Science.gov

Sample records for 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate prpp

  1. A simple and sensitive method for estimating the concentration and synthesis of 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Tax, W J; Veerkamp, J H

    1977-07-15

    A method is presented for the determination of 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), which is based on the release of 14CO2 from [carboxyl-14C]-orotic acid by the consecutive action of orotate phosphoribosyltransferase and orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase. The assay is simpler and less time-consuming than most methods currently employed and is equally sensitive. The method proved to be suitable for measuring low concentrations of PRPP such as found in human erythrocytes and fibroblasts. An increased PRPP concentration was observed in erythrocytes from patients with partial or complete deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phospho-ribosyltransferase. frp, sp,e (but not all) gouty patients and from a patient with deficiency of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. PRPP synthetase activity was measured with a method similar to the assay for PRPP. In erythrocytes with an increased PRPP concentration, PRPP synthetase activity was found to be normal at both optimal and suboptimal substrate concentrations.

  2. A simple and sensitive method for estimating the concentration and synthesis of 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Tax, W J; Veerkamp, J H

    1977-07-15

    A method is presented for the determination of 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), which is based on the release of 14CO2 from [carboxyl-14C]-orotic acid by the consecutive action of orotate phosphoribosyltransferase and orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase. The assay is simpler and less time-consuming than most methods currently employed and is equally sensitive. The method proved to be suitable for measuring low concentrations of PRPP such as found in human erythrocytes and fibroblasts. An increased PRPP concentration was observed in erythrocytes from patients with partial or complete deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phospho-ribosyltransferase. frp, sp,e (but not all) gouty patients and from a patient with deficiency of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. PRPP synthetase activity was measured with a method similar to the assay for PRPP. In erythrocytes with an increased PRPP concentration, PRPP synthetase activity was found to be normal at both optimal and suboptimal substrate concentrations. PMID:195752

  3. Towards in vivo regulon kinetics: PurR activation by 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate during purine depletion in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Jendresen, Christian Bille; Dimitrov, Peter; Gautier, Laurent; Liu, Meng; Martinussen, Jan; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2014-07-01

    Short-term adaptation to changing environments relies on regulatory elements translating shifting metabolite concentrations into a specifically optimized transcriptome. So far the focus of analyses has been divided between regulatory elements identified in vivo and kinetic studies of small molecules interacting with the regulatory elements in vitro. Here we describe how in vivo regulon kinetics can describe a regulon through the effects of the metabolite controlling it, exemplified by temporal purine exhaustion in Lactococcus lactis. We deduced a causal relation between the pathway precursor 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and individual mRNA levels, whereby unambiguous and homogeneous relations could be obtained for PurR regulated genes, thus linking a specific regulon to a specific metabolite. As PurR activates gene expression upon binding of PRPP, the pur mRNA curves reflect the in vivo kinetics of PurR PRPP binding and activation. The method singled out the xpt-pbuX operon as kinetically distinct, which was found to be caused by a guanine riboswitch whose regulation was overlaying the PurR regulation. Importantly, genes could be clustered according to regulatory mechanism and long-term consequences could be distinguished from transient changes--many of which would not be seen in a long-term adaptation to a new environment. The strategy outlined here can be adapted to analyse the individual effects of members from larger metabolomes in virtually any organism, for elucidating regulatory networks in vivo.

  4. Substitutions in hamster CAD carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase alter allosteric response to 5-phosphoribosyl-alpha-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and UTP.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Christine Q; Simmons, Alan J; Haubner, Aaron; Ream, Amber; Davidson, Jeffrey N

    2004-03-15

    CPSase (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II), a component of CAD protein (multienzymic protein with CPSase, aspartate transcarbamylase and dihydro-orotase activities), catalyses the regulated steps in the de novo synthesis of pyrimidines. Unlike the orthologous Escherichia coli enzyme that is regulated by UMP, inosine monophosphate and ornithine, the mammalian CPSase is allosterically inhibited by UTP, and activated by PRPP (5-phosphoribosyl-a-pyrophosphate) and phosphorylation. Four residues (Thr974, Lys993, Lys954 and Thr977) are critical to the E. coli inosine monophosphate/UMP-binding pocket. In the present study, three of the corresponding residues in the hamster CPSase were altered to determine if they affect either PRPP activation or UTP inhibition. Substitution of the hamster residue, positionally equivalent to Thr974 in the E. coli enzyme, with alanine residue led to an enzyme with 5-fold lower activity and a near loss of PRPP activation. Whereas replacement of the tryptophan residue at position 993 had no effect, an Asp992-->Asn substitution yielded a much-activated enzyme that behaved as if PRPP was present. The substitution Lys954-->Glu had no effect on PRPP stimulation. Only modest decreases in UTP inhibitions were observed with each of the altered CPSases. The results also show that while PRPP and UTP can act simultaneously, PRPP activation is dominant. Apparently, UTP and PRPP have distinctly different associations within the mammalian enzyme. The findings of the present study may prove relevant to the neuropathology of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome PMID:14651476

