Science.gov

Sample records for 5-mw rcs-based short-pulse

  1. Short pulse neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2016-08-02

    Short pulse neutron generators are described herein. In a general embodiment, the short pulse neutron generator includes a Blumlein structure. The Blumlein structure includes a first conductive plate, a second conductive plate, a third conductive plate, at least one of an inductor or a resistor, a switch, and a dielectric material. The first conductive plate is positioned relative to the second conductive plate such that a gap separates these plates. A vacuum chamber is positioned in the gap, and an ion source is positioned to emit ions in the vacuum chamber. The third conductive plate is electrically grounded, and the switch is operable to electrically connect and disconnect the second conductive plate and the third conductive plate. The at least one of the resistor or the inductor is coupled to the first conductive plate and the second conductive plate.

  2. SHORT PULSE STRETCHER

    DOEpatents

    Branum, D.R.; Cummins, W.F.

    1962-12-01

    >A short pulse stretching circuit capable of stretching a short puise to enable it to be displayed on a relatively slow sweeping oscilloscope is described. Moreover, the duration of the pulse is increased by charging a capacitor through a diode and thereafter discharging the capacitor at such time as is desired. In the circuit the trigger pulse alone passes through a delay line, whereas the main signal passes through the diode only, and results in over-all circuit losses which are proportional to the low losses of the diode only. (AEC)

  3. Demonstration of 5MW PAFC power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Usami, Yutaka; Takae, Toshio

    1996-12-31

    Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Technology Research Association, established in May 1991 by Japanese 10 electric power and 4 gas companies, started a new project in 1991 FY, with the object of PAFC realization and aiming the development of 5MW- class PAFC. power plant for urban energy center and 1 MW- class power plant for onsite use. This project is carried out as 6 years plan jointly with New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization. The targets of the project are to evaluate and resolve the development task, such as a high reliability, compactness and cost reduction throughout the engineering, manufacturing and field testing of PAFC power plants. PAC tests and power generating test operations of 5MW plant were completed in 1994. Conducting the 2 years continuous operations and studies since 1995, the plant operational performance, system control characteristics, waste heat recovery and environmental advantage will be demonstrated.

  4. Development of a 5 MW reference gearbox for offshore wind turbines: 5 MW reference gearbox

    SciTech Connect

    Nejad, Amir Rasekhi; Guo, Yi; Gao, Zhen; Moan, Torgeir

    2015-07-27

    This paper presents detailed descriptions, modeling parameters and technical data of a 5MW high-speed gearbox developed for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory offshore 5MW baseline wind turbine. The main aim of this paper is to support the concept studies and research for large offshore wind turbines by providing a baseline gearbox model with detailed modeling parameters. This baseline gearbox follows the most conventional design types of those used in wind turbines. It is based on the four-point supports: two main bearings and two torque arms. The gearbox consists of three stages: two planetary and one parallel stage gears. The gear ratios among the stages are calculated in a way to obtain the minimum gearbox weight. The gearbox components are designed and selected based on the offshore wind turbine design codes and validated by comparison to the data available from large offshore wind turbine prototypes. All parameters required to establish the dynamic model of the gearbox are then provided. Moreover, a maintenance map indicating components with high to low probability of failure is shown. The 5 MW reference gearbox can be used as a baseline for research on wind turbine gearboxes and comparison studies. It can also be employed in global analysis tools to represent a more realistic model of a gearbox in a coupled analysis.

  5. 1.5 MW, 110 GHz Gyrotron with a Depressed Collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunmi; Anderson, James; Shapiro, Michael; Jagadishwar, Sirigiri; Temkin, Richard

    2004-11-01

    A 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron is under development for electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating at DIII-D. Research conducted at MIT in short pulse operation is aimed at providing data on the operation of the gyrotron at very high efficiency. The 1.5 MW gyrotron design is based on previous successful results from the 1 MW gyrotrons built by Communication and Power Industries (CPI). A TE_22,6 mode cavity is utilized with an electron beam voltage of 96 kV and a beam current of 40 A. Recently we have successfully run the gyrotron in the axial configuration, and the experimental peak power was 1.44 MW at 37 % efficiency, when operating in the TE_22,6 mode. We have rebuilt this experiment in a configuration which has an internal mode converter and depressed collector, which should enhance the efficiency (> 50 %). The internal mode converter of the TE_22,6 mode to a Gaussian beam consists of an irregular waveguide launcher and four quasi-optical mirrors. A new cavity that provides greatly reduced Ohmic heating on the wall has been designed to enhance the gyrotron efficiency. This cavity will be tested in the next stage of the experiment.

  6. Short-pulse laser materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.; Myers, B.R.; Banks, P.S.; Honea, E.C.

    1997-06-18

    While there is much that we have learned about materials processing in the ultrashort-pulse regime, there is an enormous amount that we don`t know. How short does the pulse have to be to achieve a particular cut (depth, material, quality)? How deep can you cut? What is the surface roughness? These questions are clearly dependent upon the properties of the material of interest along with the short-pulse interaction physics. From a technology standpoint, we are asked: Can you build a 100 W average power system ? A 1000 W average power system? This proposal seeks to address these questions with a combined experimental and theoretical program of study. Specifically, To develop an empirical database for both metals and dielectrics which can be used to determine the pulse duration and wavelength necessary to achieve a specific machining requirement. To investigate Yb:YAG as a potential laser material for high average power short-pulse systems both directly and in combination with titanium doped sapphire. To develop a conceptual design for a lOOW and eventually 5OOW average power short-pulse system.

  7. The 1.5 MW wind turbine of tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    De Wolff, T.J.; Sondergaard, H.

    1996-12-31

    The Danish company Nordtank is one of the pioneers within the wind turbine industry. Since 1981 Nordtank has installed worldwide more than 2300 wind turbine generators with a total name plate capacity that is exceeding 350 MW. This paper will describe two major wind turbine technology developments that Nordtank has accomplished during the last year: Site Optimization of Nordtank wind turbines: Nordtank has developed a flexible design concept for its WTGs in the 500/600 kW range, in order to offer the optimal WTG solution for any given site and wind regime. Nordtank`s 1.5 MW wind turbine: In September 1995, Nordtank was the first company to install a commercial 1.5 NM WTG. This paper will document the development process, the design as well as operations of the Nordtank 1.5 MW WTG.

  8. Raft River 5-MW(e) geothermal pilot plant project

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, T.L.; Whitbeck, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The Raft River 5-MW(e) Pilot Plant Project was started in 1976. Construction is scheduled for completion in July 1980, with three years of engineering and operational testing to follow. The plant utilized a 280/sup 0/F geothermal fluid energy source and a dual boiling isobutane cycle. Developmental efforts are in progress in the areas of down hole pumps and chemical treatment of geothermal fluid for cooling tower makeup.

  9. The 5 MW for solar-chemistry development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, J. T.

    1981-11-01

    The US-DOE, 5MW solar Central Receiver Test Facility (CRTF) operates to develop and proof-test high efficiency solar receivers and collectors (heliostats) for applications such as electricity generation and process heating. The capabilities of CRTF for solar chemical process development studies are described and related to chemical reactant heating rates. A Sun Fuels program is planned to demonstrate a process for upgrading both nonrenewable and renewable feedstocks into conventional fuels. To additionally benefit from the high intensity light source, studies on the direct solar pyrolysis of metal halides and carbonyls to produce high purity, high value metals are recommended.

  10. Short-pulse laser interactions with disordered materials and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Phinney, L.M.; Goldman, C.H.; Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    High-power, short-pulse lasers in the picosecond and subpicosecond range are utilized in an increasing number of technologies, including materials processing and diagnostics, micro-electronics and devices, and medicine. In these applications, the short-pulse radiation interacts with a wide range of media encompassing disordered materials and liquids. Examples of disordered materials include porous media, polymers, organic tissues, and amorphous forms of silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon dioxide. In order to accurately model, efficiently control, and optimize short-pulse, laser-material interactions, a thorough understanding of the energy transport mechanisms is necessary. Thus, fractals and percolation theory are used to analyze the anomalous diffusion regime in random media. In liquids, the thermal aspects of saturable and multiphoton absorption are examined. Finally, a novel application of short-pulse laser radiation to reduce surface adhesion forces in microstructures through short-pulse laser-induced water desorption is presented.

  11. A Two Frequency 1.5 MW Gyrotron Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tax, David; Guss, William; Shapiro, Michael; Temkin, Richard; Rock, Ben; Vernon, Ronald; Neilson, Jeffrey

    2012-10-01

    Megawatt gyrotrons are an important microwave source for electron cyclotron heating and current drive (ECH/ECCD) in fusion plasmas due to their ability to produce megawatts of power at millimeter wave frequencies. The MIT gyrotron operates nominally at 96 kV and 40 A with 3 μs pulses and has previously demonstrated 1.5 MW of output power with > 50 % efficiency at 110 GHz with a depressed collector. A new cavity has been designed for 1.5 MW operation at two distinct frequencies: 110 GHz in the TE22,6 mode and 124.5 GHz in the TE24,7 mode. A new internal mode converter (IMC) consisting of a dimpled wall launcher and four smooth curved mirrors has also been designed and was optimized for both modes. Simulations of the IMC indicate that > 98 % Gaussian beam content could be achieved for each mode. Cold test results for the components will be presented as well as the current status of the hot test experiment.

  12. 5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

  13. Medical applications of ultra-short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B M; Marion, J E

    1999-06-08

    The medical applications for ultra short pulse lasers (USPLs) and their associated commercial potential are reviewed. Short pulse lasers offer the surgeon the possibility of precision cutting or disruption of tissue with virtually no thermal or mechanical damage to the surrounding areas. Therefore the USPL offers potential improvement to numerous existing medical procedures. Secondly, when USPLs are combined with advanced tissue diagnostics, there are possibilities for tissue-selective precision ablation that may allow for new surgeries that cannot at present be performed. Here we briefly review the advantages of short pulse lasers, examine the potential markets both from an investment community perspective, and from the view. of the technology provider. Finally nominal performance and cost requirements for the lasers, delivery systems and diagnostics and the present state of development will be addressed.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPACT PHOTO-INJECTOR WITH RFFOCUSING LENS FOR SHORT PULSE ELECTRON SOURCE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Grabenhofer, Alexander; Eaton, Douglas W.

    2013-09-01

    For development of compact ultrafast electron source system, we are currently designing a short-pulse RF-gun with RF focusing structure by means of a series of comprehensive modeling analysis processes. EM design of a 2.5 cell resonant cavity with input coupler, acceleration dynamics of photo-emitted electron bunch, EM design of RF-lens with input coupler, and phasespace analysis of focused electron bunch are systematically examined with multi-physics simulators. All the features of the 2.856 GHz cavity geometry were precisely engineered for acceleration energies ranging from 100 keV to 500 keV (safety limited) to be powered by our 5 MW S-band klystron. The klystron (Thales TH2163) and modulator system (ScandiNova K1 turnkey system) were successfully installed and tested. Performance tests of the klystron system show peak output power > 5 MW, as per operation specifications. At the quasi-relativistic energies, the electron source is capable of generating 100fC – 1 pC electron bunch with pulse duration close to 30 fs – 1 ps and transverse size of a few hundred microns. PIC simulations have shown that the electron bunch undergoes fast RF acceleration, rapidly reaching the desired energies, which can be controlled by tuning RF injection phase and input driving power. It has been shown that it is possible to also focus/compress the bunch longitudinally using a RF-lens, which would allow us to control the temporal resolution of the system as well. While our primary analysis has been performed on a 2.5 cell design, we are also looking into half-cell (single cavity) design that is expected to provide the same range of beam energy with a simple configuration.

  15. Cylindrical short-pulse Child-Langmuir law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Wee Shing

    2005-10-01

    Laser-driven short pulses have been prevalently used in photo-injectors to produce extremely high current densities. If the pulse length of the short-pulse current is less than the transit time across the gap, the space-charge-limiting (SCL) current density of the electron beam exceeds that of the classical long-pulse limit as given by the Child-Langmuir (CL) Law. The 1D short-pulse CL law for a planar electrode has been derived with verification from PIC simulation [1]. The extension to the 2D and 3D models of the short-pulse CL law has also been presented recently [2]. In the long pulse limit, the 2D and 3D CL laws for both planar and cylindrical diodes have also been developed [3]. In this paper, we will present the 1D and 2D short-pulse CL law in the coaxial cylinder configuration for both convergent and divergent flows. The analytical results will be compared with 2D PIC simulation results. [1] 'Ag'ust Valfells et. al. , ``Effects of pulse-length and emitter area in virtual cathode formation in electron guns'', Phys. Plasmas 9, 2377 (2002). [2] W. S. Koh and L. K. Ang, "Two-dimensional Short-Pulse Chid-Langmuir Law", The 32nd International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS), N05CH37707, 3P38, pp. 298 (2005).[3] W. S. Koh, et. al., Three-dimensional Child-Langmuir law for hot electron emission, Phys. Plasmas 12, 053107 (2005). Email: elkang@ntu.edu.sg

  16. Fiber Laser Front Ends for High Energy, Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Siders, C; Beach, R; Barty, C

    2007-06-21

    We are developing a fiber laser system for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal for these systems as they are highly reliable and enable long term stable operation.

  17. Application of Yb:YAG short pulse laser system

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.; Biswal, Subrat; Bartolick, Joseph M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Crane, John K.; Telford, Steve; Perry, Michael D.

    2004-07-06

    A diode pumped, high power (at least 20W), short pulse (up to 2 ps), chirped pulse amplified laser using Yb:YAG as the gain material is employed for material processing. Yb:YAG is used as the gain medium for both a regenerative amplifier and a high power 4-pass amplifier. A single common reflective grating optical device is used to both stretch pulses for amplification purposes and to recompress amplified pulses before being directed to a workpiece.

  18. Modeling and simulation of ultra-short pulse amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflaum, Christoph; Hartmann, Rainer; Rahimi, Zhabiz

    2016-03-01

    Ultra-short pulses with high average power are required for a variety of technical and medical applications. Single, multi-pass, and regenerative amplifiers are used, in order to increase the power of ultra-short lasers. Typical laser crystals for such amplifiers include Ti:Sapphire or Yb:YAG laser crystals. Difficulties in the amplification of ultra-short pulses include gain narrowing effects and dispersion effects in the laser crystal. In particular, these complications arise, when a pulse stretcher is needed before amplification of the laser beam. We present a technique to model and simulate the amplification of ultra-short pulses. This technique allows to model both gain narrowing effects and decrease of beam quality caused by amplification of the laser beam. This requires a detailed 3-dimensional simulation of population inversion. Gain narrowing effects are taken into account by analyzing the gain of the spectrum of the laser beam. It is important to distinguish amplifiers with one or only two passes and a regenerative amplifier. These two different kind of amplifiers are modeled by different approaches. A regenerative amplifier is modeled by a set of time dependent rate equations. However, a single pass amplifier is modeled by a set of spatial dependent rate equations. In both cases, a system of rate equations arises from spectral discretization of the laser beam. Detailed simulation results are presented.

  19. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2007-08-28

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dots and D-dots, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetic codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a corresponding broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  20. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2008-02-04

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dot and D-dot probes, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from several hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetics codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a correspondingly broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  1. Short-Pulse Laser-Matter Computational Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Town, R; Tabak, M

    2004-11-02

    For three days at the end of August 2004, 55 plasma scientists met at the Four Points by Sheraton in Pleasanton to discuss some of the critical issues associated with the computational aspects of the interaction of short-pulse high-intensity lasers with matter. The workshop was organized around the following six key areas: (1) Laser propagation/interaction through various density plasmas: micro scale; (2) Anomalous electron transport effects: From micro to meso scale; (3) Electron transport through plasmas: From meso to macro scale; (4) Ion beam generation, transport, and focusing; (5) ''Atomic-scale'' electron and proton stopping powers; and (6) K{alpha} diagnostics.

  2. Short pulse generation by laser slicing at NSLSII

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.; Blednykh, A.; Guo, W.; Krinsky, S.; Li, Y.; Shaftan, T.; Tchoubar, O.; Wang, G.; Willeke, F.; Yang, L.

    2011-03-28

    We discuss an upgrade R&D project for NSLSII to generate sub-pico-second short x-ray pulses using laser slicing. We discuss its basic parameters and present a specific example for a viable design and its performance. Since the installation of the laser slicing system into the storage ring will break the symmetry of the lattice, we demonstrate it is possible to recover the dynamical aperture to the original design goal of the ring. There is a rapid growth of ultrafast user community interested in science using sub-pico-second x-ray pulses. In BNL's Short Pulse Workshop, the discussion from users shows clearly the need for a sub-pico-second pulse source using laser slicing method. In the proposal submitted following this workshop, NSLS team proposed both hard x-ray and soft x-ray beamlines using laser slicing pulses. Hence there is clearly a need to consider the R&D efforts of laser slicing short pulse generation at NSLSII to meet these goals.

  3. Making Relativistic Positrons Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Chen, C; Chen, S; Cone, K; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Liang, E; Price, D; Van Maren, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Mithen, J; Murphy, C V; Myatt, J; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R; Stafford, D; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorfer, P

    2009-08-24

    This paper describes a new positron source produced using ultra-intense short pulse lasers. Although it has been studied in theory since as early as the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process, and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser based positron source with its unique characteristics may complements the existing sources using radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  4. An integrated CMOS detection system for optical short-pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Gun; Hong, Nam-Pyo; Choi, Young-Wan

    2014-03-01

    We present design of a front-end readout system consisting of charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) and pulse shaper for detection of stochastic and ultra-small semiconductor scintillator signal. The semiconductor scintillator is double sided silicon detector (DSSD) or avalanche photo detector (APD) for high resolution and peak signal reliability of γ-ray or X-ray spectroscopy. Such system commonly uses low noise multichannel CSA. Each CSA in multichannel includes continuous reset system based on tens of MΩ and charge-integrating capacitor in feedback loop. The high value feedback resistor requires large area and huge power consumption for integrated circuits. In this paper, we analyze these problems and propose a CMOS short pulse detection system with a novel CSA. The novel CSA is composed of continuous reset system with combination of diode connected PMOS and 100 fF. This structure has linearity with increased input charge quantity from tens of femto-coulomb to pico-coulomb. Also, the front-end readout system includes both slow and fast shapers for detecting CSA output and preventing pile-up distortion. Shaping times of fast and slow shapers are 150 ns and 1.4 μs, respectively. Simulation results of the CMOS detection system for optical short-pulse implemented in 0.18 μm CMOS technology are presented.

  5. Making relativistic positrons using ultraintense short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Wilks, S. C.; Bonlie, J. D.; Chen, S. N.; Cone, K. V.; Elberson, L. N.; Price, D. F.; Schneider, M. B.; Shepherd, R.; Stafford, D. C.; Tommasini, R.; Van Maren, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gregori, G.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J.

    2009-12-15

    This paper describes a new positron source using ultraintense short pulse lasers. Although it has been theoretically studied since the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2x10{sup 10} positrons/s ejected at the back of approximately millimeter thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short (approx1 ps) ultraintense (approx1x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser-based positron source with its unique characteristics may complement the existing sources based on radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  6. Modelling hot electron generation in short pulse target heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircombe, N. J.; Hughes, S. J.

    2013-11-01

    Target heating experiments planned for the Orion laser facility, and electron beam driven fast ignition schemes, rely on the interaction of a short pulse high intensity laser with dense material to generate a flux of energetic electrons. It is essential that the characteristics of this electron source are well known in order to inform transport models in radiation hydrodynamics codes and allow effective evaluation of experimental results and forward modelling of future campaigns. We present results obtained with the particle in cell (PIC) code EPOCH for realistic target and laser parameters, including first and second harmonic light. The hot electron distributions are characterised and their implications for onward transport and target heating are considered with the aid of the Monte-Carlo transport code THOR.

  7. Stimulated brillouin backscatter of a short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, D.E.; Williams, E.A.; Berger, R.L.

    1994-11-03

    Stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBBS) from a short-pulse laser, where the pulse length is short compared to the plasma length, is found to be qualitatively different than in the long pulse regime, where the pulse length is long compared to the plasma length. We find that after an initial transient of order the laser pulse length transit time, the instability reaches a steady state in the variables x{prime} = x {minus} V{sub g}t, t{prime} = t, where V{sub g} is the pulse group velocity. In contrast, SBBS in a long pulse can be absolutely unstable and grows indefinitely, or until nonlinearities intervene. We find that the motion of the laser pulse induces Doppler related effects that substantially modify the backscattered spectrum at higher intensities, where the instability is strongly coupled (i.e. , has a growth rate large compared to the ion acoustic frequency).

  8. Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch Technology for Short Pulse Electromagnetics and Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Denison, Gary J.; Helgeson, Wesley D.; Hjalmarson, Harold P.; Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Mar, Alan; O'Malley, Martin W.; Zutavern, Fred J.

    1999-08-05

    High gain photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) are being used to produce high power electromagnetic pulses foc (1) compact, repetitive accelerators, (2) ultra-wide band impulse sources, (3) precision gas switch triggers, (4) optically-activated firesets, and (5) high power optical pulse generation and control. High power, sub-nanosecond optical pulses are used for active optical sensors such as compact optical radars and range-gated hallistic imaging systems. Following a brief introduction to high gain PCSS and its general applications, this paper will focus on PCSS for optical pulse generation and control. PCSS technology can be employed in three distinct approaches to optical pulse generation and control: (1) short pulse carrier injection to induce gain-switching in semiconductor lasers, (2) electro-optical Q-switching, and (3) optically activated Q-switching. The most significant PCSS issues for these applications are switch rise time, jitter, and longevity. This paper will describe both the requirements of these applications and the most recent results from PCSS technology. Experiments to understand and expand the limitations of high gain PCSS will also be described.

  9. Airborne profiling of ice thickness using a short pulse radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, R. S.; Heighway, J. E.; Gedney, R.

    1973-01-01

    The acquisition and interpretation of ice thickness data from a mobile platform has for some time been a goal of the remote sensing community. Such data, once obtainable, is of value in monitoring the changes in ice thickness over large areas, and in mapping the potential hazards to traffic in shipping lanes. Measurements made from a helicopter-borne ice thickness profiler of ice in Lake Superior, Lake St. Clair and the St. Clair river as part of NASA's program to develop an ice information system are described. The profiler described is a high resolution, non-imaging, short pulse radar, operating at a carrier frequency of 2.7 GHz. The system can resolve reflective surfaces separated by as little as 10 cm. and permits measurement of the distance between resolvable surfaces with an accuracy of about 1 cm. Data samples are given for measurements both in a static (helicopter hovering), and a traverse mode. Ground truth measurements taken by an ice auger team traveling with the helicopter are compared with the remotely sensed data and the accuracy of the profiler is discussed based on these measurements.

  10. Studying the mechanism of micromachining by short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadag, Shiva

    The semiconductor materials like Si and the transparent dielectric materials like glass and quartz are extensively used in optoelectronics, microelectronics, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) industries. The combination of these materials often go hand in hand for applications in MEMS such as in chips for pressure sensors, charge coupled devices (CCD), and photovoltaic (PV) cells for solar energy generation. The transparent negative terminal of the solar cell is made of glass on one surface of the PV cell. The positive terminal (cathode) on the other surface of the solar cell is made of silicon with a glass negative terminal (anode). The digital watches and cell phones, LEDs, micro-lens, optical components, and laser optics are other examples for the application of silicon and or glass. The Si and quartz are materials extensively used in CCD and LED for digital cameras and CD players respectively. Hence, three materials: (1) a semiconductor silicon and transparent dielectrics,- (2) glass, and (3) quartz are chosen for laser micromachining as they have wide spread applications in microelectronics industry. The Q-switched, nanosecond pulsed lasers are most extensively used for micro-machining. The nanosecond type of short pulsed laser is less expensive for the end users than the second type, pico or femto, ultra-short pulsed lasers. The majority of the research work done on these materials (Si, SiO 2, and glass) is based on the ultra-short pulsed lasers. This is because of the cut quality, pin point precision of the drilled holes, formation of the nanometer size microstructures and fine features, and minimally invasive heat affected zone. However, there are many applications such as large surface area dicing, cutting, surface cleaning of Si wafers by ablation, and drilling of relatively large-sized holes where some associated heat affected zone due to melting can be tolerated. In such applications the nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of materials is very

  11. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung

    1992-12-31

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  12. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung.

    1992-01-01

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  13. Studying the mechanism of micromachining by short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadag, Shiva

    The semiconductor materials like Si and the transparent dielectric materials like glass and quartz are extensively used in optoelectronics, microelectronics, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) industries. The combination of these materials often go hand in hand for applications in MEMS such as in chips for pressure sensors, charge coupled devices (CCD), and photovoltaic (PV) cells for solar energy generation. The transparent negative terminal of the solar cell is made of glass on one surface of the PV cell. The positive terminal (cathode) on the other surface of the solar cell is made of silicon with a glass negative terminal (anode). The digital watches and cell phones, LEDs, micro-lens, optical components, and laser optics are other examples for the application of silicon and or glass. The Si and quartz are materials extensively used in CCD and LED for digital cameras and CD players respectively. Hence, three materials: (1) a semiconductor silicon and transparent dielectrics,- (2) glass, and (3) quartz are chosen for laser micromachining as they have wide spread applications in microelectronics industry. The Q-switched, nanosecond pulsed lasers are most extensively used for micro-machining. The nanosecond type of short pulsed laser is less expensive for the end users than the second type, pico or femto, ultra-short pulsed lasers. The majority of the research work done on these materials (Si, SiO 2, and glass) is based on the ultra-short pulsed lasers. This is because of the cut quality, pin point precision of the drilled holes, formation of the nanometer size microstructures and fine features, and minimally invasive heat affected zone. However, there are many applications such as large surface area dicing, cutting, surface cleaning of Si wafers by ablation, and drilling of relatively large-sized holes where some associated heat affected zone due to melting can be tolerated. In such applications the nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of materials is very

  14. Adaptive optics for ultra short pulsed lasers in UHV environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, Francois; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed an electro-mechanical deformable mirror compatible with Ultra High Vacuum environment, suitable for ultra short pulsed lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations. μ-AME actuators are driven by stepper motors, and their patented special design allows controlling the force with a very high accuracy. Materials and assembly method have been adapted to UHV constraints and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for standard MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The deformable mirror design allows changing easily an actuator or even the membrane if needed, in order to improve the facility availability. They are designed for circular, square or elliptical aperture from 30mm up to 500mm or more, with incidence angle from 0° to 45°. They can be equipped with passive or active cooling for high power lasers with high repetition rate.

  15. Extending ultra-short pulse laser texturing over large area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mincuzzi, G.; Gemini, L.; Faucon, M.; Kling, R.

    2016-11-01

    Surface texturing by Ultra-Short Pulses Laser (UPL) for industrial applications passes through the use of both fast beam scanning systems and high repetition rate, high average power P, UPL. Nevertheless unwanted thermal effects are expected when P exceeds some tens of W. An interesting strategy for a reliable heat management would consists in texturing with a low fluence values (slightly higher than the ablation threshold) and utilising a Polygon Scanner Heads delivering laser pulses with unrepeated speed. Here we show for the first time that with relatively low fluence it is possible over stainless steel, to obtain surface texturing by utilising a 2 MHz femtosecond laser jointly with a polygonal scanner head in a relatively low fluence regime (0.11 J cm-2). Different surface textures (Ripples, micro grooves and spikes) can be obtained varying the scan speed from 90 m s-1 to 25 m s-1. In particular, spikes formation process has been shown and optimised at 25 m s-1 and a full morphology characterization by SEM has been carried out. Reflectance measurements with integrating sphere are presented to compare reference surface with high scan rate textures. In the best case we show a black surface with reflectance value < 5%.

  16. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  17. Covert situational awareness with handheld ultrawideband short-pulse radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Mark A.; Nag, Soumya; Payment, Tim

    2001-08-01

    Law enforcement and emergency services all face the difficult task of determining the locations of people within a building. A handheld radar able to detect motion through walls and other obstructions has been developed to fill this need. This paper describes the attributes and difficulties of the radar design and includes test results of the radar's performance. This discussion begins by summarizing key user requirements and the electromagnetic losses of typical building materials. Ultra-wideband (UWB) short pulse radars are well suited for a handheld sensor primarily because of their inherit time isolation in high clutter environments and their capability to achieve high resolution at low spectral center frequencies. There are also constraints that complicate the system design. Using a technique referred to as time-modulation allows the radars to reject range ambiguities and enhances electromagnetic compatibility with similar radars and ambient systems. An outline of the specifications of the radar developed and a process diagram on how it generates a motion map showing range and direction of the people moving within structures is included. Images are then presented to illustrate its performance. The images include adults, child, and a dog. The test results also include data showing the radar's performance through a variety of building materials.

  18. Overview of LANL short-pulse ion acceleration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Offermann, Dustin; Cobble, James A.; Gautier, Donald; Kline, John; Workman, Jonathan; Archuleta, Fred; Gonzales, Raymond; Hurry, Thomas; Johnson, Randall; Letzring, Samuel; Montgomery, David; Reid, Sha-Marie; Shimada, Tsutomu; Gaillard, Sandrine A.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Bussman, Michael; Kluge, Thomas; Cowan, Thomas E.; Rassuchine, Jenny M.; Lowenstern, Mario E.; Mucino, J. Eduardo; Gall, Brady; Korgan, Grant; Malekos, Steven; Adams, Jesse; Bartal, Teresa; Chawla, Surgreev; Higginson, Drew; Beg, Farhat; Nilson, Phil; Mac Phee, Andrew; Le Pape, Sebastien; Hey, Daniel; Mac Kinnon, Andy; Geissel, Mattias; Schollmeier, Marius; Stephens, Rich

    2009-12-02

    An overview of Los Alamos National Laboratory's activities related to short-pulse ion acceleration is presented. LANL is involved is several projects related to Inertial Confinement Fusion (Fast Ignition) and Laser-Ion Acceleration. LANL has an active high energy X-ray backlighter program for radiographing ICF implosions and other High Energy Density Laboratory Physics experiments. Using the Trident 200TW laser we are currently developing high energy photon (>10 keV) phase contrast imaging techniques to be applied on Omega and the NIF. In addition we are engaged in multiple programs in laser ion acceleration to boost the ion energies and efficiencies for various potential applications including Fast Ignition, active material interrogation, and medical applications. Two basic avenues to increase ion performance are currently under study: one involves ultra-thin targets and the other involves changing the target geometry. We have recently had success in boosting proton energies above 65 MeV into the medical application range. Highlights covered in the presentation include: The Trident Laser System; X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging for ICF and HEDLP; Improving TNSA Ion Acceleration; Scaling Laws; Flat Targets; Thin Targets; Cone Targets; Ion Focusing;Trident; Omega EP; Scaling Comparisons; and, Conclusions.

  19. SLIM, Short-pulse Technology for High Gradient Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Arntz, Floyd; Kardo-Sysoev, A.; Krasnykh, A.; /SLAC

    2008-12-16

    A novel short-pulse concept (SLIM) suited to a new generation of a high gradient induction particle accelerators is described herein. It applies advanced solid state semiconductor technology and modern microfabrication techniques to a coreless induction method of charged particle acceleration first proven on a macro scale in the 1960's. Because this approach avoids use of magnetic materials there is the prospect of such an accelerator working efficiently with accelerating pulses in the nanosecond range and, potentially, at megahertz pulse rates. The principal accelerator section is envisioned as a stack of coreless induction cells, the only active element within each being a single, extremely fast (subnanosecond) solid state opening switch: a Drift Step Recovery Diode (DSRD). Each coreless induction cell incorporates an electromagnetic pulse compressor in which inductive energy developed within a transmission-line feed structure over a period of tens of nanoseconds is diverted to the acceleration of the passing charge packet for a few nanoseconds by the abrupt opening of the DSRD switch. The duration of this accelerating output pulse--typically two-to-four nanoseconds--is precisely determined by a microfabricated pulse forming line connected to the cell. Because the accelerating pulse is only nanoseconds in duration, longitudinal accelerating gradients approaching 100 MeV per meter are believed to be achievable without inciting breakdown. Further benefits of this approach are that, (1) only a low voltage power supply is required to produce the high accelerating gradient, and, (2) since the DSRD switch is normally closed, voltage stress is limited to a few nanoseconds per period, hence the susceptibility to hostile environment conditions such as ionizing radiation, mismatch (e.g. in medical applications the peak beam current may be low), strong electromagnetic noise levels, etc is expected to be minimal. Finally, we observe the SLIM concept is not limited to linac

  20. Plasmas and Short-Pulse, High-Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Thomas

    1999-11-01

    Many of the applications of short-pulse, high-intensity laser systems, including coherent UV and X-ray generation, compact particle accelerators, and non-perturbative nonlinear optics as well as the study of laser-matter interaction physics, require large intensity-interaction length products. In recent years, plasma structures resulting from the hydrodynamic evolution of laser-produced plasma filaments have proven to be attractive media for guiding pulses with peak powers approaching the terawatt level over lengths many times the vacuum Rayleigh range. The hydrodynamics of plasma waveguides have been characterized using time- and space-resolved interferometry measurements of electron density profiles. The laser-driven ionization and heating phase of the plasma filament creation is followed by hot electron driven plasma expansion. Density profiles suitable for optical guiding develop within the first few hundred picoseconds after plasma creation, during which rapid cooling occurs. At longer times the plasma expansion closely follows that of a cylindrical blast wave, with further cooling due to expansion work. The observed guided intensity profiles of end-coupled and tunnel-coupled pulses compare favorably with calculations of the quasi-bound waveguide modes based on the measured electron density profiles. Time- and space-resolved electron density measurements of a laser-driven concentric implosion were also performed. The implosion is the result of the interaction of a second laser pulse with an existing plasma waveguide. The two-pulse absorption and ionization significantly exceed that due to a single pulse of the same total energy. The author would like to acknowledge the significant contributions of Prof. Howard M. Milchberg to the work being presented.

  1. High temperature, high density opacity measurements using short pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarty, D. J.; James, S. F.; Brown, C. R. D.; Williams, B. M.; Guymer, T.; Hill, M.; Morton, J.; Chapman, D.; Shepherd, R.; Dunn, J.; Brown, G.; Schneider, M.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chung, H. K.; Harris, J. W. O.; Upcraft, L.; Smith, C. C.; Lee, R. W.

    2010-08-01

    Heating of thin foil targets by a high power laser at intensities of 1017 -1019W/cm2 has been studied as a method for producing high temperature, high density samples to investigate X-ray opacity and equation of state. The targets were plastic (parylene N) foils with a buried microdot of a sample material, which was either aluminium, germanium or a mixture of germanium and titanium mixture of germanium and titanium. L-shell and K-shell spectra were taken using crystal spectrometers recording onto film and an ultrafast X-ray streak camera coupled to a conical focussing crystal with a time resolution of 1ps. The conditions in the microdot were inferred by comparing the measured spectra to synthetic spectra produced by the time-dependent collisional-radiative (CR) models FLY and FLYCHK. The data were also compared to simulated spectra from a number of opacity codes assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Temperature and density gradients were taken into account in the comparisons. The sample conditions, inferred from the CR modelling using FLYCHK, were 800±100eV and 1.5±0.5g/cc, in the germanium/titanium samples and 600+50/-150eV, 3-4g/cc in the pure germanium or aluminium samples. The higher densities were achieved by using a combination of long and short pulses to compress and heat the foils respectively. The experimental results and comparisons to predicted spectra are presented and discussed.

  2. Extrapolation of the Dutch 1 MW tunable free electron maser to a 5 MW ECRH source

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Nelson, S.; Kamin, G.; Antonsen, T. Levush, B.; Urbanus, W.; Tulupov, A.

    1995-04-01

    A Free Electron Maser (FEM) is now under construction at the FOM Institute (Rijnhuizen) Netherlands with the goal of producing 1 MW long pulse to CW microwave output in the range 130 GHz to 250 GHz with wall plug efficiencies of 50% (Verhoeven, et al EC-9 Conference). An extrapolated version of this device is proposed which by scaling up the beam current, would produce microwave power levels of up to 5 MW CW in order to reduce the cost per watt and increase the power per module, thus providing the fusion community with a practical ECRH source.

  3. Development of short pulse laser pumped x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Osterheld, A L; Hunter, J R; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2000-02-22

    X-ray lasers have been extensively studied around the world since the first laboratory demonstration on the Novette laser at LLNL in 1984. The characteristic properties of short wavelength, high monochromaticity, collimation and coherence make x-ray lasers useful for various applications. These include demonstrations of biological imaging within the water window, interferometry of laser plasmas and radiography of laser-heated surfaces. One of the critical issues has been the high power pump required to produce the inversion. The power scaling as a function of x-ray laser wavelength follows a {approx} {lambda}{sup -4} to {approx} {lambda}{sup -6} law. The shortest x-ray laser wavelength of {approx}35 {angstrom} demonstrated for Ni-like Au was at the limit of Nova laser capabilities. By requiring large, high power lasers such as Nova, the shot rate and total number of shots available have limited the rapid development of x-ray lasers and applications. In fact over the last fifteen years the main thrust has been to develop more efficient, higher repetition rate x-ray lasers that can be readily scaled to shorter wavelengths. The recent state of progress in the field can be found in references. The objective of the project was to develop a soft x-ray laser (XRL) pumped by a short pulse laser of a few joules. In effect to demonstrate a robust, worlung tabletop x-ray laser at LLNL for the first time. The transient collisional scheme as proposed by Shlyaptsev et al. was the candidate x-ray laser for study. The successful endeavor of any scientific investigation is often based upon prudent early decisions and the choice of this scheme was both sound and fruitful. It had been demonstrated very recently for Ne-like Ti at 326 {angstrom} using a small tabletop laser but had not yet reached its full potential. We chose this scheme for several reasons: (a) it was a collisional-type x-ray laser which has been historically the most robust; (b) it had the promise of high efficiency

  4. Space Debris-de-Orbiting by Vaporization Impulse using Short Pulse Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Early, J; Bibeau, C; Claude, P

    2003-09-16

    Space debris constitutes a significant hazard to low earth orbit satellites and particularly to manned spacecraft. A quite small velocity decrease from vaporization impulses is enough to lower the perigee of the debris sufficiently for atmospheric drag to de-orbit the debris. A short pulse (picosecond) laser version of the Orion concept can accomplish this task in several years of operation. The ''Mercury'' short pulse Yb:S-FAP laser being developed at LLNL for laser fusion is appropriate for this task.

  5. Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Shaber, C.R.; Thurow, T.L.

    1981-11-17

    The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

  6. Definition of a 5MW/61.5m wind turbine blade reference model.

    SciTech Connect

    Resor, Brian Ray

    2013-04-01

    A basic structural concept of the blade design that is associated with the frequently utilized %E2%80%9CNREL offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine%E2%80%9D is needed for studies involving blade structural design and blade structural design tools. The blade structural design documented in this report represents a concept that meets basic design criteria set forth by IEC standards for the onshore turbine. The design documented in this report is not a fully vetted blade design which is ready for manufacture. The intent of the structural concept described by this report is to provide a good starting point for more detailed and targeted investigations such as blade design optimization, blade design tool verification, blade materials and structures investigations, and blade design standards evaluation. This report documents the information used to create the current model as well as the analyses used to verify that the blade structural performance meets reasonable blade design criteria.

  7. Stabilization of CO2 laser short-pulse oscillation by tickle pulse for dot processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokita, Daisaku; Sakurada, Noriyo; Ishii, Yoshio; Kubota, Yuzuru; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2005-03-01

    Image drawing using a laser system has been attempted by Segmented Pixel Drawing (SPD) method and Laser Plastic Coloring (LPC) method in our laboratory. Laser dot processing by a short pulse oscillation of a CO2 laser is used for these laser methods. Stable short pulse oscillation is required for an accurate image drawing. That oscillation has a tendency to be unstable because of its long oscillation interval. A tickle pulse is known as one of a technique which is conventionally used for a continuous pulse oscillation of a CO2 laser in order to make rising rate of laser oscillation quick. In this study, this tickle pulse has been improved and applied to the short pulse oscillation in order to stable short pulse oscillation and high accurate laser dot processing. In the result, processed dots are appeared bigger with less variation in their sizes with the improved tickle pulse case compared with the conventional case. Short pulse oscillation is stabilized by these improved tickle pulse. Reproducibility and accuracy ofthe SPD method and LPC method might be realized by this stabilized dot processing.

  8. An Overview of High Energy Short Pulse Technology for Advanced Radiography of Laser Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J; Key, M; Britten, J; Beach, R; Beer, G; Brown, C; Bryan, S; Caird, J; Carlson, T; Crane, J; Dawson, J; Erlandson, A C; Fittinghoff, D; Hermann, M; Hoaglan, C; Iyer, A; Jones, L; Jovanovic, I; Komashko, A; Landen, O; Liao, Z; Molander, W; Mitchell, A; Moses, E; Nielsen, N; Nguyen, H; Nissen, J; Payne, S; Pennington, D; Risinger, L; Rushford, M; Skulina, K; Spaeth, M; Stuart, B; Tietbohl, G; Wattellier, B

    2004-06-18

    The technical challenges and motivations for high-energy, short-pulse generation with NIF-class, Nd:glass laser systems are reviewed. High energy short pulse generation (multi-kilojoule, picosecond pulses) will be possible via the adaptation of chirped pulse amplification laser techniques on the NIF. Development of meter-scale, high efficiency, high-damage-threshold final optics is a key technical challenge. In addition, deployment of HEPW pulses on NIF is constrained by existing laser infrastructure and requires new, compact compressor designs and short-pulse, fiber-based, seed-laser systems. The key motivations for high energy petawatt pulses on NIF is briefly outlined and includes high-energy, x-ray radiography, proton beam radiography, proton isochoric heating and tests of the fast ignitor concept for inertial confinement fusion.

  9. Theoretical and experimental studies of ultra-short pulsed laser drilling of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalowski, Andreas; Qin, Yuan; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Methods for the machining of metals based on the use of ultra-short pulsed laser radiation continue to gain importance in industrial production technology. Theoretical considerations and experimental studies on laser drilling of steel are discussed. The applicability of geometrical optics to calculate the absorbed energy distribution inside small blind holes is investigated theoretically. A model for melt transport during ultra-short pulsed drilling is proposed and verified experimentally. It confirms that helical drilling is advantageous for machining burr-free holes.

  10. Time-dependent Bragg diffraction and short-pulse reflection by one-dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    The time-dependence of the Bragg diffraction by one-dimensional photonic crystals and its influence on the short pulse reflection are studied in the framework of the coupled-wave theory. The indicial response of the photonic crystal is calculated and it appears that it presents a time-delay effect with a transient time conditioned by the extinction length. A numerical simulation is presented for a Bragg mirror in the x-ray domain and a pulse envelope modelled by a sine-squared shape. The potential consequences of the time-delay effect in time-dependent optics of short-pulses are emphasized.

  11. Measurement of lake ice thickness with a short-pulse radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; Mueller, R. A.; Schertler, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of lake ice thickness were made during March 1975 at the Straits of Mackinac by using a short-pulse radar system aboard an all-terrain vehicle. These measurements were compared with ice thicknesses determined with an auger. Over 25 sites were explored which had ice thicknesses in the range 29 to 60 cm. The maximum difference between radar and auger measurements was less than 9.8 percent. The magnitude of the error was less than + or - 3.5 cm. The NASA operating short-pulse radar system used in monitoring lake ice thickness from an aircraft is also described.

  12. Design and analysis of a 5-MW vertical-fluted-tube condenser for geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Llewellyn, G.H.

    1982-03-01

    The design and analysis of an industtial-sized vertical-fluted-tube condenser. The condenser is used to condense superheated isobutane vapor discharged from a power turbine in a geothermal test facility operated for the US Department of Energy. The 5-MW condenser has 1150 coolant tubes in a four-pass configuration with a total heat transfer area of 725 m/sup 2/ (7800 ft/sup 2/). The unit is being tested at the Geothermal Components Test Facility in the Imperial Valley of East Mesa, California. The condenser design is based on previous experimental research work done at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on condensing refrigerants on a wide variety of single vertical tubes. Condensing film coefficients obtained on the high-performance vertical fluted tubes in condensing refrigerants are as much as seven times greater than those obtained with vertical smooth tubes that have the same diameter and length. The overall heat transfer performance expected from the fluted tube condenser is four to five times the heat transfer obtained from the identical units employing smooth tubes. Fluted tube condensers also have other direct applications in the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program in condensing ammonia, in the petroleum industry in condensing light hydrocarbons, and in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry in condensing fluorocarbon vapors.

  13. Reduced-order FSI simulation of NREL 5 MW wind turbine in atmospheric boundary layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta-Mena, Javier; Campbell, Robert; Lavely, Adam; Jha, Pankaj

    2015-11-01

    A partitioned fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver based on an actuator-line method solver and a finite-element modal-dynamic structural solver is used to evaluate the effect of blade deformation in the presence of a day-time, moderately convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The solver components were validated separately and the integrated solver was partially validated against FAST. An overview of the solver is provided in addition to results of the validation study. A finite element model of the NREL 5 MW rotor was developed for use in the present simulations. The effect of blade pitching moment and the inherent bend/twist coupling of the rotor blades are assessed for both uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases. The results suggest that blade twisting in response to pitching moment and the bend/twist coupling can have a significant impact on rotor out-of-plane bending moment and power generated for both the uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases.

  14. Statistical fault diagnosis of wind turbine drivetrain applied to a 5MW floating wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghane, Mahdi; Nejad, Amir R.; Blanke, Mogens; Gao, Zhen; Moan, Torgeir

    2016-09-01

    Deployment of large scale wind turbine parks, in particular offshore, requires well organized operation and maintenance strategies to make it as competitive as the classical electric power stations. It is important to ensure systems are safe, profitable, and cost-effective. In this regards, the ability to detect, isolate, estimate, and prognose faults plays an important role. One of the critical wind turbine components is the gearbox. Failures in the gearbox are costly both due to the cost of the gearbox itself and also due to high repair downtime. In order to detect faults as fast as possible to prevent them to develop into failure, statistical change detection is used in this paper. The Cumulative Sum Method (CUSUM) is employed to detect possible defects in the downwind main bearing. A high fidelity gearbox model on a 5-MW spar-type wind turbine is used to generate data for fault-free and faulty conditions of the bearing at the rated wind speed and the associated wave condition. Acceleration measurements are utilized to find residuals used to indirectly detect damages in the bearing. Residuals are found to be nonGaussian, following a t-distribution with multivariable characteristic parameters. The results in this paper show how the diagnostic scheme can detect change with desired false alarm and detection probabilities.

  15. CFD-based design load analysis of 5MW offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, T. T.; Ryu, G. J.; Kim, Y. H.; Kim, D. H.

    2012-11-01

    The structure and aerodynamic loads acting on NREL 5MW reference wind turbine blade are calculated and analyzed based on advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and unsteady Blade Element Momentum (BEM). A detailed examination of the six force components has been carried out (three force components and three moment components). Structure load (gravity and inertia load) and aerodynamic load have been obtained by additional structural calculations (CFD or BEM, respectively,). In CFD method, the Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes approach was applied to solve the continuity equation of mass conservation and momentum balance so that the complex flow around wind turbines was modeled. Written in C programming language, a User Defined Function (UDF) code which defines transient velocity profile according to the Extreme Operating Gust condition was compiled into commercial FLUENT package. Furthermore, the unsteady BEM with 3D stall model has also adopted to investigate load components on wind turbine rotor. The present study introduces a comparison between advanced CFD and unsteady BEM for determining load on wind turbine rotor. Results indicate that there are good agreements between both present methods. It is importantly shown that six load components on wind turbine rotor is significant effect under Extreme Operating Gust (EOG) condition. Using advanced CFD and additional structural calculations, this study has succeeded to construct accuracy numerical methodology to estimate total load of wind turbine that compose of aerodynamic load and structure load.

  16. The diagnostics of ultra-short pulse laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Since the invention of the laser, coherent light has been used to break down solid or gaseous material and transform it into a plasma. Over the last three decades two things have changed. Due to multiple advancements and design of high power lasers it is now possible to increase the electric and magnetic field strength that pushed the electron motion towards the regime of relativistic plasma physics. Moreover, due to the short pulse duration of the driving laser the underlying physics has become so transient that concepts like thermal equilibrium (even a local one) or spatial isotropy start to fail. Consequently short pulse laser-driven plasmas have become a rich source of new phenomena that we are just about beginning to explore. Such phenomena, like particle acceleration, nuclear laser-induced reactions, the generation of coherent secondary radiation ranging from THz to high harmonics and the production of attosecond pulses have excited an enormous interest in the study of short pulse laser plasmas. The diagnostics of such ultra-short pulse laser plasmas is a challenging task that involves many and different techniques compared to conventional laser-produced plasmas. While this review cannot cover the entire field of diagnostics that has been developed over the last years, we will try to give a summarizing description of the most important techniques that are currently being used.

  17. Electron acceleration in relativistic plasma waves generated by a single frequency short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Coverdale, C.A.; Darrow, C.B.; Decker, C.D.; Mori, W.B.; Tzeng, K.C., Clayton, C.E.; Marsh, K.A.; Joshi, C.

    1995-04-27

    Experimental evidence for the acceleration of electrons in a relativistic plasma wave generated by Raman forward scattering (SRS-F) of a single-frequency short pulse laser are presented. A 1.053 {mu}m, 600 fsec, 5 TW laser was focused into a gas jet with a peak intensity of 8{times}10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. At a plasma density of 2{times}10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3}, 2 MeV electrons were detected and their appearance was correlated with the anti-Stokes laser sideband generated by SRS-F. The results are in good agreement with 2-D PIC simulations. The use of short pulse lasers for making ultra-high gradient accelerators is explored.

  18. Precision short-pulse damage test station utilizing optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Brown, C; Wattellier, B; Nielsen, N; Molander, W; Stuart, B; Pennington, D; Barty, C J

    2004-03-22

    The next generation of high-energy petawatt (HEPW)-class lasers will utilize multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings for pulse compression, due to their high efficiency and high damage threshold for picosecond pulses. The peak power of HEPW lasers will be determined by the aperture and damage threshold of the final dielectric grating in the pulse compressor and final focusing optics. We have developed a short-pulse damage test station for accurate determination of the damage threshold of the optics used on future HEPW lasers. Our damage test station is based on a highly stable, high-beam-quality optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) operating at 1053 nm at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. We present the design of our OPCPA system pumped by a commercial Q-switched pump laser and the results of the full system characterization. Initial short-pulse damage experiments in the far field using our system have been performed.

  19. Simulation studies of vapor bubble generation by short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P.; London, R.A.; Strauss, M.

    1997-10-26

    Formation of vapor bubbles is characteristic of many applications of short-pulse lasers in medicine. An understanding of the dynamics of vapor bubble generation is useful for developing and optimizing laser-based medical therapies. To this end, experiments in vapor bubble generation with laser light deposited in an aqueous dye solution near a fiber-optic tip have been performed. Numerical hydrodynamic simulations have been developed to understand and extrapolate results from these experiments. Comparison of two-dimensional simulations with the experiment shows excellent agreement in tracking the bubble evolution. Another regime of vapor bubble generation is short-pulse laser interactions with melanosomes. Strong shock generation and vapor bubble generation are common physical features of this interaction. A novel effect of discrete absorption by melanin granules within a melanosome is studied as a possible role in previously reported high Mach number shocks.

  20. Chromium carbide thin films deposited by ultra-short pulse laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teghil, R.; Santagata, A.; De Bonis, A.; Galasso, A.; Villani, P.

    2009-06-01

    Pulsed laser deposition performed by a laser with a pulse duration of 250 fs has been used to deposit films from a Cr 3C 2 target. Due to the different processes involved in the laser ablation when it is performed by an ultra-short pulse source instead of a conventional short pulse one, it has been possible to obtain in vacuum films containing only one type of carbide, Cr 3C 2, as shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. On the other hand, Cr 3C 2 is not the only component of the films, since a large amount of amorphous carbon is also present. The films, deposited at room temperature, are amorphous and seem to be formed by the coalescence of a large number of particles with nanometric size. The film composition can be explained in terms of thermal evaporation from particles ejected from the target.

  1. Feasibility study on a short-pulsed IR wavelength for effective calculus fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-05-01

    Laser-induced lithotripsy has been used for a minimally-invasive surgery to treat kidney-stone disease associated with urinary obstruction. A short-pulsed Tm:YAG laser (λ = 2.01 µm) was developed to improve fragmentation efficiency and was evaluated with a Ho:YAG laser (λ = 2.12 μm) as to its ablation feature and mass removal rate. Application of a train of sub-microsecond pulses with a lower energy at a frequency of 500 Hz created multiple events of cavitation that accompanied strong acoustic transients. During Tm:YAG irradiation, both high light absorption and secondary photomechanical impacts readily fragmented the calculus into small pieces (< 3 mm) and removed them 130 times faster than photothermal Ho:YAG lithotripsy. The proposed short-pulsed Tm:YAG approach may be an effective lithotripter for treating calculus disease.

  2. Generation of radiation from interacion between ultra short pulse high power laser and plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugami, Noboru

    2005-10-01

    The generation of electromagnetic wave from the interaction between short pulse laser and plasmas are studied. The Ti:Sapphire laser (0.2 TW/100 fs) was forcused on neutral gas (N2 : 7.5 Torr) using a lens with a focal length 250 mm. By the interaction between short pulse and plasma, the electromagnetic wave was generated. The frequency of the observed electromagnetic waves was in the microwave range (˜ 100 GHz). The radiation pulses of this microwave were detected by the microwave circuit element, constructed by the horn antenna and crystal the detectors. The pulse duration was typically 200 ps (FWHM). It has the polarization in the radial direction and emitted in the conical direction. The emission of the radiation is due to the electron oscillation, because the direction and its intensity were changed by the applied magnetic field.

  3. SHORT-PULSE ELECTROMAGNETIC TRANSPONDER FOR HOLE-TO-HOLE USE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, David L.; Watts, Raymond D.; Bramsoe, Erik

    1983-01-01

    Hole-to-hole observations were made through nearly 20 m of granite using an electromagnetic transponder (an active reflector) in one borehole and a single-hole short-pulse radar in another. The transponder is inexpensive, operationally simple, and effective in extending the capability of a short-pulse borehole radar system to allow hole-to-hole operation without requiring timing cables. A detector in the transponder senses the arrival of each pulse from the radar. Each pulse detection triggers a kilovolt-amplitude pulse for retransmission. The transponder 'echo' may be stronger than that of a passive reflector by a factor of as much as 120 db. The result is an increase in range capability by a factor which depends on attenuation in the medium and hole-to-hole wavepath geometry.

  4. Nonlinear wave interactions between short pulses of different spatio-temporal extents

    PubMed Central

    Sivan, Y.; Rozenberg, S.; Halstuch, A.; Ishaaya, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the nonlinear wave interactions between short pulses of different spatio-temporal extents. Unlike the well-understood mixing of quasi-monochromatic waves, this configuration is highly non-intuitive due to the complex coupling between the spatial and temporal degrees of freedom of the interacting pulses. We illustrate the process intuitively with transitions between different branches of the dispersion curves and interpret it in terms of spectral exchange between the interacting pulses. We verify our interpretation with an example whereby a spectrally-narrow pulse “inherits” the wide spectrum of a pump pulse centered at a different wavelength, using exact numerical simulations, as well as a simplified coupled mode analysis and an asymptotic analytical solution. The latter also provides a simple and intuitive quantitative interpretation. The complex wave mixing process studied here may enable flexible spatio-temporal shaping of short pulses and is the starting point of the study of more complicated systems. PMID:27381552

  5. Time of flight emission spectroscopy of laser produced nickel plasma: Short-pulse and ultrafast excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Joshi, Jagdish C.; Philip, Reji

    2014-07-07

    We report the experimental investigation and comparison of the temporal features of short-pulse (7 ns) and ultrafast (100 fs) laser produced plasmas generated from a solid nickel target, expanding into a nitrogen background. When the ambient pressure is varied in a large range of 10⁻⁶Torr to 10²Torr, the plume intensity is found to increase rapidly as the pressure crosses 1 Torr. Time of flight (TOF) spectroscopy of emission from neutral nickel (Ni I) at 361.9 nm (3d⁹(²D) 4p → 3d⁹(²D) 4s transition) reveals two peaks (fast and slow species) in short-pulse excitation and a single peak in ultrafast excitation. The fast and slow peaks represent recombined neutrals and un-ionized neutrals, respectively. TOF emission from singly ionized nickel (Ni II) studied using the 428.5 nm (3p⁶3d⁸(³P) 4s→ 3p⁶3d⁹ 4s) transition shows only a single peak for either excitation. Velocities of the neutral and ionic species are determined from TOF measurements carried out at different positions (i.e., at distances of 2 mm and 4 mm, respectively, from the target surface) on the plume axis. Measured velocities indicate acceleration of neutrals and ions, which is caused by the Coulomb pull of the electrons enveloping the plume front in the case of ultrafast excitation. Both Coulomb pull and laser-plasma interaction contribute to the acceleration in the case of short-pulse excitation. These investigations provide new information on the pressure dependent temporal behavior of nickel plasmas produced by short-pulse and ultrafast laser pulses, which have potential uses in applications such as pulsed laser deposition and laser-induced nanoparticle generation.

