meets reasonable blade design criteria.

  15. Report of the Snowmass T4 working group on particle sources: Positron sources, anti-proton sources and secondary beams

    SciTech Connect

    N. Mokhov et al.

    2002-12-05

    This report documents the activities of the Snowmass 2001 T4 Particle Sources Working Group. T4 was charged with examining the most challenging aspects of positron sources for linear colliders and antiproton sources for proton-antiproton colliders, and the secondary beams of interest to the physics community that will be available from the next generation of high-energy particle accelerators. The leading issues, limiting technologies, and most important R and D efforts of positron production, antiproton production, and secondary beams are discussed in this paper. A listing of T4 Presentations is included.

  16. Correlation of spectral, spatial, and angular characteristics of an ultrashort laser driven proton source

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.; Nakamura, T.; Mima, K.

    2009-04-15

    The laser driven ion source is a highly organized dynamical system. It relies on a well defined interrelation between the spatial and momentum distributions of emitted ions. This correlation is found by a consecutive spectral characterization of distinct proton beamlets emitted from different spatial target positions and under different angles. In case of a flat target and a perfectly round laser focal spot, the proton source is circular symmetric and each source point behaves similarly: the higher the proton energy the smaller the source size and the larger the emission angle for a similar source extension. Only the symmetry axis is unique; here all protons are emitted at 0 deg. to the target normal.

  17. Design and analysis of a 5-MW vertical-fluted-tube condenser for geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Llewellyn, G.H.

    1982-03-01

    The design and analysis of an industtial-sized vertical-fluted-tube condenser. The condenser is used to condense superheated isobutane vapor discharged from a power turbine in a geothermal test facility operated for the US Department of Energy. The 5-MW condenser has 1150 coolant tubes in a four-pass configuration with a total heat transfer area of 725 m/sup 2/ (7800 ft/sup 2/). The unit is being tested at the Geothermal Components Test Facility in the Imperial Valley of East Mesa, California. The condenser design is based on previous experimental research work done at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on condensing refrigerants on a wide variety of single vertical tubes. Condensing film coefficients obtained on the high-performance vertical fluted tubes in condensing refrigerants are as much as seven times greater than those obtained with vertical smooth tubes that have the same diameter and length. The overall heat transfer performance expected from the fluted tube condenser is four to five times the heat transfer obtained from the identical units employing smooth tubes. Fluted tube condensers also have other direct applications in the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program in condensing ammonia, in the petroleum industry in condensing light hydrocarbons, and in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry in condensing fluorocarbon vapors.

  18. Reduced-order FSI simulation of NREL 5 MW wind turbine in atmospheric boundary layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta-Mena, Javier; Campbell, Robert; Lavely, Adam; Jha, Pankaj

    2015-11-01

    A partitioned fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver based on an actuator-line method solver and a finite-element modal-dynamic structural solver is used to evaluate the effect of blade deformation in the presence of a day-time, moderately convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The solver components were validated separately and the integrated solver was partially validated against FAST. An overview of the solver is provided in addition to results of the validation study. A finite element model of the NREL 5 MW rotor was developed for use in the present simulations. The effect of blade pitching moment and the inherent bend/twist coupling of the rotor blades are assessed for both uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases. The results suggest that blade twisting in response to pitching moment and the bend/twist coupling can have a significant impact on rotor out-of-plane bending moment and power generated for both the uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases.

  19. Statistical fault diagnosis of wind turbine drivetrain applied to a 5MW floating wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghane, Mahdi; Nejad, Amir R.; Blanke, Mogens; Gao, Zhen; Moan, Torgeir

    2016-09-01

    Deployment of large scale wind turbine parks, in particular offshore, requires well organized operation and maintenance strategies to make it as competitive as the classical electric power stations. It is important to ensure systems are safe, profitable, and cost-effective. In this regards, the ability to detect, isolate, estimate, and prognose faults plays an important role. One of the critical wind turbine components is the gearbox. Failures in the gearbox are costly both due to the cost of the gearbox itself and also due to high repair downtime. In order to detect faults as fast as possible to prevent them to develop into failure, statistical change detection is used in this paper. The Cumulative Sum Method (CUSUM) is employed to detect possible defects in the downwind main bearing. A high fidelity gearbox model on a 5-MW spar-type wind turbine is used to generate data for fault-free and faulty conditions of the bearing at the rated wind speed and the associated wave condition. Acceleration measurements are utilized to find residuals used to indirectly detect damages in the bearing. Residuals are found to be nonGaussian, following a t-distribution with multivariable characteristic parameters. The results in this paper show how the diagnostic scheme can detect change with desired false alarm and detection probabilities.

  20. CFD-based design load analysis of 5MW offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, T. T.; Ryu, G. J.; Kim, Y. H.; Kim, D. H.

    2012-11-01

    The structure and aerodynamic loads acting on NREL 5MW reference wind turbine blade are calculated and analyzed based on advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and unsteady Blade Element Momentum (BEM). A detailed examination of the six force components has been carried out (three force components and three moment components). Structure load (gravity and inertia load) and aerodynamic load have been obtained by additional structural calculations (CFD or BEM, respectively,). In CFD method, the Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes approach was applied to solve the continuity equation of mass conservation and momentum balance so that the complex flow around wind turbines was modeled. Written in C programming language, a User Defined Function (UDF) code which defines transient velocity profile according to the Extreme Operating Gust condition was compiled into commercial FLUENT package. Furthermore, the unsteady BEM with 3D stall model has also adopted to investigate load components on wind turbine rotor. The present study introduces a comparison between advanced CFD and unsteady BEM for determining load on wind turbine rotor. Results indicate that there are good agreements between both present methods. It is importantly shown that six load components on wind turbine rotor is significant effect under Extreme Operating Gust (EOG) condition. Using advanced CFD and additional structural calculations, this study has succeeded to construct accuracy numerical methodology to estimate total load of wind turbine that compose of aerodynamic load and structure load.

  1. Using the Fermilab proton source for a muon to electron conversion experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Bogert, D.; DeJongh, F.; Geer, S.; McGinnis, D.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    The Fermilab proton source is capable of providing 8 GeV protons for both the future long-baseline neutrino program (NuMI), and for a new program of low energy muon experiments. In particular, if the 8 GeV protons are rebunched and then slowly extracted into an external beamline, the resulting proton beam would be suitable for a muon-to-electron conversion experiment designed to improve on the existing sensitivity by three orders of magnitude. We describe a scheme for the required beam manipulations. The scheme uses the Accumulator for momentum stacking, and the Debuncher for bunching and slow extraction. This would permit simultaneous operation of the muon program with the future NuMI program, delivering 10{sup 20} protons per year at 8 GeV for the muon program at the cost of a modest ({approx}10%) reduction in the protons available to the neutrino program.

  2. Source characterization and modeling development for monoenergetic-proton radiography experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Casey, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2012-06-15

    A monoenergetic proton source has been characterized and a modeling tool developed for proton radiography experiments at the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Comm. 133, 495 (1997)] laser facility. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to measure global isotropy levels in proton fluence and images of the proton source itself provided information on local uniformity relevant to proton radiography experiments. Global fluence uniformity was assessed by multiple yield diagnostics and deviations were calculated to be {approx}16% and {approx}26% of the mean for DD and D{sup 3}He fusion protons, respectively. From individual fluence images, it was found that the angular frequencies of Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 50 rad{sup -1} contributed less than a few percent to local nonuniformity levels. A model was constructed using the Geant4 [S. Agostinelli et al., Nuc. Inst. Meth. A 506, 250 (2003)] framework to simulate proton radiography experiments. The simulation implements realistic source parameters and various target geometries. The model was benchmarked with the radiographs of cold-matter targets to within experimental accuracy. To validate the use of this code, the cold-matter approximation for the scattering of fusion protons in plasma is discussed using a typical laser-foil experiment as an example case. It is shown that an analytic cold-matter approximation is accurate to within Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10% of the analytic plasma model in the example scenario.

  3. Source characterization and modeling development for monoenergetic-proton radiography experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Casey, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2012-06-01

    A monoenergetic proton source has been characterized and a modeling tool developed for proton radiography experiments at the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Comm. 133, 495 (1997)], 10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2 laser facility. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to measure global isotropy levels in proton fluence and images of the proton source itself provided information on local uniformity relevant to proton radiography experiments. Global fluence uniformity was assessed by multiple yield diagnostics and deviations were calculated to be ˜16% and ˜26% of the mean for DD and D3He fusion protons, respectively. From individual fluence images, it was found that the angular frequencies of ≳50 rad-1 contributed less than a few percent to local nonuniformity levels. A model was constructed using the Geant4 [S. Agostinelli et al., Nuc. Inst. Meth. A 506, 250 (2003)], 10.1016/S0168-9002(03)01368-8 framework to simulate proton radiography experiments. The simulation implements realistic source parameters and various target geometries. The model was benchmarked with the radiographs of cold-matter targets to within experimental accuracy. To validate the use of this code, the cold-matter approximation for the scattering of fusion protons in plasma is discussed using a typical laser-foil experiment as an example case. It is shown that an analytic cold-matter approximation is accurate to within ≲10% of the analytic plasma model in the example scenario.

  4. High-intensity pulsed source of polarized protons with an atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A.S.; Esin, S.K.; Kubalov, S.A.; Kuzik, V.E.; Stepanov, A.A.; Yakushev, V.P.

    1985-10-25

    A source of polarized protons with a beam current up to 2.5 mA in the pulse, a degree of polarization 0.78 +- 0.01, a current pulse length of 120 ..mu..s, and a repetition frequency of 1 Hz is described. This is the first source of polarized protons which makes use of the charge exchange of polarized hydrogen atoms with ions of a deuterium plasma.

  5. Proton beam production by a laser ion source with hydride target.

    PubMed

    Okamura, M; Stifler, C; Palm, K; Steski, D; Ikeda, S; Kumaki, M; Kanesue, T

    2016-02-01

    We studied proton beam production from a laser ion source using hydrogen rich target materials. In general, gas based species are not suitable for laser ion sources since formation of a dense laser target is difficult. In order to achieve reliable operation, we tested hydride targets using a sub nanosecond Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, which may help suppress target material consumption. We detected enough yields of protons from a titanium hydride target without degradation of beam current during the experiment. The combination of a sub nanosecond laser and compressed hydride target may provide stable proton beam. PMID:26931967

  6. Complex active regions as the main source of extreme and large solar proton events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishkov, V. N.

    2013-12-01

    A study of solar proton sources indicated that solar flare events responsible for ≥2000 pfu proton fluxes mostly occur in complex active regions (CARs), i.e., in transition structures between active regions and activity complexes. Different classes of similar structures and their relation to solar proton events (SPEs) and evolution, depending on the origination conditions, are considered. Arguments in favor of the fact that sunspot groups with extreme dimensions are CARs are presented. An analysis of the flare activity in a CAR resulted in the detection of "physical" boundaries, which separate magnetic structures of the same polarity and are responsible for the independent development of each structure.

  7. REPORT OF THE SNOWMASS M6 WORKING GROUP ON HIGH INTENSITY PROTON SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    CHOU,W.; WEI,J.

    2001-08-14

    The M6 working group had more than 40 active participants (listed in Section 4). During the three weeks at Snowmass, there were about 50 presentations, covering a wide range of topics associated with high intensity proton sources. The talks are listed in Section 5. This group also had joint sessions with a number of other working groups, including E1 (Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders), E5 (Fixed-Target Experiments), M1 (Muon Based Systems), T4 (Particle Sources), T5 (Beam dynamics), T7 (High Performance Computing) and T9 (Diagnostics). The M6 group performed a survey of the beam parameters of existing and proposed high intensity proton sources, in particular, of the proton drivers. The results are listed in Table 1. These parameters are compared with the requirements of high-energy physics users of secondary beams in Working Groups E1 and E5. According to the consensus reached in the E1 and E5 groups, the U.S. HEP program requires an intense proton source, a 1-4 MW Proton Driver, by the end of this decade.

  8. Proton Linac Front End for High Intensity Neutrino Source at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Wai-Ming; Apollinari, Giorgio; Madrak, Robyn; Moretti, Alfred; Ristori, Leonardo; Romanov, Gennady; Steimel, James; Webber, Robert; Wildman, David

    2008-04-01

    Fermilab has recently proposed the construction of an 8 GeV superconducting linac for the exploration of the high intensity frontier. The High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D program was established to explore the feasibility of certain technical solutions proposed for the front end of a high intensity linac. The low energy (˜60 MeV) section operates at 325 MHz and comprises an RFQ, two re-buncher cavities, 16 room temperature (RT) and 29 superconducting cross-bar H-type resonators, and superconducting solenoid focusing elements. One of the distinguishing features of this linac is the use of one klystron to feed multiple radio frequency (RF) elements. As an example, the RFQ, the re-bunchers and the 16 RT cavities are powered by a single 2.5 MW pulsed klystron. To achieve individual control over the phase and the voltage amplitude, each of the RF elements is equipped with a high power vector modulator. The RF control system will be discussed. The first RT cavity is completed with a power coupler, two mechanical tuners, vacuum and cooling systems, and has been RF conditioned. Preliminary tests on resonance frequency stability control and tests results of the cavity resonance frequency response to cooling water temperature and tuner position will also be discussed.

  9. Report of the Snowmass M6 Working Group on high intensity proton sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou and J. Wei

    2002-08-20

    The U.S. high-energy physics program needs an intense proton source, a 1-4 MW Proton Driver (PD), by the end of this decade. This machine will serve as a stand-alone facility that will provide neutrino superbeams and other high intensity secondary beams such as kaons, muons, neutrons, and anti-protons (cf. E1 and E5 group reports) and also serve as the first stage of a neutrino factory (cf. M1 group report). It can also be a high brightness source for a VLHC. Based on present accelerator technology and project construction experience, it is both feasible and cost-effective to construct a 1-4 MW Proton Driver. Two recent PD design studies have been made, one at FNAL and the other at the BNL. Both designed PD's for 1 MW proton beams at a cost of about U.S. $200M (excluding contingency and overhead) and both designs were upgradeable to 4 MW. An international collaboration between FNAL, BNL and KEK on high intensity proton facilities is addressing a number of key design issues. The superconducting (sc) RF cavities, cryogenics, and RF controls developed for the SNS can be directly adopted to save R&D efforts, cost, and schedule. PD studies are also actively being pursued at Europe and Japan.

  10. First beam from the TRASCO intense proton source (TRIPS) at INFN-LNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Chines, F.; Campisano, C.

    2002-02-01

    The TRASCO intense proton source (TRIPS) was installed at INFN-LNS in May 2000 and the commissioning is in progress. This article describes the design of the source along with the first results and the next developments. The source has been able to deliver more than 20 mA of protons with high reliability from a 4.5 mm extraction aperture at 65 kV, largely above the minimum requested current density. The goals in terms of beam energy (80 keV) and current (60 mA from 8 mm extraction aperture) have been achieved. Further optimization of the source is under way, with special care given to the reliability needed for the accelerator driving system purpose.

  11. Sources and sinks of energetic electrons and protons in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Allen, J. A.; Randall, B. A.; Thomsen, M. F.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with some results of continuing analysis and interpretation of energetic particle observations made onboard Pioneer 11 during its August-September 1979 encounter with Saturn. Source strength estimates and the radial dependence of the phase space density of protons of energies above 80 MeV indicate with some confidence that the cosmic-ray neutron albedo from the planets atmosphere and rings is the source of these particles.

  12. H- Ion Sources for High Intensity Proton Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland Paul; Dudnikov, Vadim

    2015-02-20

    Existing RF Surface Plasma Sources (SPS) for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H+ and H- ion generation around 3 to 5 mA/cm2 per kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) SPS described here was developed to improve H- ion production efficiency, reliability and availability for pulsed operation as used in the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source . At low RF power, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm2 per kW of RF power at 13.56 MHz. Initial cesiation of the SPS was performed by heating cesium chromate cartridges by discharge as was done in the very first versions of the SPS. A small oven to decompose cesium compounds and alloys was developed and tested. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power 1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with 4 kW RF power in the plasma and 250 Gauss longitudinal magnetic field. The ratio of electron current to negative ion current was improved from 30 to 2. Stable generation of H- beam without intensity degradation was demonstrated in the aluminum nitride (AlN) discharge chamber for 32 days at high discharge power in an RF SPS with an external antenna. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. The extracted collector current can be increased significantly by optimizing the longitudinal magnetic field in the discharge chamber. While this project demonstrated the advantages of the pulsed version of the SA RF SPS as an upgrade to the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source, it led to a possibility for upgrades to CW machines like the many cyclotrons used for commercial applications. Four appendices contain important details of the work carried out under this grant.

  13. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Patil, D. S.; Mittal, K. C.

    2013-07-01

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10-4-10-3 mbar and 400-1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 1010 cm-3 to 3.8 × 1011 cm-3 and 4-14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  14. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2013-07-15

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10{sup −4}–10{sup −3} mbar and 400–1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 3.8 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and 4–14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  15. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Kewlani, H; Mishra, L; Patil, D S; Mittal, K C

    2013-07-01

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10(-4)-10(-3) mbar and 400-1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 10(10) cm(-3) to 3.8 × 10(11) cm(-3) and 4-14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  16. Tev Protons From Sgr A* As The Origin For The Galactic Center HESS Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.; Melia, F.

    2006-09-01

    Recent observations by the HESS array of Cerenkov telescopes have uncovered a point-source emitter of TeV gamma-rays, whose centroid is located within 30" of the supermassive black hole Sgr A*. A likely origin of these TeV photons is pion decay in the particle cascade initiated by a TeV proton accelerated by Sgr A* and a proton in the ambient medium. Liu et al. (2006) have shown that stochastic acceleration of protons close to the central supermassive black hole can account for the observed flux and spectral index of the HESS source. Here, we present results of an exact numerical simulation of proton transport within the central 6 pc^3 of the Galaxy, and the subsequent pion decays and gamma ray emissivity. Utilizing a self-consistent model of the gas density and distribution around Sgr A* (Rockefeller et al. 2005), we predict the location, spectrum and flux of TeV gamma-rays from Sgr A*, with an expectation that this model may be tested with future high-resolution TeV observations.

  17. Dynamometer Testing of Samsung 2.5MW Drivetrain: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-311

    SciTech Connect

    Wallen, R.

    2011-02-01

    SHI's prototype 2.5 MW wind turbine drivetrain was tested at the NWTC 2.5 MW dynamometer test facility over the course of 4 months between December 2009 and March 2010. This successful testing campaign allowed SHI to validate performance, safety, control tuning, and reliability in a controlled environment before moving to full-scale testing and subsequent introduction of a commercial product into the American market.

  18. Intense proton beam source for ITER neutral-beam spectroscopy diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, R. R.; Davis, H. A.; Henins, I.; Greenly, J. B.

    An intense proton beam has been developed to evaluate a gas-cell neutralizer for use in an intense-neutral beam source for Tokomak Spectroscopy diagnostics. The allowed energy range of the proton stream is determined to be 50 to 70 keV from neutralization and reionization cross-sections and from the alpha particle charge exchange recombination intensity as a function of energy (baseline diagnostic). The neutralization evaluation source uses a flashover anode, magnetized, ion-diode. Neutral probes sensitive to energetic atomic and molecular hydrogen, developed to evaluate neutralizer performance, show neutral fluence from the ion-diode during the beam pulse. An array of Rogowski current probes, used to study the evolution of the current path, suggests that expansion of the anode plasma along the radial insulating magnetic field leads to impedance collapse.

  19. Intense proton beam source for ITER neutral-beam spectroscopy diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, R.R.; Davis, H.A.; Henins, I.; Greenly, J.B.

    1994-09-01

    An intense proton beam has been developed to evaluate a gas-cell neutralizer for use in an intense-neutral beam source for Tokomak Spectroscopy diagnostics. The allowed energy range of the proton stream is determined to be 50 to 70 keV from neutralization and reionization cross-sections and from the alpha particle charge exchange recombination intensity as a function of energy (baseline diagnostic). The neutralization evaluation source uses a flashover anode, magnetized, ion-diode. Neutral probes sensitive to energetic atomic and molecular hydrogen, developed to evaluate neutralizer performance, show neutral fluence from the ion-diode during the beam pulse. An array of Rogowski current probes, used to study the evolution of the current path, suggests that expansion of the anode plasma along the radial insulating magnetic field leads to impedance collapse.

  20. Improvement of beam emittance of the CEA high intensity proton source SILHI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, R.; Beauvais, P.-Y.; Ferdinand, R.; Leroy, P.-A.; Celona, L.; Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.

    1999-06-01

    The emittance of the intense proton beam extracted by the source SILHI at Commisariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA)-Saclay is a key parameter for the design of the IPHI Project RFQ. This parameter has a relevant role even for the design of an intense proton source for the TRASCO project of Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The tests performed in the framework of CEA-INFN collaboration have been mainly devoted to a 75 mA beam emittance investigation injecting different gases in the beam line. The results show that the rms normalized emittance decreases up to a factor 3 while the beam losses induced by recombination are contained within 5%. Normalized emittance in r-r' plane of about 0.1 π min mrad have been obtained using Ar and Kr.

  1. Promotion of a Ti-Mediated Mannich Reaction by a Proton Source.

    PubMed

    Limanto, John; Yoshikawa, Naoki; Reamer, Robert A; Tan, Lushi; Brunskill, Andrew; Reibarkh, Mikhail

    2016-01-15

    Low temperature NMR studies revealed that a diastereoselective Mannich reaction between a phenyl oxazolidone-derived titanium enolate and an aromatic aldimine was found to occur only after introduction of a proton source. While various protic additives could be used to promote the transformation, the best results were obtained using AcOH to afford the corresponding Mannich products in high diastereoselectivities and yields. PMID:26656787

  2. RBF neural network based PI pitch controller for a class of 5-MW wind turbines using particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Poultangari, Iman; Shahnazi, Reza; Sheikhan, Mansour

    2012-09-01

    In order to control the pitch angle of blades in wind turbines, commonly the proportional and integral (PI) controller due to its simplicity and industrial usability is employed. The neural networks and evolutionary algorithms are tools that provide a suitable ground to determine the optimal PI gains. In this paper, a radial basis function (RBF) neural network based PI controller is proposed for collective pitch control (CPC) of a 5-MW wind turbine. In order to provide an optimal dataset to train the RBF neural network, particle swarm optimization (PSO) evolutionary algorithm is used. The proposed method does not need the complexities, nonlinearities and uncertainties of the system under control. The simulation results show that the proposed controller has satisfactory performance. PMID:22738782

  3. RBF neural network based PI pitch controller for a class of 5-MW wind turbines using particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Poultangari, Iman; Shahnazi, Reza; Sheikhan, Mansour

    2012-09-01

    In order to control the pitch angle of blades in wind turbines, commonly the proportional and integral (PI) controller due to its simplicity and industrial usability is employed. The neural networks and evolutionary algorithms are tools that provide a suitable ground to determine the optimal PI gains. In this paper, a radial basis function (RBF) neural network based PI controller is proposed for collective pitch control (CPC) of a 5-MW wind turbine. In order to provide an optimal dataset to train the RBF neural network, particle swarm optimization (PSO) evolutionary algorithm is used. The proposed method does not need the complexities, nonlinearities and uncertainties of the system under control. The simulation results show that the proposed controller has satisfactory performance.

  4. Natural snowfall reveals large-scale flow structures in the wake of a 2.5-MW wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiarong; Toloui, Mostafa; Chamorro, Leonardo P; Guala, Michele; Howard, Kevin; Riley, Sean; Tucker, James; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-06-24

    To improve power production and structural reliability of wind turbines, there is a pressing need to understand how turbines interact with the atmospheric boundary layer. However, experimental techniques capable of quantifying or even qualitatively visualizing the large-scale turbulent flow structures around full-scale turbines do not exist today. Here we use snowflakes from a winter snowstorm as flow tracers to obtain velocity fields downwind of a 2.5-MW wind turbine in a sampling area of ~36 × 36 m(2). The spatial and temporal resolutions of the measurements are sufficiently high to quantify the evolution of blade-generated coherent motions, such as the tip and trailing sheet vortices, identify their instability mechanisms and correlate them with turbine operation, control and performance. Our experiment provides an unprecedented in situ characterization of flow structures around utility-scale turbines, and yields significant insights into the Reynolds number similarity issues presented in wind energy applications.

  5. Laser-driven proton sources and their applications: femtosecond intense laser plasma driven simultaneous proton and x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Daido, H.; Yogo, A.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Orimo, S.; Mori, M.; Ma, J.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kiriyama, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Shimoura, T.; Tanoue, M.; Nakai, Y.; Akutsu, A.; Nagashima, A.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Z.; Kimura, T.; Tajima, T.; Nemoto, K.; Oishi, Y.; Nayuki, T.; Fujii, T.; Noda, A.; Iwashita, Y.; Shirai, T.; Nakamura, S.; Choi, I. W.; Yu, T. J.; Sung, J. H.; Kim, H. T.; Jeong, T. M.; Hong, K.-H.; Noh, Y.-C.; Ko, D.-K.; Lee, J.

    2008-05-01

    We have performed simultaneous proton and X-ray imaging with an ultra-short and high-intensity Ti: Sap laser system. More than 1010 protons, whose maximum energy reaches 2.5 MeV, were delivered within a ~ps bunch. At the same time, keV X-ray is generated at almost the same place where protons are emitted. We have performed the simultaneous imaging of the copper mesh by using proton and x-ray beams, in practical use of the characteristics of the laser produced plasma that it can provide those beams simultaneously without any serious problems on synchronization.

  6. Study on the microwave ion source of the 100-MeV proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung

    2016-09-01

    A microwave ion source is used as an ion source for the 100-MeV proton accelerator at the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC). The specifications of the ion source are a 50-keV energy and a 20-mA peak current. The plasma is operated in the CW mode by using a magnetron, and the pulse beam is extracted using a semiconductor switch located in the extraction power supply. The beam characteristics were measured based on the pulse voltage and current. A test stand was also installed to study the beam characteristics of the ion source off-line. In this paper, the pulse beam characteristics of the ion source are presented, and the installation of the test stand is reported.

  7. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Patil, D. S.; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10-3 mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  8. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P. Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2014-03-15

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, −2 to −4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup −3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  9. Measurements of beam current density and proton fraction of a permanent-magnet microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

    2011-11-15

    A permanent-magnet microwave ion source has been built for use in a high-yield, compact neutron generator. The source has been designed to produce up to 100 mA of deuterium and tritium ions. The electron-cyclotron resonance condition is met at a microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz and a magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT. The source operates at a low hydrogen gas pressure of about 0.15 Pa. Hydrogen beams with a current density of 40 mA/cm{sup 2} have been extracted at a microwave power of 450 W. The dependence of the extracted proton beam fraction on wall materials and operating parameters was measured and found to vary from 45% for steel to 95% for boron nitride as a wall liner material.

  10. A Project of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy System based on a Proton Linac Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyanagi, Yoshikai; Asano, Kenji; Arakawa, Akihiro; Fukuchi, Shin; Hiraga, Fujio; Kimura, Kenju; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Kubota, Michio; Kumada, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Akira; Sakae, Takeji; Saitoh, Kimiaki; Shibata, Tokushi; Yoshioka, Masakazu

    At present, the clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) are being performed at research reactor facilities. However, an accelerator based BNCT has a merit that it can be built in a hospital. So, we just launched a development project for the BNCT based on an accelerator in order to establish and to spread the BNCT as an effective therapy in the near future. In the project, a compact proton linac installed in a hospital will be applied as a neutron source, and energy of the proton beam is planned to be less than about 10 MeV to reduce the radioactivity. The BNCT requires epithermal neutron beam with an intensity of around 1x109 (n/cm2/sec) to deliver the therapeutic dose to a deeper region in a body and to complete the irradiation within an hour. From this condition, the current of the proton beam required is estimated to be a few mA on average. Enormous heat deposition in the target is a big issue. We are aiming at total optimization of the accelerator based BNCT from the linac to the irradiation position. Here, the outline of the project is introduced and the moderator design is presented.

  11. Upgraded Waveguide Components for New 1.2 and 1.5 MW Gyrotrons on the DIII-D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, Y. A.; Doane, J. L.; Cengher, M.; Lohr, J.; Ponce, D.

    2012-10-01

    The present gyrotron system on the DIII-D tokamak comprises 110 GHz gyrotrons in the 1 MW class with designed pulse lengths of 10 s. The system is being upgraded with two types of depressed collector gyrotrons producing 1.2 MW at 110 GHz and 1.5 MW at 117.5 GHz, for which waveguide components having higher power ratings will be required. New power monitors and polarizers have been designed and fabricated, which are capable of operating for 10 s pulses at the higher power levels. This presentation reports an analysis of the component heat loading to obtain a thermal equilibrium. Using this equilibrium, a stress strain analysis was performed to calculate life expectancies. The calculations take into account the temperature dependence of the heat transfer coefficient in the component coolant channels. Although the high heat load components required upgrading, the waveguide lines themselves have adequate margins for the expected power and pulse length. A summary of the thermal capabilities of other components will also be presented.

  12. Experimental Research on a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz Gyrotron with a Smooth Mirror Internal Mode Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tax, D. S.; Mastovsky, I.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.; Torrezan, A. C.

    2010-11-01

    Megawatt gyrotrons are important for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) of fusion plasmas, including ITER. These gyrotrons should operate with high efficiency to reduce the prime power required and to ensure good reliability. The gyrotron efficiency is affected both by the physical principles that govern the device and the performance of components like the internal mode converter (IMC), which must convert the electromagnetic cavity mode into a Gaussian beam. An IMC consisting of a helically-cut launcher and three smooth curved mirrors, which is less susceptible to alignment errors than an IMC using mirrors with phase correcting surfaces, was recently tested on a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz, 3μs pulsed gyrotron operating in the TE22,6 mode, and an output beam with 95.8 ± 0.5 % Gaussian beam content was measured in both hot and cold tests. We are also examining the issue of mode competition in the gyrotron, which can limit the achievable output power and efficiency. The sequence of competing modes excited during the rise time of the voltage pulse has been measured and results are compared with the numerical simulation code MAGY. These results should provide a good test of the accuracy of the code.

  13. Investigations for Improvement of Energy Yield of Rotor-blades from the 1.5 MW Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaresque, N.; Bicker, S.; Dollinger, C.; Fandrich, A.; Gatz, S.; Hölling, M.; Irschik, K.; Reichstein, T.; Schaffarczyk, A. P.; von Zengen, C.

    2016-09-01

    In a combined approach of extensive measurement and accompanying simulation a wind turbine blade used in the 1.5 MW class was investigated for improvement of aerodynamic properties and especially the energy yield. One blade was dismantled and its geometry was locally measured by a specially designed laser scanning-system. From this geometry data set five 2D wind tunnel models were manufactured and measured in the wind tunnel of Deutsche Wind Guard Engineering GmbH at Bremerhaven, Germany. In addition, extensive CFD investigations were performed to investigate the usefulness of so-called aerodynamic devices like vortex generators, Gurney flaps and others for improving energy yield. As a result it could be shown that the aerodynamic efficiency of the manufactured blades - if measured in terms of lift-to-drag ratio - is at a high level but still can be further improved. 3D CFD investigations were able to show the influence of Gurney flaps and boundary layer fences and their interactions.

  14. Source terms and attenuation lengths for estimating shielding requirements or dose analyses of proton therapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lai, Bo-Lun; Lin, Uei-Tyng; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2013-08-01

    Proton therapy accelerators in the energy range of 100-300 MeV could potentially produce intense secondary radiation, which must be carefully evaluated and shielded for the purpose of radiation safety in a densely populated hospital. Monte Carlo simulations are generally the most accurate method for accelerator shielding design. However, simplified approaches such as the commonly used point-source line-of-sight model are usually preferable on many practical occasions, especially for scoping shielding design or quick sensitivity studies. This work provides a set of reliable shielding data with reasonable coverage of common target and shielding materials for 100-300 MeV proton accelerators. The shielding data, including source terms and attenuation lengths, were derived from a consistent curve fitting process of a number of depth-dose distributions within the shield, which were systematically calculated by using MCNPX for various beam-target shield configurations. The general characteristics and qualities of this data set are presented. Possible applications in cases of single- and double-layer shielding are considered and demonstrated.

  15. Characterization of proton beam emission from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S. K.; Tayyab, M.; Bagchi, S.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.

    2013-04-01

    We report here characterization of the ions produced in the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) at RRCAT, which operates at 2.45 GHz and is aimed to produce a 50 keV, 30 mA proton beam. The plasma in the source was created using microwave power in the range of 150-1200 W. An efficient, single hole, three-electrode ion extraction system was employed to extract the ion beam from the ECRIS, and the extracted ion beam was characterized using a Thomson Parabola Ion Spectrograph, which provides complete information of all the differently charged species present in the plasma. The extracted ion beam current measured up to 8 mA beam current for 25 keV accelerating field and followed the Child-Langmuir law.

  16. Laser Produced Plasmas as a Source of Ions, Protons and X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanuik, Robert

    The work presented in this thesis is primarily focused on the use of a laser produced plasma as a source of protons, ions and X-rays. It explores high impact applications of both high power ultrafast lasers and nanosecond lasers. Section 1 gives a general introduction to the physics governing the experiments and the lasers in the following sections. Section 2 describes all the laser systems used in this thesis. Section 3 is covers two different experiments involving the generation of X-rays from a laser produced plasma. Section 4 describes a laser accelerated proton experiment conducted in the Center for Plasma Research in Queens University Belfast, using the TARANIS laser system. In this experiment 13 MeV protons were accelerated from10 μm gold foil targets into a sample of BK-7 glass. The interaction of the protons with the glass were observed by taking spatially resolved images of the transient opacity induced by the protons interacting with the BK-7 Glass and an optical probe beam. These spatially resolved images are presented in Section 4.3. Section 5 describes the refurbishment of the 1-m normal incidence VUV spectrometer. It describes the replacement of a photographic plate based detection system with a linear CCD array. The CCD array can detect the VUV radiation through a sodium salicylate phosphor coating which emits at 410 nm on interacting with VUV radiation. Different phosphors are compared in terms of sensitivity and ease of coating and the grounds for choosing sodium salicylate are explained. The adaptations to the spectrometer to use the linear CCD array are described and the details on calibrating the spectrometer are explained. Finally, Section 6 describes a set of spectroscopic experiments which use the refurbished 1-m normal incidence spectrometer. First Section 6.2 describes a repeat of the photoabsorption of indium and indium plus which was conducted previously on the spectrometer. This was designed as a proof of principle of the working of

  17. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Ma, H. Y.; Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhao, H. Y.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-01

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented.

  18. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Ma, H Y; Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Zhang, Z M; Zhao, H Y; He, Y; Zhao, H W

    2016-02-01

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented.

  19. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization for Glass-Fiber Epoxy-Matrix Composite 5 MW Horizontal-Axis Wind-Turbine Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, G.; Pandurangan, B.; Sellappan, V.; Vallejo, A.; Ozen, M.

    2010-11-01

    A multi-disciplinary design-optimization procedure has been introduced and used for the development of cost-effective glass-fiber reinforced epoxy-matrix composite 5 MW horizontal-axis wind-turbine (HAWT) blades. The turbine-blade cost-effectiveness has been defined using the cost of energy (CoE), i.e., a ratio of the three-blade HAWT rotor development/fabrication cost and the associated annual energy production. To assess the annual energy production as a function of the blade design and operating conditions, an aerodynamics-based computational analysis had to be employed. As far as the turbine blade cost is concerned, it is assessed for a given aerodynamic design by separately computing the blade mass and the associated blade-mass/size-dependent production cost. For each aerodynamic design analyzed, a structural finite element-based and a post-processing life-cycle assessment analyses were employed in order to determine a minimal blade mass which ensures that the functional requirements pertaining to the quasi-static strength of the blade, fatigue-controlled blade durability and blade stiffness are satisfied. To determine the turbine-blade production cost (for the currently prevailing fabrication process, the wet lay-up) available data regarding the industry manufacturing experience were combined with the attendant blade mass, surface area, and the duration of the assumed production run. The work clearly revealed the challenges associated with simultaneously satisfying the strength, durability and stiffness requirements while maintaining a high level of wind-energy capture efficiency and a lower production cost.

  20. Instability of outer tip vortices for a 2.5 MW wind turbine: integrating snow PIV with LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yang, Xiaolei; Hong, Jiarong; Barone, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Recent field experiments conducted around a 2.5 MW wind turbine using super-large-scale PIV (SLPIV) using natural snow particles have revealed tip vortex cores (visualized as areas devoid of snowflakes) of complex shape, consisting of both round and elongated void patterns. Here we employ large-eddy simulation to elucidate the structure and dynamics of the complex tip vortices identified experimentally. The LES is shown to reproduce vortex cores in remarkable agreement with the SLPIV results, essentially capturing all vortex core patterns observed in the field in the tip shear layer. We show that the stretched elongated vortex cores observed in 2D planes are the footprints of a second set of counter-rotating spiral vortices that emanates along the tip shear layer immediately downwind of the blades and is intertwined with the tip vortices. We argue that this large-scale instability is of centrifugal type since the mean flow characteristics in the outer tip shear layer resemble those of the Taylor-Couette flow. This study highlights the feasibility of employing snow voids to visualize tip vortices and demonstrates the enormous potential of integrating SLPIV with LES as a powerful tool for gaining novel insights into the wakes of utility scale wind turbines. This work was supported by Department of Energy DOE (DE-EE0002980, DE-EE0005482 and DE-AC04-94AL85000), Sandia National Laboratories and NSF Career Award (NSF-CBET-1454259) for Jiarong Hong. Computational resources were provided by SNL and MSI.

  1. Observations of Regular Filamentary Plasma Arrays in High-Pressure Gas Breakdown by 1.5 MW, 110 GHz Gyrotron Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidaka, Yoshiteru

    2008-11-01

    Formation of regular two-dimensional plasma filamentary arrays has been observed in long open-shuttered images of air breakdown at atmospheric pressure [Y. Hidaka et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 035003 (2008)]. The breakdown was generated by a focused linearly-polarized Gaussian beam from a 1.5-MW, 110-GHz gyrotron with a 3-microsecond pulse length. Each plasma filament is elongated in the electric field direction and separated roughly one-quarter wavelength from each other in the H-plane. The development of this array structure can be explained as a result of diffraction of the beam around the highly conductive filaments. The diffraction generates a new electric field profile in which a high intensity region emerges about a quarter wavelength upstream from an existing filament. A new plasma filament is likely to appear at the intensified spot. The same process continues and results in the formation of the observed array. Electromagnetic wave simulations that model plasma filaments as metallic posts agree quite well with the hypothesis above. With a nanoseconds-gated ICCD camera, we directly confirmed that only a few rows of the observed array are bright at any one moment, as well as that the light emitting region propagates towards the microwave source. Further experimental breakdown research has been carried out with nitrogen, helium, and SF6 at different pressures. Although each species exhibits qualitatively different structures, in general, a lumpy plasma at high pressures transforms into a more familiar, diffuse plasma as pressure is decreased. The propagation velocity of the ionization front has been also estimated both from the ICCD images and a photodiode array. The velocity is on the order of 10 km/s, and increases as the pressure decreases and the power density increases.

  2. TH-A-19A-01: An Open Source Software for Proton Treatment Planning in Heterogeneous Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Desplanques, M; Baroni, G; Wang, K; Phillips, J; Gueorguiev, G; Sharp, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Due to its success in Radiation Oncology during the last decade, interest in proton therapy is on the rise. Unfortunately, despite the global enthusiasm in the field, there is presently no free, multiplatform and customizable Treatment Planning System (TPS) providing proton dose distributions in heterogenous medium. This restricts substantially the progress of clinical research for groups without access to a commercial Proton TPS. The latest implementation of our pencil beam dose calculation algorithm for proton beams within the 3D Slicer open-source environment fulfills all the conditions described above. Methods: The core dose calculation algorithm is based on the Hong algorithm (1), which was upgraded with the Kanematsu theory describing the evolution of the lateral scattering of proton beamlets in heterogeneous medium. This algorithm deals with both mono-energetic beams and Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP). In order to be user-friendly, we provide a graphical user interface implemented with the Qt libraries, and visualization with the 3D Slicer medical image analysis software. Two different pencil beam algorithms were developed, and the clinical proton beam line at our facility was modeled. Results: The dose distributions provided by our algorithms were compared to dose distributions coming from both commercialized XiO TPS and literature (dose measurements, GEANT4 and MCNPx) and turned out to be in a good agreement, with maximum dose discrepancies of 5% in homogeneous phantoms and 10% in heterogeneous phantoms. The algorithm of SOBP creation from an optimized weigthing of mono-energetic beams results in flat SOBP. Conclusion: We hope that our efforts in implementing this new, open-source proton TPS will help the research groups to have a free access to a useful, reliable proton dose calculation software.(1) L. Hong et al., A pencil beam algorithm for proton dose calculations, Phys. Med. Biol. 41 (1996) 1305–1330. This project is paid for by NCI

  3. A version of the Trasco Intense Proton Source optimized for accelerator driven system purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Presti, M.; Andò, L.; Passarello, S.; Zhang, XZh.; Consoli, F.; Chines, F.; Percolla, C.; Calzona, V.; Winkler, M.

    2004-05-01

    A full set of measurements of the magnetic field has been carried out to define a different design of the TRASCO Intense Proton Source (TRIPS) magnetic system, based on permanent magnets, in order to increase the reliability of the source. The two coils of the source generate a maximum field of 150 mT and the optimum field was determined around 95 mT. The OPERA-3D package was used to simulate the magnetic field and a new magnetic system was designed as a combination of three rings of NdFeB magnets and soft iron. The high voltage insulation has been completely modified, in order to avoid any electronics at 80 kV voltage. The description of the magnetic measurements and the comparison with the simulations are presented, along with the mechanical design of the new version permanent magnet TRIPS (PM-TRIPS) and the new design of the extraction system. Finally the modification of the low energy beam transfer line (LEBT), which now includes a 30° bending magnet, will be outlined, with special regard to the accelerator availability improvement which can be obtained with the installation of two PM-TRIPS sources or more on the LEBT.

  4. Proton Heating by Cyclotron Waves in the Presence of a Finite Source and a Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Yoon, P. H.; Choe, G.

    2012-12-01

    One of the outstanding problems in the study of solar wind is the acceleration of protons and heavy ions. The preferential heating of these ions in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field is interpreted as the resonant heating by cyclotron waves. The present paper investigates the resonant cyclotron heating of the solar wind ions by quasilinear theoretical formalism. The major focus is on the role of source and sink terms associated with the Alfven-cyclotron waves. If one considers low-frequency Alfvenic waves as the wave source, then the resulting cyclotron heating is extremely small [Yoon & Fang 2009, Rha et al., 2011, Moya et al., 2011]. However, with a finite source term an appreciable heating can result [Yoon & Fang 2009]. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate the problem of Alfvenic turbulent heating by cyclotron resonance with a continuous source of Alfvenic turbulence as well as a sink term. We also discuss the role of nonlinear mode coupling as well as the effects of spatial inhomogeneity.

  5. The flux and source of energetic protons in Saturn's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.; Mcdonald, F. B.

    1982-01-01

    The flux of energetic protons in Saturn's inner magnetosphere was observed in two channels from 48 to 63 and 63 to 160 MeV. Absorption features due to the G ring and the satellites Enceladus and Mimas were easily identifiable. The flux observed in the absorption slot of Mimas can be maintained by the decay of a cosmic ray albedo neutron flux of 0.007/sq cm/s/sr. This flux is entirely consistent with calculations of the neutron flux produced by galactic cosmic ray interactions with the rings of Saturn. The omnidirectional proton flux of 0.0082/sq cm/s at 2.734 R sub s requires a residence time of 30 years. Both the residence time and the energy spectrum are comparable to those found in the inner radiation belt of the Earth. The angular distribution is nearly isotropic in the Mimas slot and beyond 4R sub s. Otherwise the pitch angle distribution is pancake and is approximated by sin(n)theta with n in the range 2 to 7. This distribution is consistent with an isotropic neutron source in the ring plane.

  6. Development of the integrated control system for the microwave ion source of the PEFP 100-MeV proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Gi; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Jang, Ji-Ho; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2012-07-01

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) 20-MeV proton linear accelerator is currently operating at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The ion source of the 100-MeV proton linac needs at least a 100-hour operation time. To meet the goal, we have developed a microwave ion source that uses no filament. For the ion source, a remote control system has been developed by using experimental physics and the industrial control system (EPICS) software framework. The control system consists of a versa module europa (VME) and EPICS-based embedded applications running on a VxWorks real-time operating system. The main purpose of the control system is to control and monitor the operational variables of the components remotely and to protect operators from radiation exposure and the components from critical problems during beam extraction. We successfully performed the operation test of the control system to confirm the degree of safety during the hardware performance.

  7. A high intensity 200 mA proton source for the FRANZ-Project (Frankfurt-Neutron-Source at the Stern-Gerlach-Center)

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, W. Ratzinger, U.; Klump, B.; Volk, K.

    2014-02-15

    At the University of Frankfurt a high current proton source has been developed and tested for the FRANZ-Project [U. Ratzinger, L. P. Chau, O. Meusel, A. Schempp, K. Volk, M. Heil, F. Käppeler, and R. Stieglitz, “Intense pulsed neutron source FRANZ in the 1–500 keV range,” ICANS-XVIII Proceedings, Dongguan, April 2007, p. 210]. The ion source is a filament driven arc discharge ion source. The new design consists of a plasma generator, equipped with a filter magnet to produce nearly pure proton beams (92 %), and a compact triode extraction system. The beam current density has been enhanced up to 521 mA/cm{sup 2}. Using an emission opening radius of 4 mm, a proton beam current of 240 mA at 50 keV beam energy in continuous wave mode (cw) has been extracted. This paper will present the current status of the proton source including experimental results of detailed investigations of the beam composition in dependence of different plasma parameters. Both, cw and pulsed mode were studied. Furthermore, the performance of the ion source was studied with deuterium as working gas.

  8. A high intensity 200 mA proton source for the FRANZ-Project (Frankfurt-Neutron-Source at the Stern-Gerlach-Center)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, W.; Ratzinger, U.; Klump, B.; Volk, K.

    2014-02-01

    At the University of Frankfurt a high current proton source has been developed and tested for the FRANZ-Project [U. Ratzinger, L. P. Chau, O. Meusel, A. Schempp, K. Volk, M. Heil, F. Käppeler, and R. Stieglitz, "Intense pulsed neutron source FRANZ in the 1-500 keV range," ICANS-XVIII Proceedings, Dongguan, April 2007, p. 210]. The ion source is a filament driven arc discharge ion source. The new design consists of a plasma generator, equipped with a filter magnet to produce nearly pure proton beams (92 %), and a compact triode extraction system. The beam current density has been enhanced up to 521 mA/cm2. Using an emission opening radius of 4 mm, a proton beam current of 240 mA at 50 keV beam energy in continuous wave mode (cw) has been extracted. This paper will present the current status of the proton source including experimental results of detailed investigations of the beam composition in dependence of different plasma parameters. Both, cw and pulsed mode were studied. Furthermore, the performance of the ion source was studied with deuterium as working gas.

  9. Future laser-accelerated proton beams at ELI-Beamlines as potential source of positron emitters for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, E.; Italiano, A.; Margarone, D.; Pagano, B.; Baldari, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-04-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of novel, fast and efficient, radiopharmaceutical methods of labeling. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility where a PW, 30 fs, 10 Hz laser system will be available. The production yields of several positron emitters were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account three possible scenarios of broad proton spectra expected, with maximum energies ranging from about 8 MeV to 100 MeV. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of radiopharmaceuticals exploiting modern fast and efficient labeling systems.