  6. Short-pulse laser-produced plasma from C60 molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Wuelker, Cornelius; Theobald, Wolfgang; Ouw, Donald; Schaefer, Fritz P.; Chichkov, Boris N.

    1995-05-01

    The first experimental observations of a plasma produced in a vapor of C60 molecules with a high-intensity subpicosecond KrF laser (6x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) are reported. It differs from a plasma created in an ordinary carbon preplasma by reaching much higher ionization stages under the same experimental conditions. This remarkable property of C60 molecules (and other clusters) opens new prospects for short-pulse driven X-ray lasers.

  7. Numerical modeling of short-pulse excimer lasers with negative branch unstable cavities.

    PubMed

    Fang, H; Perrone, M R

    1995-05-20

    A one-dimensional code for the numerical simulation of negative branch unstable resonators with an intracavity aperture that are applied to high-gain, short-pulse XeCl lasers is described. The model predicts near- and far-field performance of the output laser beams. The intracavity aperture size is shown as an important parameter for control of the output beam energy and divergence. A comparison with experimental measurements is presented. PMID:21052408

  8. Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

    2009-10-02

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

  9. Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

    2010-02-04

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

  10. Short-pulse, compressed ion beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.; Davidson, R. C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D.; Ji, Q.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Persaud, A.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2016-05-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynamics of radiation-induced damage in materials with pump-probe experiments, and to stabilize novel metastable phases of materials when short-pulse heating is followed by rapid quenching. First experiments used a lithium ion source; a new plasma-based helium ion source shows much greater charge delivered to the target.

  11. Measuring the energy of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in a short pulse laser amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, Marin; Adams, Daniel; Greco, Michael; Meier, Amanda; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles

    2010-10-01

    In high-gain pulsed laser amplifiers, amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) tends to limit the gain in single stage fiber amplifiers. Even if ASE is not strong enough to deplete the gain of the amplifier, it still contributes strongly to a low-intensity background output in the amplified signal. The intensity contrast between the amplified short pulse and this background ASE pedestal can be measured with third-order autocorrelation, but this method cannot be used to completely specify the ASE's energy, which is distributed over many nanoseconds. We have developed a novel method that allows us to determine the energy and the spectrum of the ASE. We use a cross polarized wave (XPW) generating crystal such as BaF2 to ``clean up'' the ASE from the short pulse(SP). The input pulse (SP and ASE) and the cross-polarized signal are passed through a birefringent crystal such as sapphire. The relative group velocity difference along each crystal axis results in a delay between both channels. After passing through a polarizer, an interferogram is obtained in a spectrometer. This interferogram results from interference of the XPW pulse with the short-pulse content of the amplifier output, with a background of the ASE spectrum. Fourier analysis yields both the ASE energy and its spectrum.

  12. A new high intensity and short-pulse molecular beam valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, B.; Claus, P. F. H.; van Oorschot, B. G. M.; Gerritsen, L.; Eppink, A. T. J. B.; van de Meerakker, S. Y. T.; Parker, D. H.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the design and performance of a new home-built pulsed gas valve, which we refer to as the Nijmegen Pulsed Valve (NPV). The main output characteristics include a short pulse width (as short as 20 μs) combined with operating rates up to 30 Hz. The operation principle of the NPV is based on the Lorentz force created by a pulsed current passing through an aluminum strip located within a magnetic field, which opens the nozzle periodically. The amplitude of displacement of the opening mechanism is sufficient to allow the use of nozzles with up to 1.0 mm diameter. To investigate the performance of the valve, several characterizations were performed with different experimental methods. First, a fast ionization gauge was used to measure the beam intensity of the free jet emanating from the NPV. We compare free jets from the NPV with those from several other pulsed valves in current use in our laboratory. Results showed that a high intensity and short pulse-length beam could be generated by the new valve. Second, the NPV was tested in combination with a skimmer, where resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization combined with velocity map imaging was used to show that the NPV was able to produce a pulsed molecular beam with short pulse duration (˜20 μs using 0.1% NO/He at 6 bars) and low rotational temperature (˜1 K using 0.5% NO/Ar at 6 bars). Third, a novel two-point pump-probe method was employed which we label double delay scan. This method allows a full kinematic characterization of the molecular beam, including accurate speed ratios at different temporal positions. It was found that the speed ratio was maximum (S = 50 using 0.1% NO/He at 3 bars) at the peak position of the molecular beam and decreased when it was on the leading or falling edge.

  13. Theory of suppressing avalanche process of carrier in short pulse laser irradiated dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hongxiang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, WG; Yuan, XD; Xiang, Xia; Sun, Kai; Gao, Fei

    2014-05-28

    A theory for controlling avalanche process of carrier during short pulse laser irradiation is proposed. We show that avalanche process of conduction band electrons (CBEs) is determined by the occupation number of phonons in dielectrics. The theory provides a way to suppress avalanche process and a direct judgment for the contribution of avalanche process and photon ionization process to the generation of CBEs. The obtained temperature dependent rate equation shows that the laser induced damage threshold of dielectrics, e.g., fused silica, increase nonlinearly with the decreases of temperature. Present theory predicts a new approach to improve the laser induced damage threshold of dielectrics.

  14. Exploitation of stimulated Raman scattering in short-pulse fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shian; Takamido, Tetsuji; Imai, Shinji; Wise, Frank

    2010-07-15

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) generally limits the performance of short-pulse fiber amplifiers. We present the results of experiments that show that, under some conditions, SRS can extend the performance of amplifiers limited by nonlinear phase accumulation. The Stokes spectrum can be free of distortions arising from self-phase modulation and can circumvent the gain-narrowing limit of the amplifier. The generation of 1 microJ and 90 fs pulses from a single-mode fiber amplifier illustrates the potential of the process.

  15. Generation of nanostructured surfaces by interfering and no-interfering ultra-short pulse laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Y.; Tsuchida, K.; Miyanaga, N.

    2009-02-01

    Top down technology of ultra-short pulse laser processing was applied to induce liquidly process and generate new nanostructures such as nano-waterdrop, nanocrown, and fine web structure. For example, a nano-waterdrop was generated by a single shot ps laser irradiation and had the narrow dieter of about 50 nm. In the case of nanocrown, whiskers were standing at the edge of a nanohole, and the diameter of the whiskers was around 100 nm. In addition, wavelength-sized web structure was generated in a single shot of femtosecond laser irradiation.

  16. Polygon Scanner System for Ultra Short Pulsed Laser Micro-Machining Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Loor, R.

    Ultra short pulsed lasers have gained acceptance in micro-machining applications and many processes have been developed in the lab. Transferring the technology to the manufacturing floor started few years ago as soon as relatively high average power (> 5W) lasers became available. Now that high repetition rates and average powers of 50 Watt and more are reaching the market, the commercially available galvo based laser scanners systems limit the efficient use of this expensive laser power. We present a novel polygon based scanner system incorporating laser and scanner synchronization enabling writing speeds of 50 m/sec and higher.

  17. Application of short pulsed laser systems for micro-scale processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Jared, Bradley Howell

    2010-03-01

    The relatively recent development of short (nsec) and ultra-short (fsec) pulsed laser systems has introduced process capabilities which are particularly suited for micro-manufacturing applications. Micrometer feature resolutions and minimal heat affected zones are commonly cited benefits, although unique material interactions also prove attractive for many applications. A background of short and ultra-short pulsed laser system capabilities and material interactions will be presented for micro-scale processing. Processing strengths and limitations will be discussed and demonstrated within the framework of applications related to micro-machining, material surface modifications, and fundamental material science research.

  18. Laser initiation and beam quality evolution in a confocal unstable resonator, short-pulse-duration laser.

    PubMed

    Ewanizky, T F

    1997-11-20

    The subjects of laser initiation and beam quality evolution in short-pulse-duration systems that employ confocal unstable resonators motivated this work. Experimentation and analysis of the performance of a laser-pumped, organic dye laser are presented. Combined results indicate that a saturation flux arises through a coalescence of stabilized, diverging-mode components of the initially emitted fluorescence. The ABCD law method was used to devise calculational techniques that clearly demonstrate the particular mechanisms responsible for rapid mode stabilization, subsequent beam quality development, and laser initiation. PMID:18264413

  19. High mode volume self filtering unstable resonator applied to a short pulse XeCl laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luches, A.; Nassisi, V.; Perrone, M. R.; Radiotis, E.

    1989-05-01

    A high mode volume non confocal self filtering unstable resonator has been applied to a short pulse XeCl laser. Such a resonator made up of a concave mirror (focal length is 25 cm) and a convex mirror (focal length is -25 cm), has a magnification | M|=34 and a cavity length of 151 cm. A nearly diffraction limited laser beam of 5.5 mJ, 10 ns duration and with a brightness of 2.5×10 13 W cm -2 sr -1 has been obtained. These results are compared to those obtained with another self-filtering unstable resonator having the same resonator length but | M|=10.

  20. Proton stopping power measurements using high intensity short pulse lasers produced proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. N.; Atzeni, S.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Mangia, F.; Marques, J.-R.; Riquier, R.; Fuchs, J.

    2014-03-01

    Proton stopping power measurements in solids and gases, typically made using proton accelerators, Van de Graf machines, etc., have existed now for many decades for many elements and compounds. We propose a new method of making this type of measurement using a different source, namely proton beams created by high intensity short pulse lasers. The advantage of this type of source is that there is the high number of particles and short bunch lengths, which is ideal for measurements of evolving mediums such as hot dense plasmas. Our measurements are consistent with exiting data and theory which validates this method.

  1. Transient thermal and nonthermal electron and phonon relaxation after short-pulsed laser heating of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-12-07

    Several dynamic thermal and nonthermal scattering processes affect ultrafast heat transfer in metals after short-pulsed laser heating. Even with decades of measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, the role of thermal vs. nonthermal electron and phonon scattering on overall electron energy transfer to the phonons remains unclear. In this work, we derive an analytical expression for the electron-phonon coupling factor in a metal that includes contributions from equilibrium and nonequilibrium distributions of electrons. While the contribution from the nonthermal electrons to electron-phonon coupling is non-negligible, the increase in the electron relaxation rates with increasing laser fluence measured by thermoreflectance techniques cannot be accounted for by only considering electron-phonon relaxations. We conclude that electron-electron scattering along with electron-phonon scattering have to be considered simultaneously to correctly predict the transient nature of electron relaxation during and after short-pulsed heating of metals at elevated electron temperatures. Furthermore, for high electron temperature perturbations achieved at high absorbed laser fluences, we show good agreement between our model, which accounts for d-band excitations, and previous experimental data. Our model can be extended to other free electron metals with the knowledge of the density of states of electrons in the metals and considering electronic excitations from non-Fermi surface states.

  2. Ignition and growth modeling of short pulse shock initiation experiments on fine particle Hexanitrostilbene (HNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig M.; Chidester, Steven K.

    2014-05-01

    Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) is a booster explosive that is usually initiated using short pulse duration shock waves produced by high velocity impacts with thin flyer plates. HNS is generally used at a density of 1.60 g/cm3 which implies a porosity of 8%. It has been produced in several forms (I - IV, ultrafine, etc.) with various particle surface areas. The threshold flyer velocities for shock induced detonation versus failure to detonate for these different surface area materials vary slightly, but, in this paper, an average Ignition and Growth reactive flow model parameter set was determined using all of the experimental data from several aluminium and KaptonTM flyer plate studies. This data ranged from shock pressures of 4 GPa to above the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation pressure (~20 GPa) and from 1 to 120 nanoseconds in time duration. Good agreement was obtained for the available short pulse duration detonation verses failure to threshold flyer velocity data using the Ignition and Growth model,

  3. Advanced concepts for high-power, short-pulse CO2 laser development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Daniel F.; Hasson, Victor; von Bergmann, Hubertus; Chen, Yu-hsin; Schmitt-Sody, A.; Penano, Joseph R.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-short pulse lasers are dominated by solid-state technology, which typically operates in the near-infrared. Efforts to extend this technology to longer wavelengths are meeting with some success, but the trend remains that longer wavelengths correlate with greatly reduced power. The carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is capable of delivering high energy, 10 micron wavelength pulses, but the gain structure makes operating in the ultra-short pulse regime difficult. The Naval Research Laboratory and Air Force Research Laboratory are developing a novel CO2 laser designed to deliver ~1 Joule, ~1 picosecond pulses, from a compact gain volume (~2x2x80 cm). The design is based on injection seeding an unstable resonator, in order to achieve high energy extraction efficiency, and to take advantage of power broadening. The unstable resonator is seeded by a solid state front end, pumped by a custom built titanium sapphire laser matched to the CO2 laser bandwidth. In order to access a broader range of mid infrared wavelengths using CO2 lasers, one must consider nonlinear frequency multiplication, which is non-trivial due to the bandwidth of the 10 micron radiation.

  4. Transient thermal and nonthermal electron and phonon relaxation after short-pulsed laser heating of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-12-01

    Several dynamic thermal and nonthermal scattering processes affect ultrafast heat transfer in metals after short-pulsed laser heating. Even with decades of measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, the role of thermal vs. nonthermal electron and phonon scattering on overall electron energy transfer to the phonons remains unclear. In this work, we derive an analytical expression for the electron-phonon coupling factor in a metal that includes contributions from equilibrium and nonequilibrium distributions of electrons. While the contribution from the nonthermal electrons to electron-phonon coupling is non-negligible, the increase in the electron relaxation rates with increasing laser fluence measured by thermoreflectance techniques cannot be accounted for by only considering electron-phonon relaxations. We conclude that electron-electron scattering along with electron-phonon scattering have to be considered simultaneously to correctly predict the transient nature of electron relaxation during and after short-pulsed heating of metals at elevated electron temperatures. Furthermore, for high electron temperature perturbations achieved at high absorbed laser fluences, we show good agreement between our model, which accounts for d-band excitations, and previous experimental data. Our model can be extended to other free electron metals with the knowledge of the density of states of electrons in the metals and considering electronic excitations from non-Fermi surface states.

  5. Hot Electron Measurement and Modeling for Short-Pulse Laser Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; McLean, S; Patel, P K; Wilks, S C

    2003-09-08

    We measured the hot electron production from short pulse laser plasma interactions using a fiber-array-based compact electron spectrometer that uses permanent magnets for electron energy dispersion and over 100 scintillating fibers coupled to a 1024 x 1024 pixel CCD as the detection system. This spectrometer has electron energy coverage from 10 keV to 60 MeV. The whole spectrometer is compact with dimensions of 8 inch x 7 inch x 4 inch. We performed systematic measurements of electron production on the ultra short pulse laser JanUSP (with pulse width less than 100 fs) at intensity range interest to Fast Ignition scheme from 10{sup 17} Wcm{sup -2} up to 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2} at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory. The electron distributions were obtained at various laser energies for different solid target materials and observation angles. We determined characteristic temperature of the escaped hot electrons at various incident laser intensity which is confirmed by theoretical simulations using the ZOHAL Particle-in-cell (PIC) code.

  6. Microwave short-pulse bed-level detector. Annual report, January 1-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Balanis, C.A.; Delauder, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    A short-pulse microwave system for measuring the bed-level within a fluidized-bed combustor, has been designed, built, and laboratory tested on static beds. The system is a short-pulse radar which operates in the frequency region of 6.75 to 10.95 GHz as a time-domain measurement system. Laboratory measurements of static bed-levels, for smooth and corrugated surfaces of metal plates and limestone sand, agree to an average of 2.0% of the actual heights. Additionally, the system was tested with a dielectric thermal protector, which did not compromise the accuracy of the measurements. Analytical models have been formulated to provide insight into the operation of the system on a wide range of simulated targets without the necessity of performing expensive and difficult laboratory experiments. Two formulations have been used to describe electromagnetic scattering by a rough surface as a function of frequency: the space harmonic model and the physical optics model. A reconstruction technique has been devised which uses the scattering models and the spectrum of the transmitted pulse to synthesize the reflected pulse. The data generated by the models compare well to previously published data and to experimental results.

  7. Exact theory and numeric results for short pulse ionization of simple model atom in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokhlenko, A.

    2016-10-01

    Our exact theory for continuous harmonic perturbation of a one dimensional model atom by parametric variations of its potential is generalized for the cases when (a) the atom is exposed to short pulses of an external harmonic electric field and (b) the forcing is represented by short bursts of different shape changing the strength of the binding potential. This work is motivated not only by the wide use of laser pulses for atomic ionization, but also by our earlier study of the same model which successfully described the ionization dynamics in all orders, i.e., the multi-photon processes, though being treated by the non-relativistic Schrödinger equation. In particular, it was shown that the bound atom cannot survive the excitation of its potential caused by any non-zero frequency and amplitude of the continuous harmonic forcing. Our present analysis found important laws of the atomic ionization by short pulses, in particular the efficiency of ionizing this model system and presumably real ones as well.

  8. Characteristics of High Energy Ka and Bremsstrahlung Sources Generated by Short Pulse Petawatt Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Izumi, N; Key, M H; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Patel, P K; Phillips, T W; Zhang, B B

    2004-04-13

    We have measured the characteristics of high energy K{alpha} sources created with the Vulcan Petawatt laser at RAL and the JanUSP laser at LLNL. High energy x-ray backlighters will be essential for radiographing High-Energy-Density Experimental Science (HEDES) targets for NIF projects especially to probe implosions and high areal density planar samples. Hard K{alpha} x-ray photons are created through relativistic electron plasma interactions in the target material after irradiation by short pulse high intensity lasers. For our Vulcan experiment, we employed a CsI scintillator/CCD camera for imaging and a CCD camera for single photon counting. We measured the Ag K{alpha} source (22 keV) size using a pinhole array and the K{alpha} flux using a single photon counting method. We also radiographed a high Z target using the high energy broadband x-rays generated from these short pulse lasers. This paper will present results from these experiments.

  9. Investigating short-pulse shock initiation thresholds in HMX-based explosives with reactive mesoscale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, H.; May, C.; Tarver, C.; Reaugh, J.

    2013-06-01

    Short-pulse loading experiments have demonstrated the probabilistic nature of shock initiation thresholds in a variety of explosives. The intensely loaded region of explosive adjacent to the flyer impact zone, and its potential hot spots, influences the overall sample shock sensitivity. As the size of this region decreases below the representative volume element size, the likelihood of sampling differing hot spot densities in it increases from sample to sample. We hypothesize that this variation in active hot spots contributes to the probabilistic nature of short-pulse shock initiation. We investigate the role of microstructure and explosive reactive properties on shock initiation response with mesoscale simulations of miniature flyer plate experiments. LX-10 (95%wt HMX, 5%wt Viton A) is the model explosive. To investigate the influence of microstructure, we vary void size and spatial position. While void volume fraction and HMX grain size distributions are fixed, assigning random spatial positions to these parameters leads to hot spot density variations over many microstructural realizations. HMX reactivity is also investigated. The influences of microstructure and reactivity parameters are discussed. This study enables the development of predictive shock sensitivity models with basic structure-property information. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was funded in part by the Joint DoD-DOE Munitions Program.

  10. Strip Velocity Measurements for Gated X-Ray Imagers Using Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P. W.; Cardenas, M.; Griffin, M.; Mead, A.; Silbernagel, C. T.; Bell, P.; Haque, S. H.

    2013-09-01

    Strip velocity measurements of gated X-ray imagers are presented using an ultra-short pulse laser. Obtaining time-resolved X-ray images of inertial confinement fusion shots presents a difficult challenge. One diagnostic developed to address this challenge is the gated X-ray imagers. The gated X-ray detectors (GXDs) developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory use a microchannel plate (MCP) coated with a gold strip line, which serves as a photocathode. GXDs are used with an array of pinholes, which image onto various parts of the GXD image plane. As the pulse sweeps over the strip lines, it creates a time history of the event with consecutive images. In order to accurately interpret the timing of the images obtained using the GXDs, it is necessary to measure the propagation of the pulse over the strip line. The strip velocity was measured using a short pulse laser with a pulse duration of approximately 1-2 ps. The 200nm light from the laser is used to illuminate the GXD MCP. The laser pulse is split and a retroreflective mirror is used to delay one of the legs. By adjusting the distance to the mirror, one leg is temporally delayed compared to the reference leg. The retroreflective setup is calibrated using a streak camera with a 1 ns full sweep. Resolution of 0.5 mm is accomplished to achieve a temporal resolution of ~5 ps on the GXD strip line.

  11. Method to produce a short pulse on rf discharge excitation slab-type carbon dioxide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Akira; Suzuki, Kaoru; Nakata, Junji

    1998-10-01

    We propose a novel system to produce the short pulse using a halved confocal of the unstable concave-convex resonator on radio frequency discharge excitation slab type carbon dioxide laser. This method is provided a full reflection concave mirror to have a function of variable curvature which can control using a piezo electric device (PZT). Generally, the slab type laser is directly modulated by applying pulse voltage for pulsation of laser. There is a large capacity and fluctuation of plasma at the transition of pulsation. Consequently, the pulse width is longer than 1.0 micro second and repetitive frequency is less than 10 kilo Hertz. On the other hand, the pulse oscillation by our proposed method has the short pulse width which is 300 nano second and maximum repetitive frequency is about 100 kilo Hertz. We can choose the pulse oscillation or the continuous wave (CW) oscillation at the each condition on same resonator. The peak power at the pulse oscillation is about 12 times as high as that at the CW oscillation.

  12. GINGER simulations of short-pulse effects in the LEUTL FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Fawley, W.M.

    2001-07-01

    While the long-pulse, coasting beam model is often used in analysis and simulation of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron lasers (FELs), many current SASE demonstration experiments employ relatively short electron bunches whose pulse length is on the order of the radiation slippage length. In particular, the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) FEL at the Advanced Photon Source has recently lased and nominally saturated in both visible and near-ultraviolet wavelength regions with a sub-ps pulse length that is somewhat shorter than the total slippage length in the 22-m undulator system. In this paper we explore several characteristics of the short pulse regime for SASE FELs with the multidimensional, time-dependent simulation code GINGER, concentrating on making a direct comparison with the experimental results from LEUTL. Items of interest include the radiation gain length, pulse energy, saturation position, and spectral bandwidth. We address the importance of short-pulse effects when scaling the LEUTL results to proposed x-ray FELs and also briefly discuss the possible importance of coherent spontaneous emission at startup.

  13. Single-step electropolymerization patterning of a polypyrrole nanowire by ultra-short pulses via an AFM cantilever.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kihwan; Lee, Gyudo; Jung, Huihun; Park, Jinsung; Kim, Chi Hyun; Seo, Jongbum; Yoon, Dae Sung; Lee, Sang Woo; Kwon, Taeyun

    2011-06-01

    Conducting polymers (CPs) have attracted a great deal of attention due to their unique properties; these properties are useful in implementing various functional devices, such as memory, and chemical and biological sensors. In particular, the nanopatterning of CPs is a key technology that will accelerate the adoption of CPs in fabricating nanoscaled multifunctional devices. This paper presents an innovative technique for forming polypyrrole nanowire (PPy-NW) patterns, without any additional pretreatment on the gold surface, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ultra-short pulse voltage. Applying the ultra-short pulse voltage to the AFM tip has the following advantage: since the electrochemical current is extremely localized around the tip, the successful formation of CP nanowires results. This is because the pulse width is much shorter than the resistor-capacitor (RC) time constant of the equivalent electrochemical circuit of our experimental set-up. This paper provides systematic results regarding the dimensional variation of the PPy-NW patterns produced by varying the electrical conditions of the ultra-short pulse, such as the pulse amplitude, width, and frequency. The results show that use of an ultra-short pulse is essential in fabricating PPy-NW patterns. Additionally, an ultra-short pulse offers excellent pattern controllability for both width (353 nm ∼ 3.37 µm) and height (2.0 ∼ 88.3 nm).

  14. Dynamometer Testing of Samsung 2.5MW Drivetrain: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-311

    SciTech Connect

    Wallen, R.

    2011-02-01

    SHI's prototype 2.5 MW wind turbine drivetrain was tested at the NWTC 2.5 MW dynamometer test facility over the course of 4 months between December 2009 and March 2010. This successful testing campaign allowed SHI to validate performance, safety, control tuning, and reliability in a controlled environment before moving to full-scale testing and subsequent introduction of a commercial product into the American market.

  15. Short Pulse Laser Absorption and Energy Partition at Relativistic Laser Intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R; Chen, H; Ping, Y; Dyer, G; Wilks, S; Chung, H; Kemp, A; Hanson, S; Widmann, K; Fournier, K; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Niles, A; Beiersdorfer, P

    2007-02-27

    We have performed experiments at the COMET and Calisto short pulse laser facilities to make the first comprehensive measurements of the laser absorption and energy partition in solid targets heated with an ultrashort laser pulse focused to relativistic laser intensities (>10 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}). The measurements show an exceedingly high absorption for P polarized laser-target interactions above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Additionally, the hot electron population is observed to markedly increase at the same intensity range. An investigation of the relaxation process was initiated u using time sing time-resolved K{sub {alpha}} spectroscopy. Measurements of the time time-resolved K{sub {alpha}} radiation suggest a 10-20 ps relativistic electron relaxation time. However modeling difficulties of these data are apparent and a more detailed investigation on this subject matter is warranted.

  16. The thermoelastic basis of short pulsed laser ablation of biological tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Itzkan, I; Albagli, D; Dark, M L; Perelman, L T; von Rosenberg, C; Feld, M S

    1995-01-01

    Strong evidence that short-pulse laser ablation of biological tissues is a photomechanical process is presented. A full three-dimensional, time-dependent solution to the thermoelastic wave equation is compared to the results of experiments using an interferometric surface monitor to measure thermoelastic expansion. Agreement is excellent for calibrations performed on glass and on acrylic at low laser fluences. For cortical bone, the measurements agree well with the theoretical predictions once optical scattering is included. The theory predicts the presence of the tensile stresses necessary to rupture the tissue during photomechanical ablation. The technique is also used to monitor the ablation event both before and after material is ejected. PMID:7892208

  17. Condition for short pulse generation in ultrahigh frequency mode-locking of semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, K. Y.; Paslaski, J.

    1991-11-01

    It is shown that although it is possible to obtain mode-locking without self-pulsation when certain criteria are satisfied, the shortest pulses are almost always generated at or close to the onset of self-pulsation. Thus, the amplitude of the optical pulse train is modulated by the (relatively) low-frequency envelop of a few gigahertz under this condition. This observation was obtained by simultaneously measuring the pulsewidth using an autocorrelator and monitoring the optical intensity using a high-speed photodiode and a microwave spectrum analyzer. It is concluded that while it is possible to generate picosecond optical pulses in ultrahigh-frequency mode-locking of quantum-well lasers, very short pulses (approaching 1 ps) are almost always accompanied by self-pulsation which is manifested as low-frequency (gigahertz) envelope modulation of the optical pulse train.

  18. Characterization of a novel, short pulse laser-driven neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.; Deppert, O.; and others

    2013-05-15

    We present a full characterization of a short pulse laser-driven neutron source. Neutrons are produced by nuclear reactions of laser-driven ions deposited in a secondary target. The emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component into 4π and a forward directed, jet-like contribution, with energies ranging up to 80 MeV. A maximum flux of 4.4 × 10{sup 9} neutrons/sr has been observed and used for fast neutron radiography. On-shot characterization of the ion driver and neutron beam has been done with a variety of different diagnostics, including particle detectors, nuclear reaction, and time-of-flight methods. The results are of great value for future optimization of this novel technique and implementation in advanced applications.

  19. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Short Pulse Duration Shock Initiation Experiments on HNS IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig; Chidester, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments on 1.60 g/cm3 density (92% TMD) HNS IV have been reported by Schwarz, Bowden et al., Dudley et al., Goveas et al., Greenaway et al., and others. This flyer threshold velocity for detonation/failure data plus measured unreacted HNS Hugoniot data and detonation cylinder test product expansion data were used as the experimental basis for the development of an Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the shock initiation of HNS IV. The resulting Ignition and Growth HNS IV model parameters yielded good overall agreement with all of this experimental data. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.: Explosive, HNS IV, shock to detonation transition, Ignition and Growth: 82.33.Vx, 82.40.Fp.

  20. The evolution of ultra-intense, short-pulse lasers in underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, C.D.; Mori, W.B.; Tzeng, K.C.

    1995-11-03

    The propagation of short-pulse lasers through underdense plasmas at ultra-high intensities (I {>=}10{sup 19}W/cm) is examined. The pulse evolution is found to be significantly different than it is for moderate intensities. Rather than beam breakup from self-modulation, Raman forward scattering and laser hose instabilities the behavior is dominated by leading edge erosion. A differential equation which describes local pump depletion is derived and used to analyze the formation and evolution of the erosion. This pulse erosion is demonstrated with one dimensional particle in cell (PIC) simulations. In addition, two dimensional simulations are presented which show pulse erosion along with other effects such as channeling and diffraction.

  1. Analysis of the Interaction of Short-Pulse High-Fluence Radiation with Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, R.Jeffery

    1999-07-23

    We generally use large-scale hydrocodes to study the dynamic response of targets to influence pulsed radiation loads. However, for many applications where the desired solution does not require a detailed specification of pressure- or velocity-time histories, there are simple analytic approaches that can yield surprisingly accurate results. Examples include determining either the final velocity of a radiation-driven flying plate or the impulse delivered to a structural element. These methods are all based on relatively straightforward use of conservation of mass and momentum, but they typically need one scaling-law parameter. In this context, short pulse means short compared to the characteristic time of the desired response, which allows for the phenomena to be essentially uncoupled. High fluence means that the input energy is great enough to yield vaporization or blowoff of one or more portions of the configuration. We discuss some of these methods, give examples, and suggest limitations and criteria for their use.

  2. High power, short pulses ultraviolet laser for the development of a new x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Meixler, L.; Nam, C.H.; Robinson, J.; Tighe, W.; Krushelnick, K.; Suckewer, S.; Goldhar, J.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    1989-04-01

    A high power, short pulse ultraviolet laser system (Powerful Picosecond-Laser) has been developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) as part of experiments designed to generate shorter wavelength x-ray lasers. With the addition of pulse compression and a final KrF amplifier the laser output is expected to have reached 1/3-1/2 TW (10/sup 12/ watts) levels. The laser system, particularly the final amplifier, is described along with some initial soft x-ray spectra from laser-target experiments. The front end of the PP-Laser provides an output of 20--30 GW (10/sup 9/ watts) and can be focussed to intensities of /approximately/10/sup 16/ W/cm/sup 2/. Experiments using this output to examine the effects of a prepulse on laser-target interaction are described. 19 refs., 14 figs.

  3. Status of the Short-Pulse X-ray Project at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A; Berenc, T G; Borland, M; Brajuskovic, B; Bromberek, D J; Carwardine, J; Decker, G; Emery, L; Fuerst, J D; Grelick, A E; Horan, D; Kaluzny, J; Lenkszus, F; Lill, R M; Liu, J; Ma, H; Sajaev, V; Smith, T L; Stillwell, B K; Waldschmidt, G J; Wu, G; Yang, B X; Yang, Y; Zholents, A; Byrd, J M; Doolittle, L R; Huang, G; Cheng, G; Ciovati, G; Dhakal, P; Eremeev, G V; Feingold, J J; Geng, R L; Henry, J; Kneisel, P; Macha, K; Mammosser, J D; Matalevich, J; Palczewski, A D; Rimmer, R A; Wang, H; Wilson, K M; Wiseman, M; Li, Z; Xiao, L

    2012-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source Upgrade (APS-U) Project at Argonne will include generation of short-pulse x-rays based on Zholents deflecting cavity scheme. We have chosen superconducting (SC) cavities in order to have a continuous train of crabbed bunches and flexibility of operating modes. In collaboration with Jefferson Laboratory, we are prototyping and testing a number of single-cell deflecting cavities and associated auxiliary systems with promising initial results. In collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we are working to develop state-of-the-art timing, synchronization, and differential rf phase stability systems that are required for SPX. Collaboration with Advanced Computations Department at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is looking into simulations of complex, multi-cavity geometries with lower- and higher-order modes waveguide dampers using ACE3P. This contribution provides the current R&D status of the SPX project.

  4. Short pulse, high power microwave radiation source with a laser-induced sheet plasma mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated the short pulse, high power microwave radiation source using an ultraviolet laser-induced sheet plasma mirror in a gas-filled x-band rectangular waveguide from the conventional microwave sources and components. A laser-induced sheet plasma with an overdense plasma acts as a plasma mirror. The long pulse propagating in the gas-filled waveguide was sliced by the sheet plasma mirror at two different points along the waveguide. We observed about twice the power of the pulse by adding the two sliced microwave pulses produced by this scheme. A maximum peak power of 200 kW with a pulse duration of 10 ns (full width at half maximum) from the long microwave pulse source with a pulse duration of 0.8 mus was observed.

  5. Characterization of a heat flux sensor using short pulse laser calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhle, Stefan; Battaglia, Jean-Luc; Batsale, Jean-Christophe; Enouf, Olivier; Dubard, Jimmy; Filtz, Jean-Remy

    2007-05-01

    A method to calibrate classical heat flux sensors is presented. The classical approach to measure the temperature inside a known material by using a thermocouple fails when the measurement time is very short. In this work the surface heat flux is determined by solving the inverse heat conduction problem using a noninteger identified system as a direct model for the estimation process. Using short pulse laser calibration measurements the crucial design aspects of the sensor that play a significant role when assuming one-dimensional, semi-infinite heat transfer have been accounted for. The theoretical approach as well as the calibration results are presented and comparisons to the classical approach and results from finite element modeling are shown. It is concluded that the new method ameliorate the heat flux sensor significantly and extend its application to very short measurement times.

  6. Focal spot measurement in ultra-intense ultra-short pulse laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lanqin; Peng, Hansheng; Zhou, Kainan; Wang, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiao; Zeng, Xiaoming; Zhu, Qihua; Huang, Xiaojun; Wei, Xiaofeng; Ren, Huan

    2005-06-01

    A peak power of 286-TW Ti:sapphire laser facility referred to as SILEX-I was successfully built at China Academy of Engineering Physics, for a pulse duration of 30 fs in a three-stage Ti:sapphire amplifier chain based on chirped-pulse amplification. The beam have a wavefront distortion of 0.63μm PV and 0.09μm RMS, and the focal spot with an f/2.2 OAP is 5.7μm, to our knowledge, this is the best far field obtained for high-power ultra-short pulse laser systems with no deformable mirror wavefront correction. The peak focused intensity of ~1021W /cm2 were expected.

  7. High ion charge states in a high-current, short-pulse, vacuum ARC ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.; Brown, I.; MacGill, R.; Dickinson, M.

    1996-08-01

    Ions of the cathode material are formed at vacuum arc cathode spots and extracted by a grid system. The ion charge states (typically 1-4) depend on the cathode material and only little on the discharge current as long as the current is low. Here the authors report on experiments with short pulses (several {mu}s) and high currents (several kA); this regime of operation is thus approaching a more vacuum spark-like regime. Mean ion charge states of up to 6.2 for tungsten and 3.7 for titanium have been measured, with the corresponding maximum charge states of up to 8+ and 6+, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of Saha calculations and freezing of the charge state distribution.

  8. An imaging proton spectrometer for short-pulse laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Hazi, A; van Maren, R; Chen, S; Fuchs, J; Gauthier, M; Pape, S L; Rygg, J R; Shepherd, R

    2010-05-11

    Ultra intense short pulse laser pulses incident on solid targets can generate energetic protons. In additions to their potentially important applications such as in cancer treatments and proton fast ignition, these protons are essential to understand the complex physics of intense laser plasma interaction. To better characterize these laser-produced protons, we designed and constructed a novel, spatially imaging proton spectrometer that will not only measure proton energy distribution with high resolution, but also provide its angular characteristics. The information obtained from this spectrometer compliments those from commonly used diagnostics including radiochromic film packs, CR39 nuclear track detectors, and non-imaging magnetic spectrometers. The basic characterizations and sample data from this instrument are presented.

  9. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. N.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Dorard, S.; Marquès, J.-R.; Fuchs, J.; Mangia, F.; Atzeni, S.; Riquier, R.

    2014-04-15

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams.

  10. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device.

    PubMed

    Chen, S N; Gauthier, M; Higginson, D P; Dorard, S; Mangia, F; Riquier, R; Atzeni, S; Marquès, J-R; Fuchs, J

    2014-04-01

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams. PMID:24784604

  11. Experimental approach to interaction physics challenges of the shock ignition scheme using short pulse lasers.

    PubMed

    Goyon, C; Depierreux, S; Yahia, V; Loisel, G; Baccou, C; Courvoisier, C; Borisenko, N G; Orekhov, A; Rosmej, O; Labaune, C

    2013-12-01

    An experimental program was designed to study the most important issues of laser-plasma interaction physics in the context of the shock ignition scheme. In the new experiments presented in this Letter, a combination of kilojoule and short laser pulses was used to study the laser-plasma coupling at high laser intensities for a large range of electron densities and plasma profiles. We find that the backscatter is dominated by stimulated Brillouin scattering with stimulated Raman scattering staying at a limited level. This is in agreement with past experiments using long pulses but laser intensities limited to 2×10(15)  W/cm2, or short pulses with intensities up to 5×10(16)  W/cm2 as well as with 2D particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:24476284

  12. High Energy, Short Pulse Fiber Injection Lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2008-09-10

    A short pulse fiber injection laser for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This system produces 100 {micro}J pulses with 5 nm of bandwidth centered at 1053 nm. The pulses are stretched to 2.5 ns and have been recompressed to sub-ps pulse widths. A key feature of the system is that the pre-pulse power contrast ratio exceeds 80 dB. The system can also precisely adjust the final recompressed pulse width and timing and has been designed for reliable, hands free operation. The key challenges in constructing this system were control of the signal to noise ratio, dispersion management and managing the impact of self phase modulation on the chirped pulse.

  13. Control of Brillouin short-pulse seed amplification by chirping the pump pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2015-04-15

    Seed amplification via Brillouin backscattering of a long pump pulse is considered. Similar to Raman amplification, several obstructive effects may occur during short-pulse Brillouin amplification. One is the spontaneous Raman backscattering of the pump before interacting with the seed. Preforming the plasma and/or chirping the pump will reduce unwanted pump backscattering. Optimized regions for low-loss pump propagation were proposed already in conjunction with Raman seed amplification. Hence, the influence of the chirp of the pump during Brillouin interaction with the seed becomes important and will be considered here. Both, the linear as well as the nonlinear evolution phases of the seed caused by Brillouin amplification under the action of a chirped pump are investigated. The amplification rate as well as the seed profiles are presented as function of the chirping rate. Also the dependence of superradiant scaling rates on the chirp parameter is discussed.

  14. Short-Pulse Laser Sintering of Multilayer Hard Metal Coatings: Structure and Wear Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharanzhevskiy, Evgeny; Ipatov, Alexey; Nikolaeva, Irina; Zakirova, Raushaniya

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports on the phase composition and properties of multilayer hard metal coatings deposited on steel by a process variant of Selective laser melting (SLM). The process is based on layer-wise short-pulse laser sintering of high-dispersive WC-Co powder on a steel substrate. High temperature in the molten zone and chemical interaction with the substrate explain high level of adhesion strength between the coating and the substrate. The technique allows obtaining both high quality hard-metal multilayer gradient coatings with thickness up to 200 μm, density near to the theoretical density (TD), hardness up to 21 GPa and complex 3D objects by layer-wise powder based process such as SLM.

  15. Short-pulsed, electric-discharge degradation of toxic and sludge wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, L.A.; Bystritskii, V.M.; Wessel, F.J.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project funded by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project was a collaborative effort with the University of California at Irvine (UCI), which was the lead project performer. Short-pulse, electric-discharge streamers were used to degrade aromatic and chlorinated compounds in water aerosols. An atomizer supplies 10--50 {micro}m aerosol droplets to a discharge chamber containing thin wires that are driven by electric pulses of 50--90 kV amplitude, 50--150 ns pulse duration, and 100 Hz repetition rate. The combination of a high electric field, large H{sub 2}O dielectric constant and atomization provide efficient degradation of organic molecules including: paranitrophenol, di-chlorophenol and perchloroethylene. The specific energy input for degradation of a pollutant molecule depends on the particular compound, its concentration, and the operational parameters of the discharge.

  16. Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Banakh, V A; Smalikho, I N

    2014-09-22

    Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere have been studied based on numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation for the complex spectral amplitude of the wave field by the split-step method. It has been shown that under conditions of strong optical turbulence, the relative variance of energy density fluctuations of pulsed radiation of femtosecond duration becomes much less than the relative variance of intensity fluctuations of continuous-wave radiation. The spatial structure of fluctuations of the energy density with a decrease of the pulse duration becomes more large-scale and homogeneous. For shorter pulses the maximal value of the probability density distribution of energy density fluctuations tends to the mean value of the energy density.

  17. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. N.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Dorard, S.; Mangia, F.; Riquier, R.; Atzeni, S.; Marquès, J.-R.; Fuchs, J.

    2014-04-01

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams.

  18. Two-dimensional electromagnetic Child-Langmuir law of a short-pulse electron flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. H.; Tai, L. C.; Liu, Y. L.; Ang, L. K.; Koh, W. S.

    2011-02-15

    Two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations were performed to study the effect of the displacement current and the self-magnetic field on the space charge limited current density or the Child-Langmuir law of a short-pulse electron flow with a propagation distance of {zeta} and an emitting width of W from the classical regime to the relativistic regime. Numerical scaling of the two-dimensional electromagnetic Child-Langmuir law was constructed and it scales with ({zeta}/W) and ({zeta}/W){sup 2} at the classical and relativistic regimes, respectively. Our findings reveal that the displacement current can considerably enhance the space charge limited current density as compared to the well-known two-dimensional electrostatic Child-Langmuir law even at the classical regime.

  19. Short-pulse laser beam interactions with biocompatible polymer materials and tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    1996-12-01

    Pulsed laser beams, of very short duration, appear to be very promising tools for polymer surface processing. Recently we have studied the interaction of picosecond and femtosecond laser radiation in the visible region of the spectrum with synthetic polymer films and we have compared these studies with our similar studies with nanosecond duration laser radiation. Biocompatible polymers have been extensively used for sutures, vascular grafts or bone and other hard tissue replacements. The use of surgical lasers for intervention on biocompatible material - tissue interfaces has attracted a great deal of interest, as both the high intensity, short pulse duration lasers and the prosthetic biomaterials are in increasing use. Our recent ablation studies, using ultrashort laser pulses, of biocompatible materials, are described in this article. Lasers were introduced in medical research in the early sixties but the laser beam ability to remove efficiently and safely soft or hard tissue, the lateral thermal damage and the final surface characteristics are still under investigation. In the past few years, by virtue of their water or water and hydroxyapatite content respectively, exhibit strong absorption restricting residual thermal damage to a relatively small zone. Recently we have investigated the interaction of short pulse laser radiation of picosecond and femtosecond duration with soft and hard tissue, as this unexplored field is expected to be a potential alternative in powerful laser processing of biomedical structures. The experimental results obtained, including ablation rates, ablation wavelength dependence, pulse duration dependence, fluence dependence, etc. are presented. These results are discussed according to simple theoretical models of laser energy absorption and the possible mechanisms of ultrashort pulse laser ablation, which in some cases involves multiphoton photodissociation processes. Finally, the design characteristics of the lasers employed in our

  20. Transient Self-Amplified Cerenkov Radiation with a Short Pulse Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Camacho, J F

    2009-01-22

    An analytic and numerical examination of the slow wave Cerenkov free electron maser is presented. We consider the steady state amplifier configuration as well as operation in the selfamplified spontaneous emission (SASE) regime. The linear theory is extended to include electron beams that have a parabolic radial density inhomogeneity. Closed form solutions for the dispersion relation and modal structure of the electromagnetic field are determined in this inhomogeneous case. To determine the steady state response, a macro-particle approach is used to develop a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the amplitude and phase of the electromagnetic wave, which are solved in conjunction with the particle dynamical equations to determine the response when the system is driven as an amplifier with a time harmonic source. We then consider the case in which a fast rise time electron beam is injected into a dielectric loaded waveguide. In this case, radiation is generated by SASE, with the instability seeded by the leading edge of the electron beam. A pulse of radiation is produced, slipping behind the leading edge of the beam due to the disparity between the group velocity of the radiation and the beam velocity. Short pulses of microwave radiation are generated in the SASE regime and are investigated using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The nonlinear dynamics are significantly more complicated in the transient SASE regime when compared with the steady state amplifier model due to the slippage of the radiation with respect to the beam. As strong self-bunching of the electron beam develops due to SASE, short pulses of superradiant emission develop with peak powers significantly larger than the predicted saturated power based on the steady state amplifier model. As these superradiant pulses grow, their pulse length decreases and forms a series of soliton-like pulses. Comparisons between the linear theory, macro-particle model, and PIC simulations are

  1. Comparative study of long- and short-pulsed electric fields for treating melanoma in an in vivo mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinhua; Chen, Xinmei; Schoenbach, Karl H; Zheng, Shusen; Swanson, R James

    2011-01-01

    A mouse melanoma model was set up with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in vivo. With the same energy, long- (1 ms) and short- (300 ns) pulsed electric fields were delivered to two melanomas injected into the same mouse. The tumor growth and green fluorescence were followed up to compare the different treatment efficacy of long and short pulses. After two days post treatment, short pulse-treated tumors showed a significantly lower tumor volume compared with long pulse-treated tumors (n=8, p<0.05). On 8 experimental animals, a short nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) had lesser or delayed effects on GFP quenching and greater effects in reducing tumor size. Short pulses produced by nsPEFs can cause melanoma regression with less effect on the plasma membrane.

  2. RBF neural network based PI pitch controller for a class of 5-MW wind turbines using particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Poultangari, Iman; Shahnazi, Reza; Sheikhan, Mansour

    2012-09-01

    In order to control the pitch angle of blades in wind turbines, commonly the proportional and integral (PI) controller due to its simplicity and industrial usability is employed. The neural networks and evolutionary algorithms are tools that provide a suitable ground to determine the optimal PI gains. In this paper, a radial basis function (RBF) neural network based PI controller is proposed for collective pitch control (CPC) of a 5-MW wind turbine. In order to provide an optimal dataset to train the RBF neural network, particle swarm optimization (PSO) evolutionary algorithm is used. The proposed method does not need the complexities, nonlinearities and uncertainties of the system under control. The simulation results show that the proposed controller has satisfactory performance. PMID:22738782

  3. RBF neural network based PI pitch controller for a class of 5-MW wind turbines using particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Poultangari, Iman; Shahnazi, Reza; Sheikhan, Mansour

    2012-09-01

    In order to control the pitch angle of blades in wind turbines, commonly the proportional and integral (PI) controller due to its simplicity and industrial usability is employed. The neural networks and evolutionary algorithms are tools that provide a suitable ground to determine the optimal PI gains. In this paper, a radial basis function (RBF) neural network based PI controller is proposed for collective pitch control (CPC) of a 5-MW wind turbine. In order to provide an optimal dataset to train the RBF neural network, particle swarm optimization (PSO) evolutionary algorithm is used. The proposed method does not need the complexities, nonlinearities and uncertainties of the system under control. The simulation results show that the proposed controller has satisfactory performance.

  4. Natural snowfall reveals large-scale flow structures in the wake of a 2.5-MW wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiarong; Toloui, Mostafa; Chamorro, Leonardo P; Guala, Michele; Howard, Kevin; Riley, Sean; Tucker, James; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-06-24

    To improve power production and structural reliability of wind turbines, there is a pressing need to understand how turbines interact with the atmospheric boundary layer. However, experimental techniques capable of quantifying or even qualitatively visualizing the large-scale turbulent flow structures around full-scale turbines do not exist today. Here we use snowflakes from a winter snowstorm as flow tracers to obtain velocity fields downwind of a 2.5-MW wind turbine in a sampling area of ~36 × 36 m(2). The spatial and temporal resolutions of the measurements are sufficiently high to quantify the evolution of blade-generated coherent motions, such as the tip and trailing sheet vortices, identify their instability mechanisms and correlate them with turbine operation, control and performance. Our experiment provides an unprecedented in situ characterization of flow structures around utility-scale turbines, and yields significant insights into the Reynolds number similarity issues presented in wind energy applications.

  5. Efficient generation of fast ions from surface modulated nanostructure targets irradiated by high intensity short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Alexander; Kumar, Naveen; Pukhov, Alexander; Platonov, Konstantin

    2011-10-15

    It's shown that the imposition of sub-laser wavelength relief structures on the surface of mass-limited-targets results into several folds higher short-pulse laser absorption, and consequently the efficient generation of fast ions. The optimum relief parameters for enhanced short-pulse laser absorption and higher ion acceleration are estimated numerically by particle-in-cell simulations and then corroborated by analytical scalings. The stability of the pre-imposed surface modulation during the laser pulse foil interaction is also examined.

  6. Neutron imaging with the short-pulse laser driven neutron source at the Trident laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guler, N.; Volegov, P.; Favalli, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Falk, K.; Jung, D.; Tybo, J. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Croft, S.; Danly, C.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, D.; Johnson, R. P.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Taddeucci, T.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Roth, M.

    2016-10-01

    Emerging approaches to short-pulse laser-driven neutron production offer a possible gateway to compact, low cost, and intense broad spectrum sources for a wide variety of applications. They are based on energetic ions, driven by an intense short-pulse laser, interacting with a converter material to produce neutrons via breakup and nuclear reactions. Recent experiments performed with the high-contrast laser at the Trident laser facility of Los Alamos National Laboratory have demonstrated a laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism operating in the regime of relativistic transparency, featuring a volumetric laser-plasma interaction. This mechanism is distinct from previously studied ones that accelerate ions at the laser-target surface. The Trident experiments produced an intense beam of deuterons with an energy distribution extending above 100 MeV. This deuteron beam, when directed at a beryllium converter, produces a forward-directed neutron beam with ˜5 × 109 n/sr, in a single laser shot, primarily due to deuteron breakup. The neutron beam has a pulse duration on the order of a few nanoseconds with an energy distribution extending from a few hundreds of keV to almost 80 MeV. For the experiments on neutron-source spot-size measurements, our gated neutron imager was setup to select neutrons in the energy range of 2.5-35 MeV. The spot size of neutron emission at the converter was measured by two different imaging techniques, using a knife-edge and a penumbral aperture, in two different experimental campaigns. The neutron-source spot size is measured ˜1 mm for both experiments. The measurements and analysis reported here give a spatial characterization for this type of neutron source for the first time. In addition, the forward modeling performed provides an empirical estimate of the spatial characteristics of the deuteron ion-beam. These experimental observations, taken together, provide essential yet unique data to benchmark and verify theoretical work into the

  7. Progress in understanding the short-pulse-driven collisional x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J

    1998-09-21

    Recently, the technique of using a nsec pulse to preform and ionize the plasma followed by a psec pulse to heat the plasma has enabled low-Z neon-like and nickel-like ions to lase driven by small lasers with only ten joules of energy. In this work we model recent experiments done using the COMET laser at LLNL to illuminate I cm long slab targets of Ti with a 4.8 J, 800 ps prepulse followed 1.6 nsec later by a 6 J, 1 psec drive pulse. The LASNEX code is used to calculate the hydrodynamic evolution of the plasma and provide the temperatures and densities fo the XRASER code, which then does the kinetics calculations to determine the gain. The temporal and spatial evolution of the plasma is studied both with and without radiation transport included for the 3d and 3s (arrow) 2p Ne-like Ti resonance lines. Large regions with gains greater than 80 cmminus1 are predicted for the 3p 1S0 (arrow), 3s 1P,1Ne-like Ti laser line at 326 Å. Given the large gain and low gradients in these plasmas, we do propagation calculations including refraction to understand which regions have the right combination of high gain and low gradients to contribute to the X-ray laser output. Calculations are also presented using different delays between the long and short pulse and different widths for the short pulse to provide better insight for optimizing the laser output. In addition to the standard 326 Å laser line, high gain is also predicted and observed for the 3d 1P1 (arrow) 3p 1P1, laser line at 301 Å in Ne-like Ti. We present calculations with and without radiation rransport included on the strong 3d 1P1 (arrow) 2p 1S0, resonance line to better understand this self photopumping effect. We also look at the analog transition in Ni-like ions to understand if self photopumping may also play a role in Ni-like ions. High gain is predicted on the 3d

  8. Modeling short-pulse-driven collisional x-ray lasers and other new schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Li, Y; Nilsen, J; Osterheld, A L

    1999-07-01

    Recently, the technique of using a nsec pulse to preform and ionize the plasma followed by a psec pulse to heat the plasma has enabled low-Z neon-like and nickel-like ions to laser driven by small lasers with only ten joules of energy. In this work we model recent experiments done using the COMET laser at LLNL to illuminate 1 cm long slab targets of Ti with a 4.8 J, 800 ps prepulse followed 1.6 nsec later by a 6 J, 1 psec drive pulse. The LASNEX code is used to calculate the hydrodynamic evolution of the plasma and provide the temperatures and densities to the XRASER code, which then does the kinetics calculations to determine the gain. The temporal and spatial evolution of the plasma is studied both with and without radiation transport included for the 3d and 3s {_} 2p Ne-like Ti resonance lines. Large regions with gains greater than 80 cm{sup {minus}1} are predicted for the 3p {sup 1}S{sub 0} {_} 3s {sup 1}P{sub 1} Ne-like Ti laser line at 326 {angstrom}. Given the large gain and large gradients in these plasmas, we do propagation calculations including refraction to understand which regions have the right combination of high gain and low gradients to contribute to the X-ray laser output. Calculations are also presented using different delays between the long and short pulse and different widths for the short pulse to provide better insight for optimizing the laser output. In addition to the standard 326 {angstrom} laser line, high gain is also predicted and observed for the 3d {sup 1}P{sub 1} {_} 3p {sup 1}P{sub 1} laser line at 301 {angstrom} in Ne-like Ti. We present calculations with and without radiation transport included on the strong 3d {sup 1}P{sub 1} {_} 2p {sup 1}S{sub 0} resonance line to better understand this self photopumping effect. We also look at the analog transition in Ni-like ions to understand if self photopumping may also play a role in Ni-like ions. High gain is predicted on the 3d{sup 9} 4f {sup 1}P{sub 1} {_} 3d{sup 9} 4d {sup 1}P{sub 1

  9. Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Effects from Short-Pulse Lasers and Fusion Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, D C; Throop, A; Brown, Jr., C G; Kimbrough, J; Stowell, M L; White, D A; Song, P; Back, N; MacPhee, A; Chen, H; DeHope, W; Ping, Y; Maddox, B; Lister, J; Pratt, G; Ma, T; Tsui, Y; Perkins, M; O'Brien, D; Patel, P

    2009-03-06

    Our research focused on obtaining a fundamental understanding of the source and properties of EMP at the Titan PW(petawatt)-class laser facility. The project was motivated by data loss and damage to components due to EMP, which can limit diagnostic techniques that can be used reliably at short-pulse PW-class laser facilities. Our measurements of the electromagnetic fields, using a variety of probes, provide information on the strength, time duration, and frequency dependence of the EMP. We measure electric field strengths in the 100's of kV/m range, durations up to 100 ns, and very broad frequency response extending out to 5 GHz and possibly beyond. This information is being used to design shielding to mitigate the effects of EMP on components at various laser facilities. We showed the need for well-shielded cables and oscilloscopes to obtain high quality data. Significant work was invested in data analysis techniques to process this data. This work is now being transferred to data analysis procedures for the EMP diagnostics being fielded on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In addition to electromagnetic field measurements, we measured the spatial and energy distribution of electrons escaping from targets. This information is used as input into the 3D electromagnetic code, EMSolve, which calculates time dependent electromagnetic fields. The simulation results compare reasonably well with data for both the strength and broad frequency bandwidth of the EMP. This modeling work required significant improvements in EMSolve to model the fields in the Titan chamber generated by electrons escaping the target. During dedicated Titan shots, we studied the effects of varying laser energy, target size, and pulse duration on EMP properties. We also studied the effect of surrounding the target with a thick conducting sphere and cube as a potential mitigation approach. System generated EMP (SGEMP) in coaxial cables does not appear to be a significant at Titan. Our results

  10. Lattice Boltzmann method for short-pulsed laser transport in a multi-layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2015-04-01

    We construct a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for transient radiative transfer in one-dimensional multi-layered medium with distinct refractive index in each layer. The left boundary is irradiated normally by a short-pulsed laser. The Fresnel interfaces conditions, which incorporate reflection and refraction, are used at the boundaries and the interfaces. Based on the Fresnel's law and Snell's law, the interfacial intensity formulas are introduced. The collimated and diffuse intensities are treated individually. At a transient time step, the collimated component is first solved by LBM and then embedded into the transient radiative transfer equation as a source term. To keep the consistency of the directions in all the layers, angular interpolation of the intensities at the interfaces is adopted. The transient radiative transfer in a two-layer medium is first investigated, and the time-resolved results are validated by comparing with those by the Monte Carlo method (MCM). Of particular interest, the angular intensities along the slab at different times are presented to illustrate a variety of interesting phenomena, and the discontinuous nature of the intensity at the interfaces is discussed. The effects of various parameters on the time-resolved signals are examined.

  11. A short-pulse mode for the SPHINX LTD Z-pinch driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Almeida, Thierry; Lassalle, Francis; Zucchini, Frederic; Loyen, Arnaud; Morell, Alain; Chuvatin, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The SPHINX machine is a 6MA, 1 μs, LTD Z-pinch driver at CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for studying radiation effects. Different power amplification concepts were examined in order to reduce the current rise time without modifying the generator discharge scheme, including the Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM) proposed by Chuvatin. A DLCM device, capable of shaping the current pulse without reducing the rise time, was developed at CEA. This device proved valuable for isentropic compression experiments in cylindrical geometry. Recently, we achieved a short pulse operation mode by inserting a vacuum closing switch between the DLCM and the load. The current rise time was reduced to ~300 ns. We explored the use of a reduced-height wire array for the Dynamic Flux Extruder in order to improve the wire array compression rate and increase the efficiency of the current transfer to the load. These developments are presented. Potential benefits of these developments for future Z pinch experiments are discussed.

  12. Investigation of energy partitioning from Leopard short-pulse laser interactions in mass limited targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, B.; Sawada, H.; Yabuuchi, T.; McLean, H.; Patel, P.; Beg, F.

    2013-10-01

    The energy distribution in the interaction of a high-intensity, short-pulse laser with a mass limited target was investigated by simultaneously collecting x-ray and particle data. The Leopard laser system at the Nevada Terawatt Facility delivered 15 J of energy in a 350 fs pulse duration. With a beam spot size limited to within 8 μm, the target interaction achieved a peak intensity of 1019 W/cm2 at 20° incidence. The size of the Cu foil targets was varied from 2-20 μm in thickness and from 50 by 50 μm to 2000 by 2000 μm in surface area. A Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer and a spherical crystal imager were used to measure 7.5-9.5 keV x-rays and 8.05 keV monochromatic x-ray images respectively. The escaping electrons and protons in the rear were monitored with a magnet-based electron spectrometer and radiochromic film. Preliminary results show both a decrease of the K β/K α ratio and a stronger He α emission for smaller sized targets, less than 250 by 250 μm. The detailed analyses of the K α images and particle data will be presented.

  13. Photoassociation of ultracold LiRb molecules with short pulses near a Feshbach resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gacesa, Marko; Ghosal, Subhas; Byrd, Jason; Côté, Robin

    2014-05-01

    Ultracold diatomic molecules prepared in the lowest ro-vibrational state are a required first step in many experimental studies aimed at investigating the properties of cold quantum matter. We propose a novel approach to produce such molecules in a two-color photoassociation experiment with short pulses performed near a Feshbach resonance. Specifically, we report the results of a theoretical investigation of formation of 6Li87Rb molecules in a magnetic field. We show that the molecular formation rate can be significantly increased if the pump step is performed near a magnetic Feshbach resonance due to the strong coupling between the energetically open and closed hyperfine states. In addition, the dependence of the nodal structure of the total wave function on the magnetic field allows for enhanced control over the shape and position of the wave packet. The proposed approach is applicable to different systems that have accessible Feshbach resonances. Partially supported by ARO(MG), DOE(SG), AFOFR(JB), NSF(RC).

  14. Highly-charged heavy-ion production with short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, G.; Bitmire, T.; Perry, M.; Anderson, O.; Kuehl, T.

    1998-01-27

    This MathCAD document describes a possible approach using a PW -class short pulse laser to form a useful number (10{sup 12}) of high and uniform charge state ions with low ion temperature (<< 100 eV) and low momentum spread ({delta}p{sub z}/p, < 10{sup -4} ) for injection into heavy-ion fusion accelerators. As a specific example, we consider here Xenon{sup +26}, which has an ionization energy E{sub i} {approximately} 860 eV for the 26th electron, and a significantly higher ionization potential of 1500 eV for the 27th electron because of the M-shell jump. The approach considered here may be used for other ion species as well. The challenge is not simply to produce high charge states with a laser (the ITEP group [Sharkov] have used long pulse CO{sub 2} lasers to create many charge states of chromium up to helium-like Cr{sup +25} by collisional ionization at high Te), nor just to create such high charge states more selectively by field (tunneling) ionization at higher intensities and shorter pulses. Rather, the challenge is to create a selected uniform high charge state, in useful numbers, while keeping the ion temperature and momentum spread small, and avoiding subsequent loss of ion charge state due to recombination and charge-exchange with background gas atoms during extraction into a useful low emittance beam.

  15. Theoretical analysis of saturation and limit cycles in short pulse FEL oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Piovella, N.; Chaix, P.; Jaroszynski, D.

    1995-12-31

    We derive a model for the non linear evolution of a short pulse oscillator from low signal up to saturation in the small gain regime. This system is controlled by only two independent parameters: cavity detuning and losses. Using a closure relation, this model reduces to a closed set of 5 non linear partial differential equations for the EM field and moments of the electron distribution. An analysis of the linearised system allows to define and calculate the eigenmodes characterising the small signal regime. An arbitrary solution of the complete nonlinear system can then be expanded in terms of these eigenmodes. This allows interpreting various observed nonlinear behaviours, including steady state saturation, limit cycles, and transition to chaos. The single mode approximation reduces to a Landau-Ginzburg equation. It allows to obtain gain, nonlinear frequency shift, and efficiency as functions of cavity detuning and cavity losses. A generalisation to two modes allows to obtain a simple description of the limit cycle behaviour, as a competition between these two modes. An analysis of the transitions to more complex dynamics is also given. Finally, the analytical results are compared to the experimental data from the FELIX experiment.

  16. Slow and fast light via SBS in optical fibers for short pulses and broadband pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalosha, V. P.; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2006-12-01

    Slow-light effect via stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in single-mode optical fibers was considered for short probe pulses of nanosecond duration relevant to Gb/s data streams. Unlike recent estimations of delay versus pump based on steady-state small-signal approximation we have used numerical solution of three-wave equations describing SBS for a realistic fiber length. Both regimes of small signal and pump depletion (gain saturation) were considered. The physical origin of Stokes pulse distortion is revealed which is related to excitation of long-living acoustic field behind the pulse and prevents effective delay control by pump power increase at cw pumping. We have shown different slope of the gain-dependent delay for different pulse durations. Spectrally broadened pumping by multiple cw components, frequency-modulated pump and pulse train were studied for short pulses which allow to obtain large delay and suppress pulse distortion. In the pump-depletion regime of pumping by pulse train, both pulse delay and distortion decrease with increasing pump, and the pulse achieves advancement.

  17. Slow and fast light via SBS in optical fibers for short pulses and broadband pump.

    PubMed

    Kalosha, V P; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2006-12-25

    Slow-light effect via stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in single-mode optical fibers was considered for short probe pulses of nanosecond duration relevant to Gb/s data streams. Unlike recent estimations of delay versus pump based on steady-state small-signal approximation we have used numerical solution of three-wave equations describing SBS for a realistic fiber length. Both regimes of small signal and pump depletion (gain saturation) were considered. The physical origin of Stokes pulse distortion is revealed which is related to excitation of long-living acoustic field behind the pulse and prevents effective delay control by pump power increase at cw pumping. We have shown different slope of the gain-dependent delay for different pulse durations. Spectrally broadened pumping by multiple cw components, frequency-modulated pump and pulse train were studied for short pulses which allow to obtain large delay and suppress pulse distortion. In the pump-depletion regime of pumping by pulse train, both pulse delay and distortion decrease with increasing pump, and the pulse achieves advancement. PMID:19532161

  18. Large Area and Short-Pulse Shock Initiation of a Tatb/hmx Mixed Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiji, Wang; Chengwei, Sun; Jun, Chen; Cangli, Liu; Jianheng, Zhao; Fuli, Tan; Ning, Zhang

    2007-12-01

    The large area and short-pulse shock initiation experiments on the plastic bonded mixed explosive of TATB(80%) and HMX(15%) have been performed with an electric gun where a Mylar flyer of 10-19 mm in diameter and 0.05˜0.30 mm in thickness was launched by an electrically exploding metallic bridge foil. The cylindrical explosive specimens (Φ16 mm×8 mm in size) were initiated by the Mylar flyers in thickness of 0.07˜0.20 mm, which induced shock pressure in specimen was of duration ranging from 0.029 to 0.109 μs. The experimental data were treated with the DRM(Delayed Robbins-Monro) procedure and to provide the initiation threshold of flyer velocities at 50% probability are 3.398˜1.713 km/s and that of shock pressure P 13.73˜5.23 GPa, respectively for different pulse durations. The shock initiation criteria of the explosive specimen at 50% and 100% probabilities are yielded. In addition, the 30° wedged sample was tested and the shock to detonation transition (SDT) process emerging on its inclined surface was diagnosed with a device consisting of multiple optical fiber probe, optoelectronic transducer and digital oscilloscope. The POP plot of the explosive has been gained from above SDT data.

  19. Large Area and Short Pulsed Shock Initiation of A TATB/HMX Mixed Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guiji; Sun, Chengwei; Chen, Jun; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Fuli; Zhang, Ning

    2007-06-01

    The large area and short pulsed shock initiation experiment on a plastic bonded mixed explosive of TATB(80%) and HMX(15%) has been performed with an electric gun where a mylar flyer of 19mm in diameter and 0.05˜0.30mm in thickness is launched by an electrically exploding metallic bridge foil. The cylindrical explosive specimens (φ16mm x 8mm in size) were initiated by the mylar flyers in thickness of 0.07˜0.20mm, which induced shock pressure in specimen was of duration ranging 0.029˜0.109μs. The experimental data were treated with the DRM(Delayed Robbins-Monro) procedure and to provide the threshold of shock pressure P 13.73˜5.23GPa. The shock initiation criterion of the explosive specimen is (P/GPa)^1.451(τ/μs) = 1.2. Meanwhile the criterion in 100% probability in the experiment is (P/GPa)^1.8(τ/μs) = 2.63. In addition, the 30^o wedged specimen was tested and the shock to detonation transition (SDT) process emerging on its inclined surface was diagnosed with a device consisting of multiple optical fiber probe, optoelectronic transducer and digital oscilloscope. The POP plot of the explosive has been gained from above SDT data.

  20. Short-pulse high-power microwave breakdown at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng-Cheng; Liao, Cheng; Feng, Ju

    2015-02-01

    The fluid model is proposed to investigate the gas breakdown driven by a short-pulse (such as a Gaussian pulse) high-power microwave at high pressures. However, the fluid model requires specification of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF); the common assumption of a Maxwellian EEDF can result in the inaccurate breakdown prediction when the electrons are not in equilibrium. We confirm that the influence of the incident pulse shape on the EEDF is tiny at high pressures by using the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model. As a result, the EEDF for a rectangular microwave pulse directly derived from the Boltzmann equation solver Bolsig+ is introduced into the fluid model for predicting the breakdown threshold of the non-rectangular pulse over a wide range of pressures, and the obtained results are very well matched with those of the PIC-MCC simulations. The time evolution of a non-rectangular pulse breakdown in gas, obtained by the fluid model with the EEDF from Bolsig+, is presented and analyzed at different pressures. In addition, the effect of the incident pulse shape on the gas breakdown is discussed. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB328904), the NSAF of China (Grant No. U1330109), and 2012 Doctoral Innovation Funds of Southwest Jiaotong University.

  1. Why Are Short Pulses More Efficient in Tissue Erosion Using Pulsed Cavitational Ultrasound Therapy (Histotripsy)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Maxwell, Adam D.; Park, Simone; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2010-03-01

    Histotripsy produces mechanical tissue fractionation through controlled cavitation. The histotripsy induced tissue erosion is more efficient with shorter (i.e., 3-6 cycles) rather than longer (i.e. 24 cycles) pulses. In this study, we investigated the reasons behind this observation by studying dynamics of the cavitating bubble clouds and individual bubbles during and after a therapy pulse. Bubble clouds were generated at a gel-water interface using 5 to 30-cycle 1 MHz pulses at P-/P+>19/125-MPa pressure and 1-kHz pulse repetition frequency. The evolution of the overall bubble cloud and individual bubbles were studied using high speed photography. Results show that: 1) within the first 10-15 cycles, the overall cloud grew to its maximum size; the individual bubbles underwent violent expansion and collapse, and grew in size with each cycle of ultrasound; 2) between the 15th cycle and the end of the pulse, the overall cloud size did not change even if further cycles of ultrasound were delivered; the individual bubbles no longer underwent violent collapse; 3) after the pulse, the overall cloud gradually dissolved; the individual bubbles may coalesce into larger bubbles for 0-40 μs, and then gradually dissolved. These observations suggest that violent growth and collapse of individual bubbles occur within the first few cycles of ultrasound pulse most often. This may explain why extremely short pulses are more energy efficient in histotripsy-induced tissue erosion.

  2. Large-scale atomistic simulations of surface nanostructuring by short pulse laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengping; Shugaev, Maxim; Zhigilei, Leonid

    2015-03-01

    The availability of petascale supercomputing resources has expanded the range of research questions that can be addressed in the simulations and, in particular, enabled large-scale atomistic simulations of short pulse laser nanostructuring of metal surfaces. A series of simulations performed for systems consisting of 108 - 109 atoms is used in this study to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the generation of complex multiscale surface morphology and microstructure. At low laser fluence, just below the spallation threshold, a concurrent occurrence of fast laser melting, dynamic relaxation of laser-induced stresses, and rapid cooling and resolidification of the transiently melted surface region is found to produce a sub-surface porous region covered by a nanocrystalline layer. At higher laser fluences, in the spallation and phase explosion regimes, the material disintegration and ejection driven by the relaxation of laser-induced stresses and/or explosive release of vapor leads to the formation of complex surface morphology that can only be studied in billion-atom simulations. The first result from a billion atom simulation of surface nanostructuring performed on Titan will be discussed in the presentation. Financial support is provided by NSF (DMR-0907247 and CMMI-1301298) and AFOSR (FA9550-10-1-0541). Computational support is provided by the OLCF (MAT048) and NSF XSEDE (TG-DMR110090).

  3. Resistance and recovery of river biofilms receiving short pulses of Triclosan and Diuron.

    PubMed

    Proia, L; Morin, S; Peipoch, M; Romaní, A M; Sabater, S

    2011-08-01

    The effects of the herbicide Diuron (DIU) and the bactericide Triclosan (TCS) were assessed on laboratory-grown stream biofilms. Four week-old biofilms were exposed in mesocosms to 48-hours of short pulses of either DIU or TCS. The direct and indirect effects of each toxicant on the biofilms, and the subsequent recovery of the biofilms, were evaluated according to structural and functional biomarkers. These parameters were analyzed immediately before exposure, immediately after exposure, and 9 and 16days post-exposure. DIU caused an increase in diatom mortality (+79%), which persisted until the end of the experiment. TCS also affected diatom mortality (+41%), although the effect did not appear until 1week post-exposure. TCS caused an increase in bacterial mortality (+45%); however, this parameter returned to normal values 1week post-exposure. TCS compromised the cellular integrity of the green alga Spirogyra sp., whereas DIU did not. TCS also strongly inhibited phosphate uptake (-71%), which did not return to normal values until 2weeks post-exposure. DIU directly affected algae, but barely affected the heterotrophs, whereas TCS seriously impaired bacteria (direct effect) as well as autotrophs (indirect effect). However, the biofilms recovered their normal structure and function within only a few days to a few weeks. These findings demonstrate the capacity of biofilms to cope with periodic inputs of toxicants, but also the risks associated to repeated exposure or multi-contamination in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:21621820

  4. Ellipsometric Pump-probe Experiments for High Density Plasma with Ultra-short pulse Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Hitoki; Morikami, Hidetoshi; Ueda, Ken-Ichi; More, Richard M.

    2003-10-01

    A new type of ultra-short-pulse laser pump-probe experiment has been performed. In these measurements, reflectivity of p- and s- polarization (Rp and R_s) and their phase difference are obtained. Typical detection sensitivity was 5mrad for the phase difference and 2 ˜4% for reflectivity with time resolution of 100fs. When the data are plotted as Y=frac2|r_s||r_p|sin(δ)(|r_s|^2+|r_p|^2) versus X=frac|r_p|^2|r_s|^2, the trajectories of the Au target data with I=2×10^12 ˜5×10^13W/cm^2 follow approximately the same curve in (X, Y) space while for Cu the trajectories follow various curves. The unique Au trajectory implies a unique state of expanded Au such as neutral gold atoms. Fluid simulation with non-ideal equation of state and adiabatic expansion shows rapid recombination in the expanding plasma and the unique (X, Y) trajectory is reproduced by Maxwell's equations with these density profiles. By fitting the unknown complex dielectric function of high density Au neutral gas, the atomic polarizability (-1.75 + 0.2 i)× 10-24 cm^3 is obtained for λ=745nm light. The Saha equation predicts recombination and formation of gold negative ions and a low density of free electrons in the low-density vapor.

  5. Proton acceleration from high-contrast short pulse lasers interacting with sub-micron thin foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical study complemented with published experimental data of proton acceleration from sub-micron (thickness < 1 μm) foils irradiated by ultra-high contrast ( >1010 ) short pulse lasers is presented. The underlying physics issues pertinent to proton acceleration are addressed using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For laser energy ɛ≤4 J (intensity I ≤5 ×1020 W/cm 2 ), simulation predictions agree with experimental data, both exhibiting scaling superior to Target Normal Sheath Acceleration's model. Anomalous behavior was observed for ɛ>4 J ( I >5 ×1020 W/cm 2 ), for which the measured maximum proton energies were much lower than predicted by scaling and these simulations. This unexpected behavior could not be explained within the frame of the model, and we conjecture that pre-pulses preceding the main pulse by picoseconds may be responsible. If technological issues can be resolved, energetic proton beams could be generated for a wide range of applications such as nuclear physics, radiography, and medical science.

  6. Fiber Laser Front Ends for High-Energy Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Liao, Z M; Mitchell, S; Messerly, M; Beach, R; Jovanovic, I; Brown, C; Payne, S A; Barty, C J

    2005-01-18

    We are developing an all fiber laser system optimized for providing input pulses for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal solutions for these systems as they are highly reliable and once constructed they can be operated with ease. Furthermore, they offer an additional benefit of significantly reduced footprint. In most labs containing equivalent bulk laser systems, the system occupies two 4'x8' tables and would consist of 10's if not a 100 of optics which would need to be individually aligned and maintained. The design requirements for this application are very different those commonly seen in fiber lasers. High energy lasers often have low repetition rates (as low as one pulse every few hours) and thus high average power and efficiency are of little practical value. What is of high value is pulse energy, high signal to noise ratio (expressed as pre-pulse contrast), good beam quality, consistent output parameters and timing. Our system focuses on maximizing these parameters sometimes at the expense of efficient operation or average power. Our prototype system consists of a mode-locked fiber laser, a compressed pulse fiber amplifier, a ''pulse cleaner'', a chirped fiber Bragg grating, pulse selectors, a transport fiber system and a large flattened mode fiber amplifier. In our talk we will review the system in detail and present theoretical and experimental studies of critical components. We will also present experimental results from the integrated system.

  7. Compensation of nonlinear phase shifts with third-order dispersion in short-pulse fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shian; Kuznetsova, Lyuba; Chong, Andy; Wise, Frank

    2005-06-27

    We show that nonlinear phase shifts and third-order dispersion can compensate each other in short-pulse fiber amplifiers. This compen-sation can be exploited in any implementation of chirped-pulse amplification, with stretching and compression accomplished with diffraction gratings, single-mode fiber, microstructure fiber, fiber Bragg gratings, etc. In particular, we consider chirped-pulse fiber amplifiers at wavelengths for which the fiber dispersion is normal. The nonlinear phase shift accumulated in the amplifier can be compensated by the third-order dispersion of the combination of a fiber stretcher and grating compressor. A numerical model is used to predict the compensation, and experimental results that exhibit the main features of the calculations are presented. In the presence of third-order dispersion, an optimal nonlinear phase shift reduces the pulse duration, and enhances the peak power and pulse contrast compared to the pulse produced in linear propagation. Contrary to common belief, fiber stretchers can perform as well or better than grating stretchers in fiber amplifiers, while offering the major practical advantages of a waveguide medium.

  8. Creation of Pure Frozen Gas Targets for Ion Acceleration using Short Pulse Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCary, Edward; Stehr, Florian; Jiao, Xuejing; Quevedo, Hernan; Franke, Philip; Agustsson, Ronald; Oshea, Finn; Berry, Robert; Chao, Dennis; Woods, Kayley; Gautier, Donald; Letzring, Sam; Hegelich, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    A system for shooting interchangeable frozen gas targets was developed at the University of Texas and will be tested at Los Alamos National Lab. A target holder which can hold up to five substrates used for target growing was cryogenically cooled to temperatures below 14 K. The target substrates consist of holes with diameters ranging from 15 μm-500 μm and TEM grids with micron scale spacing, across which films of ice are frozen by releasing small amounts of pure gas molecules directly into the vacuum target chamber. Frozen gas targets comprised of simple molecules like methane and single element gasses like hydrogen and deuterium will provide novel target configuations that will be compared with laser plasma interaction simulations. The targets will be shot with the ultra-intense short-pulse Trident laser. Accelerated ion spectra will be characterized using a Thomson Parabola with magnetic field strength of 0.92T and electric field strength of 30kV. Hydrogen targets will be additionally characterized using stacks of copper which become activated upon exposure to energetic protons resulting in a beta decay signal which be imaged on electron sensitive imaging plates to provide an energy spectrum and spacial profile of the proton beam. Details of target creation and pre-shot characterization will be presented.

  9. Upgraded Waveguide Components for New 1.2 and 1.5 MW Gyrotrons on the DIII-D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, Y. A.; Doane, J. L.; Cengher, M.; Lohr, J.; Ponce, D.

    2012-10-01

    The present gyrotron system on the DIII-D tokamak comprises 110 GHz gyrotrons in the 1 MW class with designed pulse lengths of 10 s. The system is being upgraded with two types of depressed collector gyrotrons producing 1.2 MW at 110 GHz and 1.5 MW at 117.5 GHz, for which waveguide components having higher power ratings will be required. New power monitors and polarizers have been designed and fabricated, which are capable of operating for 10 s pulses at the higher power levels. This presentation reports an analysis of the component heat loading to obtain a thermal equilibrium. Using this equilibrium, a stress strain analysis was performed to calculate life expectancies. The calculations take into account the temperature dependence of the heat transfer coefficient in the component coolant channels. Although the high heat load components required upgrading, the waveguide lines themselves have adequate margins for the expected power and pulse length. A summary of the thermal capabilities of other components will also be presented.

  10. Experimental Research on a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz Gyrotron with a Smooth Mirror Internal Mode Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tax, D. S.; Mastovsky, I.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.; Torrezan, A. C.

    2010-11-01

    Megawatt gyrotrons are important for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) of fusion plasmas, including ITER. These gyrotrons should operate with high efficiency to reduce the prime power required and to ensure good reliability. The gyrotron efficiency is affected both by the physical principles that govern the device and the performance of components like the internal mode converter (IMC), which must convert the electromagnetic cavity mode into a Gaussian beam. An IMC consisting of a helically-cut launcher and three smooth curved mirrors, which is less susceptible to alignment errors than an IMC using mirrors with phase correcting surfaces, was recently tested on a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz, 3μs pulsed gyrotron operating in the TE22,6 mode, and an output beam with 95.8 ± 0.5 % Gaussian beam content was measured in both hot and cold tests. We are also examining the issue of mode competition in the gyrotron, which can limit the achievable output power and efficiency. The sequence of competing modes excited during the rise time of the voltage pulse has been measured and results are compared with the numerical simulation code MAGY. These results should provide a good test of the accuracy of the code.

  11. Investigations for Improvement of Energy Yield of Rotor-blades from the 1.5 MW Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaresque, N.; Bicker, S.; Dollinger, C.; Fandrich, A.; Gatz, S.; Hölling, M.; Irschik, K.; Reichstein, T.; Schaffarczyk, A. P.; von Zengen, C.

    2016-09-01

    In a combined approach of extensive measurement and accompanying simulation a wind turbine blade used in the 1.5 MW class was investigated for improvement of aerodynamic properties and especially the energy yield. One blade was dismantled and its geometry was locally measured by a specially designed laser scanning-system. From this geometry data set five 2D wind tunnel models were manufactured and measured in the wind tunnel of Deutsche Wind Guard Engineering GmbH at Bremerhaven, Germany. In addition, extensive CFD investigations were performed to investigate the usefulness of so-called aerodynamic devices like vortex generators, Gurney flaps and others for improving energy yield. As a result it could be shown that the aerodynamic efficiency of the manufactured blades - if measured in terms of lift-to-drag ratio - is at a high level but still can be further improved. 3D CFD investigations were able to show the influence of Gurney flaps and boundary layer fences and their interactions.

  12. Cutting and drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by 70W short pulse nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, Peter; Stolberg, Klaus; Bastick, Stefan; Ziolkowski, Ewa; Roehner, Markus; Suttmann, Oliver; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2014-02-01

    Continuous carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) are recognized as having a significant lightweight construction potential for a wide variety of industrial applications. However, a today`s barrier for a comprehensive dissemination of CFRP structures is the lack of economic, quick and reliable manufacture processes, e.g. the cutting and drilling steps. In this paper, the capability of using pulsed disk lasers in CFRP machining is discussed. In CFRP processing with NIR lasers, carbon fibers show excellent optical absorption and heat dissipation, contrary to the plastics matrix. Therefore heat dissipation away from the laser focus into the material is driven by heat conduction of the fibres. The matrix is heated indirectly by heat transfer from the fibres. To cut CFRP, it is required to reach the melting temperature for thermoplastic matrix materials or the disintegration temperature for thermoset systems as well as the sublimation temperature of the reinforcing fibers simultaneously. One solution for this problem is to use short pulse nanosecond lasers. We have investigated CFRP cutting and drilling with such a laser (max. 7 mJ @ 10 kHz, 30 ns). This laser offers the opportunity of wide range parameter tuning for systematic process optimization. By applying drilling and cutting operations based on galvanometer scanning techniques in multi-cycle mode, excellent surface and edge characteristics in terms of delamination-free and intact fiber-matrix interface were achieved. The results indicate that nanosecond disk laser machining could consequently be a suitable tool for the automotive and aircraft industry for cutting and drilling steps.

  13. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station.

    PubMed

    Gallmeier, F X; Lu, W; Riemer, B W; Zhao, J K; Herwig, K W; Robertson, J L

    2016-06-01

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm(2) to 20 × 20 mm(2). This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments' sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator. PMID:27370444

  14. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station.

    PubMed

    Gallmeier, F X; Lu, W; Riemer, B W; Zhao, J K; Herwig, K W; Robertson, J L

    2016-06-01

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm(2) to 20 × 20 mm(2). This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments' sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator.

  15. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallmeier, F. X.; Lu, W.; Riemer, B. W.; Zhao, J. K.; Herwig, K. W.; Robertson, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm2 to 20 × 20 mm2. This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments' sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator.

  16. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gallmeier, F. X.; Lu, W.; Riemer, B. W.; Zhao, J. K.; Herwig, K. W.; Robertson, J. L.

    2016-06-14

    We identified candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared tomore » the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm2 to 20 × 20 mm2. Furthermore, this increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments’ sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. Our first effort decoupled group moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator.« less

  17. Modeling of Short-Pulse-Driven Nickel-Like X-Ray Lasers and Recent Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J; Dunn, J

    2001-07-27

    The technique of using a nsec pulse to preform and ionize the plasma followed by a psec pulse to heat the plasma has enabled low-Z nickel-like ions to achieve saturated output when driven by small lasers with less than ten joules of energy. We model experiments done using the COMET laser at LLNL and the P 102 laser at Limeil to produce Ni-like Pd and Ag lasers. The COMET experiments use a 2 J, 600 ps prepulse followed 700 psec later by a 6 J, 6 psec drive pulse in a 1.6 cm long line focus. The P102 experiments used a somewhat larger energy and were able to use different combinations of frequency doubled light for both the prepulse and short pulse drive. The LASNEX code is used to calculate the hydrodynamic evolution of the plasma and provide the temperatures and densities to the CRETIN code, which then does the kinetics calculations to determine the gain. The temporal and spatial evolution of the plasmas are studied both with and without radiation transport included to understand the role of the self photopumping process on the gain of the Ni-like 4f {yields} 4d laser lines as well as the gain of the usual collisionally driven Ni-like 4d {yields} 4p laser lines. In particular we study why the 4f {yields} 4d line lases well only when frequency doubled light is used with the prepulse in the P 102 experiments. Experimental results are presented for Ni-like Pd including two-dimensional near-field and far-field images.

  18. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization for Glass-Fiber Epoxy-Matrix Composite 5 MW Horizontal-Axis Wind-Turbine Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, G.; Pandurangan, B.; Sellappan, V.; Vallejo, A.; Ozen, M.

    2010-11-01

    A multi-disciplinary design-optimization procedure has been introduced and used for the development of cost-effective glass-fiber reinforced epoxy-matrix composite 5 MW horizontal-axis wind-turbine (HAWT) blades. The turbine-blade cost-effectiveness has been defined using the cost of energy (CoE), i.e., a ratio of the three-blade HAWT rotor development/fabrication cost and the associated annual energy production. To assess the annual energy production as a function of the blade design and operating conditions, an aerodynamics-based computational analysis had to be employed. As far as the turbine blade cost is concerned, it is assessed for a given aerodynamic design by separately computing the blade mass and the associated blade-mass/size-dependent production cost. For each aerodynamic design analyzed, a structural finite element-based and a post-processing life-cycle assessment analyses were employed in order to determine a minimal blade mass which ensures that the functional requirements pertaining to the quasi-static strength of the blade, fatigue-controlled blade durability and blade stiffness are satisfied. To determine the turbine-blade production cost (for the currently prevailing fabrication process, the wet lay-up) available data regarding the industry manufacturing experience were combined with the attendant blade mass, surface area, and the duration of the assumed production run. The work clearly revealed the challenges associated with simultaneously satisfying the strength, durability and stiffness requirements while maintaining a high level of wind-energy capture efficiency and a lower production cost.

  19. Instability of outer tip vortices for a 2.5 MW wind turbine: integrating snow PIV with LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yang, Xiaolei; Hong, Jiarong; Barone, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Recent field experiments conducted around a 2.5 MW wind turbine using super-large-scale PIV (SLPIV) using natural snow particles have revealed tip vortex cores (visualized as areas devoid of snowflakes) of complex shape, consisting of both round and elongated void patterns. Here we employ large-eddy simulation to elucidate the structure and dynamics of the complex tip vortices identified experimentally. The LES is shown to reproduce vortex cores in remarkable agreement with the SLPIV results, essentially capturing all vortex core patterns observed in the field in the tip shear layer. We show that the stretched elongated vortex cores observed in 2D planes are the footprints of a second set of counter-rotating spiral vortices that emanates along the tip shear layer immediately downwind of the blades and is intertwined with the tip vortices. We argue that this large-scale instability is of centrifugal type since the mean flow characteristics in the outer tip shear layer resemble those of the Taylor-Couette flow. This study highlights the feasibility of employing snow voids to visualize tip vortices and demonstrates the enormous potential of integrating SLPIV with LES as a powerful tool for gaining novel insights into the wakes of utility scale wind turbines. This work was supported by Department of Energy DOE (DE-EE0002980, DE-EE0005482 and DE-AC04-94AL85000), Sandia National Laboratories and NSF Career Award (NSF-CBET-1454259) for Jiarong Hong. Computational resources were provided by SNL and MSI.

  20. Development and Application of a Predictive Computational Tool for Short-Pulse, High-Intensity Target Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Town, R J; Chung, H; Langdon, A B; Lasinski, B F; Lund, S M; McCandless, B C; Still, C H; Tabak, M

    2007-01-26

    The widely differing spatial, temporal, and density scales needed to accurately model the fast ignition process and other short-pulse laser-plasma interactions leads to a computationally challenging project that is difficult to solve using a single code. This report summarizes the work performed on a three year LDRD to couple together three independent codes using PYTHON to build a new integrated computational tool. An example calculation using this new model is described.

  1. Short-pulse Laser Induced Transient Structure Formation and Ablation Studied with Time-resolved Coherent XUV-scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski-Tinten, Klaus; Barty, Anton; Boutet, Sebastien; Shymanovich, Uladzimir; Chapman, Henry; Bogan, Mike; Marchesini, Stefano; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Stojanovic, Nikola; Bonse, Jörn; Rosandi, Yudi; Urbassek, Herbert M.; Tobey, Ra'anan; Ehrke, Henri; Cavalleri, Andrea; Düsterer, Stefan; Redlin, Harald; Frank, Matthias; Bajt, Sasa; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, Marvin; Hajdu, Janos; Treusch, Rolf; Bostedt, Christoph; Hoener, M.; Möller, T.

    2010-10-01

    The structural dynamics of short-pulse laser irradiated surfaces and nano-structures has been studied with nm spatial and ultrafast temporal resolution by means of single-shot coherent XUV-scattering techniques. The experiments allowed us to time-resolve the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures, and to follow the expansion and disintegration of nano-objects during laser ablation.

  2. Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Chad M.; Perricone, Matthew J.; Faraone, Kevin M.; Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-10-01

    Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

  3. Short-pulse, high-energy radiation generation from laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumaker, Will

    2013-10-01

    Recent experimental results of laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of ~GeV electrons driven by the 200TW HERCULES and the 400TW ASTRA-GEMINI laser systems and their subsequent generation of photons, positrons, and neutrons are presented. In LWFA, high-intensity (I >1019 W /cm2), ultra-short (τL < 1 / (2 πωpe)) laser pulses drive highly nonlinear plasma waves which can trap ~ nC of electrons and accelerate them to ~GeV energies over ~cm lengths. These electron beams can then be converted by a high-Z target via bremsstrahlung into low-divergence (< 20 mrad) beams of high-energy (<600 MeV) photons and subsequently into positrons via the Bethe-Heitler process. By increasing the material thickness and Z, the resulting Ne+ /Ne- ratio can approach unity, resulting in a near neutral density plasma jet. These quasi-neutral beams are presumed to retain the short-pulse (τL < 40 fs) characteristic of the electron beam, resulting in a high peak density of ne- /e+ ~ 1016 cm-3 , making the source an excellent candidate for laboratory study of astrophysical leptonic jets. Alternatively, the electron beam can be interacted with a counter-propagating, ultra-high intensity (I >1021 W /cm2) laser pulse to undergo inverse Compton scattering and emit a high-peak brightness beam of high-energy photons. Preliminary results and experimental sensitivities of the electron-laser beam overlap are presented. The high-energy photon beams can be spectrally resolved using a forward Compton scattering spectrometer. Moreover, the photon flux can be characterized by a pixelated scintillator array and by nuclear activation and (γ,n) neutron measurements from the photons interacting with a secondary solid target. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed using FLUKA to support the yield estimates. This research was supported by DOE/NSF-PHY 0810979, NSF CAREER 1054164, DARPA AXiS N66001-11-1-4208, SF/DNDO F021166, and the Leverhulme Trust ECF-2011-383.

  4. Compact Short-Pulsed Electron Linac Based Neutron Sources for Precise Nuclear Material Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Tagi, K.; Matsuyama, D.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Harada, H.

    2015-10-01

    An X-band (11.424GHz) electron linac as a neutron source for nuclear data study for the melted fuel debris analysis and nuclear security in Fukushima is under development. Originally we developed the linac for Compton scattering X-ray source. Quantitative material analysis and forensics for nuclear security will start several years later after the safe settlement of the accident is established. For the purpose, we should now accumulate more precise nuclear data of U, Pu, etc., especially in epithermal (0.1-10 eV) neutrons. Therefore, we have decided to modify and install the linac in the core space of the experimental nuclear reactor "Yayoi" which is now under the decommission procedure. Due to the compactness of the X-band linac, an electron gun, accelerating tube and other components can be installed in a small space in the core. First we plan to perform the time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurement for study of total cross sections of the nuclei for 0.1-10 eV energy neutrons. Therefore, if we adopt a TOF line of less than 10m, the o-pulse length of generated neutrons should be shorter than 100 ns. Electronenergy, o-pulse length, power, and neutron yield are ~30 MeV, 100 ns - 1 micros, ~0.4 kW, and ~1011 n/s (~103 n/cm2/s at samples), respectively. Optimization of the design of a neutron target (Ta, W, 238U), TOF line and neutron detector (Ce:LiCAF) of high sensitivity and fast response is underway. We are upgrading the electron gun and a buncher to realize higher current and beam power with a reasonable beam size in order to avoid damage of the neutron target. Although the neutron flux is limited in case of the X-band electron linac based source, we take advantage of its short pulse aspect and availability for nuclear data measurement with a short TOF system. First, we form a tentative configuration in the current experimental room for Compton scattering in 2014. Then, after the decommissioning has been finished, we move it to the "Yayoi" room and perform

  5. Return current and proton emission from wire targets interacting with an intense short pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beg, Farhat

    2004-05-01

    One of the important characteristics of short pulse high intensity laser-solid interactions is the generation of energetic charged particles, which result from the very efficient conversion of laser energy into hot electrons. Since the electrons in the electric field of the laser have relativistic quiver motions, the temperature of the hot electron distribution of the plasma produced at such extreme intensities can become very high. A large number of hot electrons (1013-1014) having an average energy of the order of 1-2 MeV can be generated as intensities exceed 1019 Wcm-2. Since the resulting beam current exceeds the Alfvén limit, a neutralizing return current of cold plasma electrons moving in the opposite direction is produced. Another source of return current is that due to the escape of very energetic electrons from the target, which then creates a large electrostatic potential due to charge separation. These return currents can cause significant ohmic heating. In addition escaping electrons establish the large electrostatic fields, accelerating a large number of protons from the target with energies of 10's of MeV. The experiments reported here were performed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory with the VULCAN laser facility at intensity greater than 5 x1019 Wcm-2 on wire targets. In some shots an additional wire or foil was placed nearby. The laser was blocked by the main wire target so that no laser light reached the additional wire or foil. Three main observations were made: (i) a Z-pinch was driven in the wire due to the return current, (ii) optical transition radiation (OTR) at 2w was generated and (iii) energetic proton emission was observed. The wire targets were observed to be ohmically heated and were m=0 unstable. The OTR emission is likely due to electron bunches accelerated by the ponderomotive force of the laser. The proton emission was in a form of thin disk perpendicular to the wire and centered on the wire at the laser focus. Proton

  6. Progress of high average power, short-pulse laser technology for the Compton X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Akira; Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Washio, Masakazu

    2011-05-01

    Recent progress is reported in the development of high average power, short-pulse laser technology, which is relevant toward achieving a high X-ray flux in a Compton X-ray source for use in various applications. The Yb-based laser material is suitable for high-pulse energy in a picosecond pulse length. The thin disc amplifier technology is now close to operating continuously with 1 J, 2 ps, at a 100 Hz repetition rate with a multi-pass amplification scheme. The average power is 100 W at a 1030 nm wavelength. The laser beam quality is fine enough to focus on the bunched electron beam from a photocathode/S-band linac single-pass accelerator and to generate an X-ray flux of 109 photons/s at 100 Hz. The short-pulse carbon dioxide (CO2) laser has an advantage for a Compton X-ray source in high X-ray flux applications. The short-pulse amplification of the CO2 laser pulse has been demonstrated, at a power level of more than 10 kW at a 100 kHz repetition rate in a single laser beam, for application in the plasma generation for an extreme ultraviolet light source, using a commercially available RF-pumped laser module. The pulse length is now limited to around 1 ns because of the bandwidth of the low-pressure gain medium. The additional pulse compression scheme makes a high average power, pulsed CO2 laser ideal for various applications of the Compton X-ray source.

  7. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental restorative materials with an ultra short pulse laser (USPL) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Andreas; Wehry, Richard; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Schelle, Florian

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental restoration materials following laser ablation using an Ultra Short Pulse Laser (USPL) system. Specimens of phosphate cement (PC), ceramic (CE) and composite (C) were used. Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm and a pulse length of 8 ps. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the thickness of the restoration material. A time delay for temperature increase was observed in the PC and C group. Employing the USPL system for removal of restorative materials, heat generation has to be considered.

  8. Temporal and spatial temperature distribution in the glabrous skin of rats induced by short-pulse CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Pen-Li; Hsu, Shu-Shen; Tsai, Meng-Li; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Wang, An-Bang; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2012-11-01

    Pain is a natural alarm that aids the body in avoiding potential danger and can also present as an important indicator in clinics. Infrared laser-evoked potentials can be used as an objective index to evaluate nociception. In animal studies, a short-pulse laser is crucial because it completes the stimulation before escape behavior. The objective of the present study was to obtain the temporal and spatial temperature distributions in the skin caused by the irradiation of a short-pulse laser. A fast speed infrared camera was used to measure the surface temperature caused by a CO2 laser of different durations (25 and 35 ms) and power. The measured results were subsequently implemented with a three-layer finite element model to predict the subsurface temperature. We found that stratum corneum was crucial in the modeling of fast temperature response, and escape behaviors correlated with predictions of temperature at subsurface. Results indicated that the onset latency and duration of activated nociceptors must be carefully considered when interpreting physiological responses evoked by infrared irradiation.

  9. Using a short-pulse diffraction-limited laser beam to probe filamentation of a random phase plate smoothed beam.

    PubMed

    Kline, J L; Montgomery, D S; Flippo, K A; Johnson, R P; Rose, H A; Shimada, T; Williams, E A

    2008-10-01

    A short pulse (few picoseconds) laser probe provides high temporal resolution measurements to elucidate details of fast dynamic phenomena not observable with typical longer laser pulse probes and gated diagnostics. Such a short pulse laser probe (SPLP) has been used to measure filamentation of a random phase plate (RPP) smoothed laser beam in a gas-jet plasma. The plasma index of refraction due to driven density and temperature fluctuations by the RPP beam perturbs the phase front of a SPLP propagating at a 90 degree angle with respect to the RPP interaction beam. The density and temperature fluctuations are quasistatic on the time scale of the SPLP (approximately 2 ps). The transmitted near-field intensity distribution from the SPLP provides a measure of the phase front perturbation. At low plasma densities, the transmitted intensity pattern is asymmetric with striations across the entire probe beam in the direction of the RPP smoothed beam. As the plasma density increases, the striations break up into smaller sizes along the direction of the RPP beam propagation. The breakup of the intensity pattern is consistent with self-focusing of the RPP smoothed interaction beam. Simulations of the experiment using the wave propagation code, PF3D, are in qualitative agreement demonstrating that the asymmetric striations can be attributed to the RPP driven density fluctuations. Quantification of the beam breakup measured by the transmitted SPLP could lead to a new method for measuring self-focusing of lasers in underdense plasmas.

  10. Impact of Pre-Plasma on Fast Electron Generation and Transport from Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, J.; McGuffey, C.; Krauland, C.; Jarrott, L. C.; Sorokovikova, A.; Qiao, B.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Park, J.; Link, A.; Chen, H.; McLean, H. S.; Wagner, C.; Minello, V.; McCary, E.; Meadows, A.; Spinks, M.; Gaul, E.; Dyer, G.; Hegelich, B. M.; Martinez, M.; Donovan, M.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results and analysis from recent short pulse laser matter experiments using the Texas Petawatt Laser to study the impact of pre-plasma on fast electron generation and transport. The experimental setup consisted of 3 separate beam elements: a main, high intensity, short pulse beam for the interaction, a secondary pulse of equal intensity interacting with a separate thin foil target to generate protons for side-on proton imaging and a third, low intensity, wider beam to generate a varied scale length pre-plasma. The main target consisted of a multilayer planar Al foil with a buried Cu fluor layer. The electron beam was characterized with multiple diagnostics, including several bremsstrahlung spectrometers, magnetic electron spectrometers and Cu-K α imaging. The protons from the secondary target were used to image the fields on the front of the target in the region of laser plasma interaction. Features seen in the interaction region by these protons will be presented along with characteristics of the generated electron beam. This work performed under the auspices of the US DOE under Contracts DE-FOA-0000583 (FES, NNSA).

  11. Short-pulse Er:YAG laser increases bond strength of composite resin to sound and eroded dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cersosimo, Maria Cecília Pereira; Matos, Adriana Bona; Couto, Roberta Souza D.'Almeida; Marques, Márcia Martins; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the irradiation with a short-pulse Er:YAG laser on the adhesion of composite resin to sound and eroded dentin (SD and ED). Forty-six samples of occlusal dentine, obtained from human molars, had half of their surface protected, while the other half was submitted to erosive cycles. Afterward, 23 samples were irradiated with Er:YAG laser, resulting in four experimental groups: SD, sound irradiated dentine (SID-Er:YAG, 50 μs, 2 Hz, 80 mJ, and 12.6 J/cm2), ED, and eroded irradiated dentin (EID-erosion + Er:YAG laser). A self-etching adhesive system was used, and then cylinders of composite resin were prepared. A microshear bond strength test was performed after 24 h storage (n=20). The morphology of SD and ED, with or without Er:YAG laser irradiation, was evaluated under scanning electron microscopy (n=3). Bond strength values (MPa) were subjected to analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test. Statistically significant differences were found among the experimental groups: SD (9.76±3.39 B), SID (12.77±5.09 A), ED (5.12±1.72 D), and EID (7.62±3.39 C). Even though erosion reduces the adhesion to dentin, the surface irradiation with a short-pulse Er:YAG laser increases adhesion to both ED and SD.

  12. Short-pulse Er:YAG laser increases bond strength of composite resin to sound and eroded dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cersosimo, Maria Cecília Pereira; Matos, Adriana Bona; Couto, Roberta Souza D.'Almeida; Marques, Márcia Martins; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the irradiation with a short-pulse Er:YAG laser on the adhesion of composite resin to sound and eroded dentin (SD and ED). Forty-six samples of occlusal dentine, obtained from human molars, had half of their surface protected, while the other half was submitted to erosive cycles. Afterward, 23 samples were irradiated with Er:YAG laser, resulting in four experimental groups: SD, sound irradiated dentine (SID-Er:YAG, 50 μs, 2 Hz, 80 mJ, and 12.6 J/cm2), ED, and eroded irradiated dentin (EID-erosion + Er:YAG laser). A self-etching adhesive system was used, and then cylinders of composite resin were prepared. A microshear bond strength test was performed after 24 h storage (n=20). The morphology of SD and ED, with or without Er:YAG laser irradiation, was evaluated under scanning electron microscopy (n=3). Bond strength values (MPa) were subjected to analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test. Statistically significant differences were found among the experimental groups: SD (9.76±3.39 B), SID (12.77±5.09 A), ED (5.12±1.72 D), and EID (7.62±3.39 C). Even though erosion reduces the adhesion to dentin, the surface irradiation with a short-pulse Er:YAG laser increases adhesion to both ED and SD.

  13. Simulation of the short pulse effects in the start-up from noise in high-gain FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, S.J.; Kim, K.J.

    1995-12-31

    The spatio-temporal evolution of high-gain free electron lasers from noise is investigated by 1-D simulation calculation. To understand the discrepancy between the experimental result and theoretical prediction of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), the strong slippage effect in the short pulse electron beam and the coherent bunched beam effect are considered. When the length over which the electron density varies significantly is comparable or smaller than the FEL wavelength, the initial noise level would be increased due to the enhanced coherence between electrons. With a proper computer modeling of the start-up from noise including the energy spread, the overall performance and characteristics of SASE are studied. This work will be helpful to increase the credibility of the simulation calculation to predict the SASE performance in all wave-length regions.

  14. A design study for photon diagnostics for the APS storage ring short-pulse x-ray source.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B. X.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Landahl, E. C.; Dufresne, E. M.

    2008-01-01

    A short x-ray pulse source based on the crab cavity scheme proposed by Zholents is being developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Photon diagnostics that visualize the electron bunches with transverse momentum chirp and verify the performance of the short x-ray pulse are required. We present a design study for the imaging diagnostics inside and outside of the crab cavity zone, utilizing both x-ray and visible synchrotron radiation. The diagnostics outside of the crab cavity zone will be used to map out stable operation parameters of the storage ring with crab cavities and to perform single-bunch, single- pass imaging of the chirped bunch, which facilitates optimizing the performance of the short-pulse source without disturbing other users around the ring.

  15. Remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and sea state from satellites using short-pulse multicolor laser altimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Tsai, B. M.; Abshire, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Short pulse multicolor laser ranging systems are currently being developed for satellite ranging applications. These systems use Q-switched pulsed lasers and streak tube cameras to provide timing accuracies approaching a few picoseconds. Satellite laser ranging systems was used to evaluate many important geophysical phenomena such as fault motion, polar motion and solid earth tides, by measuring the orbital perturbations of retroreflector equipped satellites. Some existing operational systems provide range resolution approaching a few millimeters. There is currently considerable interest in adapting these highly accurate systems for use as airborne and satellite based altimeters. Potential applications include the measurement of sea state, ground topography and atmospheric pressure. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of multicolor laser altimeters for use in monitoring sea state and atmospheric pressure.

  16. Remote profiling of lake ice using an S-band short pulse radar aboard an all-terrain vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; Mueller, R. A.; Schertler, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    An airborne short-pulse radar system to measure ice thickness was designed. The system supported an effort to develop an all-weather Great Lakes Ice Information System to aid in extending the winter navigation season. Experimental studies into the accuracy and limitations of the system are described. A low power version was operated from an all-terrain vehicle on the Straits of Mackinac during March 1975. The vehicle allowed rapid surveying of large areas and eliminated the ambiguity in location between the radar system and the ground truth ice auger team. It was also possible to the effects of snow cover, surface melt water, pressure ridging, and ice type upon the accuracy of the system. Over 25 sites were explored which had ice thicknesses from 29 to 60 cm. The maximum radar overestimate was 9.8 percent, while the maximum underestimate was 6.6 percent. The average error of the 25 measurements was 0.1 percent.

  17. Self-consistent particle-in-cell modelling of short pulse absorption and transport for high energy density physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, M. G.; Arber, T. D.; Sircombe, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    In order for detailed, solid density particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to run within a reasonable time frame, novel approaches to modelling high density material must be employed. For the purposes of modelling high intensity, short pulse laser-plasma interactions, however, these approaches must be consistent with retaining a full PIC model in the low-density laser interaction region. By replacing the standard Maxwell field solver with an electric field update based on a simplified Ohm's law in regions of high electron density, it is possible to access densities at and above solid without being subject to the standard grid and time step constraints. Such a model has recently been implemented in the PIC code EPOCH. We present the initial results of a detailed two-dimensional simulation performed to compare the adapted version of the code with recent experimental results from the Orion laser facility.

  18. High performance compact magnetic spectrometers for energetic ion and electron measurement in ultra intense short pulse laser solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Link, A; van Maren, R; Patel, P; Shepherd, R; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-05-08

    Ultra intense short pulse lasers incident on solid targets can generate relativistic electrons that then accelerate energetic protons and ions. These fast electrons and ions can effectively heat the solid target, beyond the region of direct laser interaction, and are vital to realizing the fast ignition concept. To study these energetic ions and electrons produced from the laser-target interactions, we have developed a range of spectrometers that can cover a large energy range (from less than 0.1 MeV to above 100 MeV). They are physically compact and feature high performance and low cost. We will present the basic design of these spectrometers and their test results from recent laser experiments.

  19. An analysis of short pulse and dual frequency radar techniques for measuring ocean wave spectra from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning beam microwave radars were used to measure ocean wave directional spectra from satellites. In principle, surface wave spectral resolution in wave number can be obtained using either short pulse (SP) or dual frequency (DF) techniques; in either case, directional resolution obtains naturally as a consequence of a Bragg-like wave front matching. A four frequency moment characterization of backscatter from the near vertical using physical optics in the high frequency limit was applied to an analysis of the SP and DF measurement techniques. The intrinsic electromagnetic modulation spectrum was to the first order in wave steepness proportional to the large wave directional slope spectrum. Harmonic distortion was small and was a minimum near 10 deg incidence. NonGaussian wave statistics can have an effect comparable to that in the second order of scattering from a normally distributed sea surface. The SP technique is superior to the DF technique in terms of measurement signal to noise ratio and contrast ratio.

  20. Laser Processing of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics - Release of Carbon Fiber Segments During Short-pulsed Laser Processing of CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Juergen; Brodesser, Alexander; Hustedt, Michael; Bluemel, Sven; Jaeschke, Peter; Kaierle, Stefan

    Cutting and ablation using short-pulsed laser radiation are promising technologies to produce or repair CFRP components with outstanding mechanical properties e.g. for automotive and aircraft industry. Using sophisticated laser processing strategies and avoiding excessive heating of the workpiece, a high processing quality can be achieved. However, the interaction of laser radiation and composite material causes a notable release of hazardous substances from the process zone, amongst others carbon fiber segments or fibrous particles. In this work, amounts and geometries of the released fiber segments are analyzed and discussed in terms of their hazardous potential. Moreover, it is investigated to what extent gaseous organic process emissions are adsorbed at the fiber segments, similar to an adsorption of volatile organic compounds at activated carbon, which is typically used as filter material.

  1. Multi-soliton, multi-breather and higher order rogue wave solutions to the complex short pulse equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Liming; Feng, Bao-Feng; Zhu, Zuonong

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, we are concerned with the general analytic solutions to the complex short pulse (CSP) equation including soliton, breather and rogue wave solutions. With the aid of a generalized Darboux transformation, we construct the N-bright soliton solution in a compact determinant form, the N-breather solution including the Akhmediev breather and a general higher order rogue wave solution. The first and second order rogue wave solutions are given explicitly and analyzed. The asymptotic analysis is performed rigorously for both the N-soliton and the N-breather solutions. All three forms of the analytical solutions admit either smoothed-, cusped- or looped-type ones for the CSP equation depending on the parameters. It is noted that, due to the reciprocal (hodograph) transformation, the rogue wave solution to the CSP equation can be a smoothed, cusponed or a looped one, which is different from the rogue wave solution found so far.

  2. High-power Waveguide Dampers for the Short-Pulse X-Ray Project at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Waldschmidt, G J; Liu, J; Middendorf, M E; Nassiri, A; Smith, T L; Wu, G; Henry, J; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A; Wiseman, M

    2012-07-01

    High-power waveguide dampers have been designed and prototyped for the Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) cavities at the Advanced Photon Source. The cavities will operate at 2.815 GHz and utilize the TM110 dipole mode. As a result, higher-order (HOM) and lower-order mode (LOM) in-vacuum dampers have been designed to satisfy the demanding broadband damping requirements in the APS storage ring. The SPX single-cell cavity consists of two WR284 waveguides for damping the HOMs and one WR284 waveguide for primarily damping the LOM where up to 2kW will be dissipated in the damping material. The damper designs and high-power experimental results will be discussed in this paper.