  10. Characterization of an explosively bonded aluminum proton beam window for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Janney, Jim G; Parish, Chad M

    2014-01-01

    An effort is underway at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to change the design of the 1st Generation high-nickel alloy proton beam window (PBW) to one that utilizes aluminum for the window material. One of the key challenges to implementation of an aluminum PBW at the SNS was selection of an appropriate joining method to bond an aluminum window to the stainless steel bulk shielding of the PBW assembly. An explosively formed bond was selected as the most promising joining method for the aluminum PBW design. A testing campaign was conducted to evaluate the strength and efficacy of explosively formed bonds that were produced using two different interlayer materials: niobium and titanium. The characterization methods reported here include tensile testing, thermal-shock leak testing, optical microscopy, and advanced scanning electron microscopy. All tensile specimens examined failed in the aluminum interlayer and measured tensile strengths were all slightly greater than the native properties of the aluminum interlayer, while elongation values were all slightly lower. A leak developed in the test vessel with a niobium interlayer joint after repeated thermal-shock cycles, and was attributed to an extensive crack network that formed in a layer of niobium-rich intermetallics located on the bond interfaces of the niobium interlayer; the test vessel with a titanium interlayer did not develop a leak under the conditions tested. Due to the experience gained from these characterizations, the explosively formed bond with a titanium interlayer was selected for the aluminum PBW design at the SNS.

  11. A compact source of intense 1-100 keV monochromatic X-rays from low energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arduini, G.; Cicardi, C.; Milazzo, M.; Sangaletti, L.; Silari, M.

    1995-05-01

    The properties and possible applications of a very intense source of monochromatic X-rays, tunable in the 1-100 keV range, obtained by coupling a low energy (2-4 MeV) high current proton accelerator with an irradiation chamber provided with a multiple target system and collimator are discussed. The properties of the source are presented in terms of intensity, monochromaticity, polarizability and time structure. Fields where such a source can be employed are discussed, namely PIXE-induced XRF, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, generation of soft X-rays, radiographic applications in archeometry and medical radiography with monoenergetic radiation.

  12. Shielding analysis of proton therapy accelerators: a demonstration using Monte Carlo-generated source terms and attenuation lengths.

    PubMed

    Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lin, Uei-Tyng

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are generally considered the most accurate method for complex accelerator shielding analysis. Simplified models based on point-source line-of-sight approximation are often preferable in practice because they are intuitive and easy to use. A set of shielding data, including source terms and attenuation lengths for several common targets (iron, graphite, tissue, and copper) and shielding materials (concrete, iron, and lead) were generated by performing Monte Carlo simulations for 100-300 MeV protons. Possible applications and a proper use of the data set were demonstrated through a practical case study, in which shielding analysis on a typical proton treatment room was conducted. A thorough and consistent comparison between the predictions of our point-source line-of-sight model and those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for a 360° dose distribution around the room perimeter showed that the data set can yield fairly accurate or conservative estimates for the transmitted doses, except for those near the maze exit. In addition, this study demonstrated that appropriate coupling between the generated source term and empirical formulae for radiation streaming can be used to predict a reasonable dose distribution along the maze. This case study proved the effectiveness and advantage of applying the data set to a quick shielding design and dose evaluation for proton therapy accelerators. PMID:25811254

  13. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Ma, H Y; Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Zhang, Z M; Zhao, H Y; He, Y; Zhao, H W

    2016-02-01

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented. PMID:26932075

  14. Shielding analysis of proton therapy accelerators: a demonstration using Monte Carlo-generated source terms and attenuation lengths.

    PubMed

    Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lin, Uei-Tyng

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are generally considered the most accurate method for complex accelerator shielding analysis. Simplified models based on point-source line-of-sight approximation are often preferable in practice because they are intuitive and easy to use. A set of shielding data, including source terms and attenuation lengths for several common targets (iron, graphite, tissue, and copper) and shielding materials (concrete, iron, and lead) were generated by performing Monte Carlo simulations for 100-300 MeV protons. Possible applications and a proper use of the data set were demonstrated through a practical case study, in which shielding analysis on a typical proton treatment room was conducted. A thorough and consistent comparison between the predictions of our point-source line-of-sight model and those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for a 360° dose distribution around the room perimeter showed that the data set can yield fairly accurate or conservative estimates for the transmitted doses, except for those near the maze exit. In addition, this study demonstrated that appropriate coupling between the generated source term and empirical formulae for radiation streaming can be used to predict a reasonable dose distribution along the maze. This case study proved the effectiveness and advantage of applying the data set to a quick shielding design and dose evaluation for proton therapy accelerators.

  15. Proton source size measurements in the eA {yields} e{prime}ppX reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksey Stavinskiy; Konstantin Mikhaylov; R. Lednicky; Alexander Vlassov; Et. Al.

    2004-06-01

    Two-proton correlations at small relative momentum q were studied in the eA({sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, C, Fe) {yields} e{prime}ppX reaction at E{sub 0} = 4.46 GeV using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. The enhancement of the correlation function at small q was found to be in accordance with theoretical expectation. Emission region sizes were extracted and proved to be dependent on A and proton momentum. The size of the two-proton emission region on the lightest possible nucleus, He, was measured for the first time.

  16. A 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source and a dual-lens low energy beam transport.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W H; Ma, H Y; Yang, Y; Wu, Q; Zhang, X Z; Wang, H; Ma, B H; Feng, Y C; Fang, X; Guo, J W; Cao, Y; Li, X X; Zhu, Y H; Li, J Y; Sha, S; Lu, W; Lin, S H; Guo, X H; Zhao, H Y; Sun, L T; Xie, D Z; Peng, S X; Liu, Z W; Zhao, H W

    2012-02-01

    The structure and preliminary commissioning results of a new 2.45 GHz ECR proton ion source and a dual-lens low energy beam transport (LEBT) system are presented in this paper. The main magnetic field of the ion source is provided by a set of permanent magnets with two small electro-solenoid magnets at the injection and the extraction to fine tune the magnetic field for better microwave coupling. A 50 keV pulsed proton beam extracted by a three-electrode mechanism passes through the LEBT system of length of 1183 mm. This LEBT consists of a diagnosis chamber, two Glaser lenses, two steering magnets, and a final beam defining cone. A set of inner permanent magnetic rings is embedded in each of the two Glaser lenses to produce a flatter axial-field to reduce the lens aberrations.

  17. Drivetrain load effects in a 5-MW bottom-fixed wind turbine under blade-pitch fault condition and emergency shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasekhi Nejad, Amir; Jiang, Zhiyu; Gao, Zhen; Moan, Torgeir

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the effect of the blade-pitch fault and emergency shutdown on drivetrain responses in a 5-MW bottom-fixed wind turbine are investigated. A 5-MW reference gearbox with 4-point support is employed and the decoupled analysis approach is used for the load effect analysis. The effect of this fault event is then investigated for all bearings and gears inside the gearbox as well as main bearings. The results show that the blade-pitch fault creates significant axial forces on main bearings which increases the nontorque force entering the gearbox. Due to the emergency shutdown, the rotor torque reversal occurs which causes force reversals in gears. The main bearings are more affected than gears and bearings inside the gearbox in this fault condition and emergency shutdown, but first-stage bearings may also be considerably affected. It is therefore recommended to conduct a thorough inspection of main bearings and first stage bearings in case of such blade-pitch fault condition and emergency shutdown.

  18. Thermal-hydraulic simulation of mercury target concepts for a pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.; Haines, J.

    1996-06-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) is a high-power, accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron source being designed by a multi-laboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to achieve very high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. The ORSNS is projected to have a 1 MW proton beam upgradable to 5 MW. About 60% of the beam power (1-5 MW, 17-83 kJ/pulse in 0.5 microsec at 60 cps) is deposited in the liquid metal (mercury) target having the dimensions of 65x30x10 cm (about 19.5 liter). Peak steady state power density is about 150 and 785 MW/m{sup 3} for 1 MW and 5 MW beam respectively, whereas peak pulsed power density is as high as 5.2 and 26.1 GW/m{sup 3}, respectively. The peak pulse temperature rise rate is 14 million C/s (for 5 MW beam) whereas the total pulse temperature rise is only 7 C. In addition to thermal shock and materials compatibility, key feasibility issues for the target are related to its thermal-hydraulic performance. This includes proper flow distribution, flow reversals, possible {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} and the challenge of mitigating the effects of thermal shock through possible injection of helium bubbles throughout the mercury volume or other concepts. The general computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFDS-FLOW3D was used to simulate the thermal and flow distribution in three preliminary concepts of the mercury target. Very initial CFD simulation of He bubbles injection demonstrates some potential for simulating behavior of He bubbles in flowing mercury. Much study and development will be required to be able to `predict`, even in a crude way, such a complex phenomena. Future direction in both design and R&D is outlined.

  19. Synchrotron based proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2002-09-19

    Proton drivers are the proton sources that produce intense short proton bunches. They have a wide range of applications. This paper discusses the proton drivers based on high-intensity proton synchrotrons. It gives a review of the high-intensity proton sources over the world and a brief report on recent developments in this field in the U.S. high-energy physics (HEP) community. The Fermilab Proton Driver is used as a case study for a number of challenging technical design issues.

  20. Numerical Analysis of NREL 5MW Wind Turbine: A Study Towards a Better Understanding of Wake Characteristic and Torque Generation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman Siddiqui, M.; Rasheed, Adil; Tabib, Mandar; Kvamsdal, Trond

    2016-09-01

    With the increased feasibility of harvesting offshore wind energy, scale of wind turbines is growing rapidly and there is a trend towards clustering together higher number of turbines in order to harvest maximum yield and to leave a smaller footprint on the environment. This causes complex flow configurations inside the farms, the study of which is essential to making offshore wind energy a success. The present study focuses on NREL 5MW wind turbine with the following objectives (a)To compare Sliding Mesh Interface and Multiple Reference Frame modeling approaches and their predictive capabilities in reproducing the characteristics of flow around the full scale wind turbine. (b)To get a better insight into wake dynamics behind the turbine in near and far wake regions operating under different tip-speed-ratio and incoming turbulence intensities.

  1. High-intensity polarized H-(proton), deuteron and 3He++ion source development at BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski,A.

    2008-06-23

    New techniques for the production of polarized electron, H{sup -} (proton), D (D+) and {sup 3}H{sup ++} ion beams are discussed. Feasibility studies of these techniques are in progress at BNL. An Optically Pumped Polarized H{sup -} Ion Source (OPPIS) delivers beam for polarization studies in RHIC. The polarized deuteron beam will be required for the deuteron Electron Dipole Moment (EDM) experiment, and the {sup 3}H{sup ++} ion beam is a part of the experimental program for the future eRHIC (Electron Ion) collider.

  2. Coupling of proton source and sink via H+-migration along the membrane surface as revealed by double patch-clamp experiments.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Y N; Pohl, P

    1998-06-12

    Long-range proton transfer along the surface of black lipid bilayers was observed between two integral membrane channels (gramicidins), one operating as a proton source, the other as a sink, by patch-clamp technique. In contrast, potassium ions were shown to equilibrate with the aqueous bulk phase before being consumed. Both channels opened and closed simultaneously only if the charge between them was carried by protons. In this case an anomalous high conductance between two patched membrane fragments was measured, each of them containing one single gramicidin channel. The coupled state disappeared when the distance between these two channels was increased above the critical value. The latter was shown to increase with the channel lifetime. Our results support the idea of the 'localized' proton coupling, in which protons that have been pumped across membranes migrate along the membrane surface to reach another membrane protein that utilizes the established pH gradient. PMID:9650589

  3. Focusing and transport of high-intensity multi-MeV proton bunches from a compact laser-driven source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busold, S.; Schumacher, D.; Deppert, O.; Brabetz, C.; Frydrych, S.; Kroll, F.; Joost, M.; Al-Omari, H.; Blažević, A.; Zielbauer, B.; Hofmann, I.; Bagnoud, V.; Cowan, T. E.; Roth, M.

    2013-10-01

    Laser ion acceleration provides for compact, high-intensity ion sources in the multi-MeV range. Using a pulsed high-field solenoid, for the first time high-intensity laser-accelerated proton bunches could be selected from the continuous exponential spectrum and delivered to large distances, containing more than 109 particles in a narrow energy interval around a central energy of 9.4 MeV and showing ≤30mrad envelope divergence. The bunches of only a few nanoseconds bunch duration were characterized 2.2 m behind the laser-plasma source with respect to arrival time, energy width, and intensity as well as spatial and temporal bunch profile.

  4. Project X - a new multi-megawatt proton source at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project X is a multi-megawatt proton facility being developed to support intensity frontier research in elementary particle physics, with possible applications to nuclear physics and nuclear energy research, at Fermilab. The centerpiece of this program is a superconducting H-linac that will support world leading programs in long baseline neutrino experimentation and the study of rare processes. Based on technology shared with the International Linear Collider (ILC), Project X will provide multi-MW beams at 60-120 GeV from the Main Injector, simultaneous with very high intensity beams at lower energies. Project X will also support development of a Muon Collider as a future facility at the energy frontier.

  5. Brightness measurement of an electron impact gas ion source for proton beam writing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N.; Xu, X.; Pang, R.; Santhana Raman, P.; Khursheed, A.; van Kan, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    We are developing a high brightness nano-aperture electron impact gas ion source, which can create ion beams from a miniature ionization chamber with relatively small virtual source sizes, typically around 100 nm. A prototype source of this kind was designed and successively micro-fabricated using integrated circuit technology. Experiments to measure source brightness were performed inside a field emission scanning electron microscope. The total output current was measured to be between 200 and 300 pA. The highest estimated reduced brightness was found to be comparable to the injecting focused electron beam reduced brightness. This translates into an ion reduced brightness that is significantly better than that of conventional radio frequency ion sources, currently used in single-ended MeV accelerators.

  6. A hybrid ion-source concept for a proton driver front-end

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, R.; Luft, P.; Regis, M.; Wallig, J.; Monroy, M.; Ratti,A.; Syversrud, D.; Welton, R.; Anderson, D.

    2004-10-18

    A novel concept for creating intense beams of negative hydrogen ion beams has been devised, and first steps towards its realization have been taken. In this approach, an ECR plasma generator operating at 2.45 GHz frequency is utilized as a plasma cathode, and electrons are extracted instead of ions and injected at moderate energy into an SNS type multi-cusp H{sup -} ion source. This secondary source is then driven by chopped d. c. power, rather than rf power, but does not need filaments which are the cause for the rather short lifetime of conventional H{sup -} sources. The development of this ion source is primarily aimed at the future beam-power goal of 3 MW for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) [1] that will be pursued after the start of SNS operations. The first two phases of this development effort have been successfully passed: assembly of a test stand and verification of the performance of an rf-driven SNS ion-source prototype and extraction of electrons with more than 200 mA current from a 2.45-GHz ECR ion source obtained on loan from Argonne National Laboratory. An electron-extraction chamber that joins these ECR and H{sup -} sources has been fabricated, and the next goal is the demonstration of actual H{sup -} ion production by this novel, hybrid ion source. This paper describes the source principle and design in detail, reports on the current status of the development work, and gives an outlook on future lines of development.

  7. Fiber Bragg grating temperature sensors in a 6.5-MW generator exciter bridge and the development and simulation of its thermal model.

    PubMed

    de Morais Sousa, Kleiton; Probst, Werner; Bortolotti, Fernando; Martelli, Cicero; da Silva, Jean Carlos Cardozo

    2014-09-05

    This work reports the thermal modeling and characterization of a thyristor. The thyristor is used in a 6.5-MW generator excitation bridge. Temperature measurements are performed using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. These sensors have the benefits of being totally passive and immune to electromagnetic interference and also multiplexed in a single fiber. The thyristor thermal model consists of a second order equivalent electric circuit, and its power losses lead to an increase in temperature, while the losses are calculated on the basis of the excitation current in the generator. Six multiplexed FBGs are used to measure temperature and are embedded to avoid the effect of the strain sensitivity. The presented results show a relationship between field current and temperature oscillation and prove that this current can be used to determine the thermal model of a thyristor. The thermal model simulation presents an error of 1.5 °C, while the FBG used allows for the determination of the thermal behavior and the field current dependence. Since the temperature is a function of the field current, the corresponding simulation can be used to estimate the temperature in the thyristors.

  8. Fiber Bragg Grating Temperature Sensors in a 6.5-MW Generator Exciter Bridge and the Development and Simulation of Its Thermal Model

    PubMed Central

    de Morais Sousa, Kleiton; Probst, Werner; Bortolotti, Fernando; Martelli, Cicero; da Silva, Jean Carlos Cardozo

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the thermal modeling and characterization of a thyristor. The thyristor is used in a 6.5-MW generator excitation bridge. Temperature measurements are performed using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. These sensors have the benefits of being totally passive and immune to electromagnetic interference and also multiplexed in a single fiber. The thyristor thermal model consists of a second order equivalent electric circuit, and its power losses lead to an increase in temperature, while the losses are calculated on the basis of the excitation current in the generator. Six multiplexed FBGs are used to measure temperature and are embedded to avoid the effect of the strain sensitivity. The presented results show a relationship between field current and temperature oscillation and prove that this current can be used to determine the thermal model of a thyristor. The thermal model simulation presents an error of 1.5 °C, while the FBG used allows for the determination of the thermal behavior and the field current dependence. Since the temperature is a function of the field current, the corresponding simulation can be used to estimate the temperature in the thyristors. PMID:25198007

  9. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  10. High-Brightness Picosecond Proton Beam Source Based on BNL TW CO2 Laser: Proof-of-Principle Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Pavlishin, I. V.; Yakimenko, V.; Shkolnikov, P. L.; Pukhov, A.

    2006-11-27

    We initiate study of a high-brightness multi-MeV ion and proton beam source driven by a picosecond CO2 laser. High-energy, collimated particle beams will originate from the rear surface of laser-irradiated foils by a process called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA). The expected advantage of using a CO2 gas laser for this application rather than the ultra-fast solid state lasers is the 100-fold increase of the electron ponderomotive potential for the same laser intensity due to a 10 times longer CO2 laser wavelength. This promises to provide substantial enhancement in energy efficiency and particle yield, and will facilitate the advancement of the TNSA technique towards practical applications.

  11. Experimental results from high-intensity sources of monochromatic X-rays generated by 10-38 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avaldi, L.; Bassi, S.; Castiglioni, M.; Milazzo, M.; Silari, M.; Weckermann, B.

    1990-12-01

    The performance of a high intensity X-ray source generated by proton bombardment of pure elemental targets has been investigated experimentally. The K α yields of several thick targets of pure elemental composition have been measured at proton energies between 12 and 38 MeV. The measured yields ((3-5 × 10 10 photons/(s μA sr)) compare favourably with the expected values, while a sensible background contribution from nuclear processes asks for a careful experimental arrangement in order to use this source for XRF analyses.

  12. Development of an all-permanent-magnet microwave ion source equipped with multicusp magnetic fields for high current proton beam production.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Hara, S; Seki, T; Iga, T

    2008-02-01

    An all-permanent-magnet (APM) microwave hydrogen ion source was developed to reduce the size and to simplify structure of a conventional solenoid coil microwave ion source developed for reliability improvement of high current proton linac application systems. The difficulty in developing the APM source was sensitive dependence of the source performance on axial magnetic field in the microwave discharge chamber. It was difficult to produce high current proton beam stably without precise tuning of the magnetic field using solenoid coils. We lowered the sensitivity using multicusp magnetic fields for plasma confinement at the discharge chamber sidewall of the source. This enabled stable high current proton beam production with the APM microwave ion source with no tuning coil. The water cooling and the power supply for the coils are not necessary for the APM source, which leads to better reliability and system simplification. The outer diameter of the APM source was around 300 mm, which was 20% lower than the coil source. The APM source produced a maximum hydrogen ion beam current of 65 mA (high current density of 330 mA/cm(2), proton ratio of 87%, and beam energy of 30 keV) with a 5 mm diameter extraction aperture, pulse width of 400 micros, and 20 Hz repetition rate at 1.3 kW microwave power. This performance is almost the same as the best performances of the conventional coil sources. The extracted ion beams were focused with electrostatic five-grid lens to match beam to acceptance of radio-frequency quadrupole linacs. The maximum focused beam current through the orifice (5 mm radius) and the lens was 36 mA and the 90% focused beam half-width was 1-2 mm.

  13. Experimental Characterization of a Grid-Loss Event on a 2.5-MW Dynamometer Using Advanced Operational Modal Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Helsen, J.; Weijtjens, W.; Guo, Y.; Keller, J.; McNiff, B.; Devriendt, C.; Guillaume, P.

    2015-02-01

    This paper experimentally investigates a worst case grid loss event conducted on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) drivetrain mounted on the 2.5MW NREL dynamic nacelle test-rig. The GRC drivetrain has a directly grid-coupled, fixed speed asynchronous generator. The main goal is the assessment of the dynamic content driving this particular assess the dynamic content of the high-speed stage of the GRC gearbox. In addition to external accelerometers, high frequency sampled measurements of strain gauges were used to assess torque fluctuations and bending moments both at the nacelle main shaft and gearbox high-speed shaft (HSS) through the entire duration of the event. Modal analysis was conducted using a polyreference Least Squares Complex Frequency-domain (pLSCF) modal identification estimator. The event driving the torsional resonance was identified. Moreover, the pLSCF estimator identified main drivetrain resonances based on a combination of acceleration and strain measurements. Without external action during the grid-loss event, a mode shape characterized by counter phase rotation of the rotor and generator rotor determined by the drivetrain flexibility and rotor inertias was the main driver of the event. This behavior resulted in significant torque oscillations with large amplitude negative torque periods. Based on tooth strain measurements of the HSS pinion, this work showed that at each zero-crossing, the teeth lost contact and came into contact with the backside flank. In addition, dynamic nontorque loads between the gearbox and generator at the HSS played an important role, as indicated by strain gauge-measurements.

  14. Thermodynamics of various F420 coenzyme models as sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-06-14

    32 F420 coenzyme models with alkylation of the three different N atoms (N1, N3 and N10) in the core structure (XFH(-)) were designed and synthesized and the thermodynamic driving forces (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the 32 XFH(-) releasing hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and electrons, the thermodynamic driving forces of the 32 XFH˙ releasing protons and hydrogen atoms and the thermodynamic driving forces of XF(-)˙ releasing electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The effects of the methyl group at N1, N3 and N10 and a negative charge on N1 and N10 atoms on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were examined; the results show that seating arrangements of the methyl group and the negative charge have remarkably different effects on the thermodynamic properties of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates. The effects of the substituents at C7 and C8 on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were also examined; the results show that the substituents at C7 and C8 have good Hammett linear free energy relationships with the six thermodynamic parameters. Meanwhile, a reasonable determination of possible reactions between members of the F420 family and NADH family in vivo was given according to a thermodynamic analysis platform constructed using the elementary step thermodynamic parameter of F420 coenzyme model 2FH(-) and NADH model MNAH releasing hydride ions in acetonitrile. The information disclosed in this work can not only fill a gap in the chemical thermodynamics of F420 coenzyme models as a class of very important organic sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons, but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of F420 coenzyme.

  15. Thermodynamics of various F420 coenzyme models as sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-06-14

    32 F420 coenzyme models with alkylation of the three different N atoms (N1, N3 and N10) in the core structure (XFH(-)) were designed and synthesized and the thermodynamic driving forces (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the 32 XFH(-) releasing hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and electrons, the thermodynamic driving forces of the 32 XFH˙ releasing protons and hydrogen atoms and the thermodynamic driving forces of XF(-)˙ releasing electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The effects of the methyl group at N1, N3 and N10 and a negative charge on N1 and N10 atoms on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were examined; the results show that seating arrangements of the methyl group and the negative charge have remarkably different effects on the thermodynamic properties of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates. The effects of the substituents at C7 and C8 on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were also examined; the results show that the substituents at C7 and C8 have good Hammett linear free energy relationships with the six thermodynamic parameters. Meanwhile, a reasonable determination of possible reactions between members of the F420 family and NADH family in vivo was given according to a thermodynamic analysis platform constructed using the elementary step thermodynamic parameter of F420 coenzyme model 2FH(-) and NADH model MNAH releasing hydride ions in acetonitrile. The information disclosed in this work can not only fill a gap in the chemical thermodynamics of F420 coenzyme models as a class of very important organic sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons, but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of F420 coenzyme

  16. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC. Design of a multi-cusp ion source for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao-Bing; Huang, Tao; Ouyang, Hua-Fu; Zhang, Hua-Shun; Gong, Ke-Yun

    2010-12-01

    The permanent magnets of the discharge chamber in a multi-cusp proton source are studied and designed. The three electrode extraction system is adopted and simulated. A method to extract different amounts of current while keeping the beam emittance unchanged is proposed.

  17. Experimental optimization of beam quality extracted from a duoplasmatron proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Y. K.; Draganic, I. N.; Fortgang, C. M.

    2014-10-01

    The LANSCE accelerator facility operates with two independent ion injectors for H⁺ and H⁻ particle beams. The H⁺ ion beam is formed using a duoplasmatron source followed by a 750 keV Cockroft-Walton accelerating column. Formation of an optimal plasma meniscus is an important feature for minimizing beam emittance, and maximizing beam brightness. A series of experiments were performed to find the optimal combination of extraction voltage and extracted current for the H⁺ beam. Measurements yielded the best ratio of beam perveance to Child–Langmuir perveance of 0.52 for maximizing beam brightness.

  18. THE RF SYSTEM DESIGN FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    D. REES; M. LYNCH; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator includes a nominally 1000 MeV, 2 mA average current linac consisting of a radio frequency quadrapole (RFQ), drift tube linac (DTL), coupled cavity linac (CCL), a medium and high beta super conducting (SC) linac, and two buncher cavities for beam transport to the ring. Los Alamos is responsible for the RF systems for all sections of the linac. The SNS linac is a pulsed proton linac and the RF system must support a 1 msec beam pulse at up to a 60 Hz repetition rate. The RFQ and DTL utilize seven, 2.5 MW klystrons and operate at 402.5 MHz. The CCL, SC, and buncher cavities operate at 805 MHz. Six, 5 MW klystrons are utilized for the CCL and buncher cavities while eighty-one 550 kW klystrons are used for the SC cavities. All of the RF hardware for the SNS linac is currently in production. This paper will present details of the RF system-level design as well as specific details of the SNS RF equipment. The design parameters will be discussed. One of the design challenges has been achieving a reasonable cost with the very large number of high-power klystrons. The approaches we used to reduce cost and the resulting design compromises will be discussed.

  19. Design of a New Acceleration System for High-Current Pulsed Proton Beams from an ECR Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Andrew L.; Pogrebnyak, Ivan; Surbrook, Jason T.; Kelly, Keegan J.; Carlin, Bret P.; Champagne, Arthur E.; Clegg, Thomas B.

    2014-03-01

    A primary objective for accelerators at TUNL's Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics (LENA) is to maximize target beam intensity to ensure a high rate of nuclear events during each experiment. Average proton target currents of several mA are needed from LENA's electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source because nuclear cross sections decrease substantially at energies of interest <200 keV. We seek to suppress undesired continuous environmental background by pulsing the beam and detecting events only during beam pulses. To improve beam intensity and transport, we installed a more powerful, stable microwave system for the ECR plasma, and will install a new acceleration system. This system will: reduce defocusing effects of the beam's internal space charge; provide better vacuum with a high gas conductance accelerating column; suppress bremsstrahlung X-rays produced when backstreaming electrons strike internal acceleration tube structures; and provide better heat dissipation by using deionized water to provide the current drain needed to establish the accelerating tube's voltage gradient. Details of beam optical modeling calculations, proposed accelerating tube design, and initial beam pulsing tests will be described. Work supported in part by USDOE Office of HE and Nuclear Physics.

  20. Electrocatalytic Reduction of CO2 to CO With Re-Pyridyl-NHCs: Proton Source Influence on Rates and Product Selectivities.

    PubMed

    Liyanage, Nalaka P; Dulaney, Hunter A; Huckaba, Aron J; Jurss, Jonah W; Delcamp, Jared H

    2016-06-20

    A series of four electron-deficient-substituted Re(I) pyridyl N-heterocyclic carbene (pyNHC) complexes have been synthesized, and their electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 has been evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and controlled potential electrolysis experiments. All of the catalysts were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry under inert atmosphere and under CO2 and compared to the known benchmark catalyst Re(bpy)(CO)3Br. Among the four Re-NHC catalysts, Re(pyNHC-PhCF3)(CO)3Br (2) demonstrated the highest catalytic rate (icat/ip)(2) at the first and second reduction events with a value of 4 at the second reduction potential (TOF = 0.8 s(-1)). The rate of catalysis was enhanced through the addition of proton sources (PhOH, TFE, and H2O; TOF up to 100 s(-1); (icat/ip)(2) = 700). Controlled potential electrolysis shows Faradaic efficiencies (FE) for CO production and accumulated charge for the Re(pyNHC-PhCF3)(CO)3Br catalyst exceed those of the benchmark catalyst in the presence of 2 M H2O (92%, 13 C at 1 h versus 61%, 3 C for the benchmark catalyst) under analogous experimental conditions. A peak FE of 100% was observed during electrolysis with Re(pyNHC-PhCF3)(CO)3Br.

  1. Physics with a High Intensity Proton Source at Fermilab: Project X Golden Book

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Jeffrey; Asner, David; Bigi, Ikaros; Bryman, Douglas; Buras, Andrzej; Carena, Marcela Carosi, Roberto; Christian, Dave; Conrad, Janet; Diwan, Milind; Dukes, Craig; /Virginia U. /Fermilab

    2008-02-03

    . We have already begun to see the enlargement of the Standard Model in the leptonic sector. Neutrino masses and mixing angles, which in the early 1990's were unknown, must now be incorporated into our full description of nature. In a minimal scenario of Majorana masses and mixings amongst the three known left-handed neutrinos, we see a strong hint of a new and very large mass scale, possibly associated with grand unification or the scale of quantum gravity, the Planck mass. We are not yet sure what the proper description of neutrino masses and mixing angles will be. Experiments may reveal additional unexpected particles coupled to the neutrino sector. New phenomena, such as leptonic CP-violation, will be major focal points of our expanding understanding of the lepton sector. There is much to be done with experiment to attack the issues that neutrinos now present. Already, developments in neutrino physics and the possibility of a novel source of CP-violation in the lepton sector have spawned hopes that the cosmic matter-antimatter asymmetry may be explained through leptogenesis. Neutrino physics, together with the search for new energy frontier physics, offers the possibility of experimental handles on the questions of dark matter and dark energy. Without the discovery of new particles in accelerator experiments, the telescope-based cosmological observations of the early universe would remain unexplained puzzles. The process of understanding the laws of physics in greater detail through accelerator-based high energy physics will potentially have incisive impact on our understanding of dark matter and dark energy. Precision flavor physics in both the quark and the lepton sectors offers a window on the sensitive entanglement of beyond-the-Standard-Model physics with rare processes, through quantum loop effects involving known or new states. Flavor physics offers sensitive indirect probes and may be the first place to reveal additional key components of the post

  2. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... nucleus is surrounded by electrons. In proton therapy, beams of fast-moving protons are used to destroy ... atoms to release proton, neutron, and helium ion beams. In this highly specialized form of radiosurgery , proton ...

  3. Design of the 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz ultra-wideband 3 dB high power hybrid coupler for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating in fusion grade reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Rana Pratap; Kumar, Sunil; Kulkarni, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Design and developmental procedure of strip-line based 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz, ultra-wideband high power 3 dB hybrid coupler has been presented and its applicability in ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in tokamak is discussed. For the high power handling capability, spacing between conductors and ground need to very high. Hence other structural parameters like strip-width, strip thickness coupling gap, and junction also become large which can be gone upto optimum limit where various constrains like fabrication tolerance, discontinuities, and excitation of higher TE and TM modes become prominent and significantly deteriorates the desired parameters of the coupled lines system. In designed hybrid coupler, two 8.34 dB coupled lines are connected in tandem to get desired coupling of 3 dB and air is used as dielectric. The spacing between ground and conductors are taken as 0.164 m for 1.5 MW power handling capability. To have the desired spacing, each of 8.34 dB segments are designed with inner dimension of 3.6 × 1.0 × 40 cm where constraints have been significantly realized, compensated, and applied in designing of 1.5 MW hybrid coupler and presented in paper.

  4. Design of the 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz ultra-wideband 3 dB high power hybrid coupler for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating in fusion grade reactor.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rana Pratap; Kumar, Sunil; Kulkarni, S V

    2016-01-01

    Design and developmental procedure of strip-line based 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz, ultra-wideband high power 3 dB hybrid coupler has been presented and its applicability in ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in tokamak is discussed. For the high power handling capability, spacing between conductors and ground need to very high. Hence other structural parameters like strip-width, strip thickness coupling gap, and junction also become large which can be gone upto optimum limit where various constrains like fabrication tolerance, discontinuities, and excitation of higher TE and TM modes become prominent and significantly deteriorates the desired parameters of the coupled lines system. In designed hybrid coupler, two 8.34 dB coupled lines are connected in tandem to get desired coupling of 3 dB and air is used as dielectric. The spacing between ground and conductors are taken as 0.164 m for 1.5 MW power handling capability. To have the desired spacing, each of 8.34 dB segments are designed with inner dimension of 3.6 × 1.0 × 40 cm where constraints have been significantly realized, compensated, and applied in designing of 1.5 MW hybrid coupler and presented in paper.

  5. Estimate of the radiation source term for 18F production via thick H218O targets bombarded with 18 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzate, Juan Ángel

    2015-12-01

    The positron-emitting radionuclide most important from the point of view of radiation protection is 18F. This isotope is usually produced by bombarding 18O-enriched water with protons. Currently there are few experimental data on the radiation source term generated during these reactions. In addition, presently there is no theoretical estimates of this source term, for use in radiation protection, validated by experimental data. Up till now this term is calculated by using nuclear interactions' simulation codes, such as ALICE91. An estimate of the energy spectra for neutrons and photons, induced by 18 MeV protons on H218O target, have been calculated by using MCNPX code with cross sections from release 0 of ENDF/B VII library for all materials except 18O, for which TENDL-2012 library was used. This estimate was validated against a recent experiment carried out at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The calculated spectra have generally well reproduced experiments. The results show that the calculated radiation source term may be used to estimate the neutron activation of the accelerator components and the cyclotron building, to calculate the cyclotron shielding, and to carry out radiation protection evaluations in general, for the case of cyclotrons producing 18F by means of the 18O(p,n)18F nuclear reactions, for proton energies up to 18 MeV.

  6. Exotic Protonated Species Produced by UV-Induced Photofragmentation of a Protonated Dimer: Metastable Protonated Cinchonidine.

    PubMed

    Alata, Ivan; Scuderi, Debora; Lepere, Valeria; Steinmetz, Vincent; Gobert, Fabrice; Thiao-Layel, Loïc; Le Barbu-Debus, Katia; Zehnacker-Rentien, Anne

    2015-10-01

    A metastable protonated cinchona alkaloid was produced in the gas phase by UV-induced photodissociation (UVPD) of its protonated dimer in a Paul ion trap. The infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectrum of the molecular ion formed by UVPD was obtained and compared to DFT calculations to characterize its structure. The protonation site obtained thereby is not accessible by classical protonation ways. The protonated monomer directly formed in the ESI source or by collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the dimer undergoes protonation at the most basic alkaloid nitrogen. In contrast, protonation occurs at the quinoline aromatic ring nitrogen in the UVPD-formed monomer. PMID:26347997

  7. Exotic Protonated Species Produced by UV-Induced Photofragmentation of a Protonated Dimer: Metastable Protonated Cinchonidine.

    PubMed

    Alata, Ivan; Scuderi, Debora; Lepere, Valeria; Steinmetz, Vincent; Gobert, Fabrice; Thiao-Layel, Loïc; Le Barbu-Debus, Katia; Zehnacker-Rentien, Anne

    2015-10-01

    A metastable protonated cinchona alkaloid was produced in the gas phase by UV-induced photodissociation (UVPD) of its protonated dimer in a Paul ion trap. The infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectrum of the molecular ion formed by UVPD was obtained and compared to DFT calculations to characterize its structure. The protonation site obtained thereby is not accessible by classical protonation ways. The protonated monomer directly formed in the ESI source or by collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the dimer undergoes protonation at the most basic alkaloid nitrogen. In contrast, protonation occurs at the quinoline aromatic ring nitrogen in the UVPD-formed monomer.

  8. Continuous operation of 2.45-GHz microwave proton source for 306 hours with more than 50 mA DC beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shi-Xiang; Zhang, Ai-Lin; Ren, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Yuan; Zhang, Jing-Feng; Gong, Jian-Hua; Guo, Zhi-Yu; Chen, Jia-Er

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes a long-term operation of the 2.45-GHz microwave proton source at Peking University. The DC proton beam of 50-55 mA with energy of 35 keV has been run for 306 hours continuously. Total beam availability, defined as 35-keV beam-on time divided by elapsed time, is higher than 99%. Water cooling machine failures cause all the downtime, and no plasma generator failure or high voltage breakdown is observed. The longest uninterrupted run time is 122 hours. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB845502) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91126004).

  9. Challenges and design solutions of the liquid hydrogen circuit at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallimore, S.; Nilsson, P.; Sabbagh, P.; Takibayev, A.; Weisend, J. G., II; Beßler, Y.; Klaus, M.

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS), Lund, Sweden will be a 5MW long-pulse neutron spallation research facility and will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. Neutrons are produced by accelerating a high-energy proton beam into a rotating helium-cooled tungsten target. These neutrons pass through moderators to reduce their energy to an appropriate range (< 5 meV for cold neutrons); two of which will use liquid hydrogen at 17 K as the moderating and cooling medium. There are several technical challenges to overcome in the design of a robust system that will operate under such conditions, not least the 20 kW of deposited heat. These challenges and the associated design solutions will be detailed in this paper.

  10. SU-E-T-623: Delivery of 3D Conformal Proton-Therapy Fields at Extended Source- To-Axis Distances

    SciTech Connect

    Kryck, E; Slopsema, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric properties of proton dose distributions delivered at extended source-to-skin distances (SSD). Methods: Radiation was delivered with a gantry-mounted proton double scattering system (Proteus 230, IBA). This system has a maximum field diameter of 24 cm at isocenter and a nominal source-to-axis distance of 230 cm. Dose was measured at nominal SSD as well as at -10, +10, +25, +50, +75, and +100 cm for several range and modulation width combinations. Depth dose distributions were measured with a multi-layer ionization chamber (MLIC), and lateral dose distributions with a 2D ionization chamber array as well as with a diode in a water phantom. Results: The maximum field diameter was found to increase from 24.0 cm at nominal SSD to 29.1 cm and 33.3 cm at +50 cm and +100 cm respectively. Field flatness remained below 3% for all SSD. Tilt in the spread-out Bragg peak depth dose distribution increased with SSD up to 0.4 %-per-g/cm2 at +100 cm. The measured range decreased with 1.1x10-3 g/cm2 per centimeter shift in SSD due to proton energy loss in air, very close to the theoretically calculated value of 1.06x10-3 g/cm3. The output and dose rate decrease with the inverse of the SSD squared as expected. Conclusion: Extending the SSD up to 100 cm increases the maximum field diameter from 24.0 cm to 33.3 cm while the dose uniformity remains acceptable.

  11. Possible production of high-energy gamma rays from proton acceleration in the extragalactic radio source markarian 501

    PubMed

    Mannheim

    1998-01-30

    The active galaxy Markarian 501 was discovered with air-Cerenkov telescopes at photon energies of 10 tera-electron volts. Such high energies may indicate that the gamma rays from Markarian 501 are due to the acceleration of protons rather than electrons. Furthermore, the observed absence of gamma ray attenuation due to electron-positron pair production in collisions with cosmic infrared photons implies a limit of 2 to 4 nanowatts per square meter per steradian for the energy flux of an extragalactic infrared radiation background at a wavelength of 25 micrometers. This limit provides important clues about the epoch of galaxy formation.

  12. Analogies between respiration and a light-driven proton pump as sources of energy for active glutamate transport in Halobacterium halobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belliveau, J. W.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    Halobacterium halobium is known to contain sheets of bacteriorhodopsin, a pigment which upon exposure to light undergoes cyclic protonation and deprotonation, resulting in net H(+) translocation. In this paper, experiments were conducted to test H. halobium cell envelope vesicles for respiration-induced glutamate uptake. It is shown that glutamate transport in H. halobium cell envelope vesicles can occur as a result of respiration, as well as light acting on bacteriorhodopsin. Glutamate transport can be energized by the oxidation of dimethyl phenylenediamine, and the properties of the transport system are entirely analogous to those observed with illumination as the source of energy. In the case of respiration-dependent glutamate transport, the transportation is also driven by a Na(+) gradient, thereby confirming the existence of a single glutamate transport system independent of the source of energy. The analogy observed is indirect evidence that the cytochrome oxidase of H. halobium functions as a H(+) pump.

  13. Optimal moderator materials at various proton energies considering photon dose rate after irradiation for an accelerator-driven ⁹Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy neutron source.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Y; Hiraga, F; Kiyanagi, Y

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the accelerator beam power and the neutron-induced radioactivity of (9)Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) neutron sources having a MgF2, CaF2, or AlF3 moderator and driven by protons with energy from 8 MeV to 30 MeV. The optimal moderator materials were found to be MgF2 for proton energies less than 10 MeV because of lower required accelerator beam power and CaF2 for higher proton energies because of lower photon dose rate at the treatment position after neutron irradiation. PMID:26272165

  14. Optimal moderator materials at various proton energies considering photon dose rate after irradiation for an accelerator-driven ⁹Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy neutron source.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Y; Hiraga, F; Kiyanagi, Y

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the accelerator beam power and the neutron-induced radioactivity of (9)Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) neutron sources having a MgF2, CaF2, or AlF3 moderator and driven by protons with energy from 8 MeV to 30 MeV. The optimal moderator materials were found to be MgF2 for proton energies less than 10 MeV because of lower required accelerator beam power and CaF2 for higher proton energies because of lower photon dose rate at the treatment position after neutron irradiation.

  15. Proton scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, Gregory H

    2009-01-01

    This note presents analytic estimates of the performance of proton beams in remote surveillance for nuclear materials. The analysis partitions the analysis into the eight steps used by a companion note: (1) Air scattering, (2) Neutron production in the ship and cargo, (3) Target detection probability, (4) Signal produced by target, (5) Attenuation of signal by ship and cargo, (6) Attenuation of signal by air, (7) Geometric dilution, and (8) Detector Efficiency. The above analyses indicate that the dominant air scattering and loss mechanisms for particle remote sensing are calculable with reliable and accepted tools. They make it clear that the conversion of proton beams into neutron sources rapidly goes to completion in all but thinnest targets, which means that proton interrogation is for all purposes executed by neutrons. Diffusion models and limiting approximations to them are simple and credible - apart from uncertainty over the cross sections to be used in them - and uncertainty over the structure of the vessels investigated. Multiplication is essentially unknown, in part because it depends on the details of the target and its shielding, which are unlikely to be known in advance. Attenuation of neutron fluxes on the way out are more complicated due to geometry, the spectrum of fission neutrons, and the details of their slowing down during egress. The attenuation by air is large but less uncertain. Detectors and technology are better known. The overall convolution of these effects lead to large but arguably tolerable levels of attenuation of input beams and output signals. That is particularly the case for small, mobile sensors, which can more than compensate for size with proximity to operate reliably while remaining below flux limits. Overall, the estimates used here appear to be of adequate accuracy for decisions. That assessment is strengthened by their agreement with companion calculations.

  16. SU-E-T-554: Monte Carlo Calculation of Source Terms and Attenuation Lengths for Neutrons Produced by 50–200 MeV Protons On Brass

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Mendez, J; Faddegon, B; Paganetti, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We used TOPAS (TOPAS wraps and extends Geant4 for medical physicists) to compare Geant4 physics models with published data for neutron shielding calculations. Subsequently, we calculated the source terms and attenuation lengths (shielding data) of the total ambient dose equivalent (TADE) in concrete for neutrons produced by protons in brass. Methods: Stage1: The Bertini and Binary nuclear models available in Geant4 were compared with published attenuation at depth of the TADE in concrete and iron. Stage2: Shielding data of the TADE in concrete was calculated for 50– 200 MeV proton beams on brass. Stage3: Shielding data from Stage2 was extrapolated for 235 MeV proton beams. This data was used in a point-line-source analytical model to calculate the ambient dose per unit therapeutic dose at two locations inside one treatment room at the Francis H Burr Proton Therapy Center. Finally, we compared these results with experimental data and full TOPAS simulations. Results: At larger angles (∼130o) the TADE in concrete calculated with the Bertini model was about 9 times larger than that calculated with the Binary model. The attenuation length in concrete calculated with the Binary model agreed with published data within 7%±0.4% (statistical uncertainty) for the deepest regions and 5%±0.1% for shallower regions. For iron the agreement was within 3%±0.1%. The ambient dose per therapeutic dose calculated with the Binary model, relative to the experimental data, was a ratio of 0.93±0.16 and 1.23±0.24 for two locations. The analytical model overestimated the dose by four orders of magnitude. These differences are attributed to the complexity of the geometry. Conclusion: The Binary and Bertini models gave comparable results, with the Binary model giving the best agreement with published data at large angle. Shielding data we calculated using the Binary model is useful for fast shielding calculations with other analytical models. This work was supported by

  17. Proton therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... direction of the tumor. A machine called a synchrotron or cyclotron creates and speeds up the protons. ... redness in the radiation area, and temporary hair loss. AFTER THE PROCEDURE Following proton therapy, you should ...

  18. Enantioselective Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Hong, Allen Y.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective protonation is a common process in biosynthetic sequences. The decarboxylase and esterase enzymes that effect this valuable transformation are able to control both the steric environment around the proton acceptor (typically an enolate) and the proton donor (typically a thiol). Recently, several chemical methods to achieve enantioselective protonation have been developed by exploiting various means of enantiocontrol in different mechanisms. These laboratory transformations have proven useful for the preparation of a number of valuable organic compounds. PMID:20428461

  19. Proton Collimators for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, George H.; Momota, Hiromu

    2003-01-01

    Proton collimators have been proposed for incorporation into inertial-electrostatic-confinement (IEC) fusion reactors. Such reactors have been envisioned as thrusters and sources of electric power for spacecraft and as sources of energetic protons in commercial ion-beam applications.

  20. European Spallation Source and Neutron Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeck, James

    2014-03-01

    International collaborations in large-scale scientific projects can link Sciences and Society. Following this goal, the European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries. Scandinavia is providing 50 percent of the construction cost whilst the other member states are providing financial support mainly via in-kind contribution from institutes, laboratories or industries of the given countries. Scientists and engineers from 35 different countries are members of the workforce in Lund who participate in its design and construction. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics by producing very high flux neutrons to study condensed matter physics, chemistry, biology, nuclear physics and materials science. The ESS will be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. A tungsten target and a 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator, composed mainly of superconducting Radio-Frequency components, are used to achieve these goals.

  1. Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelfke, Uwe

    Proton therapy is one of the most rapidly developing new treatment technologies in radiation oncology. This treatment approach has — after roughly 40 years of technical developments — reached a mature state that allows a widespread clinical application. We therefore review the basic physical and radio-biological properties of proton beams. The main physical aspect is the elemental dose distribution arising from an infinitely narrow proton pencil beam. This includes the physics of proton stopping powers and the concept of CSDA range. Furthermore, the process of multiple Coulomb scattering is discussed for the lateral dose distribution. Next, the basic terms for the description of radio-biological properties of proton beams like LET and RBE are briefly introduced. Finally, the main concepts of modern proton dose delivery concepts are introduced before the standard method of inverse treatment planning for hadron therapy is presented.

  2. Apparatus for proton radiography

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors.

  3. Flash Proton Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Frank E.

    Protons were first investigated as radiographic probes as high energy proton accelerators became accessible to the scientific community in the 1960s. Like the initial use of X-rays in the 1800s, protons were shown to be a useful tool for studying the contents of opaque materials, but the electromagnetic charge of the protons opened up a new set of interaction processes which complicated their use. These complications in combination with the high expense of generating protons with energies high enough to penetrate typical objects resulted in proton radiography becoming a novelty, demonstrated at accelerator facilities, but not utilized to their full potential until the 1990s at Los Alamos. During this time Los Alamos National Laboratory was investigating a wide range of options, including X-rays and neutrons, as the next generation of probes to be used for thick object flash radiography. During this process it was realized that the charge nature of the protons, which was the source of the initial difficulty with this idea, could be used to recover this technique. By introducing a magnetic imaging lens downstream of the object to be radiographed, the blur resulting from scattering within the object could be focused out of the measurements, dramatically improving the resolution of proton radiography of thick systems. Imaging systems were quickly developed and combined with the temporal structure of a proton beam generated by a linear accelerator, providing a unique flash radiography capability for measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This technique has now been employed at LANSCE for two decades and has been adopted around the world as the premier flash radiography technique for the study of dynamic material properties.

  4. Energy source possibilities in underwater technics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farin, Juho

    1991-04-01

    Underwater energy source possibilities are treated. The power demand of underwater vehicles is restricted to approximately 0.5 MW. Besides well known primary and secondary batteries as well as conventional diesel engines and closed cycle diesels, fuel cells, radio nuclear isotopes and small nuclear reactors have already been installed or tested in conditions representative of underwater.

  5. Generic guide concepts for the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendler, C.; Martin Rodriguez, D.; Bentley, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The construction of the European Spallation Source (ESS) faces many challenges from the neutron beam transport point of view: the spallation source is specified as being driven by a 5 MW beam of protons, each with 2 GeV energy, and yet the requirements in instrument background suppression relative to measured signal vary between 10-6 and 10-8. The energetic particles, particularly above 20 MeV, which are expected to be produced in abundance in the target, have to be filtered in order to make the beamlines safe, operational and provide good quality measurements with low background. We present generic neutron guides of short and medium length instruments which are optimised for good performance at minimal cost. Direct line of sight to the source is avoided twice, with either the first point out of line of sight or both being inside the bunker (20 m) to minimise shielding costs. These guide geometries are regarded as a baseline to define standards for instruments to be constructed at ESS. They are used to find commonalities and develop principles and solutions for common problems. Lastly, we report the impact of employing the over-illumination concept to mitigate losses from random misalignment passively, and that over-illumination should be used sparingly in key locations to be effective. For more widespread alignment issues, a more direct, active approach is likely to be needed.

  6. Study of the production yields of 18F, 11C, 13N and 15O positron emitters from plasma-laser proton sources at ELI-Beamlines for labeling of PET radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Ernesto; Italiano, Antonio; Margarone, Daniele; Pagano, Benedetta; Baldari, Sergio; Korn, Georg

    2016-03-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of microfluidics labeling approaches. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources such that expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility. 18F, 11C, 13N and 15O production yields were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account the broad proton spectra expected. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of 18F-, 11C- and 13N-labeled radiopharmaceuticals exploiting fast and efficient microfluidic labeling systems.

  7. Demonstration of a high-intensity neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Tessler, M

    2015-12-01

    A free surface liquid-lithium jet target is operating routinely at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), bombarded with a ~1.91 MeV, ~1.2 mA continuous-wave narrow proton beam. The experiments demonstrate the liquid lithium target (LiLiT) capability to constitute an intense source of epithermal neutrons, for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The target dissipates extremely high ion beam power densities (>3 kW/cm(2), >0.5 MW/cm(3)) for long periods of time, while maintaining stable conditions and localized residual activity. LiLiT generates ~3×10(10) n/s, which is more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional (7)Li(p,n)-based near threshold neutron sources. A shield and moderator assembly for BNCT, with LiLiT irradiated with protons at 1.91 MeV, was designed based on Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of BNCT-doses produced in a phantom. According to these simulations it was found that a ~15 mA near threshold proton current will apply the therapeutic doses in ~1h treatment duration. According to our present results, such high current beams can be dissipated in a liquid-lithium target, hence the target design is readily applicable for accelerator-based BNCT.

  8. Proton interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    Energetic proton beams may provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because: they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and proton beams can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections for delayed neutrons and gamma-rays using the 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Results will be presented.

  9. Source circuit design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noel, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    The cost of several circuit configurations for large (5MW) array fields were investigated to assess the relative costs of high and low voltage configurations. Three source circuit NOC voltages were evaluated: 400V (ungrounded), 800V (+ or 400V center grounded), and 2000V (+ or - 1000V center grounded). Four source circuit configurations were considered for each of the three NOC voltages. The configurations correspond to source circuit currents of 15, 30, 45, and 60 amperes, respectively. Conceptual layouts for 5MW building blocks for each of the above configurations were developed. The designs were optimized to minimize BOS electrical and structural costs. Only the BOS electrical costs were evaluated. The designs were broken down into the following elements for cost: (1) basic source circuit intermodule wiring, bypass diodes and associated hardware, source circuit to J-Box wiring, etc; (2) J-Box blocking diodes, varistors, heat sinks, and housing; (3) disconnects source circuit disconnects, fuses, and housing; (4) bus cabling J-Box to PCU interface wiring, and trenching; (5) interface bus bar, group disconnects, and fuses; and (6) fault detection shunts, signal wire, electronics, and alarm. It is concluded that high voltage low current circuits are not economical, at higher currents high and low voltage circuit costs approach each other, high voltage circuits are not likely to offer near term advantage, and development work/manufacturer stimulation is needed to develop low cost high voltage hardware.

  10. The Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, Carlos Garcia; Sassot, Rodolfo

    2003-10-01

    In this talk we present a collection of selected topics concerning the structure of the proton and the fundamental interactions as seen inside it. These topics have been thoroughly covered by high energy experiments with ever increasing precision in recent years and beautifully illustrate our present knowledge of the standard model.

  11. Proton Radiobiology

    PubMed Central

    Tommasino, Francesco; Durante, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak), the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation) are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE), protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed. PMID:25686476

  12. Changes in the Zero-Point Energy of the Protons as the Source of the Binding Energy of Water to A-Phase DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, G. F.; Senesi, R.; Mayers, J.

    2010-10-01

    The measured changes in the zero-point kinetic energy of the protons are entirely responsible for the binding energy of water molecules to A phase DNA at the concentration of 6 water molecules/base pair. The changes in kinetic energy can be expected to be a significant contribution to the energy balance in intracellular biological processes and the properties of nano-confined water. The shape of the momentum distribution in the dehydrated A phase is consistent with coherent delocalization of some of the protons in a double well potential, with a separation of the wells of 0.2 Angst .

  13. Very energetic protons in Saturn's radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, W.; Mcilwain, C.

    1980-01-01

    Very energetic protons are trapped in the inner Saturnian radiation belt. The University of California at San Diego instrument on Pioneer 11 has definitely identified protons of energy greater than 80 MeV on channel M3 and has tentatively detected protons of energy greater than 600 MeV on channel C3. The spatial distribution of the protons is distinct from that of the trapped electrons, the main difference being that the protons are strongly absorbed by the innermost moons and that the electrons are not. The source strength for injecting protons by the decay of cosmic ray albedo neutrons generated in the rings of Saturn has been estimated. The required proton lifetime is approximately 20 years.

  14. Determination of total proton release in purple membrane suspension by umbelliferone fluorescence quenching technique.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S; Singh, A K

    1992-06-01

    A technique for determining total proton release from purple membrane suspension under steady illumination has been described. Illuminated purple membrane is found to quench the fluorescence life-time of umbelliferone indicating the release of protons in the medium. Besides the "stoichiometric" release of protons from bacteriorhodopsin, there seems to be release of protons from sources other than protonated retinylidene Schiff base moiety also.

  15. Compact Proton Accelerator for Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Paul, A C

    2007-06-12

    An investigation is being made into the feasibility of making a compact proton dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator for medical radiation treatment based on the high gradient insulation (HGI) technology. A small plasma device is used for the proton source. Using only electric focusing fields for transporting and focusing the beam on the patient, the compact DWA proton accelerator m system can deliver wide and independent variable ranges of beam currents, energies and spot sizes.

  16. The Evolution of the Cryogenic System of the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, W.; Arnold, Ph; Fydrych, J.; Jurns, J.; Wang, X. L.; Weisend, J. G., II

    2015-12-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is an intergovernmental project building a multidisciplinary research laboratory based upon the world's most powerful neutron source to be built in Lund, Sweden. The ESS will use a superconducting linear accelerator which will deliver protons with 5 MW of power to the target at 2.0 GeV with a nominal current of 62.5 mA. A cryomodule test stand will be supplied with helium for the site acceptance tests. The target will have two moderators using supercritical hydrogen to cool down the neutrons. The neutron instruments and the experiments’ sample environment will use liquid helium and liquid nitrogen to cool detectors and samples. The ESS cryogenic system is designed to deliver cryogenic cooling capacity to all three client system. A first concept of the ESS cryogenic system was developed in 2010 and 2011 with a limited amount of input from the clients as well as from site infrastructure (i.e. buildings and utilities). The design had to be flexible enough to accommodate future changes in scope, schedule and available infrastructure. Over the following years the design has evolved together with these parameters to achieve a maturity today which allowed us to order the accelerator cryoplant and to start procurement of many of the other parts of the ESS cryogenic system. This paper presents the evolution of the design throughout the years and the factors influencing certain design choices.

  17. Holmium-161 produced using 11.6 MeV protons: A practical source of narrow-band X-rays.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Bryan J; Mendenhall, Marcus H

    2010-10-01

    We present a novel technique to produce narrow-band X-rays by preparing (161)Ho from the bombardment of dysprosium foil by 11.6 MeV protons. The activated foil produces predominantly 45-55 keV X-rays, which are suitable for activating iodinated radio-sensitizing agents (e.g. IUdR) for oncological therapy. We demonstrate that clinically useful quantities of the nuclide are easily produced with a medical cyclotron which is far from the current state of the art.

  18. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M.-J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images. This causes systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4%, but can become even 10% in bone regions [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. This may lead to no dose in parts of the tumor and too high dose in healthy tissues [1]. A direct measurement of proton stopping powers with high-energy protons will allow reducing these uncertainties and will improve the quality of the treatment. Several studies have shown that a sufficiently accurate radiograph can be obtained by tracking individual protons traversing a phantom (patient) [4,6,10]. Our studies benefit from the gas-filled time projection chambers based on GridPix technology [2], developed at Nikhef, capable of tracking a single proton. A BaF2 crystal measuring the residual energy of protons was used. Proton radiographs of phantom consisting of different tissue-like materials were measured with a 30×30 mm2 150 MeV proton beam. Measurements were simulated with the Geant4 toolkit.First experimental and simulated energy radiographs are in very good agreement [3]. In this paper we focus on simulation studies of the proton scattering angle as it affects the position resolution of the proton energy loss radiograph. By selecting protons with a small scattering angle, the image quality can be improved significantly.

  19. Acidic ionic liquid/water solution as both medium and proton source for electrocatalytic H2 evolution by [Ni(P2N2)2]2+ complexes

    PubMed Central

    Pool, Douglas H.; Stewart, Michael P.; O’Hagan, Molly; Shaw, Wendy J.; Roberts, John A. S.; Bullock, R. Morris; DuBois, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    The electrocatalytic reduction of protons to H2 by (where in the highly acidic ionic liquid dibutylformamidium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide shows a strong dependence on added water. A turnover frequency of 43,000–53,000 s-1 has been measured for hydrogen production at 25 °C when the mole fraction of water (χH2O) is 0.72. The same catalyst in acetonitrile with added dimethylformamidium trifluoromethanesulfonate and water has a turnover frequency of 720 s-1. Thus, the use of an ionic liquid/aqueous solution enhances the observed catalytic rate by more than a factor of 50, compared to a similar acid in a traditional organic solvent. Complexes (X = H, OMe,CH2P(O)(OEt)2, Br) are also catalysts in the ionic liquid/water mixture, and the observed catalytic rates correlate with the hydrophobicity of X. PMID:22685211

  20. Protons @ interfaces: implications for biological energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Mulkidjanian, Armen Y; Heberle, Joachim; Cherepanov, Dmitry A

    2006-08-01

    The review focuses on the anisotropy of proton transfer at the surface of biological membranes. We consider (i) the data from "pulsed" experiments, where light-triggered enzymes capture or eject protons at the membrane surface, (ii) the electrostatic properties of water at charged interfaces, and (iii) the specific structural attributes of proton-translocating enzymes. The pulsed experiments revealed that proton exchange between the membrane surface and the bulk aqueous phase takes as much as about 1 ms, but could be accelerated by added mobile pH-buffers. Since the accelerating capacity of the latter decreased with the increase in their electric charge, it was concluded that the membrane surface is separated from the bulk aqueous phase by a barrier of electrostatic nature. The barrier could arise owing to the water polarization at the negatively charged membrane surface. The barrier height depends linearly on the charge of penetrating ions; for protons, it has been estimated as about 0.12 eV. While the proton exchange between the surface and the bulk aqueous phase is retarded by the interfacial barrier, the proton diffusion along the membrane, between neighboring enzymes, takes only microseconds. The proton spreading over the membrane is facilitated by the hydrogen-bonded networks at the surface. The membrane-buried layers of these networks can eventually serve as a storage/buffer for protons (proton sponges). As the proton equilibration between the surface and the bulk aqueous phase is slower than the lateral proton diffusion between the "sources" and "sinks", the proton activity at the membrane surface, as sensed by the energy transducing enzymes at steady state, might deviate from that measured in the adjoining water phase. This trait should increase the driving force for ATP synthesis, especially in the case of alkaliphilic bacteria.

  1. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandale, Walter

    2015-02-01

    In the last five decades, proton-proton and proton-antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion-ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  2. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Niklas

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  3. A two-dimensional angular-resolved proton spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Su; Yuan, Xiaohui; Fang, Yuan; Ge, Xulei; Deng, Yanqing; Wei, Wenqing; Gao, Jian; Fu, Feichao; Jiang, Tao; Liao, Guoqian; Liu, Feng; Chen, Min; Li, Yutong; Zhao, Li; Ma, Yanyun; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    We present a novel design of two-dimensional (2D) angular-resolved spectrometer for full beam characterization of ultrashort intense laser driven proton sources. A rotated 2D pinhole array was employed, as selective entrance before a pair of parallel permanent magnets, to sample the full proton beam into discrete beamlets. The proton beamlets are subsequently dispersed without overlapping onto a planar detector. Representative experimental result of protons generated from femtosecond intense laser interaction with thin foil target is presented.

  4. Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2011-10-25

    In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue receives substantially less or, in some cases, no radiation. Since these times, particle accelerators have continuously been used in cancer therapy and today new facilities specifically designed for proton therapy are being built in many countries. Proton therapy has been hailed as a revolutionary cancer treatment, with higher cure rates and fewer side effects than traditional X-ray photon radiation therapy. Proton therapy is the modality of choice for treating certain small tumors of the eye, head or neck. Because it exposes less of the tissue surrounding a tumor to the dosage, proton therapy lowers the risk of secondary cancers later in life - especially important for young children. To date, over 80,000 patients worldwide have been treated with protons. Currently, there are nine proton radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States, one at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. An overview of the treatment technology and this new center will be presented.

  5. Computer-aided design of a proton pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    New, Michael H.; Pohorille, Andrew; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The use of transmembrane proton gradients in energy transduction is an almost universal feature of life on earth. These proton gradients are established and maintained by specialized assemblies of proteins which actively pump protons across membranes. One broad class of proton pumps uses captured light energy to drive the proton pumping. Our goal is to elucidate the minimum structural requirements of a light-driven proton-pump. There are two basic components to a simple light-driven proton pump: a source of photo-generated protons and a "gate-keeper" which prevents these protons from reattaching themselves to their source. A wide variety of molecules in the membrane, even as simple as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, are capable of releasing protons when illuminated. Our work is therefore focused on the design of the "gate-keeper." Our initial model involves a pair of proton acceptors, coupled to each other by a transient water bridge, and supported in the membrane by a small bundle of peptide helices. Upon illumination, the proton source transfers its proton to the:- first acceptor of the gate-keeper. While the reverse reaction is highly probable, all that is needed to ensure irreversibility is a nonvanishing probability that the proton will be transferred to the second acceptor across a transient water bridge. Back transfer of the proton to the first acceptor, and thence to the proton source, is impeded by the free energy required to move the proton uphill towards the. proton source and by the disruption of the transient water bridge. As a prototypical water-bridged proton transfer system, we are studying the transfer of a proton across a water bridge from a formic acid to a formate anion. With a pK(sub alpha), of 3.7. formic acid is a good model for the acidic amino acids glutamate and aspartate which are good candidates for gate-keeper proton acceptors. Simulations of proton transfer reactions in a membrane are complicated by the quantum mechanical nature of

  6. Polarized proton beams in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski, A.

    2010-10-04

    The polarized beam for RHIC is produced in the optically-pumped polarized H{sup -} ion source and then accelerated in Linac to 200 MeV for strip-injection to Booster and further accelerated 24.3 GeV in AGS for injection in RHIC. In 2009 Run polarized protons was successfully accelerated to 250 GeV beam energy. The beam polarization of about 60% at 100 GeV beam energy and 36-42% at 250 GeV beam energy was measured with the H-jet and p-Carbon CNI polarimeters. The gluon contribution to the proton spin was studied in collisions of longitudinally polarized proton beams at 100 x 100 GeV. At 250 x 250 GeV an intermediate boson W production with the longitudinally polarized beams was studied for the first time.

  7. EXCESS RF POWER REQUIRED FOR RF CONTROL OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) LINAC, A PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY SUPERCONDUCTING PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    M. LYNCH; S. KWON; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    A high-intensity proton linac, such as that being planned for the SNS, requires accurate RF control of cavity fields for the entire pulse in order to avoid beam spill. The current design requirement for the SNS is RF field stability within {+-}0.5% and {+-}0.5{sup o} [1]. This RF control capability is achieved by the control electronics using the excess RF power to correct disturbances. To minimize the initial capital costs, the RF system is designed with 'just enough' RF power. All the usual disturbances exist, such as beam noise, klystron/HVPS noise, coupler imperfections, transport losses, turn-on and turn-off transients, etc. As a superconducting linac, there are added disturbances of large magnitude, including Lorentz detuning and microphonics. The effects of these disturbances and the power required to correct them are estimated, and the result shows that the highest power systems in the SNS have just enough margin, with little or no excess margin.

  8. COMPACT PROTON INJECTOR AND FIRST ACCELERATOR SYSTEM TEST FOR COMPACT PROTON DIELECTRIC WALL CANCER THERAPY ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Guethlein, G; Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Watson, J; Weir, J; Pearson, D

    2009-04-23

    A compact proton accelerator for cancer treatment is being developed by using the high-gradient dielectric insulator wall (DWA) technology [1-4]. We are testing all the essential DWA components, including a compact proton source, on the First Article System Test (FAST). The configuration and progress on the injector and FAST will be presented.

  9. System Modeling and Validation of a Thermoelectric Fluidic Power Source: Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell and Thermoelectric Generator (PEMFC-TEG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Condra, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    To facilitate the co-design and co-optimization of fluid or combustion systems and thermoelectric devices, a three-dimensional (3D) thermoelectric generator (TEG) model has been proposed and implemented in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation environment. The model includes all temperature-dependent characteristics of the materials and nonlinear fluid-thermal- electric multiphysics coupled effects. In this paper, the device-level model is first extended to the module level by taking a general geometry, identifying regions such as positive and negative thermoelements, and assigning properties to them. The system-level model is then demonstrated by coupling the module-level model with a fluidic-thermal system model in a single CFD simulator to predict the generation performance based on the thermal equilibrium that is achieved. The linked models are validated experimentally at the system level using data from three real thermoelectric modules installed on the surface of an exhaust pipe-like rig, where the temperature profile as well as the electricity generated can be measured and compared with the simulation results. The rig is intended not only to verify the proposed system model but also to mimic a practical exhaust recovery apparatus for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Based on the data obtained from the system-level test rig, a novel low-temperature low-cost application for auxiliary electric power appliances based on the waste heat of the PEMFC can be envisaged. Within the common simulator, it is shown that the thermoelectric model can be connected to various continuum-domain CFD models of the fuel cell itself, thus enabling further possibilities to optimize system efficiency and performance.

  10. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  11. Ion-proton pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  12. What's In a Proton?

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2016-07-12

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  13. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  14. What's In a Proton?

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-07-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  15. Proton: The Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  16. Proton: the particle.

    PubMed

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  17. Proton: the particle.

    PubMed

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. PMID:24074929

  18. Ring current proton decay by charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Fritz, T.

    1975-01-01

    Explorer 45 measurements during the recovery phase of a moderate magnetic storm have confirmed that the charge exchange decay mechanism can account for the decay of the storm-time proton ring current. Data from the moderate magnetic storm of 24 February 1972 was selected for study since a symmetrical ring current had developed and effects due to asymmetric ring current losses could be eliminated. It was found that after the initial rapid decay of the proton flux, the equatorially mirroring protons in the energy range 5 to 30 keV decayed throughout the L-value range of 3.5 to 5.0 at the charge exchange decay rate calculated by Liemohn. After several days of decay, the proton fluxes reached a lower limit where an apparent equilibrium was maintained, between weak particle source mechanisms and the loss mechanisms, until fresh protons were injected into the ring current region during substorms. While other proton loss mechanisms may also be operating, the results indicate that charge exchange can entirely account for the storm-time proton ring current decay, and that this mechanism must be considered in all studies involving the loss of proton ring current particles.

  19. Proton stopping power measurements using high intensity short pulse lasers produced proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. N.; Atzeni, S.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Mangia, F.; Marques, J.-R.; Riquier, R.; Fuchs, J.

    2014-03-01

    Proton stopping power measurements in solids and gases, typically made using proton accelerators, Van de Graf machines, etc., have existed now for many decades for many elements and compounds. We propose a new method of making this type of measurement using a different source, namely proton beams created by high intensity short pulse lasers. The advantage of this type of source is that there is the high number of particles and short bunch lengths, which is ideal for measurements of evolving mediums such as hot dense plasmas. Our measurements are consistent with exiting data and theory which validates this method.

  20. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  1. Gelation mechanism of tetra-armed poly(ethylene glycol) in aprotic ionic liquid containing nonvolatile proton source, protic ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kei; Fujii, Kenta; Nishi, Kengo; Sakai, Takamasa; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Morita, Masayuki; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2015-04-01

    We report the gelation mechanism of tetra-armed prepolymer chains in typical aprotic ionic liquid (aIL), i.e., A-B type cross-end coupling reaction of tetra-armed poly(ethylene glycol)s with amine and activated ester terminals (TetraPEG-NH2 and TetraPEG-NHS, respectively) in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([C2mIm][TFSA]). In the ion gel system, we focused on the pH (or H(+) concentration) dependence of the gelation reaction. We thus applied the protic ionic liquid (pIL), 1-ethylimidazolium TFSA ([C2ImH][TFSA]), as a nonvolatile H(+) source, and added it into the solvent aIL. It was found that the gelation time of TetraPEG ion gel can be successfully controlled from 1 min to 3 h depending on the concentration of pIL (cpIL = 0-3 mM). This suggests that the acid-base properties of TetraPEG-NH2 showing acid-base equilibrium (-NH2 + H(+) ⇆ -NH3(+)) in the solutions play a key role in the gelation process. The acid dissociation constants, pKa's of TetraPEG-NH3(+) and C2ImH(+) (cation of pIL) in aIL were directly determined by potentiometric titration to be 16.4 and 13.7, respectively. This indicates that most of the H(+) ions bind to TetraPEG-NH2 and then C2ImH(+) exists as neutral C2Im. The reaction efficiency of amide bond (cross-linked point) systematically decreased with increasing cpIL, which was reflected to the mechanical strength of the ion gels. From these results, we discuss the gelation mechanism of TetraPEG in aIL to point out the relationship between polymer network structure and [H(+)] in the solutions. PMID:25768427

  2. Noncoplanarity effects in proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Liou, M.K.; Timmermans, R.; Gibson, B.F.

    1998-10-01

    Noncoplanarity in proton-proton bremsstrahlung is investigated. Significant effects are observed for certain photon polar angles, {psi}{sub {gamma}}. Such noncoplanarity effects, not of dynamical origin, are possibly responsible for past disagreements between theory and experiment. The Harvard noncoplanar coordinate system, which avoids kinematic singularities in the cross section, is used in our calculations and is recommended for use in the analysis of experimental data. Alternative methods of presenting cross sections are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Proceedings of the workshop on ion source issues relevant to a pulsed spallation neutron source: Part 2 workshop presentations

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, L.; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Alonso, J.

    1994-10-01

    As part of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Pulsed Spallation Source study, this Workshop was convened to address ion-source technology`s present status with respect to the next-generation Pulsed Spallation Source in the 1-5 MW range for the neutron scattering community. Considerations of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) parameters and designs were included in the discussions throughout the Workshop. Ion-source requirements and actually-achieved performances were assessed, resulting in a determination of research and development requirements to bridge the gap. Part 1 of these Proceedings summarizes the Workshop; Part 2 contains viewgraphs of Workshop presentations.

  4. Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of protonated neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, N. A.; Simons, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Protonated neurotransmitters have been produced in the gas phase via a novel photochemical scheme: complexes of the species of interest, 1-phenylethylamine, 2-amino-1-phenylethanol and the diastereo-isomers, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, with a suitable proton donor, phenol (or indole), are produced in a supersonic expansion and ionized by resonant two photon ionization of the donor. Efficient proton transfer generates the protonated neurotransmitters, complexed to a phenoxy radical. Absorption of infrared radiation, and subsequent evaporation of the phenoxy tag, coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry, provides vibrational spectra of the protonated (and also hydrated) complexes for comparison with the results of quantum chemical computation. Comparison with the conformational structures of the neutral neurotransmitters (established previously) reveals the effect of protonation on their structure. The photochemical proton transfer strategy allows spectra to be recorded from individual laser shots and their quality compares favourably with that obtained using electro-spray or matrix assisted laser desorption ion sources.

  5. Proton acceleration in neutron star magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, I. A.; Katz, J. I.; Diamond, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    To explain the emission of TeV and PeV gamma rays from accreting X-ray binary sources, protons must be accelerated to several times the gamma-ray energy. It is shown here that at certain times, the plasma in the accretion column of the neutron star may form a deep enough pool that the top portion becomes unstable to convective motions in spite of the strong magnetic field. The resulting turbulence produces fluctuations in the strength of the magnetic field that travel up the accretion column, taking energy out to the region of the energetic protons. The protons resonantly absorb this energy and are accelerated to high energies. Including the synchrotron radiation losses of the protons, it is shown that they can be accelerated to energies that are high enough to explain the gamma-ray observations.

  6. Treatment planning optimisation in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    McGowan, S E; Burnet, N G; Lomax, A J

    2013-01-01

    The goal of radiotherapy is to achieve uniform target coverage while sparing normal tissue. In proton therapy, the same sources of geometric uncertainty are present as in conventional radiotherapy. However, an important and fundamental difference in proton therapy is that protons have a finite range, highly dependent on the electron density of the material they are traversing, resulting in a steep dose gradient at the distal edge of the Bragg peak. Therefore, an accurate knowledge of the sources and magnitudes of the uncertainties affecting the proton range is essential for producing plans which are robust to these uncertainties. This review describes the current knowledge of the geometric uncertainties and discusses their impact on proton dose plans. The need for patient-specific validation is essential and in cases of complex intensity-modulated proton therapy plans the use of a planning target volume (PTV) may fail to ensure coverage of the target. In cases where a PTV cannot be used, other methods of quantifying plan quality have been investigated. A promising option is to incorporate uncertainties directly into the optimisation algorithm. A further development is the inclusion of robustness into a multicriteria optimisation framework, allowing a multi-objective Pareto optimisation function to balance robustness and conformity. The question remains as to whether adaptive therapy can become an integral part of a proton therapy, to allow re-optimisation during the course of a patient's treatment. The challenge of ensuring that plans are robust to range uncertainties in proton therapy remains, although these methods can provide practical solutions.

  7. Treatment planning optimisation in proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, S E; Burnet, N G; Lomax, A J

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT. The goal of radiotherapy is to achieve uniform target coverage while sparing normal tissue. In proton therapy, the same sources of geometric uncertainty are present as in conventional radiotherapy. However, an important and fundamental difference in proton therapy is that protons have a finite range, highly dependent on the electron density of the material they are traversing, resulting in a steep dose gradient at the distal edge of the Bragg peak. Therefore, an accurate knowledge of the sources and magnitudes of the uncertainties affecting the proton range is essential for producing plans which are robust to these uncertainties. This review describes the current knowledge of the geometric uncertainties and discusses their impact on proton dose plans. The need for patient-specific validation is essential and in cases of complex intensity-modulated proton therapy plans the use of a planning target volume (PTV) may fail to ensure coverage of the target. In cases where a PTV cannot be used, other methods of quantifying plan quality have been investigated. A promising option is to incorporate uncertainties directly into the optimisation algorithm. A further development is the inclusion of robustness into a multicriteria optimisation framework, allowing a multi-objective Pareto optimisation function to balance robustness and conformity. The question remains as to whether adaptive therapy can become an integral part of a proton therapy, to allow re-optimisation during the course of a patient's treatment. The challenge of ensuring that plans are robust to range uncertainties in proton therapy remains, although these methods can provide practical solutions. PMID:23255545

  8. How proton pulse characteristics influence protoacoustic determination of proton-beam range: simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kevin C; Seghal, Chandra M; Avery, Stephen

    2016-03-21

    The unique dose deposition of proton beams generates a distinctive thermoacoustic (protoacoustic) signal, which can be used to calculate the proton range. To identify the expected protoacoustic amplitude, frequency, and arrival time for different proton pulse characteristics encountered at hospital-based proton sources, the protoacoustic pressure emissions generated by 150 MeV, pencil-beam proton pulses were simulated in a homogeneous water medium. Proton pulses with Gaussian widths ranging up to 200 μs were considered. The protoacoustic amplitude, frequency, and time-of-flight (TOF) range accuracy were assessed. For TOF calculations, the acoustic pulse arrival time was determined based on multiple features of the wave. Based on the simulations, Gaussian proton pulses can be categorized as Dirac-delta-function-like (FWHM < 4 μs) and longer. For the δ-function-like irradiation, the protoacoustic spectrum peaks at 44.5 kHz and the systematic error in determining the Bragg peak range is <2.6 mm. For longer proton pulses, the spectrum shifts to lower frequencies, and the range calculation systematic error increases (⩽ 23 mm for FWHM of 56 μs). By mapping the protoacoustic peak arrival time to range with simulations, the residual error can be reduced. Using a proton pulse with FWHM = 2 μs results in a maximum signal-to-noise ratio per total dose. Simulations predict that a 300 nA, 150 MeV, FWHM = 4 μs Gaussian proton pulse (8.0 × 10(6) protons, 3.1 cGy dose at the Bragg peak) will generate a 146 mPa pressure wave at 5 cm beyond the Bragg peak. There is an angle dependent systematic error in the protoacoustic TOF range calculations. Placing detectors along the proton beam axis and beyond the Bragg peak minimizes this error. For clinical proton beams, protoacoustic detectors should be sensitive to <400 kHz (for -20 dB). Hospital-based synchrocyclotrons and cyclotrons are promising sources of proton pulses for generating clinically measurable protoacoustic

  9. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  10. A New High-Current Proton Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, M. R.; Galloway, R. A.; DeSanto, L.; Jongen, Y.

    2009-03-01

    A high-current (>20 mA) dc proton accelerator is being developed for applications such as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the detection of explosive materials by nuclear resonance absorption (NRA) of gamma radiation. The high-voltage dc accelerator (adjustable between 1.4 and 2.8 MeV) will be a single-ended industrial Dynamitron® system equipped with a compact high-current, microwave-driven proton source. A magnetic mass analyzer inserted between the ion source and the acceleration tube will select the protons and reject heavier ions. A sorption pump near the ion source will minimize the flow of neutral hydrogen gas into the acceleration tube. For BNCT, a lithium target for generating epithermal neutrons is being developed that will be capable of dissipating the high power (>40 kW) of the proton beam. For NRA, special targets will be used to generate gamma rays with suitable energies for exciting nuclides typically present in explosive materials. Proton accelerators with such high-current and high-power capabilities in this energy range have not been developed previously.

  11. Protonation of caffeine: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, Hamed; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2013-03-01

    Protonation of caffeine was examined by ion mobility spectrometry equipped with two ionization sources, corona discharge (CD) and UV photoionization. Three peaks were observed in ion mobility spectrum by simultaneously running the two ionization sources. Experimental and theoretical evidence was collected to link the observed peaks to caffeine related ionic species. One peak was attributed to the M+ ion while the other two were assigned to different protonated isomers of caffeine. In the case of CD ionization source, it was observed that different sites of caffeine compete for protonation and their relative intensities, depends on the sample concentration as well as the nature of the reactant ions. The new concept of "internal proton affinity" (IPA) was defined to express the tendency of holding the added proton for each atom in a molecule.

  12. A new group of eubacterial light-driven retinal-binding proton pumps with an unusual cytoplasmic proton donor.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andrew; Ljumovic, Milena; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Shibata, Yohei; Ito, Shota; Inoue, Keiichi; Kandori, Hideki; Brown, Leonid S

    2015-12-01

    One of the main functions of microbial rhodopsins is outward-directed light-driven proton transport across the plasma membrane, which can provide sources of energy alternative to respiration and chlorophyll photosynthesis. Proton-pumping rhodopsins are found in Archaea (Halobacteria), multiple groups of Bacteria, numerous fungi, and some microscopic algae. An overwhelming majority of these proton pumps share the common transport mechanism, in which a proton from the retinal Schiff base is first transferred to the primary proton acceptor (normally an Asp) on the extracellular side of retinal. Next, reprotonation of the Schiff base from the cytoplasmic side is mediated by a carboxylic proton donor (Asp or Glu), which is located on helix C and is usually hydrogen-bonded to Thr or Ser on helix B. The only notable exception from this trend was recently found in Exiguobacterium, where the carboxylic proton donor is replaced by Lys. Here we describe a new group of efficient proteobacterial retinal-binding light-driven proton pumps which lack the carboxylic proton donor on helix C (most often replaced by Gly) but possess a unique His residue on helix B. We characterize the group spectroscopically and propose that this histidine forms a proton-donating complex compensating for the loss of the carboxylic proton donor.

  13. A new group of eubacterial light-driven retinal-binding proton pumps with an unusual cytoplasmic proton donor.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andrew; Ljumovic, Milena; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Shibata, Yohei; Ito, Shota; Inoue, Keiichi; Kandori, Hideki; Brown, Leonid S

    2015-12-01

    One of the main functions of microbial rhodopsins is outward-directed light-driven proton transport across the plasma membrane, which can provide sources of energy alternative to respiration and chlorophyll photosynthesis. Proton-pumping rhodopsins are found in Archaea (Halobacteria), multiple groups of Bacteria, numerous fungi, and some microscopic algae. An overwhelming majority of these proton pumps share the common transport mechanism, in which a proton from the retinal Schiff base is first transferred to the primary proton acceptor (normally an Asp) on the extracellular side of retinal. Next, reprotonation of the Schiff base from the cytoplasmic side is mediated by a carboxylic proton donor (Asp or Glu), which is located on helix C and is usually hydrogen-bonded to Thr or Ser on helix B. The only notable exception from this trend was recently found in Exiguobacterium, where the carboxylic proton donor is replaced by Lys. Here we describe a new group of efficient proteobacterial retinal-binding light-driven proton pumps which lack the carboxylic proton donor on helix C (most often replaced by Gly) but possess a unique His residue on helix B. We characterize the group spectroscopically and propose that this histidine forms a proton-donating complex compensating for the loss of the carboxylic proton donor. PMID:26260121

  14. The Schwarzschild Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Haramein, Nassim

    2010-11-24

    We review our model of a proton that obeys the Schwarzschild condition. We find that only a very small percentage ({approx}10{sup -39}%) of the vacuum fluctuations available within a proton volume need be cohered and converted to mass-energy in order for the proton to meet the Schwarzschild condition. This proportion is equivalent to that between gravitation and the strong force where gravitation is thought to be {approx}10{sup -38} to 10{sup -40} weaker than the strong force. Gravitational attraction between two contiguous Schwarzschild protons can accommodate both nucleon and quark confinement. We calculate that two contiguous Schwarzschild protons would rotate at c and have a period of 10{sup -23} s and a frequency of 10{sup 22} Hz which is characteristic of the strong force interaction time and a close approximation of the gamma emission typically associated with nuclear decay. We include a scaling law and find that the Schwarzschild proton data point lies near the least squares trend line for organized matter. Using a semi-classical model, we find that a proton charge orbiting at a proton radius at c generates a good approximation to the measured anomalous magnetic moment.

  15. Electron-proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An electron-proton spectrometer was designed to measure the geomagnetically trapped radiation in a geostationary orbit at 6.6 earth radii in the outer radiation belt. This instrument is to be flown on the Applications Technology Satellite-F (ATS-F). The electron-proton spectrometer consists of two permanent magnet surface barrier detector arrays and associated electronics capable of selecting and detecting electrons in three energy ranges: (1) 30-50 keV, (2) 150-200 keV, and (3) 500 keV and protons in three energy ranges. The electron-proton spectrometer has the capability of measuring the fluxes of electrons and protons in various directions with respect to the magnetic field lines running through the satellite. One magnet detector array system is implemented to scan between EME north and south through west, sampling the directional flux in 15 steps. The other magnet-detector array system is fixed looking toward EME east.

  16. Medical Applications: Proton Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2009-05-01

    Proton therapy is a highly advanced and precise form of radiation treatment for cancer. Due to the characteristic Bragg peak associated with ion energy deposition, proton therapy provides the radiation oncologist with an improved method of treatment localization within a patient, as compared with conventional radiation therapy using X-rays or electrons. Controlling disease and minimizing side effects are the twin aims of radiation treatment. Proton beams enhance the opportunity for both by facilitating maximal dose to tumor and minimal dose to surrounding tissue. In the United States, five proton radiotherapy centers currently treat cancer patients, with more in the construction phase. New facilities and enabling technologies abound. An overview of the treatment modality generally, as well as of the capabilities and research planned for the field and for the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute in particular, will be presented.

  17. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The MEIC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low-energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  18. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  19. A Superconducting Linac Proton Driver at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, G. William

    2004-05-01

    A proton driver has emerged as the leading candidate for Fermilab's next near-term accelerator project. The preferred technical solution is an 8 GeV superconducting linac based on technology developed for TESLA and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Its primary mission is to serve as a single-stage H- injector to prepare 2 MW "Super-Beams" for Neutrino experiments using the Fermilab Main Injector. The linac can also accelerate electrons, protons, and relativistic muons, permitting future applications such as a driver for an FEL, a long-pulse spallation source, the driver for an intense 8 GeV neutrino or kaon program, and potential applications to a neutrino factory or muon collider. The technical design of the 8 GeV linac, as well as the design of an alternative synchrotron based proton driver, will be described along with plans for project proposal and construction.

  20. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed.

  1. Proton microscopy at GSI and FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, Frank E; Mariam, Fesseha G; Golubev, A A; Turtikov, V I; Varentsov, D

    2009-01-01

    Proton radiography was invented in the 1990's at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as a diagnostic to study dynamic material properties under extreme pressures, strain and strain rate. Since this time hundreds of dynamic proton radiography experiments have been performed at LANL and facilities have been commissioned at the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) in Russia for similar applications in dynamic material studies. Recently an international collaboration was formed to develop a new proton radiography capability for the study of dynamic material properties at the Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) located at Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany. This new Proton microscope for FAIR (PRIOR) will provide radiographic imaging of dynamic systems with unprecedented spatial, temporal and density resolution, resulting in a window for understanding dynamic material properties at new length scales. These dynamic experiments will be driven with many energy sources including heavy ions, high explosives and lasers. The design of the proton microscope and expected radiographic performance is presented.

  2. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Rygg, J R; Zylstra, A B; Séguin, F H; LePape, S; Bachmann, B; Craxton, R S; Garcia, E M; Kong, Y Z; Gatu-Johnson, M; Khan, S F; Lahmann, B J; McKenty, P W; Petrasso, R D; Rinderknecht, H G; Rosenberg, M J; Sayre, D B; Sio, H W

    2015-11-01

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF's 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the (3)He(d,p)(4)He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (10(10) protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (∼13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n)(3)He reactions also show 2 × 10(10) isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons. PMID:26628185

  3. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rygg, J. R.; LePape, S.; Bachmann, B.; Khan, S. F.; Sayre, D. B.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Lahmann, B. J.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sio, H. W.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Kong, Y. Z.; McKenty, P. W.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.

    2015-11-15

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF’s 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (10{sup 10} protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (∼13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n){sup 3}He reactions also show 2 × 10{sup 10} isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons.

  4. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygg, J. R.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; LePape, S.; Bachmann, B.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Kong, Y. Z.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Khan, S. F.; Lahmann, B. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Sio, H. W.

    2015-11-01

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF's 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the 3He(d,p)4He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (1010 protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (˜13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n)3He reactions also show 2 × 1010 isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons.

  5. Strangeness in the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberg, Mary

    2014-03-01

    Both perturbative and non-perturbative mechanisms contribute to strangeness in the proton sea. We have developed a hybrid model in which non-perturbative contributions are calculated in a meson cloud model which expands the proton in terms of meson-baryon states, and perturbative contributions are calculated in a statistical model which expands the proton in terms of quark-gluon states. The perturbative contributions are represented in the parton distributions of the ``bare'' hadrons in the meson cloud. We compare our results to the recent experimental data of ATLAS and HERMES. This research has been supported in part by NSF Award 1205686.

  6. Are protons nonidentical fermions?

    SciTech Connect

    Mart, T.

    2014-09-25

    We briefly review the progress of our investigation on the electric (charge) radius of the proton. In order to explain the recently measured proton radius, which is significantly smaller than the standard CODATA value, we assume that the real protons radii are not identical, they are randomly distributed in a certain range. To obtain the measured radius we average the radii and fit both the mean radius and the range. By using an averaged dipole form factor we obtain the charge radius r{sub E} = 0.8333 fm, in accordance with the recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen.

  7. Proton beam characterization by proton-induced acoustic emission: simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Jones, K C; Witztum, A; Sehgal, C M; Avery, S

    2014-11-01

    Due to their Bragg peak, proton beams are capable of delivering a targeted dose of radiation to a narrow volume, but range uncertainties currently limit their accuracy. One promising beam characterization technique, protoacoustic range verification, measures the acoustic emission generated by the proton beam. We simulated the pressure waves generated by proton radiation passing through water. We observed that the proton-induced acoustic signal consists of two peaks, labeled α and γ, with two originating sources. The α acoustic peak is generated by the pre-Bragg peak heated region whereas the source of the γ acoustic peak is the proton Bragg peak. The arrival time of the α and γ peaks at a transducer reveals the distance from the beam propagation axis and Bragg peak center, respectively. The maximum pressure is not observed directly above the Bragg peak due to interference of the acoustic signals. Range verification based on the arrival times is shown to be more effective than determining the Bragg peak position based on pressure amplitudes. The temporal width of the α and γ peaks are linearly proportional to the beam diameter and Bragg peak width, respectively. The temporal separation between compression and rarefaction peaks is proportional to the spill time width. The pressure wave expected from a spread out Bragg peak dose is characterized. The simulations also show that acoustic monitoring can verify the proton beam dose distribution and range by characterizing the Bragg peak position to within ~1 mm.

  8. Proton channel models

    PubMed Central

    Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Martínez, Agustín; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are integral membrane proteins with the capacity to permeate elementary particles in a voltage and pH dependent manner. These proteins have been found in several species and are involved in various physiological processes. Although their primary topology is known, lack of details regarding their structures in the open conformation has limited analyses toward a deeper understanding of the molecular determinants of their function and regulation. Consequently, the function-structure relationships have been inferred based on homology models. In the present work, we review the existing proton channel models, their assumptions, predictions and the experimental facts that support them. Modeling proton channels is not a trivial task due to the lack of a close homolog template. Hence, there are important differences between published models. This work attempts to critically review existing proton channel models toward the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the structural features of these proteins. PMID:24755912

  9. Limits of proton conductivity.

    PubMed

    Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter; Wohlfarth, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    Parasitic current seems to be the cause for the "highest proton conductivity" of a material reported to date. Kreuer and Wohlfarth verify this hypothesis by measuring the conductivity of the same materials after preparing them in a different way. They further explain the limits of proton conductivity and comment on the problems of determining the conductivity of small objects (e.g., whiskers, see picture).

  10. Proton beam therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  11. Proton transport by halorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Varo, G.; Brown, L.S.; Needleman, R.

    1996-05-28

    In halorhodopsin from Natronobacterium pharaonis, a light-driven chloride pump, the chloride binding site also binds azide. When azide is bound at this location the retinal Schiff base transiently deprotonates after photoexcitation with light >530 nm, like in the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. As in the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin, pyranine detects the release of protons to the bulk. The subsequent reprotonation of the Schiff base is also dependent on azide, but with different kinetics that suggest a shuttling of protons from the surface as described earlier for halorhodopsin from Halobacterium salinarium. The azide-dependent, bacteriorhodopsin-like photocycle results in active electrogenic proton transport in the cytoplasmic to extracellular direction, detected in cell envelope vesicle suspensions both with a potential-sensitive electrode and by measuring light-dependent pH change. We conclude that in halorhodopsin an azide bound to the extracellular side of the Schiff base, and another azide shuttling between the Schiff base and the cytoplasmic surface, fulfill the functions of Asp-85 and Asp-96, respectively, in bacteriorhodopsin. Thus, although halorhodopsin is normally a chloride ion pump, it evidently contains all structural requirements, except an internal proton acceptor and a donor, of a proton pump. This observation complements our earlier finding that when a chloride binding site was created in bacteriorhodopsin through replacement of Asp-85 with a threonine, that protein became a chloride ion pump. 52 refs., 9 figs.

  12. [Proton generator of superhigh frequency].

    PubMed

    Liberman, E A; Eĭdus, V L

    1981-01-01

    Possible mechanism of superhigh frequency (10(10)-10(12) Hz) electromagnetic oscillation generation by an external proton in a system of hydrogen bonds of biomacromolecules is briefly discussed. The external proton in a proton channel deforms the potential profile of the proton of hydrogen bond in such a way, that there appears a possibility of the low frequency proton tunneling along the hydrogen bond. The interaction with the neighbouring bonds leads to further lowering of the generated frequency.

  13. Parametrized energy spectrum of cosmic-ray protons with kinetic energies down to 1 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    A new estimation of the interstellar proton spectrum is made in which the source term of primary protons is taken from shock acceleration theory and the cosmic ray propagation calculation is based on a proposed nonuniform galactic disk model.