  3. Investigating short-pulse shock initiation in HMX-based explosives with reactive meso-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, H. K.; Tarver, C. M.; Reaugh, J. E.; May, C. M.

    2014-05-01

    We performed reactive meso-scale simulations of short-pulse experiments to study the influence of flyer velocity and pore structure on shock initiation of LX-10 (95wt% HMX, 5wt% Viton A). Our calculations show that the reaction evolution fit a power law relationship in time and increases with increasing porosity, decreasing pore size, and increasing flyer velocity. While heterogeneous shock initiation modes, dependent on hot spot mechanisms, are predicted at lower flyer velocities, mixed heterogeneous-homogeneous shock initiation modes, less dependent on hot spots, are predicted at higher velocities. These studies are important because they enable the development of predictive shock initiation models that incorporate complex microstructure and can be used to optimize performance-safety characteristics of explosives.

  4. A rapidly-tuned, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate CO{sub 2} laser for IR dial

    SciTech Connect

    Zaugg, T.; Thompson, D.; Leland, W.T.; Busch, G.

    1997-08-01

    Analysis of noise sources in Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) in the infrared region of the spectrum indicates that the signal-to-noise ratio for direct detection can be improved if multiple-wavelength, short-pulse-length beams are transmitted and received at high repetition rates. Atmospheric effects can be minimized, albedo can be rapidly scanned, and uncorrelated speckle can be acquired at the maximum possible rate. A compact, rugged, RF-excited waveguide laser can produce 15 nanosecond pulses at a 100 kHz rate with sufficient energy per pulse to reach the speckle limit of the signal-to-noise ratio. A high-repetition-rate laser has been procured and will be used to verify these signal and noise scaling relationships at high repetition rates. Current line-tuning devices are mechanical and are capable of switching lines at a rate up to a few hundred Hertz. Acousto-optic modulators, deflectors or tunable filters can be substituted for these mechanical devices in the resonator of a CO{sub 2} laser and used to rapidly line-tune the laser across the 9 and 10 micron bands at a rate as high as 100 kHz. Several configurations for line tuning using acousto-optic and electro-optic devices with and without gratings are presented. The merits of and constraints on each design are also discussed. A pair of large aperture, acousto-optic deflectors has been purchased and the various line-tuning designs will be evaluated in a conventional, glass tube, CO{sub 2} laser, with a view to incorporation into the high-repetition-rate, waveguide laser. A computer model of the dynamics of an RF-excited, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate waveguide laser has been developed. The model will be used to test the consequences of various line-tuning designs.

  5. Field and photo-emission in a short-pulse, high-charge Cesium telluride RF photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, Eric E.

    A new high-charge RF gun is now operating at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The 1.5 cell 1.3 GHz gun uses a Cesium telluride photocathode driven with a 248 nm laser to provide short-pulse, high charge electron beams for the new 75 MeV drive beamline. The high-gradient RF gun (peak field on the cathode > 80MV/m) is a key piece of the facility upgrade. The large Cs2Te photocathode (diameter > 30 mm) was fabricated in-house. The photo-injector will be used to generate high-charge, short pulse, single bunches (Q > 100 nC) and bunch-trains (Q > 1000 nC) for wakefield experiments, typically involving dielectric-loaded accelerating structures. Details of the photocathode fabrication process and the results of associated diagnostic measurements are presented, including QE measurements and work function measurements performed with a Kelvin probe. Fieldemitted dark current from the Cs2Te cathode was measured during RF conditioning and characterized. Fowler-Nordheim plots of the data are presented and compared to similar measurements made using a copper cathode in the initial phase of conditioning. The results for cesium telluride exhibited non-linear regions within the Fowler-Nordheim plots similar to previous experimental results for other p-type semiconductors. Results of quantum efficiency (QE) studies are presented with the cathode operating in both single and bunch-train modes. QE uniformity and lifetime studies are presented. During commissioning, the cesium telluride photocathode produced bunch-charge of 100 nC, breaking the previous record. No evidence of bunch-train position-dependence of QE was found when generating four-bunch trains with total charge up to 200 nC.

  6. Drivetrain load effects in a 5-MW bottom-fixed wind turbine under blade-pitch fault condition and emergency shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasekhi Nejad, Amir; Jiang, Zhiyu; Gao, Zhen; Moan, Torgeir

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the effect of the blade-pitch fault and emergency shutdown on drivetrain responses in a 5-MW bottom-fixed wind turbine are investigated. A 5-MW reference gearbox with 4-point support is employed and the decoupled analysis approach is used for the load effect analysis. The effect of this fault event is then investigated for all bearings and gears inside the gearbox as well as main bearings. The results show that the blade-pitch fault creates significant axial forces on main bearings which increases the nontorque force entering the gearbox. Due to the emergency shutdown, the rotor torque reversal occurs which causes force reversals in gears. The main bearings are more affected than gears and bearings inside the gearbox in this fault condition and emergency shutdown, but first-stage bearings may also be considerably affected. It is therefore recommended to conduct a thorough inspection of main bearings and first stage bearings in case of such blade-pitch fault condition and emergency shutdown.

  7. Pulse compression below 40fs at 1μm: The first step towards a short-pulse, high-energy beam line at LULI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Zou, Jiping; Martin, Luc; Simon, Francois; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Audebert, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    We present the upgrading project ELFIE (Equipement Laser de Forte Intensité et Energie) based on the "100TW" mixed Nd:glass CPA laser system at 1μm at LULI, which includes an energy enhancement and the development of a short-pulse, high-energy, good temporal contrast beam line (50fs/5J). We report the first experimental step towards the short-pulse, high-energy beam line: spectral broadening above 60nm from 7nm and temporal pulse compression below 40fs from 300fs at 1μm through a Krypton-filled hollow fiber compressor.

  8. Numerical Analysis of NREL 5MW Wind Turbine: A Study Towards a Better Understanding of Wake Characteristic and Torque Generation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman Siddiqui, M.; Rasheed, Adil; Tabib, Mandar; Kvamsdal, Trond

    2016-09-01

    With the increased feasibility of harvesting offshore wind energy, scale of wind turbines is growing rapidly and there is a trend towards clustering together higher number of turbines in order to harvest maximum yield and to leave a smaller footprint on the environment. This causes complex flow configurations inside the farms, the study of which is essential to making offshore wind energy a success. The present study focuses on NREL 5MW wind turbine with the following objectives (a)To compare Sliding Mesh Interface and Multiple Reference Frame modeling approaches and their predictive capabilities in reproducing the characteristics of flow around the full scale wind turbine. (b)To get a better insight into wake dynamics behind the turbine in near and far wake regions operating under different tip-speed-ratio and incoming turbulence intensities.

  9. SiO2-glass drilling by short-pulse CO2 laser with controllable pulse-tail energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Miyu; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2016-03-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse with the almost same spike-pulse energy of about 0.8 mJ and the controllable pulse-tail energy of 6.33-23.08 mJ. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance and a spark-gap switch. The dependence of SiO2 glass drilling on the fluence and the number was investigated by four types of short-pulse CO2 lasers. In this work, the effective short laser pulse with the spike pulse energy of 0.8 mJ for SiO2 glass drilling was the laser pulse with the pulse tail energy of 19.88 mJ, and produces the drilling depth per the fluence of 124 μm/J/cm2.

  10. Production of neutrons up to 18 MeV in high-intensity, short-pulse laser matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D. P.; McNaney, J. M.; Swift, D. C.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J.; Frenje, J. A.; Jarrott, L. C.; Tynan, G.; Beg, F. N.; Kodama, R.; Nakamura, H.; Lancaster, K. L.

    2011-10-15

    The generation of high-energy neutrons using laser-accelerated ions is demonstrated experimentally using the Titan laser with 360 J of laser energy in a 9 ps pulse. In this technique, a short-pulse, high-energy laser accelerates deuterons from a CD{sub 2} foil. These are incident on a LiF foil and subsequently create high energy neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(d,xn) nuclear reaction (Q = 15 MeV). Radiochromic film and a Thomson parabola ion-spectrometer were used to diagnose the laser accelerated deuterons and protons. Conversion efficiency into protons was 0.5%, an order of magnitude greater than into deuterons. Maximum neutron energy was shown to be angularly dependent with up to 18 MeV neutrons observed in the forward direction using neutron time-of-flight spectrometry. Absolutely calibrated CR-39 detected spectrally integrated neutron fluence of up to 8 x 10{sup 8} n sr{sup -1} in the forward direction.

  11. Transition from interpulse to afterglow plasmas driven by repetitive short-pulse microwaves in a multicusp magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Shail; Sahu, Debaprasad; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2012-08-15

    In the power-off phase, plasmas generated by repetitive short-pulse microwaves in a multicusp magnetic field show a transitive nature from interpulse to afterglow as a function of pulse duration t{sub w} = 20-200 {mu}s. The ionized medium can be driven from a highly non equilibrium to an equilibrium state inside the pulses, thereby dictating the behavior of the plasma in the power-off phase. Compared to afterglows, interpulse plasmas observed for t{sub w} < 50 {mu}s are characterized by a quasi-steady-state in electron density that persists for {approx} 20-40 {mu}s even after the end of the pulse and has a relatively slower decay rate ({approx} 4.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}) of the electron temperature, as corroborated by optical measurements. The associated electron energy probability function indicates depletion in low energy electrons which appear at higher energies just after the end of the pulse. The transition occurs at t{sub w} {approx} 50 {mu}s as confirmed by time evolution of integrated electron numbers densities obtained from the distribution function.

  12. Investigation of stimulated raman scattering using short-pulse diffraction limited laser beam near the instability threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, John L; Montgomery, David S; Flippo, Kirk A; Rose, Harvey A; Yin, L; Albright, B J; Johnson, R P; Shimada, T; Bowers, K; Rousseaux, C; Tassin, V; Baton, S D; Amiranoff, F; Hardin, R A

    2008-01-01

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and> 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using particle-in-cell codes to validate our understanding quantitatively. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser facility and the LULI (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses) to investigate stimulated Raman scattering near the threshold of the instability using 527 nm and 1059 nm laser light respectively with 1.5-3.0 ps pulses. In both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gas-jet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k{lambda}{sub D} were completed at the Trident laser facility. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Work is currently underway comparing the results of the experiments with simulations using the VPIC [K. J. Bowers, et at., Phys. Plasmas, 15 055703 (2008)] particle-in-cell code. Details of the experimental results are presented in this manuscript.

  13. Improving Switching Performance of Power MOSFETs Used in High Rep-Rate, Short Pulse, High-Power Pulsers

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, E G

    2006-09-19

    As their switching and power handling characteristics improve, solid-state devices are finding new applications in pulsed power. This is particularly true of applications that require fast trains of short duration pulses. High voltage (600-1200V) MOSFETs are especially well suited for use in these systems, as they can switch at significant peak power levels and are easily gated on and off very quickly. MOSFET operation at the shortest pulse durations is not constrained by the intrinsic capabilities of the MOSFET, but rather by the capabilities of the gate drive circuit and the system physical layout. This project sought to improve MOSFET operation in a pulsed power context by addressing these issues. The primary goal of this project is to improve the switching performance of power MOSFETs for use in high rep-rate, short pulse, high-power applications by improving the design of the gate drive circuits and the circuit layouts used in these systems. This requires evaluation of new commercial gate drive circuits and upgrading the designs of LLNL-developed circuits. In addition, these circuits must be tested with the fastest available high-voltage power MOSFETs.

  14. Numerical simulation of high-power virtual-cathode reflex triode driven by repetitive short pulse electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Yovchev, I.G.; Spassovsky, I.P.; Nikolov, N.A.; Dimitrov, D.P.; Messina, G.; Raimondi, P.; Barroso, J.J.; Correa, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    A virtual-cathode reflex triode is investigated by numerical simulations. A trapezoidal in shape voltage pulse with an amplitude of 300 kV is applied to the solid cathode of the device to drive the cathode negative. The electron beam-to-microwave power conversion efficiency {epsilon}, calculated for the pulse flat top with a duration {tau}{sub ft} = 1.2 ns is approximately the same (about 1.5--2%) as well as for a long flat top ({tau}{sub ft} = 4 ns). The simulations show a 10--15% increase of {epsilon} at {tau}{sub ft} shortening to 0.6 ns. However, this occurs when the anode mesh transparency is high (80--90%). Considerable enhancement of the efficiency (about four times) for {tau}{sub ft} = 0.6 ns has been calculated if the cathode side surface is brought near to the anode tube (from {approx}0.5% at cathode radius R{sub c} = 1.6 cm to {approx}2% at R{sub c} = 3.8 cm). The obtained results would find an application for the design of virtual-cathode reflex triode devices driven by a short pulse and high repetition rate electron gun.

  15. FY05 LDRD Final ReportTime-Resolved Dynamic Studies using Short Pulse X-Ray Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Budil, K; Sadigh, B; Gilmer, G; Falcone, R; Lee, R; Ng, A

    2006-02-10

    Established techniques must be extended down to the ps and sub-ps time domain to directly probe product states of materials under extreme conditions. We used short pulse ({le} 1 ps) x-ray radiation to track changes in the physical properties in tandem with measurements of the atomic and electronic structure of materials undergoing fast laser excitation and shock-related phenomena. The sources included those already available at LLNL, including the picosecond X-ray laser as well as the ALS Femtosecond Phenomena beamline and the SSRL based sub-picosecond photon source (SPPS). These allow the temporal resolution to be improved by 2 orders of magnitude over the current state-of-the-art, which is {approx} 100 ps. Thus, we observed the manifestations of dynamical processes with unprecedented time resolution. Time-resolved x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and x-ray scattering were used to study phase changes in materials with sub-picosecond time resolution. These experiments coupled to multiscale modeling allow us to explore the physics of materials in high laser fields and extreme non-equilibrium states of matter. The ability to characterize the physical and electronic structure of materials under extreme conditions together with state-of-the-art models and computational facilities will catapult LLNL's core competencies into the scientific world arena as well as support its missions of national security and stockpile stewardship.

  16. Investigation of Stimulated Raman Scattering Using Short-Pulse Diffraction Limited Laser Beam near the Instability Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Yin, L.; Flippo, K. A.; Albright, B. J.; Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Rose, H. A.; Rousseaux, C.; Tassin, V.; Baton, S. D.; Amiranoff, F.; Hardin, R. A.

    2008-11-01

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman (SRS) and Stimulated Brillouin (SBS) Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and > 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using PIC codes to validate our understanding. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser and the LULI to investigate SRS near the threshold of the instability using 527 and 1064 nm laser light respectively with 1.5 -- 3 ps pulses. In the case of both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gasjet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k?D were completed at the Trident laser. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Details of the experimental results will be presented.

  17. Direct laser acceleration of electron by an ultra intense and short-pulsed laser in under-dense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. Y.; Gu, Y. J.; Zhu, Z.; Li, X. F.; Ban, H. Y.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2011-05-15

    Direct laser acceleration (DLA) of electron by an ultra intense and short-pulsed laser interacting with under-dense plasma is investigated based on 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. A high-density electron beam is generated by the laser longitudinal ponderomotive force. Although the total number of DLA electrons is significantly smaller than the number of electrons trapped in the bubble, the total charge of high-energy DLA electrons (E>800MeV) reaches 67 pC/{mu}m. It is found that the electron beam occurs in a two-stage acceleration, i.e., accelerated in vacuum by the laser directly soon after a DLA process in plasma. The beam is accelerated violently with effective acceleration gradient in 100 GeV/cm. The energy spectrum of electrons presents a Maxwellian distribution with the highest energy of about 3.1 GeV. The dependence of maximum electron energy and electric quantity with laser intensity, laser width, pulse duration, and initial plasma density are also studied.

  18. Coaxial short pulsed laser

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

    1975-08-01

    This invention relates to a laser system of rugged design suitable for use in a field environment. The laser itself is of coaxial design with a solid potting material filling the space between components. A reservoir is employed to provide a gas lasing medium between an electrode pair, each of which is connected to one of the coaxial conductors. (auth)

  19. Study of energy partitioning in mass limited targets using the 50 TW Leopard short-pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Brandon; Sawada, Hiroshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Yabuuchi, Toshinori; Chen, Hui; Park, J.-B.; McClean, Harry; Patel, Prav; Beg, Farhat

    2014-10-01

    Mass limited Cu targets were used to study the energy distribution in the interaction of an ultra-intense, short-pulse laser by measuring characteristic x-rays and energetic particles. At the Nevada Terawatt Facility, Leopard delivered 15 J to an 8 μm spot size in a 350 fs pulse, achieving a peak intensity of 1019 W/cm2 at 20° incidence. The 2 μm thick Cu foil targets varied in size from 1 mm2 to 75 μm by 60 μm. A spherical crystal imager and a Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer were used to measure 8.05 keV monochromatic x-ray images and 7.5-9.5 keV x-rays respectively. A magnet-based electron spectrometer in the rear monitored escaping electrons. Results show a decrease in the absolute yield of both escaped electrons and Cu K-shell x-rays as targets sizes are reduced, while He α emission remains nearly constant. In the smallest target, a bulk temperature of about 150 eV was inferred from the ratio of K β to K α. The interaction of the Leopard laser with the targets was simulated with 2-D implicit Particle-in-cell code PICLS. Comparisons of the simulation and experiment will be presented. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science under Fusion Science Center, and the National Nuclear Security Administration under cooperative agreements DE-FC52-06NA27616 and DE-NA0002075. T.Y. was supported by Japan/U.S. Cooperation.

  20. A note on ultra-short pulses compression in silicon optical waveguides under fourth-order dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeng Mandeng, L.; Fewo Ibraid, S.; Tchawoua, C.; Kofané, T. C.

    2014-08-01

    We present an overview of the pulse compression phenomenon obtained during the propagation of ultra-short pulses in common used optical waveguides. In the case of the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides, using the modified and realistic variational approach (MVA) that involves the Rayleigh's dissipation function (RDF), we conduct the analysis of the compression mechanism on different input profiles. This study allows to show the effects of fourth-order dispersion (FOD), the nonlinear coefficients of absorption (nonlinear absorption) and the chirp, not only on symmetric and compact pulses but also on those with asymmetric profile as the Airy pulses. Indeed, considering the case of linear compression, the conditions of their occurrence are obtained. A relation between the FOD, the group-velocity dispersion (GVD) and the chirp is proposed in this way. In the nonlinear case, using the symmetric profiles as input pulses, we demonstrate a periodic compression induced by the interplay between the self-phase modulation (SPM) and the FOD. This appears as a new mode to generate the pulse compression phenomenon. Then, we show that when large values of the initial chirp and absorption coefficients as the two-photon absorption (TPA) present in these waveguides are considered, the compression mechanism is completely destroyed with at least the observation of one pulse amplification over a short distance of propagation before the pulse broadening. Finally, the study relating to the Airy pulses, leads rather to the reduction of the compression length induced by the SPM, the TPA and the free-carrier absorption (FCA) showing the pulse asymmetry influence.

  1. Precise ablation of dental hard tissues with ultra-short pulsed lasers. Preliminary exploratory investigation on adequate laser parameters.

    PubMed

    Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Wehner, Martin; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Lampert, Friedrich; Poprawe, Reinhart; Hermans, Martin; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of introducing ultra-short pulsed lasers (USPL) in restorative dentistry by maintaining the well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also overcoming disadvantages, such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. USPL ablation of dental hard tissues was investigated in two phases. Phase 1--different wavelengths (355, 532, 1,045, and 1,064 nm), pulse durations (picoseconds and femtoseconds) and irradiation parameters (scanning speed, output power, and pulse repetition rate) were assessed for enamel and dentin. Ablation rate was determined, and the temperature increase measured in real time. Phase 2--the most favorable laser parameters were evaluated to correlate temperature increase to ablation rate and ablation efficiency. The influence of cooling methods (air, air-water spray) on ablation process was further analyzed. All parameters tested provided precise and selective tissue ablation. For all lasers, faster scanning speeds resulted in better interaction and reduced temperature increase. The most adequate results were observed for the 1064-nm ps-laser and the 1045-nm fs-laser. Forced cooling caused moderate changes in temperature increase, but reduced ablation, being considered unnecessary during irradiation with USPL. For dentin, the correlation between temperature increase and ablation efficiency was satisfactory for both pulse durations, while for enamel, the best correlation was observed for fs-laser, independently of the power used. USPL may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, since effective ablation and low temperature increase were observed. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this technique seems to be promising for promoting the laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach.

  2. Analysis of the short-pulsed CO2 laser ablation process for optimizing the processing performance for cutting bony tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrwald, Markus; Burgner, Jessica; Platzek, Christoph; Feldmann, Claus; Raczkowsky, Jörg; Wörn, Heinz

    2010-02-01

    Recently we established an experimental setup for robot-assisted laser bone ablation using short-pulsed CO2 laser. Due to the comparable low processing speed of laser bone ablation the application in surgical interventions is not yet feasible. In order to optimize this ablation process, we conducted a series of experiments to derive parameters for a discrete process model. After applying single and multiple laser pulses with varying intensity onto bone, the resulting craters were measured using a confocal microscope in 3D. The resulting ablation volumes were evaluated by applying Gaussian function fitting. We then derived a logarithmic function for the depth prediction of laser ablation on bone. In order to increase the ablation performance we conducted experiments using alternate fluids replacing the water spray: pure glycerin, glycerin/water mixture, acids and bases. Because of the higher boiling point of glycerin compared to water we had expected deeper craters through the resulting higher temperatures. Experimental results showed that glycerin or a glycerin/water mix do not have any effect on the depth of the ablation craters. Additionally applying the acid or base on to the ablation site does only show minor benefits compared to water. Furthermore we preheated the chemicals with a low energy pulse prior to the ablation pulse, which also showed no effect. However, applying a longer soaking time of the chemicals induced nearly a doubling of the ablation depth in some cases. Furthermore with this longer soaking time, carbonization at the crater margins does not occur as is observed when using conventionally water spray.

  3. Fiber Bragg grating temperature sensors in a 6.5-MW generator exciter bridge and the development and simulation of its thermal model.

    PubMed

    de Morais Sousa, Kleiton; Probst, Werner; Bortolotti, Fernando; Martelli, Cicero; da Silva, Jean Carlos Cardozo

    2014-09-05

    This work reports the thermal modeling and characterization of a thyristor. The thyristor is used in a 6.5-MW generator excitation bridge. Temperature measurements are performed using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. These sensors have the benefits of being totally passive and immune to electromagnetic interference and also multiplexed in a single fiber. The thyristor thermal model consists of a second order equivalent electric circuit, and its power losses lead to an increase in temperature, while the losses are calculated on the basis of the excitation current in the generator. Six multiplexed FBGs are used to measure temperature and are embedded to avoid the effect of the strain sensitivity. The presented results show a relationship between field current and temperature oscillation and prove that this current can be used to determine the thermal model of a thyristor. The thermal model simulation presents an error of 1.5 °C, while the FBG used allows for the determination of the thermal behavior and the field current dependence. Since the temperature is a function of the field current, the corresponding simulation can be used to estimate the temperature in the thyristors.

  4. Fiber Bragg Grating Temperature Sensors in a 6.5-MW Generator Exciter Bridge and the Development and Simulation of Its Thermal Model

    PubMed Central

    de Morais Sousa, Kleiton; Probst, Werner; Bortolotti, Fernando; Martelli, Cicero; da Silva, Jean Carlos Cardozo

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the thermal modeling and characterization of a thyristor. The thyristor is used in a 6.5-MW generator excitation bridge. Temperature measurements are performed using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. These sensors have the benefits of being totally passive and immune to electromagnetic interference and also multiplexed in a single fiber. The thyristor thermal model consists of a second order equivalent electric circuit, and its power losses lead to an increase in temperature, while the losses are calculated on the basis of the excitation current in the generator. Six multiplexed FBGs are used to measure temperature and are embedded to avoid the effect of the strain sensitivity. The presented results show a relationship between field current and temperature oscillation and prove that this current can be used to determine the thermal model of a thyristor. The thermal model simulation presents an error of 1.5 °C, while the FBG used allows for the determination of the thermal behavior and the field current dependence. Since the temperature is a function of the field current, the corresponding simulation can be used to estimate the temperature in the thyristors. PMID:25198007

  5. Enhancing caries resistance with a short-pulsed CO2 9.3-μm laser: a laboratory study (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Rechmann, Beate M.; Groves, William H.; Le, Charles; Rapozo-Hilo, Marcia L.; Featherstone, John D. B.

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this laboratory study was to test whether irradiation with a new 9.3µm microsecond short-pulsed CO2-laser enhances enamel caries resistance with and without additional fluoride applications. 101 human enamel samples were divided into 7 groups. Each group was treated with different laser parameters (Carbon-dioxide laser, wavelength 9.3µm, 43Hz pulse-repetition rate, pulse duration between 3μs to 7μs (1.5mJ/pulse to 2.9mJ/pulse). Using a pH-cycling model and cross-sectional microhardness testing determined the mean relative mineral loss delta Z (∆Z) for each group. The pH-cycling was performed with or without additional fluoride. The CO2 9.3μm short-pulsed laser energy rendered enamel caries resistant with and without additional fluoride use.

  6. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Abdou, Ashraf A; West, David L; Shea, Thomas J; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Farny, Dr. Caleb H.; Kaminsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  7. Study and development of 22 kW peak power fiber coupled short pulse Nd:YAG laser for cleaning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Ambar; Vishwakarma, S. C.; Vachhani, D. M.; Singh, Ravindra; Misra, Pushkar; Jain, R. K.; Arya, R.; Upadhyaya, B. N.; Oak, S. M.

    2014-11-01

    Free running short pulse Nd:YAG laser of microsecond pulse duration and high peak power has a unique capability to ablate material from the surface without heat propagation into the bulk. Applications of short pulse Nd:YAG lasers include cleaning and restoration of marble, stones, and a variety of metals for conservation. A study on the development of high peak power short pulses from Nd:YAG laser along with its cleaning and conservation applications has been performed. A pulse energy of 1.25 J with 55 μs pulse duration and a maximum peak power of 22 kW has been achieved. Laser beam has an M2 value of ~28 and a pulse-to-pulse stability of ±2.5%. A lower value of M2 means a better beam quality of the laser in multimode operation. A top hat spatial profile of the laser beam was achieved at the exit end of 200 μm core diameter optical fiber, which is desirable for uniform cleaning. This laser system has been evaluated for efficient cleaning of surface contaminations on marble, zircaloy, and inconel materials for conservation with cleaning efficiency as high as 98%. Laser's cleaning quality and efficiency have been analysed by using a microscope, a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) measurements.

  8. Mechanisms and kinetics of short pulse laser-induced destruction of silver-containing nanoparticles in multicomponent silicate photo-thermo-refractive glass.

    PubMed

    Lumeau, Julien; Glebov, Leonid B

    2014-11-01

    Photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass is a photosensitive multi-component silicate glass that is commercially used for the recording of volume holographic elements and finds many applications in advanced laser systems. Refractive index decrement in this glass is observed after UV exposure followed by thermal development. This procedure also causes the appearance of Ag-containing particles that can then be optically bleached by using the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. Despite the broad usage of this method, its mechanisms are still unclear. In this paper, a systematic study of the short pulse laser-induced destruction of Ag-containing particles' kinetics versus incident energy per pulse and dosage is presented. We show that no bleaching of Ag-containing particles occurs for an energy density in laser pulses below 0.1  J/cm2 while above 1  J/cm2, the efficiency of bleaching saturates. Efficiency of bleaching depends on the type of particles to be bleached (Ag, AgBr…). Using a simple model of short pulse laser interaction with nanoparticles embedded in glass, the temperature of the Ag-containing particles reached during the laser interaction is shown to be large enough to produce complete dissipation of these particles which is expected to be the main mechanism of short pulse laser-induced destruction of Ag-containing particles.

  9. Directional spectra of ocean waves from microwave backscatter: A physical optics solution with application to the short-pulse and two-frequency measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    Two simple microwave radar techniques that are potentially capable of providing routine satellite measurements of the directional spectrum of ocean waves were developed. One technique, the short pulse technique, makes use of very short pulses to resolve ocean surface wave contrast features in the range direction; the other technique, the two frequency correlation technique makes use of coherency in the transmitted waveform to detect the large ocean wave contrast modulation as a beat or mixing frequency in the power backscattered at two closely separated microwave frequencies. A frequency domain analysis of the short pulse and two frequency systems shows that the two measurement systems are essentially duals; they each operate on the generalized (three frequency) fourth-order statistical moment of the surface transfer function in different, but symmetrical ways, and they both measure the same directional contrast modulation spectrum. A three dimensional physical optics solution for the fourth-order moment was obtained for backscatter in the near vertical, specular regime, assuming Gaussian surface statistics.

  10. A treatise on the interaction of molecular systems with short-pulsed highly-intense external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Amit K.; Adhikari, Satrajit; Baer, Michael

    2010-11-01

    In this review, we consider two gauges: one, the field-free gauge, is formed by the field-free electronic eigenstates and the other, the field-dressed gauge, is formed by the field-dressed electronic basis set. The field-free gauge is used, of course, in the case of time-independent systems but then it is also the more common one to be used in the case of molecular systems exposed to external fields. This gauge is conceptually simple and therefore numerically friendly - two features which make it versatile for numerical application. The field-dressed gauge is, eventually, more involved but yields deeper insight which might lead to a better understanding of the complicated interaction between a molecular system and external fields. In addition, these features can be exploited to develop efficient and reliable approximations that may save CPU (computer processing unit) time in numerical applications. These two gauges are the main topics of the present review. Once the general derivation of the two gauges is completed, two additional issues are discussed: (i) we extend these gauges to include external fields formed by non-classical photon-state distributions (also known as non-coherent Fock-state distributions). These photon state distributions, recently considered for the first time for molecular systems [A.K. Paul, S. Adhikari, M. Baer, R. Baer, Phys. Rev. A 81 (2010) 013412], are interesting on their own footing. Although here they mainly serve as a vehicle to test the above-mentioned novel approximations, we also devote part of the review to studying the importance of non-coherent Fock states for obtaining an unbiased correct understanding of the interaction of molecular systems with strong, short-pulsed laser fields. For this purpose, we study the photo-dissociation process of H2+ and show (a) that the approximations, recently introduced, diminish the CPU time by about one order of magnitude with minimal loss of accuracy and (b) indeed non-coherent Fock states

  11. Experimental Characterization of a Grid-Loss Event on a 2.5-MW Dynamometer Using Advanced Operational Modal Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Helsen, J.; Weijtjens, W.; Guo, Y.; Keller, J.; McNiff, B.; Devriendt, C.; Guillaume, P.

    2015-02-01

    This paper experimentally investigates a worst case grid loss event conducted on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) drivetrain mounted on the 2.5MW NREL dynamic nacelle test-rig. The GRC drivetrain has a directly grid-coupled, fixed speed asynchronous generator. The main goal is the assessment of the dynamic content driving this particular assess the dynamic content of the high-speed stage of the GRC gearbox. In addition to external accelerometers, high frequency sampled measurements of strain gauges were used to assess torque fluctuations and bending moments both at the nacelle main shaft and gearbox high-speed shaft (HSS) through the entire duration of the event. Modal analysis was conducted using a polyreference Least Squares Complex Frequency-domain (pLSCF) modal identification estimator. The event driving the torsional resonance was identified. Moreover, the pLSCF estimator identified main drivetrain resonances based on a combination of acceleration and strain measurements. Without external action during the grid-loss event, a mode shape characterized by counter phase rotation of the rotor and generator rotor determined by the drivetrain flexibility and rotor inertias was the main driver of the event. This behavior resulted in significant torque oscillations with large amplitude negative torque periods. Based on tooth strain measurements of the HSS pinion, this work showed that at each zero-crossing, the teeth lost contact and came into contact with the backside flank. In addition, dynamic nontorque loads between the gearbox and generator at the HSS played an important role, as indicated by strain gauge-measurements.

  12. Observations of Regular Filamentary Plasma Arrays in High-Pressure Gas Breakdown by 1.5 MW, 110 GHz Gyrotron Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidaka, Yoshiteru

    2008-11-01

    Formation of regular two-dimensional plasma filamentary arrays has been observed in long open-shuttered images of air breakdown at atmospheric pressure [Y. Hidaka et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 035003 (2008)]. The breakdown was generated by a focused linearly-polarized Gaussian beam from a 1.5-MW, 110-GHz gyrotron with a 3-microsecond pulse length. Each plasma filament is elongated in the electric field direction and separated roughly one-quarter wavelength from each other in the H-plane. The development of this array structure can be explained as a result of diffraction of the beam around the highly conductive filaments. The diffraction generates a new electric field profile in which a high intensity region emerges about a quarter wavelength upstream from an existing filament. A new plasma filament is likely to appear at the intensified spot. The same process continues and results in the formation of the observed array. Electromagnetic wave simulations that model plasma filaments as metallic posts agree quite well with the hypothesis above. With a nanoseconds-gated ICCD camera, we directly confirmed that only a few rows of the observed array are bright at any one moment, as well as that the light emitting region propagates towards the microwave source. Further experimental breakdown research has been carried out with nitrogen, helium, and SF6 at different pressures. Although each species exhibits qualitatively different structures, in general, a lumpy plasma at high pressures transforms into a more familiar, diffuse plasma as pressure is decreased. The propagation velocity of the ionization front has been also estimated both from the ICCD images and a photodiode array. The velocity is on the order of 10 km/s, and increases as the pressure decreases and the power density increases.

  13. Fast-ion radial diffusivity evaluated from vertical neutral particle measurements following short pulse beam injection into a TFTR ohmic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kusama, Y. . Naka Fusion Research Establishment); Heidbrink, W.W. ); Barnes, C.W. ); Beer, M.; Hammett, G.W.; McCune, D.C.; Medley, S.S.; Scott, S.D.; Zarnstorff, M.C. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    The radial diffusivity of fast ions was evaluated from vertical neutral particle measurements in experiments where a short pulse of neutral deuterium beams was injected into a TFTR ohmic deuterium plasma. A comparison between the temporal evolution of the measured neutral particle flux and theoretical calculations showed that the spatially-averaged diffusion coefficient of fast ions is {le} 0.1 m{sup 2}/sec. This value is approximately an order of magnitude less than the diffusion coefficient for thermal ions and is consistent with results obtained previously on TFTR from other diagnostics.

  14. Optical design of the short pulse x-ray imaging and microscopy time-angle correlated diffraction beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, R.; Dufresne, E. M.; Borland, M.; Beno, M. A.; Young, L.; Kim, K.-J.; Evans, P. G.

    2013-05-15

    The short pulse x-ray imaging and microscopy beamline is one of the two x-ray beamlines that will take full advantage of the short pulse x-ray source in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) upgrade. A horizontally diffracting double crystal monochromator which includes a sagittally focusing second crystal will collect most of the photons generated when the chirped electron beam traverses the undulator. A Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror system after the monochromator will deliver to the sample a beam which has an approximately linear correlation between time and vertical beam angle. The correlation at the sample position has a slope of 0.052 ps/{mu}rad extending over an angular range of 800 {mu}rad for a cavity deflection voltage of 2 MV. The expected time resolution of the whole system is 2.6 ps. The total flux expected at the sample position at 10 keV with a 0.9 eV energy resolution is 5.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} photons/s at a spot having horizontal and vertical full width at half maximum of 33 {mu}m horizontal by 14 {mu}m vertical. This new beamline will enable novel time-dispersed diffraction experiments on small samples using the full repetition rate of the APS.

  15. Dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in bilinear elastic-plastic media, and the implications to short-pulsed laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, E.-A.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by short laser pulses in water and elastic-plastic media were investigated theoretically in order to get a better understanding of their role in short-pulsed laser surgery. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which include the elastic-plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble, compressibility, viscosity, density and surface tension. Breakdown in water produces a monopolar acoustic signal characterized by a compressive wave. Breakdown in an elastic-plastic medium produces a bipolar acoustic signal, with a leading positive compression wave and a trailing negative tensile wave. The calculations revealed that consideration of the tissue elasticity is essential to describe the bipolar shape of the shock wave emitted during optical breakdown. The elastic-plastic response of the medium surrounding the bubble leads to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and pressure amplitude of the shock wave emitted during bubble collapse, and shortening of the oscillation period of the bubble. The results are discussed with respect to collateral damage in short-pulsed laser surgery.

  16. Design of the 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz ultra-wideband 3 dB high power hybrid coupler for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating in fusion grade reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Rana Pratap; Kumar, Sunil; Kulkarni, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Design and developmental procedure of strip-line based 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz, ultra-wideband high power 3 dB hybrid coupler has been presented and its applicability in ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in tokamak is discussed. For the high power handling capability, spacing between conductors and ground need to very high. Hence other structural parameters like strip-width, strip thickness coupling gap, and junction also become large which can be gone upto optimum limit where various constrains like fabrication tolerance, discontinuities, and excitation of higher TE and TM modes become prominent and significantly deteriorates the desired parameters of the coupled lines system. In designed hybrid coupler, two 8.34 dB coupled lines are connected in tandem to get desired coupling of 3 dB and air is used as dielectric. The spacing between ground and conductors are taken as 0.164 m for 1.5 MW power handling capability. To have the desired spacing, each of 8.34 dB segments are designed with inner dimension of 3.6 × 1.0 × 40 cm where constraints have been significantly realized, compensated, and applied in designing of 1.5 MW hybrid coupler and presented in paper.

  17. Design of the 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz ultra-wideband 3 dB high power hybrid coupler for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating in fusion grade reactor.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rana Pratap; Kumar, Sunil; Kulkarni, S V

    2016-01-01

    Design and developmental procedure of strip-line based 1.5 MW, 30-96 MHz, ultra-wideband high power 3 dB hybrid coupler has been presented and its applicability in ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in tokamak is discussed. For the high power handling capability, spacing between conductors and ground need to very high. Hence other structural parameters like strip-width, strip thickness coupling gap, and junction also become large which can be gone upto optimum limit where various constrains like fabrication tolerance, discontinuities, and excitation of higher TE and TM modes become prominent and significantly deteriorates the desired parameters of the coupled lines system. In designed hybrid coupler, two 8.34 dB coupled lines are connected in tandem to get desired coupling of 3 dB and air is used as dielectric. The spacing between ground and conductors are taken as 0.164 m for 1.5 MW power handling capability. To have the desired spacing, each of 8.34 dB segments are designed with inner dimension of 3.6 × 1.0 × 40 cm where constraints have been significantly realized, compensated, and applied in designing of 1.5 MW hybrid coupler and presented in paper.

  18. A short pulse (7 μs FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A.; Groen, Wilhelm A.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 μs have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 μm nozzle releases about 1016 particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4×1022 particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5×10-6 Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Δv /v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the cantilever

  19. A short pulse (7 {mu}s FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Ende, Daan A. van den; Groen, Wilhelm A.

    2009-11-15

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 {mu}s have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 {mu}m nozzle releases about 10{sup 16} particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10{sup 22} particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10{sup -6} Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow ({Delta}v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas

  20. A short pulse (7 micros FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5 kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A; Groen, Wilhelm A; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 micros have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 microm nozzle releases about 10(16) particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10(22) particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10(-6) Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Delta v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the

  1. Dynamics of a one-dimensional model and a three-dimensional hydrogen atom in an intense high-frequency short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X. ); Basile, S. di Fisica Teorica dell'Universita, Casello Postale 50, 98166 Sant'Agata di Messina, Messina, Italy )

    1991-08-01

    We present nonperturbative calculations of ionizing and trapping probabilities for a one-dimensional model and a three-dimensional hydrogen atom in an intense high-frequency Gaussian-pulsed laser field. Investigating the dynamics of the ionization process (for one- and two-photon ionization), we find that only for extremely short pulses, especially for hydrogen, does the system have a significant probability of surviving at the end of the pulse, leading to the phenomenon of atomic stabilization with respect to ionization. We also find that a one-dimensional model has a higher survival probability at the end of a Gaussian pulse, as compared to the three-dimensional hydrogen atom.

  2. Diode-pumped short pulse passively Q-switched 912 nm Nd:GdVO4/Cr:YAG laser at high repetition rate operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Yu, X.; Wang, C.; Yan, R. P.; Li, X. D.; Gao, J.; Zhang, Z. H.; Yu, J. H.

    2010-06-01

    A diode-end-pumped passively Q-switched 912 nm Nd:GdVO4/Cr:YAG laser is demonstrated for the first time. In a concave-piano cavity, pulsed 912 nm laser performance is investigated using two kinds of Cr:YAG crystal with different unsaturated transmission ( T U) of 95% and 90% at 912 nm as the saturable absorbers. When the T U = 90% Cr:YAG is used, as much as 2.6 W average output power for short pulsed 912 nm laser is achieved at an absorbed pump power of 34.0 W, corresponding to an optical efficiency of 7.6% and a slope efficiency of 20.3%. Moreover, 10.5 ns duration pulses and up to 2.3 kW peak power is obtained at the repetition rate around 81.6 kHz.

  3. Kinetic study on non-thermal volumetric plasma decay in the early afterglow of air discharge generated by a short pulse microwave or laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Zhou, Qianhong; Dong, Zhiwei

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports a kinetic study on non-thermal plasma decay in the early afterglow of air discharge generated by short pulse microwave or laser. A global self-consistent model is based on the particle balance of complex plasma chemistry, electron energy equation, and gas thermal balance equation. Electron-ion Coulomb collision is included in the steady state Boltzmann equation solver to accurately describe the electron mobility and other transport coefficients. The model is used to simulate the afterglow of microsecond to nanosecond pulse microwave discharge in N2, O2, and air, as well as femtosecond laser filament discharge in dry and humid air. The simulated results for electron density decay are in quantitative agreement with the available measured ones. The evolution of plasma decay under an external electric field is also investigated, and the effect of gas heating is considered. The underlying mechanism of plasma density decay is unveiled through the above kinetic modeling.

  4. Effect of pulse slippage on density transition-based resonant third-harmonic generation of short-pulse laser in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Vishal; Kant, Niti

    2016-08-01

    The resonant third-harmonic generation of a self-focusing laser in plasma with a density transition was investigated. Because of self-focusing of the fundamental laser pulse, a transverse intensity gradient was created, which generated a plasma wave at the fundamental wave frequency. Phase matching was satisfied by using a Wiggler magnetic field, which provided additional angular momentum to the third-harmonic photon to make the process resonant. An enhancement was observed in the resonant third-harmonic generation of an intense short-pulse laser in plasma embedded with a magnetic Wiggler with a density transition. A plasma density ramp played an important role in the self-focusing, enhancing the third-harmonic generation in plasma. We also examined the effect of the Wiggler magnetic field on the pulse slippage of the third-harmonic pulse in plasma. The pulse slippage was due to the group-velocity mismatch between the fundamental and third-harmonic pulses.

  5. Ultra-short pulse generation in the hybridly mode-locked erbium-doped all-fiber ring laser with a distributed polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, Alexander A.; Sazonkin, Stanislav G.; Lazarev, Vladimir A.; Dvoretskiy, Dmitriy A.; Leonov, Stanislav O.; Pnev, Alexey B.; Karasik, Valeriy E.; Grebenyukov, Vyacheslav V.; Pozharov, Anatoly S.; Obraztsova, Elena D.; Dianov, Evgeny M.

    2015-06-01

    We report for the first time to the best of our knowledge on the ultra-short pulse (USP) generation in the dispersion-managed erbium-doped all-fiber ring laser hybridly mode-locked with boron nitride-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes in the co-action with a nonlinear polarization evolution in the ring cavity with a distributed polarizer. Stable 92.6 fs dechirped pulses were obtained via precise polarization state adjustment at a central wavelength of 1560 nm with 11.2 mW average output power, corresponding to the 2.9 kW maximum peak power. We have also observed the laser switching from a USP generation regime to a chirped pulse one with a corresponding pulse-width of 7.1 ps at the same intracavity dispersion.

  6. The Influence of High-Power Ion Beams and High-Intensity Short-Pulse Implantation of Ions on the Properties of Ceramic Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabyshev, A. V.; Konusov, F. V.; Pavlov, S. K.; Remnev, G. E.

    2016-02-01

    The paper is focused on the study of the structural, electrical and optical characteristics of the ceramic silicon carbide before and after irradiation in the regimes of the high-power ion beams (HPIB) and high-intensity short-pulse implantation (HISPI) of carbon ions. The dominant mechanism of transport of charge carriers, their type and the energy spectrum of localized states (LS) of defects determining the properties of SiC were established. Electrical and optical characteristics of ceramic before and after irradiation are determined by the biographical and radiation defects whose band gap (BG) energy levels have a continuous energetic distribution. A dominant p-type activation component of conduction with participation of shallow acceptor levels 0.05-0.16 eV is complemented by hopping mechanism of conduction involving the defects LS with a density of 1.2T017-2.4T018 eV-Am-3 distributed near the Fermi level.The effect of radiation defects with deep levels in the BG on properties change dominates after HISPI. A new material with the changed electronic structure and properties is formed in the near surface layer of SiC after the impact of the HPIB.

  7. High-resolution measurements of the spatial and temporal evolution of megagauss magnetic fields created in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Gourab Singh, Prashant Kumar; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2014-01-15

    A pump-probe polarimetric technique is demonstrated, which provides a complete, temporally and spatially resolved mapping of the megagauss magnetic fields generated in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions. A normally incident time-delayed probe pulse reflected from its critical surface undergoes a change in its ellipticity according to the magneto-optic Cotton-Mouton effect due to the azimuthal nature of the ambient self-generated megagauss magnetic fields. The temporal resolution of the magnetic field mapping is typically of the order of the pulsewidth, limited by the laser intensity contrast, whereas a spatial resolution of a few μm is achieved by this optical technique. High-harmonics of the probe can be employed to penetrate deeper into the plasma to even near-solid densities. The spatial and temporal evolution of the megagauss magnetic fields at the target front as well as at the target rear are presented. The μm-scale resolution of the magnetic field mapping provides valuable information on the filamentary instabilities at the target front, whereas probing the target rear mirrors the highly complex fast electron transport in intense laser-plasma interactions.

  8. Free-electron laser at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY: toward a tunable short-pulsed soft x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerth, Christopher

    2001-12-01

    A high peak current, low emittance, short pulse electron beam can produce intense, laser-like radiation in a single pass through a long periodic magnetic structure. The construction of such free-electron lasers (FELs) based on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) has become feasible by recent advances in accelerator technologies. Since SASE FELs do not require any optical components they are promising sources for the generation of intense, sub- picosecond laser pulses which are continuously tunable over a wide wavelength range in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and X-ray region. In the first phase of the VUV-FEL (phase I) at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY, SASE was achieved for the first time in the VUV at wavelengths between 80 and 180 nm. The concept of the VUV FEL at DESY and first experimental results are presented. The second phase of the TESLA Test Facility (phase II), which includes an increase of the electron beam energy to 1 GeV, aims at the construction of a SASE FEL operating in the soft X-ray region. An overview of the current status and the activities toward a soft X-ray FEL user facility is given.

  9. Ultra-short pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1993-01-01

    An inexpensive pulse generating circuit is disclosed that generates ultra-short, 200 picosecond, and high voltage 100 kW, pulses suitable for wideband radar and other wideband applications. The circuit implements a nonlinear transmission line with series inductors and variable capacitors coupled to ground made from reverse biased diodes to sharpen and increase the amplitude of a high-voltage power MOSFET driver input pulse until it causes non-destructive transit time breakdown in a final avalanche shockwave diode, which increases and sharpens the pulse even more.

  10. Ultra-short pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1993-12-28

    An inexpensive pulse generating circuit is disclosed that generates ultra-short, 200 picosecond, and high voltage 100 kW, pulses suitable for wideband radar and other wideband applications. The circuit implements a nonlinear transmission line with series inductors and variable capacitors coupled to ground made from reverse biased diodes to sharpen and increase the amplitude of a high-voltage power MOSFET driver input pulse until it causes non-destructive transit time breakdown in a final avalanche shock wave diode, which increases and sharpens the pulse even more. 5 figures.

  11. Expression of heat shock proteins 70 and 47 in tissues following short-pulse laser irradiation: assessment of thermal damage and healing.

    PubMed

    Sajjadi, Amir Yousef; Mitra, Kunal; Grace, Michael

    2013-10-01

    In order to develop effective laser-based therapeutics, the extent of laser-induced damage must be quantified for given laser parameters. Therefore, we want to determine the spatiotemporal expression patterns of heat shock proteins, both to understand the roles of heat shock proteins in laser-induced tissue damage and repair and to develop heat shock proteins as tools to illustrate the extent of laser-induced damage and wound healing following irradiation. We exposed anesthetized mice to the focused beam of a short-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm; 200 ns pulsewidth) for 15s, while measuring temperature distribution in the skin using an infrared thermal camera. Following irradiation, we examined expression of HSP47 and HSP70 over time (0-24h) as indicators of the heat shock response and recovery from damage in the laser-irradiated region. Expression patterns of HSP70 and HSP47 as detected by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy delineate the extent of damage and the process of healing in tissue. Both HSP70 and HSP47 were expressed in dermis and epidermis following laser irradiation, and the spatial and temporal changes in HSP expression patterns define the laser-induced thermal damage zone and the process of healing in tissues. HSP70 may define biochemically the thermal damage zone in which cells are targeted for destruction, and HSP47 may illustrate the process of recovery from thermally induced damage. Studying the effects of different laser parameters on the expression of HSPs will allow development of effective laser therapies that provide accurate and precise tissue ablation and may promote rapid wound healing following laser-based surgery.

  12. Production of silver-silica core-shell nanocomposites using ultra-short pulsed laser ablation in nanoporous aqueous silica colloidal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santagata, A.; Guarnaccio, A.; Pietrangeli, D.; Szegedi, Á.; Valyon, J.; De Stefanis, A.; De Bonis, A.; Teghil, R.; Sansone, M.; Mollica, D.; Parisi, G. P.

    2015-05-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser ablation of materials in liquid has been demonstrated to be a versatile technique for nanoparticles production. In a previous paper, it has been described, for the first time, how by laser ablation in a liquid system, silver nanoparticles can be loaded onto SBA-15 and MCM-41 supports which show promising catalytic properties for the oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). The aim of the present research is to demonstrate the formation of stable silver-silica core-shell nanoparticles by direct laser ablation (Ti:Sa; 800 nm pulse duration: 120 fs repetition rate: 1 kHz, pulse energy: 3.6 mJ, fluence: 9 J cm  -  2) of a Ag target submerged in a static colloidal solution of MCM-41 or SBA-15 silica nanoporous materials. In previous studies, it was discovered that a side and negligible product of the laser ablation process of silver performed in water-silica systems, could be related to the formation of silver-silica core-shell nanoparticles. In order to emphasize this side process some modifications to the laser ablation experimental set-up were performed. Among these, the most important one, in order to favor the production of the core-shell systems, was to keep the liquid silica suspension firm. The laser generated nanomaterials were then analyzed using TEM morphologic characterization. By UV-vis absorption spectra the observed features have been related to components of the colloidal solution as well as to the number of the incident laser pulses. In this manner characterizations on both the process and the resulting suspension have been performed. Significant amount of small sized silver-silica core-shell nanoparticles have been detected in the studied systems. The size distribution, polydispersivity, UV-vis plasmonic bands and stability of the produced silver-silica core-shell nanocomposites have been related to the extent of damage induced in the nanoporous silica structure during the ablation procedure adopted

  13. Demonstration of short pulse laser heating of solid targets to temperatures of 600eV at depths exceeding 30μm using the Orion high power laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, L. M. R.; Hoarty, D. J.; Allan, P.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; James, S. F.; Shepherd, R.; Lancaster, K. L.; Gray, R. J.; Wagenaars, E.; Dance, R. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Culfa, O.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2012-10-01

    The recently completed Orion laser at AWE in the UK has the capability of delivering a petaWatt short pulse at 1.06μm in two of its twelve laser beams. In the experiments described one of the short pulse beams was converted to 2nd harmonic at sub-aperture delivering 3x10^20W/cm^2 (100J of 0.53μm light in 0.5ps) onto plastic foils (parylene N) with embedded tracer layers of aluminium. The target heating profile was recorded on a shot by shot basis by changing the depth of the plastic overcoat between the laser and the buried aluminium layer and recording the aluminium K-shell emission spectra. These spectra were then compared to the FLY atomic kinetics and line-shape code to infer the conditions in the target. Temperatures of 600eV were recorded through a plastic depth in excess of 30μm. In contrast to this similar experiments conducted with the Orion short pulse beam operating at wavelength 1.06μm at energy of 500J (˜10^21W/cm^2) produced heating through only 5μm of plastic. The importance of the improved pulse contrast in 2nd harmonic operation in solid target heating is clear from these results. The data are also compared to results from similar experiments conducted on the VULCAN petaWatt laser using 1.06μm light but with improved pulse contrast.

  14. Complex characterization of short-pulse propagation through InAs/InP quantum-dash optical amplifiers: from the quasi-linear to the two-photon-dominated regime.

    PubMed

    Capua, Amir; Saal, Abigael; Karni, Ouri; Eisenstein, Gadi; Reithmaier, Johann Peter; Yvind, Kresten

    2012-01-01

    We describe direct measurements at a high temporal resolution of the changes experienced by the phase and amplitude of an ultra-short pulse upon propagation through an inhomogenously broadened semiconductor nanostructured optical gain medium. Using a cross frequency-resolved optical gating technique, we analyze 150 fs-wide pulses propagating along an InP based quantum dash optical amplifier in both the quasi-linear and saturated regimes. For very large electrical and optical excitations, a second, trailing peak is generated and enhanced by a unique two-photon-induced amplification process.

  15. Emittance of short-pulsed high-current ion beams formed from the plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge sustained by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Razin, S. Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Sidorov, A.; Skalyga, V.

    2014-02-15

    We present experimental results on measuring the emittance of short-pulsed (≤100 μs) high-current (80–100 mA) ion beams of heavy gases (Nitrogen, Argon) formed from a dense plasma of an ECR source of multiply charged ions (MCI) with quasi-gas-dynamic mode of plasma confinement in a magnetic trap of simple mirror configuration. The discharge was created by a high-power (90 kW) pulsed radiation of a 37.5-GHz gyrotron. The normalized emittance of generated ion beams of 100 mA current was (1.2–1.3) π mm mrad (70% of ions in the beams). Comparing these results with those obtained using a cusp magnetic trap, it was concluded that the structure of the trap magnetic field lines does not exert a decisive influence on the emittance of ion beams in the gas-dynamic ECR source of MCI.

  16. Prospects for the diagnosis of electron-ion temperature equilibration rates of warm dense matter by ultra-short pulse hard X-ray diffraction with an X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo Gareta, J. J.; Riley, D.

    2006-10-01

    Ultra-short pulse kiloelectronvolt X-ray diffraction with an X-ray free electron laser and its potential for the diagnosis of electron-ion equilibration rates of warm dense matter are evaluated. A simple experimental configuration is suggested for the generation and subsequent probing of warm dense aluminium with the TESLA X-ray free electron laser. Differential scattering cross-sections are computed in an approximate manner with Thomas-Fermi form factors and tabular ion-ion static structure factors of one-component plasmas, inclusive of electron screening and degeneracy. This requires simulation of the sample, for which we use a hydrodynamic code featuring the Sesame equation of state, Thomas-Fermi ionisation and cold solid opacities (for the calculation of energy deposition). The effect of electron-ion equilibration rate on the evolution of the diffraction pattern on a picosecond time-scale is investigated. Finally, the signal level expected from experiment is estimated, indicating that measurements with good angular-resolution are possible.

  17. Correlation dynamics after short-pulse photoassociation

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Christiane P.; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2010-06-15

    Two atoms in an ultracold gas are correlated at short interatomic distances due to threshold effects in which the potential energy of their interaction dominates the kinetic energy. The correlations manifest themselves in a distinct nodal structure of the density matrix at short interatomic distances. Pump-probe spectroscopy has recently been suggested [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 260401 (2009)] to probe these pair correlations: A suitably chosen, short photoassociation laser pulse depletes the ground-state pair density within the photoassociation window, creating a nonstationary wave packet in the electronic ground state. The dynamics of this nonstationary wave packet is monitored by time-delayed probe and ionization pulses. Here we discuss how the choice of the pulse parameters affects the experimental feasibility of this pump-probe spectroscopy of two-body correlations.