  14. Polarization measurement of laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, Natascha; Engels, Ralf; Engin, Ilhan; Greven, Patrick; Holler, Astrid; Lehrach, Andreas; Maier, Rudolf; Büscher, Markus; Cerchez, Mirela; Swantusch, Marco; Toncian, Monika; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald; Gibbon, Paul; Karmakar, Anupam

    2014-02-15

    We report on the successful use of a laser-driven few-MeV proton source to measure the differential cross section of a hadronic scattering reaction as well as on the measurement and simulation study of polarization observables of the laser-accelerated charged particle beams. These investigations were carried out with thin foil targets, illuminated by 100 TW laser pulses at the Arcturus laser facility; the polarization measurement is based on the spin dependence of hadronic proton scattering off nuclei in a Silicon target. We find proton beam polarizations consistent with zero magnitude which indicates that for these particular laser-target parameters the particle spins are not aligned by the strong magnetic fields inside the laser-generated plasmas.

  15. PREFACE: Transport phenomena in proton conducting media Transport phenomena in proton conducting media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikerling, Michael

    2011-06-01

    , charge-bearing species at interfaces and porous host materials on proton transport properties. As a common thread, articles in this special issue contribute to understanding the functionality provided by complex materials, beyond hydrogen bond fluctuations in water. The first group of articles (Smirnov et al, Henry et al, Medvedev and Stuchebrukhov) elucidates various aspects of the impact of local structural fluctuations, hydrogen bonding and long-range electrostatic forces on proton transfer across and at the surface of mitochondrial membranes. The second group of articles (Ilhan and Spohr, Allahyarov et al and Idupulapati et al) employ molecular dynamics simulations to rationalize vital dependencies of proton transport mechanisms in aqueous-based polymer electrolyte membranes on the nanoporous, phase-separated ionomer morphology, and on the level of hydration. The articles by Gebel et al, Boillat et al, and Aleksandrova et al employ small angle neutron scattering, neutron radiography, and electrochemical atomic force microscopy, respectively, to obtain detailed insights into the kinetics of water sorption, water distribution, water transport properties, as well as spatial maps of proton conductivity in fuel cell membranes. The contribution of Paschos et al provides a comprehensive review of phosphate-based solid state protonic conductors for intermediate temperature fuel cells. The topic of proton conductive materials for high-temperature, water-free operation of fuel cells is continued in the article of Verbraeken et al which addresses synthesis and characterization of a proton conducting perovskite. The guest editor wishes to acknowledge and thank all contributing authors for their commitment to this special issue. Moreover, I would like to thank the staff at IOP Publishing for coordinating submission and refereeing processes. Finally, for the readers, I hope that this special issue will be a valuable and stimulating source of insights into the versatile and

  16. High-Power Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.

    2002-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be the world’s most intense source of neutrons for fundamental science and industrial applications. Design and construction of this facility, located at Oak Ridge, is a joint venture between six DOE laboratories. Construction began in 1999 and is currently ahead of the scheduled 2006 completion date. Injecting a high-power, pulsed proton beam into a mercury target produces neutrons. In this talk, we review the physics requirements, design, and status of the construction of the 1-GeV, 1.4-MW average power RF linac for SNS. The accelerator consists of a drift tube linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and a superconducting rf (SRF) linac. The phase and quadrupole settings are set to avoid structure and parametric resonances, with coherent resonances posing minimal risk for emittance growth. The DTL is 37 m long and accelerates the ions to 87 MeV. The CCL is 55 m long and accelerates the ions to 186 MeV. The rf structure design and stability for both the DTL and CCL have been validated with scale models. The SRF linac has a modular design to accelerate ions to 1000 MeV, with a straightforward upgrade to 1.3 GeV at a later date. 3D particle-in-cell simulations of beam dynamics are performed to validate performance. The accelerator utilizes 93 MW of pulsed power operating continuously at 60-Hz with an 8factor. Approximately one hundred 402.5 or 805-MHz klystrons, with outputs between 0.55 and 5 MW, are used. The klystrons are powered by a novel converter-modulator that takes advantage of recent advances in IGBT switch plate assemblies and low-loss material cores for boost transformer. Beam diagnostics include position, phase, profile, and current monitors. They are designed to enable accurate beam steering and matching, and to minimize beam loss that would lead to activation and prevent hands-on maintenance.

  17. Studying Proton-Proton Collisions Using Pythia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Adi

    2004-10-01

    At Brookhaven National Lab, the RHIC experiments are currently investigating, on a subatomic level, what happens when heavy ions collide at high speeds. This is done in order to create such high temperatures and densities that quarks are no longer bound to one another. This state of matter is called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Evidence for the existence of the QGP may be the quenching of hadron jets, which occurs when the fast quarks or gluons lose so much energy in the hot, dense medium that they cannot survive. Then the jets of particles that these particles usually result in cannot be made. By studying the particle yield at high transverse momentum (Pt), one can probe what is happening to the jets created during collisions. Using Pythia, a standard model event generator based on the Lund String Model, we study jets of particles created when elementary protons collide. Then we know what should happen to jets at high transverse momentum transfer, when no QGP is present. Comparing the pt spectrum of jet partners generated by Pythia to RHIC results for proton-proton collisions shows that the two do in fact agree. This not only insures that the analysis of RHIC data is correct, but it also establishes a basis for comparison for Au-Au collisions. Comparing d+Au collision data to the Pythia Pt spectrum of jets with leading baryon and meson triggers, we found good agreement. Thus the jet production does not change drastically in nature in the presence of a cold nuclear medium.

  18. High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred; Berger, Marie-Helen; Sayir, Ali

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Protonic Conductors (HTPC) with the perovskite structure are envisioned for electrochemical membrane applications such as H2 separation, H2 sensors and fuel cells. Successive membrane commercialization is dependent upon addressing issues with H2 permeation rate and environmental stability with CO2 and H2O. HTPC membranes are conventionally fabricated by solid-state sintering. Grain boundaries and the presence of intergranular second phases reduce the proton mobility by orders of magnitude than the bulk crystalline grain. To enhanced protonic mobility, alternative processing routes were evaluated. A laser melt modulation (LMM) process was utilized to fabricate bulk samples, while pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was utilized to fabricate thin film membranes . Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2-x)O9 and SrCe(1-x)Y(x)O3 bulk samples were fabricated by LMM. Thin film BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3 membranes were fabricated by PLD on porous substrates. Electron microscopy with chemical mapping was done to characterize the resultant microstructures. High temperature protonic conduction was measured by impedance spectroscopy in wet air or H2 environments. The results demonstrate the advantage of thin film membranes to thick membranes but also reveal the negative impact of defects or nanoscale domains on protonic conductivity.

  19. Proton charge extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stryker, Jesse R.; Miller, Gerald A.

    2016-01-01

    We examine how corrections to S -state energy levels En S in hydrogenic atoms due to the finite proton size are affected by moments of the proton charge distribution. The corrections to En S are computed moment by moment. The results demonstrate that the next-to-leading order term in the expansion is of order rp/aB times the size of the leading order term. Our analysis thus dispels any concern that the larger relative size of this term for muonic hydrogen versus electronic hydrogen might account for the current discrepancy of proton radius measurements extracted from the two systems. Furthermore, the next-to-leading order term in powers of rp/aB that we derive from a dipole proton form factor is proportional to , rather than , as would be expected from the scalar nature of the form factor. The dependence of the finite-size correction on and higher odd-power moments is shown to be a general result for any spherically symmetric proton charge distribution. A method for computing the moment expansion of the finite-size correction to arbitrary order is introduced and the results are tabulated for principal quantum numbers up to n =7 .

  20. Proton transfer in organic scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Dipankar

    This dissertation focuses on the fundamental understanding of the proton transfer process and translating the knowledge into design/development of new organic materials for efficient non-aqueous proton transport. For example, what controls the shuttling of a proton between two basic sites? a) Distance between two groups? or b) the basicity? c) What is the impact of protonation on molecular conformation when the basic sites are attached to rigid scaffolds? For this purpose, we developed several tunable proton sponges and studied proton transfer in these scaffolds theoretically as well as experimentally. Next we moved our attention to understand long-range proton conduction or proton transport. We introduced liquid crystalline (LC) proton conductor based on triphenylene molecule and established that activation energy barrier for proton transport is lower in the LC phase compared to the crystalline phase. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of several critical factors: the choice of the proton transferring groups, mobility of the charge carriers, intrinsic vs. extrinsic charge carrier concentrations and the molecular architectures on long-range proton transport. The outcome of this research will lead to a deeper understanding of non-aqueous proton transfer process and aid the design of next generation proton exchange membrane (PEM) for fuel cell.

  1. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps.

    PubMed

    Buch-Pedersen, M J; Pedersen, B P; Veierskov, B; Nissen, P; Palmgren, M G

    2009-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK(a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires.

  2. Synchrotron radiation from protons

    SciTech Connect

    Dutt, S.K.

    1992-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from protons, though described by the same equations as the radiation from electrons, exhibits a number of interesting features on account of the parameters reached in praxis. In this presentation, we shall point out some of the features relating to (i) normal synchrotron radiation from dipoles in proton machines such as the High Energy Booster and the Superconducting Super Collider; (ii) synchrotron radiation from short dipoles, and its application to light monitors for proton machines, and (iii) synchrotron radiation from undulators in the limit when, the deflection parameter is much smaller than unity. The material for this presentation is taken largely from the work of Hofmann, Coisson, Bossart, and their collaborators, and from a paper by Kim. We shall emphasize the qualitative aspects of synchrotron radiation in the cases mentioned above, making, when possible, simple arguments for estimating the spectral and angular properties of the radiation. Detailed analyses can be found in the literature.

  3. The physics of proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Zhang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes as well as selected practical experimental and theoretical methods. We conclude by briefly speculating on possible future areas of research of relevance to the physics of proton therapy. PMID:25803097

  4. Shielding of relativistic protons.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, A; Durante, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Manti, L; Pugliese, M; Scampoli, P; Mancusi, D; Sihver, L; Rusek, A

    2007-06-01

    Protons are the most abundant element in the galactic cosmic radiation, and the energy spectrum peaks around 1 GeV. Shielding of relativistic protons is therefore a key problem in the radiation protection strategy of crewmembers involved in long-term missions in deep space. Hydrogen ions were accelerated up to 1 GeV at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York. The proton beam was also shielded with thick (about 20 g/cm2) blocks of lucite (PMMA) or aluminium (Al). We found that the dose rate was increased 40-60% by the shielding and decreased as a function of the distance along the axis. Simulations using the General-Purpose Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS) show that the dose increase is mostly caused by secondary protons emitted by the target. The modified radiation field after the shield has been characterized for its biological effectiveness by measuring chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed just behind the shield block, or to the direct beam, in the dose range 0.5-3 Gy. Notwithstanding the increased dose per incident proton, the fraction of aberrant cells at the same dose in the sample position was not significantly modified by the shield. The PHITS code simulations show that, albeit secondary protons are slower than incident nuclei, the LET spectrum is still contained in the low-LET range (<10 keV/microm), which explains the approximately unitary value measured for the relative biological effectiveness. PMID:17256178

  5. Production of high-brightness CW proton beams with very high proton fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, D.; McMichael, G.; Lykke, K.R.; Schneider, J.D.; Sherman, J.; Stevens, R. Jr.; Hodgkins, D.

    1995-12-01

    This paper demonstrates a new technique to significantly enhance the proton fraction of an ion beam extracted from a plasma ion source. We employ a magnetically confined microwave driven source, though the technique is not source-specific and can probably be applied equally effectively to other plasma sources such as Penning and multicusp types. Specifically, we dope the plasma with about 1% H{sub 2}O, which increases the proton fraction of a 45 keV 45 mA beam from 75 to 90% with 375W 2.45 GHz power to the source and from 84% to 92% for 500W when the source is operated under nonresonant conditions. Much of the remaining fraction of the beam comprises a heavy mass ion we believe to be N{sup +} impurity ions resulting from the conditions under which the experiments were performed. If so, this impurity can be easily removed and much higher proton fractions could be expected. Preliminary measurements show the additive has no adverse effect on the emittance of the extracted beam, and source stability is greatly improved.

  6. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    It was found that female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was determined to be 7 years after the proton exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received by the experimental animals were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event. It is concluded that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crew members. 15 references.

  7. Proton-Proton Scattering at 105 Mev and 75 Mev

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Birge, R. W.; Kruse, U. E.; Ramsey, N. F.

    1951-01-31

    The scattering of protons by protons provides an important method for studying the nature of nuclear forces. Recent proton-proton scattering experiments at energies as high as thirty Mev{sup 1} have failed to show any appreciable contribution to the cross section from higher angular momentum states, but it is necessary to bring in tensor forces to explain the magnitude of the observed cross section.

  8. Anisotropic proton instability magnetospheric /APIM/ hiss - An introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parady, B. K.

    1974-01-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss is broadband ELF noise between 100 and 2000 Hz generally occurring inside the plasmasphere. It is proposed that some plasmaspheric ELF hiss is generated by ring current protons. The mechanism by which waves are generated is the anisotropic proton instability magnetospheric (APIM) hiss mechanism. APIM hiss (with a frequency close to the lower hybrid resonance frequency) is a loss-cone, flute instability arising from proton velocity space anisotropies. The energy driving the waves comes from the free energy of the 'inverted population' of the proton loss-cone distribution. The APIM hiss mechanism predicts the bandwidth, center frequency, source location, and wave normal angle of some types of plasmaspheric hiss. APIM hiss is suggested as a possible additional loss mechanism for ring current protons.

  9. New constraints from PAMELA anti-proton data on annihilating and decaying dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cholis, Ilias

    2011-09-01

    Recently the PAMELA experiment has released its updated anti-proton flux and anti-proton to proton flux ratio data up to energies of ≈ 200GeV. With no clear excess of cosmic ray anti-protons at high energies, one can extend constraints on the production of anti-protons from dark matter. In this letter, we consider both the cases of dark matter annihilating and decaying into standard model particles that produce significant numbers of anti-protons. We provide two sets of constraints on the annihilation cross-sections/decay lifetimes. In the one set of constraints we ignore any source of anti-protons other than dark matter, which give the highest allowed cross-sections/inverse lifetimes. In the other set we include also anti-protons produced in collisions of cosmic rays with interstellar medium nuclei, getting tighter but more realistic constraints on the annihilation cross-sections/decay lifetimes.

  10. Predictions of diffractive cross sections in proton-proton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2013-04-15

    We review our pre-LHC predictions of the total, elastic, total-inelastic, and diffractive components of proton-proton cross sections at high energies, expressed in the form of unitarized expressions based on a special parton-model approach to diffraction employing inclusive proton parton distribution functions and QCD color factors and compare with recent LHC results.

  11. An online, energy-resolving beam profile detector for laser-driven proton beams.

    PubMed

    Metzkes, J; Zeil, K; Kraft, S D; Karsch, L; Sobiella, M; Rehwald, M; Obst, L; Schlenvoigt, H-P; Schramm, U

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a scintillator-based online beam profile detector for the characterization of laser-driven proton beams is presented. Using a pixelated matrix with varying absorber thicknesses, the proton beam is spatially resolved in two dimensions and simultaneously energy-resolved. A thin plastic scintillator placed behind the absorber and read out by a CCD camera is used as the active detector material. The spatial detector resolution reaches down to ∼4 mm and the detector can resolve proton beam profiles for up to 9 proton threshold energies. With these detector design parameters, the spatial characteristics of the proton distribution and its cut-off energy can be analyzed online and on-shot under vacuum conditions. The paper discusses the detector design, its characterization and calibration at a conventional proton source, as well as the first detector application at a laser-driven proton source. PMID:27587116

  12. An online, energy-resolving beam profile detector for laser-driven proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzkes, J.; Zeil, K.; Kraft, S. D.; Karsch, L.; Sobiella, M.; Rehwald, M.; Obst, L.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Schramm, U.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a scintillator-based online beam profile detector for the characterization of laser-driven proton beams is presented. Using a pixelated matrix with varying absorber thicknesses, the proton beam is spatially resolved in two dimensions and simultaneously energy-resolved. A thin plastic scintillator placed behind the absorber and read out by a CCD camera is used as the active detector material. The spatial detector resolution reaches down to ˜4 mm and the detector can resolve proton beam profiles for up to 9 proton threshold energies. With these detector design parameters, the spatial characteristics of the proton distribution and its cut-off energy can be analyzed online and on-shot under vacuum conditions. The paper discusses the detector design, its characterization and calibration at a conventional proton source, as well as the first detector application at a laser-driven proton source.

  13. Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data.

    1993-08-18

    Version 00 The Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data file PNESD contains the numerical data and the related bibliography for the differential elastic cross sections, polarization and integral nonelastic cross sections for elastic proton-nucleus scattering.

  14. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  15. The Search for Proton Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  16. Proton bunch compression strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Valeri; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The paper discusses main limitations on the beam power and other machine parameters for a 4 MW proton driver for muon collider. The strongest limitation comes from a longitudinal microwave instability limiting the beam power to about 1 MW for an 8 GeV compressor ring.

  17. High Power Proton Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the capabilities and challenges of high intensity proton accelerators, such as J-PARC, Fermilab MI, SNS, ISIS, PSI, ESS (in the future) and others. The presentation will focus on lessons learned, new concepts, beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate them.

  18. Preparation, characterization and application of novel proton conducting ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Siwei

    Due to the immediate energy shortage and the requirement of environment protection nowadays, the efficient, effective and environmental friendly use of current energy sources is urgent. Energy conversion and storage is thus an important focus both for industry and academia. As one of the hydrogen energy related materials, proton conducting ceramics can be applied in solid oxide fuel cells and steam electrolysers, as well as high temperature hydrogen separation membranes and hydrogen sensors. For most of the practical applications, both high proton conductivity and chemical stability are desirable. However, the state-of-the-art proton conducting ceramics are facing great challenges in simultaneously fulfilling conductivity and stability requirements for practical applications. Consequently, understanding the properties for the proton conducting ceramics and developing novel materials that possess both high proton conductivity and enhanced chemical stability have both scientific and practical significances. The objective of this study is to develop novel proton conducting ceramics, either by evaluating the doping effects on the state-of-the-art simple perovskite structured barium cerates, or by investigating novel complex perovskite structured Ba3Ca1.18Nb1.82O 9-delta based proton conductors as potential proton conducting ceramics with improved proton conductivity and enhanced chemical stability. Different preparation methods were compared, and their influence on the structure, including the bulk and grain boundary environment has been investigated. In addition, the effects of microstructure on the electrical properties of the proton conducting ceramics have also been characterized. The solid oxide fuel cell application for the proton conducting ceramics performed as electrolyte membranes has been demonstrated.

  19. Intensity modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Kooy, H M; Grassberger, C

    2015-07-01

    Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) implies the electromagnetic spatial control of well-circumscribed "pencil beams" of protons of variable energy and intensity. Proton pencil beams take advantage of the charged-particle Bragg peak-the characteristic peak of dose at the end of range-combined with the modulation of pencil beam variables to create target-local modulations in dose that achieves the dose objectives. IMPT improves on X-ray intensity modulated beams (intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) with dose modulation along the beam axis as well as lateral, in-field, dose modulation. The clinical practice of IMPT further improves the healthy tissue vs target dose differential in comparison with X-rays and thus allows increased target dose with dose reduction elsewhere. In addition, heavy-charged-particle beams allow for the modulation of biological effects, which is of active interest in combination with dose "painting" within a target. The clinical utilization of IMPT is actively pursued but technical, physical and clinical questions remain. Technical questions pertain to control processes for manipulating pencil beams from the creation of the proton beam to delivery within the patient within the accuracy requirement. Physical questions pertain to the interplay between the proton penetration and variations between planned and actual patient anatomical representation and the intrinsic uncertainty in tissue stopping powers (the measure of energy loss per unit distance). Clinical questions remain concerning the impact and management of the technical and physical questions within the context of the daily treatment delivery, the clinical benefit of IMPT and the biological response differential compared with X-rays against which clinical benefit will be judged. It is expected that IMPT will replace other modes of proton field delivery. Proton radiotherapy, since its first practice 50 years ago, always required the highest level of

  20. Intensity modulated proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grassberger, C

    2015-01-01

    Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) implies the electromagnetic spatial control of well-circumscribed “pencil beams” of protons of variable energy and intensity. Proton pencil beams take advantage of the charged-particle Bragg peak—the characteristic peak of dose at the end of range—combined with the modulation of pencil beam variables to create target-local modulations in dose that achieves the dose objectives. IMPT improves on X-ray intensity modulated beams (intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) with dose modulation along the beam axis as well as lateral, in-field, dose modulation. The clinical practice of IMPT further improves the healthy tissue vs target dose differential in comparison with X-rays and thus allows increased target dose with dose reduction elsewhere. In addition, heavy-charged-particle beams allow for the modulation of biological effects, which is of active interest in combination with dose “painting” within a target. The clinical utilization of IMPT is actively pursued but technical, physical and clinical questions remain. Technical questions pertain to control processes for manipulating pencil beams from the creation of the proton beam to delivery within the patient within the accuracy requirement. Physical questions pertain to the interplay between the proton penetration and variations between planned and actual patient anatomical representation and the intrinsic uncertainty in tissue stopping powers (the measure of energy loss per unit distance). Clinical questions remain concerning the impact and management of the technical and physical questions within the context of the daily treatment delivery, the clinical benefit of IMPT and the biological response differential compared with X-rays against which clinical benefit will be judged. It is expected that IMPT will replace other modes of proton field delivery. Proton radiotherapy, since its first practice 50 years ago, always required the

  1. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.J.

    1998-06-02

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H{sup {minus}} beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H{sup {minus}} beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H{sup {minus}} beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H{sup {minus}} beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H{sup {minus}} beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H{sup {minus}} beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser. 9 figs.

  2. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, Carol J.

    1998-01-01

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

  3. Liquid deuterium cold source in graphite thermal column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsuro, M.; Kawai, T.; Maeda, Y.; Yamaoka, H.; Akiyoshi, T.; Okamoto, S.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid deuterium cold source with a non-spherical moderator chamber of about 4 litres was installed into the graphite thermal column of 5 MW Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Three cold neutron holes and one very cold neutron hole are provided in the graphite for beam extractions. The operation tests with hydrogen liquefied in the condenser showed satisfactory performances and high gain factors of cold and very cold neutrons of more than 20 and 10, respectively. Neutron measurements with the deuterium moderator are now in progress.

  4. Solar wind proton flux extremes and their association with pseudostreamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Gibson, Sarah E.; Fisk, Lennard A.

    2013-06-01

    Proton flux, as defined by the product of proton number density and proton speed, while exhibiting remarkable constancy across heliographic latitudes from pole to equator as measured by the Ulysses spacecraft, nevertheless showed obvious departure from this constancy for some mid-latitude wind and extended to high heliomagnetic latitudes during the recent two solar minima. We examine the solar wind exclusive of ICMEs from Ulysses and ACE observations, to analyze the solar wind in-situ data exhibiting extremes in proton flux. We first find these extreme-proton-flux winds generally originate in latitudes middle-distant from the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), and they have relatively slower speed than the bulk of the solar wind. Then we map the in-situ ACE observations in Carrington rotation (CR) 1997 back to the solar surface by using the Potential-Field-Source-Surface (PFSS) model, in order to consider the coronal properties at the extreme-proton-flux wind sources. We find there is a clear association between these extreme-proton-flux solar wind and the mid-latitude coronal holes and "pseudostreamer" structures.

  5. Beam acceleration through proton radio frequency quadrupole accelerator in BARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, P. V.; Krishnagopal, S.; Mathew, J. V.; Singh, S. K.; Jain, P.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, M.; Kumar, R.; Roychowdhury, P.; Kelwani, H.; Rama Rao, B. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Agarwal, A.; Kukreti, B. M.; Singh, P.

    2016-05-01

    A 3 MeV proton Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India, for the Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) programme. The 352 MHz RFQ is built in 4 segments and in the first phase two segments of the LEHIPA RFQ were commissioned, accelerating a 50 keV, 1 mA pulsed proton beam from the ion source, to an energy of 1.24 MeV. The successful operation of the RFQ gave confidence in the physics understanding and technology development that have been achieved, and indicate that the road forward can now be traversed rather more quickly.

  6. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  7. Automated method of tracing proton tracks in nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Jin-lu; Li, Hong-yun; Song, Ji-wen; Zhang, Jian-fu; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Zhong-bing; Liu, Jin-liang; Liu, Lin-yue

    2015-07-01

    The low performance of the manual recognition of proton-recoil tracks in nuclear emulsions has limited its application to energy spectrum measurement of a pulsed neutron source. We developed an automated microscope system to trace proton-recoil tracks in nuclear emulsions. Given a start point on the proton track of interest, the microscope system can automatically trace and record the entire track using an image processing algorithm. Tests indicate that no interaction of the operator is needed in tracing the entire track. This automated microscope greatly reduces the labor of the operator and increases the efficiency of track data collection in nuclear emulsion.

  8. Retention and Switching Kinetics of Protonated Gate Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    DEVINE,R.A.B.; HERRERA,GILBERT V.

    2000-06-27

    The switching and memory retention time has been measured in 50 {micro}m gatelength pseudo-non-volatile memory MOSFETs containing, protonated 40 nm gate oxides. Times of the order of 3.3 seconds are observed for fields of 3 MV cm{sup {minus}1}. The retention time with protons placed either at the gate oxide/substrate or gate oxide/gate electrode interfaces is found to better than 96% after 5,000 seconds. Measurement of the time dependence of the source-drain current during switching provides clear evidence for the presence of dispersive proton transport through the gate oxide.

  9. Retention and switching kinetics of protonated gate field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    DEVINE,R.A.B.; HERRERA,GILBERT V.

    2000-05-23

    The switching and memory retention time has been measured in 50 {micro}m gatelength pseudo-non-volatile memory MOSFETS containing, protonated 40 nm gate oxides. Times of the order of 3.3 seconds are observed for fields of 3 MV cm{sup {minus}1}. The retention time with protons placed either at the gate oxide/substrate or gate oxide/gate electrode interfaces is found to better than 96{percent} after 5,000 seconds. Measurement of the time dependence of the source-drain current during switching provides clear evidence for the presence of dispersive proton transport through the gate oxide.

  10. Exploring universality of transversity in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radici, Marco; Ricci, Alessandro M.; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2016-08-01

    We consider the azimuthal correlations of charged hadron pairs with large total transverse momentum and small relative momentum, produced in proton-proton collisions with one transversely polarized proton. One of these correlations directly probes the chiral-odd transversity parton distribution in connection with a chiral-odd interference fragmentation function. We present predictions for this observable based on previous extractions of transversity (from charged pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering) and of the interference fragmentation function (from the production of back-to-back charged pion pairs in electron-positron annihilations). All analyses are performed in the framework of collinear factorization. We compare our predictions to the recent data on proton-proton collisions released by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC, and we find them reasonably compatible. This comparison confirms for the first time the predicted role of transversity in proton-proton collisions, and it allows us to test its universality.

  11. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues. PMID:26043157

  12. ISIS as a Proton Driver for a Neutrino Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, Christopher R.

    2004-10-01

    The paper describes plans to develop the ISIS accelerators into a high intensity, multi-megawatt, proton driver for a range of fixed-target studies. Possibilities include use in a Neutrino Factory and an advanced spallation neutron source. A phased upgrade would allow intermediate accelerator R&D on pressing problems such as nanosecond proton bunch compression, the pion target and the muon capture channel. A possible bunch compression experiment using the existing ISIS synchrotron is also outlined.

  13. Conceptual design of a superconducting high-intensity proton linac

    SciTech Connect

    Dominic Chan, K.C.

    1996-09-01

    A SCRF (superconducting RF linac) has been developed for a high-intensity proton linac which will be used as the driver for neutron sources. This design is conservative, using current SCRF technologies. As well as lowering operating cost, the design offers performance advantages in availability, beam loss, and upgradability, which are important for the application as a neutron source.

  14. Calibration of the LLNL Imaging Proton Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmus, A. M.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Kuranz, C. C.; Klein, S.; Belancourt, P. X.; Fein, J. R.; MacDonald, M. J.; Drake, R. P.; Hazi, A. U.; Pollock, B. B.; Park, J.; Williams, G. J.; Chen, H.

    2014-10-01

    Ultra intense short pulse lasers incident on solid targets (e.g. Au foil) produce well collimated, broadband proton beams. These proton beams can be used to characterize magnetic fields in high-energy-density systems. The Imaging Proton Spectrometer (IPS) was previously designed and built (H. Chen 2010, RSI) for use with such laser produced proton beams. The IPS has an energy range of 50 keV-40 MeV with a resolving power (E/dE) of about 250 at 0.5 MeV and 350 at 2 MeV, as well as a single spatial imaging direction. In order to better characterize the imaging capability of this diagnostic, a 3D FEA solver has been used to calculate the magnetic field of the IPS. Particle trajectories are then obtained via numerical integration to calibrate the imaging axis of the IPS. Experiments using alpha sources will be used to verify the calculated calibration. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0001840. Work by LLNL was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Proton transfer at carbon.

    PubMed

    Richard, J P; Amyes, T L

    2001-12-01

    The viability of living systems requires that C--H bonds of biological molecules be stable in water, but that there also be a mechanism for shortening the timescale for their heterolytic cleavage through enzymatic catalysis of a variety of catabolic and metabolic reactions. An understanding of the mechanism of enzymatic catalysis of proton transfer at carbon requires the integration of results of studies to determine the structure of the enzyme-substrate complex with model studies on the mechanism for the non-enzymatic reaction in water, and the effect of the local protein environment on the stability of the transition state for this reaction. A common theme is the importance of electrostatic interactions in providing stabilization of bound carbanion intermediates of enzyme-catalyzed proton-transfer reactions.

  16. Proton therapy in the clinic.

    PubMed

    DeLaney, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    The clinical advantage for proton radiotherapy over photon approaches is the marked reduction in integral dose to the patient, due to the absence of exit dose beyond the proton Bragg peak. The integral dose with protons is approximately 60% lower than that with any external beam photon technique. Pediatric patients, because of their developing normal tissues and anticipated length of remaining life, are likely to have the maximum clinical gain with the use of protons. Proton therapy may also allow treatment of some adult tumors to much more effective doses, because of normal tissue sparing distal to the tumor. Currently, the most commonly available proton treatment technology uses 3D conformal approaches based on (a) distal range modulation, (b) passive scattering of the proton beam in its x- and y-axes, and (c) lateral beam-shaping. It is anticipated that magnetic pencil beam scanning will become the dominant mode of proton delivery in the future, which will lower neutron scatter associated with passively scattered beam lines, reduce the need for expensive beam-shaping devices, and allow intensity-modulated proton radiotherapy. Proton treatment plans are more sensitive to variations in tumor size and normal tissue changes over the course of treatment than photon plans, and it is expected that adaptive radiation therapy will be increasingly important for proton therapy as well. While impressive treatment results have been reported with protons, their cost is higher than for photon IMRT. Hence, protons should ideally be employed for anatomic sites and tumors not well treated with photons. While protons appear cost-effective for pediatric tumors, their cost-effectiveness for treatment of some adult tumors, such as prostate cancer, is uncertain. Comparative studies have been proposed or are in progress to more rigorously assess their value for a variety of sites. The utility of proton therapy will be enhanced by technological developments that reduce its cost

  17. Smashing Protons to Smithereens

    SciTech Connect

    Marc-André Pleier

    2010-05-05

    Pleier discusses the extraordinary research taking place at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) — the world’s newest, biggest, and highest energy particle accelerator located at CERN. Pleier is one of hundreds of researchers from around the world working on ATLAS, a seven-story particle detector positioned at a point where the LHC’s oppositely circulating beams of protons slam into one another head-on.

  18. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J.

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  19. Smashing Protons to Smithereens

    ScienceCinema

    Marc-André Pleier

    2016-07-12

    Pleier discusses the extraordinary research taking place at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) — the world’s newest, biggest, and highest energy particle accelerator located at CERN. Pleier is one of hundreds of researchers from around the world working on ATLAS, a seven-story particle detector positioned at a point where the LHC’s oppositely circulating beams of protons slam into one another head-on.

  20. Proton transport and torque generation in rotary biomotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. Yu.; Savel'Ev, S.; Mourokh, L. G.; Nori, Franco

    2008-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of rotary biomotors within a simple nanoelectromechanical model, consisting of a stator part and a ring-shaped rotor having 12 proton-binding sites. This model is closely related to the membrane-embedded F0 motor of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase, which converts the energy of the transmembrane electrochemical gradient of protons into mechanical motion of the rotor. It is shown that the Coulomb coupling between the negative charge of the empty rotor site and the positive stator charge, located near the periplasmic proton-conducting channel (proton source), plays a dominant role in the torque-generating process. When approaching the source outlet, the rotor site has a proton energy level higher than the energy level of the site, located near the cytoplasmic channel (proton drain). In the first stage of this torque-generating process, the energy of the electrochemical potential is converted into potential energy of the proton-binding sites on the rotor. Afterwards, the tangential component of the Coulomb force produces a mechanical torque. We demonstrate that, at low temperatures, the loaded motor works in the shuttling regime where the energy of the electrochemical potential is consumed without producing any unidirectional rotation. The motor switches to the torque-generating regime at high temperatures, when the Brownian ratchet mechanism turns on. In the presence of a significant external torque, created by ATP hydrolysis, the system operates as a proton pump, which translocates protons against the transmembrane potential gradient. Here we focus on the F0 motor, even though our analysis is applicable to the bacterial flagellar motor.

  1. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-10-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  2. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  3. Pion, Kaon, Proton and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive pion, kaon, proton, and antiproton production from proton-proton collisions is studied at a variety of proton energies. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity are compared with experimental data. The Badhwar and Alper parameterizations are moderately satisfactory for charged pion production. The Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best, and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. However, no parameterization is able to fully account for all the data.

  4. Inward diffusion and loss of radiation belt protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2016-03-01

    Radiation belt protons in the kinetic energy range 24 to 76 MeV are being measured by the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope on each of the two Van Allen Probes. Data have been processed for the purpose of studying variability in the trapped proton intensity during October 2013 to August 2015. For the lower energies (≲32 MeV), equatorial proton intensity near L = 2 showed a steady increase that is consistent with inward diffusion of trapped solar protons, as shown by positive radial gradients in phase space density at fixed values of the first two adiabatic invariants. It is postulated that these protons were trapped with enhanced efficiency during the 7 March 2012 solar proton event. A model that includes radial diffusion, along with known trapped proton source and loss processes, shows that the observed average rate of increase near L = 2 is predicted by the same model diffusion coefficient that is required to form the entire proton radiation belt, down to low L, over an extended (˜103 year) interval. A slower intensity decrease for lower energies near L = 1.5 may also be caused by inward diffusion, though it is faster than predicted by the model. Higher-energy (≳40 MeV) protons near the L = 1.5 intensity maximum are from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay. Their observed intensity is lower than expected by a factor ˜2, but the discrepancy is resolved by adding an unspecified loss process to the model with a mean lifetime ˜120 years.

  5. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING OF THE SOLAR WIND INCLUDING PICKUP PROTONS AND TURBULENCE TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Matthaeus, William H.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2012-07-20

    To study the effects of interstellar pickup protons and turbulence on the structure and dynamics of the solar wind, we have developed a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that treats interstellar pickup protons as a separate fluid and incorporates the transport of turbulence and turbulent heating. The governing system of equations combines the mean-field equations for the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and pickup protons and the turbulence transport equations for the turbulent energy, normalized cross-helicity, and correlation length. The model equations account for photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with solar wind protons, energy transfer from pickup protons to solar wind protons, and plasma heating by turbulent dissipation. Separate mass and energy equations are used for the solar wind and pickup protons, though a single momentum equation is employed under the assumption that the pickup protons are comoving with the solar wind protons. We compute the global structure of the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU for a source magnetic dipole on the Sun tilted by 0 Degree-Sign -90 Degree-Sign and compare our results with Voyager 2 observations. The results computed with and without pickup protons are superposed to evaluate quantitatively the deceleration and heating effects of pickup protons, the overall compression of the magnetic field in the outer heliosphere caused by deceleration, and the weakening of corotating interaction regions by the thermal pressure of pickup protons.

  6. Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Wind Including Pickup Protons and Turbulence Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.

    2012-01-01

    To study the effects of interstellar pickup protons and turbulence on the structure and dynamics of the solar wind, we have developed a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that treats interstellar pickup protons as a separate fluid and incorporates the transport of turbulence and turbulent heating. The governing system of equations combines the mean-field equations for the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and pickup protons and the turbulence transport equations for the turbulent energy, normalized cross-helicity, and correlation length. The model equations account for photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with solar wind protons, energy transfer from pickup protons to solar wind protons, and plasma heating by turbulent dissipation. Separate mass and energy equations are used for the solar wind and pickup protons, though a single momentum equation is employed under the assumption that the pickup protons are comoving with the solar wind protons.We compute the global structure of the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU for a source magnetic dipole on the Sun tilted by 0 deg - .90 deg and compare our results with Voyager 2 observations. The results computed with and without pickup protons are superposed to evaluate quantitatively the deceleration and heating effects of pickup protons, the overall compression of the magnetic field in the outer heliosphere caused by deceleration, and the weakening of corotating interaction regions by the thermal pressure of pickup protons.

  7. Experimental and numerical characterization of ion-cyclotron heated protons on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, V.; Parker, R. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Granetz, R. S.; Harvey, R. W.; Jaeger, E. F.; Liptac, J.; Fiore, C. L.; Greenwald, M.; Irby, J. H.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2007-06-01

    Energetic minority protons with ~100 keV effective temperature are routinely created in Alcator C-Mod plasmas with the application of ion-cyclotron-range-of-frequency (ICRF) heating. A multichannel compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA) is used to make measurements of these distributions in Alcator C-Mod's unique and reactor-relevant operating space via active and passive charge-exchange techniques. A radially injected 50 keV diagnostic hydrogen neutral beam is used for active analysis. Using a detailed model that accounts for beam, halo and impurity electron donors, core proton temperatures of ~30-120 keV are directly measured for the first time in lower density (ne0 ~ (0.8-1.5) × 1020 m-3) Alcator C-Mod plasmas with up to only ~0.5 MW of ICRF power. The model found that the minority proton temperatures are peaked spatially away from r/a = 0, even for an on-axis resonance. Additionally, noticeable phase-space anisotropy is seen as expected for ICRF heating. The measured effective temperatures also scale approximately with the Stix parameter. The CNPA temperature measurements are compared with several leading simulation packages such as the TORIC/FPPRF and AORSA/CQL3D full-wave/Fokker-Planck (FW/FP) solvers. Preliminary comparisons with the AORSA/CQL3D code which include results from a new synthetic diagnostic show good agreement and demonstrate that accurate tracking of the minority distribution during iterations of the FW and FP solvers is required to simulate Alcator C-Mod's energetic minority populations with accuracy. Physically, poor wave focusing and preferential heating of trapped energetic protons are found to move the fast proton temperature profiles off-axis. These FW/FP analyses represent the first comparison between predictions of these detailed codes and core minority tail experimental measurements on Alcator C-Mod.

  8. Proton-proton correlations observed in two-proton radioactivity of 94Ag.

    PubMed

    Mukha, Ivan; Roeckl, Ernst; Batist, Leonid; Blazhev, Andrey; Döring, Joachim; Grawe, Hubert; Grigorenko, Leonid; Huyse, Mark; Janas, Zenon; Kirchner, Reinhard; La Commara, Marco; Mazzocchi, Chiara; Tabor, Sam L; Van Duppen, Piet

    2006-01-19

    The stability and spontaneous decay of naturally occurring atomic nuclei have been much studied ever since Becquerel discovered natural radioactivity in 1896. In 1960, proton-rich nuclei with an odd or an even atomic number Z were predicted to decay through one- and two-proton radioactivity, respectively. The experimental observation of one-proton radioactivity was first reported in 1982, and two-proton radioactivity has now also been detected by experimentally studying the decay properties of 45Fe (refs 3, 4) and 54Zn (ref. 5). Here we report proton-proton correlations observed during the radioactive decay of a spinning long-lived state of the lightest known isotope of silver, 94Ag, which is known to undergo one-proton decay. We infer from these correlations that the long-lived state must also decay through simultaneous two-proton emission, making 94Ag the first nucleus to exhibit one- as well as two-proton radioactivity. We attribute the two-proton emission behaviour and the unexpectedly large probability for this decay mechanism to a very large deformation of the parent nucleus into a prolate (cigar-like) shape, which facilitates emission of protons either from the same or from opposite ends of the 'cigar'.

  9. Applications of High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Rajendran; Mishra, Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    collider and neutrino factory - summary of working group 2 / J. Galambos, R. Garoby and S. Geer -- Prospects for a very high power CW SRF linac / R. A. Rimmer -- Indian accelerator program for ADS applications / V. C. Sahni and P. Singh -- Ion accelerator activities at VECC (particularly, operating at low temperature) / R. K. Bhandari -- Chinese efforts in high intensity proton accelerators / S. Fu, J. Wang and S. Fang -- ADSR activity in the UK / R. J. Barlow -- ADS development in Japan / K. Kikuchi -- Project-X, SRF, and very large power stations / C. M. Ankenbrandt, R. P. Johnson and M. Popovic -- Power production and ADS / R. Raja -- Experimental neutron source facility based on accelerator driven system / Y. Gohar -- Transmutation mission / W. S. Yang -- Safety performance and issues / J. E. Cahalan -- Spallation target design for accelerator-driven systems / Y. Gohar -- Design considerations for accelerator transmutation of waste system / W. S. Yang -- Japan ADS program / T. Sasa -- Overview of members states' and IAEA activities in the field of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) / A. Stanculescu -- Linac for ADS applications - accelerator technologies / R. W. Garnett and R. L. Sheffield -- SRF linacs and accelerator driven sub-critical systems - summary working groups 3 & 4 / J. Delayen -- Production of Actinium-225 via high energy proton induced spallation of Thorium-232 / J. Harvey ... [et al.] -- Search for the electric dipole moment of Radium-225 / R. J. Holt, Z.-T. Lu and R. Mueller -- SRF linac and material science and medicine - summary of working group 5 / J. Nolen, E. Pitcher and H. Kirk.

  10. RF Sources for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Brunkhorst, C.; Fredd, E.; Goulding, R. H.; Goulding, R. H.; Greenough, N.; Kung, C.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Swain, D. W.; Wilson, J. R.

    2005-10-04

    The RF source requirements for the ITER ion cyclotron (IC) heating and current drive system are very challenging ? 20 MW CW power into an antenna load with a VSWR of up to 2 over the frequency range of 35-65 MHz. For the two present antenna designs under consideration, 8 sources providing 2.5 MW each are to be employed. For these sources, the outputs of two final power amplifiers (FPAs), using the high power CPI 4CM2500KG tube, are combined with a 180? hybrid combiner to easily meet the ITER IC source requirements ? 2.5 MW is supplied at a VSWR of 2 at ? 70% of the maximum tube power available in class B operation. The cylindrical cavity configuration for the FPAs is quite compact so that the 8 combined sources fit into the space allocated at the ITER site with room to spare. The source configuration is described in detail and its projected operating power curves are presented. Although the CPI tube has been shown to be stable under high power operating conditions on many facilities, a test of the combined FPA source arrangement is in preparation using existing high power 30 MHz amplifiers to assure that this configuration can be made robustly stable for all phases at a VSWR up to 2. The possibility of using 12 sources to feed a suitably modified antenna design is also discussed in the context of providing flexibility for specifying the final IC antenna design.

  11. Magnetic quadrupoles lens for hot spot proton imaging in inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Chen, J.; Zhu, B.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, T. K.; Tan, F.; Hong, W.; Zhang, B. H.; Wang, X. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Imaging of DD-produced protons from an implosion hot spot region by miniature permanent magnetic quadrupole (PMQ) lens is proposed. Corresponding object-image relation is deduced and an adjust method for this imaging system is discussed. Ideal point-to-point imaging demands a monoenergetic proton source; nevertheless, we proved that the blur of image induced by proton energy spread is a second order effect therefore controllable. A proton imaging system based on miniature PMQ lens is designed for 2.8 MeV DD-protons and the adjust method in case of proton energy shift is proposed. The spatial resolution of this system is better than 10 μm when proton yield is above 109 and the spectra width is within 10%.

  12. Electronic absorption spectra of protonated pyrene and coronene in neon matrixes.

    PubMed

    Garkusha, Iryna; Fulara, Jan; Sarre, Peter J; Maier, John P

    2011-10-13

    Protonated pyrene and coronene have been isolated in 6 K neon matrixes. The cations were produced in the reaction of the parent aromatics with protonated ethanol in a hot-cathode discharge source, mass selected, and co-deposited with neon. Three electronic transitions of the most stable isomer of protonated pyrene and four of protonated coronene were recorded. The strongest, S(1) ← S(0) transitions, are in the visible region, with onset at 487.5 nm for protonated pyrene and 695.6 nm for protonated coronene. The corresponding neutrals were also observed. The absorptions were assigned on the basis of ab initio coupled-cluster and time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The astrophysical relevance of protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  13. Differential Cross Sections for Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Dick, Frank; Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering is investigated within the framework of the one pion exchange model in an attempt to model nucleon-nucleon interactions spanning the large range of energies important to cosmic ray shielding. A quantum field theoretic calculation is used to compute both differential and total cross sections. A scalar theory is then presented and compared to the one pion exchange model. The theoretical cross sections are compared to proton-proton scattering data to determine the validity of the models.

  14. Proton Degradation of Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. H.; Rax, B. G.; Selva, L. E.

    1997-01-01

    The severe degradation of optocouplers in space has been shown to be mainly due to proton displacement damage in the light-emitting diodes that are used within the optocouplers. However, a variety of LED technologies can be used in optocouplers and their sensitivity to proton displacement damage varies by about two orders of magnitude. Optocouplers are very simple hybrid devices, and the type of LED can be readily changed by the manufacturers with little cost impact. many optocoupler manufacturers purchase LEDs from outside sources with little knowledge or control of the manufacturing process used for the LED, leading to the possibility of very dramatic differences in radiation response (JPL has observed such differences for one type of optocoupler that is used in a hybrid power converter).

  15. Magnifying lens for 800 MeV proton radiography.

    PubMed

    Merrill, F E; Campos, E; Espinoza, C; Hogan, G; Hollander, B; Lopez, J; Mariam, F G; Morley, D; Morris, C L; Murray, M; Saunders, A; Schwartz, C; Thompson, T N

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the design and performance of a magnifying magnetic-lens system designed, built, and commissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for 800 MeV flash proton radiography. The technique of flash proton radiography has been developed at LANL to study material properties under dynamic loading conditions through the analysis of time sequences of proton radiographs. The requirements of this growing experimental program have resulted in the need for improvements in spatial radiographic resolution. To meet these needs, a new magnetic lens system, consisting of four permanent magnet quadrupoles, has been developed. This new lens system was designed to reduce the second order chromatic aberrations, the dominant source of image blur in 800 MeV proton radiography, as well as magnifying the image to reduce the blur contribution from the detector and camera systems. The recently commissioned lens system performed as designed, providing nearly a factor of three improvement in radiographic resolution. PMID:22047305

  16. Magnifying lens for 800 MeV proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, F. E.; Campos, E.; Espinoza, C.; Hogan, G.; Hollander, B.; Lopez, J.; Mariam, F. G.; Morley, D.; Morris, C. L.; Murray, M.; Saunders, A.; Schwartz, C.; Thompson, T. N.