  18. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A method of producing a long output pulse (SA) from a short pump pulse (P), using an elongated amplified fiber (11) having a doped core (12) that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding 13. A seed beam (S) of the longer wavelength is injected into the core (12) at one end of the fiber (11) and a pump pulse (P) of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding (13) at the other end of the fiber (11). The counter-propagating seed beam (S) and pump pulse (P) will produce an amplified output pulse (SA) having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse (P) through the fiber (11) plus the length of the pump pulse (P).

  19. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, Leland G.; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  20. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1994-08-02

    A method of producing a long output pulse from a short pump pulse is disclosed, using an elongated amplified fiber having a doped core that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding. A seed beam of the longer wavelength is injected into the core at one end of the fiber and a pump pulse of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding at the other end of the fiber. The counter-propagating seed beam and pump pulse will produce an amplified output pulse having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse through the fiber plus the length of the pump pulse. 3 figs.

  1. Ultra short pulse reconstruction software: GROG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galletti, M.; Galimberti, M.; Giulietti, D.; Curcio, A.

    2016-07-01

    A new algorithmic method based on the 1D Conjugate Gradient Minimization Method, is presented. The purpose is, analyzing experimental FROG/GRENOUILLE traces, to accurately retrieve intensity and phase both in temporal and spectral domain so as to completely characterize an Ultra Short High Power laser pulse. This algorithm shows important features in the reconstruction of many different pulse classes. The employment of this algorithm also permits the inclusion of material response function present in the FROG/GRENOUILLE set-up.

  2. Ultra-short pulses to signal neuronal growth cone machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Manoj; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Andres, Rosa; Cormack, Iain G.; Artigas, David; Soriano, Eduardo; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2007-02-01

    Measurable change in the sensory motor machinery of growth cones are induced by non contact femtosecond laser. The focused laser beam with an average power of 3 mW was positioned at some distance away from the closest fillopodia of cortical neurons from primary cell cultures (mice E15). By identifying a set of preliminary parameters we were able to statistically analyze the phenomenological behavior of the fillopodia and classify the effects different conditions of laser light has on the growth cone. Results show that fillopodia become significantly biased towards the focused femtosecond laser light. The same experiment performed with continuous wave (CW) produced results which were indistinguishable from the case where there is no laser light present (placebo condition) indicating no clear effects of the CW laser light on the fillopodia at a distance. These findings show the potential for ultrashort pulsed light to become a new type of pathfinding cue for neuronal growth cones.

  3. Plasma mirrors for short pulse KrF lasers.

    PubMed

    Gilicze, Barnabás; Barna, Angéla; Kovács, Zsolt; Szatmári, Sándor; Földes, István B

    2016-08-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that plasma mirrors can be successfully applied for KrF laser systems. High reflectivity up to 70% is achieved by optimization of the beam quality on the plasma mirror. The modest spectral shift and the good reflected beam quality allow its applicability for high power laser systems for which a new arrangement is suggested. PMID:27587094

  4. SLIM, Short-pulse Technology for High Gradient Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, A.; Kardo-Sysoev, A.; Arntz, F.; /Diversified Tech., Bedford

    2009-12-09

    The conclusions of this paper are: (1) The gradient of the SLIM-based technology is believed to be achievable in the same range as it is for the gradient of a modern rf-linac technology ({approx}100 MeV per meter). (2) The SLIM concept is based on the nsec TEM pulse mode operation with no laser or rf systems. (3) Main components of SLIM are not stressed while the energy is pumped into the induction system. Components can accept the hard environment conditions such as a radiation dose, mismatch, hard electromagnetic nose level, etc. Only for several nanoseconds the switch is OFF and produces a stress in the induction system. At that time, the delivery of energy to the beam takes place. (4) The energy in the induction system initially is storied in the magnetic field when the switch is ON. That fact makes another benefit: a low voltage power supplies can be used. The reliability of a lower voltage power supply is higher and they are cheaper. (5) The coreless SLIM concept offers to work in the MHz range of repetition rate. The induction system has the high electric efficiency (much higher than the DWA). (6) The array of lined up and activated SLIM cells is believed to be a solid state structure of novel accelerating technology. The electron-hole plasma in the high power solid state structure is precisely controlled by the electromagnetic process of a pulsed power supply.

  5. Short-pulse amplification by strongly coupled stimulated Brillouin scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew R.; Jia, Qing; Mikhailova, Julia M.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-08-01

    We examine the feasibility of strongly coupled stimulated Brillouin scattering as a mechanism for the plasma-based amplification of sub-picosecond pulses. In particular, we use fluid theory and particle-in-cell simulations to compare the relative advantages of Raman and Brillouin amplification over a broad range of achievable parameters.

  6. Computational modeling of ultra-short-pulse ablation of enamel

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 sec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  7. Giant-chirp oscillators for short-pulse fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Renninger, William H; Chong, Andy; Wise, Frank W

    2008-12-15

    A new regime of pulse parameters in a normal-dispersion fiber laser is identified. Dissipative solitons exist with remarkably large pulse duration and chirp, along with large pulse energy. A low-repetition-rate oscillator that generates pulses with large and linear chirp can replace the standard oscillator, stretcher, pulse-picker, and preamplifier in a chirped-pulse fiber amplifier. The theoretical properties of such a giant-chirp oscillator are presented. A fiber laser designed to operate in the new regime generates approximately 150 ps pulses at a 3 MHz repetition rate. Amplification of these pulses to 1 microJ energy with pulse duration as short as 670 fs demonstrates the promise of this new approach.

  8. Optical ablation by high-power short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Herman, S.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Shore, B.W.; Perry, M.D.

    1996-02-01

    Laser-induced damage threshold measurements were performed on homogeneous and multilayer dielectrics and gold-coated optics at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations {tau} ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Gold coatings were found, both experimentally and theoretically, to be limited to 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} in the subpicosecond range for 1053-nm pulses. In dielectrics, we find qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated {tau}{sup 1/2} scaling that indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for {tau}{le}10 ps and from conventional heating and melting for {tau}{approx_gt}50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production by multiphoton ionization, joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in quantitative agreement with both the pulse-width and the wavelength scaling of experimental results. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  9. Short-pulse Laser Capability on the Mercury Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbers, C; Armstrong, P; Bayramian, A; Barty, C J; Bibeau, C; Britten, J; Caird, J; Campbell, R; Chai, B; Crane, J; Cross, R; Erlandson, A; Fei, Y; Freitas, B; Jovanovic, I; Liao, Z; Molander, B; Schaffers, K; Stuart, B; Sutton, S; Ladran, T; Telford, S; Thelin, P; Utterback, E

    2006-06-22

    Applications using high energy ''petawatt-class'' laser drivers operating at repetition rates beyond 0.01 Hz are only now being envisioned. The Mercury laser system is designed to operate at 100 J/pulse at 10 Hz. We investigate the potential of configuring the Mercury laser to produce a rep-rated, ''petawatt-class'' source. The Mercury laser is a prototype of a high energy, high repetition rate source (100 J, 10 Hz). The design of the Mercury laser is based on the ability to scale in energy through scaling in aperture. Mercury is one of several 100 J, high repetition rate (10 Hz) lasers sources currently under development (HALNA, LUCIA, POLARIS). We examine the possibility of using Mercury as a pump source for a high irradiance ''petawatt-class'' source: either as a pump laser for an average power Ti:Sapphire laser, or as a pump laser for OPCPA based on YCa{sub 4}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (YCOB), ideally producing a source approaching 30 J /30 fs /10 Hz--a high repetition rate petawatt. A comparison of the two systems with nominal configurations and efficiencies is shown in Table 1.

  10. Characterization of short-pulse laser driven neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Katerina; Jung, Daniel; Guler, Nevzat; Deppert, Oliver; Devlin, Matthew; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F. E.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2014-10-01

    We present a full spectral characterization of a novel laser driven neutron source, which employed the Break Out Afterburner ion acceleration mechanism. Neutrons were produced by nuclear reactions of the ions deposited on Be or Cu converters. We observed neutrons at energies up to 150 MeV. The neutron spectra were measured by five neutron time-of-flight detectors at various positions and distances from the source. The nTOF detectors observed that emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component peaking at 3.5--5 MeV resulting from nuclear reactions in the converter and a directional component at 25--70 MeV, which was a product of break-up reaction of the forward moving deuterons. Energy shifts due to geometrical effects in BOA were also observed.

  11. Development of a short pulsed solid propellant plasma thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guman, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    The experimental results are summarized that were obtained in the development of a Teflon solid propellant pulsed plasma thruster. The feasibility was established of storing and feeding solid propellant in the form of an open circular loop into an operational thruster. This technique was verified to be practical by feeding over 20 inches of Teflon into a micro-thruster over an accumulated life test of 1858 hours. High energy density capacitors were evaluated under vacuum conditions when the capacitor is coupled directly to a plasma thruster. Numerous early capacitor failures were encountered. It was concluded that essentially all of the failures encountered in a vacuum environment are due to an internal electrical breakdown that will occur inside a capacitor that is not truly hermetically sealed. A steady input power significantly in excess of 130 watts can safely be tolerated if heat conduction can be provided to a sink whose temperature is about 16 C. A vacuum life test of the capacitor bank was carried out while discharging into a milli-lb. (milli-Newton) type pulsed plasma thruster. More than 1500 hours of vacuum testing of this milli-Newton type system has been accumulated without any capacitor problems. Recommendations are made for future capacitor designs.

  12. Ultra-Short Pulsed Laser Engineered Metal-Glass Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalmashonak, Andrei; Seifert, Gerhard; Abdolvand, Amin

    Glasses and other dielectrics containing metallic nanoparticles are very promising materials for applications in optoelectronics due to their unique linear and non-linear optical properties. These properties are dominated by the strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the metal nanoparticles. The SPR occurs when the electron and light waves couple with each other at a metal-dielectric interface. These are regarded as the collective oscillation of the nanoparticle (NP) electrons.

  13. Correlated states of a quantum oscillator acted by short pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1993-01-01

    Correlated squeezed states for a quantum oscillator are constructed based on the method of quantum integrals of motion. The quantum oscillator is acted upon by short duration pulses. Three delta-kickings of frequency are used to model the pulses' dependence upon the time aspects of the frequency of the oscillator. Additionally, the correlation coefficient and quantum variances of operations of coordinates and momenta are written in explicit form.

  14. Short-pulse high intensity laser thin foil interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audebert, Patrick

    2003-10-01

    The technology of ultrashort pulse laser generation has progressed to the point that optical pulses larger than 10 J, 300 fs duration or shorter are routinely produced. Such pulses can be focused to intensities exceeding 10^18 W/cm^2. With high contrast pulses, these focused intensities can be used to heat solid matter to high temperatures with minimal hydrodynamic expansion, producing an extremely high energy-density state of matter for a short period of time. This high density, high temperature plasma can be studied by x-ray spectroscopy. We have performed experiments on thin foils of different elements under well controlled conditions at the 100 Terawatt laser at LULI to study the characteristics X-ray emission of laser heated solids. To suppress the ASE effect, the laser was frequency doubled. S-polarized light with a peak intensity of 10^19W/cm^2 was used to minimize resonance absorption. To decrease the effect of longitudinal temperature gradients very thin (800 μ) aluminum foil targets were used. We have also studied the effect of radial gradient by limiting the measured x-ray emission zone using 50μ or 100μ pinhole on target. The spectra, in the range 7-8Å, were recorded using a conical crystal spectrometer coupled to a 800 fs resolution streak camera. A Fourier Domain Interferometry (FDI) of the back of the foil was also performed providing a measurement of the hydrodynamic expansion as function of time for each shot. To simulate the experiment, we used the 1D hydrodynamic code FILM with a given set of plasma parameter (ρ, Te) as initial conditions. The X-ray emission was calculated by post processing hydrodynamic results with a collisional-radiative model which uses super-configuration average atomic data. The simulation reproduces the main features of the experimental time resolved spectrum.

  15. Plasma mirrors for short pulse KrF lasers.

    PubMed

    Gilicze, Barnabás; Barna, Angéla; Kovács, Zsolt; Szatmári, Sándor; Földes, István B

    2016-08-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that plasma mirrors can be successfully applied for KrF laser systems. High reflectivity up to 70% is achieved by optimization of the beam quality on the plasma mirror. The modest spectral shift and the good reflected beam quality allow its applicability for high power laser systems for which a new arrangement is suggested.

  16. Short Pulse Laser Production of Diamond Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P.S.; Stuart, B.C.; Dinh, L.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; McLean, W.; Perry, M.D.

    1998-03-20

    The use of diamond thin films has the potential for major impact in many industrial and scientific applications. These include heat sinks for electronics, broadband optical sensors, windows, cutting tools, optical coatings, laser diodes, cold cathodes, and field emission displays. Attractive properties of natural diamond consist of physical hardness, high tensile yield strength, chemical inertness, low coefficient of friction, high thermal conductivity, and low electrical conductivity. Unfortunately, these properties are not completely realized in currently produced diamond thin films. Chemical vapor deposition, in its many forms, has been the most successful to this point in producing crystalline diamond films microns to millimeters in thickness which are made up of closely packed diamond crystals microns in physical dimension. However, high purity films are difficult to realize due to the use of hydrogen in the growth process which becomes included in the film matrix. These impurities are manifest in film physical properties which are inferior to those of pure crystalline diamond. In addition, the large density of grain boundaries due to the polycrystalline nature of the films reduce the films' diamond-like character. Finally, substrates must be heated to several hundred degrees Celsius which is not suitable for many materials. Pulsed laser deposition is attractive due to its ability to produce high purity films-limited only by the purity of the target. For diamond film production, high purity carbon can be ablated directly by lasers and deposited as thin films at ambient temperatures. However, lasers currently in use generally deliver long (>10 ns) pulses, and the generally explosive nature of laser ablation, in addition to the desired single-atom or single-ion carbon, liberates significant amounts of carbon clusters (C{sub n} where n=2-30) and macroscopic particles (> 1-10 pm) of carbon. These carbon particles interrupt the ordered deposition of crystalline diamond, forming undesirable grain boundaries and rough surfaces that are difficult to polish. In addition, PLD generated films tend to be ''amorphous'' or nanocrystalline with no observable long-range order, but still possessing physical properties which are diamond-like in some approximation. This has given rise to the term ''diamond-like carbon'' when referring to these PLD-produced, amorphous carbon films. Growth rates for PLD have been prohibitively slow until recently with the advent of high average power, high rep-rate lasers.

  17. Distinguishing Raman from strongly coupled Brillouin amplification for short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qing; Barth, Ido; Edwards, Matthew R.; Mikhailova, Julia M.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-05-01

    Plasma-based amplification by strongly coupled Brillouin scattering has recently been suggested for the compression of a short seed laser to ultrahigh intensities in sub-quarter-critical-density plasmas. However, by employing detailed spectral analysis of particle-in-cell simulations in the same parameter regime, we demonstrate that, in fact, Raman backscattering amplification is responsible for the growth and compression of the high-intensity, leading spike, where most of the energy compression occurs, while the ion mode only affects the low-intensity tail of the amplified pulse. The critical role of the initial seed shape is identified. A number of subtleties in the numerical simulations are also pointed out.

  18. Tissue photoablation process with short-pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Gerhard J.; Doerschel, Klaus; Kar, Hasan

    1992-03-01

    Since Hippocrates, physicians have three weapons to fight malignant diseases of the human body: Quae medicamenta non sanat, ferrum sanat; quae ferrum non sanat, ignis sanat; and quae vero ignis non sanat, insanabilia reputari oportet. Today there are various possibilities to use the ''fire'': electrical and optical cauterization; mono- and bipolar rf-surgery; ionizing radiation for tumor treatment; and last but not least, the laser of laser tissue interactions, all can be used to remove malignant tissue either by biological digestion or immediate ablation, i.e., photovaporization or photodecomposition. This paper will discuss a semiempirical theory of the so-called photoablation process and the thermal side effects of the surrounding tissue. The term ''Photoablation; has to be well differentiated with the terms photovaporization, photodisruption and photofragmentation. As will be shown in this paper, photoablation is a microscale fast thermal explosion.

  19. Plasma mirrors for short pulse KrF lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilicze, Barnabás; Barna, Angéla; Kovács, Zsolt; Szatmári, Sándor; Földes, István B.

    2016-08-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that plasma mirrors can be successfully applied for KrF laser systems. High reflectivity up to 70% is achieved by optimization of the beam quality on the plasma mirror. The modest spectral shift and the good reflected beam quality allow its applicability for high power laser systems for which a new arrangement is suggested.

  20. Laser fusion neutron source employing compression with short pulse lasers

    DOEpatents

    Sefcik, Joseph A; Wilks, Scott C

    2013-11-05

    A method and system for achieving fusion is provided. The method includes providing laser source that generates a laser beam and a target that includes a capsule embedded in the target and filled with DT gas. The laser beam is directed at the target. The laser beam helps create an electron beam within the target. The electron beam heats the capsule, the DT gas, and the area surrounding the capsule. At a certain point equilibrium is reached. At the equilibrium point, the capsule implodes and generates enough pressure on the DT gas to ignite the DT gas and fuse the DT gas nuclei.

  1. Cross sections for short pulse single and double ionization ofhelium

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, Alicia; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2007-11-27

    In a previous publication, procedures were proposed for unambiguously extracting amplitudes for single and double ionization from a time-dependent wavepacket by effectively propagating for an infinite time following a radiation pulse. Here we demonstrate the accuracy and utility of those methods for describing two-photon single and one-photon double ionization of helium. In particular it is shown how narrow features corresponding to autoionizing states are easily resolved with these methods.

  2. Very-short-pulse modulator using asymmetric thyristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perol, P.

    1984-09-01

    The development of a semiconductor delay-line modulator for a 40-nsec/pulse 10-kHz-repetition-rate coaxial magnetron radar used to monitor airport runway traffic is reported and illustrated with circuit diagrams, output spectra, and photographs. The problems presented by the design specifications are indicated, and the solutions adopted (asymmetric press-packed thyristors and ferrite pulse transformer) are explained. Pulse widths and peak powers with 16 nf of delay line and a 2.5-kV charge at the level of the modulator are found to be 120 nsec and 58 kW without truncation and 40 nsec and 50-51 kW with truncation, the latter corresponding to an efficiency of 17 percent. The pulse leading edges have dI/dt at the transformer primary = 1.8 kA/microsec and dV/dt at the magnetron = 160 kV/microsec.

  3. Short-pulse, high-intensity lasers at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Roberts, J.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Fulton, R.D.; Kyrala, G.A.; Schappert, G.T.

    1994-03-01

    Advances in ultrafast lasers and optical amplifiers have spurred the development of terawatt-class laser systems capable of delivering focal spot intensities approaching 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. At these extremely high intensities, the optical field strength is more than twenty times larger than the Bohr electric field, permitting investigations of the optical properties of matter in a previously unexplored regime. The authors describe two laser systems for high intensity laser interaction experiments: The first is a terawatt system based on amplification of femtosecond pulses in XeCl which yields 250 mJ in 275 fs and routinely produces intensifies on target in excess of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. The second system is based on chirped pulse amplification of 100-fs pulses in Ti:sapphire.

  4. Short-pulse dynamics in strongly nonlinear dissipative granular chains.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Alexandre; Romero, Aldo H; Nesterenko, Vitali F; Lindenberg, Katja

    2008-11-01

    We study the energy decay properties of a pulse propagating in a strongly nonlinear granular chain with damping proportional to the relative velocity of the grains. We observe a wave disturbance that at low viscosities consists of two parts exhibiting two entirely different time scales of dissipation. One part is an attenuating solitary wave, dominated by discreteness and nonlinearity effects as in a dissipationless chain, and has the shorter lifetime. The other is a purely dissipative shocklike structure with a much longer lifetime and exists only in the presence of dissipation. The range of viscosities and initial configurations that lead to this complex wave disturbance are explored.

  5. Picosecond lasers: the next generation of short-pulsed lasers.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Joshua R; Kaufman, Joely; Metelitsa, Andrea I; Green, Jeremy B

    2014-12-01

    Selective photothermolysis, first discussed in the context of targeted microsurgery in 1983, proposed that the optimal parameters for specific thermal damage rely critically on the duration over which energy is delivered to the tissue. At that time, nonspecific thermal damage had been an intrinsic limitation of all commercially available lasers, despite efforts to mitigate this by a variety of compensatory cooling mechanisms. Fifteen years later, experimental picosecond lasers were first reported in the dermatological literature to demonstrate greater efficacy over their nanosecond predecessors in the context of targeted destruction of tattoo ink. Within the last 4 years, more than a decade after those experiments, the first commercially available cutaneous picosecond laser unit became available (Cynosure, Westford, Massachusetts), and several pilot studies have demonstrated its utility in tattoo removal. An experimental picosecond infrared laser has also recently demonstrated a nonthermal tissue ablative capability in soft tissue, bone, and dentin. In this article, we review the published data pertaining to dermatology on picosecond lasers from their initial reports to the present as well as discuss forthcoming technology.

  6. Measurements of short-pulse propagation through concrete walls

    SciTech Connect

    Aurand, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    The authors recently performed a series of experimental measurements of transient electromagnetic (EM) propagation through two different concrete walls. Several different short-duration pulses were used for the incident radiation, with frequency content from VHF to 20 GHz. Both walls were 30 cm thick, with three internal layers of reinforcing steel bars. For this particular set of data, the incident wave polarization was vertical linear only. Corroborating swept-frequency measurements were made with a vector network analyzer. This paper describes the propagation measurements through the two walls, and the propagation model of a lossy dielectric layer. They also examine the transfer function, dielectric constant, loss tangent, attenuation constant, and time-domain impulse response of these walls. The attenuation increases steadily with frequency, and is a strong function of the moisture content of the concrete. The time-domain pulse attenuation and dispersion are consistent with the lowpass-filtering effect of this attenuation loss vs. frequency. The time domain behavior will be very useful in time-domain radar studies of ground-penetrating radar, free-space layered measurement systems, etc.

  7. Characterization of short pulse laser-produced plasmas at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ultra short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R.; Price, D.; White, W.; Osterheld, A.; Walling, R.; Goldstein, W.; Stewart, R.; Gordan, S.

    1993-07-14

    The K-shell emission from porous aluminum targets is used to infer the density and temperature of plasmas created with 800 nm and 400 nm, 140 fs laser light. The laser beam is focused to a minimum spot size of 5 {mu}m with 800 nm light and 3 {mu}m with 400 nm light, producing a normal incidence peak intensity of 10{sup 18} Watts/cm{sup 2}. A new 800 fs x-ray streak camera is used to study the broadband x-ray emission. The time resolved and time integrated x-ray emission implies substantial differences between the porous target and the flat target temperature.

  8. 1.5 MW turbine installation at NREL's NWTC on Aug. 21

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Generating 20 percent of the nation's electricity from clean wind resources will require more and bigger wind turbines. NREL is installing two large wind turbines at the National Wind Technology Center to examine some of the industry's largest machines and address issues to expand wind energy on a commercial scale.

  9. Engineering aspects of the application of structural materials in the 5 MW-ESS-mercury-target

    SciTech Connect

    Guttek, B.

    1996-06-01

    A main problem of the ESS-Hg-target development and the design of the components of its primary Hg-circuit is the choice of structural materials. As designing, calculations and experiments with elected materials take time and are very costy, a preview on their successful application has to be done before as detailed as possible. One aspect on this is to have the knowledge of characteristics values of the structural material candidates under the occuring mechanical and thermal loads, irradiation, corrosion and erosion. Another point is the technology of engineering concerning the manufacturing, welding, surface treatment, and quality control of such parts and components under the demand to reach maximum lifetime.

  10. Over 0.5 MW green laser from sub-nanosecond giant pulsed microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lihe; Taira, Takunori

    2016-03-01

    A sub-nanosecond green laser with laser head sized 35 × 35 × 35 mm3 was developed from a giant pulsed microchip laser for laser processing on organic superconducting transistor with a flexible substrate. A composite monolithic Y3Al5O12 (YAG) /Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG/YAG crystal was designed for generating giant pulsed 1064 nm laser. A fibercoupled 30 W laser diode centered at 808 nm was used with pump pulse duration of 245 μs. The 532 nm green laser was obtained from a LiB3O5 (LBO) crystal with output energy of 150 μJ and pulse duration of 268 ps. The sub-nanosecond green laser is interesting for 2-D ablation patterns.

  11. Definition of a 5-MW Reference Wind Turbine for Offshore System Development

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Musial, W.; Scott, G.

    2009-02-01

    This report describes a three-bladed, upwind, variable-speed, variable blade-pitch-to-feather-controlled multimegawatt wind turbine model developed by NREL to support concept studies aimed at assessing offshore wind technology.

  12. Intermittent exposure of rats to 2450-MHz microwaves at 2. 5 MW cm sq: behavioral and physiological effects

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, J.A.; DeWitt, J.R.; Emmerson, R.Y.; Bailey, C.; Stensaas, S.

    1986-01-01

    Long-Evans male adult rats were intermittently exposed for 14 weeks to continuous wave (c-w) 2450-MHz microwaves at an average power density of 2.5 mW/sq. cm. The mean specific absorption rate was 0.70 W/kg (plus or minus 0.02 SEM). The rats were exposed 7 h/day, 7 days/week in a radiation chamber with a monopole above ground, while housed in Plexiglas cages. Weekly measures of body mass and food intake did not indicate statistically significant effects of microwave irradiation. Assessments of threshold for electric-footshock detection revealed a significant difference between microwave and sham-exposed animals. Assessments of cholinesterase and sulfhydryl groups in blood and 17-ketosteriods, in urine did not distinguish the two groups of rats. Behavioral measures made at the end of the 14-week exposure included an open-field test, shuttlebox avoidance performance, and schedule-controlled lever-pressing for food pellets: Statistically significant differences between microwave- and sham-exposed rats were observed for these measures. Examination of adrenal tissue, plasma electrolytes, and organ masses after 14 weeks of exposure revealed no difference between the two group of rats.

  13. Development of a short pulsed corona discharge ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    An Yuan; Aliaga-Rossel, R.; Choi, Peter; Gilles, Jean-Paul

    2005-08-15

    The development of a pulsed corona discharge ionization source and its use in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is presented. In a point-plane electrode geometry, an electrical pulse up to 12 kV, 150 ns rise time and 500 ns pulse width was used to generate a corona discharge in air. A single positive high voltage pulse was able to generate about 1.6x10{sup 10} ions at energy consumption of 22 {mu}J. Since the temporal distribution of ions is in a pulsed form, the possibility of removal the ion gate has been investigated. By purposely arranging the interface between discharge field and drift field, nearly 10{sup 7} positive ions were drawn into the drift region with absence of the ion gate after every single discharge. The positive spectrum of acetone dimer (working at room temperature) was obtained with a resolving power of 20 by using this configuration. The advantages of this new scheme are the low power consumption compared with the dc method as well as the simplicity of the IMS cell structure.

  14. Material processing with ultra-short pulse lasers working in 2μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisiat, B.; Gaponov, D.; Gečys, P.; Lavoute, L.; Silva, M.; Hideur, A.; Ducros, N.; Račiukaitis, G.

    2015-03-01

    New wavelengths of laser radiation are of interest for material processing. Results of application of the all-fiber ultrashort pulsed laser emitting in 2 µm range, manufactured by Novae, are presented. Average output power was 4.35 W in a single-spatial-mode beam centered at the 1950 nm wavelength. Pulses duration was 40 ps, and laser operated at 4.2 MHz pulse repetition rate. This performance corresponded to 25 kW of pulse peak power and almost 1 µJ in pulse energy. Material processing was performed using three different focusing lenses (100, 30 and 18 mm) and mechanical stages for the workpiece translation. 2 µm laser radiation is strongly absorbed by some polymers. Swelling of PMMA surface was observed for scanning speed above 5 mm/s using the average power of 3.45 W focused with the 30 mm lens. When scanning speed was reduced below 4 mm/s, ablation of PMMA took place. The swelling of PMMA is a consequence of its melting due to absorbed laser power. Therefore, experiments on butt welding of PMMA and overlapping welding of PMMA with other polymers were performed. Stable joint was achieved for the butt welding of two PMMA blocks with thickness of 5 mm. The laser was used to cut a Kapton film on a paper carrier with the same set-up as previous. The cut width depended on the cutting speed and focusing optics. A perfect cut with a width of 11 µm was achieved at the translation speed of 60 mm/s.

  15. Robust Short-Pulse, High-Peak-Power Laser Transmitter for Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Malcolm W.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a pulsed fiber based master oscillator power amplifier laser at 1550 nm to support moderate data rates with high peak powers in a compact package suitable for interplanetary optical communications. To accommodate pulse position modulation, the polarization maintaining laser transmitter generates pulses from 0.1 to 1 ns with variable duty cycle over a pulse repetition frequency range of 10 to 100 MHz.

  16. Short-pulse cross-phase modulation in an electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feizpour, Amir; Dmochowski, Greg; Steinberg, Aephraim M.

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) has been proposed as a way to greatly enhance cross-phase modulation, with the possibility of leading to few-photon-level optical nonlinearities [Schmidt and Imamoglu, Opt. Lett. 21, 1936 (1996), 10.1364/OL.21.001936]. This enhancement grows as the transparency window width, ΔEIT, is narrowed. Decreasing ΔEIT, however, has been shown to increase the response time of the nonlinear medium. This suggests that, for a given pulse duration, the nonlinearity would diminish once the window width became narrower than this pulse bandwidth. We show that this is not the case: the peak phase shift saturates but does not decrease. We show that in the regimes of most practical interest—narrow EIT windows perturbed by short signal pulses—the enhancement offered by EIT is not only in the magnitude of the nonlinear phase shift but also in its increased duration. That is, for the case of signal pulses much shorter (temporally) than the inverse EIT bandwidth, the narrow window serves to prolong the effect of the passing signal pulse, leading to an integrated phase shift that grows linearly with 1 /ΔEIT ; this continued growth of the integrated phase shift improves the detectability of the phase shift, in principle, without bound. For many purposes, it is this detectability which is of more interest than the absolute magnitude of the peak phase shift. We present analytical expressions based on a linear time-invariant model that accounts for the temporal behavior of the cross-phase modulation for several parameter ranges of interest. We conclude that in order to optimize the detectability of the EIT-based cross-phase shift, one should use the narrowest possible EIT window and a signal pulse that is as broadband as the excited-state linewidth and detuned by half a linewidth.

  17. Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments plus ignition and growth modeling on Composition B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Chadd M.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2014-05-01

    Composition B (63% RDX, 36% TNT, 1% wax) is still a widely used energetic material whose shock initiation characteristics are necessary to understand. It is now possible to shock initiate Composition B and other secondary explosives at diameters well below their characteristic failure diameters for unconfined self-sustaining detonation. This is done using very high velocity, very thin, small diameter flyer plates accelerated by electric or laser power sources. Recently experimental detonation versus failure to detonate threshold flyer velocity curves for Composition B using several KaptonTM flyer thicknesses and diameters were measured. Flyer plates with diameters of 2 mm successfully detonated Composition B, which has a nominal failure diameter of 4.3 mm. The shock pressures required for these initiations are greater than the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) pressure in self-sustaining Composition B detonation waves. The initiation process is two-dimensional, because both rear and side rarefactions can affect the shocked Composition B reaction rates. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for Composition B is extended to yield accurate simulations of this new threshold velocity data for various flyer thicknesses.

  18. From short pulses to short breaks: exotic plasma bullets via residual electron control

    PubMed Central

    Xian, YuBin; Zhang, Peng; Lu, XinPei; Pei, XueKai; Wu, ShuQun; Xiong, Qing; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2013-01-01

    Plasma plumes with exotically segmented channel structure and plasma bullet propagation are produced in atmospheric plasma jets. This is achieved by tailoring interruptions of a continuous DC power supply over the time scales of lifetimes of residual electrons produced by the preceding discharge phase. These phenomena are explained by studying the plasma dynamics using nanosecond-precision imaging. One of the plumes is produced using 2 – 10 μs interruptions in the 8 kV DC voltage and features a still bright channel from which a propagating bullet detaches. A shorter interruption of 900 ns produces a plume with the additional long conducting dark channel between the jet nozzle and the bright area. The bullet size, formation dynamics, and propagation speed and distance can be effectively controlled. This may lead to micrometer- and nanosecond-precision delivery of quantized plasma bits, warranted for next-generation health, materials, and device technologies. PMID:23549279

  19. Forward voltage short-pulse technique for measuring high power laser array junction temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Byron L. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Frazin (Inventor); Barnes, Bruce W. (Inventor); Baker, Nathaniel R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of measuring the temperature of the P-N junction within the light-emitting region of a quasi-continuous-wave or pulsed semiconductor laser diode device. A series of relatively short and low current monitor pulses are applied to the laser diode in the period between the main drive current pulses necessary to cause the semiconductor to lase. At the sufficiently low current level of the monitor pulses, the laser diode device does not lase and behaves similar to an electronic diode. The voltage across the laser diode resulting from each of these low current monitor pulses is measured with a high degree of precision. The junction temperature is then determined from the measured junction voltage using their known linear relationship.

  20. Hydrodynamic model for ultra-short pulse ablation of hard dental tissue

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.; Alley, W.E.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Neev, J.

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 fsec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  1. Double Ionization of H2 in Intense Short-Pulse Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaoxu; Bartschat Bartschat, Klaus; Schneider, Barry I.

    2010-03-01

    We report our development of a nonperturbative time-dependent method to treat one- and two-photon double ionization of the hydrogen molecule by intense ultrashort laser pulses. The two-center two-electron system is discretized in prolate spheroidal coordinates combined with a FE-DVR basis. The solution to the time-dependent laser-driven problem is obtained in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation by propagating the initial state using an effective Arnoldi algorithm. We discuss the dependence of the fully differential cross section for double ionization on the directions of both the molecular and the laser polarization axes. Our results are compared with other recent theoretical predictions.

  2. RF photoinjector development for a short-pulse, hard x-ray Thomson scattering source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sage, G. P.; Anderson, S. G.; Cowan, T. E.; Crane, J. K.; Ditmire, T.; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2001-05-01

    An important motivation in the development of the next generation x-ray light sources is to achieve picosecond and sub-ps pulses of hard x-rays for dynamic studies of a variety of physical, chemical, and biological processes. Present hard x-ray sources are either pulse-width or intensity limited, which allows ps-scale temporal resolution only for signal averaging of highly repetitive processes. A much faster and brighter hard x-ray source is being developed at LLNL, based on Thomson scattering of fs-laser pulses by a relativistic electron beam, which will enable x-ray characterization of the transient structure of a sample in a single shot. Experimental and diagnostic techniques relevant to the development of next generation sources including the Linac Coherent Light Source can be tested with the Thomson scattering hard x-ray source. This source will combine an RF photoinjector with a 100 MeV S-band linac. The photoinjector and linac also provide an ideal test-bed for examining space-charge induced emittance growth effects. A program of beam dynamics and diagnostic experiments are planned in parallel with Thomson source development. Our experimental progress and future plans will be discussed.

  3. Optical damage performance measurements of multilayer dielectric gratings for high energy short pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, D.; Carr, C. W.; Negres, R. A.; Hackel, R. P.; Stanion, K. A.; Cross, D. A.; Guss, G.; Nissen, J. D.; Luthi, R.; Fair, J. E.; Britten, J. A.; Haefner, C.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the laser damage resistance of multilayer dielectric (MLD) diffraction gratings used in the pulse compressors for high energy, high peak power laser systems such as the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) Petawatt laser on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our study includes measurements of damage threshold and damage density (ρ(Φ)) with picosecond laser pulses at 1053 nm under relevant operational conditions. Initial results indicate that sparse defects present on the optic surface from the manufacturing processes are responsible for damage initiation at laser fluences below the damage threshold indicated by the standard R-on-1 test methods, as is the case for laser damage with nanosecond pulse durations. As such, this study supports the development of damage density measurements for more accurate predictions on the damage performance of large area optics.

  4. Development of high damage threshold optics for petawatt-class short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.; Boyd, R.D.

    1995-02-22

    The authors report laser-induced damage threshold measurements on pure and multilayer dielectrics and gold-coated optics at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations, {tau}, ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Damage thresholds of gold coatings are limited to 500 mJ/cm{sup 2} in the subpicosecond range for 1053-nm pulses. In dielectrics, qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated {tau}1/2 scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for {tau}{le}10 ps and from conventional melting and boiling for {tau}>50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in quantitative agreement with both the pulsewidth and wavelength scaling of experimental results.

  5. Nuclear Material Detection by One-Short-Pulse-Laser-Driven Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Aymond, F.; Bridgewater, Jon S.; Croft, Stephen; Deppert, O.; Devlin, Matthew James; Falk, Katerina; Fernandez, Juan Carlos; Gautier, Donald Cort; Gonzales, Manuel A.; Goodsell, Alison Victoria; Guler, Nevzat; Hamilton, Christopher Eric; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, Randall Philip; Jung, Daniel; Kleinschmidt, Annika; Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth; Pomerantz, Ishay; Roth, Markus; Santi, Peter Angelo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas; Wurden, Glen Anthony; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; McCary, E.

    2015-01-28

    Covered in the PowerPoint presentation are the following areas: Motivation and requirements for active interrogation of nuclear material; laser-driven neutron source; neutron diagnostics; active interrogation of nuclear material; and, conclusions, remarks, and future works.

  6. Electrophysical and optophysical properties of air ionized by a short pulse of fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagin, Iu. P.; Stal', N. L.; Khokhlov, V. D.; Chernoiarskii, A. A.

    A method for solving the nonstationary kinetic equation of electron deceleration is developed which is based on the multigroup approximation. The electron distribution function in air ionized by nonstationary sources of primary electrons is determined, and the avalanche formation of secondary electrons is considered. Theoretical and experimental results are presented on the time dependence of the air luminescence intensity in two spectral intervals, one including the 391.4 nm N2(+) band and the other including the 337.1 nm N2 band, for different values of gas pressure under the effect of a short beam of electrons with energies of 100 keV.

  7. Laser-induced resonance states as dynamic suppressors of ionization in high-frequency short pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Barash, Danny; Orel, Ann E.; Baer, Roi

    2000-01-01

    An adiabatic-Floquet formalism is used to study the suppression of ionization in short laser pulses. In the high-frequency limit the adiabatic equations involve only the pulse envelope where transitions are purely ramp effects. For a short-ranged potential having a single-bound state we show that ionization suppression is caused by the appearance of a laser-induced resonance state, which is coupled by the pulse ramp to the ground state and acts to trap ionizing flux. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  8. Computational modeling of stress transient and bubble evolution in short-pulse laser irradiated melanosome particles

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, M.; Amendt, P.A.; London, R.A.; Maitland, D.J.; Glinsky, M.E.; Lin, C.P.; Kelly, M.W.

    1997-03-04

    Objective is to study retinal injury by subnanosecond laser pulses absorbed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. The absorption centers in the RPE cell are melanosomes of order 1 {mu}m radius. Each melanosome includes many melanin particles of 10-15 nm radius, which are the local absorbers of the laser light and generate a discrete structure of hot spots. This work use the hydrodynamic code LATIS (LAser-TISsue interaction modeling) and a water equation of state to first simulate the small melanin particle of 15 nm responsible for initiating the hot spot and the pressure field. A average melanosome of 1 {mu}m scale is next simulated. Supersonic shocks and fast vapor bubbles are generated in both cases: the melanin scale and the melanosome scale. The hot spot induces a shock wave pressure than with a uniform deposition of laser energy. It is found that an absorption coefficient of 6000 -8000 cm{sup -1} can explain the enhanced shock wave emitted by the melanosome. An experimental and theoretical effort should be considered to identify the mechanism for generating shock wave enhancement.

  9. A compact, short-pulse laser for near-field, range-gated imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.; Loubriel, G.M.; Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a compact laser, which produces high power, wide-angle emission for a near-field, range-gated, imaging system. The optical pulses are produced by a 100 element laser diode array (LDA) which is pulsed with a GaAs, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS). The LDA generates 100 ps long, gain-switched, optical pulses at 904 nm when it is driven with 3 ns, 400 A, electrical pulses from a high gain PCSS. Gain switching is facilitated with this many lasers by using a low impedance circuit to drive an array of lasers, which are connected electrically in series. The total optical energy produced per pulse is 10 microjoules corresponding to a total peak power of 100 kW. The entire laser system, including prime power (a nine volt battery), pulse charging, PCSS, and LDA, is the size of a small, hand-held flashlight. System lifetime, which is presently limited by the high gain PCSS, is an active area of research and development. Present limitations and potential improvements will be discussed. The complete range-gated imaging system is based on complementary technologies: high speed optical gating with intensified charge coupled devices (ICCD) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and high gain, PCSS-driven LDAs developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The system is designed for use in highly scattering media such as turbid water or extremely dense fog or smoke. The short optical pulses from the laser and high speed gating of the ICCD are synchronized to eliminate the back-scattered light from outside the depth of the field of view (FOV) which may be as short as a few centimeters. A high speed photodiode can be used to trigger the intensifier gate and set the range-gated FOV precisely on the target. The ICCD and other aspects of the imaging system are discussed in a separate paper.

  10. Compact short-pulse laser for near-field range-gated imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zutavern, Fred J.; Helgeson, Wesley D.; Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Yates, George J.; Gallegos, Robert A.; McDonald, Thomas E., Jr.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a compact laser, which produces high power, wide-angle emission for a near-field, range-gated, imaging system. The optical pulses are produced by a 100 element laser diode array (LDA) which is pulsed with a GaAs, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS). The LDA generates 100 ps long, gain-switched, optical pulses at 904 nm when it is driven with 3 ns, 400 A, electrical pulses from a high gain PCSS. Gain switching is facilitated with this many lasers by using a low impedance circuit to drive an array of lasers, which are connected electrically in series. The total optical energy produced per pulse is 100 microjoules corresponding to a total peak power of 100 kW. The entire laser system, including prime power (a nine volt battery), pulse charging, PCSS, and LDA, is the size of a small, hand-held flashlight, System lifetime, which is presently limited by the high gain PCSS, is an active area of research and development. Present limitations and potential improvements will be discussed. The complete range-gated imaging system is based on complementary technologies: high speed optical gating with intensified charge coupled devices (ICCD) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and high gain, PCSS-driven LDAs developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The system is designed for use in highly scattering media such as turbid water or extremely dense fog or smoke. The short optical pulses from the laser and high speed gating of the ICCD are synchronized to eliminate the back-scattered light from outside the depth of the field of view (FOV) which may be as short as a few centimeters. A high speed photodiode can be used to trigger the intensifier gate and set the range-gated FOV precisely on the target. The ICCD and other aspects of the imaging system are discussed in a separate paper.

  11. Heating in short-pulse laser-driven cone-capped wire targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. J.; Wei, M.; King, J.; Beg, F.; Stephens, R. B.

    2007-11-01

    The 2-D implicit hybrid simulation code e-PLAS has been used to study heating in cone-capped copper wire targets. The code e-PLAS tracks collisional particle-in-cell (PIC) electrons traversing background plasma of collisional Eulerian cold electron and ion fluids. It computes E- and B-fields by the Implicit Moment Method [1,2]. In recent experiments [3] at the Vulcan laser facility, sub- picosecond laser pulses at 1.06 μm, and 4.0 x 10^20 W/cm^2 intensity were focused into thin-walled (˜10 μm) cones attached to copper wires. The wire diameter was varied from 10-40 μm with a typical length of 1 mm. We characterize heating of the wires as a function of their diameters and length, and relate modifications of this heating to changes in the assumed laser-generated hot electron spectrum and directivity. As in recent nail experiments [4], the cones can serve as reservoirs for hot electrons, diverting them from passage down the wires. [1] R. J. Mason, and C. Cranfill, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-14, 45 (1986). [2] R. J. Mason, J. Comp. Phys. 71, 429 (1987). [3] J. King et al., to be submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett.. [4] R. J. Mason, M. Wei, F. Beg, R. Stephens, and C. Snell, in Proc. of ICOPS07, Albuquerque, NM, June 17-22, 2007, Talk 7D4.

  12. High-Dynamic-Range Temporal Measurements of Short Pulses Amplified by OPCPA

    SciTech Connect

    Bagnoud, V.; Zuegel, J.D.; Forget, N.; LeBlanc, C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the first experimental measurement of high-dynamic-range pulse contrast of compressed optical parametric chirped-pulse-amplification (OPCPA) pulses on the picosecond scale. A key to achieving better contrast with OPCPA is the simpler experimental setup that promotes more-efficient coupling of seed pulse energy into the amplification system.

  13. Validation of short-pulse-laser-based measurement setup for absolute spectral irradiance responsivity calibration.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Michaela; Nevas, Saulius; Sperling, Armin

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the validation process of mode-locked lasers in the "tunable lasers in photometry" (TULIP) setup at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) regarding spectral irradiance responsivity calibrations. Validation has been carried out in the visible spectral range, 400-700 nm, with two different photometer heads and in the long wavelength range, 690-780 nm, with a filtered radiometer. A comparison of the results against those from two different validated measurement setups has been carried out for validation. For the visible spectral range, the comparison is conducted against the data obtained from a lamp-based monochromator setup for spectral irradiance responsivity calibrations and against the photometric values (integral quantity) measured at the photometric bench setup of PTB. For the long wavelength range, comparisons against results from two different lamp-based monochromator measurement setups were made. Additionally, the effect of different radiation bandwidths on interference oscillations has been determined for a filter radiometer without a diffuser. A procedure for the determination of the optimum bandwidth of the setup for the respective measurement device is presented. PMID:24921865

  14. Analysis of neon soft x-ray spectra from short-pulse laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Abare, A.C.; Keane, C.J.; Crane, J.K.; DaSilva, L.B.; Lee, R.W.; Perry, M.D.; Falcone, R.W.

    1993-04-01

    We report preliminary results from the analysis of streaked soft x-ray neon spectra obtained from the interaction of a picosecond Nd:glass laser with a gas jet target. In these experiments streaked spectra show prompt harmonic emission followed by longer time duration soft x-ray line emission. The majority of the line emission observed was found to originate from Li- and Be-like Ne and the major transitions in the observed spectra have been identified. Li-like emission lines were observed to decay faster in time than Be-like transitions, suggesting that recombination is taking place. Line ratios of n=4-2 and n=3-2 transitions supported the view that these lines were optically thin and thick, respectively. The time history of Li-like Ne 2p-4d and 2p-3d lines is in good agreement with a simple adiabatic expansion model coupled to a time dependent collisional-radiative code. Further x-ray spectroscopic analysis is underway which is aimed at diagnosing plasma conditions and assessing the potential of this recombining neon plasma as a quasi-steady-state recombination x-ray laser medium.

  15. Development of high damage threshold optics for petawatt-class short-pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Brent C.; Perry, Michael D.; Boyd, Robert D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Shore, Bruce W.; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.

    1995-04-01

    We report laser-induced damage threshold measurements on pure and multilayer dielectrics and gold-coated optics at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations, (tau) , ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Damage thresholds of gold coatings are limited to 500 mJ/cm2 in the subpicosecond range from 1053-nm pulses. In dielectrics, qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated (tau) 1/2 scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for (tau) 50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in quantitative agreement with both the pulsewidth and wavelength scaling of experimental results.

  16. Ultrafast electron kinetics in short pulse laser-driven dense hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Doppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Forster, E.; Gode, S.; Gregori, G.; Harmand, M.; Hilbert, V.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Mithen, J. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbaumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; White, T. G.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.; Tschentscher, T.

    2015-09-25

    Dense cryogenic hydrogen is heated by intense femtosecond infrared laser pulses at intensities of ${10}^{15}-{10}^{16}\\;$ W cm–2. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict that this heating is limited to the skin depth, causing an inhomogeneously heated outer shell with a cold core and two prominent temperatures of about $25$ and $40\\;\\mathrm{eV}$ for simulated delay times up to $+70\\;\\mathrm{fs}$ after the laser pulse maximum. Experimentally, the time-integrated emitted bremsstrahlung in the spectral range of 8–18 nm was corrected for the wavelength-dependent instrument efficiency. The resulting spectrum cannot be fit with a single temperature bremsstrahlung model, and the best fit is obtained using two temperatures of about 13 and $30\\;$eV. The lower temperatures in the experiment can be explained by missing energy-loss channels in the simulations, as well as the inclusion of hot, non-Maxwellian electrons in the temperature calculation. In conclusion, we resolved the time-scale for laser-heating of hydrogen, and PIC results for laser–matter interaction were successfully tested against the experiment data.

  17. Ultrafast electron kinetics in short pulse laser-driven dense hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Döppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Förster, E.; Göde, S.; Gregori, G.; Harmand, M.; Hilbert, V.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Mithen, J. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; White, T. G.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.; Tschentscher, T.

    2015-11-01

    Dense cryogenic hydrogen is heated by intense femtosecond infrared laser pulses at intensities of {10}15-{10}16 W cm-2. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict that this heating is limited to the skin depth, causing an inhomogeneously heated outer shell with a cold core and two prominent temperatures of about 25 and 40 {eV} for simulated delay times up to +70 {fs} after the laser pulse maximum. Experimentally, the time-integrated emitted bremsstrahlung in the spectral range of 8-18 nm was corrected for the wavelength-dependent instrument efficiency. The resulting spectrum cannot be fit with a single temperature bremsstrahlung model, and the best fit is obtained using two temperatures of about 13 and 30 eV. The lower temperatures in the experiment can be explained by missing energy-loss channels in the simulations, as well as the inclusion of hot, non-Maxwellian electrons in the temperature calculation. We resolved the time-scale for laser-heating of hydrogen, and PIC results for laser-matter interaction were successfully tested against the experiment data.

  18. Hot dense matter creation in short-pulse laser interaction with tamped foils

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S; Pasley, J; Beg, F; Gregori, G; Evans, R G; Notley, M; Mackinnon, A; Glenzer, S; Hansen, S; King, J; Chung, H; Wilks, S; Stephens, R; Freeman, R; Weber, R; Saiz, E G; Khattak, F; Riley, D

    2006-08-15

    The possibility of producing hot dense matter has important applications for the understanding of transport processes in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) [1] and laboratory astrophysics experiments [2]. While the success of ICF requires the correct solution of a complex interaction between laser coupling, equation-of-state, and particle transport problems, the possibility of experimentally recreating conditions found during the ignition phase in a simplified geometry is extremely appealing. In this paper we will show that hot dense plasma conditions found during ICF ignition experiments can be reproduced by illuminating a tamped foil with a high intensity laser. We will show that temperatures on the order of kiloelectronvolts at solid densities can be achieved under controlled conditions during the experiment. Hydrodynamic tamping by surface coatings allows to reach higher density regimes by enabling the diagnosis of matter that has not yet begun to decompress, thus opening the possibility of directly investigating strongly coupled systems [3]. Our experimental diagnostics is based on K-shell spectroscopy coupled to x-ray imaging techniques. Such techniques have recently become prevalent in the diagnosis of hot dense matter [4]. By looking at the presence, and relative strengths, of lines associated with different ionization states, spectroscopy provides considerable insight into plasma conditions. At the same time, curved crystal imaging techniques allow for the spatial resolution of different regions of the target, both allowing for comparison of heating processes with the results of Particle-In-Cell (PIC) and hybrid simulation codes.

  19. Particle characteristics of different materials after ultra-short pulsed laser (USPL) irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Joerg; Schelle, Florian; Kowalczyk, Philip; Frentzen, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The exposition of nanoparticles caused by laser application in dental health care is an open discussion. Based on the fact that nanoparticles can penetrate through the mucosa, the knowledge about particle characteristics after irradiation with an USPL is of high importance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the particle characteristics, especially the size of the ablated debris after USPL irradiation. The irradiation was carried out with an USP Nd:YVO4 laser with a center wavelength of 1064 nm. Based on the pulse duration of 8 ps and a pulse repetition rate of 500 kHz the laser emits an average power of 9 W. The materials investigated were dental tissues and dental restorative materials (composite and amalgam), ceramic and different metals (gold and aluminium). The samples were irradiated with a power density in the order of 300 GW/cm2 at distances of 5, 10, 15, and 20 mm. The debris was collected on an object plate. SEM pictures were used for analysis of the ablation debris. Depending on the irradiated material, we observed different kinds of structures: vitreous, flocculent, and pellet-like. The mean particle sizes were 10 x 10 up to 30 x 30 μm2. In addition, a cluster of ablated matter (nanometer range) distributed over the whole irradiated area was found. With increasing distances the cluster structure reduced from multi-layer to mono-layer clusters. Particle sizes in the micrometer and nanometer range were found after irradiation with an USPL. The nanoparticles create a cluster structure which is influenced by increasing distances.

  20. Methodology for the conception of speckle reduction elements in the case of short pulse illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Yves; Poyet, Jean-Michel

    2015-10-01

    One of the most efficient ways to decrease the speckle contrast in the field of laser illumination is to increase the spatial diversity of coherent laser sources. For very short laser pulses such as those required for flash laser imaging, the spatial diversity should take place instantaneously and no time averaging effect can be used. The spatial diversity is realized by sampling the laser beam into m beamlets with increased optical path length. This path length has to be greater than or equal to the coherence length of the laser beam. In this case, the beamlets are no longer able to create interferences which each other. According to the Goodman's theory of speckle reduction, the speckle contrast is then reduced by a factor of 1/√m. Unfortunately, in the case of multimode lasers, the number of uncorrelated beamlets is not infinite but is limited by a periodicity function resulting from the laser resonator length itself. The speckle reduction possibility is therefore limited and is directly linked to each laser source where the coherence length and cavity length are defined. In this work we present a methodology to determine experimentally the optical path length difference as well as the number of beamlets for de-speckling a laser source. An experimental realization is presented where both, coherence length and periodicity function are measured with a Michelson interferometer where only the speckle contrast of the two beams from each arm is analyzed. For the validation of the method, the chosen laser source is a single emitter 660 nm laser diode. Two cylindrical steppers made with diamond turned PMMA have been realized. Both elements yield interesting results with close values and in accordance with the theory of spatial diversity. The speckle contrast could be reduced from about 10% to a value close to 4%. These values confirm and validate the methodology presented in this work. Steppers can also be a promising solution for the reduction of interference fringes which appear when using a lightpipe in a laser illuminator design.

  1. Laser-fired contact formation on metallized and passivated silicon wafers under short pulse durations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Ashwin S.

    The objective of this work is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the physical processes governing laser-fired contact (LFC) formation under microsecond pulse durations. Primary emphasis is placed on understanding how processing parameters influence contact morphology, passivation layer quality, alloying of Al and Si, and contact resistance. In addition, the research seeks to develop a quantitative method to accurately predict the contact geometry, thermal cycles, heat and mass transfer phenomena, and the influence of contact pitch distance on substrate temperatures in order to improve the physical understanding of the underlying processes. Finally, the work seeks to predict how geometry for LFCs produced with microsecond pulses will influence fabrication and performance factors, such as the rear side contacting scheme, rear surface series resistance and effective rear surface recombination rates. The characterization of LFC cross-sections reveals that the use of microsecond pulse durations results in the formation of three-dimensional hemispherical or half-ellipsoidal contact geometries. The LFC is heavily alloyed with Al and Si and is composed of a two-phase Al-Si microstructure that grows from the Si wafer during resolidification. As a result of forming a large three-dimensional contact geometry, the total contact resistance is governed by the interfacial contact area between the LFC and the wafer rather than the planar contact area at the original Al-Si interface within an opening in the passivation layer. By forming three-dimensional LFCs, the total contact resistance is significantly reduced in comparison to that predicted for planar contacts. In addition, despite the high energy densities associated with microsecond pulse durations, the passivation layer is well preserved outside of the immediate contact region. Therefore, the use of microsecond pulse durations can be used to improve device performance by leading to lower total contact resistances while preserving the passivation layer. A mathematical model was developed to accurately predict LFC geometry over a wide range of processing parameters by accounting for transient changes in Al and Si alloy composition within the LFC. Since LFC geometry plays a critical role in device performance, an accurate method to predict contact geometry is an important tool that can facilitate further process development. Dimensionless analysis was also conducted to evaluate the relative importance of heat and mass transfer mechanisms. It is shown that convection plays a dominant role in the heat and mass transfer within the molten pool. Due to convective mass transfer, the contacts are heavily doped with Al and Si within 10 is after contact formation, which contributes to the entire resolidified region behaving as the electrically active LFC. The validated model is also used to determine safe operating regimes during laser processing to avoid excessively high operating temperatures. By maintaining processing temperatures below a critical temperature threshold, the onset of liquid metal expulsion and loss of alloying elements can be avoided. The process maps provide a framework that can be used to tailor LFC geometry for device fabrication. Finally, using various geometric relationships for the rear side contacting scheme for photovoltaic devices, it is shown that by employing hemispherical contacts, the number of LFCs required on the rear side can be reduced 75% while doubling the pitch distance and increasing the passivation fraction. Reducing the number of backside contacts required can have a noteworthy impact of manufacturing throughput. In addition, the analytical models suggest that device performance can be maintained at levels comparable to those achieved for planar contacts when producing three-dimensional contacts. The materials and electrical characterization results, device simulations, and design considerations presented in this thesis indicate that by forming three-dimensional LFCs, performance levels of Si-based photovoltaic devices can be maintained while greatly enhancing manufacturing efficiency. The research lays a solid foundation for future development of the LFC process with microsecond pulse durations and indicates that device fabrication employing this method is a critical step moving forward.