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the design and performance of a magnifying magnetic-lens system designed, built, and commissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for 800 MeV flash proton radiography. The technique of flash proton radiography has been developed at LANL to study material properties under dynamic loading conditions through the analysis of time sequences of proton radiographs. The requirements of this growing experimental program have resulted in the need for improvements in spatial radiographic resolution. To meet these needs, a new magnetic lens system, consisting of four permanent magnet quadrupoles, has been developed. This new lens system was designed to reduce the second order chromatic aberrations, the dominant source of image blur in 800 MeV proton radiography, as well as magnifying the image to reduce the blur contribution from the detector and camera systems. The recently commissioned lens system performed as designed, providing nearly a factor of three improvement in radiographic resolution.

  17. Magnifying lens for 800 MeV proton radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, F. E.; Campos, E.; Espinoza, C.; Hogan, G.; Hollander, B.; Lopez, J.; Mariam, F. G.; Morley, D.; Morris, C. L.; Murray, M.; Saunders, A.; Schwartz, C.; Thompson, T. N.

    2011-10-15

    This article describes the design and performance of a magnifying magnetic-lens system designed, built, and commissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for 800 MeV flash proton radiography. The technique of flash proton radiography has been developed at LANL to study material properties under dynamic loading conditions through the analysis of time sequences of proton radiographs. The requirements of this growing experimental program have resulted in the need for improvements in spatial radiographic resolution. To meet these needs, a new magnetic lens system, consisting of four permanent magnet quadrupoles, has been developed. This new lens system was designed to reduce the second order chromatic aberrations, the dominant source of image blur in 800 MeV proton radiography, as well as magnifying the image to reduce the blur contribution from the detector and camera systems. The recently commissioned lens system performed as designed, providing nearly a factor of three improvement in radiographic resolution.

  18. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    Female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was 7 years after exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event, leading to the conclusion that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crewmembers.

  19. Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Patrick M.; Kouba, Coy K.; Foster, Charles C.

    2009-01-01

    The Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation (PROPSET) program calculates the frequency of on-orbit upsets in computer chips (for given orbits such as Low Earth Orbit, Lunar Orbit, and the like) from proton bombardment based on the results of heavy ion testing alone. The software simulates the bombardment of modern microelectronic components (computer chips) with high-energy (.200 MeV) protons. The nuclear interaction of the proton with the silicon of the chip is modeled and nuclear fragments from this interaction are tracked using Monte Carlo techniques to produce statistically accurate predictions.

  20. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams

    PubMed Central

    Raschke, S.; Spickermann, S.; Toncian, T.; Swantusch, M.; Boeker, J.; Giesen, U.; Iliakis, G.; Willi, O.; Boege, F.

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 107-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential. PMID:27578260

  1. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raschke, S.; Spickermann, S.; Toncian, T.; Swantusch, M.; Boeker, J.; Giesen, U.; Iliakis, G.; Willi, O.; Boege, F.

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 107-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential.

  2. Ultra-short laser-accelerated proton pulses have similar DNA-damaging effectiveness but produce less immediate nitroxidative stress than conventional proton beams.

    PubMed

    Raschke, S; Spickermann, S; Toncian, T; Swantusch, M; Boeker, J; Giesen, U; Iliakis, G; Willi, O; Boege, F

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators can provide instantaneous dose rates at least 10(7)-fold in excess of conventional, continuous proton beams. The impact of such extremely high proton dose rates on A549 human lung cancer cells was compared with conventionally accelerated protons and 90 keV X-rays. Between 0.2 and 2 Gy, the yield of DNA double strand breaks (foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX) was not significantly different between the two proton sources or proton irradiation and X-rays. Protein nitroxidation after 1 h judged by 3-nitrotyrosine generation was 2.5 and 5-fold higher in response to conventionally accelerated protons compared to laser-driven protons and X-rays, respectively. This difference was significant (p < 0.01) between 0.25 and 1 Gy. In conclusion, ultra-short proton pulses originating from laser-plasma accelerators have a similar DNA damaging potential as conventional proton beams, while inducing less immediate nitroxidative stress, which probably entails a distinct therapeutic potential. PMID:27578260

  3. Filtered backprojection proton CT reconstruction along most likely paths

    SciTech Connect

    Rit, Simon; Dedes, George; Freud, Nicolas; Sarrut, David; Letang, Jean Michel

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) has the potential to accurately measure the electron density map of tissues at low doses but the spatial resolution is prohibitive if the curved paths of protons in matter is not accounted for. The authors propose to account for an estimate of the most likely path of protons in a filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. Methods: The energy loss of protons is first binned in several proton radiographs at different distances to the proton source to exploit the depth-dependency of the estimate of the most likely path. This process is named the distance-driven binning. A voxel-specific backprojection is then used to select the adequate radiograph in the distance-driven binning in order to propagate in the pCT image the best achievable spatial resolution in proton radiographs. The improvement in spatial resolution is demonstrated using Monte Carlo simulations of resolution phantoms. Results: The spatial resolution in the distance-driven binning depended on the distance of the objects from the source and was optimal in the binned radiograph corresponding to that distance. The spatial resolution in the reconstructed pCT images decreased with the depth in the scanned object but it was always better than previous FBP algorithms assuming straight line paths. In a water cylinder with 20 cm diameter, the observed range of spatial resolutions was 0.7 - 1.6 mm compared to 1.0 - 2.4 mm at best with a straight line path assumption. The improvement was strongly enhanced in shorter 200 Degree-Sign scans. Conclusions: Improved spatial resolution was obtained in pCT images with filtered backprojection reconstruction using most likely path estimates of protons. The improvement in spatial resolution combined with the practicality of FBP algorithms compared to iterative reconstruction algorithms makes this new algorithm a candidate of choice for clinical pCT.

  4. [Proton imaging applications for proton therapy: state of the art].

    PubMed

    Amblard, R; Floquet, V; Angellier, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Hérault, J

    2015-04-01

    Proton therapy allows a highly precise tumour volume irradiation with a low dose delivered to the healthy tissues. The steep dose gradients observed and the high treatment conformity require a precise knowledge of the proton range in matter and the target volume position relative to the beam. Thus, proton imaging allows an improvement of the treatment accuracy, and thereby, in treatment quality. Initially suggested in 1963, radiographic imaging with proton is still not used in clinical routine. The principal difficulty is the lack of spatial resolution, induced by the multiple Coulomb scattering of protons with nuclei. Moreover, its realization for all clinical locations requires relatively high energies that are previously not considered for clinical routine. Abandoned for some time in favor of X-ray technologies, research into new imaging methods using protons is back in the news because of the increase of proton radiation therapy centers in the world. This article exhibits a non-exhaustive state of the art in proton imaging.

  5. Proton in SRF Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John Paul

    2011-03-31

    Hydrogen is a difficult impurity to physically deal with in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium, therefore, its properties in the metals should be well understood to allow the metal's superconducting properties to be optimized for minimum loss in the construction of resonant accelerator cavities. It is known that hydrogen is a paramagnetic impurity in niobium from NMR studies. This paramagnetism and its effect on superconducting properties are important to understand. To that end analytical induction measurements aimed at isolating the magnetic properties of hydrogen in SRF niobium are introduced along with optical reflection spectroscopy which is also sensitive to the presence of hydrogen. From the variety, magnitude and rapid kinetics found in the optical and magnetic properties of niobium contaminated with hydrogen forced a search for an atomic model. This yielded quantum mechanical description that correctly generates the activation energy for diffusion of the proton and its isotopes not only in niobium but the remaining metals for which data is available. This interpretation provides a frame work for understanding the individual and collective behavior of protons in metals.

  6. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  7. Protons are one of the limiting factors in determining sensitivity of nano surface-assisted (+)-mode LDI MS analyses.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunji; Ahn, Miri; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Jongwon; Kim, Sunghwan

    2013-10-01

    A proton source employing a nanostructured gold surface for use in (+)-mode laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) was evaluated. Analysis of perdeuterated polyaromatic hydrocarbon compound dissolved in regular toluene, perdeuterated toluene, and deuterated methanol all showed that protonated ions were generated irregardless of solvent system. Therefore, it was concluded that residual water on the surface of the LDI plate was the major source of protons. The fact that residual water remaining after vacuum drying was the source of protons suggests that protons may be the limiting reagent in the LDI process and that overall ionization efficiency can be improved by incorporating an additional proton source. When extra proton sources, such as thiolate compounds and/or citric acid, were added to a nanostructured gold surface, the protonated signal abundance increased. These data show that protons are one of the limiting components in (+)-mode LDI MS analyses employing nanostructured gold surfaces. Therefore, it has been suggested that additional efforts are required to identify compounds that can act as proton donors without generating peaks that interfere with mass spectral interpretation.

  8. Direct-current proton-beam measurements at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Joseph; Stevens, Ralph R.; Schneider, J. David; Zaugg, Thomas

    1995-09-15

    Recently, a CW proton accelerator complex was moved from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) to Los Alamos National Laboratory. This includes a 50-keV dc proton injector with a single-solenoid low-energy beam transport system (LEBT) and a CW 1.25-MeV, 267-MHz radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ). The move was completed after CRL had achieved 55-mA CW operation at 1.25 MeV using 250-kW klystrode tubes to power the RFQ. These accelerator components are prototypes for the front end of a CW linac required for an accelerator-driven transmutation linac, and they provide early confirmation of some CW accelerator components. The injector (ion source and LEBT) and emittance measuring unit are installed and operational at Los Alamos. The dc microwave ion source has been operated routinely at 50-keV, 75-mA hydrogen-ion current. This ion source has demonstrated very good discharge and H2 gas efficiencies, and sufficient reliability to complete CW RFQ measurements at CRL. Proton fraction of 75% has been measured with 550-W discharge power. This high proton fraction removes the need for an analyzing magnet. Proton LEBT emittance measurements completed at Los Alamos suggest that improved transmission through the RFQ may be achieved by increasing the solenoid focusing current. Status of the final CW RFQ operation at CRL and the installation of the RFQ at Los Alamos will be given.

  9. Direct-current proton-beam measurements at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, J.; Stevens, R.R.; Schneider, J.D.; Zaugg, T.

    1994-08-01

    Recently, a CW proton accelerator complex was moved from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) to Los Alamos National Laboratory. This includes a 50-keV dc proton injector with a single-solenoid low-energy beam transport system (LEBT) and a CW 1.25-MeV, 267-MHz radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ). The move was completed after CRL had achieved 55-mA CW operation at 1.25 MeV using 250-kW klystrode tubes to power the RFQ. These accelerator components are prototypes for the front end of a CW linac required for an accelerator-driven transmutation linac, and they provide early confirmation of some CW accelerator components. The injector (ion source and LEBT) and emittance measuring unit are installed and operational at Los Alamos. The dc microwave ion source has been operated routinely at 50-keV, 75-mA hydrogen-ion current. This ion source has demonstrated very good discharge and H{sub 2} gas efficiencies, and sufficient reliability to complete CW RFQ measurements at CRL. Proton fraction of 75% has been measured with 550-W discharge power. This high proton fraction removes the need for an analyzing magnet. Proton LEBT emittance measurements completed at Los Alamos suggest that improved transmission through the RFQ may be achieved by increasing the solenoid focusing current. Status of the final CW RFQ operation at CRL and the installation of the RFQ at Los Alamos is given.

  10. Emission of neutron-proton and proton-proton pairs in neutrino scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Simo, I.; Amaro, J. E.; Barbaro, M. B.; De Pace, A.; Caballero, J. A.; Megias, G. D.; Donnelly, T. W.

    2016-11-01

    We use a recently developed model of relativistic meson-exchange currents to compute the neutron-proton and proton-proton yields in (νμ ,μ-) scattering from 12C in the 2p-2h channel. We compute the response functions and cross sections with the relativistic Fermi gas model for different kinematics from intermediate to high momentum transfers. We find a large contribution of neutron-proton configurations in the initial state, as compared to proton-proton pairs. In the case of charge-changing neutrino scattering the 2p-2h cross section of proton-proton emission (i.e., np in the initial state) is much larger than for neutron-proton emission (i.e., two neutrons in the initial state) by a (ω , q)-dependent factor. The different emission probabilities of distinct species of nucleon pairs are produced in our model only by meson-exchange currents, mainly by the Δ isobar current. We also analyze other effects including exchange contributions and the effect of the axial and vector currents.

  11. The "heartbeat of the proton"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisskopf, Victor F.

    "official" theme was: to establish if the proton had a structure or not in the time-like region. Thus a powerful system able to detect (e+e-) and (μ+μ-) pairs could be built. Nino established in 1963 the existence of a time-like structure of the proton studying the (e+e-) channel and in 1964 studying the (μ+μ-) channel. The set up was able to do what he wanted: a simultaneous detection of electrons and μ pairs, therefore (e±μ∓) as well. Unfortunately the proton was not a point-like particle in the time-like region and therefore the source of time-like photons originated in (bar{p}p) annihilation was very depressed. In fact, using the (e+e-) and the (μ+μ-) channels, Nino established that at 6.8 (GeV/c)2 time-like four momentum transfer, the crosssection was 500 times below the expected point-like value. This result had attracted a lot of attention. Bogoliubov was very interested when in 1964 Nino went to Dubna to present the (μ+μ-) results at the International Conference on "High Energy Physics". Yang had a model that predicted a point-like structure of the proton in the time-like region. I called this series of experiments as measuring the "heartbeat of the proton". Of course there were no (e±μ∓) events, neither in the (bar{p}p) nor in the (μ-p) channel. Nevertheless a series of experiments was performed on "standard" physics, such as the discovery of many rare decay modes of mesons and the measurement of the (φ-ϕ) mixing. All these experiments could be done because Nino had invented what is now known as the "preshower" method to reject with high efficiency pions in favor of "electrons". Once it was clear that in hadronic interactions there are very few time-like photons, he asked me if I would give green light in order to consider the use of the (e±μ∓) technology in the newly being developed Frascati (e+e-) method would have been the best in order to see if a Heavy Lepton carrying its own lepton number existed. Of course he got the green light and

  12. Fragmentation pathways of protonated peptides.

    PubMed

    Paizs, Béla; Suhai, Sándor

    2005-01-01

    The fragmentation pathways of protonated peptides are reviewed in the present paper paying special attention to classification of the known fragmentation channels into a simple hierarchy defined according to the chemistry involved. It is shown that the 'mobile proton' model of peptide fragmentation can be used to understand the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides only in a qualitative manner rationalizing differences observed for low-energy collision induced dissociation of peptide ions having or lacking a mobile proton. To overcome this limitation, a deeper understanding of the dissociation chemistry of protonated peptides is needed. To this end use of the 'pathways in competition' (PIC) model that involves a detailed energetic and kinetic characterization of the major peptide fragmentation pathways (PFPs) is proposed. The known PFPs are described in detail including all the pre-dissociation, dissociation, and post-dissociation events. It is our hope that studies to further extend PIC will lead to semi-quantative understanding of the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides which could be used to develop refined bioinformatics algorithms for MS/MS based proteomics. Experimental and computational data on the fragmentation of protonated peptides are reevaluated from the point of view of the PIC model considering the mechanism, energetics, and kinetics of the major PFPs. Evidence proving semi-quantitative predictability of some of the ion intensity relationships (IIRs) of the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides is presented. PMID:15389847

  13. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the liquid mercury target for the national spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.W.; Haines, J.R.; Rogers, M.

    1997-04-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) is a high-energy, accelerator-based spallation neutron source being designed by a multi-laboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to achieve very high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. The NSNS is proposed to have a 1 MW beam of high-energy ({approximately}1 GeV) protons upgradable to 5 MW and operating at 60 Hz with a pulse duration of 0.5 {mu}s. Peak steady-state power density in the target is about 640 MW/m{sup 3} for 1 MW, whereas the pulse instantaneous peak power density is as high as 22,000 GW/m{sup 3}. The local peak temperature rise for a single pulse over it`s time-averaged value is only 6{degrees}C, but the rate of this temperature rise during the pulse is extremely fast ({approximately}12 million {degrees}C/s). In addition to the resulting thermal shock and materials compatibility concerns, key feasibility issues for the target are related to its thermal-hydraulic performance. These include proper flow distribution, flow reversals and stagnation zones, possible {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes}, cooling of the beam {open_quotes}window{close_quotes}, and the challenge of mitigating the effects of thermal shock through possible injection of helium bubbles. An analytic approach was used on the PC spreadsheet EXCEL to evaluate target design options and to determine the global T/H parameters in the current concept. The general computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX was used to simulate the detailed time-averaged two-dimensional thermal and flow distributions in the liquid mercury. In this paper, an overview of the project and the results of this preliminary work are presented. Heat transfer characteristics of liquid mercury under wetting and non-wetting conditions are discussed, and future directions of the program in T/H analysis and R&D are outlined.

  14. Proton form factors and two-photon exchange in elastic electron-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolenko, D. M.; Arrington, J.; Barkov, L. M.; Vries, H. de; Gauzshtein, V. V.; Golovin, R. A.; Gramolin, A. V.; Dmitriev, V. F.; Zhilich, V. N.; Zevakov, S. A.; Kaminsky, V. V.; Lazarenko, B. A.; Mishnev, S. I.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Neufeld, V. V.; Rachek, I. A.; Sadykov, R. Sh.; Stibunov, V. N.; Toporkov, D. K.; Holt, R. J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Proton electromagnetic form factors are among the most important sources of information about the internal structure of the proton. Two different methods for measuring these form factors, the method proposed by Rosenbluth and the polarization-transfer method, yield contradictory results. It is assumed that this contradiction can be removed upon taking into account the hard part of the contribution of two-photon exchange to the cross section for elastic electron-proton scattering. This contribution can measured experimentally via a precision comparison of the cross sections for the elastic scattering of positrons and electrons on protons. Such a measurement, performed at the VEPP-3 storage ring in Novosibirsk at the beam energies of 1.6 and 1.0 GeV for positron (electron) scattering angles in the ranges of θ{sub e} = 15°–25° and 55°–75° in the first case and in the range of θ{sub e} = 65°–105° in the second case is described in the present article. Preliminary results of this experiment and their comparison with theoretical predictions are described.

  15. Proton therapy for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Romaine C; Huh, Soon; Li, Zuofeng; Rutenberg, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is commonly offered to patients with pancreatic malignancies although its ultimate utility is compromised since the pancreas is surrounded by exquisitely radiosensitive normal tissues, such as the duodenum, stomach, jejunum, liver, and kidneys. Proton radiotherapy can be used to create dose distributions that conform to tumor targets with significant normal tissue sparing. Because of this, protons appear to represent a superior modality for radiotherapy delivery to patients with unresectable tumors and those receiving postoperative radiotherapy. A particularly exciting opportunity for protons also exists for patients with resectable and marginally resectable disease. In this paper, we review the current literature on proton therapy for pancreatic cancer and discuss scenarios wherein the improvement in the therapeutic index with protons may have the potential to change the management paradigm for this malignancy. PMID:26380057

  16. TWO-PHOTON EXCHANGE IN ELECTRON-PROTON ELASTIC SCATTERING: THEORY UPDATE

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanasev

    2007-05-21

    Recent theoretical developments in the studies of two-photon exchange effects in elastic electron-proton scattering are reviewed. Two-photon exchange mechanism is considered a likely source of discrepancy between polarized and unpolarized experimental measurements of the proton electric form factor at momentum transfers of several GeV$^2$. This mechanism predicts measurable effects that are currently studied experimentally.

  17. Oxygen and proton distributions in the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elena, Kronberg

    2016-07-01

    Distributions of plasma sheet ions give us clues on the sources, transport, acceleration and loss processes in the magnetosphere. We combine the latest studies on spatial oxygen and proton distributions at different energy ranges focusing on Cluster observations. We discuss the dependence on solar parameters and geomagnetic conditions. The solar wind entry causes a dawnward asymmetry of the proton spatial distribution. Ionospheric ions are being transported towards the duskward side. The combination of both leads to a rather symmetric proton density in the near-Earth magnetotail. Energetic ions >100 keV during active geomagnetic periods, enhanced solar wind dynamic pressure and southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field exhibit a higher intensity in the duskward sector, indicating that the ions are accelerated inductively an then drift duskward because of a strong magnetic field gradient-curvature. At the day side, such a duskward asymmetry in the energetic ion distribution is explained by ion losses through the magnetopause. However, it is still unclear why the near-Earth (<8 RE) ionospheric ions show a dawnward asymmetry during active geomagnetic times.

  18. Effects of proton irradiation and temperature on 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoletta, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells were exposed to 1.0 MeV protons at a fixed flux of 10 to the 9th power P/sq cm-sec and fluences of 10 to the 10th power, 10 to the 11th power, 10 to the 12th power and 3 X 10 to the 12th power P/sq cm. I-V curves of the cells were made at room temperature, 65 C and 165 C after each irradiation. A value of 139.5 mw/sq cm was taken as AMO incident energy rate per unit area. Degradation occurred for both uncovered 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm cells. Efficiencies are generally higher than those of comparable U.S. cells tested earlier. Damage (loss in maximum power efficiency) with proton fluence is somewhat higher for 10 ohm-cm cells, measured at the three temperatures, for fluences above 2 X 10 to the 11th power P/sq cm. Cell efficiency, as expected, changes drastically with temperature.

  19. Measurement of proton momentum distributions using a direct geometry instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, R.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Andreani, C.

    2014-12-01

    We report the results of inelastic neutron scattering measurements on bulk water and ice using the direct geometry SEQUOIA chopper spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source (USA), with incident energy Ei= 6 eV. In this set up the measurements allow to access the Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering regime. The scattering is centred at the proton recoil energy given by the impulse approximation, and the shape of the recoil peak conveys information on the proton momentum distribution in the system. The comparison with the performance of inverse geometry instruments, such as VESUVIO at the ISIS source (UK), shows that complementary information can be accessed by the use of direct and inverse geometry instruments. Analysis of the neutron Compton profiles shows that the proton kinetic energy in ice at 271 K is larger than in room temperature liquid water, in agreement with previous measurements on VESUVIO.

  20. The proton (nuclear) microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legge, G. J. F.

    1989-04-01

    The scanning proton microprobe (SPMP) is closely related to the scanning electron microprobe (SEMP) or scanning electron microscope (SEM) with X-ray detector. Though the much greater elemental sensitivity of the SPMP is inherent in the physics, the generally inferior spatial resolution of the SPMP is not inherent and big improvements are possible, As its alternative name would imply, the SPMP is often used with heavier particle beams and with nuclear rather than atomic reactions. Its versatility and quantitative accuracy have justified greater instrumentation and computer power than that associated with other microprobes. It is fast becoming an industrially and commercially important instrument and there are few fields of scientific research in which it has not played a part. Notable contributions have been made in biology, medicine, agriculture, semiconductors, geology, mineralogy, extractive metallurgy, new materials, archaeology, forensic science, catalysis, industrial problems and reactor technology.

  1. COMPACT ACCELERATOR CONCEPT FOR PROTON THERAPY

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2006-08-18

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is being developed as a compact flash x-ray radiography source. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be presented.

  2. An Examination of Proton Charge Radius Extractions from e–p Scattering Data

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, John

    2015-09-15

    A detailed examination of issues associated with proton radius extractions from elastic electron–proton scattering experiments is presented. Sources of systematic uncertainty and model dependence in the extractions are discussed, with an emphasis on how these may impact the proton charge and magnetic radii. A comparison of recent Mainz data to previous world data is presented, highlighting the difference in treatment of systematic uncertainties as well as tension between different data sets. We find several issues that suggest that larger uncertainties than previously quoted may be appropriate, but do not find any corrections which would resolve the proton radius puzzle.

  3. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Bechstedt, U.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Khoukaz, A.; Klehr, F.; Lehrach, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Stockmanns, T.; Täschner, A.; Wuestner, P.; Xu, H.

    2014-10-01

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment.

  4. Biological modeling of gold nanoparticle enhanced radiotherapy for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuting; McMahon, Stephen J.; Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown potential as a radiosensitizer for radiation therapy using photon beams. Recently, experimental studies have been carried out using proton beams showing the GNP enhanced responses in proton therapy. In this work, we established a biological model to investigate the change in survival of irradiated cells due to the radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles. Results for proton, megavoltage (MV) photon and kilovoltage (kV) photon beams are compared. For each particle source, we assessed various treatment depths, GNP cellular uptakes and sizes. We showed that kilovoltage photons caused the highest enhancement due to the high interaction probability between GNPs and kV photons. The cell survival fraction can be significantly reduced for both proton and MV photon irradiations if GNPs accumulate in the cell. For instance, the sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) is 1.33 for protons in the middle of a spread out Bragg peak for 1 µM of internalized 50 nm GNPs. If the GNPs can all be internalized into the cell nucleus, the SER for proton therapy increases from 1.33 to 1.81. The results also show that for the same mass of GNPs in the cells, one can expect the greatest sensitization by smaller GNPs, i.e. a SER of 1.33 for 1 µM of internalized 50 nm GNPs and a SER of 3.98 for the same mass of 2 nm GNPs. We concluded that if the GNPs cannot be internalized into the cytoplasm, no GNP enhancement will be observed for proton treatment. Meanwhile, proton radiotherapy can potentially be enhanced with GNPs if they can be internalized into cells, and especially the cell nucleus.

  5. Proton-bound cluster ions in ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ewing, R G; Eiceman, G A; Stone, J A

    1999-10-28

    Gaseous oxygen and nitrogen bases, both singly and as binary mixtures, have been introduced into ion mobility spectrometers to study the appearance of protonated molecules, and proton-bound dimers and trimers. At ambient temperature it was possible to simultaneously observe, following the introduction of molecule A, comparable intensities of peaks ascribable to the reactant ion (H2O)nH+, the protonated molecule AH+ and AH+ H2O, and the symmetrical proton bound dimer A2H+. Mass spectral identification confirmed the identifications and also showed that the majority of the protonated molecules were hydrated and that the proton-bound dimers were hydrated to a much lesser extent. No significant peaks ascribable to proton-bound trimers were obtained no matter how high the sample concentration. Binary mixtures containing molecules A and B, in some cases gave not only the peaks unique to the individual compounds but also peaks due to asymmetrical proton bound dimers AHB+. Such ions were always present in the spectra of mixtures of oxygen bases but were not observed for several mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen bases. The dimers, which were not observable, notable for their low hydrogen bond strengths, must have decomposed in their passage from the ion source to the detector, i.e. in a time less than approximately 5 ms. When the temperature was lowered to -20 degrees C, trimers, both homogeneous and mixed, were observed with mixtures of alcohols. The importance of hydrogen bond energy, and hence operating temperature, in determining the degree of solvation of the ions that will be observed in an ion mobility spectrometer is stressed. The possibility is discussed that a displacement reaction involving ambient water plays a role in the dissociation.

  6. Proton-bound cluster ions in ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, R. G.; Eiceman, G. A.; Stone, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Gaseous oxygen and nitrogen bases, both singly and as binary mixtures, have been introduced into ion mobility spectrometers to study the appearance of protonated molecules, and proton-bound dimers and trimers. At ambient temperature it was possible to simultaneously observe, following the introduction of molecule A, comparable intensities of peaks ascribable to the reactant ion (H2O)nH+, the protonated molecule AH+ and AH+ H2O, and the symmetrical proton bound dimer A2H+. Mass spectral identification confirmed the identifications and also showed that the majority of the protonated molecules were hydrated and that the proton-bound dimers were hydrated to a much lesser extent. No significant peaks ascribable to proton-bound trimers were obtained no matter how high the sample concentration. Binary mixtures containing molecules A and B, in some cases gave not only the peaks unique to the individual compounds but also peaks due to asymmetrical proton bound dimers AHB+. Such ions were always present in the spectra of mixtures of oxygen bases but were not observed for several mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen bases. The dimers, which were not observable, notable for their low hydrogen bond strengths, must have decomposed in their passage from the ion source to the detector, i.e. in a time less than approximately 5 ms. When the temperature was lowered to -20 degrees C, trimers, both homogeneous and mixed, were observed with mixtures of alcohols. The importance of hydrogen bond energy, and hence operating temperature, in determining the degree of solvation of the ions that will be observed in an ion mobility spectrometer is stressed. The possibility is discussed that a displacement reaction involving ambient water plays a role in the dissociation.

  7. A telescope proton recoil spectrometer for fast neutron beam-lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Nocente, M.; Ansell, S.; Frost, C. D.; Gorini, G.

    2015-07-01

    Fast neutron measurements were performed on the VESUVIO beam-line at the ISIS spallation source using a new telescope proton recoil spectrometer. Neutrons interact on a plastic target. Proton production is mainly due to elastic scattering on hydrogen nuclei and secondly due to interaction with carbon nuclei. Recoil protons are measured by a proton spectrometer, which uses in coincidence a 2.54 cm thick YAP scintillator and a 500μm thick silicon detector, measuring the full proton recoil energy and the partial deposited energy in transmission, respectively. Recoil proton spectroscopy measurements (up to Ep = 60MeV) have been interpreted by using Monte Carlo simulations of the beam-line. This instrument is of particular interest for the characterization of the ChipIr beam-line at ISIS, which was designed to feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for the irradiation of micro-electronics.

  8. Where is the proton's spin

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    There has been much recent excitement arising from the claim by the EMC collaboration that none of the proton's spin is carried by quarks. There are many textbooks, including those written by some members of this audience, which assert that the proton's spin is carried by quarks. I will review the history of deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons from polarized protons, culminating in this most recent dramatic claim. I will show that, for the last decade, data have appeared consistent with predictions of the quark model and highlight what the new and potentially exciting data are. I will conclude with suggestions for the future. 33 refs.

  9. Eta Meson Production in Proton-Proton and Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Total cross sections for eta meson production in proton - proton collisions are calculated. The eta meson is mainly produced via decay of the excited nucleon resonance at 1535 MeV. A scalar quantum field theory is used to calculate cross sections, which also include resonance decay. Comparison between theory and experiment is problematic near threshold when resonance decay is not included. When the decay is included, the comparison between theory and experiment is much better.

  10. Measuring the Mass Ratio of the Deuteron to the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, Thomas; Nicholas, Rebecca

    1998-03-01

    An experiment was conducted to measure the ratio of the mass of the deuterium nucleus to the mass of the proton. This was done using a monochromator to record the spectral lines emitted from a deuterium source containing some residual hydrogen. The spectral lines of this source were detected by a photomultiplier and recorded by a computer. The software program LabView was used to graph and record data so that the isotropic shift in the alpha emission could be extracted.

  11. Scaling Laws for Proton Acceleration from the Rear Surface of Laser-Irradiated Thin Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; d'Humières, E.; Lefebvre, E.; Borghesi, M.; Brambrink, E.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Kaluza, M.; Malka, V.; Manclossi, M.; Meyroneinc, S.; Mora, P.; Schreiber, J.; Toncian, T.; Pépin, H.; Audebert, P.

    2006-04-01

    In the last few years, intense research has been conducted on the topic of laser-accelerated ion sources and their applications. Ultra-bright beams of multi-MeV protons are produced by irradiating thin metallic foils with ultra-intense short laser pulses. These sources open new opportunities for ion beam generation and control, and could stimulate development of compact ion accelerators for many applications, in particular proton therapy of deep-seated tumours. Here we show that scaling laws deduced from fluid models reproduce well the acceleration of proton beams for a large range of laser and target parameters. These scaling laws show that, in our regime, there is an optimum in the laser pulse duration of ˜200 fs-1 ps, with a needed laser energy level of 30 to 100 J, in order to achieve e.g. 200 MeV energy protons necessary for proton therapy.

  12. High intensity proton synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, M. K.

    1986-10-01

    Strong initiatives are being pursued in a number of countries for the construction of ``kaon factory'' synchrotrons capable of producing 100 times more intense proton beams than those available now from machines such as the Brookhaven AGS and CERN PS. Such machines would yield equivalent increases in the fluxes of secondary particles (kaons, pions, muons, antiprotons, hyperons and neutrinos of all varieties)—or cleaner beams for a smaller increase in flux—opening new avenues to various fundamental questions in both particle and nuclear physics. Major areas of investigation would be rare decay modes, CP violation, meson and hadron spectroscopy, antinucleon interactions, neutrino scattering and oscillations, and hypernuclear properties. Experience with the pion factories has already shown how high beam intensities make it possible to explore the ``precision frontier'' with results complementary to those achievable at the ``energy frontier''. This paper will describe proposals for upgrading and AGS and for building kaon factories in Canada, Europe, Japan and the United States, emphasizing the novel aspects of accelerator design required to achieve the desired performance (typically 100 μA at 30 GeV).

  13. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-07-11

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid-base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron-proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ λ. Multiple-Site Electron-Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron-proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron-proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e-/2H+ MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving

  14. Interplanetary Proton Model: JPL 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.; Spitale, G.; Wang, J.

    1993-01-01

    This study was carried out to increase the acuracy and energy range of predictive models of interplanetary proton fluences. Such an estimate is often needed when spacecraft spend a signigicant amount of time in the interplanetary environmnet.

  15. POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC. In 2002, polarized proton beams were first accelerated to 100 GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. Optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limited conditions are reported.

  16. WE-G-BRE-04: Gold Nanoparticle Induced Vasculature Damage for Proton Therapy: Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y; Paganetti, H; Schuemann, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to investigate the gold nanoparticle (GNP) induced vasculature damage in a proton beam. We compared the results using a clinical proton beam, 6MV photon beam and two kilovoltage photon beams. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using TOPAS (TOol for PArticle Simulation) to obtain the spatial dose distribution in close proximity to GNPs up to 20μm distance. The spatial dose distribution was used as an input to calculate the additional dose deposited to the blood vessels. For this study, GNP induced vasculature damage is evaluated for three particle sources (proton beam, MV photon beam and kV photon beam), various treatment depths for each particle source, various GNP uptakes and three different vessel diameters (8μm, 14μm and 20μm). Results: The result shows that for kV photon, GNPs induce more dose in the vessel wall for 150kVp photon source than 250kVp. For proton therapy, GNPs cause more dose in the vessel wall at shallower treatment depths. For 6MV photons, GNPs induce more dose in the vessel wall at deeper treatment depths. For the same GNP concentration and prescribed dose, the additional dose at the inner vessel wall is 30% more than the prescribed dose for the kVp photon source, 15% more for the proton source and only 2% more for the 6MV photon source. In addition, the dose from GNPs deceases sharper for proton therapy than kVp photon therapy as the distance from the vessel inner wall increases. Conclusion: We show in this study that GNPs can potentially be used to enhance radiation therapy by causing vasculature damage using clinical proton beams. The GNP induced damage for proton therapy is less than for the kVp photon source but significantly larger than for the clinical MV photon source.

  17. Proton driver power supply system

    SciTech Connect

    C. Jach and D. Wolff

    2002-06-03

    This paper describes magnet power supply system for a proposed Proton Driver at Fermilab. The magnet power supply system consists of resonant dipole/quadrupole power supply system, quadrupole tracking, dipole correction (horizontal and vertical) and sextupole power supply systems. This paper also describes preliminary design of the power distribution system supplying 13.8 kV power to all proton Driver electrical systems.

  18. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  19. Recent Solar-Proton Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.

    2005-01-01

    The event-integrated fluences of energetic solar protons up to 2004 at the Earth have been determined and compared to previous data. The current solar cycle has been very active, and very large fluxes of solar protons have been observed that have had serious effects in the solar system and will have produced many radionuclides in the surfaces of meteorites. Such huge events are not expected again until about 2008 or 2009.

  20. Understanding the proton's spin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Myhrer; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2010-02-01

    We discuss the tremendous progress that has been towards an understanding of how the spin of the proton is distributed on its quark and gluon constituents. This is a problem that began in earnest twenty years ago with the discovery of the proton "spin crisis" by the European Muon Collaboration. The discoveries prompted by that original work have given us unprecedented insight into the amount of spin carried by polarized gluons and the orbital angular momentum of the quarks.

  1. Voltage-gated proton channels.

    PubMed

    Decoursey, Thomas E

    2012-04-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely, the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance approximately 10(3) times smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn(2+) (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B-lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H(+) for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens.

  2. High intensity protons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Minty, M.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2012-01-05

    During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

  3. 30-kV proton injector for PIGMI

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.W.; Mueller, D.W.; Sturgess, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    A 30-kV proton injector designed for matching a 31-mA proton beam into the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) section of the PIGMI accelerator has been constructed and tested. This injector uses a small efficient duoplasmatron ion source and a single-gap extraction system for creating a convergent ion beam, and a three-element unipotential einzel lens for focusing the ion beam into the RFQ. A description of this prototype injector is presented, along with the experimental data obtained during the testing of this system.

  4. The moon as the searching ground for proton decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, J. C.; Salam, A.; Sreekantan, B. V.

    1990-03-01

    The advantages of investigating proton decay at a lunar base are identified and compared to experiments on earth with attention given to long nucleon lifetimes of more than 6 x 10 exp 32 years. The primary advantage of the moon is that it has no atmosphere, atmospheric neutrinos, nor atmospheric muons; the detector type is discussed analytically and the expected background is described. The backgrounds due to all sources can be reduced by a factor of about 200 on the moon, and proton decay and neutron-antineutron oscillations can therefore be effectively studied.

  5. The Reversed-Field-Pinch (RFP) fusion neutron source: A conceptual design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathke, C. G.; Krakowski, R. A.; Miller, R. L.; Werley, K. A.

    The conceptual design of an ohmically heated, reversed-field pinch (RFP) operating at approximately 5-MW/m(2) steady-state DT fusion neutron wall loading and approximately 124-MW total fusion power is presented. These results are useful in projecting the development of a cost effective, low input power, approximately 206 MW, source of DT neutrons for large-volume approximately 10 m(3), high-fluence, 3.4 MW yr/m(2), fusion nuclear materials and technology testing.

  6. Proton therapy for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Dinesh Mayani, Devanshi

    2011-09-01

    Proton beam therapy is the latest advancement in the treatment of various types of cancer. It is a precise form of radiotherapy. It uses a beam of protons to target the cancer cells and destroys them. It scores high on precision and effectiveness when compared to other conventional cancer treatments like surgery, chemotherapy and xray radiotherapy. Proton beam therapy destroys the cancerous cells without harming the healthy cells. Thus it considerably reduces the side-effects that accompany conventional cancer treatments. Supporters say the technology allows physicians to treat a broad spectrum of cancers with few adverse effects, while more precisely targeting tumor cells with higher doses of radiation. Detractors say proton beam therapy is hugely expensive and has not been shown to be superior to conventional radiation treatment. With proton beam therapy, physicians use a cyclotron to accelerate protons and fire them directly into tumor cells with submillimeter precision. Because healthy tissue is largely spared, oncologists can, in theory, deliver much higher doses of radiation, while improving local control and reducing the risk for recurrence and morbidities.

  7. Generation of proton aurora by magnetosonic waves

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Wang, Yongfu; He, Zhaoguo; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; Zhou, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    Earth's proton aurora occurs over a broad MLT region and is produced by the precipitation of low-energy (2–10 keV) plasmasheet protons. Proton precipitation can alter chemical compositions of the atmosphere, linking solar activity with global climate variability. Previous studies proposed that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can resonate with protons, producing proton scattering precipitation. A long-outstanding question still remains whether there is another mechanism responsible for the proton aurora. Here, by performing satellite data analysis and diffusion equation calculations, we show that fast magnetosonic waves can produce trapped proton scattering that yields proton aurora. This provides a new insight into the mechanism of proton aurora. Furthermore, a ray-tracing study demonstrates that magnetosonic wave propagates over a broad MLT region, consistent with the global distribution of proton aurora. PMID:24898626

  8. Development of Proton Computed Tomography for Applications in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkirov, Vladimir; Schulte, Reinhard; Coutrakon, George; Erdelyi, Bela; Wong, Kent; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Penfold, Scott; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; McAllister, Scott; Schubert, Keith

    2009-03-10

    Determination of the Bragg peak position in proton therapy requires accurate knowledge of the electron density and ratio of effective atomic number and mass (Z/A) of the body tissues traversed. While the Z/A ratio is fairly constant for human tissues, the density of tissues varies significantly. One possibility to obtain accurate electron density information of tissues is to use protons of sufficient energy to penetrate the patient and measure their energy loss. From these transmission measurements, it is possible to reconstruct a three-dimensional map of electron densities using algebraic techniques. The interest in proton computed tomography (pCT) has considerably increased in recent years due to the more common use of proton accelerators for cancer treatment world-wide and a modern design concept based on current high-energy physics technology has been suggested. This contribution gives a status update on the pCT project carried out by the pCT Collaboration, a group of institutions sharing interest and expertise in the development of pCT. We will present updated imaging data obtained with a small pCT prototype developed in collaboration with the Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics and installed on the proton research beam line at Loma Linda University Medical Center. We will discuss hardware decisions regarding the next-generation pCT scanner, which will permit scanning of head-sized objects. Progress has also been made in the formulation of the most likely path of protons through an object and parallelizable iterative reconstruction algorithms that can be implemented on general-purpose commodity graphics processing units. Finally, we will present simulation studies for utilizing pCT technology for on-line proton dose verification and tumor imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)

  9. Cascade photons as test of protons in UHECR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, V.; Gazizov, A.; Kalashev, O.

    2016-11-01

    An isotropic component of high energy γ-ray spectrum measured by Fermi LAT constrains the proton component of UHECR. The strongest restriction comes from the highest, (580 - 820) GeV, energy bin. One more constraint on the proton component is provided by the IceCube upper bound on ultrahigh energy cosmogenic neutrino flux. We study the influence of these restrictions on the source properties, such as evolution and distribution of sources, their energy spectrum and admixture of nuclei. We also study the sensitivity of restrictions to various Fermi LAT galactic foreground models (model B being less restrictive), to the choice of extragalactic background light model and to overall normalization of the energy spectrum. We claim that the γ-ray-cascade constraints are stronger than the neutrino ones, and that however many proton models are viable. The basic parameters of such models are relatively large γg and not very large zmax. The allowance for He4 admixture also relaxes the restrictions. However we foresee that future CTA measurements of γ-ray spectrum at Eγ ≃(600 - 800) GeV, as well as resolving of more individual γ-ray sources, may rule out the proton-dominated cosmic ray models.

  10. Absolute calibration of photostimulable image plate detectors used as (0.5-20 MeV) high-energy proton detectors.

    PubMed

    Mancić, A; Fuchs, J; Antici, P; Gaillard, S A; Audebert, P

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, the absolute calibration of photostimulable image plates (IPs) used as proton detectors is presented. The calibration is performed in a wide range of proton energies (0.5-20 MeV) by exposing simultaneously the IP and calibrated detectors (radiochromic films and solid state detector CR39) to a source of broadband laser-accelerated protons, which are spectrally resolved. The final result is a calibration curve that enables retrieving the proton number from the IP signal. PMID:18681694

  11. Sparse-view proton computed tomography using modulated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jiseoc; Kim, Changhwan; Cho, Seungryong; Min, Byungjun; Kwak, Jungwon; Park, Seyjoon; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sungyong

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Proton imaging that uses a modulated proton beam and an intensity detector allows a relatively fast image acquisition compared to the imaging approach based on a trajectory tracking detector. In addition, it requires a relatively simple implementation in a conventional proton therapy equipment. The model of geometric straight ray assumed in conventional computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction is however challenged by multiple-Coulomb scattering and energy straggling in the proton imaging. Radiation dose to the patient is another important issue that has to be taken care of for practical applications. In this work, the authors have investigated iterative image reconstructions after a deconvolution of the sparsely view-sampled data to address these issues in proton CT. Methods: Proton projection images were acquired using the modulated proton beams and the EBT2 film as an intensity detector. Four electron-density cylinders representing normal soft tissues and bone were used as imaged object and scanned at 40 views that are equally separated over 360°. Digitized film images were converted to water-equivalent thickness by use of an empirically derived conversion curve. For improving the image quality, a deconvolution-based image deblurring with an empirically acquired point spread function was employed. They have implemented iterative image reconstruction algorithms such as adaptive steepest descent-projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS), superiorization method–projection onto convex sets (SM-POCS), superiorization method–expectation maximization (SM-EM), and expectation maximization-total variation minimization (EM-TV). Performance of the four image reconstruction algorithms was analyzed and compared quantitatively via contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and root-mean-square-error (RMSE). Results: Objects of higher electron density have been reconstructed more accurately than those of lower density objects. The bone, for example, has been reconstructed

  12. H- AND PROTON BEAM LOSS COMPARISON AT SNS SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Galambos, John D; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of beam loss in the superconducting part (SCL) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac for H- and protons is presented. During the experiment the nominal beam of negative hydrogen ions in the SCL was replaced by a proton beam created by insertion of a thin stripping carbon foil placed in the low energy section of the linac. The observed significant reduction in the beam loss for protons is explained by a domination of the intra beam stripping mechanism of the beam loss for H-. The details of the experiment are discussed, and a preliminary estimation of the cross section of the reaction H- + H- -> H- + H0 + e is presented. Earlier, a short description of these studies was presented in [1].

  13. Low-altitude trapped protons at the geomagnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, T. G.; Miah, M. A.; Mitchell, J. M.; Wefel, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    Geomagnetically trapped protons in the 0.6- to 9-MeV energy range were measured at latitudes near the geomagnetic equator by the Phoenix 1 experiment on board the S81-1 mission from May to November 1982. The protons show a distribution in latitude along the line of minimum magnetic field strength with a full width at half maximum of about 10 deg but with no appreciable longitudinal variation. Between 170 and 290 Km the peak proton flux shows a fifth-power altitude dependence, in contrast to previous measurements at higher altitudes, possibly demonstrating source attenuation. The efficiency of the telescope is calculated as a function of particle pitch angle and used to investigate the time dependence (1969-1982) of the intensity.

  14. Polarization of Pc1/EMIC waves and related proton auroras observed at subauroral latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, R.; Shiokawa, K.; Sakaguchi, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Connors, M.

    2012-02-01

    We have investigated the polarization of Pc1 geomagnetic pulsations and related proton auroras at subauroral latitudes, using an induction magnetometer and an all-sky camera at Athabasca, Canada (54.7°N, 246.7°E, magnetic latitude (mlat) 61.7°N). Isolated proton auroras often appear in association with Pc1 pulsations, because of proton scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the magnetosphere. We used the proton aurora as a proxy for the location and size of the Pc1 ionospheric source. For 27 Pc1 events with simultaneously observed proton auroras over 4 years from September 7, 2005 to September 6, 2009, we calculated the distances between the Pc1 ionospheric source and the observation site, normalized by the scale size of the source. We tried three different definitions of the scale size of Pc1 ionospheric source to calculate the normalized distances. We found that the rotation angle θ between the Pc1 polarization ellipse and the direction to the proton aurora changes from 90° to 0° as the normalized distance increases. For the definition of the scale sizes that gives most clear θ-transition from 90° to 0°, the transition occurs at the normalized distance ˜2.0-4.0, while it was ˜1.0-2.0 by the model calculation of Fujita and Tamao (1988). The averaged major axes tend to point toward the proton aurora at larger distances. The difference of the transition location may imply that the Pc1 ionospheric sources are larger than the isolated proton auroras, or that the inhomogenuity of the ionospheric conductivity by the proton precipitation affects the transition distances.

  15. Fast proton conducting glasses: Creation by proton implantation and a requirement for fast proton conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Hideo; Kawamura, Ken-ichi; Kawazoe, Hiroshi; Matsunami, Noriaki; Abe, Yoshihiro

    1997-02-01

    Fast proton conducting glasses have been obtained in Mg(PO3)2 glasses by implantation of protons at 120 keV to a fluence of 1×1018 cm-2. The dc conductivity and the activation energy of the conduction in the implanted glasses are 5×10-4 s cm-1 at room temperature and 0.18 eV, respectively. No fast proton conduction was observed for H+-implanted SiO2 and Ca(PO3)2 glasses. Infrared absorption spectra revealed that implanted protons are present in the form of X-OH (X=Si or P) in SiO2 and Ca(PO3)2 glasses implanted with H+ ions to 1×1018 cm-2, but exist as POH groups and molecular water H2O in Mg(PO3)2 glasses. A quantitative discussion on the proton conductivity led to the conclusion that the coexistence of acidic groups such as POH and molecular water H2O is a structural requirement for the emergence of fast proton conduction in oxide glasses. The formation of H2O in Mg(PO3)2 was understood by considering its thermodynamic stability over SiO2 and Ca(PO3)2 glasses.

  16. PRESSURE OF THE PROTON PLASMA IN THE INNER HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; Funsten, H. O.

    2013-01-10

    We develop a physical model to study the pressure of the source proton plasma in the inner heliosheath based on the IBEX Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) spectra. A multiple linear regression technique is used to parameterize the proton distribution function, by connecting the observed ENA flux spectrum from IBEX-Hi with the power-law of the model proton distribution. We calculate the partial pressure over the measured energy range, using (1) a non-parametric method by integrating the observed ENA flux, and (2) a parametric method by integrating the modeled distribution of protons in the inner heliosheath. The two sky maps of the parametric and non-parametric partial pressures are nearly identical, owing to their power-law distributions at high energies; the kappa distribution is such a function that can be reduced to a power-law in the IBEX-Hi energy range. The slight differences between the two partial pressures may indicate protons that are not described by the kappa distribution, and instead, involve newer or 'immature' (spherical shell) pick-up proton distributions. Ultimately, however, these become incorporated with the solar wind into one single proton population described by a kappa distribution. Moreover, we derive analytically (1) the ENA flux spectra, which suggests that this flux maximizes at {approx}30 eV, and (2) the differential pressure, which provides estimates of the partial pressures outside of those measured by IBEX-Hi. Under the assumptions of the modeled ENA spectra, the Ribbon emissions appear to be primarily limited to the energy ranges of IBEX-Lo and IBEX-Hi.

  17. Characterization of proton production and consumption associated with microbial metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Production or consumption of protons in growth medium during microbial metabolism plays an important role in determining the pH of the environment. Such pH changes resulting from microbial metabolism may influence the geochemical speciation of many elements in subsurface environments. Protons produced or consumed during microbial growth were measured by determining the amount of acid or base added in a 5 L batch bioreactor equipped with pH control for different species including Escherichia coli, Geobacter sulfurreducens, and Geobacter metallireducens. Results An in silico model was used to predict the proton secretion or consumption rates and the results were compared with the data. The data was found to confirm predictions of proton consumption during aerobic growth of E. coli with acetate as the carbon source. However, in contrast to proton consumption observed during aerobic growth of E. coli with acetate, proton secretion was observed during growth of Geobacter species with acetate as the donor and Fe(III) as the extracellular electron acceptor. Conclusions In this study, we have also shown that the final pH of the medium can be either acidic or basic depending on the choice of the electron acceptor for the same electron donor. In all cases, the in silico model could predict qualitatively the proton production/consumption rates obtained from the experimental data. Therefore, measurements of pH equivalents generated or consumed during growth can help characterize the microbial physiology further and can be valuable for optimizing practical applications such as microbial fuel cells, where growth associated pH changes can limit current generation rates. PMID:20089195

  18. Proton-proton Scattering Above 3 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    A. Sibirtsev, J. Haidenbauer, H.-W. Hammer S. Krewald ,Ulf-G. Meissner

    2010-01-01

    A large set of data on proton-proton differential cross sections, analyzing powers and the double-polarization parameter A{sub NN} is analyzed employing the Regge formalism. We find that the data available at proton beam momenta from 3 GeV/c to 50 GeV/c exhibit features that are very well in line with the general characteristics of Regge phenomenology and can be described with a model that includes the {rho}, {omega}, f{sub 2}, and a{sub 2} trajectories and single-Pomeron exchange. Additional data, specifically for spin-dependent observables at forward angles, would be very helpful for testing and refining our Regge model.

  19. New versions of sources for nuclear polarized negative ion production

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.G.; Shabalin, A.L. ); Wojtsekhowski, B.B. ); Belov, A.S.; Kuzik, V.E.; Plohinsky, Y.V.; Yakushev, V.P. )

    1992-10-05

    Several variants of sources for nuclear polarized negative ion production have been proposed and tested. The simple adaptation of a high intensity polarized proton source for nuclear polarized H[sup [minus

  20. Measurement of the Wolfenstein parameters for proton-proton and proton-neutron scattering at 500 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.A.

    1984-07-01

    Using liquid hydrogen and liquid deuterium targets respectively, forward angle (ten degrees to sixty degrees in the center of Mass) free proton-proton and quasielastic proton-proton and proton-neutron triple scattering data at 500 MeV have been obtained using the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The data are in reasonable agreement with recent predictions from phase shift analyses, indicating that the proton-nucleon scattering amplitudes are fairly well determined at 500 MeV. 32 references.

  1. The Structure of the Proton

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Chambers, E. E.; Hofstadter, R.

    1956-04-01

    The structure and size of the proton have been studied by means of the methods of high-energy electron scattering. The elastic scattering of electrons from protons in polyethylene has been investigated at the following energies in the laboratory system: 200, 300, 400, 500, 550 Mev. The range of laboratory angles examined has been 30 degrees to 135 degrees. At the largest angles and the highest energy, the cross section for scattering shows a deviation below that expected from a point proton by a factor of about nine. The magnitude and variation with angle of the deviations determine a structure factor for the proton, and thereby determine the size and shape of the charge and magnetic-moment distributions within the proton. An interpretation, consistent at all energies and angles and agreeing with earlier results from this laboratory, fixes the rms radius at 0.77 {plus or minus} 0.10 x 10{sup -13} cm for each of the charge and moment distributions. The shape of the density function is not far from a Gaussian with rms radius 0.70 x 10{sup -13} cm or an exponential with rms radius 0.80 x 10 {sup -13} cm. An equivalent interpretation of the experiments would ascribe the apparent size to a breakdown of the Coulomb law and the conventional theory of electromagnetism.

  2. The Spin of the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Anthony

    2008-07-01

    doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ppnp.2007.12.039
    The twenty years since the announcement of the proton spin crisis by the European Muon Collaboration has seen tremendous progress in our knowledge of the distribution of spin within the proton. The problem is reviewed, beginning with the original data and the suggestion that polarized gluons may play a crucial role in resolving the problem through the U(1) axial anomaly. The discussion continues to the present day where not only have strong limits have been placed on the amount of polarized glue in the proton but the experimental determination of the spin content has become much more precise. It is now clear that the origin of the discrepancy between experiment and the naive expectation of the fraction of spin carried by the quarks and anti-quarks in the proton lies in the non-perturabtive structure of the proton. We explain how the features expected in a modern, relativistic and chirally symmetric description of nucleon str

  3. Spin models of the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, G.P.

    1988-10-20

    We have constructed a model of the proton spin based on a broken SU(6) parameterization for the spin-weighted valence quark distributions in a longitudinally polarized proton. The polarized sea and gluon distributions are assumed to have simple relations to the corresponding unpolarized structure functions. The sum rules, which involve the non-singlet components of the structure function xg/sub 1/, imply that the valence quarks carry about 78% of the proton spin, while the spin carried by sea quarks is negative. Recent EMC data suggest a model in which the sea quarks carry a large negative polarization, whereas certain theoretical arguments favor a model with a smaller negatively polarized sea. These models are discussed with reference to the sum rules. Experiments are suggested which will discriminate between these models. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Proton aurora and substorm intensifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. C.; Xu, B.; Lyons, L. R.; Newell, P. T.; Creutzberg, F.

    1993-01-01

    Ground based measurements from the CANOPUS array of meridian scanning photometers and precipitating ion and electron data from the DMSP F9 satellite show that the electron arc which brightens to initiate substorm intensifications is formed within a region of intense proton precipitation that is well equatorward (approximately four to six degrees) of the nightside open-closed field line boundary. The precipitating protons are from a population that is energized via earthward convection from the magnetotail into the dipolar region of the magnetosphere and may play an important role in the formation of the electron arcs leading to substorm intensifications on dipole-like field lines.

  5. Active interrogation using energetic protons

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L; Chung, Kiwhan; Greene, Steven J; Hogan, Gary E; Makela, Mark; Mariam, Fesseha; Milner, Edward C; Murray, Matthew; Saunders, Alexander; Spaulding, Randy; Wang, Zhehui; Waters, Laurie; Wysocki, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Energetic proton beams provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and they can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections and neutron yields for delayed neutrons and gamma rays using 800 MeV and 4 GeV proton beams with a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Measurements of neutron energies yield suggest a signature unique to fissile material. Results are presented in this paper.

  6. Vision 20/20: Proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Alfred R.

    2009-02-15

    The first patients were treated with proton beams in 1955 at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in California. In 1970, proton beams began to be used in research facilities to treat cancer patients using fractionated treatment regimens. It was not until 1990 that proton treatments were carried out in hospital-based facilities using technology and techniques that were comparable to those for modern photon therapy. Clinical data strongly support the conclusion that proton therapy is superior to conventional radiation therapy in a number of disease sites. Treatment planning studies have shown that proton dose distributions are superior to those for photons in a wide range of disease sites indicating that additional clinical gains can be achieved if these treatment plans can be reliably delivered to patients. Optimum proton dose distributions can be achieved with intensity modulated protons (IMPT), but very few patients have received this advanced form of treatment. It is anticipated widespread implementation of IMPT would provide additional improvements in clinical outcomes. Advances in the last decade have led to an increased interest in proton therapy. Currently, proton therapy is undergoing transitions that will move it into the mainstream of cancer treatment. For example, proton therapy is now reimbursed, there has been rapid development in proton therapy technology, and many new options are available for equipment, facility configuration, and financing. During the next decade, new developments will increase the efficiency and accuracy of proton therapy and enhance our ability to verify treatment planning calculations and perform quality assurance for proton therapy delivery. With the implementation of new multi-institution clinical studies and the routine availability of IMPT, it may be possible, within the next decade, to quantify the clinical gains obtained from optimized proton therapy. During this same period several new proton therapy facilities will be built

  7. Hydrogen-Bonded Organic Frameworks (HOFs): A New Class of Porous Crystalline Proton-Conducting Materials.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Avishek; Illathvalappil, Rajith; Anothumakkool, Bihag; Sen, Arunabha; Samanta, Partha; Desai, Aamod V; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ghosh, Sujit K

    2016-08-26

    Two porous hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs) based on arene sulfonates and guanidinium ions are reported. As a result of the presence of ionic backbones appended with protonic source, the compounds exhibit ultra-high proton conduction values (σ) 0.75× 10(-2)  S cm(-1) and 1.8×10(-2)  S cm(-1) under humidified conditions. Also, they have very low activation energy values and the highest proton conductivity at ambient conditions (low humidity and at moderate temperature) among porous crystalline materials, such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs). These values are not only comparable to the conventionally used proton exchange membranes, such as Nafion used in fuel cell technologies, but is also the highest value reported in organic-based porous architectures. Notably, this report inaugurates the usage of crystalline hydrogen-bonded porous organic frameworks as solid-state proton conducting materials. PMID:27464784

  8. Proton-exchanged optical waveguides in LiTaO3: phase composition and stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuneva, M.; Christova, K.; Tonchev, S.

    2012-12-01

    Planar optical waveguide layers were obtained in Z-cut LiTaO3 crystal substrates via proton exchange. Two different media were used as proton sources: benzoic acid melt and lithium hydrogensulphate vapors, controlling the thickness of the waveguides by duration and temperature of the proton exchange process and also by post-exchange annealing. The intrinsic stress caused by the penetration of the hydrogen ions into the crystal lattice was estimated by the optical integral method. The phase composition of proton-exchanged layers was analyzed based on the mode and IR-absorption spectra. An attempt to relate the level of stress to the level of proton doping has been made.

  9. Optimization of the {sup 7}Li(p,n) proton beam energy for BNCT applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Donahue, R.J.

    1996-02-01

    The reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7} Be has been proposed as an accelerator-based source of neutrons for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). This reaction has a large steep resonance for proton energies of about 2.3 MeV which ends at about 2.5 MeV. It has generally been accepted that one should use 2.5 MeV protons to get the highest yield of neutrons for BNCT. This paper suggests that for BNCT the optimum proton energy may be about 2.3 MeV and that a proton energy of about 2.2 MeV will provide the same useful neutron fluence outside a thinner moderator as the neutron fluence from a 2.5 MeV proton beam with a thicker moderator.

  10. Plans for a proton driver at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kephart, R.D.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    , and will certainly have important implications for our understanding of cosmology and the evolution of the early Universe. The current Fermilab Program is an important part of the world-wide accelerator based effort to explore and understand the physics of neutrino oscillations. By early 2005, with both MINOS and MiniBooNE taking data, Fermilab will be able to answer some of the most pressing first-round questions raised by the discovery that neutrinos have mass. Fermilab's high-intensity neutrino beams are derived from 8- and 120-GeV proton beams. MiniBooNE is currently taking data using 8 GeV Protons from the Booster. The 120 GeV NuMI beam will start to operate in early 2005 using a 0.25 MW proton beam power from the Main Injector. Future neutrino programs will build on these existing facilities. New short and long baseline experiments have been proposed. There are proposals to increase the available number of protons at 8 and 120 GeV with the goal of addressing the full range of questions presented by neutrino oscillations. Key to that vision is a new intense proton source that usually is referred to as the Proton Driver.

  11. Measurement of pion, kaon and proton production in proton-proton collisions at TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Molina, R. Alfaro; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Prado, C. Alves Garcia; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Pedrosa, F. Baltasar Dos Santos; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Camejo, A. Batista; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Martinez, H. Bello; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Diaz, L. Calero; Caliva, A.; Villar, E. Calvo; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castellanos, J. Castillo; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Sanchez, C. Ceballos; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Barroso, V. Chibante; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Balbastre, G. Conesa; Valle, Z. Conesa del; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Morales, Y. Corrales; Maldonado, I. Cortés; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Albino, R. Cruz; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Caro, A. De; Cataldo, G. de; Cuveland, J. de; Falco, A. De; Gruttola, D. De; Marco, N. De; Pasquale, S. De; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Bari, D. Di; Mauro, A. Di; Nezza, P. Di; Corchero, M. A. Diaz; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Gimenez, D. Domenicis; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Téllez, A. Fernández; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Girard, M. Fusco; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Dziadus, E. Gladysz; Glässel, P.; Ramirez, A. Gomez; Zamora, P. González; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Corral, G. Herrera; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hilden, T. E.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Bustamante, R. T. Jimenez; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Uysal, A. Karasu; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Meethaleveedu, G. Koyithatta; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Pointe, S. L. La; Rocca, P. La; Fernandes, C. Lagana; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Monzón, I. León; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; Torres, E. López; Lowe, A.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Cervantes, I. Maldonado; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Blanco, J. Martin; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Pedreira, M. Martinez; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Masui, H.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Pérez, J. Mercado; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Zetina, L. Montaño; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Godoy, D. A. Moreira De; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Silva, A. C. Oliveira Da; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Velasquez, A. Ortiz; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Costa, H. Pereira Da; Filho, E. Pereira De Oliveira; Peresunko, D.; Lara, C. E. Pérez; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Cahuantzi, M. Rodríguez; Manso, A. Rodriguez; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Montero, A. J. Rubio; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Castro, X. Sanchez; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Seeder, K. S.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Stassinaki, M. Spyropoulou; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Toledo, A. Szanto de; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Takaki, J. D. Tapia; Peloni, A. Tarantola; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Muñoz, G. Tejeda; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Palomo, L. Valencia; Vallero, S.; Maarel, J. Van Der; Hoorne, J. W. Van; Leeuwen, M. van; Vanat, T.; Vyvre, P. Vande; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Limón, S. Vergara; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Baillie, O. Villalobos; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Haller, B. von; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-05-01

    The measurement of primary , , and production at mid-rapidity ( 0.5) in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV performed with a large ion collider experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC) is reported. Particle identification is performed using the specific ionisation energy-loss and time-of-flight information, the ring-imaging Cherenkov technique and the kink-topology identification of weak decays of charged kaons. Transverse momentum spectra are measured from 0.1 up to 3 GeV/ for pions, from 0.2 up to 6 GeV/ for kaons and from 0.3 up to 6 GeV/ for protons. The measured spectra and particle ratios are compared with quantum chromodynamics-inspired models, tuned to reproduce also the earlier measurements performed at the LHC. Furthermore, the integrated particle yields and ratios as well as the average transverse momenta are compared with results at lower collision energies.

  12. Fast proton conducting glasses: Creation by proton implantation and a requirement for fast proton conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hosono, H.; Kawamura, K.; Kawazoe, H.; Matsunami, N.; Abe, Y.

    1997-02-01

    Fast proton conducting glasses have been obtained in Mg(PO{sub 3}){sub 2} glasses by implantation of protons at 120 keV to a fluence of 1{times}10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}2}. The dc conductivity and the activation energy of the conduction in the implanted glasses are 5{times}10{sup {minus}4} scm{sup {minus}1} at room temperature and 0.18 eV, respectively. No fast proton conduction was observed for H{sup +}-implanted SiO{sub 2} and Ca(PO{sub 3}){sub 2} glasses. Infrared absorption spectra revealed that implanted protons are present in the form of X{endash}OH (X=Si or P) in SiO{sub 2} and Ca(PO{sub 3}){sub 2} glasses implanted with H{sup +} ions to 1{times}10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}2}, but exist as POH groups and molecular water H{sub 2}O in Mg(PO{sub 3}){sub 2} glasses. A quantitative discussion on the proton conductivity led to the conclusion that the coexistence of acidic groups such as POH and molecular water H{sub 2}O is a structural requirement for the emergence of fast proton conduction in oxide glasses. The formation of H{sub 2}O in Mg(PO{sub 3}){sub 2} was understood by considering its thermodynamic stability over SiO{sub 2} and Ca(PO{sub 3}){sub 2} glasses. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Theoretical uncertainties in proton lifetime estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolešová, Helena; Malinský, Michal; Mede, Timon

    2016-06-01

    We recapitulate the primary sources of theoretical uncertainties in proton lifetime estimates in renormalizable, four-dimensional & non-supersymmetric grand unifications that represent the most conservative framework in which this question may be addressed at the perturbative level. We point out that many of these uncertainties are so severe and often even irreducible that there are only very few scenarios in which an NLO approach, as crucial as it is for a real testability of any specific model, is actually sensible. Among these, the most promising seems to be the minimal renormalizable SO(10) GUT whose high-energy gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken by the adjoint and the five-index antisymmetric irreducible representations.

  14. Electron and Proton Auroral Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Frey, H. U.; Gerard, J. C.; Hubert, B.; Fuselier, S.; Spann, J. F., Jr.; Gladstone, R.; Burch, J. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Data from the Wide-band Imaging Camera (WIC) sensitive to far ultraviolet auroras and from the Spectrographic Imager (SI) channel SI12, sensitive to proton precipitation induced Lyman alpha were analyzed during a high altitude orbit segment of the IMAGE spacecraft. This segment began during the expansive phase of a substorm. The aurora changed into a double oval configuration, consisting of a set of discrete pole-ward forms and a separate diffuse auroral oval equatorwards, Although IMF Bz was strongly southward considerable activity could be seen poleward of the discrete auroras in the region that was considered to be the polar cap. The SI12 Doppler shifted Lyman alpha signature of precipitating protons show that the proton aurora is on the equatorward side of the diffuse aurora. In the following several hours the IMF Bz field changed signed. Although the general character of the proton and electron aurora did not change, the dayside aurora moved equatorward when the Bz was negative and more bright aurora was seen in the central polar cap during periods of positive Bz.

  15. Invariant Spin in the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Anthony

    2008-11-01

    We discuss recent theoretical progress in understanding the distribution of spin and orbital angular momentum in the proton. Particular attention is devoted to the effect of QCD evolution and to the distinction between "chiral" and "invariant" spin. This is particularly significant with respect to the possible presence of polarized strange quarks.

  16. Invariant Spin in the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Anthony W.

    2008-10-13

    We discuss recent theoretical progress in understanding the distribution of spin and orbital angular momentum in the proton. Particular attention is devoted to the effect of QCD evolution and to the distinction between 'chiral' and 'invariant' spin. This is particularly significant with respect to the possible presence of polarized strange quarks.

  17. Gluon polarization in the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Steven D.; Casey, Andrew; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2011-03-15

    We combine heavy-quark renormalization group arguments with our understanding of the nucleon's wave function to deduce a bound on the gluon polarization {Delta}g in the proton. The bound is consistent with the values extracted from spin experiments at COMPASS and RHIC.

  18. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  19. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The

  20. A new silicon tracker for proton imaging and dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. T.; Waltham, C.; Price, T.; Allinson, N. M.; Allport, P. P.; Casse, G. L.; Kacperek, A.; Manger, S.; Smith, N. A.; Tsurin, I.

    2016-09-01

    For many years, silicon micro-strip detectors have been successfully used as tracking detectors for particle and nuclear physics experiments. A new application of this technology is to the field of particle therapy where radiotherapy is carried out by use of charged particles such as protons or carbon ions. Such a treatment has been shown to have advantages over standard x-ray radiotherapy and as a result of this, many new centres offering particle therapy are currently under construction around the world today. The Proton Radiotherapy, Verification and Dosimetry Applications (PRaVDA) consortium are developing instrumentation for particle therapy based upon technology from high-energy physics. The characteristics of a new silicon micro-strip tracker for particle therapy will be presented. The array uses specifically designed, large area sensors with technology choices that follow closely those taken for the ATLAS experiment at the HL-LHC. These detectors will be arranged into four units each with three layers in an x-u-v configuration to be suitable for fast proton tracking with minimal ambiguities. The sensors will form a tracker capable of tracing the path of ~200 MeV protons entering and exiting a patient allowing a new mode of imaging known as proton computed tomography (pCT). This will aid the accurate delivery of treatment doses and in addition, the tracker will also be used to monitor the beam profile and total dose delivered during the high fluences used for treatment. We present here details of the design, construction and assembly of one of the four units that will make up the complete tracker along with its characterisation using radiation tests carried out using a 90Sr source in the laboratory and a 60 MeV proton beam at the Clatterbridge Cancer Centre.

  1. Proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors are the one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism has been reported with different proton pump inhibitors with prolonged oral use. We report the first reported case of possible such effect with intravenous preparation of proton pump inhibitor. This case report raises awareness among physicians worldwide of this often unknown association, as life-threatening cardiac and neuromuscular complications can arise with unrecognized hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia with proton pump inhibitors.

  2. Low-Energy Proton Testing Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Heidel, David F.; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Xapsos, M.A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony; Friendlich, M.R.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Hakey, Mark C.; Dodd, Paul E.; Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Sierawski, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Use of low-energy protons and high-energy light ions is becoming necessary to investigate current-generation SEU thresholds. Systematic errors can dominate measurements made with low-energy protons. Range and energy straggling contribute to systematic error. Low-energy proton testing is not a step-and-repeat process. Low-energy protons and high-energy light ions can be used to measure SEU cross section of single sensitive features; important for simulation.

  3. The size of the proton.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Randolf; Antognini, Aldo; Nez, François; Amaro, Fernando D; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M R; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Fernandes, Luis M P; Giesen, Adolf; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Knowles, Paul; Le Bigot, Eric-Olivier; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A M; Ludhova, Livia; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; Dos Santos, Joaquim M F; Schaller, Lukas A; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Kottmann, Franz

    2010-07-01

    The proton is the primary building block of the visible Universe, but many of its properties-such as its charge radius and its anomalous magnetic moment-are not well understood. The root-mean-square charge radius, r(p), has been determined with an accuracy of 2 per cent (at best) by electron-proton scattering experiments. The present most accurate value of r(p) (with an uncertainty of 1 per cent) is given by the CODATA compilation of physical constants. This value is based mainly on precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen and calculations of bound-state quantum electrodynamics (QED; refs 8, 9). The accuracy of r(p) as deduced from electron-proton scattering limits the testing of bound-state QED in atomic hydrogen as well as the determination of the Rydberg constant (currently the most accurately measured fundamental physical constant). An attractive means to improve the accuracy in the measurement of r(p) is provided by muonic hydrogen (a proton orbited by a negative muon); its much smaller Bohr radius compared to ordinary atomic hydrogen causes enhancement of effects related to the finite size of the proton. In particular, the Lamb shift (the energy difference between the 2S(1/2) and 2P(1/2) states) is affected by as much as 2 per cent. Here we use pulsed laser spectroscopy to measure a muonic Lamb shift of 49,881.88(76) GHz. On the basis of present calculations of fine and hyperfine splittings and QED terms, we find r(p) = 0.84184(67) fm, which differs by 5.0 standard deviations from the CODATA value of 0.8768(69) fm. Our result implies that either the Rydberg constant has to be shifted by -110 kHz/c (4.9 standard deviations), or the calculations of the QED effects in atomic hydrogen or muonic hydrogen atoms are insufficient. PMID:20613837

  4. Mitochondrial proton and electron leaks

    PubMed Central

    Jastroch, Martin; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Mookerjee, Shona; Treberg, Jason R.; Brand, Martin D.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial proton and electron leak have a major impact on mitochondrial coupling efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species. In the first part of this chapter, we address the molecular nature of the basal and inducible proton leak pathways, and their physiological importance. The basal leak is unregulated, and a major proportion can be attributed to mitochondrial anion carriers, while the proton leak through the lipid bilayer appears to be minor. The basal proton leak is cell-type specific and correlates with metabolic rate. The inducible leak through the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) and uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can be activated by fatty acids, superoxide, or peroxidation products. The physiological role of inducible leak through UCP1 in mammalian brown adipose tissue is heat production, whereas the roles of non-mammalian UCP1 and its paralogous proteins, in particular UCP2 and UCP3, are not yet resolved. The second part of the chapter focuses on the electron leak that occurs in the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Exit of electrons prior to the reduction of oxygen to water at cytochrome c oxidase causes the production of superoxide. As the mechanisms of electron leak are crucial to understanding their physiological relevance, we summarize the mechanisms and topology of electron leak from Complex I and III in studies using isolated mitochondria. We also highlight recent progress and challenges of assessing electron leak in the living cell. Finally, we emphasise the importance of proton and electron leak as therapeutic targets in body weight regulation and insulin secretion. PMID:20533900

  5. Proton structure functions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, Bruno

    2001-10-01

    The electron-proton collider HERA, like an electron-mycroscope, explores the structure of the proton down to 10-16 cm and up to the situation of very high parton densities. The proton energy was upgraded from 820 to 920 GeV in the Fall of '98 and the luminosity has also substantially improved, with another factor of 3 upgrade expected to follow this year. Inclusive proton structure functions have been studied with incident e+ and e- of 27 GeV in the neutral (NC) and charged (CC) current interactions as functions of the squared four-momentum transfer, Q2, and of the fractional proton momentum carried by partons, x. The structure function F2, as well as the γ-Z0 interference term xF3, have been measured in a range of Q2 and 1/x that extends by orders of magnitude that reached by fixed target experiments. The DGLAP evolution equations [1] allow for a perturbative NLO QCD fit of the measured non-perturbative structure functions in the available kinematic range: αS and the gluon density at low x are fitted at the same time with good precision. The longitudinal structure function, FL, can be determined within the DGLAP formalism. With CC, the electroweak unification has been tested; at high x, a first flavor decomposition of the light quarks is achieved. The contribution to F2 of the charm quark has been measured and results to be relevant. Bounds on the radius of quarks and on compositeness are derived from the data at the highest Q2, 100

  6. Proton structure functions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H1; ZEUS Collaborations,

    2001-10-01

    The electron-proton collider HERA, like an electron-mycroscope, explores the structure of the proton down to 10-16 cm and up to the situation of very high parton densities. The proton energy was upgraded from 820 to 920 GeV in the Fall of '98 and the luminosity has also substantially improved, with another factor of 3 upgrade expected to follow this year. Inclusive proton structure functions have been studied with incident e+ and e- of 27 GeV in the neutral (NC) and charged (CC) current interactions as functions of the squared four-momentum transfer, Q2, and of the fractional proton momentum carried by partons, x. The structure function F2, as well as the γ-Z0 interference term xF3, have been measured in a range of Q2 and 1/x that extends by orders of magnitude that reached by fixed target experiments. The DGLAP evolution equations [1] allow for a perturbative NLO QCD fit of the measured non-perturbative structure functions in the available kinematic range: αS and the gluon density at low x are fitted at the same time with good precision. The longitudinal structure function, FL, can be determined within the DGLAP formalism. With CC, the electroweak unification has been tested; at high x, a first flavor decomposition of the light quarks is achieved. The contribution to F2 of the charm quark has been measured and results to be relevant. Bounds on the radius of quarks and on compositeness are derived from the data at the highest Q2, 100

  7. Electrochemical model of the function of the cytochrome c oxidase proton pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojković, Branko P.; McMahon, Benjamin H.; Martin, R. L.; Gennis, Robert B.

    2000-03-01

    We combine quantum chemical calculations with an electrostatic model of the oxidase protein (in which the protein is seen as a non-uniform dielectric) to quantify the potential energy changes as the protein cycles through the four electron reduction of molecular oxygen to water. We find that the electric fields obtained directly from the quantum chemical calculations are adequate to explain the active translocation of four protons and joining of four protons and electrons at the oxygen, all against a 200 mV potential. The source of energy is the 500 mV per electron of redox energy released by bringing an electron from cytochrome c to the active binuclear site of the oxidase protein. Each electron entering the active site is accompanied by a proton taken up rapidly through the D channel. Two protons are pumped by the protons entering via the K channel, which are slower than D channel protons, but chemically stabilized at the active site, thus pushing the D channel protons ahead of them. Two other protons are forced out the high potential side of the oxidase when electrons move from the copper ligands and the heme onto the oxygen molecule during the 0=0 bond cleavage step.

  8. Two-photon exchange corrections in elastic lepton-proton scattering at small momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomalak, Oleksandr; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, elastic electron-proton scattering experiments, with and without polarized protons, gave strikingly different results for the electric over magnetic proton form factor ratio. A mysterious discrepancy (``the proton radius puzzle'') has been observed in the measurement of the proton charge radius in muon spectroscopy experiments versus electron spectroscopy and electron scattering. Two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions are the largest source of the hadronic uncertainty in these experiments. We compare the existing models of the elastic contribution to TPE correction in lepton-proton scattering. A subtracted dispersion relation formalism for the TPE in electron-proton scattering has been developed and tested. Its relative effect on cross section is in the 1 - 2 % range for a low value of the momentum transfer. An alternative dispersive evaluation of the TPE correction to the hydrogen hyperfine splitting was found and applied. For the inelastic TPE contribution, the low momentum transfer expansion was studied. In addition with the elastic TPE it describes the experimental TPE fit to electron data quite well. For a forthcoming muon-proton scattering experiment (MUSE) the resulting TPE was found to be in the 0 . 5 - 1 % range, which is the planned accuracy goal.

  9. Which hydrogen atom of toluene protonates PAH molecules in (+)-mode APPI MS analysis?

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Arif; Ghosh, Manik Kumer; Choi, Myung Chul; Choi, Cheol Ho; Kim, Sunghwan

    2013-03-01

    A previous study (Ahmed, A. et al., Anal. Chem. 84, 1146-1151( 2012) reported that toluene used as a solvent was the proton source for polyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs) that were subjected to (+)-mode atmospheric-pressure photoionization. In the current study, the exact position of the hydrogen atom in the toluene molecule (either a methyl hydrogen or an aromatic ring hydrogen) involved in the formation of protonated PAH ions was investigated. Experimental analyses of benzene and anisole demonstrated that although the aromatic hydrogen atom of toluene did not contribute to the formation of protonated anthracene, it did contribute to the formation of protonated acridine. Thermochemical data and quantum mechanical calculations showed that the protonation of anthracene by an aromatic ring hydrogen atom of toluene is endothermic, while protonation by a methyl hydrogen atom is exothermic. However, protonation of acridine by either an aromatic ring hydrogen or a methyl hydrogen atom of toluene is exothermic. The different behavior of acridine and anthracene was attributed to differences in gas-phase basicity. It was concluded that both types of hydrogen in toluene can be used for protonation of PAH compounds, but a methyl hydrogen atom is preferred, especially for non-basic compounds.

  10. Optimized enzymatic dual functions of PaPrx protein by proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul-Hong; Lee, Seung Sik; Kim, Kye Ryung; Jung, Myung Hwan; Lee, Sang Yeol; Cho, Eun Ju; Singh, Sudhir; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of proton irradiation on the function and structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa peroxiredoxin (PaPrx). Polyacrylamide gel demonstrated that PaPrx proteins exposed to proton irradiation at several doses exhibited simultaneous formation of high molecular weight (HMW) complexes and fragmentation. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) analysis revealed that the number of fragments and very low molecular weight (LMW) structures increased as the proton irradiation dose increased. The peroxidase activity of irradiated PaPrx was preserved, and its chaperone activity was significantly increased by increasing the proton irradiation dose. The chaperone activity increased about 3–4 fold after 2.5 kGy proton irradiation, compared with that of non-irradiated PaPrx, and increased to almost the maximum activity after 10 kGy proton irradiation. We previously obtained functional switching in PaPrx proteins, by using gamma rays and electron beams as radiation sources, and found that the proteins exhibited increased chaperone activity but decreased peroxidase activity. Interestingly, in this study we newly found that proton irradiation could enhance both peroxidase and chaperone activities. Therefore, we can suggest proton irradiation as a novel protocol for conserved 2-Cys protein engineering. PMID:23753570

  11. Nonplanarity and the protonation behavior of porphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    SOMMA,MARIA S.; MEDFORTH,CRAIG J.; TH,KEVIN M.; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.

    2000-03-21

    {sup 1}H NMR studies of the protonation of highly nonplanar porphyrins with strong acids reveal the presence of the previously elusive monocation, and show that its stability can be related to the amount of saddle distortion induced by protonation; the amount of saddle distortion for a porphyrin dication is also found to correlate well with the rate of intermolecular proton transfer.

  12. PULSED POWER APPLICATIONS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Pulsed power technology has been applied in particle accelerators and storage rings for over four decades. It is most commonly used in injection, extraction, beam manipulation, source, and focusing systems. These systems belong to the class of repetitive pulsed power. In this presentation, we review and discuss the history, present status, and future challenge of pulsed power applications in high intensity proton accelerators and storage rings.

  13. Generation and manipulation of proton beams by ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Nickles, P. V.; Schnuerer, M.; Steinke, S.; Sokollik, T.; Sandner, W.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Andreev, A.

    2009-07-25

    Applying a 21-channel Thomson spectrometer setup has revealed further insight to the connection between spatial and spectral beam characteristic of laser accelerated protons. Analyzing the central emission cone (plus/minus 3 degree) shows an increasing beam divergency for protons with increasing kinetic energies. This holds for protons emitted from the same source area at the target surface. The whole beam is a well ordered system with a clear functional dependence of trajectories on proton energy. This is a consequence of the source dynamics which is determined by the sheath development in time. Thus laser-driven ion beams can be advantageously manipulated for further propagation to an experiment. We demonstrate this capability with a magnetic quadrupole and obtain a nearly parallel and monochromatized beam. Furthermore we set our achievements in beam production efficiency into context with other laser systems and demonstrate the potential of very-thin target foils.

  14. Influence of transverse diffusion within the proton beam fast-ignitor scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D.; Maynard, Gilles; Kurilenkov, Yuri K.

    2004-12-01

    Fast ignition of an inertial confinement fusion target by an energetic proton beam is here re-examined. We put special emphasis on the role of the transverse dispersion of the beam induced during its travel between the proton source and the compressed deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. The theoretical model and the computer code used in our calculations are presented. Different beam initial energy distributions are analyzed. We found that the beam exhibits small collective effects while multiple scattering collisions provide a substantial transverse dispersion of the beam. Therefore, the nuclear dispersion imposes severe restrictions on the schemes for fast ignitor even considering an ideal monoenergetic and noncorrelated proton beam.

  15. Cosmogenic Neutrinos Challenge the Cosmic-ray Proton Dip Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Jonas; Boncioli, Denise; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter

    2016-07-01

    The origin and composition of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) remain a mystery. The proton dip model describes their spectral shape in the energy range above 109 GeV by pair production and photohadronic interactions with the cosmic microwave background. The photohadronic interactions also produce cosmogenic neutrinos peaking around 109 GeV. We test whether this model is still viable in light of recent UHECR spectrum measurements from the Telescope Array experiment and upper limits on the cosmogenic neutrino flux from IceCube. While two-parameter fits have been already presented, we perform a full scan of the three main physical model parameters: source redshift evolution, injected proton maximal energy, and spectral index. We find qualitatively different conclusions compared to earlier two-parameter fits in the literature: a mild preference for a maximal energy cutoff at the sources instead of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff, hard injection spectra, and strong source evolution. The predicted cosmogenic neutrino flux exceeds the IceCube limit for any parameter combination. As a result, the proton dip model is challenged at more than 95% C.L. This is strong evidence against this model independent of mass composition measurements.

  16. Threshold pion production from proton-proton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.

    1995-08-01

    We showed that the threshold production of {pi}{sup 0}pp, {pi}{sup +}np, and {pi}{sup +}d from proton-proton collisions can be consistently described by a model consisting of pion s-wave rescattering and N{bar N} pair-terms of heavy-meson exchanges. The large difference between {sigma}{sup tot}(pp {yields} {pi}{sup +}d) and {sigma}{sup tot}(pp {yields} {pi}{sup +}np) is understood from the orthogonality of the deuteron and the np scattering wave functions. In a calculation using the Paris potential, we find that the data can be reproduced best by using a soft {pi}NN form factor with {Delta} = 650 MeV for a monopole form. This is consistent with our earlier studies of pion production in the A-excitation region. A paper describing this result was submitted for publication.

  17. Calculation of Top Squark Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Linville, Andrea J.; /Washington U., St. Louis /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    Though the Standard Model of particle physics is an elegant theory which has been studied extensively for decades, it leaves many fundamental questions unanswered and is thus widely believed to be incomplete. Possible extensions to the Standard Model (SM) have been postulated and are in the process of being investigated experimentally. The most promising extension is the Minimal Supersymmetric Model (MSSM) which relates every SM particle to a superpartner that differs by 1/2 unit of spin. The lightest supersymmetric quark, or squark, is expected to be the stop, and the search for this particle is an important experimental task. In this analysis, we use parton-model methods to predict the stop production cross section in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies.

  18. Energy dependence of the characteristic decay time of proton fluxes in solar cosmic ray events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daibog, E. I.; Logachev, Yu. I.; Kecskemety, K.

    2008-02-01

    Energetic solar proton events within the energy interval 1-48 MeV at the stage of their decay are considered over the period of 1974-2001. The dependence of the characteristic decay time on the proton energy in the assumed power-law representation τ( E) = E - n is analyzed for the events with an exponential decay form. The dependence of n on the heliolongitude of the flare (the particles source on the Sun) is studied.

  19. Proton-Proton Weak Capture in Chiral Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Marcucci, Laura Elisa; Schiavilla, Rocco; Viviani, MIchele

    2013-05-01

    The astrophysical $S$-factor for proton-proton weak capture is calculated in chiral effective field theory over the center-of-mass relative-energy range 0--100 keV. The chiral two-nucleon potential derived up to next-to-next-to-next-to leading order is augmented by the full electromagnetic interaction including, beyond Coulomb, two-photon and vacuum-polarization corrections. The low-energy constants (LEC's) entering the weak current operators are fixed so as to reproduce the $A=3$ binding energies and magnetic moments, and the Gamow-Teller matrix element in tritium $\\beta$ decay. Contributions from $S$ and $P$ partial waves in the incoming two-proton channel are retained. The $S$-factor at zero energy is found to be $S(0)=(4.030 \\pm 0.006)\\times 10^{-23}$ MeV fm$^2$, with a $P$-wave contribution of $0.020\\times 10^{-23}$ MeV fm$^2$. The theoretical uncertainty is due to the fitting procedure of the LEC's and to the cutoff dependence. It is shown that polynomial fits to parametrize the energy dependence of the $S$-factor are inherently unstable.

  20. Proton-proton weak capture in chiral effective field theory.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, L E; Schiavilla, R; Viviani, M

    2013-05-10

    The astrophysical S factor for proton-proton weak capture is calculated in chiral effective field theory over the center-of-mass relative-energy range 0-100 keV. The chiral two-nucleon potential derived up to next-to-next-to-next-to leading order is augmented by the full electromagnetic interaction including, beyond Coulomb, two-photon and vacuum-polarization corrections. The low-energy constants entering the weak current operators are fixed so as to reproduce the A=3 binding energies and magnetic moments and the Gamow-Teller matrix element in tritium β decay. Contributions from S and P partial waves in the incoming two-proton channel are retained. The S factor at zero energy is found to be S(0)=(4.030±0.006)×10(-23) MeV fm(2), with a P-wave contribution of 0.020×10(-23) MeV fm(2). The theoretical uncertainty is due to the fitting procedure of the low-energy constants and to the cutoff dependence.

  1. Proton-proton weak capture in chiral effective field theory.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, L E; Schiavilla, R; Viviani, M

    2013-05-10

    The astrophysical S factor for proton-proton weak capture is calculated in chiral effective field theory over the center-of-mass relative-energy range 0-100 keV. The chiral two-nucleon potential derived up to next-to-next-to-next-to leading order is augmented by the full electromagnetic interaction including, beyond Coulomb, two-photon and vacuum-polarization corrections. The low-energy constants entering the weak current operators are fixed so as to reproduce the A=3 binding energies and magnetic moments and the Gamow-Teller matrix element in tritium β decay. Contributions from S and P partial waves in the incoming two-proton channel are retained. The S factor at zero energy is found to be S(0)=(4.030±0.006)×10(-23) MeV fm(2), with a P-wave contribution of 0.020×10(-23) MeV fm(2). The theoretical uncertainty is due to the fitting procedure of the low-energy constants and to the cutoff dependence. PMID:23705703

  2. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Jin Jung; Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui; Jung, Seunho; Kwon, Chanho

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  3. Microscopic dynamics of a base protonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsgaard, Bjørn; Petersen, Christian; Thøgersen, Jan; Keiding, Søren Rud; Jensen, Svend J. Knak

    2008-10-01

    The protonation of the base peroxynitrite in aqueous solution is investigated by way of the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics technique. It is found that the protonation proceeds through an increase in the vibration amplitude of the hydrogen bond between the base and the hydronium ion. When the amplitude gets sufficiently large a proton may oscillate a few times between the base and the hydronium ion before it remains as part of peroxynitrous acid. The start of the protonation requires a certain orientation of the hydrogen bond. The estimated protonation time agrees well with the one obtained from femtosecond UV experiments.

  4. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of proton conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masłowski, T.; Drzewiński, A.; Ulner, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Zdanowska-Frączek, M.; Nordlund, K.; Kuronen, A.

    2014-07-01

    The kinetic Monte Carlo method is used to model the dynamic properties of proton diffusion in anhydrous proton conductors. The results have been discussed with reference to a two-step process called the Grotthuss mechanism. There is a widespread belief that this mechanism is responsible for fast proton mobility. We showed in detail that the relative frequency of reorientation and diffusion processes is crucial for the conductivity. Moreover, the current dependence on proton concentration has been analyzed. In order to test our microscopic model the proton transport in polymer electrolyte membranes based on benzimidazole C7H6N2 molecules is studied.

  5. Excited state of protonated benzene and toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Esteves-López, Natalia; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2015-08-21

    We present photo-fragmentation electronic spectra of the simplest protonated aromatic molecules, protonated benzene and toluene, recorded under medium resolution conditions and compared with the photo-fragmentation spectrum of protonated pyridine. Despite the resolution and cold temperature achieved in the experiment, the electronic spectra of protonated benzene and toluene are structure-less, thus intrinsically broadened. This is in agreement with the large geometrical changes and the fast dynamic toward internal conversion predicted by ab initio calculations for protonated benzene [Rode et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 5865–5873 (2009)].

  6. Compact proton spectrometers for measurements of shock

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Zylstra, A; Frenje, J A; Seguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G; Dewald, E; Doeppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Hicks, D; Landen, O L; London, R; Meezan, N B

    2012-05-02

    The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign (NIC) diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

  7. Proton hydrates as soft ion/ion proton transfer reagents for multiply deprotonated biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Jeremiah J.; Hodges, Brittany D. M.; Saad, Ola M.; Leary, Julie A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2008-10-01

    Ion/ion proton transfer from protonated strong gaseous bases such as pyridine and 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (i.e., the proton sponge), to multiply charged anions derived from a sulfated pentasaccharide drug, Arixtra(TM), gives rise to extensive fragmentation of the oligosaccharide. This drug serves as a model for sulfated glycosaminoglycans, an important class of polymers in glycobiology. The extent of fragmentation appears to correlate with the proton affinity of the molecule used to transfer the proton, which in turn correlates with the reaction exothermicity. Consistent with tandem mass spectrometry results, anions with sodium counter-ions are more stable with respect to fragmentation under ion/ion proton transfer conditions than ions of the same charge state with protons counter-ions. Proton hydrates were found to give rise to much less anion fragmentation and constitute the softest protonation agents thus far identified for manipulating the charge states of multiply charged biopolymer anions. The reaction exothermicities associated with proton hydrates comprised of five or more water molecules are lower than that for protonated proton sponge, which is among the softest reagents thus far examined for ion/ion proton transfer reactions. The partitioning of ion/ion reaction exothermicity among all of the degrees of freedom of the products may also differ for proton hydrates relative to protonated molecules. However, a difference in energy partitioning need not be invoked to rationalize the results reported here.

  8. Coronal shock acceleration and heliospheric transport of solar energetic protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozarev, Kamen Asenov

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CME) in the Sun's atmosphere produce highly energetic charged particles during violent bursts of activity. Protons, the most numerous and important species of these solar energetic particles (SEP), accelerate and propagate throughout the heliosphere, probing the interplanetary transport conditions. They also present a significant radiation hazard to space operations. Nevertheless, SEP acceleration in the low corona is currently not well constrained and poorly understood. In this dissertation, I examine off-limb extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave dynamics between 1.3 and 2.0 solar radii in the corona, and I show that the EUV signatures are consistent with CME-driven shocks. Therefore, such shocks may form very low in the corona. I also develop a data-driven model for estimating the maximum energy to which protons may be accelerated in coronal shocks. I apply it to an observed shock and show that it may accelerate protons up to tens of MeV during its fast coronal passage, consistent with in-situ observations. To explore further coronal SEP acceleration by CME-driven shocks, I modify a global, 3D numerical model for interplanetary SEP transport for the coronal conditions, and adapt it to incorporate results from a realistic magnetohydrodynamic coronal and CME model. Furthermore, I apply a diffusive shock acceleration model, which explicitly treats proton energization at traveling shocks, to an MHD simulation of a real CME event. I find that the source population becomes strongly accelerated. In addition, I simulate the proton transport between the Sun and Earth, and find that the modeled fluxes are consistent with particle observations near Earth. Results suggest that CME-driven shocks in the corona may be the primary source of SEPs in solar storms. In addition, conditions along coronal shock fronts vary greatly, influencing the amount of acceleration. Finally, I model the global proton transport between Earth and 5 AU during a

  9. Methods and apparatus for producing and storing positrons and protons

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2010-07-06

    Apparatus for producing and storing positrons may include a trap that defines an interior chamber therein and that contains an electric field and a magnetic field. The trap may further include a source material that includes atoms that, when activated by photon bombardment, become positron emitters to produce positrons. The trap may also include a moderator positioned adjacent the source material. A photon source is positioned adjacent the trap so that photons produced by the photon source bombard the source material to produce the positron emitters. Positrons from the positron emitters and moderated positrons from the moderator are confined within the interior chamber of the trap by the electric and magnetic fields. Apparatus for producing and storing protons are also disclosed.