  2. Thermal interaction of short-pulsed laser focused beams with skin tissues.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jian; Guo, Zhixiong

    2009-07-01

    Time-dependent thermal interaction is developed in a skin tissue cylinder subjected to the irradiation of a train of short laser pulses. The skin embedded with a small tumor is stratified as three layers: epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat with different optical, thermal and physiological properties. The laser beam is focused to the tumor site by an objective lens for thermal therapy. The ultrafast radiation heat transfer of the focused beam is simulated by the transient discrete ordinates method. The transient Pennes bio-heat equation is solved numerically by the finite volume method with alternating direction implicit scheme. Emphasis is placed on the characterization of the focused beam propagation and absorption and the temperature rise in the focal spot. The effects of the focal spot size and location, the laser power, and the bio-heat equation are investigated. Comparisons with collimated irradiation are conducted. The focused beam can penetrate a greater depth and produce higher temperature rise at the target area, and thus reduce the possibility of thermal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. It is ideal for killing cancerous cells and small tumors.

  3. Electrophysical and optophysical properties of air ionized by a short pulse of fast electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Vagin, Yu.P.; Stal', N.L.; Khokhlov, V.D.; Chernoyarskii, A.A.

    1987-12-01

    A method of solving the nonsteady kinetic equation of deceleration of electrons is developed in the basis of the application of the multigroup approximation. The electron distribution function in air ionized by nonsteady sources of primary electrons is determined, and the process of avalanche formation of secondary electrons in air is investigated. The time dependence of the emission intensity of air is determined, experimentally and by calculation, in two spectral intervals, one of which includes the lambda = 391.4 nm NS N/sub 2//sup +/ (O, O) band while the other includes the lambda = 337.1 nm 2 PS N/sub 2/ (O, O) band, under the action of a short electron beam with an energy E = 100 keV for different values of the gas pressure. The agreement between theoretical results and experimental data indicates the reliability of the method of solving the nonsteady kinetic equation of electron deceleration proposed in the paper.

  4. Generation of strong pulsed magnetic fields using a compact, short pulse generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanuka, D.; Efimov, S.; Nitishinskiy, M.; Rososhek, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-04-01

    The generation of strong magnetic fields (˜50 T) using single- or multi-turn coils immersed in water was studied. A pulse generator with stored energy of ˜3.6 kJ, discharge current amplitude of ˜220 kA, and rise time of ˜1.5 μs was used in these experiments. Using the advantage of water that it has a large Verdet constant, the magnetic field was measured using the non-disturbing method of Faraday rotation of a polarized collimated laser beam. This approach does not require the use of magnetic probes, which are sensitive to electromagnetic noise and damaged in each shot. It also avoids the possible formation of plasma by either a flashover along the conductor or gas breakdown inside the coil caused by an induced electric field. In addition, it was shown that this approach can be used successfully to investigate the interesting phenomenon of magnetic field enhanced diffusion into a conductor.

  5. Short-pulse photoassociation in rubidium below the D{sub 1} line

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Christiane P.; Kosloff, Ronnie; Masnou-Seeuws, Francoise

    2006-04-15

    Photoassociation of two ultracold rubidium atoms and the subsequent formation of stable molecules in the singlet ground and lowest triplet states is investigated theoretically. The method employs laser pulses inducing transitions via excited states correlated to the 5S+5P{sub 1/2} asymptote. Weakly bound molecules in the singlet ground or lowest triplet state can be created by a single pulse while the formation of more deeply bound molecules requires a two-color pump-dump scenario. More deeply bound molecules in the singlet ground or lowest triplet state can be produced only if efficient mechanisms for both pump and dump steps exist. While long-range 1/R{sup 3} potentials allow for efficient photoassociation, stabilization is facilitated by the resonant spin-orbit coupling of the 0{sub u}{sup +} states. Molecules in the singlet ground state bound by a few wave numbers can thus be formed. This provides a promising first step toward ground-state molecules which are ultracold in both translational and vibrational degrees of freedom.

  6. Theory of multiphoton ionization of atoms by strong, short pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kulander, K.C.

    1987-07-10

    A numerical technique for investigating the behavior of many electron atoms in intense laser fields is presented. A description of the method is followed by results of an illustrative, application to helium for a number of wavelengths and intensities. A discussion of high order ionization dynamics for this system based on these calculations is provided. 10 refs.

  7. Manipulating mammalian cell by phase transformed titanium surface fabricated through ultra-short pulsed laser synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Sivaprasad; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-15

    Developing cell sensitive indicators on interacting substrates that allows specific cell manipulation by a combination of physical, chemical or mechanical cues is a challenge for current biomaterials. Hence, various fabrication approaches have been created on a variety of substrates to mimic or create cell specific cues. However, to achieve cell specific cues a multistep process or a post-chemical treatment is often necessitated. So, a simple approach without any chemical or biological treatment would go a long way in developing bio-functionalized substrates to effectively modulate cell adhesion and interaction. The present investigation is aimed to study the manipulative activity induced by phase transformed titanium surface. An ultra-short laser is used to fabricate the phase transformed titanium surface where a polymorphic titanium oxide phases with titanium monoxide (TiO), tri-titanium oxide (Ti3O) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) have been synthesized on commercially pure titanium. Control over oxide phase transformed area was demonstrated via a combination of laser scanning time (laser pulse interaction time) and laser pulse widths (laser pulse to pulse separation time). The interaction of phase transformed titanium surface with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells developed a new bio-functionalized platforms on titanium based biomaterials to modulate cell migration and adhesion. The synthesized phase transformed titanium surface on the whole appeared to induce directional cues for cell migration with unique preferential cell adhesion unseen by other fabrication approaches. The precise bio-functionalization controllability exhibited during fabrication offers perceptible edge for developing a variety of smart bio-medical devices, implants and cardiovascular stents where the need in supressing specific cell adhesion and proliferation is of great demand.

  8. Microcracks, spall and fracture in glass: A study using short pulsed laser shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Zen; Nakano, M.; Yamauchi, Y.; Kishida, K.; Tanaka, K. A.

    1998-04-01

    This work reports our meso mechanical study of microcrack behavior, especially the process leading from microcracking to macro failure. Using laser loading with a duration on the order of nanoseconds, spallation in a cylindrical geometry was achieved in soda-lime glass at the microcrack evolution stage. Laser induced shock waves were used to conduct crack initiation experiments for the first time. The specimens were examined after experiments and were compared with those loaded by conventional static and dynamic methods. A meso scale failure model of nucleation, growth, and percolation (NGP) is suggested based on the experiments. The NGP model is characterized by a randomly generated microcrack field and by simultaneous percolation statistics in time iteration. In most existing damage models, the statistical average of microcracks over a finite space is required in order to evaluate the damage variables. This procedure is not necessary in the NGP model. We show that the connection of microcracks can be very complicated, possibly a self-organized process.

  9. Measurements of emission spectra from hot, dense germanium plasma in short pulse laser experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarty, D. J.; James, S. F.; Brown, C. R. D.; Williams, B. M.; Chung, H. K.; Harris, J. W. O.; Upcraft, L.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Smith, C. C.; Lee, R. W.

    2010-01-01

    Heating of thin foil targets by an high power laser at intensities of 10 17-10 19 W/cm 2 has been studied as a method for producing high temperature, high density samples to investigate X-ray opacity and equation of state. The targets were plastic (parylene-N) foils with a microdot made of a mixture of germanium and titanium buried at depth of 1.5 μm. The L-shell spectra from the germanium and the K-shell spectra from the titanium were taken using crystal spectrometers recording onto film and an ultra fast X-ray streak camera coupled to a conical focussing crystal with a time resolution of 1 ps. The conditions in the microdot were inferred by comparing the measured spectra to synthetic spectra produced by the time-dependent collisional-radiative (CR) models FLY and FLYCHK. The data were also compared to simulated spectra from a number of opacity codes assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Temperature and density gradients were taken into account in the comparisons. The sample conditions were inferred from the CR modelling using FLYCHK to be 800 ± 100 eV and 1.5 ± 0.5 g/cc. The best fit to the LTE models was at a temperature 20% lower than with the CR model. Though the sample departs from LTE significantly useful spectral comparisons can still be made. The results and comparisons are discussed along with improvements to the experimental technique to achieve conditions closer to LTE.

  10. Experimental observation of short-pulse upshifted frequency microwaves from a laser-created overdense plasma.

    PubMed

    Yugami, Noboru; Niiyama, Toshihiko; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Gao, Hong; Sasaki, Shigeo; Ito, Hiroaki; Nishida, Yasushi

    2002-03-01

    A short and frequency upshifted from a source microwave pulse is experimentally generated by the overdense plasma that is rapidly created by a laser. The source wave, whose frequency is 9 GHz, is propagating in the waveguide filled with tetrakis-dimethyl-amino-ethylene gas, which is to be converted to the overdense plasma by the laser. The detected frequency of the pulse is over 31.4 GHz and its duration is 10 ns. This technique has the potential for the generation of a tunable frequency source.

  11. Analysis of neon soft x-ray spectra from short-pulse laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abare, Amber C.; Keane, Christopher J.; Crane, John K.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Lee, Richard W.; Perry, Michael D.; Falcone, Roger W.

    1993-07-01

    We report preliminary results from the analysis of streaked soft x-ray neon spectra obtained from the interaction of a picosecond Nd:glass laser with a gas jet target. In these experiments streaked spectra show prompt harmonic emission followed by longer time duration soft x-ray line emission. The majority of the line emission observed was found to originate from Li- and Be-like Ne and the major transitions in the observed spectra have been identified. Li-like emission lines were observed to decay faster in time than Be-like transitions, suggesting that recombination is taking place. Line ratios of n equals 4 - 2 and n equals 3 - 2 transitions supported the view that these lines were optically thin and thick, respectively. The time history of Li-like Ne 2p-4d and 2p-3d lines is in good agreement with a simple adiabatic expansion model coupled to a time dependent collisional-radiative code. Further x-ray spectroscopic analysis is underway which is aimed at diagnosing plasma conditions and assessing the potential of this recombining neon plasma as a quasi-steady-state recombination x-ray laser medium.

  12. Mesoscale Laser Processing using Excimer and Short-Pulse Ti: Sapphire Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Shirk, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Gilmer, G H; Stuart, B C; Armstrong, J P; Oberhelman, S K; Baker, S L; Nikitin, A J; Mariella, R P

    2003-07-28

    Targets to study high-energy density physics and inertial confinement fusion processes have very specific and precise tolerances that are pushing the state-of-the-art in mesoscale microsculpting technology. A significant effort is required in order to advance the capabilities to make these targets with very challenging geometries. Ultrashort pulsed (USP) Ti:Sapphire lasers and excimer lasers are proving to be very effective tools in the fabrication of the very small pieces that make up these targets. A brief description of the dimensional and structural requirements of these pieces will be presented, along with theoretical and experimental results that demonstrate to what extent these lasers are achieving the desired results, which include sub-{mu}m precision and RMS surface values well below 100 nm. This work indicates that excimer lasers are best at sculpting the polymer pieces and that the USP lasers work quite well on metal and aerogel surfaces, especially for those geometries that cannot be produced using diamond machining and where material removal amounts are too great to do with focused ion beam milling in a cost effective manner. In addition, the USP laser may be used as part of the procedure to fill target capsules with fusion fuel, a mixture of deuterium and tritium, without causing large perturbations on the surface of the target by keeping holes drilled through 125 {micro}m of beryllium below 5 {micro}m in diameter.

  13. Comparison of Single Event Transients Generated by Short Pulsed X-Rays, Lasers and Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoza, David; LaLumondiere, Stephen D.; Tockstein, Michael A.; Brewe, Dale L.; Wells, Nathan P.; Koga, Rokutaro; Gaab, K. M.; Lotshaw, William T.; Moss, Steven C.

    2014-12-01

    We report an experimental study of the transients generated by pulsed x-rays, heavy ions, and different laser wavelengths in a Si p-i-n photodiode. We compare the charge collected by all of the excitation methods to determine the equivalent LET for pulsed x-rays relative to heavy ions. Our comparisons show that pulsed x-rays from synchrotron sources can generate a large range of equivalent LET and generate transients similar to those excited by laser pulses and heavy ion strikes. We also look at how the pulse width of the transients changes for the different excitation methods. We show that the charge collected with pulsed x-rays is greater than expected as the x-ray photon energy increases. Combined with their capability of focusing to small spot sizes and of penetrating metallization, pulsed x-rays are a promising new tool for high resolution screening of SEE susceptibility

  14. Ultra-intense, short pulse laser-plasma interactions with applications to the fast ignitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wilks, S.C.; Kruer, W.L.; Young, P.E.; Hammer, J.; Tabak, M.

    1995-04-01

    Due to the advent of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) as an efficient means of creating ultra-high intensity laser light (I > 5{times}10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) in pulses less than a few picoseconds, new ideas for achieving ignition and gain in DT targets with less than 1 megajoule of input energy are currently being pursued. Two types of powerful lasers are employed in this scheme: (1) channeling beams and (2) ignition beams. The current state of laser-plasma interactions relating to this fusion scheme will be discussed. In particular, plasma physics issues in the ultra-intense regime are crucial to the success of this scheme. We compare simulation and experimental results in this highly nonlinear regime.

  15. High Energy K(alpha) Radiography Using High-intensity, Short-pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Izumi, N; Key, M H; King, J A; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Patel, P K; Price, D F; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Snavely, R A; Tabak, M; Town, R J; Wickersham, J E; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Theobald, W; Chambers, D M; Eagelton, R; Goldsack, T; Clarke, R J; Heathcote, R; Giraldez, E; Nikroo, A; Steinman, D A; Stephens, R B; Zhang, B B

    2005-11-16

    We have performed experiments using Callisto, the Vulcan 100 TW and the Vulcan Petawatt high intensity lasers to understand the characteristics of high energy, K{alpha} x-ray sources and to implement workable radiography solutions at 20-100 keV. Our measurements show that the K{alpha} size from a simple foil target is larger than 60 {micro}m, far larger than the experiment resolution requirement. The total K{alpha} yield is independent of target thicknesses verifying that refluxing plays a major role in photon generation. Smaller radiating volumes emit brighter K{alpha} radiation. 1-D radiography experiments using small-edge-on foils resolved 10 {micro}m features with high contrast. We tested a variety of small volume 2-D point sources such as cones, wires, and embedded wires, measuring photon yields and comparing our measurements with predictions from hybrid-PIC LSP simulations. In addition to high-energy, high-resolution backlighters, future experiments will also need imaging detectors and diagnostic tools that are workable in the 20-100 keV energy range. An initial look at some of these detector issues is also presented.

  16. Tunable short-pulse beat-wave laser source operating at 1 microm.

    PubMed

    Hankla, A K; Bullock, A B; White, W E; Squier, J A; Barty, C P

    1997-11-15

    We have demonstrated a chirped-pulse-amplification system utilizing an air-spaced etalon inside a regenerative amplifier to produce two simultaneous 2.0-ps pulses, one centered at the gain peak of Nd:phosphate glass (1052 nm) and the other centered at the gain peak of Nd:silicate (1061 nm). Autocorrelations of the resulting beat wave demonstrate a beat frequency of 2.3 THz. We achieved wavelength tunability over a 10-nm range by electronically adjusting the etalon spacing and variable pulse width by changing the etalon rotation. PMID:18188344

  17. A short-pulse Ka-band instrumentation radar for foliage attenuation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puranen, Mikko; Eskelinen, Pekka

    2008-10-01

    A portable Ka-band instrumentation radar for foliage attenuation measurements has been designed. It uses direct dielectric resonator oscillator multiplier pulse modulation giving a half power pulse width of 17 ns. The dual conversion scalar receiver utilizes either a digital storage oscilloscope in envelope detection format or a special gated comparator arrangement providing 1 m resolution and associated led seven segment display for data analysis. The calibrated dynamic range is better than 37 dB with an equivalent noise floor of 0.005 dBsm at 25 m test range distance. First experiments indicate an effective beamwidth close to 1°. The total weight is below 5 kg and the unit can be mounted on a conventional photographic tripod. Power is supplied from a 12 V/6 A h sealed lead acid battery giving an operating time in excess of 10 h.

  18. Investigating the Inverse Faraday Effect with an intense short pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmudin, Zulfikar; Tatarakis, Michealis; Krushelnick, Karl; Clark, Eugene; Santala, Marko; Dangor, Bucker; Clarke, Robert; Neely, David; Faure, Jerome; Malka, Victor

    2000-10-01

    A circularly polarised laser beam traversing through a plasma can generate an azimuthal electron current, due to their combined quiver motion. This will generate a solenoidal magnetic field in the plasma colinear with the laser propagation. This phenomena is known as the Inverse Faraday Effect (IFE), and can result in sizeable magnetic field strength for an ultra-intense laser pulses traversing through sufficiently dense plasmas. We present here measurements of the IFE field generated by the ultra-intense Vulcan:CPA laser travelling through underdense plasmas. The Vulcan:CPA laser can be focused to greater than 5 × 10^18 Wcm-2, and can generate IFE magnetic fields in excess of 2 MG. We present here the variation of the field with intensity and density, as well as measurements of its temporal and spatial behaviour. Noticeably the field is only observed for the time duration of the driver pulse, and decreases in spatial extent with increasing strength of magnetic field.

  19. The physical response of soft musculoskeletal tissues to short-pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dark, Marta Lyselle

    An experimental study was performed to determine the physical properties of knee meniscus using a low energy laser technique. Following irradiation by a 10 ns laser pulse, tissue undergoes thermoelastic expansion in response to laser-induced stresses. The stresses evolve, propagating through the tissue. If they exceed the material's strength, ablation occurs-the material ruptures. Below ablation threshold, the material remains in an expanded state until thermal relaxation occurs. We use numerical methods to solve the 3-D thermoelastic wave equation for a hydrated sample. In addition to thermoelastic expansion, expansion due to the formation of cavitation bubbles within the tissue was modeled. Cavitation occurs when tensile stresses rupture fluid. The laser-induced response of a gelatin phantom was measured with a Michelson interferometer and compared with predictions. Using gelatin as a tissue model provided a consistent experimental model of meniscus. Meniscus, like all biological tissue, is highly heterogeneous. By adapting the time dependent numerical solution of the wave equation, the measurement of physical properties of a hydrated sample became possible. The thermoelastic model depends on sound speed, Poisson's ratio, thermal expansion coefficient, and optical penetration depth. Once the behavior of gelatin was understood, human knee meniscus was studied. The thermoelastic model and experiment, allows measurement of physical properties of meniscus. Also, a numerical model of cavitation based on Rayleigh's equations was developed. By comparing experiment and theory in menicus and water, we determined properties important to cavitation: threshold pressure, bubble density, surface tension and nucleation size. Finally, histology was compared with experiment. The presence and amount of cavitation displacement was correlated with the condition of meniscus. Physical properties can be used to diagnose degenerative cartilage. This research has increased understanding of the interaction of short laser pulses with cartilage tissue, and measured significant physical properties of knee meniscus with a minimally invasive laser technique. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14- 0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  20. Broadband short pulse measurement by autocorrelation with a sum-frequency generation set-up

    SciTech Connect

    Glotin, F.; Jaroszynski, D.; Marcouille, O.

    1995-12-31

    Previous spectral and laser pulse length measurements carried out on the CLIO FEL at wavelength {lambda}=8.5 {mu}m suggested that very short light pulses could be generated, about 500 fs wide (FWHM). For these measurements a Michelson interferometer with a Te crystal, as a non-linear detector, was used as a second order autocorrelation device. More recent measurements in similar conditions have confirmed that the laser pulses observed are indeed single: they are not followed by other pulses distant by the slippage length N{lambda}. As the single micropulse length is likely to depend on the slippage, more measurements at different wavelengths would be useful. This is not directly possible with our actual interferometer set-up, based on a phase-matched non-linear crystal. However, we can use the broadband non-linear medium provided by one of our users` experiments: Sum-Frequency Generation over surfaces. With such autocorrelation set-up, interference fringes are no more visible, but this is largely compensated by the frequency range provided. First tests at 8 {mu}m have already been performed to validate the technic, leading to results similar to those obtained with our previous Michelson set-up.

  1. High-energy K{alpha} radiography using high-intensity, short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.-S.; Chung, H.-K.; Izumi, N.; Key, M.H.; King, J.A.; Koch, J.A.; Landen, O.L.; Patel, P.K.; Price, D.F.; Remington, B.A.; Robey, H.F.; Snavely, R.A.; Tabak, M.; Town, R.P.J.; Wickersham, J.E.; Chambers, D.M.; Eagleton, R.; Goldsack, T.; Clarke, R.J.; Heathcote, R.

    2006-05-15

    The characteristics of 22-40 keV K{alpha} x-ray sources are measured. These high-energy sources are produced by 100 TW and petawatt high-intensity lasers and will be used to develop and implement workable radiography solutions to probe high-Z and dense materials for the high-energy density experiments. The measurements show that the K{alpha} source size from a simple foil target is larger than 60 {mu}m, too large for most radiography applications. The total K{alpha} yield is independent of target thicknesses, verifying that refluxing plays a major role in photon generation. Smaller radiating volumes emit brighter K{alpha} radiation. One-dimensional radiography experiments using small-edge-on foils resolved 10 {mu}m features with high contrast. Experiments were performed to test a variety of small volume two-dimensional point sources such as cones, wires, and embedded wires, measured photon yields, and compared the measurements with predictions from hybrid-particle-in-cell simulations. In addition to high-energy, high-resolution backlighters, future experiments will also need imaging detectors and diagnostic tools that are workable in the high-energy range. An initial look at some of these detector issues is also presented.

  2. An ultra short pulse reconstruction software applied to the GEMINI high power laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galletti, Mario; Galimberti, Marco; Hooker, Chris; Chekhlov, Oleg; Tang, Yunxin; Bisesto, Fabrizio Giuseppe; Curcio, Alessandro; Anania, Maria Pia; Giulietti, Danilo

    2016-09-01

    The GRENOUILLE traces of Gemini pulses (15 J, 30 fs, PW, shot per 20 s) were acquired in the Gemini Target Area PetaWatt at the Central Laser Facility (CLF), Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). A comparison between the characterizations of the laser pulse parameters made using two different types of algorithms: Video Frog and GRenouille/FrOG (GROG), was made. The temporal and spectral parameters came out to be in great agreement for the two kinds of algorithms. In this experimental campaign it has been showed how GROG, the developed algorithm, works as well as VideoFrog algorithm with the PetaWatt pulse class.

  3. Thermal interaction of short-pulsed laser focused beams with skin tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jian; Guo, Zhixiong

    2009-07-01

    Time-dependent thermal interaction is developed in a skin tissue cylinder subjected to the irradiation of a train of short laser pulses. The skin embedded with a small tumor is stratified as three layers: epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat with different optical, thermal and physiological properties. The laser beam is focused to the tumor site by an objective lens for thermal therapy. The ultrafast radiation heat transfer of the focused beam is simulated by the transient discrete ordinates method. The transient Pennes bio-heat equation is solved numerically by the finite volume method with alternating direction implicit scheme. Emphasis is placed on the characterization of the focused beam propagation and absorption and the temperature rise in the focal spot. The effects of the focal spot size and location, the laser power, and the bio-heat equation are investigated. Comparisons with collimated irradiation are conducted. The focused beam can penetrate a greater depth and produce higher temperature rise at the target area, and thus reduce the possibility of thermal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. It is ideal for killing cancerous cells and small tumors.

  4. Laser ion acceleration and neutron source in short-pulse solid- nanoparticle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, K.; Watari, T.; Matsukado, K.; Sekine, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Takagi, M.; Satoh, N.; Kawashima, T.; Kan, H.

    2016-03-01

    We propose both an efficient neutron source and an extremely high energy proton source using solid CD and CH nano-particles, respectively, irradiated by an intense laser light. With a use of 3-d PIC simulations, we obtain an optimum CD radius for a neutron source, 250 nm and required laser field of a=eE/mωc ≈ 2, which results in D-D reaction rate of <σv> = 2x10-16 cm3/s, corresponding to an effective deuteron temperature of 500 keV to 1MeV. Reduction of neutron yield by pre-expansion is discussed. In a range of a ≈100, laser radiation pressure surrounding the particles accelerates electrons in the forward direction. Protons following the electrons become directional high energy, for example, proton energy of 450 MeV is obtained within 130 fs in CH particle interaction with 700 nm in radius. More than 10% of total protons in CH-particles are accelerated forward. Proton energy continuously increases with time and with the increase of particle size and the direction is also collimated with time.

  5. Laser-driven high-power X- and γ-ray ultra-short pulse source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Kando, Masaki; Zhidkov, Alexei G.

    2009-07-01

    A novel ultra-bright high-intensity source of X-ray and gamma radiation is suggested. It is based on the double Doppler effect, where a relativistic flying mirror reflects counter-propagating electromagnetic radiation causing its frequency multiplication and intensification, and on the inverse double Doppler effect, where the mirror acquires energy from an ultra-intense co-propagating electromagnetic wave. The role of the flying mirror is played by a high-density thin plasma slab accelerating in the radiation pressure dominant regime. Frequencies of high harmonics generated at the flying mirror by relativistically strong counter-propagating radiation undergo multiplication with the same factor as the fundamental frequency of the reflected radiation, approximately equal to the quadruple of the square of the mirror Lorentz factor.

  6. Short pulse laser stretcher-compressor using a single common reflective grating

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.; Biswal, Subrat; Bartolick, Joseph M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Telford, Steve

    2004-05-25

    The present invention provides an easily aligned, all-reflective, aberration-free pulse stretcher-compressor in a compact geometry. The stretcher-compressor device is a reflective multi-layer dielectric that can be utilized for high power chirped-pulse amplification material processing applications. A reflective grating element of the device is constructed: 1) to receive a beam for stretching of laser pulses in a beam stretcher beam path and 2) to also receive stretched amplified pulses to be compressed in a compressor beam path through the same (i.e., common) reflective multilayer dielectric diffraction grating. The stretched and compressed pulses are interleaved about the grating element to provide the desired number of passes in each respective beam path in order to achieve the desired results.

  7. Heating of thin foils with a relativistic-intensity short-pulse laser.

    PubMed

    Audebert, P; Shepherd, R; Fournier, K B; Peyrusse, O; Price, D; Lee, R; Springer, P; Gauthier, J-C; Klein, L

    2002-12-23

    K-shell x-ray spectroscopy of sub-100 nm Al foils irradiated by high contrast, spatially uniform, 150 fs, Ilambda (2)=2 x 10(18) W microm(2)/cm(2), laser pulses is obtained with 500 fs time resolution. Two distinct phases occur: At /=500 fs the resonance transitions dominate. Initial satellites arise from a large area, high density, low temperature (approximately 100 eV) plasma created by fast electrons. Thus, contrary to predictions, a short, high intensity laser incident on a thin foil does not create a uniform, hot dense plasma. PMID:12484827

  8. Short pulse laser mass spectrometry of nitrotoluenes: ionization and fragmentation behavior.

    PubMed

    Weickhardt, Christian; Tönnies, Karen

    2002-01-01

    The mass spectra of all isomers of mononitrotoluene, four isomers of dinitrotoluene and of 2,4,6,-trinitrotoluene, obtained by multiphoton ionization utilizing ultrashort laser pulses with center wavelengths of either 206 nm or 412 nm, are presented and discussed. Under these ionization conditions all nitrotoluenes exhibit a high degree of fragmentation which increases with the degree of substitution. For the compounds having a nitro group in position 2 and/or 6 a pronounced ortho effect leading to the loss of OH is observed. The fragmentation patterns in the lower mass range are typical for alkylated aromatic substances. While no fundamental differences between the mass spectra obtained with the two wavelengths were observed, the visible light in all cases resulted in a broader variety of fragments and additional signals in the higher mass range. The latter can be used for isomer identification.

  9. Control of mixed-state quantum systems by a train of short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugny, D.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.; Daems, D.; Dion, C. M.; Guérin, S.; Jauslin, H. R.

    2005-09-01

    A density matrix approach is developed for the control of a mixed-state quantum system using a time-dependent external field such as a train of pulses. This leads to the definition of a target density matrix constructed in a reduced Hilbert space as a specific combination of the eigenvectors of a given observable through weighting factors related to the initial statistics of the system. A train of pulses is considered as a possible strategy to reach this target. An illustration is given by considering the laser control of molecular alignment and orientation in thermal equilibrium.

  10. Propagation of intense short-pulse laser in homogeneous near-critical density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habara, H.; Nakaguchi, S.; Uematsu, Y.; Baton, S. D.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Iwawaki, T.; MacDonald, M.; Nazarov, W.; Rousseaux, C.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2016-05-01

    Ultra intense laser light propagation in a homogeneous overdense plasma was investigated using a plastic foam target filling a polyimide tube. Laser propagation into overdense plasma was measured via Doppler red shift of the reflected laser light from the moving plasma at 0.3-0.4 of speed of light. We also observed strongly collimated electron beam possibly caused by the magnetic field surrounding the plasma channel, and high energy X-rays emitted via synchrotron radiation by the oscillating electrons inside the channel. These features imply that UIL propagates inside the overdense plasma as predicted in PIC calculation, and are very important for direct irradiation scheme of fast ignition.

  11. Temporal Narrowing of Neutrons Produced by High-Intensity Short-Pulse Lasers.

    PubMed

    Higginson, D P; Vassura, L; Gugiu, M M; Antici, P; Borghesi, M; Brauckmann, S; Diouf, C; Green, A; Palumbo, L; Petrascu, H; Sofia, S; Stardubtsev, M; Willi, O; Kar, S; Negoita, F; Fuchs, J

    2015-07-31

    The production of neutron beams having short temporal duration is studied using ultraintense laser pulses. Laser-accelerated protons are spectrally filtered using a laser-triggered microlens to produce a short duration neutron pulse via nuclear reactions induced in a converter material (LiF). This produces a ∼3  ns duration neutron pulse with 10(4)  n/MeV/sr/shot at 0.56 m from the laser-irradiated proton source. The large spatial separation between the neutron production and the proton source allows for shielding from the copious and undesirable radiation resulting from the laser-plasma interaction. This neutron pulse compares favorably to the duration of conventional accelerator sources and should scale up with, present and future, higher energy laser facilities to produce brighter and shorter neutron beams for ultrafast probing of dense materials.

  12. Diagnostics of high-brightness short-pulse lasers and the plasmas they generate

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, G.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Cobble, J.A.; Schappert, G.T.; Taylor, A.J.

    1994-02-01

    The properties of a laser influence the interaction of the intense laser light with materials. The authors will describe some of the diagnostics that they have implemented at the Los Alamos Bright Source to correlate the changes in the x-ray spectrum and temporal history of a laser generated silicon plasmas with the changes of the incident XeCl laser light. One property is of special interest, the existence of a short prepulse. They find that the prepulse enhances the generation of the x-rays from a later pulse.

  13. Spectral broadening induced by intense ultra-short pulse in 4H-SiC crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-hua, Xu; Teng-fei, Yan; Gang, Wang; Wen-jun, Wang; Jing-kui, Liang; Xiao-long, Chen

    2016-06-01

    We report the observation of spectral broadening induced by 200 femtosecond laser pulses with the repetition rate of 1 kHz at the wavelength of 532 nm in semi-insulating 4H-SiC single crystals. It is demonstrated that the full width at half maximum of output spectrum increases linearly with the light propagation length and the peak power density, reaching a maximum 870 cm-1 on a crystal of 19 mm long under an incident laser with a peak power density of 60.1 GW/cm2. Such spectral broadening can be well explained by the self-phase modulation model which correlates time-dependent phase change of pulses to intensity-dependent refractive index. The nonlinear refractive index n 2 is estimated to be 1.88×10-15 cm2/W. The intensity-dependent refractive index is probably due to both the nonlinear optical polarizability of the bound electrons and the increase of free electrons induced by the two-photon absorption process. Super continuum spectra could arise as crystals are long enough to induce the self-focusing effect. The results show that SiC crystals may find applications in spectral broadening of high power lasers. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA041402) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51272276 and 51322211).

  14. Spectral broadening induced by intense ultra-short pulse in 4H–SiC crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-hua, Xu; Teng-fei, Yan; Gang, Wang; Wen-jun, Wang; Jing-kui, Liang; Xiao-long, Chen

    2016-06-01

    We report the observation of spectral broadening induced by 200 femtosecond laser pulses with the repetition rate of 1 kHz at the wavelength of 532 nm in semi-insulating 4H–SiC single crystals. It is demonstrated that the full width at half maximum of output spectrum increases linearly with the light propagation length and the peak power density, reaching a maximum 870 cm‑1 on a crystal of 19 mm long under an incident laser with a peak power density of 60.1 GW/cm2. Such spectral broadening can be well explained by the self-phase modulation model which correlates time-dependent phase change of pulses to intensity-dependent refractive index. The nonlinear refractive index n 2 is estimated to be 1.88×10‑15 cm2/W. The intensity-dependent refractive index is probably due to both the nonlinear optical polarizability of the bound electrons and the increase of free electrons induced by the two-photon absorption process. Super continuum spectra could arise as crystals are long enough to induce the self-focusing effect. The results show that SiC crystals may find applications in spectral broadening of high power lasers. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA041402) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51272276 and 51322211).

  15. Engineering studies related to geodetic and oceanographic remote sensing using short pulse techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, L. S.; Brown, G. S.; Hayne, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    For the Skylab S-193 radar altimeter, data processing flow charts and identification of calibration requirements and problem areas for defined S-193 altimeter experiments are presented. An analysis and simulation of the relationship between one particular S-193 measurement and the parameter of interest for determining the sea surface scattering cross-section are considered. For the GEOS-C radar altimeter, results are presented for system analyses pertaining to signal-to-noise ratio, pulse compression threshold behavior, altimeter measurement variance characteristics, desirability of onboard averaging, tracker bandwidth considerations, and statistical character of the altimeter data in relation to harmonic analysis properties of the geodetic signal.

  16. Ultrafast electron kinetics in short pulse laser-driven dense hydrogen

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Fortmann-Grote, C.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Doppner, T.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Forster, E.; et al

    2015-09-25

    Dense cryogenic hydrogen is heated by intense femtosecond infrared laser pulses at intensities ofmore » $${10}^{15}-{10}^{16}\\;$$ W cm–2. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict that this heating is limited to the skin depth, causing an inhomogeneously heated outer shell with a cold core and two prominent temperatures of about $25$ and $$40\\;\\mathrm{eV}$$ for simulated delay times up to $$+70\\;\\mathrm{fs}$$ after the laser pulse maximum. Experimentally, the time-integrated emitted bremsstrahlung in the spectral range of 8–18 nm was corrected for the wavelength-dependent instrument efficiency. The resulting spectrum cannot be fit with a single temperature bremsstrahlung model, and the best fit is obtained using two temperatures of about 13 and $$30\\;$$eV. The lower temperatures in the experiment can be explained by missing energy-loss channels in the simulations, as well as the inclusion of hot, non-Maxwellian electrons in the temperature calculation. In conclusion, we resolved the time-scale for laser-heating of hydrogen, and PIC results for laser–matter interaction were successfully tested against the experiment data.« less

  17. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with tail-free short pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Dobashi, Kazuma; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2014-11-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser with a tail-free short laser pulse. In a discharge tube, two structures were researched. One is a shingle scheme that is constituted of a 45 cm-long discharge tube. Another is a tandem that is constituted of two 30 cm-long discharge tubes connected with an intermediate electrode were used. In gas media, CO2- rich mixture (CO2: N2= 20: 1) was used to reduce a laser pulse tail. The laser system did not require expensive and scarce helium. A fast discharge (<1 μs) in a low gas pressure (<1.8 kPa) produced a tail-free laser pulse with the pulse width of about 100 ns. The single scheme produced an output energy of 4.7 mJ by a charging voltage of -36.3 kV, and the tandem scheme produced an output energy of 9.3 mJ by a charging voltage of -25.2 kV. The tandem scheme produced higher spike pulse by lower voltage than the single scheme. Therefore, the tandem scheme will be effective in longitudinally excited CO2 lasers with simple and compact designs.

  18. Temporal Narrowing of Neutrons Produced by High-Intensity Short-Pulse Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, D. P.; Vassura, L.; Gugiu, M. M.; Antici, P.; Borghesi, M.; Brauckmann, S.; Diouf, C.; Green, A.; Palumbo, L.; Petrascu, H.; Sofia, S.; Stardubtsev, M.; Willi, O.; Kar, S.; Negoita, F.; Fuchs, J.

    2015-07-01

    The production of neutron beams having short temporal duration is studied using ultraintense laser pulses. Laser-accelerated protons are spectrally filtered using a laser-triggered microlens to produce a short duration neutron pulse via nuclear reactions induced in a converter material (LiF). This produces a ˜3 ns duration neutron pulse with 104 n /MeV /sr /shot at 0.56 m from the laser-irradiated proton source. The large spatial separation between the neutron production and the proton source allows for shielding from the copious and undesirable radiation resulting from the laser-plasma interaction. This neutron pulse compares favorably to the duration of conventional accelerator sources and should scale up with, present and future, higher energy laser facilities to produce brighter and shorter neutron beams for ultrafast probing of dense materials.

  19. Satellite and Opacity Effects on Resonance Line Shapes Produced from Short-Pulse Laser Heated Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R; Audebert, P; Chen, H-K; Fournier, K B; Peyreusse, O; Moon, S; Lee, R W; Price, D; Klein, L; Gauthier, J C; Springer, P

    2002-12-03

    We measure the He-like, time-resolved emission from thin foils consisting of 250 {angstrom} of carbon-250 {angstrom} of aluminum and 500 {angstrom} aluminum illuminated with a 150 fs laser pulse at an intensity of 1 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Dielectronic satellite contributions to the 1s{sup 2}-1s2p({sup 1}P), 1s{sup 2}-1s3p({sup 1}P), and 1s{sup 2}1s4p({sup 1}P) line intensities are modeled using the configuration averaged code AVERROES and is found to be significant for all three resonance lines. The contribution of opacity broadening is inferred from the data and found to be significant only in the 1s{sup 2}-1s2p({sup 1}P).

  20. Prospect for feedback guided surgery with ultra-short pulsed laser light.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Diana C; Tsai, Philbert S; Kleinfeld, David

    2012-02-01

    The controlled cutting of tissue with laser light is a natural technology to combine with automated stereotaxic surgery. A central challenge is to cut hard tissue, such as bone, without inducing damage to juxtaposed soft tissue, such as nerve and dura. We review past work that demonstrates the feasibility of such control through the use of ultrafast laser light to both cut and generate optical feedback signals via second harmonic generation and laser induced plasma spectra.

  1. ELI-Beamlines: development of next generation short-pulse laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rus, B.; Bakule, P.; Kramer, D.; Naylon, J.; Thoma, J.; Green, J. T.; Antipenkov, R.; Fibrich, M.; Novák, J.; Batysta, F.; Mazanec, T.; Drouin, M. A.; Kasl, K.; Baše, R.; Peceli, D.; Koubíková, L.; Trojek, P.; Boge, R.; Lagron, J. C.; Vyhlídka, Å.; Weiss, J.; Cupal, J.,; Hřebíček, J.; Hříbek, P.; Durák, M.; Polan, J.; Košelja, M.; Korn, G.; Horáček, M.; Horáček, J.; Himmel, B.; Havlíček, T.; Honsa, A.; Korouš, P.; Laub, M.; Haefner, C.; Bayramian, A.; Spinka, T.; Marshall, C.; Johnson, G.; Telford, S.; Horner, J.; Deri, B.; Metzger, T.; Schultze, M.; Mason, P.; Ertel, K.; Lintern, A.; Greenhalgh, J.; Edwards, C.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Collier, J.; Ditmire, T.,; Gaul, E.; Martinez, M.; Frederickson, C.; Hammond, D.; Malato, C.; White, W.; Houžvička, J.

    2015-05-01

    Overview of the laser systems being built for ELI-Beamlines is presented. The facility will make available high-brightness multi-TW ultrashort laser pulses at kHz repetition rate, PW 10 Hz repetition rate pulses, and kilojoule nanosecond pulses for generation of 10 PW peak power. The lasers will extensively employ the emerging technology of diode-pumped solid-state lasers (DPSSL) to pump OPCPA and Ti:sapphire broadband amplifiers. These systems will provide the user community with cutting-edge laser resources for programmatic research in generation and applications of high-intensity X-ray sources, in particle acceleration, and in dense-plasma and high-field physics.

  2. Ultra-wideband short-pulse radar with range accuracy for short range detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T; Pankonin, Jeffrey; Heintzleman, Richard E; Kinzie, Nicola Jean; Popovic, Zorana P

    2014-10-07

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) radar transmitter apparatus comprises a pulse generator configured to produce from a sinusoidal input signal a pulsed output signal having a series of baseband pulses with a first pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The pulse generator includes a plurality of components that each have a nonlinear electrical reactance. A signal converter is coupled to the pulse generator and configured to convert the pulsed output signal into a pulsed radar transmit signal having a series of radar transmit pulses with a second PRF that is less than the first PRF.

  3. Tunable short-pulse beat-wave laser source operating at 1 microm.

    PubMed

    Hankla, A K; Bullock, A B; White, W E; Squier, J A; Barty, C P

    1997-11-15

    We have demonstrated a chirped-pulse-amplification system utilizing an air-spaced etalon inside a regenerative amplifier to produce two simultaneous 2.0-ps pulses, one centered at the gain peak of Nd:phosphate glass (1052 nm) and the other centered at the gain peak of Nd:silicate (1061 nm). Autocorrelations of the resulting beat wave demonstrate a beat frequency of 2.3 THz. We achieved wavelength tunability over a 10-nm range by electronically adjusting the etalon spacing and variable pulse width by changing the etalon rotation.

  4. Short-pulse excitation of microwave plasma for efficient diamond growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hideaki; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Mokuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    To realize a variety of potential applications of diamonds, particularly in the area of power electronics, it is indispensable to improve their growth efficiency. Most conventional approaches have tried to achieve this simply by increasing the gas temperature; however, this makes it difficult to grow large diamond crystals. To improve the growth efficiency while lowering the gas temperature, we propose that using a pulse-modulated microwave plasma with a sub-millisecond pulse width can enhance the power efficiency of the growth rate of single-crystal diamonds. We found that using a sub-millisecond pulse-mode discharge could almost double the growth rate obtained using continuous mode discharge for a fixed average microwave power and gas pressure. A comparison between experimental observations of the optical emission spectra of the discharge and a numerical simulation of the gas temperature suggests that a decrease in the gas temperature was achieved, and highlights the importance of electron-dominated reactions for obtaining the enhancement of the growth rate. This result will have a large impact in the area of diamond growth because it enables diamond growth to be more power efficient at reduced temperatures.

  5. Manipulating mammalian cell by phase transformed titanium surface fabricated through ultra-short pulsed laser synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Sivaprasad; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-15

    Developing cell sensitive indicators on interacting substrates that allows specific cell manipulation by a combination of physical, chemical or mechanical cues is a challenge for current biomaterials. Hence, various fabrication approaches have been created on a variety of substrates to mimic or create cell specific cues. However, to achieve cell specific cues a multistep process or a post-chemical treatment is often necessitated. So, a simple approach without any chemical or biological treatment would go a long way in developing bio-functionalized substrates to effectively modulate cell adhesion and interaction. The present investigation is aimed to study the manipulative activity induced by phase transformed titanium surface. An ultra-short laser is used to fabricate the phase transformed titanium surface where a polymorphic titanium oxide phases with titanium monoxide (TiO), tri-titanium oxide (Ti3O) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) have been synthesized on commercially pure titanium. Control over oxide phase transformed area was demonstrated via a combination of laser scanning time (laser pulse interaction time) and laser pulse widths (laser pulse to pulse separation time). The interaction of phase transformed titanium surface with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells developed a new bio-functionalized platforms on titanium based biomaterials to modulate cell migration and adhesion. The synthesized phase transformed titanium surface on the whole appeared to induce directional cues for cell migration with unique preferential cell adhesion unseen by other fabrication approaches. The precise bio-functionalization controllability exhibited during fabrication offers perceptible edge for developing a variety of smart bio-medical devices, implants and cardiovascular stents where the need in supressing specific cell adhesion and proliferation is of great demand. PMID:26546983

  6. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Atomic Oxygen Measurements in Short Pulse Discharges by Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempert, Walter; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Mintusov, Eugene; Jiang, Naibo; Adamovich, Igor

    2007-10-01

    Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure time-dependent absolute oxygen atom concentrations in O2/He, O2/N2, and CH4/air plasmas produced with a 20 nanosecond duration, 20 kV pulsed discharge at 10 Hz repetition rate. Xenon calibrated spectra show that a single discharge pulse creates initial oxygen dissociation fraction of ˜0.0005 for air like mixtures at 40-60 torr total pressure. Peak O atom concentration is a factor of approximately two lower in fuel lean (φ=0.5) methane/air mixtures. In helium buffer, the initially formed atomic oxygen decays monotonically, with decay time consistent with formation of ozone. In all nitrogen containing mixtures, atomic oxygen concentrations are found to initially increase, for time scales on the order of 10-100 microseconds, due presumably to additional O2 dissociation caused by collisions with electronically excited nitrogen. Further evidence of the role of metastable N2 is demonstrated from time-dependent N2 2^nd Positive and NO Gamma band emission spectroscopy. Comparisons with modeling predictions show qualitative, but not quantitative, agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Laser prepulse induced plasma channel formation in air and relativistic self focusing of an intense short pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashok; Dahiya, Deepak; Sharma, A. K.

    2011-02-15

    An analytical formalism is developed and particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to study plasma channel formation in air by a two pulse technique and subsequent relativistic self focusing of the third intense laser through it. The first prepulse causes tunnel ionization of air. The second pulse heats the plasma electrons and establishes a prolonged channel. The third pulse focuses under the combined effect of density nonuniformity of the channel and relativistic mass nonlinearity. A channel with 20% density variation over the spot size of the third pulse is seen to strongly influence relativistic self focusing at normalized laser amplitude {approx}0.4-1. In deeper plasma channels, self focusing is less sensitive to laser amplitude variation. These results are reproduced in particle-in-cell simulations. The present treatment is valid for millimeter range plasma channels.

  8. Mechanism and influencing factors on critical pulse width of oil-immersed polymer insulators under short pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Liang Li, Rui; Zheng, Lei; Su, Jian Cang; Cheng, Jie; Yu, Bin Xiong; Wu, Xiao Long; Zhang, Xi Bo; Pan, Ya Feng; Zeng, Bo

    2015-04-15

    The critical pulse width (τ{sub c}) is a pulse width at which the surface flashover threshold (E{sub f}) is equal to the bulk breakdown threshold (E{sub BD}) for liquid-polymer composite insulation systems, which is discovered by Zhao et al. [Annual Report Conference on Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena (IEEE Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Society, Shenzhen, China, 2013), Vol. 2, pp. 854–857]. In this paper, the mechanism of τ{sub c} is interpreted in perspective of the threshold and the time delay (t{sub d}) of surface flashover and bulk breakdown, respectively. It is found that two changes appear as the pulse width decreases which are responsible for the existence of τ{sub c}: (1) E{sub BD} is lower than E{sub f}; (2) t{sub d} of bulk breakdown is shorter than t{sub d} of surface flashover. In addition, factors which have influences on τ{sub c} are investigated, such as the dielectric type, the insulation length, the dielectric thickness, the dielectrics configuration, the pulse number, and the liquid purity. These influences of factors are generalized as three types if τ{sub c} is expected to increase: (1) factors causing E{sub BD} to decrease, such as increasing the pulse number or employing a dielectric of lower E{sub BD}; (2) factors causing E{sub f} to increase, such as complicating the insulator's configuration or increasing the liquid purity; (3) factors causing E{sub BD} and E{sub f} to increase together, but E{sub f} increases faster than E{sub BD}, such as decreasing the dielectric thickness or the insulation length. With the data in references, all the three cases are verified experimentally. In the end, a general method based on τ{sub c} for solid insulation design is presented and the significance of τ{sub c} on solid insulation design and on solid demolition are discussed.

  9. Three-Dimensional Dynamics of Breakout Afterburner Ion Acceleration Using High-Contrast Short-Pulse Laser and Nanoscale Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Jung, D.; Fernández, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2011-07-01

    Breakout afterburner (BOA) laser-ion acceleration has been demonstrated for the first time in the laboratory. In the BOA, an initially solid-density target undergoes relativistically induced transparency, initiating a period of enhanced ion acceleration. First-ever kinetic simulations of the BOA in three dimensions show that the ion beam forms lobes in the direction orthogonal to laser polarization and propagation. Analytic theory presented for the electron dynamics in the laser ponderomotive field explains how azimuthal symmetry breaks even for a symmetric laser intensity profile; these results are consistent with recent experiments at the Trident laser facility.

  10. Note: a short-pulse high-intensity molecular beam valve based on a piezoelectric stack actuator.

    PubMed

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Joalland, Baptiste; Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Oldham, James M; Suits, Arthur G

    2014-11-01

    Solenoid and piezoelectric disk valves, which are widely used to generate molecular beam pulses, still suffer from significant restrictions, such as pulse durations typically >50 μs, low repetition rates, and limited gas flows and operational times. Much of this arises owing to the limited forces these actuators can achieve. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a new pulsed valve based on a high-force piezoelectric stack actuator. We show here that operation with pulse durations as low as 20 μs and repetition rates up to 100 Hz can be easily achieved by operating the valve in conjunction with a commercial fast high-voltage switch. We outline our design and demonstrate its performance with molecular beam characterization via velocity map ion imaging.

  11. Tamper to delay motion and decrease ionization of a sample during short pulse x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    London, Richard A.; Szoke; Abraham , Hau-Riege; Stefan P. , Chapman; Henry N.

    2007-06-26

    A system for x-ray imaging of a small sample comprising positioning a tamper so that it is operatively connected to the sample, directing short intense x-ray pulses onto the tamper and the sample, and detecting an image from the sample. The tamper delays the explosive motion of the sample during irradiation by the short intense x-ray pulses, thereby extending the time to obtain an x-ray image of the original structure of the sample.

  12. Temporal compression of cw diode-laser output into short pulses with cesium-vapor group-velocity dispersion.

    PubMed

    Choi, K; Menders, J; Ross, D; Korevaar, E

    1993-11-15

    Using a technique similar to chirped pulse compression, we have compressed the 50-mW cw output of a diode laser into pulses of greater than 500-mW peak power and less than 400-ps duration. By applying a small current modulation to the diode, we induced a small wavelength modulation in the vicinity of the 6s(1/2)-to-6p(3/2) cesium resonance transition at 852 nm. Group-velocity dispersion on propagation through a cesium vapor cell then led to pulse compression. We developed a simple model to make predictions of output pulse shapes by using different modulation waveforms. PMID:19829441

  13. Three-dimensional dynamics of breakout afterburner ion acceleration using high-contrast short-pulse laser and nanoscale targets.

    PubMed

    Yin, L; Albright, B J; Bowers, K J; Jung, D; Fernández, J C; Hegelich, B M

    2011-07-22

    Breakout afterburner (BOA) laser-ion acceleration has been demonstrated for the first time in the laboratory. In the BOA, an initially solid-density target undergoes relativistically induced transparency, initiating a period of enhanced ion acceleration. First-ever kinetic simulations of the BOA in three dimensions show that the ion beam forms lobes in the direction orthogonal to laser polarization and propagation. Analytic theory presented for the electron dynamics in the laser ponderomotive field explains how azimuthal symmetry breaks even for a symmetric laser intensity profile; these results are consistent with recent experiments at the Trident laser facility.

  14. Part 2: Ultra-short pulse laser patterning of very thin indium tin oxide on glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, C.; Milne, D.; Chan, H.; Rostohar, D.; O'Connor, G. M.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate selective patterning of ultra-thin 20 nm Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) thin films on glass substrates, using 343, 515, and 1030 nm femtosecond (fs), and 1030 nm picoseconds (ps) laser pulses. An ablative removal mechanism is observed for all wavelengths at both femtosecond and picoseconds time-scales. The absorbed threshold fluence values were determined to be 12.5 mJ cm-2 at 343 nm, 9.68 mJ cm-2 at 515 nm, and 7.50 mJ cm-2 at 1030 nm for femtosecond and 9.14 mJ cm-2 at 1030 nm for picosecond laser exposure. Surface analysis of ablated craters using atomic force microscopy confirms that the selective removal of the film from the glass substrate is dependent on the applied fluence. Film removal is shown to be primarily through ultrafast lattice deformation generated by an electron blast force. The laser absorption and heating process was simulated using a two temperature model (TTM). The predicted surface temperatures confirm that film removal below 1 J cm-2 to be predominately by a non-thermal mechanism.

  15. Generation of single-crystalline domain in nano-scale silicon pillars by near-field short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In, Jung Bin; Xiang, Bin; Hwang, David J.; Ryu, Sang-Gil; Kim, Eunpa; Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Dubon, Oscar; Minor, Andrew M.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2014-01-01

    We observe laser-induced grain morphology change in silicon nanopillars under a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) environment. We couple the TEM with a near-field scanning optical microscopy pulsed laser processing system. This novel combination enables immediate scrutiny on the grain morphologies that the pulsed laser irradiation produces. We find unusual transformation of the tip of the amorphous or polycrystalline silicon pillar into a single crystalline domain via melt-mediated crystallization. On the basis of the three-dimensional finite difference simulation result and the dark field TEM data, we propose that the creation of the distinct single crystalline tip originates from the dominant grain growth initiated at the apex of the non-planar liquid-solid interface. Our microscopic observation provides a fundamental basis for laser-induced conversion of amorphous nanostructures into coarse-grained crystals.

  16. Continuously tunable, high-power, single-mode radiation from a short-pulse free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Weits, H H; Oepts, D

    1999-07-01

    This paper gives the first demonstration of high-power, continuously tunable, narrowband radiation that is produced by means of a free-electron laser (FEL) in the far-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. A Fox-Smith intracavity étalon was used to induce phase coherence between the 40 optical micropulses that were circulating in the laser cavity. The corresponding phase-locked spectrum consisted of a comb of discrete frequencies separated by 1 GHz. A pair of external Fabry-Pérot étalons was used to filter out a single line from this spectrum. The power in the selected narrow line at 69 microm wavelength was equal to 250 mW during the macropulse of the laser. The spectral width of the selected line is as small as that of a single cavity mode, i.e., a fraction of 25 MHz, in single macropulses of the laser. The average bandwidth of 25 MHz is determined by mode hopping of the phase-locked FEL. The selected frequency hops over 25 MHz between the extrema of this band. The influence of partially coherent spontaneous emission and mode hopping on the final linewidth was studied. The narrow-linewidth radiation was scanned in frequency over 1 GHz. We show that the possibilities to scan over smaller or larger frequency intervals are unlimited. PMID:11969840

  17. Design and construction of a short-pulse front end for a large CO/sub 2/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, C.W.; Alexander, R.F.; Collins, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    A CO/sub 2/ laser oscillator, switch out, and preamplifier system which produces 1 ns pulses of 10.6 ..mu..m light with an energy of about 1 joule was designed and constructed. Commercial CO/sub 2/ TEA devices were used throughout. Alignment was simplified by using a single He-Ne laser and penta prism reflectors on kinematic mounts. Performance of this system as compared with calculations with the Laser Optical Train simulation (LOTS) program is discussed.