  10. Pulsating proton aurora caused by rising tone Pc1 waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, R.; Shiokawa, K.; Omura, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Miyoshi, Y.; Sakaguchi, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Connors, M.

    2016-02-01

    We found rising tone emissions with a dispersion of ˜1 Hz per several tens of seconds in the dynamic spectrum of a Pc1 geomagnetic pulsation (Pc1) observed on the ground. These Pc1 rising tones were successively observed over ˜30 min from 0250 UT on 14 October 2006 by an induction magnetometer at Athabasca, Canada (54.7°N, 246.7°E, magnetic latitude 61.7°N). Simultaneously, a Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms panchromatic (THEMIS) all-sky camera detected pulsations of an isolated proton aurora with a period of several tens of seconds, ˜10% variations in intensity, and fine structures of 3° in magnetic longitudes. The pulsations of the proton aurora close to the zenith of ATH have one-to-one correspondences with the Pc1 rising tones. This suggests that these rising tones scatter magnetospheric protons intermittently at the equatorial region. The radial motion of the magnetospheric source, of which the isolated proton aurora is a projection, can explain the central frequency increase of Pc1, but not the shorter period (tens of seconds) frequency increase of ˜1 Hz in Pc1 rising tones. We suggest that EMIC-triggered emissions generate the frequency increase of Pc1 rising tones on the ground and that they also cause the Pc1 pearl structure, which has a similar characteristic time.

  11. Proton emission - new results and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, R. D.

    2016-09-01

    Proton emission is the radioactive decay mode that is expected to determine the limit of observable proton-rich nuclei for most elements. Considerable progress has been made in the study of proton-emitting nuclei since the first observation of direct proton emission nearly 50 years ago. This has led to improvements in our understanding of this decay process and provided invaluable nuclear structure data far from the valley of beta stability. The rapid fall in half-lives with increasing neutron deficiency when proton emission dominates makes it likely that for some elements, the lightest isotopes whose ground states can be observed in conventional experiments have already been reached. The enhanced stability against proton emission of the recently discovered high-lying isomer in 158Ta raises the possibility that proton emission from multiparticle isomers could be observed in nuclei beyond the expected boundaries of the nuclear landscape.

  12. Dynamic Protonation Equilibrium of Solvated Acetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Wei; Frigato, Tomaso; Straatsma, TP; Helms, Volkhard H.

    2007-04-13

    For the first time, the dynamic protonation equilibrium between an amino acid side chain analogue and bulk water as well as the diffusion properties of the excess proton were successfully reproduced through unbiased computer simulations. During a 50 ns Q-HOP MD simulation, two different regimes of proton transfer were observed. Extended phases of frequent proton swapping between acetic acid and nearby water were separated by phases where the proton freely diffuses in the simulation box until it is captured again by acetic acid. The pKa of acetic acid was calculated around 3.0 based on the relative population of protonated and deprotonated states and the diffusion coefficient of excess proton was computed from the average mean squared displacement in the simulation. Both calculated values agree well with the experimental measurements.

  13. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  14. Protonated water clusters in TPC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Yunus; Kalkan, Yalçın; Veenhof, Rob

    2016-07-01

    Water vapour is added to the ALICE TPC gas to enhance its stability. These polar molecules create large protonated water clusters around a H+ core. In this context, the reactions H3O+(H2 O) n - 1 +H2 O →H3O+(H2O)n (n=1-9) were studied in the gas phase. Structures for these clusters are suggested and the most stable structures for each cluster size are shown. The thermodynamic parameters Δ Hn-1,n0, Δ Gn-1,n0, Δ Sn-1,n0 and equilibrium constants K n - 1 , n for the reaction were calculated to determine the size of the water clusters. The results are close to experimental data found in the literature. Protonated water clusters at stp have a size of 6-9 which corresponds to a mass of 127.1 - 181.2 g / mole.

  15. Proton affinities of hydrated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadbeigi, Younes

    2016-09-01

    Proton affinities (PA) of non-hydrated, M, and hydrated forms, M(H2O)1,2,3, of 20 organic molecules including alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones and amines were calculated by the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. For homogeneous families, linear correlations were observed between PAs of the M(H2O)1,2,3 and the PAs of the non-hydrated molecules. Also, the absolute values of the hydration enthalpies of the protonated molecules decreased linearly with the PAs. The correlation functions predicted that for an amine with PA < 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is larger than the corresponding PA, while for an amine with PA > 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is smaller than the PA.

  16. Proton Resonance Spectroscopy -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, Jr, J F

    2009-07-27

    This report summarizes work supported by the DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER40990 during its duration from June 1996 to May 2009. Topics studied include (1) statistical descriptions of nuclear levels and measurements of proton resonances relevant to such descriptions, including measurements toward a complete level scheme for 30P, (2) the development of methods to estimate the missing fraction of levels in a given measurement, and (3) measurements at HRIBF relevant to nuclear astrophysics.

  17. Proton Therapy for Thoracoabdominal Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Hideyuki; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Tokuuye, Koichi

    In advanced-stage disease of certain thoracoabdominal tumors, proton therapy (PT) with concurrent chemotherapy may be an option to reduce side effects. Several technological developments, including a respiratory gating system and implantation of fiducial markers for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), are necessary for the treatment in thoracoabdominal tumors. In this chapter, the role of PT for tumors of the lung, the esophagus, and liver are discussed.

  18. Proton synchrotron radiation at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, Randy; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    While protons are not generally associated with synchrotron radiation, they do emit visible light at high enough energies. This paper presents an overview of the use of synchrotron radiation in the Tevatron to measure transverse emittances and to monitor the amount of beam in the abort gap. The latter is necessary to ensure a clean abort and prevent quenches of the superconducting magnets and damage to the silicon detectors of the collider experiments.

  19. Proton Beams from Nanotube Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Masakatsu; Tanaka, Motohiko

    2013-10-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) is known to have extraordinary material and mechanical properties. Here we propose a novel ion acceleration scheme with nanometer-size CNT working at such an extreme circumstance as temperatures higher than billions of degree and durations shorter than tens of femtosecond, dubbed as nanotube accelerator, with which quasimonoenergetic and collimated MeV-order proton beams are generated. In nanotube accelerators, CNTs with fragments of a hydrogen compound embedded inside are irradiated by an ultrashort ultraintense laser. Under such laser and target conditions, low-Z materials such as hydrogen and carbon will be fully ionized. Substantial amount of electrons of the system are then blown off by the brutal laser electric field within only a few laser cycles. This leads to a new type of ion acceleration, in which the nanotube and embedded materials play the roles of a gun barrel and bullets, respectively, to produce highly collimated and quasimonoenergetic proton beams. Three-dimensional particle simulations, that take all the two-body Coulomb interactions into account, demonstrate generation of quasimonoenergetic 1.5-MeV proton beams under a super-intense electrostatic field ~ 1014 V m-1.

  20. Solid-state proton conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Jewulski, J.R.; Osif, T.L.; Remick, R.J.

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this program was to survey the field of solid-state proton conductors (SSPC), identify conductors that could be used to develop solid-state fuel cells suitable for use with coal derived fuel gases, and begin the experimental research required for the development of these fuel cells. This document covers the following topics: the history of developments and current status of the SSPC, including a review of proton conducting electrolyte structures, the current status of the medium temperature SSPC development, electrodes for moderate temperature (SSPC) fuel cell, basic material and measurement techniques applicable for SSPC development, modeling and optimization studies. Correlation and optimization studies, to include correlation studies on proton conduction and oxide cathode optimization for the SSPC fuel cell. Experiments with the SSPC fuel cells including the fabrication of the electrolyte disks, apparatus for conducting measurements, the strontium-cerium based electrolyte, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with solid foil electrodes, the barium-cerium based electrolyte with porous electrodes, and conduction mechanisms. 164 refs., 27 figs., 13 tabs.

  1. 1.5 MW turbine installation at NREL's NWTC on Aug. 21

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Generating 20 percent of the nation's electricity from clean wind resources will require more and bigger wind turbines. NREL is installing two large wind turbines at the National Wind Technology Center to examine some of the industry's largest machines and address issues to expand wind energy on a commercial scale.

  2. Engineering aspects of the application of structural materials in the 5 MW-ESS-mercury-target

    SciTech Connect

    Guttek, B.

    1996-06-01

    A main problem of the ESS-Hg-target development and the design of the components of its primary Hg-circuit is the choice of structural materials. As designing, calculations and experiments with elected materials take time and are very costy, a preview on their successful application has to be done before as detailed as possible. One aspect on this is to have the knowledge of characteristics values of the structural material candidates under the occuring mechanical and thermal loads, irradiation, corrosion and erosion. Another point is the technology of engineering concerning the manufacturing, welding, surface treatment, and quality control of such parts and components under the demand to reach maximum lifetime.

  3. Over 0.5 MW green laser from sub-nanosecond giant pulsed microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lihe; Taira, Takunori

    2016-03-01

    A sub-nanosecond green laser with laser head sized 35 × 35 × 35 mm3 was developed from a giant pulsed microchip laser for laser processing on organic superconducting transistor with a flexible substrate. A composite monolithic Y3Al5O12 (YAG) /Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG/YAG crystal was designed for generating giant pulsed 1064 nm laser. A fibercoupled 30 W laser diode centered at 808 nm was used with pump pulse duration of 245 μs. The 532 nm green laser was obtained from a LiB3O5 (LBO) crystal with output energy of 150 μJ and pulse duration of 268 ps. The sub-nanosecond green laser is interesting for 2-D ablation patterns.

  4. Definition of a 5-MW Reference Wind Turbine for Offshore System Development

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Musial, W.; Scott, G.

    2009-02-01

    This report describes a three-bladed, upwind, variable-speed, variable blade-pitch-to-feather-controlled multimegawatt wind turbine model developed by NREL to support concept studies aimed at assessing offshore wind technology.

  5. The Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Spence, H. E.; Westfall, J.; Hoxie, V.

    In order to measure the crucially-important high-energy electron (and proton) component in the Earth's radiation belts, there is a need for a carefully designed particle telescope. This is required since the highest energy particles are a source of great concern from the space weather and climate perspective. Their production is the least understood aspect of radiation belt science and it is important that their fluxes and energy distributions be accurately determined. The Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) consists of a stack of silicon solid-state detectors in a telescope configuration, a conical collimator, and a thick case surrounding the detector stack to shield the sensor from penetrating radiation and bremsstrahlung that would cause background. The REPT has an FOV (field of view) that is a circular cone of 30° . The instrument will point nearly perpendicular to the spin axis of the Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) spacecraft and will sample all pitch angles of particles during normal (or nominal) magnetic field orientations. It will measure high-energy electrons (up to ˜20 MeV) with good sensitivity and will also measure protons to E˜100 MeV. The REPT will be used in a closely coordinated way with the Magnetic Electron-Ion Spectrometer that is part of the RBSP proposed payload. The goal for the REPT design is to measure well the directional intensities and energy spectra of ˜2 to ˜20 MeV electrons throughout the slot and outer radiation belt region. To do this, the instrument requires an adequately large geometric factor to get reasonable count rates (above background) at the higher energies and yet must not saturate at the lower energy ranges. Thus, there must be a balance between foreground saturation on the one hand and background dominance on the other. There must be fast enough electronics to avert undue dead-time limitations and chance coincidence effects. Present simulations and lab testing show that a good design has been attained

  6. Hydrogen-bonded proton transfer in the protonated guanine-cytosine (GC+H)+ base pair.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuexia; Wang, Hongyan; Gao, Simin; Schaefer, Henry F

    2011-10-13

    The single proton transfer at the different sites of the Watson-Crick (WC) guanine-cytosine (GC) DNA base pair are studied here using density functional methods. The conventional protonated structures, transition state (TS) and proton-transferred product (PT) structures of every relevant species are optimized. Each transition state and proton-transferred product structure has been compared with the corresponding conventional protonated structure to demonstrate the process of proton transfer and the change of geometrical structures. The relative energies of the protonated tautomers and the proton-transfer energy profiles in gas and solvent are analyzed. The proton-transferred product structure G(+H(+))-H(+)C(N3)(-H(+))(PT) has the lowest relative energy for which only two hydrogen bonds exist. Almost all 14 isomers of the protonated GC base pair involve hydrogen-bonded proton transfer following the three pathways, with the exception of structure G-H(+)C(O2). When the positive charge is primarily "located" on the guanine moiety (H(+)G-C, G-H(+)C(C4), and G-H(+)C(C6)), the H(1) proton transfers from the N(1) site of guanine to the N(3) site of cytosine. The structures G-H(+)C(C5) and G-H(+)C(C4) involve H(4a) proton transfer from the N(4) of cytosine to the O(6) site of guanine. H(2a) proton transfer from the N(2) site of guanine to the O(2) site of cytosine is found only for the structure G-H(+)C(C4). The structures to which a proton is added on the six-centered sites adjoining the hydrogen bonds are more prone to proton transfer in the gas phase, whereas a proton added on the minor groove and the sites adjoining the hydrogen bonds is favorable to the proton transfer in energy in the aqueous phase.

  7. Innermost Van Allen Radiation Belt for High Energy Protons at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The high energy proton radiation belts of Saturn are energetically dominated by the source from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND), trapping of protons from beta decay of neutrons emitted from galactic cosmic ray nuclear interactions with the main rings. These belts were originally discovered in wide gaps between the A-ring, Janus/Epimetheus, Mimas, and Enceladus. The narrow F and G rings significant affected the CRAND protons but did not produce total depletion. Voyager 2 measurements subsequently revealed an outermost CRAND proton belt beyond Enceladus. Although the source rate is small, the trapping times limited by radial magnetospheric diffusion are very long, about ten years at peak measured flux inwards of the G ring, so large fluxes can accumulate unless otherwise limited in the trapping region by neutral gas, dust, and ring body interactions. One proposed final extension of the Cassini Orbiter mission would place perikrone in a 3000-km gap between the inner D ring and the upper atmosphere of Saturn. Experience with CRAND in the Earth's inner Van Allen proton belt suggests that a similar innermost belt might be found in this comparably wide region at Saturn. Radial dependence of magnetospheric diffusion, proximity to the ring neutron source, and northward magnetic offset of Saturn's magnetic equator from the ring plane could potentially produce peak fluxes several orders of magnitude higher than previously measured outside the main rings. Even brief passes through such an intense environment of highly penetrating protons would be a significant concern for spacecraft operations and science observations. Actual fluxes are limited by losses in Saturn's exospheric gas and in a dust environment likely comparable to that of the known CRAND proton belts. The first numerical model of this unexplored radiation belt is presented to determine limits on peak magnitude and radial profile of the proton flux distribution.

  8. Electric fields, electron production, and electron motion at the stripper foil in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.

    1995-05-01

    The beam instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) most likely involves coupled oscillations between electrons and protons. For this instability to occur, there must be a strong source of electrons. Investigation of the various sources of electrons in the PSR had begun. Copious electron production is expected in the injection section because this section contains the stripper foil. This foil is mounted near the center of the beam pipe, and both circulating and injected protons pass through it, thus allowing ample opportunity for electron production. This paper discusses various mechanisms for electron production, beam-induced electric fields, and electron motion in the vicinity of the foil.

  9. {beta}-delayed proton decays near the proton drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.-W.; Li, Z.-K.; Xie, Y.-X.; Pan, Q.-Y.; Huang, W.-X.; Wang, X.-D.; Yu, Y.; Xing, Y.-B.; Shu, N.-C.; Chen, Y.-S.; Xu, F.-R.; Wang, K.

    2005-05-01

    We briefly reviewed and summarized the experimental study on {beta}-delayed proton decays published by our group over the last 8 years, namely the experimental observation of {beta}-delayed proton decays of nine new nuclides in the rare-earth region near the proton drip line and five nuclides in the mass 90 region with N{approx}Z by utilizing the p-{gamma} coincidence technique in combination with a He-jet tape transport system. In addition, important technical details of the experiments were provided. The experimental results were compared to the theoretical predictions of some nuclear models, resulting in the following conclusions. (1) The experimental half-lives for {sup 85}Mo, {sup 92}Rh, as well as the predicted 'waiting point' nuclei {sup 89}Ru and {sup 93}Pd were 5-10 times longer than the macroscopic-microscopic model predictions of Moeller et al. [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 66,131(1997)]. These data considerably influenced the predictions of the mass abundances of the nuclides produced in the rp process. (2) The experimental assignments of spin and parity for the drip-line nuclei {sup 142}Ho and {sup 128}Pm could not be well predicted by any of the nuclear models. Nevertheless, the configuration-constrained nuclear potential-energy surfaces calculated by means of a Woods-Saxon-Strutinsky method could reproduce the assignments. (3) The ALICE code overestimated by one or two orders of magnitude the production-reaction cross sections of the nine studied rare-earth nuclei, while the HIVAP code overestimated them by approximately one order of magnitude.

  10. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yogo, A.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    2009-07-25

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of gamma-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  11. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogo, A.; Sato, K.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Teshima, T.; Numasaki, H.; Murakami, M.; Demizu, Y.; Akagi, S.; Nagayama, S.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Oishi, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Tanoue, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Sasao, H.; Wakai, D.; Kawachi, T.; Nishimura, H.; Bolton, P. R.; Daido, H.

    2009-07-01

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of γ-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  12. Proton Transfer Rate Coefficient Measurements of Selected Volatile Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, G.; Popović, S.; Vušković, L.

    2002-05-01

    We have developed an apparatus based on the selected ion flow tube (SIFT)footnote D. Smith and N.G. Adams, Ads. At. Mol. Phys. 24, 1 (1987). that allows the study of proton transfer between various positive ions and volatile organic molecules. Reactions in the flow tube occur at pressures of approximately 300 mTorr, eliminating the requirement of thermal beam production. The proton donor molecule H_3O^+ has been produced using several types of electrical discharges in water vapor, such as a capacitively coupled RF discharge and a DC hollow cathode discharge. Presently we are developing an Asmussen-type microwave cavity discharge using the components of a standard microwave oven that has the advantages of simple design and operation, as well as low cost. We will be presenting the results of the microwave cavity ion source to produce H_3O^+, and compare it to the other studied sources. In addition, we will be presenting a preliminary measurement of the proton transfer rate coefficient in the reaction of H_3O^+ with acetone and methanol.

  13. Nuclear proton dynamics and interactions with calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Biochemical signals acting on the nucleus can regulate gene expression. Despite the inherent affinity of nucleic acids and nuclear proteins (e.g. transcription factors) for protons, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate nuclear pH (pHnuc), and how these could be exploited to control gene expression. Here, we show that pHnuc dynamics can be imaged using the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Nuclear pores allow the passage of medium-sized molecules (calcein), but protons must first bind to mobile buffers in order to gain access to the nucleoplasm. Fixed buffering residing in the nucleus of permeabilized cells was estimated to be very weak on the basis of the large amplitude of pHnuc transients evoked by photolytic H(+)-uncaging or exposure to weak acids/bases. Consequently, the majority of nuclear pH buffering is sourced from the cytoplasm in the form of mobile buffers. Effective proton diffusion was faster in nucleoplasm than in cytoplasm, in agreement with the higher mobile-to-fixed buffering ratio in the nucleus. Cardiac myocyte pHnuc changed in response to maneuvers that alter nuclear Ca(2+) signals. Blocking Ca(2+) release from inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors stably alkalinized the nucleus. This Ca(2+)-pH interaction may arise from competitive binding to common chemical moieties. Competitive binding to mobile buffers may couple the efflux of Ca(2+)via nuclear pores with a counterflux of protons. This would generate a stable pH gradient between cytoplasm and nucleus that is sensitive to the state of nuclear Ca(2+) signaling. The unusual behavior of protons in the nucleus provides new mechanisms for regulating cardiac nuclear biology. PMID:26183898

  14. Nuclear proton dynamics and interactions with calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Biochemical signals acting on the nucleus can regulate gene expression. Despite the inherent affinity of nucleic acids and nuclear proteins (e.g. transcription factors) for protons, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate nuclear pH (pHnuc), and how these could be exploited to control gene expression. Here, we show that pHnuc dynamics can be imaged using the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Nuclear pores allow the passage of medium-sized molecules (calcein), but protons must first bind to mobile buffers in order to gain access to the nucleoplasm. Fixed buffering residing in the nucleus of permeabilized cells was estimated to be very weak on the basis of the large amplitude of pHnuc transients evoked by photolytic H(+)-uncaging or exposure to weak acids/bases. Consequently, the majority of nuclear pH buffering is sourced from the cytoplasm in the form of mobile buffers. Effective proton diffusion was faster in nucleoplasm than in cytoplasm, in agreement with the higher mobile-to-fixed buffering ratio in the nucleus. Cardiac myocyte pHnuc changed in response to maneuvers that alter nuclear Ca(2+) signals. Blocking Ca(2+) release from inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors stably alkalinized the nucleus. This Ca(2+)-pH interaction may arise from competitive binding to common chemical moieties. Competitive binding to mobile buffers may couple the efflux of Ca(2+)via nuclear pores with a counterflux of protons. This would generate a stable pH gradient between cytoplasm and nucleus that is sensitive to the state of nuclear Ca(2+) signaling. The unusual behavior of protons in the nucleus provides new mechanisms for regulating cardiac nuclear biology.

  15. Relations Between Microwave Bursts and Near-Earth High-Energy Proton Enhancements and Their Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Kiselev, V. I.; Meshalkina, N. S.; Chertok, I. M.

    2015-10-01

    We further study the relations between parameters of bursts at 35 GHz recorded with the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters during 25 years and solar proton events (Grechnev et al. in Publ. Astron. Soc. Japan 65, S4, 2013a). Here we address the relations between the microwave fluences at 35 GHz and near-Earth proton fluences above 100 MeV to find information on their sources and evaluate their diagnostic potential. The correlation between the microwave and proton fluences is pronouncedly higher than between their peak fluxes. This probably reflects a dependence of the total number of protons on the duration of the acceleration process. In events with strong flares, the correlation coefficients of high-energy proton fluences with microwave and soft X-ray fluences are higher than those with the speeds of coronal mass ejections. The results indicate a statistically larger contribution of flare processes to high-energy proton fluxes. Acceleration by shock waves seems to be less important at high energies in events associated with strong flares, although its contribution is probable and possibly prevails in weaker events. The probability of a detectable proton enhancement was found to directly depend on the peak flux, duration, and fluence of the 35 GHz burst, while the role of the Big Flare Syndrome might have been overestimated previously. Empirical diagnostic relations are proposed.

  16. Visualizing the kinetic power stroke that drives proton-coupled Zn(II) transport

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sayan; Chai, Jin; Cheng, Jie; D'Mello, Rhijuta; Chance, Mark R.; Fu, Dax

    2014-01-01

    The proton gradient is a principal energy source for respiration-dependent active transport, but the structural mechanisms of proton-coupled transport processes are poorly understood. YiiP is a proton-coupled zinc transporter found in the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, and the transport-site of YiiP receives protons from water molecules that gain access to its hydrophobic environment and transduces the energy of an inward proton gradient to drive Zn(II) efflux1,2. This membrane protein is a well characterized member3-7 of the protein family of cation diffusion facilitators (CDFs) that occurs at all phylogenetic levels8-10. X-ray mediated hydroxyl radical labeling of YiiP and mass spectrometric analysis showed that Zn(II) binding triggered a highly localized, all-or-none change of water accessibility to the transport-site and an adjacent hydrophobic gate. Millisecond time-resolved dynamics revealed a concerted and reciprocal pattern of accessibility changes along a transmembrane helix, suggesting a rigid-body helical reorientation linked to Zn(II) binding that triggers the closing of the hydrophobic gate. The gated water access to the transport-site enables a stationary proton gradient to facilitate the conversion of zinc binding energy to the kinetic power stroke of a vectorial zinc transport. The kinetic details provide energetic insights into a proton-coupled active transport reaction. PMID:25043033

  17. The M2 Proton Channel of Influenza Virus: How Does It Work?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael; Schweighofer, Karl; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modem cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATR), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATR, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar, but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), which is a good model of the biological membranes focusing cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M2 protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M2 protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long, which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by 3 amino acids on each side, is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This channel is

  18. Biological effects of proton radiation: an update.

    PubMed

    Girdhani, S; Sachs, R; Hlatky, L

    2015-09-01

    Proton radiation provides significant dosimetric advantages when compared with gamma radiation due to its superior energy deposition characteristics. Although the physical aspects of proton radiobiology are well understood, biological and clinical endpoints are understudied. The current practice to assume the relative biological effectiveness of low linear energy transfer (LET) protons to be a generic value of about 1.1 relative to photons likely obscures important unrecognised differentials in biological response between these radiation qualities. A deeper understanding of the biological properties induced by proton radiation would have both radiobiological and clinical impact. This article briefly points to some of the literature pertinent to the effects of protons on tissue-level processes that modify disease progression, such as angiogenesis, cell invasion and cancer metastasis. Recent findings hint that proton radiation may, in addition to offering improved radio-therapeutic targeting, be a means to provide a new dimension for increasing therapeutic benefits for patients by manipulating these tissue-level processes.

  19. Neutron-Proton Pairing Effect on One-Proton and Two-Proton Separation Energies in Rare-Earth Proton-Rich Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammache, F.; Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.

    2012-12-01

    The one-proton and two-proton separation energies are studied for "ordinary" and rare-earth proton-rich nuclei by including the isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing correlations using the BCS approximation. Even-even as well as odd nuclei are considered. In the latter case, the wave function is defined using the blocked-level technique. The single-particle energies used are those of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. It is shown that the np isovector pairing effects on the one-proton and two-proton separation energies are non-negligible. However, the only isovector BCS approximation seems to be inadequate for a good description of these quantities when including the np pairing effects: either a particle-number projection or the inclusion of the isoscalar pairing effect seems to be necessary. Another possible improvement would be a more realistic choice of the pairing strengths.

  20. Commissioning of the PRIOR proton microscope.

    PubMed

    Varentsov, D; Antonov, O; Bakhmutova, A; Barnes, C W; Bogdanov, A; Danly, C R; Efimov, S; Endres, M; Fertman, A; Golubev, A A; Hoffmann, D H H; Ionita, B; Kantsyrev, A; Krasik, Ya E; Lang, P M; Lomonosov, I; Mariam, F G; Markov, N; Merrill, F E; Mintsev, V B; Nikolaev, D; Panyushkin, V; Rodionova, M; Schanz, M; Schoenberg, K; Semennikov, A; Shestov, L; Skachkov, V S; Turtikov, V; Udrea, S; Vasylyev, O; Weyrich, K; Wilde, C; Zubareva, A

    2016-02-01

    Recently, a new high energy proton microscopy facility PRIOR (Proton Microscope for FAIR Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research) has been designed, constructed, and successfully commissioned at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt, Germany). As a result of the experiments with 3.5-4.5 GeV proton beams delivered by the heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18 of GSI, 30 μm spatial and 10 ns temporal resolutions of the proton microscope have been demonstrated. A new pulsed power setup for studying properties of matter under extremes has been developed for the dynamic commissioning of the PRIOR facility. This paper describes the PRIOR setup as well as the results of the first static and dynamic proton radiography experiments performed at GSI. PMID:26931841

  1. Commissioning of the PRIOR proton microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varentsov, D.; Antonov, O.; Bakhmutova, A.; Barnes, C. W.; Bogdanov, A.; Danly, C. R.; Efimov, S.; Endres, M.; Fertman, A.; Golubev, A. A.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Ionita, B.; Kantsyrev, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Lang, P. M.; Lomonosov, I.; Mariam, F. G.; Markov, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Mintsev, V. B.; Nikolaev, D.; Panyushkin, V.; Rodionova, M.; Schanz, M.; Schoenberg, K.; Semennikov, A.; Shestov, L.; Skachkov, V. S.; Turtikov, V.; Udrea, S.; Vasylyev, O.; Weyrich, K.; Wilde, C.; Zubareva, A.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, a new high energy proton microscopy facility PRIOR (Proton Microscope for FAIR Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research) has been designed, constructed, and successfully commissioned at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt, Germany). As a result of the experiments with 3.5-4.5 GeV proton beams delivered by the heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18 of GSI, 30 μm spatial and 10 ns temporal resolutions of the proton microscope have been demonstrated. A new pulsed power setup for studying properties of matter under extremes has been developed for the dynamic commissioning of the PRIOR facility. This paper describes the PRIOR setup as well as the results of the first static and dynamic proton radiography experiments performed at GSI.

  2. Mechanisms of proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrey, T.G.

    1991-01-01

    The purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium probably represents the simplest biological solar energy conversion system. Light absorbed by bacteriorhodopsin directly leads to the transport of protons across the cell membrane. The resulting chemosmotic potential can be used to make ATP. An additional feature of the purple membrane is its ability to pump protons over a wide variety of salt concentration including in extreme saline environments. This project investigates the relationship between the transport of protons across the membrane and structure and conformation of bacteriorhodospin. We have proposed experiments to study the pH dependence of proton pumping. Secondly, we are examining the role of divalent cations and the effect of the large surface potential of the purple membrane on the proton pumping function of this membrane using the photocurrents associated with the pumping process. Finally we are studying the role of proteinatable amino acids in proton transport. 16 refs.

  3. Quantitative assessment of anatomical change using a virtual proton depth radiograph for adaptive head and neck proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Yin, Lingshu; Zhang, Yawei; Kirk, Maura; Song, Gang; Ahn, Peter H; Lin, Alexander; Gee, James; Dolney, Derek; Solberg, Timothy D; Maughan, Richard; McDonough, James; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using water-equivalent thickness (WET) and virtual proton depth radiographs (PDRs) of intensity corrected cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to detect anatomical change and patient setup error to trigger adaptive head and neck proton therapy. The planning CT (pCT) and linear accelerator (linac) equipped CBCTs acquired weekly during treatment of a head and neck patient were used in this study. Deformable image registration (DIR) was used to register each CBCT with the pCT and map Hounsfield units (HUs) from the planning CT (pCT) onto the daily CBCT. The deformed pCT is referred as the corrected CBCT (cCBCT). Two dimensional virtual lateral PDRs were generated using a ray-tracing technique to project the cumulative WET from a virtual source through the cCBCT and the pCT onto a virtual plane. The PDRs were used to identify anatomic regions with large variations in the proton range between the cCBCT and pCT using a threshold of 3 mm relative difference of WET and 3 mm search radius criteria. The relationship between PDR differences and dose distribution is established. Due to weight change and tumor response during treatment, large variations in WETs were observed in the relative PDRs which corresponded spatially with an increase in the number of failing points within the GTV, especially in the pharynx area. Failing points were also evident near the posterior neck due to setup variations. Differences in PDRs correlated spatially to differences in the distal dose distribution in the beam's eye view. Virtual PDRs generated from volumetric data, such as pCTs or CBCTs, are potentially a useful quantitative tool in proton therapy. PDRs and WET analysis may be used to detect anatomical change from baseline during treatment and trigger further analysis in adaptive proton therapy. PMID:27074464

  4. The proton injector for the accelerator facility of antiproton and ion research (FAIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, C.; Berezov, R.; Fils, J.; Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.; Hollinger, R.; Kester, O.; Vinzenz, W.

    2014-02-01

    The new international accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, is one of the largest research projects worldwide and will provide an antiproton production rate of 7 × 1010 cooled pbars per hour. This is equivalent to a primary proton beam current of 2 × 1016 protons per hour. For this request a high intensity proton linac (p-linac) will be built with an operating rf-frequency of 325 MHz to accelerate a 35 mA proton beam at 70 MeV, using conducting crossed-bar H-cavities. The repetition rate is 4 Hz with beam pulse length of 36 μs. The microwave ion source and low energy beam transport developed within a joint French-German collaboration GSI/CEA-SACLAY will serve as an injector of the compact proton linac. The 2.45 GHz ion source allows high brightness ion beams at an energy of 95 keV and will deliver a proton beam current of 100 mA at the entrance of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) within an acceptance of 0.3π mm mrad (norm., rms).

  5. The proton injector for the accelerator facility of antiproton and ion research (FAIR)

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, C. Kester, O.; Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.

    2014-02-15

    The new international accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, is one of the largest research projects worldwide and will provide an antiproton production rate of 7 × 10{sup 10} cooled pbars per hour. This is equivalent to a primary proton beam current of 2 × 10{sup 16} protons per hour. For this request a high intensity proton linac (p-linac) will be built with an operating rf-frequency of 325 MHz to accelerate a 35 mA proton beam at 70 MeV, using conducting crossed-bar H-cavities. The repetition rate is 4 Hz with beam pulse length of 36 μs. The microwave ion source and low energy beam transport developed within a joint French-German collaboration GSI/CEA-SACLAY will serve as an injector of the compact proton linac. The 2.45 GHz ion source allows high brightness ion beams at an energy of 95 keV and will deliver a proton beam current of 100 mA at the entrance of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) within an acceptance of 0.3π mm mrad (norm., rms)

  6. Impact of proton irradiation on deep level states in n-GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Arehart, A. R.; Cinkilic, E.; Ringel, S. A.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.; McSkimming, B.; Speck, J. S.

    2013-07-22

    Deep levels in 1.8 MeV proton irradiated n-type GaN were systematically characterized using deep level transient spectroscopies and deep level optical spectroscopies. The impacts of proton irradiation on the introduction and evolution of those deep states were revealed as a function of proton fluences up to 1.1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}. The proton irradiation introduced two traps with activation energies of E{sub C} - 0.13 eV and 0.16 eV, and a monotonic increase in the concentration for most of the pre-existing traps, though the increase rates were different for each trap, suggesting different physical sources and/or configurations for these states. Through lighted capacitance voltage measurements, the deep levels at E{sub C} - 1.25 eV, 2.50 eV, and 3.25 eV were identified as being the source of systematic carrier removal in proton-damaged n-GaN as a function of proton fluence.

  7. Pickup protons and pressure-balanced structures: Voyager 2 observations in merged interaction regions near 35 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Belcher, J. W.; Szabo, A.; Isenberg, P. A.; Lee, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Five pressure-balanced structures, each with a scale of the order of a few hundredths of an astonomical unit (AU), were identified in two merged interaction regions (MIRs) near 35 AU in the Voyager 2 plasma and magnetic field data. They include a tangential discountinuity, simple and complex magnetic holes, slow correlated variations among the plasma and magnetic field parameters, and complex uncorrelated variations among the parameters. The changes in the magnetic pressure in these events are balanced by changes in the pressure of interstellar pickup protons. Thus the pickup protons probably play a major role in the dynamics of the MIRs. The solar wind proton and electron pressures are relatively unimportant in the MIRs at 35 AU and beyond. The region near 35 AU is transition region: the Sun is the source of the magnetic field, but the interstellar medium in source of pickups protons. Relative to the solar wind proton guyroadius, the thicknesses of the discontinuities and simple magnetic holes observed near 35 AU are at least an order of magnitude greater than those observed at 1 AU. However, the thicknesses of the tangential discontinuity and simple magnetic holes observed near 35 AU (in units of the pickup proton Larmor radius) are comparable to those observed at 1 AU (in units of the solar wind proton gyroradius). Thus the gyroradius of interstellar pickup protons controls the thickness of current sheets near 35 AU. We determine the interstellar pickup proton pressure in the PBSs. Using a model for the pickup proton temperature, we estimate that the average interstellar pickup proton pressure, temperature, and density in the MIRs at 35 AU are (0.53 +/- 0.14) x 10(exp -12) erg/cu cm, (5.8 +/- 0.4) x 10(exp 6) K and (7 +/- 2) x 10(exp -4)/cu cm.

  8. Characteristics of proton velocity distribution functions in the near-lunar wake from Chandrayaan-1/SWIM observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanya, M. B.; Bhardwaj, Anil; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Alok, Abhinaw; Wieser, Martin; Holmström, Mats; Wurz, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Due to the high absorption of solar wind plasma on the lunar dayside, a large scale wake structure is formed downstream of the Moon. However, recent in-situ observations have revealed the presence of protons in the near-lunar wake (100 km to 200 km from the surface). The solar wind, either directly or after interaction with the lunar surface (including magnetic anomalies), is the source of these protons in the near-wake region. Using the entire data from the SWIM sensor of the SARA experiment onboard Chandrayaan-1, we analyzed the velocity distribution of the protons observed in the near-lunar wake. The average velocity distribution functions, computed in the solar wind rest frame, were further separated based on the angle between the upstream solar wind velocity and the IMF. Although the protons enter the wake parallel as well as perpendicular to the IMF, the velocity distribution were not identical for the different IMF orientations, indicating the control of IMF in the proton entry processes. Several proton populations were identified from the velocity distribution and their possible entry mechanism were inferred based on the characteristics of the velocity distribution. These entry mechanisms include (i) diffusion of solar wind protons into the wake along IMF, (ii) the solar wind protons with finite gyro-radii that are aided by the wake boundary electric field, (iii) solar wind protons with gyro-radii larger than lunar radii from the tail of the solar wind velocity distribution, and (iv) scattering of solar wind protons from the dayside lunar surface or from magnetic anomalies. In order to gain more insight into the entry mechanisms associated with different populations, backtracing is carried out for each of these populations. For most of the populations, the source of the protons obtained from backtracing is found to be in agreement with that inferred from the velocity distribution. There are few populations that could not be explained by the known mechanisms

  9. A scintillator-based online detector for the angularly resolved measurement of laser-accelerated proton spectra.

    PubMed

    Metzkes, J; Karsch, L; Kraft, S D; Pawelke, J; Richter, C; Schürer, M; Sobiella, M; Stiller, N; Zeil, K; Schramm, U

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, a new generation of high repetition rate (~10 Hz), high power (~100 TW) laser systems has stimulated intense research on laser-driven sources for fast protons. Considering experimental instrumentation, this development requires online diagnostics for protons to be added to the established offline detection tools such as solid state track detectors or radiochromic films. In this article, we present the design and characterization of a scintillator-based online detector that gives access to the angularly resolved proton distribution along one spatial dimension and resolves 10 different proton energy ranges. Conceived as an online detector for key parameters in laser-proton acceleration, such as the maximum proton energy and the angular distribution, the detector features a spatial resolution of ~1.3 mm and a spectral resolution better than 1.5 MeV for a maximum proton energy above 12 MeV in the current design. Regarding its areas of application, we consider the detector a useful complement to radiochromic films and Thomson parabola spectrometers, capable to give immediate feedback on the experimental performance. The detector was characterized at an electrostatic Van de Graaff tandetron accelerator and tested in a laser-proton acceleration experiment, proving its suitability as a diagnostic device for laser-accelerated protons.

  10. Inhibitors of proton pumping: effect on passive proton transport.

    PubMed

    Bisson, M A

    1986-05-01

    Reported inhibitors of the Characean plasmalemma proton pump were tested for their ability to inhibit the passive H(+) conductance which develops in Chara corallina Klein ex Willd. at high pH. Diethylstilbestrol inhibits the proton pump and the passive H(+) conductance with about the same time course, at concentrations that have no effect on cytoplasmic streaming. N-Ethylmaleimide, a sulfhydryl reagent which is small and relatively nonpolar, also inhibits both pumping and passive conductance of H(+). However, it also inhibits cytoplasmic streaming with about the same time course, and therefore could not be considered a specific ATPase inhibitor. p-Chloromercuribenzene sulfonate (PCMBS), a sulfhydryl reagent which is large and charged and hence less able to penetrate the membrane, does not inhibit pumping or conductance at low concentration. At high concentration, PCMBS sometimes inhibits pumping without affecting H(+) conductance, but since streaming is also inhibited, the effect on the pump cannot be said to be specific. 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide, a water soluble carbodiimide, weakly inhibits both pump and conductance, apparently specifically.

  11. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  12. The spin structure of the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Steven D.

    2005-10-15

    This article reviews the present understanding of the QCD spin structure of the proton. The author first outlines the proton spin puzzle and its possible resolution in QCD. Then the review explores the present and next generation of experiments being undertaken to resolve the proton's spin-flavor structure, explaining the theoretical issues involved, the present status of experimental investigation, and the open questions and challenges for future investigation.

  13. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    PubMed

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side.

  14. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    PubMed

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side. PMID:23507617

  15. Magnets for high intensity proton synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy, Vladimir Kashikhine and Alexander Makarov

    2002-09-19

    Recently, there has been considerable interest at Fermilab for the Proton Driver, a future high intensity proton machine. Various scenarios are under consideration, including a superconducting linac. Each scenario present some special challenges. We describe here the magnets proposed in a recent study, the Proton Driver Study II, which assumes a conventional warm synchrotron, roughly of the size of the existing FNAL booster, but capable of delivering 380 kW at 8 GeV.

  16. An observation of proton-induced latchup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Donald K.; Coss, James R.; Watson, R. K.; Schwartz, Harvey R.; Pease, Ronald L.

    1992-01-01

    Proton-induced latchup in a CMOS microprocessor known to have a very low heavy-ion-induced latchup threshold LET was observed. The latchup cross section vs. proton energy for three different bias conditions is displayed. Average measures of latchup current within an 11-ms window following the onset of latchup are provided, as a function of bias and incident proton energy. These data can be interpreted in terms of the present understanding of SEE phenomena.

  17. ACCELERATION OF THERMAL PROTONS BY GENERIC PHENOMENOLOGICAL MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosian, Vahé; Kang, Byungwoo E-mail: redcrux8@stanford.edu

    2015-11-01

    We investigate heating and acceleration of protons from a thermal gas with a generic diffusion and acceleration model, and subject to Coulomb scattering and energy loss, as was done by Petrosian and East for electrons. As protons gain energy their loss to electrons becomes important. Thus, we need to solve the coupled proton–electron kinetic equation. We numerically solve the coupled Fokker–Planck equations and compute the time evolution of the spectra of both particles. We show that this can lead to a quasi-thermal component plus a high-energy nonthermal tail. We determine the evolution of the nonthermal tail and the quasi-thermal component. The results may be used to explore the possibility of inverse bremsstrahlung radiation as a source of hard X-ray emissions from hot sources such as solar flares, accretion disk coronas, and the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters. We find that the emergence of nonthermal protons is accompanied by excessive heating of the entire plasma, unless the turbulence needed for scattering and acceleration is steeper than Kolmogorov and the acceleration parameters, the duration of the acceleration, and/or the initial distributions are significantly fine-tuned. These results severely constrain the feasibility of the nonthermal inverse bremsstrahlung process producing hard X-ray emissions. However, the nonthermal tail may be the seed particles for further re-acceleration to relativistic energies, say by a shock. In the Appendix we present some tests of the integrity of the algorithm used and present a new formula for the energy loss rate due to inelastic proton–proton interactions.

  18. Proton and Ion Beams Generated with Picosecond CO{sub 2} Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Stolyarov, Daniil; Shkolnikov, Peter; Chen Min; Pukhov, Alexander; McKenna, Paul; Carroll, David; Neely, David; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Willingale, Louise; Stolyarova, Elena; Flynn, George

    2009-01-22

    1-TW, 6-ps, circularly polarized CO{sub 2} laser pulses focused onto thin Al foils are used to drive ion acceleration. The spectra of ions and protons generated in the direction normal to the rear surface, detected with a compact magnet spectrometer with CR39, reveals a broad proton high-energy peak at {approx}1 MeV. This observation conforms to the theoretical predictions that circularly polarized laser pulses are less efficient than linearly polarized pulses in driving ion acceleration via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. Instead, there is evidence that the circularly polarized laser may provide direct ponderomotive acceleration of ions and protons. We report also the first application of the BNL proton source in nano-science. Irradiation of graphite and graphene films produced local defects and membranes for variety of applications.

  19. Design study for a 500 MeV proton synchrotron with CSNS linac as an injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-Sheng; Ji, Hong-Fei; Wang, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Using the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) linac as the injector, a 500 MeV proton synchrotron is proposed for multidisciplinary applications, such as biology, material science and proton therapy. The synchrotron will deliver proton beam with energy from 80 MeV to 500 MeV. A compact lattice design has been worked out, and all the important beam dynamics issues have been investigated. The 80 MeV H- beam is stripped and injected into the synchrotron by using multi-turn injection. In order to continuously extraction the proton with small beam loss, an achromatic structure is proposed and a slow extraction method with RF knock-out is adopted and optimized.

  20. Radiation pressure acceleration of protons to 93 MeV with circularly polarized petawatt laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kim, Hyung Taek; Singhal, Himanshu; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Lee, Hwang Woon; Nickles, Peter V.; Jeong, Tae Moon; Kim, Chul Min; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-07-01

    The radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of charged particles has been a challenging task in laser-driven proton/ion acceleration due to its stringent requirements in laser and target conditions. The realization of radiation-pressure-driven proton acceleration requires irradiating ultrathin targets with an ultrahigh contrast and ultraintense laser pulses. We report the generation of 93-MeV proton beams achieved by applying 800-nm 30-fs circularly polarized laser pulses with an intensity of 6.1 × 10 20 W / cm 2 to 15-nm-thick polymer targets. The radiation pressure acceleration was confirmed from the obtained optimal target thickness, quadratic energy scaling, polarization dependence, and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We expect this clear demonstration of RPA to facilitate the realization of laser-driven proton/ion sources delivering energetic and short-pulse particle beams for novel applications.

  1. Design study for a 500 MeV proton synchrotron with CSNS linac as an injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-Sheng; Ji, Hong-Fei; Wang, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Using the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) linac as the injector, a 500 MeV proton synchrotron is proposed for multidisciplinary applications, such as biology, material science and proton therapy. The synchrotron will deliver proton beam with energy from 80 MeV to 500 MeV. A compact lattice design has been worked out, and all the important beam dynamics issues have been investigated. The 80 MeV H‑ beam is stripped and injected into the synchrotron by using multi-turn injection. In order to continuously extraction the proton with small beam loss, an achromatic structure is proposed and a slow extraction method with RF knock-out is adopted and optimized.

  2. Operando NMR spectroscopic analysis of proton transfer in heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue Lu; Liu, Wenqing; Yu, Yan-Yan; Song, Yanhong; Fang, Wen Qi; Wei, Daxiu; Gong, Xue-Qing; Yao, Ye-Feng; Yang, Hua Gui

    2016-01-01

    Proton transfer (PT) processes in solid–liquid phases play central roles throughout chemistry, biology and materials science. Identification of PT routes deep into the realistic catalytic process is experimentally challenging, thus leaving a gap in our understanding. Here we demonstrate an approach using operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that allows to quantitatively describe the complex species dynamics of generated H2/HD gases and liquid intermediates in pmol resolution during photocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this system, the effective protons for HER are mainly from H2O, and CH3OH evidently serves as an outstanding sacrificial agent reacting with holes, further supported by our density functional theory calculations. This results rule out controversy about the complicated proton sources for HER. The operando NMR method provides a direct molecular-level insight with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the quantitative studies of mechanisms of proton-involved catalytic reactions in solid–liquid phases. PMID:27311326

  3. Acid, protons and Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, G.; Meyer-Rosberg, K.; Scott, D. R.; Melchers, K.