  18. Ultra-wideband, short-pulse electromagnetics; WRI International Conference, 2nd, Brooklyn, NY, October 8-10, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, Henry L.; Carin, Lawrence; Felsen, Leopold B.

    1993-01-01

    Major subjects discussed at this conference included the following: pulse generation and detection (electro-optical and electronic methods); broadband electronic systems and components; antennas and arrays; pulse propagation and guidance; scattering theory and computation (analytic and numerical methods); and signal processing techniques. For individual titles, see A95-90905 through A95-90962.

  19. Transmission of 1064 nm laser radiation during ablation with an ultra-short pulse laser (USPL) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelle, Florian; Meister, Jörg; Oehme, Bernd; Frentzen, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    During ablation of oral hard tissue with an USPL system a small amount of the incident laser power does not contribute to the ablation process and is being transmitted. Partial transmission of ultra-short laser pulses could potentially affect the dental pulp. The aim of this study was to assess the transmission during ablation and to deduce possible risks for the patient. The study was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser, emitting pulses with a duration of 8 ps at a wavelength of 1064 nm. A repetition rate of 500 kHz and an average power of 9 W were chosen to achieve high ablation efficiency. A scanner system created square cavities with an edge length of 1 mm. Transmission during ablation of mammoth ivory and dentin slices with a thickness of 2 mm and 5 mm was measured with a power meter, placed directly beyond the samples. Effects on subjacent blood were observed by ablating specimens placed in contact to pork blood. In a separate measurement the temperature increase during ablation was monitored using an infrared camera. The influence of transmission was assessed by tuning down the laser to the corresponding power and then directly irradiating the blood. Transmission during ablation of 2 mm specimens was about 7.7% (ivory) and 9.6% (dentin) of the incident laser power. Ablation of specimens directly in contact to blood caused coagulation at longer irradiation times (t~18s). Direct irradiation of blood with the transmitted power provoked bubbling and smoke formation. Temperature measurements identified heat generation as the main reason for the observed coagulation.

  20. Hard-tissue drilling by short-pulse CO2 laser with controllable pulse-tail energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Sasaki, Tatsufumi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2016-02-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse with the almost same spike-pulse energy of about 0.8 mJ and the controllable pulse-tail energy of 0-21.26 mJ. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance and a spark-gap switch. In single-shot irradiation using these laser pulses, the dependence of the drilling depth of dry ivory samples on the fluence was investigated. The drilling depth increased with the fluence in the same laser pulse waveform. In this work, the effective short laser pulse for the hard tissue drilling was the laser pulse with the spike pulse energy of 0.87 mJ and the pulse tail energy of 6.33 mJ that produced the drilling depth of 28.1 μm at the fluence of 3.48 J/cm2 and the drilling depth per the fluence of 7.27 μm/J/cm2.

  1. Dynamical interferences to probe short-pulse photoassociation of Rb atoms and stabilization of Rb{sub 2} dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Mur-Petit, Jordi; Luc-Koenig, Eliane; Masnou-Seeuws, Francoise

    2007-06-15

    We analyze the formation of Rb{sub 2} molecules with short photoassociation pulses applied to a cold {sup 85}Rb sample. A pump laser pulse couples a continuum level of the ground electronic state X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} with bound levels in the 0{sub u}{sup +}(5S+5P{sub 1/2}) and 0{sub u}{sup +}(5S+5P{sub 3/2}) vibrational series. The nonadiabatic coupling between the two excited channels induces time-dependent beatings in the populations. We propose to take advantage of these oscillations to design further laser pulses that probe the photoassociation process via photoionization or that optimize the stabilization in deep levels of the ground state.

  2. Detection of calculus by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using an ultra-short pulse laser system (USPL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelle, F.; Brede, O.; Krueger, S.; Oehme, B.; Dehn, C.; Frentzen, M.; Braun, A.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the detection of calculus by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). The study was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser, emitting pulses with a duration of 8 ps at a wavelength of 1064 nm. A repetition rate of 500 kHz at an average power of 5 W was used. Employing a focusing lense, intensities of the order of 1011 W/cm2 were reached on the tooth surface. These high intensities led to the generation of a plasma. The light emitted by the plasma was collimated into a fibre and then analyzed by an echelle spectroscope in the wavelength region from 220 nm - 900 nm. A total number of 15 freshly extracted teeth was used for this study. For each tooth the spectra of calculus and cementum were assessed separately. Comprising all single measurements median values were calculated for the whole spectrum, leading to two specific spectra, one for calculus and one for cementum. For further statistical analysis 28 areas of interest were defined as wavelength regions, in which the signal strength differed regarding the material. In 7 areas the intensity of the calculus spectrum differed statistically significant from the intensity of the cementum spectrum (p < 0.05). Thus it can be concluded that Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy is well suited as method for a reliable diagnostic of calculus. Further studies are necessary to verify that LIBS is a minimally invasive method allowing a safe application in laser-guided dentistry.

  3. Mechanism and influencing factors on critical pulse width of oil-immersed polymer insulators under short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Su, Jian Cang; Li, Rui; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Zheng, Lei; Yu, Bin Xiong; Wu, Xiao Long; Zhang, Xi Bo; Pan, Ya Feng

    2015-04-01

    The critical pulse width (τc) is a pulse width at which the surface flashover threshold (Ef) is equal to the bulk breakdown threshold (EBD) for liquid-polymer composite insulation systems, which is discovered by Zhao et al. [Annual Report Conference on Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena (IEEE Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Society, Shenzhen, China, 2013), Vol. 2, pp. 854-857]. In this paper, the mechanism of τc is interpreted in perspective of the threshold and the time delay (td) of surface flashover and bulk breakdown, respectively. It is found that two changes appear as the pulse width decreases which are responsible for the existence of τc: (1) EBD is lower than Ef; (2) td of bulk breakdown is shorter than td of surface flashover. In addition, factors which have influences on τc are investigated, such as the dielectric type, the insulation length, the dielectric thickness, the dielectrics configuration, the pulse number, and the liquid purity. These influences of factors are generalized as three types if τc is expected to increase: (1) factors causing EBD to decrease, such as increasing the pulse number or employing a dielectric of lower EBD; (2) factors causing Ef to increase, such as complicating the insulator's configuration or increasing the liquid purity; (3) factors causing EBD and Ef to increase together, but Ef increases faster than EBD, such as decreasing the dielectric thickness or the insulation length. With the data in references, all the three cases are verified experimentally. In the end, a general method based on τc for solid insulation design is presented and the significance of τc on solid insulation design and on solid demolition are discussed.

  4. Increased efficiency of short-pulse laser-generated proton beams from novel flat-top cone targets

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Kline, J. L.; Albright, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Letzring, S.; Shimada, T.; Fernandez, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; D'Humieres, E.; Rassuchine, J.; Bakeman, M.; Renard-LeGalloudec, N.; Sentoku, Y.; Cowan, T. E.; Gaillard, S. A.; Schollmeier, M.; Nuernberg, F.; Harres, K.; Roth, M.

    2008-05-15

    Ion-driven fast ignition (IFI) may have significant advantages over electron-driven FI due to the potentially large reduction in the amount of energy required for the ignition beam and the laser driver. Recent experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident facility employing novel Au flat-top cone targets have produced a fourfold increase in laser-energy to ion-energy efficiency, a 13-fold increase in the number of ions above 10 MeV, and a few times increase in the maximum ion energy compared to Au flat-foil targets. Compared to recently published scaling laws, these gains are even greater. If the efficiency scales with intensity in accordance to flat-foil scaling, then, with little modification, these targets can be used to generate the pulse of ions needed to ignite thermonuclear fusion in the fast ignitor scheme. A proton energy of at least 30 MeV was measured from the flat-top cone targets, and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations show that the maximum cutoff energy may be as high as 40-45 MeV at modest intensity of 1x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} with 20 J in 600 fs. Simulations indicate that the observed energy and efficiency increase can be attributed to the cone target's ability to guide laser light into the neck to produce hot electrons and transport these electrons to the flat-top of the cone where they can be heated to much higher temperatures, creating a hotter, denser sheath. The PIC simulations also elucidate the critical parameters for obtaining superior proton acceleration such as the dependence on laser contrast/plasma prefill, as well as longitudinal and transverse laser pointing, and cone geometry. These novel cones have the potential to revolutionize inertial confinement fusion target design and fabrication via their ability to be mass produced. In addition, they could have an impact on the general physics community studying basic electron and radiation transport phenomena or as better sources of particle beams to study equations of state and warm dense matter, or for hadron therapy, as new radioisotope generators, or for compact proton radiography sources.

  5. Time-dependent density functional theory of high-intensity short-pulse laser irradiation on insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, S. A.; Yabana, K.; Shinohara, Y.; Otobe, T.; Lee, K.-M.; Bertsch, G. F.

    2015-11-01

    We calculate the energy deposition by very short laser pulses in SiO2 (α -quartz) with a view to establishing systematics for predicting damage and nanoparticle production. The theoretical framework is time-dependent density functional theory, implemented by the real-time method in a multiscale representation. For the most realistic simulations we employ a meta-GGA Kohn-Sham potential similar to that of Becke and Johnson. We find that the deposited energy in the medium can be accurately modeled as a function of the local electromagnetic pulse fluence. The energy-deposition function can in turn be quite well fitted to the strong-field Keldysh formula for a range of intensities from below the melting threshold to well beyond the ablation threshold. We find reasonable agreement between the damage threshold and the energy required to melt the substrate. Also, the depth of the ablated crater at higher energies is fairly well reproduced assuming that the material ablated with the energy exceeds that required to convert it to an atomic fluid. However, the calculated ablation threshold is higher than experiment, suggesting a nonthermal mechanism for the surface ablation.

  6. Note: A short-pulse high-intensity molecular beam valve based on a piezoelectric stack actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Joalland, Baptiste; Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Oldham, James M.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2014-11-15

    Solenoid and piezoelectric disk valves, which are widely used to generate molecular beam pulses, still suffer from significant restrictions, such as pulse durations typically >50 μs, low repetition rates, and limited gas flows and operational times. Much of this arises owing to the limited forces these actuators can achieve. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a new pulsed valve based on a high-force piezoelectric stack actuator. We show here that operation with pulse durations as low as 20 μs and repetition rates up to 100 Hz can be easily achieved by operating the valve in conjunction with a commercial fast high-voltage switch. We outline our design and demonstrate its performance with molecular beam characterization via velocity map ion imaging.

  7. Endodontic applications of short pulsed FR Nd:YAG dental laser: treatment of dystrophic calcification: a clinical trial report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Robert H., II

    1992-06-01

    Formation of dystrophic calcification deposits within the root canal of a tooth, have historically been difficult clinical endodontic complications. Presently, removal of such tissue, mineralized through the deposition of calcareous materials in a root canal (a 'calcified canal'), remains resistant to conventional endodontic techniques. The subsequent treatment primarily involves undesirable surgical procedures and/or loss of the tooth. Described in this clinical trial is a technique using free running (RF) pulsed, Nd:YAG laser energy to ablate hard calcified tissue which obstructed mechanical access of the root canal and root apex--a technique employed after conventional endodontic methods failed. This paper discusses the 'plasma' effect, 'spallation', canal illumination and transillumination using the helium-neon (HeNe) aiming beam. A free running pulsed, FR Nd:YAG dental laser was successfully used at 20 pulses per second and 1.75 watts to photovaporize and photodisrupt enough calcified tissue obstruction, to allow a conventional endodontic file to pass the canal blockage, and access the root apex. This clinical trial achieved the immediate, short term objective of endodontic hard tissue removal via photovaporization and photodisruption. The pulsed FR Nd:YAG dental laser used as described in this clinical report appears to be a very safe and very effective technique; offers a treatment alternative to traditional therapy that suggests high patient acceptance; and is significantly less stressful for the doctor and staff than traditional treatment options. Long-term, controlled scientific and clinical studies are necessary to establish the safety and efficacy of both the helium-neon energy for visualization and the low- watt pulsed FR Nd:YAG energy for photovaporization and photodisruption of hard calcified tissue within the root canal. Research is especially needed to understand the effects of low- watt, pulsed FR, Nd:YAG laser on the activity of osteoclasts and odontoclasts and identify risks for developing external and/or internal resorption after intracanal application of pulsed FR Nd:YAG laser energy.

  8. Fiber Laser Replacement for Short Pulse Ti:Sapphire Oscillators -- Scalable Mode Locking to Record Pulse Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; An, J

    2006-02-14

    We have investigated fiber-based lasers that mode-lock via three nonlinear mechanisms: pulse evolution, bend loss, and tunneling. Experiments with nonlinear pulse evolution proved especially promising; we report here a fiber laser that produces 25 nJ, sub-200 fs pulses, an energy that is 60% higher than previous reports. Experiments with nonlinear bend loss were inconclusive; though bend-loss data show that the effect exits, we were not able to use the phenomenon to lock a laser. New models suggest that nonlinear tunneling could provide an alternate path.

  9. Microscopic Deformation of Tungsten Surfaces by High Energy and High Flux Helium/Hydrogen Particle Bombardment with Short Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokitani, Masayuki; Yoshida, Naoaki; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Sakakita, Hajime; Kiyama, Satoru; Koguchi, Haruhisa; Hirano, Yoichi; Masuzaki, Suguru

    The neutral beam injection facility in the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology was used to irradiate a polycrystalline tungsten specimen with high energy and high flux helium and hydrogen particles. The incidence energy and flux of the beam shot were 25 keV and 8.8 × 1022 particles/m2 s, respectively. The duration of each shot was approximately 30 ms, with 6 min intervals between each shot. Surface temperatures over 1800 K were attained. In the two cases of helium irradiation, total fluence of either 1.5 × 1022 He/m2 or 4.0 × 1022 He/m2 was selected. In the former case, large sized blisters with diameter of 500 nm were densely observed. While, the latter case, the blisters were disappeared and fine nanobranch structures appeared instead. Cross-sectional observations using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with the focused ion beam (FIB) technique were performed. According to the TEM image, after irradiation with a beam shot of total fluence 4.0 × 1022 He/m2 , there were very dense fine helium bubbles in the tungsten of sizes 1-50 nm. As the helium bubbles grew the density of the tungsten matrix drastically decreased as a result of void swelling. These effects were not seen in hydrogen irradiation case.

  10. Acceleration of a solid-density plasma projectile to ultrahigh velocities by a short-pulse ultraviolet laser

    SciTech Connect

    Badziak, J.; Jablonski, S.

    2011-08-15

    It is shown by means of particle-in-cell simulations that a high-fluence ({>=}1 GJ/cm{sup 2}) solid-density plasma projectile can be accelerated up to sub-relativistic velocities by radiation pressure of an ultraviolet (UV) picosecond laser pulse of moderate values of dimensionless laser amplitude a{sub 0}{approx}10. The efficiency of acceleration by the UV laser is significantly higher than in the case of long-wavelength ({lambda} {approx} 1 {mu}m) driver of a comparable value of a{sub 0}, and the motion of the projectile is fairly well described by the ''Light Sail'' acceleration model.

  11. Superconducting Multi-Cell Deflecting Cavity for Short-Pulse X-Ray Generation at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Waldschmidt, L.H. Morrison, R. Nassiri, R.A. Rimmer, K. Tian, H. Wang

    2009-05-01

    A superconducting multi-cell cavity for the production of short x-ray pulses at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been explored as an alternative to a single-cell cavity design in order to improve the packing factor and potentially reduce the number of high-power RF systems and low-level RF controls required. The cavity will operate at 2815 MHz in the APS storage ring and will require heavy damping of parasitic modes to maintain stable beam operation. Novel on-cell dampers, attached directly to the cavity body, have been utilized by taking advantage of the magnetic field null on the equatorial plane in order to enhance damping. Design issues and simulation results will be discussed.

  12. Unmasking the functions of the chromaffin cell α7 nicotinic receptor by using short pulses of acetylcholine and selective blockers

    PubMed Central

    López, Manuela G.; Montiel, Carmen; Herrero, Carlos J.; García-Palomero, Esther; Mayorgas, Inés; Hernández-Guijo, Jesús M.; Villarroya, M.; Olivares, Román; Gandía, Luis; McIntosh, J. Michael; Olivera, Baldomero M.; García, Antonio G.

    1998-01-01

    Methyllycaconitine (MLA), α-conotoxin ImI, and α-bungarotoxin inhibited the release of catecholamines triggered by brief pulses of acetylcholine (ACh) (100 μM, 5 s) applied to fast-superfused bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, with IC50s of 100 nM for MLA and 300 nM for α-conotoxin ImI and α-bungarotoxin. MLA (100 nM), α-conotoxin ImI (1 μM), and α-bungarotoxin (1 μM) halved the entry of 45Ca2+ stimulated by 5-s pulses of 300 μM ACh applied to incubated cells. These supramaximal concentrations of α7 nicotinic receptor blockers depressed by 30% (MLA), 25% (α-bungarotoxin), and 50% (α-conotoxin ImI) the inward current generated by 1-s pulses of 100 μM ACh, applied to voltage-clamped chromaffin cells. In Xenopus oocytes expressing rat brain α7 neuronal nicotinic receptor for acetylcholine nAChR, the current generated by 1-s pulses of ACh was blocked by MLA, α-conotoxin ImI, and α-bungarotoxin with IC50s of 0.1 nM, 100 nM, and 1.6 nM, respectively; the current through α3β4 nAChR was unaffected by α-conotoxin ImI and α-bungarotoxin, and weakly blocked by MLA (IC50 = 1 μM). The functions of controlling the electrical activity, the entry of Ca2+, and the ensuing exocytotic response of chromaffin cells were until now exclusively attributed to α3β4 nAChR; the present results constitute the first evidence to support a prominent role of α7 nAChR in controlling such functions, specially under the more physiological conditions used here to stimulate chromaffin cells with brief pulses of ACh. PMID:9826675

  13. Third harmonic generation of a short pulse laser in a plasma density ripple created by a machining beam

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2008-02-15

    An intense machining laser beam, impinged on a gas jet target, causes space periodic ionization of the gas and heats the electrons. The nonuniform plasma pressure leads to atomic density redistribution. When, after a suitable time delay, a second more intense laser pulse is launched along the periodicity wave vector q-vector, a plasma density ripple n{sub q} is instantly created, leading to resonant third harmonic generation when q=4{omega}{sub p}{sup 2}/(3{omega}c{gamma}{sub 0}), where {omega}{sub p} is the plasma frequency, {omega} is the laser frequency, and {gamma}{sub 0} is the electron Lorentz factor. The third harmonic is produced through the beating of ponderomotive force induced second harmonic density oscillations and the quiver velocity of electrons at the fundamental. The relativistic mass nonlinearity plays no role in resonant coupling. The energy conversion efficiency scales as the square of plasma density and square of depth of density ripple, and is {approx}0.2% for normalized laser amplitude a{sub o}{approx}1 in a plasma of 1% critical density with 20% density ripple. The theory explains several features of a recent experiment.

  14. Modulation instability and short-pulse generation in media with relaxing Kerr nonlinearity and high self-steepening

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotovskii, I O; Korobko, D A; Lapin, V A

    2014-01-31

    The modulation instability in waveguides with high Kerr nonlinearity, characterised by a delayed nonlinear response, has been investigated with allowance for the self-steepening parameter and third-order dispersion. General expressions for the modulation gain are obtained. The influence of the waveguide parameters on the gain is analysed. It is shown that the joint effect of the delayed nonlinear response and negative nonlinearity dispersion leads to an increase in the modulation gain. The relations obtained are confirmed by numerical simulation. The results of this study can be used to design compact generators of high-frequency pulse trains. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  15. Isochoric heating of reduced-mass targets in short pulse laser experiments at 0.53 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baton, Sophie; Audebert, Patrick; Koenig, Michel; Perez, Frederic; Chahid, Makhlad; Rousseaux, Christophe; Gremillet, Laurent; Lefebvre, Erik; Rassuchine, Jenny; Cowan, Tom; Gaillard, Sandrine; Shepperd, Ronnie; Flippo, Kirk

    2008-11-01

    Recent works have shown the possibility to heat isochorically mass limited targets by using the electron refluxing. We report on experiment performed at the 100 TW LULI laser facility dedicated to the study of fast electron transport in multilayer reduced mass targets. The targets were composed of 0.2V/5Cu/5Al μm and varied from 300 to 50 μm in diameter. They were irradiated by a 300 ps laser pulse at 1.057 μm and 0.53 μm that delivered I˜2x10^19 W/cm^2 and I˜10^19 W/cm^2 respectively to form a warm dense plasma. Emission from the rear side was observed using K-alpha spectroscopy and imaging diagnostics. Spectra including the Al and Cu-K-alpha, and Al He-like emissions show changes as a function of total mass. The data obtained from all diagnostics (K-alpha spectroscopy and imagers on the rear side and the transverse side) show a different behavior depending on the incident wavelength.

  16. Transverse characteristics of short-pulse laser-produced ion beams: a study of the acceleration dynamics.

    PubMed

    Brambrink, E; Schreiber, J; Schlegel, T; Audebert, P; Cobble, J; Fuchs, J; Hegelich, M; Roth, M

    2006-04-21

    We report on first measurements of the transverse characteristics of laser-produced energetic ion beams in direct comparison to results for laser accelerated proton beams. The experiments show the same low emittance for ion beams as already found for protons. Additionally, we demonstrate that the divergence is influenced by the charge over mass ratio of the accelerated species. From these observations we deduced scaling laws for the divergence of ions as well as the temporal evolution of the ion source size. PMID:16712164

  17. Structuring by field enhancement of glass, Ag, Au, and Co thin films using short pulse laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmeanu, M.; Zamfirescu, M.; Rusen, L.; Luculescu, C.; Moldovan, A.; Stratan, A.; Dabu, R.

    2009-12-01

    Single pulse laser ablation of glass, Ag, Au, and Co thin films was experimentally investigated with a laser pulse width of 400 ps at a wavelength of 532 nm both in the far and near fields. In the far-field regime, the electromagnetic field results from a focused laser beam, while the near-field regime is realized by a combination of the focused laser beam incident on a spherical colloidal particle. For the near-field experiments we have used polystyrene colloidal particles of 700 nm diameter self-assembled or spin coated on top of the surfaces. Laser fluences applied are in the range of 0.01-10 J/cm{sup 2}. The diameter and the morphologies of the ablated holes were investigated by optical microscopy, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The dependence of the shape of the holes reflects the fluence regime and the thermophysical properties, i.e., melting temperature and thermal diffusivity of the surfaces involved in the experiments. We give quantitative data about the fluence threshold, diameter, and depth ablation dependence for the far and near fields and discuss their values with respect to the enhancement factor of the intensity of the electromagnetic field due to the use of the colloidal particles. Theoretical estimations of the intensity enhancement were done using the finite-difference time-domain method by using the RSOFT software. The application of near fields allows structuring of the surfaces with structure dimension in the order of 100 nm and even below.

  18. X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tutt, T.E.

    1994-12-01

    When a solid target is irradiated by a laser beam, the material is locally heated to a high temperature and a plasma forms. The interaction of the laser with plasma can produce energetic electrons. By observing the behavior of these {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} electrons, we hope to obtain a better understanding of Laser/Plasma Interactions. In this work we employ a layered-fluorescer technique to study the transport, and therefore the energetics, of the electrons. The plasma forms on a thin foil of metallic Pd which is bonded to thin layer of metallic Sn. Electrons formed from the plasma penetrate first the Pd and then the Sn. In both layers the energetic electrons promote inner (K) shell ionization of the metallic atoms which leads to the emission of characteristic K{sub {alpha}} x-rays of the fluorescers. By recording the x-ray spectrum emitted by the two foils, we can estimate the energy-dependent range of the electrons and their numbers.

  19. Non-filamentated ultra-intense and ultra-short pulse fronts in three-dimensional Raman seed amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2014-05-15

    Ultra-intense and ultra-short laser pulses may be generated up to the exawatt-zetawatt regime due to parametric processes in plasmas. The minimization of unwanted plasma processes leads to operational limits which are discussed here with respect to filamentation. Transverse filamentation, which originally was derived for plane waves, is being investigated for seed pulse propagation in the so called π-pulse limit. A three-dimensional (3D) three-wave-interaction model is the basis of the present investigation. To demonstrate the applicability of the three-wave-interaction model, the 1D pulse forms are compared with those obtained from 1D particle in cell and Vlasov simulations. Although wave-breaking may occur, the kinetic simulations show that the leading pumped pulse develops a form similar to that obtained from the three-wave-interaction model. In the main part, 2D and 3D filamentation processes of (localized) pulses are investigated with the three-wave-interaction model. It is shown that the leading pulse front can stay filamentation-free, whereas the rear parts show transverse modulations.

  20. Ultra-fast Movies Resolve Ultra-short Pulse Laser Ablation and Bump Formation on Thin Molybdenum Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Matthias; Rapp, Stephan; Huber, Heinz

    For the monolithic serial interconnection of CIS thin film solar cells, 470 nm molybdenum films on glass substrates must be separated galvanically. The single pulse ablation with a 660 fs laser at a wavelength of 1053 nm is investigated in a fluence regime from 0.5 to 5.0 J/cm2. At fluences above 2.0 J/cm2 bump and jet formation can be observed that could be used for creating microstructures. For the investigation of the underlying mechanisms of the laser ablation process itself as well as of the bump or jet formation, pump probe microscopy is utilized to resolve the transient ablation behavior.

  1. Improvement of density resolution in short-pulse hard x-ray radiographic imaging using detector stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borm, B.; Gärtner, F.; Khaghani, D.; Neumayer, P.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that stacking several imaging plates (IPs) constitutes an easy method to increase hard x-ray detection efficiency. Used to record x-ray radiographic images produced by an intense-laser driven hard x-ray backlighter source, the IP stacks resulted in a significant improvement of the radiograph density resolution. We attribute this to the higher quantum efficiency of the combined detectors, leading to a reduced photon noise. Electron-photon transport simulations of the interaction processes in the detector reproduce the observed contrast improvement. Increasing the detection efficiency to enhance radiographic imaging capabilities is equally effective as increasing the x-ray source yield, e.g., by a larger drive laser energy.

  2. Efficient burst mode amplifier for ultra-short pulses based on cryogenically cooled Yb³⁺:CaF₂.

    PubMed

    Körner, Jörg; Hein, Joachim; Liebetrau, Hartmut; Seifert, Reinhard; Klöpfel, Diethard; Kahle, Martin; Loeser, Markus; Siebold, Mathias; Schramm, Ulrich; Kaluza, Malte C

    2013-11-18

    We present a novel approach for the amplification of high peak power femtosecond laser pulses at a high repetition rate. This approach is based on an all-diode pumped burst mode laser scheme. In this scheme, pulse bursts with a total duration between 1 and 2 ms are be generated and amplified. They contain 50 to 2000 individual pulses equally spaced in time. The individual pulses have an initial duration of 350 fs and are stretched to 50 ps prior to amplification. The amplifier stage is based on Yb3+:CaF2 cooled to 100 K. In this amplifier, a total output energy in excess of 600 mJ per burst at a repetition rate of 10 Hz is demonstrated. For lower repetition rates the total output energy per burst can be scaled up to 915 mJ using a longer pump duration. This corresponds to an efficiency as high as 25% of extracted energy from absorbed pump energy. This is the highest efficiency, which has so far been demonstrated for a pulsed Yb3+:CaF2 amplifier.

  3. Feasibility study for SOFC-GT hybrid locomotive power: Part I. Development of a dynamic 3.5 MW SOFC-GT FORTRAN model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Andrew S.; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    2012-09-01

    This work presents the development of a dynamic SOFC-GT hybrid system model applied to a long-haul freight locomotive in operation. Given the expectations of the rail industry, the model is used to develop a preliminary analysis of the proposed system's operational capability on conventional diesel fuel as well as natural gas and hydrogen as potential fuels in the future. It is found that operation of the system on all three of these fuels is feasible with favorable efficiencies and reasonable dynamic response. The use of diesel fuel reformate in the SOFC presents a challenge to the electrochemistry, especially as it relates to control and optimization of the fuel utilization in the anode compartment. This is found to arise from the large amount of carbon monoxide in diesel reformate that is fed to the fuel cell, limiting the maximum fuel utilization possible. This presents an opportunity for further investigations into carbon monoxide electrochemical oxidation and/or system integration studies where the efficiency of the fuel reformer can be balanced against the needs of the SOFC.

  4. Aero-elastic Parameter Estimation of a 2.5 MW Wind Turbine Through Dynamic Analysis of In-Operation Vibration Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbek, Muammer; Rixen, Daniel J.

    Aero-elastic parameters of a 2.5 MW—80 m diameter—wind turbine were extracted by using the in-operation vibration data recorded for various wind speeds and operating conditions. The data acquired by 8 strain gauges (2 sensors on each blade and 2 sensors on the tower) installed on the turbine was analyzed by using OMA (Operational Modal Analysis) methods while several turbine parameters (eigenfrequencies and damping ratios) were extracted. The obtained system parameters were then qualitatively compared with the results presented in a study from literature, which includes both aeroelastic simulations and in-field measurements performed on a similar size and capacity wind turbine.

  5. Room temperature optical anisotropy of a LaMnO3 thin-film induced by ultra-short pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Munkhbaatar, Purevdorj; Marton, Zsolt; Tsermaa, Bataarchuluun; Choi, Woo Seok; Seo, Sung Seok A.; Kim, Jin Seung; Nakagawa, Naoyuki; Hwang, H. Y.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Myung-Whun, Kim

    2015-03-04

    Ultra-short laser pulse induced optical anisotropy of LaMnO3 thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrates were observed by irradiation with a femto-second laser pulse with the fluence of less than 0.1 mJ/cm2 at room temperature. The transmittance and reflectance showed different intensities for different polarization states of the probe pulse after pump pulse irradiation. The theoretical optical transmittance and re ectance that assumed an orbital ordering of the 3d eg electrons in Mn3+ ions resulted in an anisotropic time dependent changes similar to those obtained from the experimental results, suggesting that the photo-induced optical anisotropy of LaMnO3 is a result of photo-induced symmetry breaking of the orbital ordering for an optically excited state.

  6. Three-dimensional dynamics of break-out afterburner ion acceleration using high-contrast short-pulse laser and nano-scale targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Jung, D.; Bowers, K. J.; Fernandez, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2010-11-01

    Ultra-intense laser interaction with solid density carbon targets is examined in 3D VPIC simulations. It is shown that a linearly polarized laser pulse at >10^20 W/cm^2 intensity will turn a solid density, nm-scale target relativistically transparent and begin an epoch of dramatic acceleration of ions. Called the Break-Out-Afterburner (BOA) [L. Yin, et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 056706 (2007)], this mechanism leads to order-of-magnitude greater ion energy and beam currents. The BOA lasts until the electron density in the expanding target reduces to the non-relativistic critical density. A striking feature of the BOA mechanism is that the ion beam symmetry is broken, with the production of lobes in the direction orthogonal to the laser polarization and propagation directions, along which the highest ion beam energy is observed. These ion beam lobes have been measured on recent Trident experiments. An analytic theory for the production of ion beam lobes has been obtained and has been shown to be in good agreement with simulations. Moreover, other features of the BOA, e.g., the existence of an optimal target thickness for given laser and target density and the propagation of light and heavy ion species at comparable speed have been demonstrated in simulations and experiments.

  7. Determination of the nonlinear refractive index of multimode silica fiber with a dual-line ultra-short pulse laser source by using the induced grating autocorrelation technique.

    PubMed

    Traore, Aboubakar; Lalanne, Elaine; Johnson, Anthony M

    2015-06-29

    We measured, within 6% accuracy, the nonlinear refractive index (n2) of 10 meter long multimode silica fiber of 17μm core diameter, using a modified induced grating autocorrelation technique (IGA). This measurement technique, based on time-delayed two beam coupling in a photorefractive crystal has been used to accurately measure n2 in short lengths of single mode fibers. For the first time to our knowledge, IGA is used to measure n2 of multimode fiber with a passively modelocked Nd:YVO4 laser operating with a dual-line near 1342 nm. PMID:26191721

  8. Short pulse formation in a TEA CO{sub 2} laser using a CO{sub 2} - N{sub 2} - H{sub 2} gas mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Ivashchenko, M V; Karapuzikov, A I; Sherstov, I V

    2001-11-30

    The use of an optimal CO{sub 2} - N{sub 2} - H{sub 2} gas mixture with a high concentration of hydrogen (30% - 40%) was shown to allow the formation of high-power TEA CO{sub 2}-laser pulses with a base duration of {approx} 200 ns whose energy and peak power significantly exceed the parameters of pulses obtained in binary CO{sub 2} - H{sub 2} mixtures. Considering all the parameters, the helium-free 56% CO{sub 2} - 14% N{sub 2} - 30% H{sub 2} gas mixture at a pressure of 0.7 atm is optimal for the generation of short high-power pulses in the TEA CO{sub 2} laser. A small addition of nitrogen ([CO{sub 2}]/[N{sub 2}] {approx} 10 - 12) to the binary CO{sub 2} - H{sub 2} mixture not only substantially increases the pulse energy and peak power (by a factor of 3 - 3.5) but also shortens their duration at half-maximum with retention of the total (base) duration. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  9. A tuneable ultra-compact high-power, ultra-short pulsed, bright gamma-ray source based on bremsstrahlung radiation from laser-plasma accelerated electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiccia, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Vieux, G.; Issac, R. C.; Brunetti, E.; Ersfeld, B.; Welsh, G. H.; Anania, M. P.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Maneuski, D.; Shea, V. O.; Lemos, N. R. C.; Bendoyro, R. A.; Dias, J. M.; Bourgeois, N.; Ibbotson, T. P. A.; and others

    2012-03-15

    The laser driven plasma wakefield accelerator is a very compact source of high energy electrons. When the quasi-monoenergetic beam from these accelerators passes through dense material, high energy bremsstrahlung photons are emitted in a collimated beam with high flux. We show how a source based on this emission process can produce more than 10{sup 9} photons per pulse with a mean energy of 10 MeV. We present experimental results that show the feasibility of this method of producing high energy photons and compare the experimental results with GEANT4 Montecarlo simulations, which also give the scaling required to evaluate its suitability as method to produce radioisotopes via photo-nuclear reactions or for imaging applications.

  10. Modelling of non-LTE atomic physics processes in hot dense plasmas during the interaction with an intense short pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J.; Petrov, G. M.

    2014-05-01

    The implicit 2D3V particle-in-cell (PIC) code developed to study the interaction of intense lasers with matter (Petrov and Davis 2008 Comput. Phys. Commun. 179 868-80 2011 Phys. Plasmas 18 073102) has been extended to include atomic physics under extreme energy density conditions. The atomic physics model is applied to aluminium. Each ionization stage contains two levels: one ground and one lumped excited state, for which various atomic physics processes such as optical field ionization, collisional ionization, excitation, de-excitation and radiative decay describe the population density. Two-dimensional PIC simulations have been carried out for laser pulses with peak intensity 1 × 1020 W cm-2, pulse duration 60 fs, spot size 3 µm and energy 0.75 J interacting with ultrathin (0.2 µm) Al foil. Radiation emitted during the laser-target interaction is computed by accounting for both bound-bound transitions and bremsstrahlung radiation. We demonstrate that the radiation signature of laser-produced plasma can be used as a complementary tool to other diagnostic techniques used in laser-plasma interactions. Finally, results from the PIC model are compared to equilibrium calculations (Maxwell-Boltzmann and Saha). In the early stages of laser-plasma interactions (<100 fs) the plasma is far from equilibrium and equilibrium models can not be applied with confidence to model the plasma.

  11. Comparison of measured and calculated X-ray and hot-electron production in short-pulse laser-solid interactions at moderate intensities.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, T; Bastiani, S; Grémillet, L; Geindre, J P; Audebert, P; Gauthier, J C; Lefebvre, E; Bonnaud, G; Delettrez, J

    1999-08-01

    Ultrashort pulse laser-solid interaction experiments with 4x10(16) W/cm(2),120 fs, 45 degrees incidence angle, p-polarized pulses are theoretically analyzed with the help of 1(1/2)-dimensional (1(1/2) D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The laser impinges upon preformed plasmas with a precisely controlled density-gradient scale-length. PIC electron distribution functions are used as an input to 3D Monte Carlo simulations to interpret measured electron distributions and Kalpha radiation emission. Satisfactory agreement between the experimental and simulation results is obtained for the measured absorption coefficient, the energy distribution of the back-scattered hot electrons, the hot-electron temperature in the bulk of the target, and the Kalpha yield, when the preplasma scale-length is varied.

  12. Room temperature optical anisotropy of a LaMnO{sub 3} thin-film induced by ultra-short pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Munkhbaatar, Purevdorj; Kim, Jin Seung; Myung-Whun, Kim; Marton, Zsolt; Lee, Ho Nyung; Tsermaa, Baatarchuluun; Choi, Woo Seok; Seo, Sung S. Ambrose; Nakagawa, Naoyuki; Hwang, Harold Y.

    2015-03-02

    We observed ultra-short laser pulse-induced transient optical anisotropy in a LaMnO{sub 3} thin film. The anisotropy was induced by laser pulse irradiation with a fluence of less than 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. The transmittance and reflectance showed strong dependence on the polarization states of the pulses. For parallel and perpendicular polarization states, there exists a difference of approximately 0.2% for transmittance and 0.05% for reflectance at 0.3 ps after the irradiation with a pump pulse, respectively. The theoretical values for optical transmittance and reflectance with an assumption of an orbital ordering of 3d e{sub g} electrons in Mn{sup 3+} ions showed good agreement with the experimental results, demonstrating that the transient optical anisotropy in LaMnO{sub 3} thin film is due to the photo-induced symmetry-breaking of orbital ordering in excited states.

  13. Formation of upconversion nanoparticles of 18%Yb:1%Er:NAYF4 by ultra-short pulse laser ablation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemini, Laura; Hernandez, Marie-Caroline; Kling, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) is nowadays gaining popularity as innovative, reliable and efficient technique to produce high-purity nanoparticles (NPs) of many inorganic and organic materials. In this context, attention has been recently focused on luminescent up-conversion NPs (UCNPs) which, being characterized by sharp emission bands in ultraviolet (UV)-to-near-infrared (NIR) range upon NIR irradiation, are in fact of great interest in many biological and biomedical applications. Moreover, with respect to organic dyes NPs and quantum dots, UCNPs show less toxicity, increased chemical stability, long-lifetime decays and lack of photo-bleaching. Our research focuses on generation of UCNPs of rare earth lanthanide-doped crystalline material, namely 18%Yb:1%Er:NAYF4, by PLAL in water. It is well known that optical properties of NPs strongly depend on their features, as for instance size and shape, which in turn may be controlled by laser ablation parameters. Therefore, two different laser sources are used for the ablation processes in order to find the set of laser parameter, i.e. pulse duration, laser fluence and repetition rate, for which the luminescence of UPNPs is optimized: (i) Amplitude Satsuma HP3 system: 330 fs pulse duration, 1030 wavelength and (ii) Eolite Hegoa system: 50 ps pulse duration, 1030 nm wavelength. UCNPs are finally characterized by spectrophotometer analyses to define emission range and intensity under NIR light and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine their size and shape.

  14. A short pulse of mechanical force induces gene expression and growth in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts via an ERK 1/2 pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Jason P.; Pooran, Milad; Li, Chai-Fei; Luzzio, Chris; Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    2003-01-01

    Physiological mechanical loading is crucial for maintenance of bone integrity and architecture. We have calculated the strain caused by gravity stress on osteoblasts and found that 4-30g corresponds to physiological levels of 40-300 microstrain. Short-term gravity loading (15 minutes) induced a 15-fold increase in expression of growth-related immediate early gene c-fos, a 5-fold increase in egr-1, and a 3-fold increase in autocrine bFGF. The non-growth-related genes EP-1, TGF-beta, and 18s were unaffected by gravity loading. Short-term physiological loading induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2) phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner with maximum phosphorylation saturating at mechanical loading levels of 12g (p < 0.001) with no effect on total ERK. The phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was unaffected by mechanical force. g-Loading did not activate P38 MAPK or c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Additionally, a gravity pulse resulted in the localization of phosphorylated ERK 1/2 to the nucleus; this did not occur in unloaded cells. The induction of c-fos was inhibited 74% by the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 (p < 0.001) but was not affected by MEK1 or p38 MAPK-specific inhibitors. The long-term consequence of a single 15-minute gravity pulse was a 64% increase in cell growth (p < 0.001). U0126 significantly inhibited gravity-induced growth by 50% (p < 0.001). These studies suggest that short periods of physiological mechanical stress induce immediate early gene expression and growth in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts primarily through an ERK 1/2-mediated pathway.

  15. Experimental Demonstration of the Effectiveness of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency for Enhancing Cross-Phase Modulation in the Short-Pulse Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmochowski, Greg; Feizpour, Amir; Hallaji, Matin; Zhuang, Chao; Hayat, Alex; Steinberg, Aephraim M.

    2016-04-01

    We present an experiment using a sample of laser-cooled Rb atoms to show that cross-phase modulation schemes continue to benefit from electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) even as the transparency window is made narrower than the signal bandwidth (i.e., for signal pulses much shorter than the response time of the EIT system). Addressing concerns that narrow EIT windows might not prove useful for such applications, we show that while the peak phase shift saturates in this regime, it does not drop, and the time-integrated effect continues to scale inversely with EIT window width. This integrated phase shift is an important figure of merit for tasks such as the detection of single-photon-induced cross-phase shifts. Only when the window width approaches the system's dephasing rate γ does the peak phase shift begin to decrease, leading to an integrated phase shift that peaks when the window width is equal to 4 γ .

  16. Short pulse generation from a flashlamp-pumped rhodamine 6G ring dye laser using the colliding pulse mode-locking technique

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.

    1987-01-01

    The colliding pulse mode-locking (CPM) technique has been applied to a flashlamp-pumped rhodamine 6G dye laser to reliably generate pulses of <1.5 ps. Pulse evolution in the ring cavity has been studied by examining the pulse characteristics at various parts of the pulse train using a Photochron II streak camera. The measured pulse durations in the ring cavity were found to be detector-limited and were shorter than those generated in a linear cavity. The shortest pulses were observed to evolve toward the end of the --600-ns long mode-locked train.

  17. Short pulse diode-pumped Tm:YAG slab laser electro-optically Q-switched by RbTiOPO4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lin; Liu, Pian; Huang, Haitao; Liu, Xuan; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a laser diode end pumped RbTiOPO4 (RTP) electro-optically Q-switched Tm:YAG slab laser was demonstrated. Stable Q-switched pulse with the shortest pulse width of 58 ns and an average output power of 7.5 W were realized at the repetition rate of 1 KHz, corresponding to the slope efficiency of 21.7%.

  18. Ultrafast and short pulse optical nonlinearities of meso-tetrakis-(2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-N,N,N-trimethyl-4-aniliniumyl) porphyrin and its metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siji Narendran, N. K.; Soman, Rahul; Sankar, Pranitha; Arunkumar, Chellaiah; Chandrasekharan, K.

    2015-11-01

    Among the various classes of Nonlinear Optical chromophores, porphyrins appear to have exclusive characteristics that make them superior to other compounds as optical materials. Here we report the experimental analysis on the nonlinear optical properties of a new series of porphyrins, meso-tetrakis(2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-N,N,N-trimethyl-4-aniliniumyl) porphyrin and its central metal substitutions using Z-scan technique under nanosecond (532 nm, 7 ns) and femtosecond (800 nm, 100 fs) excitations. The compounds were found to exhibit two photon absorption assisted excited state absorption in the nanosecond regime and effective three photon absorption in the femtosecond regime. The third-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities (χ(3)) were of the order 10-11 esu and are compared through degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM). The compounds showed good optical limiting behavior in both femtosecond and nanosecond regimes which find applications in laser safety. The structure property relationship has been established with the support of Electrostatic Surface Potential (ESP) mapping.

  19. Emission Behavior of Crystalline 1,4-Bis(4-phenylthiophene-2-yl)benzene Film Under Optical Excitation with Ultra Short Pulses.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Sasaki, Fumio; Hotta, Shu

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated emission behaviors of crystallized films of 1,4-bis(5-phenylthiophene-2-yl)benzene (AC5) in detail which was a representative thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer. The crystallized AC5 films were prepared by vapor deposition onto a substrate and thermal treatment. The AC5 films consisted of a crystalline domain with the size of several tens of micrometers. We used femtosecond laser pulses for the excitation of the AC5 films. As a result, the femtosecond laser pulses did not induce re-absorption above excitation energy densities of their laser threshold. The obtained gain value for AC5 crystallized film was large, over 150 cm-1. Furthermore, the emission cross section of the crystallized AC5 film was nearly 10(-16) cm2. PMID:27451614

  20. Room temperature optical anisotropy of a LaMnO3 thin-film induced by ultra-short pulse laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Munkhbaatar, Purevdorj; Marton, Zsolt; Tsermaa, Bataarchuluun; Choi, Woo Seok; Seo, Sung Seok A.; Kim, Jin Seung; Nakagawa, Naoyuki; Hwang, H. Y.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Myung-Whun, Kim

    2015-03-04

    Ultra-short laser pulse induced optical anisotropy of LaMnO3 thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrates were observed by irradiation with a femto-second laser pulse with the fluence of less than 0.1 mJ/cm2 at room temperature. The transmittance and reflectance showed different intensities for different polarization states of the probe pulse after pump pulse irradiation. The theoretical optical transmittance and re ectance that assumed an orbital ordering of the 3d eg electrons in Mn3+ ions resulted in an anisotropic time dependent changes similar to those obtained from the experimental results, suggesting that the photo-induced optical anisotropy of LaMnO3 is a result ofmore » photo-induced symmetry breaking of the orbital ordering for an optically excited state.« less

  1. Characterization of nonlinear saturation and mode-locking potential of ionically-doped colored glass filter for short-pulse fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Kelleher, E J R; Popov, S V; Taylor, J R

    2013-05-20

    The nonlinear saturable absorption of an ionically-doped colored glass filter is measured directly using a Z-scan technique. For the first time, we demonstrate the potential of this material as a saturable asborber in fiber lasers. We achieve mode-locking of an ytterbium doped system. Mode-locking of cavities with all-positive and net-negative group velocity dispersion are demonstrated, achieving pulse durations of 60 ps and 4.1 ps, respectively. This inexpensive and optically robust material, with the potential for broadband operation, could surplant other saturable absorber devices in affordable mode-locked fiber lasers.

  2. Theoretical study of cw to short pulse conversion in an active cw-injected ring cavity with a Yb3+:YAG amplifier.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiyun; Bourdet, Gilbert L

    2007-05-10

    The short laser pulse generated from an active cw-injected ring cavity with Yb3+:YAG crystal, which is treated as the homogeneously broadened amplifier, is studied theoretically. Based on the derived results, the impacts of the amplifier length, the seeding laser intensity and frequency, the pump intensity, the efficiency of the acousto-optic modulator (AOM), and the frequency shift generated by the AOM on the performance of the laser pulse are analyzed. PMID:17446920

  3. Propagation In Matter Of Currents Of Relativistic Electrons Beyond The Alfven Limit, Produced In Ultra-High-Intensity Short-Pulse Laser-Matter Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Baton, S. D.; Manclossi, M.; Amiranoff, F.; Koenig, M.; Santos, J. J.; Martinolli, E.; Gremillet, L.; Popescu, H.; Antonicci, A.; Rousseaux, C.; Rabec Le Gloahec, M.; Hall, T.; Malka, V.; Cowan, T. E.; Stephens, R.; Key, M.; King, J.; Freeman, R.

    2004-12-01

    This paper reports the results of several experiments performed at the LULI laboratory (Palaiseau, France) concerning the propagation of large relativistic currents in matter from ultra-high-intensity laser pulse interaction with target. We present our results according to the type of diagnostics used in the experiments: 1) Kα emission and Kα imaging, 2) study of target rear side emission in the visible region, 3) time resolved optical shadowgraphy.

  4. Pulse shape measurements using single shot-frequency resolved optical gating for high energy (80 J) short pulse (600 fs) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Palaniyappan, S.; Johnson, R.; Shimada, T.; Gautier, D. C.; Letzring, S.; Offermann, D. T.; Fernandez, J. C.; Shah, R. C.; Jung, D.; Hegelich, B. M.; Hoerlein, R.

    2010-10-15

    Relevant to laser based electron/ion accelerations, a single shot second harmonic generation frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) system has been developed to characterize laser pulses (80 J, {approx}600 fs) incident on and transmitted through nanofoil targets, employing relay imaging, spatial filter, and partially coated glass substrates to reduce spatial nonuniformity and B-integral. The device can be completely aligned without using a pulsed laser source. Variations of incident pulse shape were measured from durations of 613 fs (nearly symmetric shape) to 571 fs (asymmetric shape with pre- or postpulse). The FROG measurements are consistent with independent spectral and autocorrelation measurements.

  5. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Generation of a Super Strong Attosecond Pulse from an Atomic Superposition State Irradiated by a Shape-Optimized Short Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fu-Ming; Yang, Yu-Jun; Jin, Ming-Xing; Ding, Da-Jun; Zhu, Qi-Ren

    2009-11-01

    Using a linearly polarized, phase-stabilized 3-fs driving pulse of 800 nm central wavelength shape-optimized on its ascending edge by its an amplitude-reduced pulse irradiating on a superposition state of the helium atom, we demonstrate theoretically the generation of a super strong isolated 176-attosecond pulse in the spectral region of 93-124 eV. The unusually high intensity of this attosecond pulse is marked by the Rabi-like oscillations emerging in the time-dependent populations of the ground state and the continuum during the occurrence of the electron recombination, which is for the first time observed in this work.

  6. Multifunctional gold nanorods for selective plasmonic photothermal therapy in pancreatic cancer cells using ultra-short pulse near-infrared laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Patino, Tania; Mahajan, Ujjwal; Palankar, Raghavendra; Medvedev, Nikolay; Walowski, Jakob; Münzenberg, Markus; Mayerle, Julia; Delcea, Mihaela

    2015-03-12

    Gold nanorods (AuNRs) have attracted considerable attention in plasmonic photothermal therapy for cancer treatment by exploiting their selective and localized heating effect due to their unique photophysical properties. Here we describe a strategy to design a novel multifunctional platform based on AuNRs to: (i) specifically target the adenocarcinoma MUC-1 marker through the use of the EPPT-1 peptide, (ii) enhance cellular uptake through a myristoylated polyarginine peptide (MPAP) and (iii) selectively induce cell death by ultra-short near infrared laser pulses. We used a biotin-avidin based approach to conjugate EPPT-1 and MPAP to AuNRs. Dual-peptide (EPPT-1+MPAP) labelled AuNRs showed a significantly higher uptake by pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells when compared to their single peptide or avidin conjugated counterparts. In addition, we selectively induced cell death by ultra-short near infrared laser pulses in small target volumes (∼1 μm3), through the creation of plasmonic nanobubbles that lead to the destruction of a local cell environment. Our approach opens new avenues for conjugation of multiple ligands on AuNRs targeting cancer cells and tumors and it is relevant for plasmonic photothermal therapy.

  7. Above scaling short-pulse ion acceleration from flat foil and ``Pizza-top Cone'' targets at the Trident laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippo, Kirk; Hegelich, B. Manuel; Cort Gautier, D.; Johnson, J. Randy; Kline, John L.; Shimada, Tsutomu; Fernández, Juan C.; Gaillard, Sandrine; Rassuchine, Jennifer; Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Cowan, Thomas E.; Malekos, Steve; Korgan, Grant

    2006-10-01

    Ion-driven Fast Ignition (IFI) has certain advantages over electron-driven FI due to a possible large reduction in the amount of energy required. Recent experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident facility have yielded ion energies and efficiencies many times in excess of recent published scaling laws, leading to even more potential advantages of IFI. Proton energies in excess of 35 MeV have been observed from targets produced by the University of Nevada, Reno - dubbed ``Pizza-top Cone'' targets - at intensities of only 1x10^19 W/cm^2 with 20 joules in 600 fs. Energies in excess of 24 MeV were observed from simple flat foil targets as well. The observed energies, above any published scaling laws, are attributed to target production, preparation, and shot to shot monitoring of many laser parameters, especially the laser ASE prepulse level and laser pulse duration. The laser parameters are monitored in real-time to keep the laser in optimal condition throughout the run providing high quality, reproducible shots.

  8. Status, Operation, and Extension of the ECRH System at ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D.; Stober, J.; Leuterer, F.; Monaco, F.; Müller, S.; Münich, M.; Rapson, C. J.; Reich, M.; Schubert, M.; Schütz, H.; Treutterer, W.; Zohm, H.; Thumm, M.; Scherer, T.; Meier, A.; Gantenbein, G.; Jelonnek, J.; Kasparek, W.; Lechte, C.; Plaum, B.; Goodman, T.; Litvak, A. G.; Denisov, G. G.; Chirkov, A.; Zapevalov, V.; Malygin, V.; Popov, L. G.; Nichiporenko, V. O.; Myasnikov, V. E.; Tai, E. M.; Solyanova, E. A.; Malygin, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    The upgraded electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been routinely used with eight gyrotrons during the last experimental campaign. A further upgrade will replace the existing system of four short-pulse (140 GHz, 2 s, 500 kW) gyrotrons. The final goal is to have around 6.5-7 MW at 140 GHz (or 5.5 MW at 105 GHz) from eight units available in the plasma during the whole AUG discharge (10 s). The system operates at 140 and 105 GHz with X2, O2 and X3 schemes. For B > 3 T also an ITER-like O1-scenario can be run using the 105 GHz option. Four of the eight launching antennas are capable of fast poloidal movements necessary for real-time control of the location of power deposition.

  9. Endodontic applications of a short pulsed FR Nd:YAG dental laser: photovaporization of extruded pulpal tissue following traumatic fractures of two maxillary central incisors--a clinical trial repor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Robert H., II

    1992-06-01

    Historically, many techniques have been attempted in the search for a satisfactory and consistent treatment of inflamed, painful, hyperemic pulpal tissue. Present techniques attempting to achieve profound local anesthesia in such tissue, have not been satisfactory. Local anesthesia techniques acceptable to the patient with painful hyperemic pulpal tissue, has eluded previous technology. The subsequent treatment of hyperemic tissue without sufficient anesthesia primarily involves undesirable invasive mechanical/surgical procedures. Described in this clinical trial is a technique using free running (FR) pulsed, Nd:YAG laser energy to ablate soft tooth pulpal tissue--a technique employed after conventional endodontic methods failed. A free running pulsed, FR Nd:YAG dental laser was successfully used at 20 pulses per second and 1.25 watts to photovaporize endodontic pulpal tissue (pulpectomy) to allow a conventional endodontic file to extirpate the remaining soft tissue remnants and access the root apex. Also described in this paper is the 'hot-tip' effect of contact fiber laser surgery. This clinical trial achieved the immediate, short term objective of endodontic soft tissue removal via photovaporization, without pain reported by the patient. The pulsed FR Nd:YAG dental laser used as described in this clinical report appears to be a very safe and very effective technique; offers a treatment alternative to traditional therapy that suggests high patient acceptance; and is significantly less stressful for the doctor and staff than traditional treatment options. Long-term, controlled scientific and clinical studies are necessary to establish the safety and efficacy of both the helium-neon energy for visualization and the low-watt pulsed FR Nd:YAG energy for photovaporization of soft endodontic pulpal tissue within the root canal. Research is especially needed to understand the effects of a low-watt, pulsed FR, Nd:YAG laser on the activity of osteoclasts and odontoclasts and identify risks for developing external and/or internal resorption after intracanal application of pulsed FR Nd:YAG laser energy.

  10. X-ray measurements at high-power lasers. Relative conversion efficiencies of short pulse laser light into K X-ray radiation in medium to high Z elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, C. I.; Indelicato, P.; Gumberidze, A.; Holland, G. E.; Seely, J. F.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, A.; Audebert, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Tabakhoff, E.; Brambrink, E.

    2009-03-01

    Conversion efficiencies of laser light into K x-ray radiation are used to characterize laser-solid interactions e.g. in measurements with back-lighter targets in Inertial Confinement Fusion research or in ultra short x-ray science where ultra short laser pulses are used to create x-rays for investigation of dynamic processes. In our measurements we observed high energy (few tens of keV) K x-ray radiation of element pairs created upon impact of a 1 ps, 100 J laser pulse on the target surface. The high-energy electrons created in this interaction ionise and excite the target material. We have used high purity alloy foils of Pd and Ag, as well as In and Sn and crystals of CsI and rare earth molybdates as target materials. Both constituents of these targets were simultaneously excited in one shot. The K x-ray radiation was dispersed and detected with the LCS (LULI Crystal Spectrometer), a Cauchois-type cylindrically bent transmission-crystal spectrometer. Measuring ratios in the x-ray spectra permits determination of relative conversion efficiencies for pairs of elements under identical laser-target interaction conditions.

  11. Tunable error-free optical frequency conversion of a 4ps optical short pulse over 25 nm by four-wave mixing in a polarisation-maintaining optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioka, T.; Kawanishi, S.; Saruwatari, M.

    1994-05-01

    Error-free, tunable optical frequency conversion of a transform-limited 4.0 ps optical pulse signalis demonstrated at 6.3 Gbit/s using four-wave mixing in a polarization-maintaining optical fibre. The process generates 4.0-4.6 ps pulses over a 25nm range with time-bandwidth products of 0.31-0.43 and conversion power penalties of less than 1.5 dB.

  12. Multi-megawatt 110 GHz ECH system for the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Callis, R.W.; Lohr, J.; O`Neill, R.C.; Ponce, D.; Prater, R.

    1997-11-01

    Two 110 GHz gyrotrons with nominal output power of 1 MW each have been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. The first 110 GHz gyrotron built by Gycom has a nominal rating of 1 MW and a 2s pulse length, with the pulse length being determined by the maximum temperature allowed on the edge cooled boron nitride window. This gyrotron was first operated into the DIII-D tokamak in late 1996. The second gyrotron was built by Communications and Power Industries (CPI) was commissioned during the spring of 1997. The CPI gyrotron uses a double disc FC-75 cooled sapphire window which has a pulse length rating of 0.8s at 1 MW, 2s at 0.5 MW and 10s at 0.2 MW. Both gyrotrons are connected to the tokamak by a low-loss-windowless evacuated transmission line using circular corrugated waveguide for propagation in the HE(11) mode. Using short pulse lengths to avoid breakdown inside the air filled waveguide, the microwave beam has been measured inside the DIII-D vacuum vessel using a paper target and an IR camera. The resultant microwave beam was found to be well focused with a spot size of approximately 8 cm. The beam can be steered poloidially from the center to the outer edge of the plasma. The initial operation of the Gycom gyrotron with about 0.5 MW delivered to a low density plasma for 0.5 s showed good central electron heating, with peak temperature in excess of 10 keV. A third gyrotron, being built by CPI, will be installed later this year. Progress with the first CPI tube will also be discussed and future plans for the ECH installation and physics experiments will be presented.

  13. ECH Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Temkin, Richard

    2014-12-24

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is needed for plasma heating, current drive, plasma stability control, and other applications in fusion energy sciences research. The program of fusion energy sciences supported by U. S. DOE, Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences relies on the development of ECH technology to meet the needs of several plasma devices working at the frontier of fusion energy sciences research. The largest operating ECH system in the world is at DIII-D, consisting of six 1 MW, 110 GHz gyrotrons capable of ten second pulsed operation, plus two newer gyrotrons. The ECH Technology Development research program investigated the options for upgrading the DIII-D 110 GHz ECH system. Options included extending present-day 1 MW technology to 1.3 – 1.5 MW power levels or developing an entirely new approach to achieve up to 2 MW of power per gyrotron. The research consisted of theoretical research and designs conducted by Communication and Power Industries of Palo Alto, CA working with MIT. Results of the study would be validated in a later phase by research on short pulse length gyrotrons at MIT and long pulse / cw gyrotrons in industry. This research follows a highly successful program of development that has led to the highly reliable, six megawatt ECH system at the DIII-D tokamak. Eventually, gyrotrons at the 1.5 megawatt to multi-megawatt power level will be needed for heating and current drive in large scale plasmas including ITER and DEMO.

  14. Radiation analysis of the CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) pellet injector system and its impact on personnel access

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.; Stevens, P.N.; Gomes, I.C.; Gomes, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is near completion. This short-pulse ignition experiment is planned to follow the operations of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The high neutron wall loadings, /approximately/4-5 MW/m/sup 2/, associated with the operation of this device require that neutronics-related issues be considered in the overall system design. Radiation shielding is required for the protection of device components and personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure, and the entire experiment is housed in a circular test cell facility with a radius of /approximately/12 m. The most critical radiation concern in the CIT design process relates to the numerous penetrations in the device. This paper discusses the impact of a major penetration on the design and operations of the CIT pellet injection system. The pellet injector is a major component, which has a line-of-sight penetration through the igloo and test cell wall. All current options for maintenance of the injector require personnel access. A nuclear analysis has been performed to determine the feasibility of hands-on access. Results indicate that personnel access to the pellet injector glovebox is possible. 10 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Status and System Performance for the DIII-D ECH System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cengher, M.; Lohr, J.; Gorelov, Y. A.; Ponce, D.; Prater, R.; Moeller, C. P.

    2014-10-01

    The electron cyclotron heating (ECH) capabilities on DIII-D are being steadily updated, leading to increased experimental flexibility and high reliability of the system. A 110 GHz depressed collector gyrotron in the 1.0 MW class was installed and is being tested and conditioned to longer pulse length. A second depressed collector gyrotron is operational in addition to the four 110 GHz, 1 MW gyrotrons. A new design depressed collector gyrotron in the 1.5 MW class, operating at 117.5 GHz, is expected to be installed during 2015 following rework to address a high voltage standoff problem. This tube will operate in the TE20,9 mode and has achieved 1.8 MW for short pulses during factory testing. The individual power generated at the gyrotrons and the power injected into the tokamak are measured on a shot-to-shot basis for the present year, with calibration based on the measured linearity between the injected power and the gyrotron cavity loading. The individual average injected powers into the plasma are between 520 and 760 kW. The line transmission coefficient including the waveguide line and the MOU is between -1.04 dB and -1.43 dB. Work supported by the US Department of Energy DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  16. The RF power system for the SNS linac

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Reass, W.A.

    1998-12-31

    The initial goal of the SNS project is to produce a 1 MW average beam of protons with short pulse lengths onto a neutron-producing target. The objective of the SNS RF system is to generate 117 MW peak of pulsed 805 MHz microwave power with an accelerated beam pulse length of 1.04 ms at a 60 Hz repetition rate. The power system must be upgradeable in peak power to deliver 2 MW average power to the neutron target. The RF system also requires about 3 MW peak of RF power at 402.5 MHz, but that system is not discussed here. The design challenge is to produce an RF system at minimum cost, that is very reliable and economical to operate. The combination of long pulses and high repetition rates make conventional solutions, such as the pulse transformer and transmission line method, very expensive. The klystron, with a modulating anode, and 1.5 MW of peak output power is the baseline RF amplifier, an 56 are required in the baseline design. The authors discuss four power system configurations that are the candidates for the design. The baseline design is a floating-deck modulating anode system. A second power system being investigated is the fast-pulsed power supply, that can be turned on and off with a rise time of under 0.1 ms. This could eliminate the need for a modulator, and drastically reduce the energy storage requirements. A third idea is to use a pulse transformer with a series IGBT switch and a bouncer circuit on the primary side, as was done for the TESLA modulator. A fourth method is to use a series IGBT switch at high voltage, and not use a pulse transformer. The authors discuss the advantages and problems of these four types of power systems, but they emphasize the first two.

  17. Radiation analysis of the CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) pellet injector system and its impact on personnel access

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.; Stevens, P.N.; Gomes, I.C.; Gomes, L.M.

    1988-08-01

    The conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is nearing completion. The CIT is a short-pulse ignition experiment, which is planned to follow the operations of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The high neutron wall loadings, 4--5 MW/m/sup 2/, associated with the operation of this device require that neutronics-related issues be considered in the overall system design. Radiation shielding is required for the protection of device components as well as personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure, and the entire experiment is housed in a circular test cell facility that has a radius of 12 m. The most critical radiation concerns in the CIT design process relate to the numerous penetrations in the device. This report discusses the impact of a major penetration on the design and operation of the pellet injection system in the CIT. The pellet injector is a major component, and it has a line-of-sight penetration through the igloo and test cell wall. All current options for maintenance of the injector require hands-on-access. A nuclear analysis has been performed to establish the feasibility of hands-on-access. A coupled Monte Carlo/discrete-ordinates methodology was used to perform the analysis. This problem is characterized by deep penetration and streaming with very large length-to-diameter ratios. Results from this study indicate that personnel access to the pellet injector glovebox is possible. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. ECH by FEL and gyrotron sources on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.W.; Turner, W.C.; Allen, S.L.; Byers, J.A.; Felker, B.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Ferguson, S.W.; Hooper, E.G.; Thomassen, K.I.; Throop, A.L. ); Makowski, M.A. )

    1990-08-09

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at LLNL is studying the physics of intense pulse ECH is a high-density tokamak plasma using a microwave FEL. Related technology development includes the FEL, a windowless quasi-optical transmission system, and other microwave components. Initial plasma experiments have been carried out at 140 GHz with single rf pulses generated using the ETA-II accelerator and the ELF wiggler. Peak power levels up to 0.2 GW and pulse durations up to 10 ns were achieved for injection into the plasma using as untapered wiggler. FEL pulses were transmitted over 33 m from the FEL to MTX using six mirrors mounted in a 50-cm-diam evacuated pipe. Measurements of the microwave beam and transmission through the plasma were carried out. For future rapid pulse experiments at high average power (4 GW peak power, 5kHz pulse rate, and {bar P} > 0.5 MW) using the IMP wiggler with tapered magnetic field, a gyrotron (140 GHz, 400 kW cw or up to 1 MW short pulse) is being installed to drive the FEL input or to directly heat the tokamak plasma at full gyrotron power. Quasi-optic techniques will be used to couple the gyrotron power. For direct plasma heating, the gyrotron will couple into the existing mirror transport system. Using both sources of rf generation, experiments are planned to investigate intense pulse absorption and tokamak physics, such as the ECH of a pellet-fueled plasma and plasma control using localized heating. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Modeling of Ultra-Short Soliton Propagation in Deterministic and Stochastic Nonlinear Cubic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Levent

    We study the short pulse dynamics in the deterministic and stochastic environment in this thesis. The integrable short pulse equation is a modelling equation for ultra-short pulse propagation in the infrared range in the optical fibers. We investigate the numerical proof for the exact solitary solution of the short pulse equation. Moreover, we demonstrate that the short pulse solitons approximate the solution of the Maxwell equation numerically. Our numerical experiments prove the particle-like behaviour of the short pulse solitons. Furthermore, we derive a short pulse equation in the higher order. A stochastic counterpart of the short pulse equation is also derived through the use of the multiple scale expansion method for more realistic situations where stochastic perturbations in the dispersion are present. We numerically show that the short pulse solitary waves persist even in the presence of the randomness. The numerical schemes developed demonstrate that the statistics of the coarse-graining noise of the short pulse equation over the slow scale, and the microscopic noise of the nonlinear wave equation over the fast scale, agree to fairly good accuracy.

  20. Integration of LHCD system with SST1 machine and its high power rf performance in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Ambulkar, K. K.; Dalakoti, S.; Parmar, P. R.; Virani, C. G.; Thakur, A. L.

    2014-02-01

    A 2.0 MW CW lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system based on 3.7 GHz klystron sources, is in advanced stage of commissioning, which would drive and sustain plasma current, non-inductively, in superconducting steadystate tokamak (SST1) for long pulse operation. Four klystrons, each rated for 0.5 MW CW rf power, delivers 2.0 MW of rf power to four layer of the LHCD system, which finally feeds the rf power to grill antenna. The antenna system along with vacuum window and vacuum transmission line is successfully integrated on the machine. Its vacuum and pressurization compatibility has been successfully established. To validate the high power performance of LHCD system for SST1 machine, stage-wise commissioning of LHCD system in staggered manner is planned. It has been envisaged that LHCD power may be gradually increased initially, since full power may not be required during the initial phases of SST1 plasma operation. Also if the system is integrated in steps or in phases, then integration issues, as well as high power operational issues, if any, can be addressed, attended and handled in a simpler way before integrating all the layers to the grill antenna. To begin with, one klystron is connected to one layer, out of four layers, which energizes a quarter of the grill antenna. Gradually, the rf power and its pulse length is increased to validate high power performance of the system. Arcing and reflections are observed as rf power is gradually increased. The problems are analysed and after taking appropriate remedial action the system performance is improved for operation up to 160kW. Several trains of short pulses are launched in SST1 vacuum vessel for rf conditioning of the LHCD system. Normally, reflections are high when power is launched in vacuum; therefore the pulse length is restricted up to 100 milliseconds. The high power performance of this layer, connected with grill antenna is validated by launching high power microwaves in vacuum vessel of SST1 machine

  1. 76 FR 18757 - Notice of a Project Waiver of Section 1605 (Buy American Requirement) of the American Recovery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... unwilling to provide a 1.5 MW wind turbine generator on the basis that the project site did not meet the... research indicated that no other domestic manufactured 1.5 MW wind turbine generators met project specifications. Accordingly, EPA will evaluate the request as a timely request. The Authority's wind...

  2. Energy and Technology Review, November 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Poggio, A.J.; Crawford, R.; Gleason, K.; Hendry, D.P.; Sanford, N.M.; Taft, S.O.

    1988-01-01

    This review by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains papers related to: cratering phenomenology revealed through discrete-element modeling; high-intensity short-pulse lasers; localized transmission of wave energy; and evidence of localized wave transmission.

  3. Progress on Converting a NIF Quad to Eight, Petawatt Beams for Advanced Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J K

    2009-10-19

    We are converting a quad of NIF beamlines into eight, short-pulse (1-50 ps), petawatt-class beams for advanced radiography and fast ignition experiments. This paper describes progress toward completing this project.

  4. X-Ray photonics: X-rays inspire electron movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrakking, Marc J. J.; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    The advent of high-energy, short-pulse X-ray sources based on free-electron lasers, laser plasmas and high-harmonic generation is now making it possible to probe the dynamics of electrons within molecules.

  5. Optical chirped beam amplification and propagation

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P.

    2004-10-12

    A short pulse laser system uses dispersive optics in a chirped-beam amplification architecture to produce high peak power pulses and high peak intensities without the potential for intensity dependent damage to downstream optical components after amplification.

  6. Progress on converting a NIF quad to eight, petawatt beams for advanced radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, J. K.; Tietbohl, G.; Arnold, P.; Bliss, E. S.; Boley, C.; Britten, G.; Brunton, G.; Clark, W.; Dawson, J. W.; Fochs, S.; Hackel, R.; Haefner, C.; Halpin, J.; Heebner, J.; Henesian, M.; Hermann, M.; Hernandez, J.; Kanz, V.; McHale, B.; McLeod, J. B.; Nguyen, H.; Phan, H.; Rushford, M.; Shaw, B.; Shverdin, M.; Sigurdsson, R.; Speck, R.; Stolz, C.; Trummer, D.; Wolfe, J.; Wong, J. N.; Siders, G. C.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-08-01

    We are converting a quad of NIF beamlines into eight, short-pulse (1-50 ps), petawatt-class beams for advanced radiography and fast ignition experiments. This paper describes progress toward completing this project.

  7. Conversion of an electromagnetic wave into a periodic train of solitons under cyclotron resonance interaction with a backward beam of unexcited electron-oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zotova, I V; Ginzburg, N S; Sergeev, A S; Kocharovskaya, E R; Zaslavsky, V Yu

    2014-10-01

    The possibility of the conversion of intense continuous microwave radiation into a periodic train of short pulses by means of resonant interaction with a beam of unexcited cyclotron electron oscillators moving backward is shown. In such a system there is a certain range of parameters where the incident stationary signal splits into a train of short pulses and each of them can be interpreted as a soliton. It is proposed to use this effect for amplitude modulation of radiation of short wavelength gyrotrons.

  8. Conversion of an Electromagnetic Wave into a Periodic Train of Solitons under Cyclotron Resonance Interaction with a Backward Beam of Unexcited Electron-Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotova, I. V.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Sergeev, A. S.; Kocharovskaya, E. R.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu.

    2014-10-01

    The possibility of the conversion of intense continuous microwave radiation into a periodic train of short pulses by means of resonant interaction with a beam of unexcited cyclotron electron oscillators moving backward is shown. In such a system there is a certain range of parameters where the incident stationary signal splits into a train of short pulses and each of them can be interpreted as a soliton. It is proposed to use this effect for amplitude modulation of radiation of short wavelength gyrotrons.

  9. Reduction and analysis of data collected during the electromagnetic tornado experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davisson, L. D.

    1976-01-01

    Techniques for data processing and analysis are described to support tornado detection by analysis of radio frequency interference in various frequency bands, and sea state determination from short pulse radar measurements. Activities include: strip chart recording of tornado data; the development and implementation of computer programs for digitalization and analysis of the data; data reduction techniques for short pulse radar data, and the simulation of radar returns from the sea surface by computer models.

  10. Loads Analysis of a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Using Fully Coupled Simulation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, J. M.; Buhl, M. L., Jr.

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents the use of fully coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulation tools to perform a loads analysis of a 5-MW offshore wind turbine supported by a barge with moorings, one of many promising floating platform concepts.

  11. Effects of copper vapor laser (CVL) on mice skin: histologic evaluation of damage and tissue stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Syllene; Moreno, E.; Oliveira, H.; Osaka, J.; Salvador, G.; Michalany, N.; Tolosa, E.

    2002-10-01

    This study was to evaluate the effects of the CVL with low energy and short pulse widths. 18 female mice, C57BL/6 (9-11 weeks old) were distributed into four groups. The control group (CG) wasn't exposed to laser beam . Group L1 had 2 laser expositions with 24 hours gap between them (0.5W). Group L2 had 3 expositions (0.5W and 0.25W) and group L3 had 4 expositions (0.25 W). It was used a CVL prototype (5lOnm, 13 Khz, pulse width of 20 ms and spot size of 0.8cm). 7 days after last laser pulse no groups presented actinic keratosis, tumors or collagen changes. CVL had effective action on pilosebaceous units. High energy with few short pulses induced hair follicles proliferation while low energy with many repetitive short pulses showed increased and specific tissue damage besides hair plugging.

  12. Propagation of ultra-short solitons in stochastic Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt, Levent; Schäfer, Tobias

    2014-01-15

    We study the propagation of ultra-short short solitons in a cubic nonlinear medium modeled by nonlinear Maxwell's equations with stochastic variations of media. We consider three cases: variations of (a) the dispersion, (b) the phase velocity, (c) the nonlinear coefficient. Using a modified multi-scale expansion for stochastic systems, we derive new stochastic generalizations of the short pulse equation that approximate the solutions of stochastic nonlinear Maxwell's equations. Numerical simulations show that soliton solutions of the short pulse equation propagate stably in stochastic nonlinear Maxwell's equations and that the generalized stochastic short pulse equations approximate the solutions to the stochastic Maxwell's equations over the distances under consideration. This holds for both a pathwise comparison of the stochastic equations as well as for a comparison of the resulting probability densities.

  13. Complex {PT}-symmetric extensions of the nonlinear ultra-short light pulse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2012-11-01

    The short pulse equation u_{xt}=u+\\frac{1}{2}(u^2u_x)_x is PT symmetric, which arises in nonlinear optics for the ultra-short pulse case. We present a family of new complex PT-symmetric extensions of the short pulse equation, i[(iu_x)^{\\sigma }]_t=au+bu^m+ic[u^n(iu_x)^{\\epsilon }]_x \\,\\, (\\sigma ,\\, \\epsilon ,\\,a,\\,b,\\,c,\\,m,\\,n \\in {R}), based on the complex PT-symmetric extension principle. Some properties of these equations with some chosen parameters are studied including the Hamiltonian structures and exact solutions such as solitary wave solutions, doubly periodic wave solutions and compacton solutions. Our results may be useful to understand complex PT-symmetric nonlinear physical models. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators’.

  14. Picosecond and femtosecond lasers for industrial material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayerhofer, R.; Serbin, J.; Deeg, F. W.

    2016-03-01

    Cold laser materials processing using ultra short pulsed lasers has become one of the most promising new technologies for high-precision cutting, ablation, drilling and marking of almost all types of material, without causing unwanted thermal damage to the part. These characteristics have opened up new application areas and materials for laser processing, allowing previously impossible features to be created and also reducing the amount of post-processing required to an absolute minimum, saving time and cost. However, short pulse widths are only one part of thee story for industrial manufacturing processes which focus on total costs and maximum productivity and production yield. Like every other production tool, ultra-short pulse lasers have too provide high quality results with maximum reliability. Robustness and global on-site support are vital factors, as well ass easy system integration.

  15. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    DOEpatents

    Swansen, James E.

    1987-01-01

    An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a .sup.3 He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output ) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

  16. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    DOEpatents

    Swansen, J.E.

    1985-03-05

    An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a /sup 3/He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

  17. The Influence of Wind Turbines on Radio Astronomical Observations in Irbene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukovs, D.

    2016-04-01

    The reflection and diffraction of external communication and navigational transmitters from tall constructions and moving blades of wind turbines produce some short-pulse additional electromagnetic interference strong enough to fully disturb radio astronomical observations. The problem of short-pulse electromagnetic interference is distinctive to all radio telescopes surrounded by wind turbines. This problem became significant for Ventspils International Radio Astronomy Centre (VIRAC) after new wind park "Platene" of Winergy Ltd. was built in 2012 and radio telescopes RT-16 and RT-32 renovated and equipped with cryogenic high sensitive receivers. The paper deals with the analysis and evaluation of intensities and probabilities of short-pulse interferences produced by wind park "Platene" and its possible impact on radio astronomical observations at VIRAC radio telescopes.

  18. Ultrashort-Pulse Child-Langmuir Law in the Quantum and Relativistic Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, L. K.; Zhang, P.

    2007-04-20

    This Letter presents a consistent quantum and relativistic model of short-pulse Child-Langmuir (CL) law, of which the pulse length {tau} is less than the electron transit time in a gap of spacing D and voltage V. The classical value of the short-pulse CL law is enhanced by a large factor due to quantum effects when the pulse length and the size of the beam are, respectively, in femtosecond duration and nanometer scale. At high voltage larger than the electron rest mass, relativistic effects will suppress the enhancement of short-pulse CL law, which is confirmed by particle-in-cell simulation. When the pulse length is much shorter than the gap transit time, the current density is proportional to V, and to the inverse power of D and {tau}.

  19. Variable Energy 2-MeV S-Band Linac for X-ray and Other Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Howard Bender, Dave Schwellenbach, Ron Sturges, Rusty Trainham

    2008-03-01

    We will describe the design and operation of a compact, 2-MeV, S-band linear accelerator (linac) with variable energy tuning and short-pulse operation down to 15 ps with 100-A peak current. The design consists of a buncher cavity for short-pulse operation and two coupled resonator sections for acceleration. Single-pulse operation is accomplished through a fast injector system with a 219-MHz subharmonic buncher. The machine is intended to support a variety of applications, such as X-ray and electron beam diagnostic development and, recently, electron diffraction studies of phase transitions in shocked materials.

  20. Variable Energy 2-MeV S-Band Linac for X-ray and Other Applications

    SciTech Connect

    H. Bender; D. Schwellenbach; R. Sturges; R. Trainham

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the design and operation of a compact, 2-MeV, S-band linear accelerator (linac) with variable energy tuning and short-pulse operation down to 15 ps with 100-A peak current. The design consists of a buncher cavity for short-pulse operation and two coupled resonator sections for acceleration. Single-pulse operation is accomplished through a fast injector system with a 219-MHz subharmonic buncher. The machine is intended to support a variety of applications, such as x-ray and electron beam diagnostic development, and recently, electron diffraction studies of phase transitions in shocked materials.

  1. Recent studies of the electron cloud induced beam instability at the Los Alamos PSR

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, Robert James; Mc Crady, Rodney C; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J; Zaugg, Thomas J; Holmes, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-06

    Recent beam studies have demonstrated that a stable beam with the standard production bunch width of 290 ns and near the e-p instability threshold will become unstable when the bunch width is shortened significantly. This was not the case years earlier when the ring rf operated at the 72.000 integer subharmonic of the Linac bunch frequency. The present operating frequency is set at the 72.070 non-integer subharmonic and appears to be responsible for the recently observed 'short pulse instability phenomenon'. Experimental characteristics of the short pulse instability are presented along with comparisons to the instability under 72.000 subharmonic operating conditions.

  2. Copper-laser oscillator with adjoint-coupled self-filtering injection.

    PubMed

    Chang, J J

    1995-03-15

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator developed to achieve diffraction-limited beam quality for high-gain short-pulse lasers is reported. The resonator is seeded with a short-pulse laser signal by adjoint-coupled injection. The two-times diffraction-limited injection beam is self-filtered through a prepulse cavity propagation to improve its beam quality. The use of a self-imaging unstable resonator diminishes the edge-diffraction-induced beam deterioration. A beam quality of 1.1-1.3 times diffraction limited is achieved throughout the entire 70-ns laser pulse of a 30-W copper-vapor laser. PMID:19859260

  3. Amplification of 1 ps Pulse Length Beam by Stimulated Raman Scattering of a 1 ns Beam in a Low Density Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E; Kirkwood, R K; Niemann, C; Meezan, N; Wilks, S C; Divol, L; Berger, R L; Landen, O L; Wurtele, J; Charman, A E; Hur, M S; Lindberg, R; Fisch, N; Malkin, V M

    2005-06-12

    The compression of a laser pulse by amplification of an ultra short pulse beam which seeds the stimulated Raman scatter of the first beam has been long been discussed in the context of solid and gas media. We investigate the possibility of using intersecting beams in a plasma to compress nanosecond pulses to picosecond duration by scattering from driven electron waves. Recent theoretical studies have shown the possibility of efficient compression with large amplitude, non-linear Langmuir waves driven either by SRS [1] or non-resonantly [2]. We describe experiments in which a plasma suitable for pulse compression is created, and amplification of an ultra short pulse beam is demonstrated.

  4. Nonlinear optics with phase-controlled pulses in the sub-two-cycle regime.

    PubMed

    Morgner, U; Ell, R; Metzler, G; Schibli, T R; Kärtner, F X; Fujimoto, J G; Haus, H A; Ippen, E P

    2001-06-11

    Nonlinear optical effects due to the phase between carrier and envelope are observed with 5 fs pulses from a Kerr-lens mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. These sub-two-cycle pulses with octave spanning spectra are the shortest pulses ever generated directly from a laser oscillator. Detection of the carrier-envelope phase slip is made possible by simply focusing the short pulses directly from the oscillator into a BBO crystal. As a further example of nonlinear optics with such short pulses, the interference between second- and third-harmonic components is also demonstrated.

  5. High-resolution imaging and target designation through clouds or smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    A method and system of combining gated intensifiers and advances in solid-state, short-pulse laser technology, compact systems capable of producing high resolution (i.e., approximately less than 20 centimeters) optical images through a scattering medium such as dense clouds, fog, smoke, etc. may be achieved from air or ground based platforms. Laser target designation through a scattering medium is also enabled by utilizing a short pulse illumination laser and a relatively minor change to the detectors on laser guided munitions.

  6. Thermal radiation and conduction in microscale structures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, C.L.

    1998-09-02

    The general objective of the current research program is to achieve a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of thermal radiation and heat conduction in microscale structures commonly encountered in engineering applications. Specifically, the program includes both experimental and analytical investigations of radiative heat transfer in microstructures, conductive heat transfer in micro devices, and short-pulse laser material interactions. Future work is planned to apply the knowledge of microscale heat transfer gained in this project to developing thermal insulating aerogel materials, thermal design schemes for quantum well lasers, and short-pulse laser micro-fabrication techniques. A listing of publications by Chang-Lin Tien is included.

  7. A microchip laser with intracavity second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Derzhavin, S I; Mashkovskii, D A; Timoshkin, V N

    2008-12-31

    A short-pulse 'green' 532-nm Nd{sup 3+}:YVO{sub 4} and KTiOPO{sub 4} microchip laser with intracavity second-harmonic generation, which is pumped by a 809-nm semiconductor laser diode, is developed. (lasers. amplifiers)

  8. Lumped transmission line avalanche pulser

    DOEpatents

    Booth, R.

    1995-07-18

    A lumped linear avalanche transistor pulse generator utilizes stacked transistors in parallel within a stage and couples a plurality of said stages, in series with increasing zener diode limited voltages per stage and decreasing balanced capacitance load per stage to yield a high voltage, high and constant current, very short pulse. 8 figs.

  9. Lumped transmission line avalanche pulser

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1995-01-01

    A lumped linear avalanche transistor pulse generator utilizes stacked transistors in parallel within a stage and couples a plurality of said stages, in series with increasing zener diode limited voltages per stage and decreasing balanced capacitance load per stage to yield a high voltage, high and constant current, very short pulse.

  10. High energy density micro plasma bunch from multiple laser interaction with thin target

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Han; Yu, Wei; Luan, S. X.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yu, M. Y.; Cai, H. B.; Zhou, C. T.; Yang, X. H.; Yin, Y.; Zhuo, H. B.; Wang, J. W.; Murakami, M.

    2014-01-13

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is used to investigate radiation-pressure driven acceleration and compression of small solid-density plasma by intense laser pulses. It is found that multiple impacts by presently available short-pulse lasers on a small hemispheric shell target can create a long-living tiny quasineutral monoenergetic plasma bunch of very high energy density.

  11. Temperature changes in different groups of teeth during cavity preparaton with Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnera J"nior, Aldo, Jr.; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Guerisoli, Danilo Z.; Pécora, Jesus D.

    2002-10-01

    Objective: Various studies have recommended parameters for the use of Er:YAG laser for the treatment of enamel and dentis caries; however, none have studied the increase in temperature caused by laser in individual groups of teeth. Summary Background Data: The effect of preparation with Er:YAG laser on the pulp temperature changes is one of the major problems in using the laser for preparation of dental hard tissue. Methods: The authors studied the intrapulpar temperature changes in 10 incisors, 10 canines, 10 premolars and 10 molars during Class V cavity preparation with focused short pulse (250 μs/pulse) and very short pulse (80-120 μs/pulse) Er:YAG laser, using the following parameters: 10 Hz frequency, 500 mJ per pulse, 6 s, 10 mm distance, 25 ml/min water flow, at 23°C and 65% humidity. Results: The greatest increase in temperature was foundin the incisors and the least increase in the molars at both pulse modes. Conclusions:The very short pulse mode caused less of an increase in temperature in the pulp chamber in all teeth than the short pulse mode.

  12. In-vitro study of intrapulpar temperature changes when using Er:YAG laser for class V cavity preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Santana da Silva, Reginaldo; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2001-04-01

    Various studies have recommended parameters for the use of Er:YAG laser for the treatment of caries of the enamel and dentin without studying the increase in temperature caused by laser in the individual groups of teeth. The Er:YAG laser has been indicated for the removal of caries, cavity preparation and preparation and disinfection of root canals. The authors studied the intrapulpar temperature change in 10 incisors, 10 canines, 10 pre-molars and 10 molars during Class V cavity preparation with focused short pulse and very short pulse Er:YAG laser, using the following parameters: 10 Hz frequency, 500 mJ per pulse, 6 s, 10 mm distance, 25 ml/min water flow, at 23 degrees C and 65 percent humidity. The greatest increase in temperature was found in the incisors and the least increase in the molars at both pulse modes. The very short pulse mode caused less of an increase in temperature in the pulp chamber in all teeth than the short pulse mode.

  13. Multiple pulse resonantly enhanced laser plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Corner, L.; Walczak, R.; Nevay, L. J.; Dann, S.; Hooker, S. M.; Bourgeois, N.; Cowley, J.

    2012-12-21

    We present an outline of experiments being conducted at Oxford University on multiple-pulse, resonantly-enhanced laser plasma wakefield acceleration. This method of laser plasma acceleration uses trains of optimally spaced low energy short pulses to drive plasma oscillations and may enable laser plasma accelerators to be driven by compact and efficient fibre laser sources operating at high repetition rates.

  14. Analytic formulation for the ac electrical conductivity in two- temperature, strongly coupled, overdense plasma: FORTRAN subroutine

    SciTech Connect

    Cauble, R.; Rozmus, W.

    1993-10-21

    A FORTRAN subroutine for the calculation of the ac electrical conductivity in two-temperature, strongly coupled, overdense plasma is presented. The routine is the result of a model calculation based on classical transport theory with application to plasmas created by the interaction of short pulse lasers and solids. The formulation is analytic and the routine is self-contained.

  15. Analytic formulation for the ac electrical conductivity in two-temperature, strongly coupled, overdense plasma: FORTRAN subroutine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauble, R.; Rozmus, W.

    1993-10-01

    A FORTRAN subroutine for the calculation of the ac electrical conductivity in two-temperature, strongly coupled, overdense plasma is presented. The routine is the result of a model calculation based on classical transport theory with application to plasmas created by the interaction of short pulse lasers and solids. The formulation is analytic and the routine is self-contained.

  16. Broadband multilayer mirror and diffractive optics for attosecond pulse shaping in the 280-500 eV photon energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenmos, A.; Hofstetter, M.; Rauhut, R.; Späth, C.; Hertrich, S.; Nickel, B.; Yang, S.; Gullikson, E. M.; Schmidt, J.; Seibald, M.; Schnick, W.; Krausz, F.; Kleineberg, U.

    2013-03-01

    Chirped broadband multilayer mirrors are key components to shape attosecond pulses in the XUV range. Compressing high harmonic pulses to their Fourier limit is the major goal for attosecond physics utilizing short pulse pump-probe experiments. Here, we report about the first implementation of multilayers and diffractive optics fulfilling these requirements in the "water-window" spectral range.

  17. Laser micro machining of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Y

    2009-01-01

    Excimer and increasingly ultra-short-pulsed lasers are important tools in the creation of microstructures and nanostructures. Capabilities of the latest systems are described, which include drilling 30-microm diameter holes in 50 to 100 microm thick metal foils and subsurface engraving of transparent materials.

  18. Investigation of a pulsed dye laser under various pumping conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nechaev, S.Y.

    1983-08-01

    An investigation was made of the influence of bilateral laser pumping in an almost longitudinal arrangement on the spectral and energy characteristics of a short-pulse laser utilizing rhodamine 6G. A considerable increase in efficiency over that for unilateral pumping was observed, together with a narrowing of the spectrum, in a dispersive resonator having a prism telescope and a grating.

  19. Recent progress of laser precision microfabrication in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhaogu; Xu, Guoliang; Zhao, Quanzhong; Liu, Cuiqing

    2002-02-01

    Review on recent progress of laser precision microfabrication in China is given in this paper. The universal fields of the LPM mostly using short pulse and short wavelength lasers in China are as follows: new materials, advanced manufacturing technology, information technology, biological technology, medical treatment and so on, which are given priority to the development in high-tech fields in China.

  20. KrF laser amplifier with phase-conjugate Brillouin retroreflectors.

    PubMed

    Gower, M C

    1982-09-01

    We have demonstrated the use of phase-conjugate stimulated Brillouin scattering mirrors to produce high-quality, short-pulse KrF laser beams from angular multiplexed and regenerative amplifiers. The mirror was also shown to isolate systems optically from amplifier spontaneous emission. Automatic alignment of targets using this mirror as a retroreflector was also demonstrated.

  1. Radiation induced cavitation: A possible phenomenon in liquid targets?

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-07-01

    The proposed design of a new, short-pulse spallation neutron source includes a liquid mercury target irradiated with a 1 GeV proton beam. This paper explores the possibility that cavitation bubbles may be formed in the mercury and briefly discusses some design features that could avoid harmful effects should cavitation take place.

  2. Inactivation of Listeria innocua on frankfurters using flash pasteurization and lauric arginate ester

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes, a psychrotrophic food-borne pathogen, is a recurring post-process contaminant on ready-to-eat meat (RTE) products including frankfurters. Flash Pasteurization (FP) uses short pulses of steam to decontaminate the surface of precooked sausages such as frankfurters. The antimi...

  3. High power neutron production targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes issues of concern in the design of targets and associated systems for high power neutron production facilities. The facilities include uses for neutron scattering, accelerator driven transmutation, accelerator production of tritium, short pulse spallation sources, and long pulse spallation sources. Each of these applications requires a source with different design needs and consequently different implementation in practise.

  4. Status of the MERCURY Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J

    2004-09-03

    The photon collider will require the development of high average-power short-pulse lasers to achieve the required rate of Compton backscattering. The MERCURY laser at LLNL has been under development as part of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program. Its basic parameters are well matched to the photon collider requirements and it is currently being commissioned.

  5. Analysis of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) measurements in the National Ignition Facility's target bay and chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. G.; Clancy, T. J.; Eder, D. C.; Ferguson, W.; Throop, A. L.

    2013-11-01

    From May 2009 to the present we have recorded electromagnetic pulse (EMP) strength and spectrum (100 MHz - 5 GHz) in the target bay and chamber of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The dependence of EMP strength and frequency spectrum on target type and laser energy is discussed. The largest EMP measured was for relatively low-energy, short-pulse (100 ps) flat targets.

  6. Stripline magnetic modulators for lasers and accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nunnally, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    The basics of magnetic modulators including magnetic element and circuit considerations as applied to accelerators and lasers requiring repetitive (1 to 10 kHz), high voltage (50 to 500 kV), short pulse (50 to 100 ns) are discussed. The scaling of energy losses and switching parameters with material are included.

  7. Lasers for nonlinear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wise, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Various versions of nonlinear microscopy are revolutionizing the life sciences, almost all of which are made possible because of the development of ultrafast lasers. In this article, the main properties and technical features of short-pulse lasers used in nonlinear microscopy are summarized. Recent research results on fiber lasers that will impact future instruments are also discussed.

  8. KrF laser amplifier with phase-conjugate Brillouin retroreflectors.

    PubMed

    Gower, M C

    1982-09-01

    We have demonstrated the use of phase-conjugate stimulated Brillouin scattering mirrors to produce high-quality, short-pulse KrF laser beams from angular multiplexed and regenerative amplifiers. The mirror was also shown to isolate systems optically from amplifier spontaneous emission. Automatic alignment of targets using this mirror as a retroreflector was also demonstrated. PMID:19714043

  9. Vortex stabilized electron beam compressed fusion grade plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2014-03-19

    Most inertial confinement fusion schemes are comprised of highly compressed dense plasmas. Those schemes involve short, extremely high power, short pulses of beams (lasers, particles) applied to lower density plasmas or solid pellets. An alternative approach could be to shoot an intense electron beam through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma.

  10. Nearly penalty-free, less than 4 ps supercontinuum Gbit/s pulse generation over 1535-1560 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioka, T.; Kawanishi, S.; Mori, K.; Saruwatari, M.

    1994-05-01

    Nearly penalty-free less than 4ps supercontinuum WDM pulses are generated at 6.3 Gbit/s over 1535-1560 nm for the first time using a 200 nm superbroadened supercontinuum in an optical fibre pumped by 1.7 W, 3.3 ps, 1542 nm short pulses from an Er(3+)-doped fibre ring laser.

  11. Large wind turbine generator performance assessment, technology status report no. 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachon, W. A.

    1981-07-01

    Detailed summaries of test results are presented for the US Department of Energy's 200-kW MOD-OA horizontal-axis WTs that were interconnected with electric utilities at various locations around the United States. A description of the progress and experiences with both the MOD-1 1.5-MW WT and the cluster of three MOD-2 2.5-MW WTs is also presented, along with a summary of plans for the DOE vertical-axis wind turbine program. A brief summary of Danish large WT programs is also provided.

  12. Neutron scattering instrumentation for biology at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1994-12-31

    Conventional wisdom holds that since biological entities are large, they must be studied with cold neutrons, a domain in which reactor sources of neutrons are often supposed to be pre-eminent. In fact, the current generation of pulsed spallation neutron sources, such as LANSCE at Los Alamos and ISIS in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a capability for small angle scattering (SANS) - a typical cold- neutron application - that was not anticipated five years ago. Although no one has yet built a Laue diffractometer at a pulsed spallation source, calculations show that such an instrument would provide an exceptional capability for protein crystallography at one of the existing high-power spoliation sources. Even more exciting is the prospect of installing such spectrometers either at a next-generation, short-pulse spallation source or at a long-pulse spallation source. A recent Los Alamos study has shown that a one-megawatt, short-pulse source, which is an order of magnitude more powerful than LANSCE, could be built with today`s technology. In Europe, a preconceptual design study for a five-megawatt source is under way. Although such short-pulse sources are likely to be the wave of the future, they may not be necessary for some applications - such as Laue diffraction - which can be performed very well at a long-pulse spoliation source. Recently, it has been argued by Mezei that a facility that combines a short-pulse spallation source similar to LANSCE, with a one-megawatt, long-pulse spallation source would provide a cost-effective solution to the global shortage of neutrons for research. The basis for this assertion as well as the performance of some existing neutron spectrometers at short-pulse sources will be examined in this presentation.

  13. Energy source possibilities in underwater technics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farin, Juho

    1991-04-01

    Underwater energy source possibilities are treated. The power demand of underwater vehicles is restricted to approximately 0.5 MW. Besides well known primary and secondary batteries as well as conventional diesel engines and closed cycle diesels, fuel cells, radio nuclear isotopes and small nuclear reactors have already been installed or tested in conditions representative of underwater.

  14. 78 FR 12050 - S. Martinez Livestock, Inc.; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... penstock; and (2) a powerhouse with a 5-MW Francis turbine-generator unit. The estimated annual generation... would include a pumped storage facility and a traditional turbine-generator facility. The pumped storage... Columbia River downstream of Priest Rapids Dam; (3) a powerhouse with five 400 megawatt (MW)...

  15. Medium-Speed Drivetrain Test Report: September 1, 2002 -- December 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Walford, C.; Lybarger, K.; Lettenmaier, T.; Roberts, D.

    2012-09-01

    This report describes the tests conducted by researchers at the National Wind Technology Center at NREL on a 1.5-MW integrated drivetrain consisting of a single-stage, epicyclic gearbox and close-coupled medium-speed permanent-magnet generator.

  16. X-Band Multi-Beam Klystron Design and Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Aaron; Neilson, Jeff; Tantawi, Sami

    2015-04-15

    Progress on the development of a 5MW 16 beam x-band multi-beam klystron is presented. The power from each of the 16 klystrons is combined using a matched waveguide network. Mechanical and electric models and simulations are discussed. The status of procuring and assembling parts is presented.

  17. 75 FR 65650 - Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the Calico Solar Project and Associated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 47620). Publication of the NOA for the Final EIS initiated a 30-day protest period for the... siting of the Calico Solar Project and related facilities, including 26,450 SunCatcher solar dishes, a... capacity reduced from 850-MW (34,000 SunCatchers) to 663.5-MW (26,540 SunCatchers); and (3) construction...

  18. 75 FR 8348 - Notice of a Regional Project Waiver of Section 1605 (Buy American) of the American Recovery and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ...) foreign manufactured wind turbine for the DeLauri Pump Station Renewable Energy Project in Charlestown... a foreign manufactured 1.5 MW wind turbine by the MWRA, as specified in its November 19, 2009... 1605(a) of Public Law 111-5, Buy American requirements, to the MWRA for the purchase of a...

  19. ROSAT telecommand scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, P. C.; Lunn, I. D. S.

    1991-07-01

    The real-time ROSAT Command System (RCS) based on the Core Command System developed for the German Space Operations Center (GSOC) are described since the launch on June 1, 1990. The off-line processing software intended to automate parts of the chain of telecommand generation have been developed to handle spacecraft control information derived from other automated systems, which include the ROSAT Mission Timeline Generator (RMTG) and the ROSAT Management of Attitude and Control System. The implementation of the interfaces between the individual RCS programs as text files organized according to a common language standard promotes visibility and ease of use. The introduction of a graphical user interface has improved the speed and efficiency of performing the tasks by an operator. Automation of both the closure of the Telecommand transport control loop and the precontact preparation activities has contributed significantly to a reduction of the spacecraft operator's workload.

  20. Dependence of the microwave radar cross section on ocean surface variables - Comparison of measurements and theory using data from the Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, David E.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the ability of theoretical radar cross section (RCS) models to predict the absolute magnitude of the ocean radar cross section under a wide variety of sea and atmospheric conditions. The dependence of the RCS on wind stress (as opposed to wind speed) was also studied. An extensive amount of experimental data was acquired during the Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment. Measurements across an ocean front demonstrated that the vertical polarization and horizontal polarization radar cross section were more strongly dependent on wind stress than on wind magnitude. Current theoretical models for the RCS, based on stress, were tested with this data. In situations where the Bragg scattering theory does not agree with the measured radar cross section (magnitude and angle dependence), revisions are hypothesized and evaluated.

  1. Linseed oil supplementation to dairy cows fed diets based on red clover silage or corn silage: Effects on methane production, rumen fermentation, nutrient digestibility, N balance, and milk production.

    PubMed

    Benchaar, C; Hassanat, F; Martineau, R; Gervais, R

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of linseed oil (LO) supplementation to red clover silage (RCS)- or corn silage (CS)-based diets on enteric CH4 emissions, ruminal fermentation characteristics, nutrient digestibility, N balance, and milk production. Twelve rumen-cannulated lactating cows were used in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design (35-d periods) with a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Cows were fed (ad libitum) RCS- or CS-based diets [forage:concentrate ratio 60:40; dry matter (DM) basis] without or with LO (4% of DM). Supplementation of LO to the RCS-based diet reduced enteric CH4 production (-9%) and CH4 energy losses (-11%) with no adverse effects on DM intake, digestion, ruminal fermentation characteristics, protozoa numbers, or milk production. The addition of LO to the CS-based diet caused a greater decrease in CH4 production (-26%) and CH4 energy losses (-23%) but was associated with a reduction in DM intake, total-tract fiber digestibility, protozoa numbers, acetate:propionate ratio, and energy-corrected milk yield. Urinary N excretion (g/d) decreased with LO supplementation to RCS- and CS-based diets, suggesting reduced potential of N2O emissions. Results from this study show that the depressive effect of LO supplementation on enteric CH4 production is more pronounced with the CS- than with the RCS-based diet. However, because of reduced digestibility with the CS-based diet, the reduction in enteric CH4 production may be offset by higher CH4 emissions from manure storage. Thus, the type of forage of the basal diet should be taken into consideration when using fat supplementation as a dietary strategy to reduce enteric CH4 production from dairy cows.

  2. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics. PMID:23126904

  3. [The Er:YAG laser in dentoalveolar surgery].

    PubMed

    Stübinger, Stefan; Seitz, Oliver; Landes, Constantin; Bornand, Christoph; Robert, Sader; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to many currently employed osteotomy techniques like saws or drills the use of short-pulsed laser light offers the possibility of non-contact and vibration-free bone cutting. With a wavelength of 2.94 microm the Er:YAG laser displays a consummate absorption in water and thus is particularly suitable for bone ablation. To examine the benefits of laser osteotomy in oral surgery a short-pulsed Er:YAG laser was used for different surgical procedures in 30 patients. Preliminary clinical findings revealed satisfactory cut efficiency and no carbonisation. No serious complications were encountered in the postoperative wound healing process. However, the surgical procedures were time-consuming. PMID:18072464

  4. Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

    2003-06-30

    The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized.

  5. Sub-picosecond laser induced damage test facility for petawatt reflective optical components characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozet, Martin; Néauport, Jérôme; Lavastre, Eric; Roquin, Nadja; Gallais, Laurent; Lamaignère, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    While considering long pulse or short pulse high power laser facilities, optical components performances and in particular laser damage resistance are always factors limiting the overall system performances. Consequently, getting a detailed knowledge of the behavior of these optical components under irradiations with large beam in short pulse range is of major importance. In this context, a Laser Induced Damage Threshold test facility called DERIC has been developed at the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Bordeaux. It uses an Amplitude Systemes laser source which delivers Gaussian pulses of 500 fs at 1053 nm. 1-on-1, S-on-1 and RasterScan test procedures are implemented to study the behavior of monolayer and multilayer dielectric coatings.

  6. Effect of laser-pulse structure and wavelength on wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortune, D. S.; Huang, Shan; Bryant, G. L.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Reinisch, Lou

    1998-07-01

    We have investigated wound healing of incisions in the buccal mucosa of a canine model created with the Vanderbilt Free Electron Laser tuned to 6.1, 6.45 and 6.8 microns. We have also used a carbon dioxide laser, continuous wave and with a short-pulse structure (100 microseconds) to access wavelength and pulse structure components to wound healing from laser incisions. The tissue was evaluated histologically and with tensiometry acutely and at post operative days 3, 7, and 14. The data indicate that shorter laser pulse durations create less lateral thermal injury and wounds with greater tensile strength, resulting in earlier wound healing. Wound healing was only slightly dependent upon the wavelength of the laser. These results demonstrate that surgical carbon dioxide lasers with a short-pulse structure of approximately 100 microseconds or less could offer more prompt wound healing while maintaining the advantages of a 10.6 micron wavelength laser.

  7. High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

    2007-04-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  8. Generation of femtosecond to sub-femtosecond x-ray pulses in free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yuantao

    2015-05-01

    Generation of high power, femtosecond to sub-femtosecond x-ray pulses is attracting much attention within the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) user community. At the existing FEL facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC, several methods have been developed to produce such short x-rays. Low-charge operation mode and emittance-spoiling scheme have successfully delivered short pulses for user experiments with duration less than 10 fs. A nonlinear compression mode has been recently developed and the pulse duration could be about 200 as. We will review the recent experimental progress at the LCLS for achieving few-femtosecond x-rays, and also discuss other short pulse schemes for reaching sub-femtosecond regime.

  9. Fiber Bragg grating Fabry-Perot cavity sensor based on pulse laser demodulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fangfang; Chen, Jianfeng; Liu, Yunqi; Wang, Tingyun

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate a fiber laser sensing technique based on fiber Bragg grating Fabry-Perot (FBG-FP) cavity interrogated by pulsed laser, where short pulses generated from active mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser and current modulated DFB laser are adopted. The modulated laser pulses launched into the FBG-FP cavity produce a group of reflected pulses. The optical loss in the cavity can be determined from the power ratio of the first two pulses reflected from the cavity. This technique does not require high reflectivity FBGs and is immune to the power fluctuation of the light source. Two short pulse laser sources were compared experimentally with each other on pulse width, pulse stability, pulse chirp and sensing efficiency.

  10. New applications for high average power beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neau, E. L.; Turman, B. N.; Patterson, E. L.

    1993-06-01

    The technology base formed by the development of high peak power simulators, laser drivers, FEL's, and ICF drivers from the early 60's through the late 80's is being extended to high average power short-pulse machines with the capabilities of supporting new types of manufacturing processes and performing new roles in environmental cleanup applications. This paper discusses a process for identifying and developing possible commercial applications, specifically those requiring very high average power levels of hundreds of kilowatts to perhaps megawatts. The authors discuss specific technology requirements and give examples of application development efforts. The application development work is directed at areas that can possibly benefit from the high specific energies attainable with short pulse machines.

  11. Metal Resistivity Measuring Device

    DOEpatents

    Renken, Jr, C. J.; Myers, R. G.

    1960-12-20

    An eddy current device is designed for detecting discontinuities in metal samples. Alternate short and long duration pulses are inductively applied to a metal sample via the outer coil of a probe. The lorg pulses give a resultant signal from the metal sample responsive to probe-tosample spacing and discontinuities with the sample, and the short pulses give a resultant signal responsive only to probe-to-sample spacing. The inner coil of the probe detects the two resultant signals and transmits them to a separation network where the two signals are separated. The two separated signals are then transmitted to a compensation network where the detected signals due to the short pulses are used to compensate for variations due to probeto-sample spacing contained in the detected signals from the long pulses. Thus a resultant signal is obtained responsive to discontinuities within the sample and independent of probe-to- sample spacing.

  12. Method of multi-channel data readout and acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.; Popov, Vladimir E.

    2010-06-15

    A method for dealing with the problem of simultaneous continuous readout of large number of data channels from the set of multiple sensors in instances where the use of multiple amplitude-to-digital converters is not practical or causes undesirable extra noise and distortion in the data. The new method uses sensor front-end s and subsequent electronics to transform the analog input signals and encode them into a series of short pulses that can be transmitted to a long distance via a high frequency transmission line without information loss. Upon arrival at a destination data decoder and analyzer device, the series of short pulses can be decoded and transformed back, to obtain, store, and utilize the sensor information with the required accuracy.

  13. Environmental and industrial applications of pulsed power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neau, E.L.

    1993-10-01

    The technology base formed by the development of high peak power simulators, laser drivers, free electron lasers (FEL`s), and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) drivers from the early 60`s through the late 80`s is being extended to high average power short-pulse machines with the capabilities of performing new roles in environmental cleanup applications and in supporting new types of industrial manufacturing processes. Some of these processes will require very high average beam power levels of hundreds of kilowatts to perhaps megawatts. In this paper we briefly discuss new technology capabilities and then concentrate on specific application areas that may benefit from the high specific energies and high average powers attainable with short-pulse machines.

  14. All solid-state high power visible laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, William M.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objective of this Phase 2 effort was to develop and deliver to NASA a high repetition rate laser-diode-pumped solid-state pulsed laser system with output in the green portion of the spectrum. The laser is for use in data communications, and high efficiency, short pulses, and low timing jitter are important features. A short-pulse 1 micron laser oscillator, a new multi-pass amplifier to boost the infrared power, and a frequency doubler to take the amplified infrared pulsed laser light into the green. This produced 1.5 W of light in the visible at a pulse repetition rate of 20 kHz in the laboratory. The pulses have a full-width at half maximum of near 1 ns. The results of this program are being commercialized.

  15. Accelerator power concepts using isolated transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Nunnally, W.C.

    1981-05-01

    This report outlines the rationale and the advantages of using multiple transmission-line sections isolated by transit time and inductance in accelerating high-current (approx. = 10 -kA), short-pulse (less than or equal to 100-ns) particle beams to the multimegavolt level. The main advantages of this system include reducing the number of output switches required per output pulse by nearly an order of magnitude over conventional systems and increasing the system capability for repetition-rate operation. The isolated transmission-line concept is developed, and possible modes of operation are outlined. In addition, a point design of a 10-kA short-pulse accelerator is presented.

  16. ORION laser target diagnosticsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K.; Wright, M. J.; Hood, B. A.; Kemshall, P.

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  17. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  18. ORION laser target diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K.; and others

    2012-10-15

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  19. High Repetition Rate Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser operating at 18.9 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, R; Dunn, J; Patel, P K; Price, D F; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2004-05-11

    We have demonstrated a 10 Hz Ni-like Mo X-ray laser operating at 18.9 nm with 150 mJ total pump energy by employing a novel pumping scheme. The grazing incidence scheme is described, where a picosecond pulse is incident at a grazing angle to a Mo plasma column produced by a slab target irradiated by a 200 ps laser pulse. This scheme uses refraction of the short pulse at a pre-determined electron density to increase absorption to pump a specific gain region. The high efficiency inherent to this scheme allows a reduction in the pump energy where 70 mJ long pulse energy and 80 mJ short pulse energy are sufficient to produce lasing at a 10 Hz repetition rate. Under these conditions and by optimizing the delay between the pulses, we achieve strong amplification and saturation for 4 mm long targets.

  20. Generation of a few femtoseconds pulses in seeded FELs using a seed laser with small transverse size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Heting; Jia, Qika

    2016-09-01

    We propose a simple method to generate a few femtosecond pulses in seeded FELs. We use a longitudinal energy-chirped electron beam passing through a dogleg where transverse dispersion will generate a horizontal energy chirp, then in the modulator, a seed laser with narrow beam radius will only modulate the center portion of the electron beam and then short pulses at high harmonics will be generated in the radiator. Using a representative realistic set of parameters, we show that 30 nm XUV pulse based on the HGHG scheme and 9 nm soft x-ray pulse based on the EEHG scheme with duration of about 8 fs (FWHM) and peak power of GW level can be generated from a 180 nm UV seed laser with beam waist of 75 μm. This new scheme can provide an optional operation mode for the existing seeded FEL facilities to meet the requirement of short-pulse FEL.