    1996-01-01

    The anti-ulcer drugs that act as covalent inhibitors of the gastric acid pump are targeted to the gastric H+/K+ ATPase by virtue of accumulation in acid and conversion to the active sulfenamide. This results in extremely effective inhibition of acid secretion. Appropriate dosage is able to optimize acid control therapy for reflux and peptic ulcer disease as compared to H2 receptor antagonists. However, clinical data on recurrence show that Helicobacter pylori eradication should accompany treatment of the lesion. These drugs have been found to synergize with many antibiotics for eradication. The survival of aerobes depends on their ability to maintain a driving force for protons across their inner membrane, the sum of a pH and potential difference gradient, the protonmotive force (pmf). The transmembrane flux of protons across the F1F0 ATPase, driven by the pmf, is coupled to the synthesis of ATP. The internal pH of H. pylori was measured using the fluorescent dye probe, BCECF, and the membrane potential defined by the uptake of the carbocyanine dye, DiSC3 [5] at different pHs to mimic the gastric environment. The protonmotive force at pH 7.0 was composed of a delta pH of 1.4 (-84mV) and a delta potential difference of -131mV, to give a pmf of -215 mV. The effect of variations in external pH on survival of the bacteria in the absence of urea correlated with the effect of external pH on the ability of the bacteria to maintain a pmf. The effect of the addition of 5 mM urea on the pmf was measured at different medium pH values. Urea restored the pmf at pH 3.0 or 3.5, but abolished the pmf at pH 7.0 or higher, due the production of the alkalinizing cation, NH3. Hence H. pylori is an acid-tolerant neutrophile due to urease activity, but urease activity also limits its survival to an acidic environment. These data help explain the occupation of the stomach by the organism and its distribution between fundus and antrum. This distribution and its alteration by proton pump

  4. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-06-25

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  5. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A.; Beloussov, Alexandre V.; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B.; Salem, Dana

    2008-07-08

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  6. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A.; Beloussov, Alexandre V.; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B.; Salem, Dana

    2010-09-21

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  7. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-12-03

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  8. Proton and heavy ion therapy.

    PubMed

    Larsson, B

    1975-01-01

    Penetrating ion beams are considered interesting supplements to the types of radiation, mostly electrons and gamma rays, that have dominated in radiation research and radiotherapy during the last decades. Biomedical experimentations and clinical studies ar larger ion accelerators (100-1000 MeV/amu) are therefore undertaken in order to exploit their possible clinical use in cancer therapy. It is concluded that an accelerator that permits effective use of protons (ca. 200 MeV) and deutrons (ca. 50 MeV, for neutron therapy) located in a central hospital would represent a convenient tool for clinical investigations at a larger scale. PMID:1201773

  9. Proton decay studies at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J.C.; Bingham, C.R.; Rykaczewski, K.; Toth, K.S.; Mas, J.F.; McConnell, J.W.; Yu, C.; Bingham, C.R.; Grzywacz, R.; Kim, S.H.; Weintraub, W.; Rykaczewski, K.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; Davinson, T.; Slinger, R.C.; Woods, P.J.; Ginter, T.N.; Gross, C.J.; MacDonald, B.D.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E.F.; Ressler, J.J.; Walters, W.B.; Szerypo, J.

    1998-12-01

    A double-sided Si-strip detector system has been installed and commissioned at the focal plane of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The system can be used for heavy charged particle emission studies with half-lives as low as a few {mu}sec. In this paper we present identification and study of the decay properties of the five new proton emitters: {sup 140}Ho, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Multiparticle production in deep inelastic lepton scattering and soft proton proton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, K.

    1987-06-01

    We demonstrate how the theoretical knowledge about multiparticle production in deep inelastic lepton scattering can be incorporated into a multistring model for low p/sub t/ proton proton collisions. 25 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Transverse relaxation of scalar-coupled protons.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Takuya F; Baishya, Bikash; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-10-25

    In a preliminary communication (B. Baishya, T. F. Segawa, G. Bodenhausen, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 17538-17539), we recently demonstrated that it is possible to obtain clean echo decays of protons in biomolecules despite the presence of homonuclear scalar couplings. These unmodulated decays allow one to determine apparent transverse relaxation rates R(2) (app) of individual protons. Herein, we report the observation of R(2) (app) for three methyl protons, four amide H(N) protons, and all 11 backbone H(α) protons in cyclosporin A. If the proton resonances overlap, their R(2) (app) rates can be measured by transferring their magnetization to neighboring (13)C nuclei, which are less prone to overlap. The R(2) (app) rates of protons attached to (13)C are faster than those attached to (12)C because of (13)C-(1)H dipolar interactions. The differences of these rates allow the determination of local correlation functions. Backbone H(N) and H(α) protons that have fast decay rates R(2) (app) also feature fast longitudinal relaxation rates R(1) and intense NOESY cross peaks that are typical of crowded environments. Variations of R(2) (app) rates of backbone H(α) protons in similar amino acids reflect differences in local environments.

  12. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-01

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  13. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, X. M. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-15

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  14. Processes forming and sustaining Saturn's proton radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmann, P.; Roussos, E.; Paranicas, C.; Krupp, N.; Haggerty, D. K.

    2013-01-01

    Saturn's proton radiation belts extend over the orbits of several moons that split this region of intense radiation into several distinct belts. Understanding their distribution requires to understand how their particles are created and evolve. High-energy protons are thought to be dominantly produced by cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND). The source of the lower energies and the role of other effects such as charge exchange with the gas originating from Enceladus is still an open question. There is also no certainty so far if the belts exist independently from each other and the rest of the magnetosphere or if and how particles are exchanged between these regions. We approach these problems by using measurements acquired by the MIMI/LEMMS instrument onboard the Cassini spacecraft. Protons in the range from 500 keV to 40 MeV are considered. Their intensities are averaged over 7 years of the mission and converted to phase space densities at constant first and second adiabatic invariant. We reproduce the resulting radial profiles with a numerical model that includes radial diffusion, losses from moons and interactions with gas, and a phenomenological source. Our results show that the dominating effects away from the moon sweeping corridors are diffusion and the source, while interactions with gas are secondary. Based on a GEANT4 simulation of the interaction of cosmic rays with Saturn's rings, we conclude that secondary particles produced within the rings can only account for the high-energy part of the source. A comparison with the equivalent processes within Earth's atmosphere shows that Saturn's atmosphere can contribute to the production of the lower energies and might be even dominating at the higher energies. Other possibilities to supply the belts and exchange particles between them, as diffusion and injections from outside the belts, or stripping of ENAs, can be excluded.

  15. Method study of parameter choice for a circular proton-proton collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Feng; Gao, Jie; Xiao, Ming; Wang, Dou; Wang, Yi-Wei; Bai, Sha; Bian, Tian-Jian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we show a systematic method of appropriate parameter choice for a circular proton-proton collider by using an analytical expression for the beam-beam tune shift limit, starting from a given design goal and technical limitations. A suitable parameter space has been explored. Based on the parameter scan, sets of appropriate parameters designed for a 50 km and 100 km circular proton-proton collider are proposed. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175192)

  16. WE-G-BRE-02: Biological Modeling of Gold Nanoparticle Radiosensitization for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y; Paganetti, H; Schuemann, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to investigate the radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (GNP) in a proton beam. A computational model was built using the Local Effect Model (LEM) to predict the biological outcome of gold nanoparticle (GNP) sensitization. We present the results using a clinical proton beam, 6MV photon beam and two kilovoltage photon beams. Methods: First, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using TOPAS (TOol for PArticle Simulation) to obtain the spatial dose distribution in the vicinity of GNPs. The dose distribution was then used as an input for LEM, which predicts dose-response curves for high linear energy transfer radiation using the track structure. The cell survival curves were evaluated for three particle sources (proton beam, MV photon beam and kV photon beam), various treatment depths for each particle source, various GNP uptakes and two different GNP sizes. Results: For proton therapy, the GNP sensitization effect is highly dependent on the treatment depth due to the energy-dependent interaction probability. We predict that if GNPs can be taken up by the cell nucleus, proton therapy can be significantly enhanced. If GNPs are only internalized into the cytoplasm, proton therapy can still be enhanced by GNPs and if GNPs are not internalized into cells, there will be no direct damage to the nucleus. For the same GNP uptake and concentration, the cell survival at 2Gy is reduced by 80% using kilovoltage photons, 50% using protons and only 2% using clinical MV photons. Finally, for the same weight of GNPs taken up by the cells, 10 nm GNPs causes 3 times more damage than 50 nm GNPs. Conclusion: We showed that GNPs have potential to be used to enhance radiation therapy for clinical proton beams.

  17. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-01

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation & treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8×109 neutrons/cm2/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with 10B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  18. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-19

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation and treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 109 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with {sup 10}B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  19. Measurement of proton and anti-proton intensities in the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Pordes et al.

    2003-06-04

    This paper describes the techniques used to measure the intensities of the proton (p) and anti-proton ({bar p}) beams in the Tevatron collider. The systems provide simultaneous measurements of the intensity of the 36 proton and 36 antiproton bunches and their longitudinal profiles.

  20. Parameterization of spectral distributions for pion and kaon production in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, John P.; Norbury, John W.; Cucinotta, Frank A.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate semi-empirical parameterizations of the energy-differential cross sections for charged pion and kaon production from proton-proton collisions are presented at energies relevant to cosmic rays. The parameterizations depend on the outgoing meson momentum and also the proton energy, and are able to be reduced to very simple analytical formulas suitable for cosmic-ray transport.

  1. Forward Proton Detection at Dø

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel, Murilo

    2006-04-01

    Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD) has been a very successful model describing the strong interaction, but its success has been limited primarily to the perturbative regime. About 40% of the total proton-antiproton cross section at the Tevatron consists of the non-perturbative processes of elastic and diffractive scattering. These processes are better described by the phenomenology of a color singlet exchange of a particle with quantum numbers of the vacuum called the pomeron (Regge theory). The D0 experiment (http://www-d0.fnal.gov) is currently taking data with a forward proton detector (FPD) to better study this process. The FPD data is being used to study the diffractive phenomenology, which has attracted both experimental and theoretical attention. This data provides a unique opportunity to study many topics in the diffractive regime, for instance events which contain a double pomeron exchange. This talk will present FPD data acquired during the last year, focusing on the methods for eliminating background and noise and emphasizing the detector capabilities to explore this interesting physics regime.

  2. PROTONATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Ricca, Alessandra; Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr; Allamandola, Louis J. E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov

    2011-02-01

    We reconsider the contribution that singly protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; HPAH{sup +}s) might make to the Class A component of the 6.2 {mu}m interstellar emission feature in light of the recent experimental measurements of protonated naphthalene and coronene. Our calculations on the small HPAH{sup +}s have a band near 6.2 {mu}m, as found in experiment. While the larger HPAH{sup +}s still have emission near 6.2 {mu}m, the much larger intensity of the band near 6.3 {mu}m overwhelms the weaker band at 6.2 {mu}m, so that the 6.2 {mu}m band is barely visible. Since the large PAHs are more representative of those in the interstellar medium, our work suggests that large HPAH{sup +}s cannot be major contributors to the observed emission at 6.2 {mu}m (i.e., Class A species). Saturating large PAH cations with hydrogen atoms retains the 6.2 {mu}m Class A band position, but the rest of the spectrum is inconsistent with observed spectra.

  3. MCNP5 for proton radiography.

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, H. G.; Brown, F. B.; Bull, J. S.; Goorley, J. T.; Little, R. C.; Liu, L. C.; Mashnik, S. G.; Prael, R. E.; Selcow, Elizabeth Carol,; Sierk, A. J.; Sweezy, J. E.; Zumbro, J. D.; Mokhov, N. V.; Striganov, S.; Gudima, K. K.

    2004-01-01

    The developmental version of MCNPS has recently been extended to provide for continuous-energy transport of high-energy protons. This enhancement involves the incorporation of several significant new physics models into the code. Multiple Coulomb scattering is treated with an advanced model that takes account of projectile and nuclear target form factors. In the next version, this model will provide a coupled sampling of both angular deflection and collisional energy loss, including straggling. The proton elastic scattering model is also new, based on recent theoretical work. Charged particle transport in the presence of magnetic fields is accomplished either by using transfer maps from the COSY INFINITY code (in void regions) or by using an algorithm adapted from the MARS code (in void regions or in scattering materials). Work is underway to validate and implement the latest versions of the Cascade-Exciton Model and the Los Alamos Quark-Gluon-String Model, which will process inelastic nuclear interactions and generate secondary particles.

  4. New interplanetary proton fluence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Armstrong, T. P.; Dao-Gibner, L.; Silverman, S.

    1990-01-01

    A new predictive engineering model for the interplanetary fluence of protons with above 10 MeV and above 30 MeV is described. The data set used is a combination of observations made from the earth's surface and from above the atmosphere between 1956 and 1963 and observations made from spacecraft in the vicinity of earth between 1963 and 1985. The data cover a time period three times as long as the period used in earlier models. With the use of this data set the distinction between 'ordinary proton events' and 'anomalously large events' made in earlier work disappears. This permitted the use of statistical analysis methods developed for 'ordinary events' on the entire data set. The greater than 10 MeV fluences at 1 AU calculated with the new model are about twice those expected on the basis of models now in use. At energies above 30 MeV, the old and new models agree. In contrast to earlier models, the results do not depend critically on the fluence from any one event and are independent of sunspot number. Mission probability curves derived from the fluence distribution are presented.

  5. M2 Proton Channel: Toward a Model of a Primitive Proton Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Transmembrane proton transfer was essential to early cellular systems in order to transduce energy for metabolic functions. The reliable, efficient and controlled generation of proton gradients became possible only with the emergence of active proton pumps. On the basis of features shared by most modern proton pumps we identify the essential mechanistic steps in active proton transport. Further, we discuss the mechanism of action of a small, transmembrane M2 proton channel from influenza A virus as a model for proton transport in protocells. The M2 channel is a 94-residue long, α-helical tetramer that is activated at low pH and exhibits high selectivity and directionality. A shorter construct, built of transmembrane fragments that are only 24 amino acids in length, exhibits very similar proton transport properties. Molecular dynamics simulations on the microsecond time-scale carried out for the M2 channel provided atomic level details on the activation of the channel in response to protonation of the histidine residue, His37. The pathway of proton conduction is mediated by His37, which accepts and donates protons at different interconverting conformation states when pH is lower than 6.5. The Val27 and Trp41 gates and the salt bridge between Asp44 and Arg45 further enhance the directionality of proton transport. It is argued that the architecture and the mechanism of action similar to that found in the M2 channel might have been the perfect starting point for evolution towards the earliest proton pumps, indicating that active proton transport could have readily emerged from simple, passive proton channels.

  6. On proton CT reconstruction using MVCT-converted virtual proton projections

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dongxu; Mackie, T. Rockwell; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To describe a novel methodology of converting megavoltage x-ray projections into virtual proton projections that are otherwise missing due to the proton range limit. These converted virtual proton projections can be used in the reconstruction of proton computed tomography (pCT). Methods: Relations exist between proton projections and multispectral megavoltage x-ray projections for human tissue. Based on these relations, these tissues can be categorized into: (a) adipose tissue; (b) nonadipose soft tissues; and (c) bone. These three tissue categories can be visibly identified on a regular megavoltage x-ray computed tomography (MVCT) image. With an MVCT image and its projection data available, the x-ray projections through heterogeneous anatomy can be converted to the corresponding proton projections using predetermined calibration curves for individual materials, aided by a coarse segmentation on the x-ray CT image. To show the feasibility of this approach, mathematical simulations were carried out. The converted proton projections, plotted on a proton sinogram, were compared to the simulated ground truth. Proton stopping power images were reconstructed using either the virtual proton projections only or a blend of physically available proton projections and virtual proton projections that make up for those missing due to the range limit. These images were compared to a reference image reconstructed from theoretically calculated proton projections. Results: The converted virtual projections had an uncertainty of {+-}0.8% compared to the calculated ground truth. Proton stopping power images reconstructed using a blend of converted virtual projections (48%) and physically available projections (52%) had an uncertainty of {+-}0.86% compared with that reconstructed from theoretically calculated projections. Reconstruction solely from converted virtual proton projections had an uncertainty of {+-}1.1% compared with that reconstructed from theoretical projections

  7. A coarse-graining approach for the proton complex in protonated aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Calero, S; Lobato, M D; García-Pérez, E; Mejías, J A; Lago, S; Vlugt, T J H; Maesen, T L M; Smit, B; Dubbeldam, D

    2006-03-30

    We have developed a computational framework for the adsorption of linear alkanes in protonated aluminosilicates. These zeolites contain trace amounts of water that form hydrated proton complexes. The presence of hydrated protons makes the simulations at the fully atomistic level difficult. Instead of constructing an elaborate and complex model, we show that an approach based on a coarse-graining of the proton-complex accurately describes the available experimental isotherms, Henry coefficients, heats of adsorption, and oxygen-proton distances. Our approach is supported by MP2 quantum mechanical simulations. The model gives remarkably good agreement with experimental data beyond the initial calibration set.

  8. BEAM SCRUBBING FOR RHIC POLARIZED PROTON RUN.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,S.Y.FISCHER,W.HUANG,H.ROSER,T.

    2004-07-05

    One of the intensity limiting factor of RHIC polarized proton beam is the electron cloud induced pressure rise. A beam scrubbing study shows that with a reasonable period of time of running high intensity 112-bunch proton beam, the pressure rise can be reduced, allowing higher beam intensity.

  9. Reduced Calibration Curve for Proton Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yevseyeva, Olga; Assis, Joaquim de; Diaz, Katherin

    2010-05-21

    The pCT deals with relatively thick targets like the human head or trunk. Thus, the fidelity of pCT as a tool for proton therapy planning depends on the accuracy of physical formulas used for proton interaction with thick absorbers. Although the actual overall accuracy of the proton stopping power in the Bethe-Bloch domain is about 1%, the analytical calculations and the Monte Carlo simulations with codes like TRIM/SRIM, MCNPX and GEANT4 do not agreed with each other. A tentative to validate the codes against experimental data for thick absorbers bring some difficulties: only a few data is available and the existing data sets have been acquired at different initial proton energies, and for different absorber materials. In this work we compare the results of our Monte Carlo simulations with existing experimental data in terms of reduced calibration curve, i.e. the range - energy dependence normalized on the range scale by the full projected CSDA range for given initial proton energy in a given material, taken from the NIST PSTAR database, and on the final proton energy scale - by the given initial energy of protons. This approach is almost energy and material independent. The results of our analysis are important for pCT development because the contradictions observed at arbitrary low initial proton energies could be easily scaled now to typical pCT energies.

  10. Proton Therapy Research and Treatment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Goodnight, J.E. Jr. . Cancer Center); Alonso, J.R. )

    1992-05-01

    This Grant proposal outlines the steps that will be undertaken to bring the UC Davis Proton Therapy Research and Treatment, known locally as the Proton Therapy Facility (PTF), through its design and construction phases. This application concentrates on the design phase of the PTF project.

  11. CONFIGURATION MANUAL POLARIZED PROTON COLLIDER AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.; MACKAY,W.W.; ALEKSEEV,I.; BAI,M.; BROWN,K.; BUNCE,G.; CAMERON,P.; COURANT,E.; ET AL.

    2001-03-01

    In this report, the authors present their design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. They provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  12. Physics at an upgraded Fermilab proton driver

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    In 2004 the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future, primarily motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics. Over the last few months a physics study has developed the physics case for the Fermilab Proton Driver. The potential physics opportunities are discussed.

  13. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  14. On the high energy proton spectrum measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, R. W.; Ito, A.; Macfall, J.; Siohan, F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Tonwar, S. C.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Yodh, G. B.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.

    1977-01-01

    The steepening of the proton spectrum beyond 1000 GeV and the rise in inelastic cross sections between 20 and 600 GeV observed by the PROTON-1-2-3 satellite experiments were explained by systematic effects of energy dependent albedo (backscatter) from the calorimeter.

  15. Configuration Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Svirida, D.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this report we present our design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. We provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  16. The Frankfurt neutron source FRANZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzubaidi, Suha; Bartz, Ulrich; Basten, Markus; Bechtold, Alexander; Chau, Long Phi; Claessens, Christine; Dinter, Hannes; Droba, Martin; Fix, Christopher; Hähnel, Hendrik; Heilmann, Manuel; Hinrichs, Ole; Huneck, Simon; Klump, Batu; Lotz, Marcel; Mäder, Dominik; Meusel, Oliver; Noll, Daniel; Nowottnick, Tobias; Obermayer, Marcus; Payir, Onur; Petry, Nils; Podlech, Holger; Ratzinger, Ulrich; Schempp, Alwin; Schmidt, Stefan; Schneider, Philipp; Seibel, Anja; Schwarz, Malte; Schweizer, Waldemar; Volk, Klaus; Wagner, Christopher; Wiesner, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    A 2MeV proton beam will produce a quasi-Maxwellian neutron spectrum of around 30 keV by the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction. The experiments are mainly focused on the measurement of differential neutron capture cross sections relevant for the astrophysical s-process in nuclear synthesis. Moreover, proton capture cross sections for the astrophysical p-process can be measured directly with the proton beam. For an efficient time of flight measurement of the neutron energies along the 0.7 m long drift from the Li-target to the sample, 1ns short, intense proton pulses are needed at the target. Additionally, to reach 107 n/cm2/s at the sample, a pulse repetition rate of 250 kHz is intended. After completion and successful running in, FRANZ will become a user facility with internal and external users. The 120 kV injector terminal and the 200mA proton source as well as the low-energy beam transport section and the FRANZ cave have been realized successfully. The 1.9 MV RF accelerator consists of a combined 4-Rod-RFQ/IH-DTL-resonator and is in the RF tuning and power testing phase. The 2 MeV transport and rebuncher section is ready for installation. In a first step FRANZ will offer experimental areas for neutron activation experiments and for proton beam experiments, as mentioned above. From the accelerator physics point of view, FRANZ will be an excellent facility for high current beam investigations and for beam wall interaction studies.

  17. MO-A-18C-01: Proton Therapy I: Basics of Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Arjomandy, B; Sahoo, N; Pankuch, M

    2014-06-15

    The goal of this session is to introduce the audience to the physics, dosimetry and treatment planning procedures used in proton therapy. The course material covers the basic physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for scattered and scanning proton beams. It will include the requirements for dosimetry measurements and present the equipment needed for commissioning of proton beams for clinical use and quality assurance checks as well as methods used for proton beam calibration and dose verification of patient treatment fields. The session covers the treatment planning strategies for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. Challenges involved in the motion management in proton therapy will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge on physics, dosimetry, treatment planning and quality assurance for proton therapy. Understand the uncertainties associated with proton therapy and currently used strategies for their mitigation in treatment planning.

  18. Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation

    DOEpatents

    Elangovan, S.; Nair, Balakrishnan G.; Small, Troy; Heck, Brian

    2011-09-06

    A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

  19. Commissioning of the PRIOR proton microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Varentsov, D.; Antonov, O.; Bakhmutova, A.; Barnes, C. W.; Bogdanov, A.; Danly, C. R.; Efimov, S.; Endres, M.; Fertman, A.; Golubev, A. A.; et al

    2016-02-18

    Recently, a new high energy proton microscopy facility PRIOR (Proton Microscope for FAIR Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research) has been designed, constructed, and successfully commissioned at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt, Germany). As a result of the experiments with 3.5–4.5 GeV proton beams delivered by the heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18 of GSI, 30 μm spatial and 10 ns temporal resolutions of the proton microscope have been demonstrated. A new pulsed power setup for studying properties of matter under extremes has been developed for the dynamic commissioning of the PRIOR facility. This study describes the PRIOR setup as well asmore » the results of the first static and dynamic protonradiography experiments performed at GSI.« less

  20. Fine structure in deformed proton emitters.

    SciTech Connect

    Sonzogni, A. A.; Davids, C. N.; Woods, P. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Ressler, J. J.; Schwartz, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Walters, W. B.

    1999-12-07

    In a recent experiment to study the proton radioactivity of the highly deformed {sup 131}Eu nucleus, two proton lines were detected. The higher energy one was assigned to the ground-state to ground-state decay, while the lower energy, to the ground-state to the 2{sup +} state decay. This constitutes the first observation of fine structure in proton radioactivity. With these four measured quantities, proton energies, half-life and branching ratio, it is possible to determine the Nilsson configuration of the ground state of the proton emitting nucleus as well as the 2{sup +} energy and nuclear deformation of the daughter nucleus. These results will be presented and discussed.

  1. Pointing of laser-accelerated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Risse, E.; Kalachnikov, M.P.; Nickles, P.V.; Sandner, W.; Schramm, U.; Habs, D.; Witte, J.; Schnuerer, M.

    2006-03-15

    Small fluctuations in the acceleration sheath change the pointing of a proton beam accelerated from the rear side of a laser irradiated thin aluminum foil. The proton acceleration was produced with 40 fs pulses of a Ti:sapphire laser at an intensity of approximately 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. This observation has been made with a high spatial resolution Thomson spectrometer. The proton beam pointing has appeared stable in the energy range between the high energy cutoff (3 MeV) and 50% of this value. Deviations of the beam position at lower energies changes in a range of 0-3 mrad. The recorded pictures show wiggled and continuous proton traces which imply a release of the proton beam from the acceleration zone with a velocity chirp.

  2. Investigation on using high-energy proton beam for total body irradiation (TBI).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Qin, Nan; Jia, Xun; Zou, Wei J; Khan, Atif; Yue, Ning J

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the possibility of using proton beam for total body irradia-tion (TBI). We hypothesized the broad-slow-rising entrance dose from a monoen-ergetic proton beam can deliver a uniform dose to patient with varied thickness. Comparing to photon-based TBI, it would not require any patient-specific com-pensator or beam spoiler. The hypothesis was first tested by simulating 250 MeV, 275 MeV, and 300 MeV protons irradiating a wedge-shaped water phantom in a paired opposing arrangement using Monte Carlo (MC) method. To allow ± 7.5% dose variation, the maximum water equivalent thickness (WET) of a treatable patient separation was 29 cm for 250 MeV proton, and > 40 cm for 275 MeV and 300 MeV proton. The compared 6 MV photon can only treat patients with up to 15.5 cm water-equivalent separation. In the second step, we simulated the dose deposition from the same beams on a patient's whole-body CT scan. The maximum patient separation in WET was 23 cm. The calculated whole-body dose variations were ± 8.9%, ± 9.0%, ± 9.6%, and ± 14% for 250 MeV proton, 275 MeV proton, 300 MeV proton, and 6 MV photon. At last, we tested the current machine capability to deliver a monoenergetic proton beam with a large uniform field. Experiments were performed on a compact double scattering single-gantry proton system. With its C-shaped gantry design, the source-to-surface distance (SSD) reached 7 m. The measured dose deposition curve had 22 cm relatively flat entrance region. The full width half maximum field size was measured 105 cm. The current scatter filter had to be redesigned to produce a uniform intensity at such treatment distance. In con-clusion, this work demonstrated the possibility of using proton beam for TBI. The current commercially available proton machines would soon be ready for such task. PMID:27685117

  3. Benchmarking of Proton Transport in Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongfeng; Li, Gui; Song, Jing; Zheng, Huaqing; Sun, Guangyao; Hao, Lijuan; Wu, Yican

    2014-06-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has been traditionally applied in nuclear design and analysis due to its capability of dealing with complicated geometries and multi-dimensional physics problems as well as obtaining accurate results. The Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC) is developed by FDS Team in China for fusion, fission, and other nuclear applications. The simulations of radiation transport, isotope burn-up, material activation, radiation dose, and biology damage could be performed using SuperMC. Complicated geometries and the whole physical process of various types of particles in broad energy scale can be well handled. Bi-directional automatic conversion between general CAD models and full-formed input files of SuperMC is supported by MCAM, which is a CAD/image-based automatic modeling program for neutronics and radiation transport simulation. Mixed visualization of dynamical 3D dataset and geometry model is supported by RVIS, which is a nuclear radiation virtual simulation and assessment system. Continuous-energy cross section data from hybrid evaluated nuclear data library HENDL are utilized to support simulation. Neutronic fixed source and critical design parameters calculates for reactors of complex geometry and material distribution based on the transport of neutron and photon have been achieved in our former version of SuperMC. Recently, the proton transport has also been intergrated in SuperMC in the energy region up to 10 GeV. The physical processes considered for proton transport include electromagnetic processes and hadronic processes. The electromagnetic processes include ionization, multiple scattering, bremsstrahlung, and pair production processes. Public evaluated data from HENDL are used in some electromagnetic processes. In hadronic physics, the Bertini intra-nuclear cascade model with exitons, preequilibrium model, nucleus explosion model, fission model, and evaporation model are incorporated to treat the intermediate energy nuclear

  4. RF parameter curves for a proton driver synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    James A. MacLachlan, Z. Qian and J.E. Griffin

    2001-07-12

    High average beam power proton synchrotrons in the medium energy range are under consideration at several laboratories for intense and specialized secondary particle sources like muon colliders and {nu} factories. A 12-16 GeV machine with a 15 Hz cycle and 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 13} p/pulse capability called the Proton Driver (PD) has been studied as a replacement for the Fermilab Booster and as a base for future facilities.[1] A staged development is proposed, initially using 20 modified 53 MHz Booster cavities in 12 GeV operation.[2] A second stage would allow 16 GeV top energy using a 7.5 MHz rf system consisting of 100 15 kV low-Q cavities.[3] This paper discusses the choices of rf system parameters made in the design study. The limited number of existing Booster cavities has led to consideration for stage 1 of an inductive insert in the ring to aid initial beam capture by compensating longitudinal space charge, an admittedly speculative expedient requiring followup with further calculation and some beam experiments. This report is one of nineteen papers at this conference by members of the Proton Driver design team; it relies on these others to help establish the general context.

  5. Electrogenic Proton Translocation by the ATPase of Sugarcane Vacuoles 1

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Margaret; Komor, Ewald

    1985-01-01

    Existence of a proton-translocating ATPase on the tonoplast of higher plants has been further confirmed by use of two experimental systems: (a) intact isolated vacuoles from sugarcane cells and (b) vesicles prepared from the same source. Addition of MgATP to vacuoles polarized the tonoplast by 40 millivolts to a value of +20 millivolts, but a large preexisting pH gradient across the membrane restricted the pH change to 0.2 unit. In vesicle preparations, the tonoplast was polarized to +66 millivolts by the addition of MgATP and the intravesicular space was acidified by 1 pH unit to pH 5.5. Proton translocation equilibrium is controlled by the protonmotive potential difference, maximal at 125 millivolts for sugarcane cells. Energization of the tonoplast occurred at physiological concentrations of MgATP. Specificity of MgATP for proton translocation was indicated by a much smaller effect of MgADP and MgGDP on the electrochemical gradient, although these substrates were also hydrolyzed by tonoplast preparation. PMID:16664053

  6. A laboratory and theoretical study of protonated carbon disulfide, HSCS+.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M C; Thaddeus, P; Wilke, Jeremiah J; Schaefer, Henry F

    2009-06-21

    The rotational spectrum of protonated carbon disulfide, HSCS(+), has been detected in the centimeter-wave band in a molecular beam by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Rotational and centrifugal distortion constants have been determined from ten transitions in the K(a)=0 ladder of the normal isotopic species, HS(13)CS(+), and DSCS(+). The present assignment agrees well with high-level coupled cluster calculations of the HSCS(+) structure, which, like earlier work, predict this isomer to be the ground state on the HCS(2) (+) potential energy surface; HCSS(+), an isomer with C(2v) symmetry, is predicted to lie more than 20 kcal/mol higher in energy. Other properties of HSCS(+) including its dipole moment, anharmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities have also been computed at the coupled cluster level of theory with large basis sets. Because carbon disulfide possesses a fairly large proton affinity, and because this nonpolar molecule may plausibly exist in astronomical sources, HSCS(+) is a good candidate for detection with radio telescopes in the submillimeter band where the stronger b-type transitions of this protonated cation are predicted to lie. PMID:19548724

  7. Electron cloud simulations of a proton storage ring using cold proton bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Y.; Holmes, J.; Lee, S. Y.; Macek, R.

    2008-02-01

    Using the ORBIT code we study the sensitivity of electron cloud properties with respect to different proton beam profiles, the secondary electron yield (SEY) parameter, and the proton loss rate. Our model uses a cold proton bunch to generate primary electrons and electromagnetic field for electron cloud dynamics. We study the dependence of the prompt and swept electron signals vs the bunch charge and the recovery of electron clouds after sweeping on the beam loss rate and the SEY. The simulation results are compared with the experimental data measured at the proton storage ring at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Our simulations indicate that the fractional proton loss rate in the field-free straight section may be an exponential function of proton beam charge and may also be lower than the averaged fractional proton loss rate over the whole ring.

  8. Focused interplanetary transport of approximately 1 MeV solar energetic protons through self-generated Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. K.; Reames, D. V.

    1994-01-01

    We present a model of the focused transport of approximately 1 MeV solar energetic protons through interplanetary Alfven waves that the protons themselves amplify or damp. It is based on the quasi-linear theory but with a phenomenological pitch angle diffusion coefficient in the 'resonance gap.' For initial Alfven wave distributions that give mean free paths greater than approximately 0.5 AU for approximately 1 MeV protons in the inner heliosphere, the model predicts greater than roughly an order of magnitude amplification (damping) in the outward (inward) propagating resonant Alfven waves at less than or approximately equal to o.3 AU heliocentric distance. As the strength of proton source is increased, the peak differential proton intensity at approximately 1 MeV at 1 AU increases to a maximum of approximately 250 particles (/(sq cm)(s)(sr)(MeV)) and then decreases slowly. It may be attenuated by a factor of 5 or more relative to the case without wave evolution, provided that the proton source is sufficiently intense that the resulting peak differential intensity of approximately 1 MeV protons at 1 AU exceeds approximately 200 particles (/(sq cm)(s)(sr)(MeV)). Therefore, in large solar proton events, (1) one may have to take into account self-amplified waves in studying solar particle propagation, (2) the number of accelerated protons escaping from a flare or interplanetary shock may have been underestimated in past studies by a significant factor, and (3) accelerated protons escaping from a traveling interplanetary shock at r less than or approximately equal to 0.3 AU should amplify the ambient hydromagnetic waves siginificantly to make the shock an efficient accelerator, even if initially the mean free path is greater than or approximately equal to 1 AU.

  9. Comparing gold nano-particle enhanced radiotherapy with protons, megavoltage photons and kilovoltage photons: a Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuting; McMahon, Stephen J; Scarpelli, Matthew; Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan

    2014-12-21

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown potential to be used as a radiosensitizer for radiation therapy. Despite extensive research activity to study GNP radiosensitization using photon beams, only a few studies have been carried out using proton beams. In this work Monte Carlo simulations were used to assess the dose enhancement of GNPs for proton therapy. The enhancement effect was compared between a clinical proton spectrum, a clinical 6 MV photon spectrum, and a kilovoltage photon source similar to those used in many radiobiology lab settings. We showed that the mechanism by which GNPs can lead to dose enhancements in radiation therapy differs when comparing photon and proton radiation. The GNP dose enhancement using protons can be up to 14 and is independent of proton energy, while the dose enhancement is highly dependent on the photon energy used. For the same amount of energy absorbed in the GNP, interactions with protons, kVp photons and MV photons produce similar doses within several nanometers of the GNP surface, and differences are below 15% for the first 10 nm. However, secondary electrons produced by kilovoltage photons have the longest range in water as compared to protons and MV photons, e.g. they cause a dose enhancement 20 times higher than the one caused by protons 10 μm away from the GNP surface. We conclude that GNPs have the potential to enhance radiation therapy depending on the type of radiation source. Proton therapy can be enhanced significantly only if the GNPs are in close proximity to the biological target.

  10. [Investigation of Carbonaceous Airborne Particles by Scanning Proton Microprobe].

    PubMed

    Bao, Liang-man; Liu, Jiang-feng; Lei, Qian-tao; Li, Xiao-lin; Zhang, Gui-lin; Li, Yan

    2016-01-15

    Carbonaceous particles are an important component of the atmospheric aerosol particles and important for global climate change, air quality and human health. The PM₁₀ single particles from two environmental monitor locations and seven pollution emission sources were analyzed using scanning proton microprobe (SPM) techniques. The concentration of carbon in individual particles was quantitatively determined by proton non-Rutherford elastic backscattering spectrometry (EBS). The results of this investigation showed that carbonaceous particles were dominant in the pollution sources of coal and oil combustions, diesel busexhaust and automobile exhaust, while inorganic particles were dominant in the sources of steel industry, cement dust and soil dust. Carbonaceous matter was enriched in particles from the city center, while mineral matter was the main component of airborne particles in the industrial area. Elemental mapping of single aerosol particles yielded important information on the chemical reactions of aerosol particles. The micro-PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) maps of S, Ca and Fe of individual carbonaceous particles showed that sulfuration reaction occurred between SO₂and mineral particles, which increased the sulfur content of particles. PMID:27078933

  11. Neutrino diagnostics of ultrahigh energy cosmic ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlers, Markus; Sarkar, Subir; Anchordoqui, Luis A.

    2009-04-15

    The energy at which cosmic rays from extra-galactic sources begin to dominate over those from galactic sources is an important open question in astroparticle physics. A natural candidate is the energy at the 'ankle' in the approximately power-law energy spectrum which is indicative of a crossover from a falling galactic component to a flatter extra-galactic component. The transition can occur without such flattening but this requires some degree of conspiracy of the spectral shapes and normalizations of the two components. Nevertheless, it has been argued that extra-galactic sources of cosmic ray protons that undergo interactions on the CMB can reproduce the energy spectrum below the ankle if the crossover energy is as low as the 'second knee' in the spectrum. This low crossover model is constrained by direct measurements by the Pierre Auger Observatory, which indicate a heavier composition at these energies. We demonstrate that upper limits on the cosmic diffuse neutrino flux provide a complementary constraint on the proton fraction in ultra-high energy extra-galactic cosmic rays and forthcoming data from IceCube will provide a definitive test of this model.

  12. Proton Irradiation Creep in Pyrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Was, Gary S.; Campbell, Anne

    2011-10-01

    This project aims to understand irradiation creep in pyrocarbon using proton irradiation under controlled stresses and temperatures. Experiments will be conducted over a range of temperatures and stresses per the proposal submitted. The work scope will include the preparation of samples, measurement of deposition thickness, thickness uniformity, and anisotropy. The samples produced will be made in strips, which will be used for the creep experiments. Materials used will include pyrolytic carbon (PyC), Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG), or graphite strip samples in that order depending upon success. Temperatures tested under will range from 800°C to 1200°C, and stresses from 6MPa to 20.7MPa. Optional testing may occur at 900°C and 1100°C and stresses from 6MPa to 20.7MPa if funding is available.

  13. Liquid hydrogen in protonic chabazite.

    PubMed

    Zecchina, Adriano; Bordiga, Silvia; Vitillo, Jenny G; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Lamberti, Carlo; Spoto, Giuseppe; Bjørgen, Morten; Lillerud, Karl Petter

    2005-05-01

    Due to its fully reversible nature, H(2) storage by molecular adsorption could represent an advantage with respect to dissociative processes, where kinetic effects during the charging and discharging processes are present. A drawback of this strategy is represented by the extremely weak interactions that require low temperature and high pressure. High surface area materials hosting polarizing sites can represent a viable way toward more favorable working conditions. Of these, in this contribution, we have studied hydrogen adsorption in a series of zeolites using volumetric techniques and infrared spectroscopy at 15 K. We have found that in H-SSZ-13 zeolite the cooperative role played by high surface area, internal wall topology, and presence of high binding energy sites (protons) allows hydrogen to densify inside the nanopores at favorable temperature and pressure conditions. PMID:15853343

  14. [Interaction of surface-active base with fraction of membrane-bound Williams's protons].

    PubMed

    Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S; Motovilov, K A; Volkov, E M; Eremeev, S A

    2013-01-01

    In the process of mitochondrial respiratory H(+)-pumps functioning, the fraction membrane-bound protons (R-protons), which have an excess of free energy is formed. According to R.J. Williams this fraction is included as energy source in the reaction of ATP synthesis. Previously, in our laboratory was found the formation of this fraction was found in the mitochondria and on the outer surface of mitoplast. On the mitoslast model we strictly shown that non-equilibrium R-proton fraction is localized on the surface of the inner mitochondrial membrane. In this paper a surface-active compound--anion of 2,4,6-trichloro-3-pentadecylphenol (TCP-C15) is described, which selectively interacts with the R-protons fraction in mitochondria. A detailed description of the specific interaction of the TCP-C15 with R-protons fraction in mitochondria is presented. Moreover, in this work it was found that phosphate transport system reacts with the R-protons fraction in mitochondria and plays the role of the endogenous volume regulation system of this fraction. The results of experiments are discussed in the terms of a local coupling model of the phosphorylation mechanism.

  15. Proton Aurora Dynamics in Response to the IMF and Solar Wind Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Mende, S.; Frey, H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Lepping, R. P.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    On May 23, 2000, proton auroras observed by IMAGE (Imager for Magnetopause to Aurora Global Exploration) FUV (Far Ultraviolet) on the dayside were very dynamic. Auroral pattern in the cusp is well correlated with Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and solar wind parameters. When IMF were northward, cusp proton aurora appeared at high latitude poleward from the auroral oval. A high-latitude proton aurora brightened after solar wind ion temperature increased and it disappeared after IMF turned southward. Under the southward IMF condition, auroral activity occurred only in the dayside auroral oval. As IMF $B_z$ reverted to northward, cusp proton aurora reappeared at high latitude. The magnetic local time of the cusp proton aurora changes with the IMF $B_y$ polarity, consistent with previous reports. These results suggest an upstream source of the high-latitude cusp proton aurora for this event. One possible explanation is that bow shock energetic ions are transported into the cusp via the high-latitude magnetic merging process to induce optical emissions in the ionosphere.

  16. Dynamic control of laser driven proton beams by exploiting self-generated, ultrashort electromagnetic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Nersisyan, G.; Brauckmann, S.; Hanton, F.; Giesecke, A. L.; Naughton, K.; Willi, O.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-05-01

    As part of the ultrafast charge dynamics initiated by high intensity laser irradiations of solid targets, high amplitude EM pulses propagate away from the interaction point and are transported along any stalks and wires attached to the target. The propagation of these high amplitude pulses along a thin wire connected to a laser irradiated target was diagnosed via the proton radiography technique, measuring a pulse duration of ˜20 ps and a pulse velocity close to the speed of light. The strong electric field associated with the EM pulse can be exploited for controlling dynamically the proton beams produced from a laser-driven source. Chromatic divergence control of broadband laser driven protons (upto 75% reduction in divergence of >5 MeV protons) was obtained by winding the supporting wire around the proton beam axis to create a helical coil structure. In addition to providing focussing and energy selection, the technique has the potential to post-accelerate the transiting protons by the longitudinal component of the curved electric field lines produced by the helical coil lens.

  17. Thermochemistry of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reagents and its Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Tronic, Tristan A.; Mayer, James M.

    2010-12-08

    Many, if not most, redox reactions are coupled to proton transfers. This includes most common sources of chemical potential energy, from the bioenergetic processes that power cells to the fossil fuel combustion that powers cars. These proton-coupled electron transfer or PCET processes may involve multiple electrons and multiple protons, as in the 4 e–, 4 H+ reduction of dioxygen (O2) to water (eq 1), or can involve one electron and one proton such as the formation of tyrosyl radicals from tyrosine residues (TyrOH) in enzymatic catalytic cycles (eq 2). In addition, many multi-electron, multi-proton processes proceed in one-electron and one-proton steps. Organic reactions that proceed in one-electron steps involve radical intermediates, which play critical roles in a wide range of chemical, biological, and industrial processes. This broad and diverse class of PCET reactions are central to a great many chemical and biochemical processes, from biological catalysis and energy transduction, to bulk industrial chemical processes, to new approaches to solar energy conversion. PCET is therefore of broad and increasing interest, as illustrated by this issue and a number of other recent reviews.

  18. IR spectroscopy of α- and β-protonated pyrrole via argon complex photodissociation.

    PubMed

    Mosley, J D; Ricks, A M; Schleyer, P v R; Wu, J I; Duncan, M A

    2012-10-01

    Protonated pyrrole cations are produced in a pulsed discharge/supersonic expansion source, mass-selected in a time-of-flight spectrometer, and studied with infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. Vibrational spectra in both the fingerprint and C-H/N-H stretching regions are obtained using the method of tagging with argon. Sharp vibrational structure is compared to IR spectra predicted by theory for the possible α-, β-, and N-protonated structures. The spectral differences among these isomers are much larger than the frequency shifts due to argon attachment at alternative sites. Though α-protonation predominates thermodynamically, the kinetically favored β-protonated species is also observed for the first time (in 3-4 times lower abundance under the conditions employed here). Theoretical investigations attribute the greater stability of α-protonated pyrrole to topological charge stabilization, rather than merely to the greater number of resonance contributors. The far-IR pattern of protonated pyrrole does not match the interstellar UIR bands.

  19. Field match verification during combination proton, photon, and electron therapy for oligometastatic inflammatory breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Amos, Richard A.; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2012-01-01

    Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has been shown in randomized trials to improve overall survival for patients with locally advanced breast cancer. The standard PMRT clinical target volume (CTV) encompasses the chest wall and undissected regional lymphatics. Conformal isodose distributions covering the standard CTV with acceptable dose limits to normal tissue can typically be achieved with a combination of photon and electron fields. Field borders are marked on the patient's skin using a light field projection of each beam and are subsequently used to verify daily field matching clinically. Initial imaging of a patient with oligometastatic inflammatory breast cancer demonstrated direct extension of disease from the involved internal mammary lymph node chain into the anterior mediastinum as the only site of metastatic disease. The patient achieved a pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and underwent mastectomy. The initial sites of gross disease, including the anterior mediastinal node was included in the CTV for PMRT, and treatment planning demonstrated a clear advantage to the inclusion of proton fields in this case. The absence of a light source on the proton delivery system that accurately projects proton field edges onto the patient's skin posed a significant challenge for daily verification of proton-to-photon and -electron field matching. Proton field-specific radiographic imaging devices were designed and used such that proton field edges could be delineated on the patient's skin and used for daily matching with photon and electron fields. Manufacture of the imaging devices was quick and inexpensive. Weekly verification of proton field alignment with the proton field delineation on the skin demonstrated agreement within 3-mm tolerance. The patient remains with no evidence of disease 18 months after completing radiation. Other patients with similar indications may benefit from multimodality radiation therapy.

  20. Insights into proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms of electrocatalytic H2 oxidation and production

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura E.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The design of molecular electrocatalysts for H2 oxidation and production is important for the development of alternative renewable energy sources that are abundant, inexpensive, and environmentally benign. Recently, nickel-based molecular electrocatalysts with pendant amines that act as proton relays for the nickel center were shown to effectively catalyze H2 oxidation and production. We developed a quantum mechanical approach for studying proton-coupled electron transfer processes in these types of molecular electrocatalysts. This theoretical approach is applied to a nickel-based catalyst in which phosphorous atoms are directly bonded to the nickel center, and nitrogen atoms of the ligand rings act as proton relays. The catalytic step of interest involves electron transfer between the nickel complex and the electrode as well as intramolecular proton transfer between the nickel and nitrogen atoms. This process can occur sequentially, with either the electron or proton transferring first, or concertedly, with the electron and proton transferring simultaneously without a stable intermediate. The electrochemical rate constants are calculated as functions of overpotential for the concerted electron-proton transfer reaction and the two electron transfer reactions in the sequential mechanisms. Our calculations illustrate that the concerted electron-proton transfer standard rate constant will increase as the equilibrium distance between the nickel and nitrogen atoms decreases and as the pendant amines become more flexible to facilitate the contraction of this distance with a lower energy penalty. This approach identifies the favored mechanisms under various experimental conditions and provides insight into the impact of substituents on the nitrogen and phosphorous atoms. PMID:22529352