  5. Mutations in the Bacillus subtilis purine repressor that perturb PRPP effector function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Weng, M; Zalkin, H

    2000-07-01

    The Bacillus subtilis pur operon repressor (PurR) has a PRPP (5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate) binding motif at residues 199-211. Two PurR PRPP binding region mutations (D203A and D204A) were constructed, and the effects on binding of repressor to the pur operon control site in vitro and on regulation of pur operon expression in vivo were investigated. PRPP significantly inhibited the binding of wild-type but not mutant PurR to pur operon control site DNA. In strains with the D203A and D204A mutations, pur operon expression in vivo was super-repressed by addition of adenine to the growth medium. These results support the role of PRPP in modulating the regulatory function of PurR in vivo. YabJ, the product of the distal gene in the bicistronic purR operon, is also required for PurR function in vivo.

  6. Ternary complex structure of human HGPRTase, PRPP, Mg2+, and the inhibitor HPP reveals the involvement of the flexible loop in substrate binding.

    PubMed Central

    Balendiran, G. K.; Molina, J. A.; Xu, Y.; Torres-Martinez, J.; Stevens, R.; Focia, P. J.; Eakin, A. E.; Sacchettini, J. C.; Craig, S. P.

    1999-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace Lys68 of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRTase) with alanine to exploit this less reactive form of the enzyme to gain additional insights into the structure activity relationship of HGPRTase. Although this substitution resulted in only a minimal (one- to threefold) increase in the Km values for binding pyrophosphate or phosphoribosylpyrophosphate, the catalytic efficiencies (k(cat)/Km) of the forward and reverse reactions were more severely reduced (6- to 30-fold), and the mutant enzyme showed positive cooperativity in binding of alpha-D-5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and nucleotide. The K68A form of the human HGPRTase was cocrystallized with 7-hydroxy [4,3-d] pyrazolo pyrimidine (HPP) and Mg PRPP, and the refined structure reported. The PRPP molecule built into the [(Fo - Fc)phi(calc)] electron density shows atomic interactions between the Mg PRPP and enzyme residues in the pyrophosphate binding domain as well as in a long flexible loop (residues Leu101 to Gly111) that closes over the active site. Loop closure reveals the functional roles for the conserved SY dipeptide of the loop as well as the molecular basis for one form of gouty arthritis (S103R). In addition, the closed loop conformation provides structural information relevant to the mechanism of catalysis in human HGPRTase. PMID:10338013

  7. Anthranilate synthase/anthranilate 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase from Aerobacter aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Egan, A. F.; Gibson, F.

    1972-01-01

    1. Anthranilate synthase and phosphoribosyltransferase from Aerobacter aerogenes purify simultaneously and sediment together on sucrose gradients, showing that they occur as an enzyme aggregate. Both activities of the intact aggregate are subject to inhibition by tryptophan. 2. By using appropriate auxotrophic mutants it was shown that an intact active enzyme aggregate is formed when the components come from separate mutant strains. An intact active aggregate can also be formed when one component is from Escherichia coli and the other from A. aerogenes. 3. Phosphoribosyltransferase of A. aerogenes is active when not in an aggregate with anthranilate synthase, but is not subject to tryptophan inhibition, indicating that the inhibitor site is on the anthranilate synthase component. 4. Anthranilate synthase can be active and sensitive to tryptophan inhibition when complexed with an inactive phosphoribosyltransferase. 5. Kinetic studies on the anthranilate synthase activity show that tryptophan is a competitive inhibitor with respect to chorismate and a non-competitive inhibitor with respect to either glutamine or NH4+ ions. This is consistent with a sequential mechanism of the ordered type in which chorismate is the first reactant. PMID:4352716

  8. In vivo effect of mutations at the PRPP binding site of the Bacillus subtilis purine repressor.

    PubMed

    Rappu, Pekka; Pullinen, Terhi; Mäntsälä, Pekka

    2003-11-01

    The Bacillus subtilis PurR mediates adenine repression and guanosine induction of purA. PRPP inhibits binding of PurR to DNA in vitro. Mutations in the PRPP binding motif of PurR caused strong repression regardless of purine exclusions or additions, establishing the role of PRPP as regulator of PurR.

  9. Implementation of the PR&PP methodology: the role of formal expert elicitations

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2010-01-01

    The application of the methodology developed by the GenIV International Forum's (GIF's) Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP) Working Group is an expert elicitation. Although the framework of the methodology is structured and systematic, it does not by itself constitute or require a formal elicitation. However, formal elicitation can be utilized in the PR&PP context to provide a systematic, credible and transparent qualitative analysis and develop input for quantitative analyses. This section provides an overview of expert elicitations, a discussion of the role formal expert elicitations can play in the PR&PP methodology, an outline of the formal expert elicitation process and a brief practical guide to conducting formal expert elicitations. Expert elicitation is a process utilizing knowledgeable people in cases, for example, when an assessment is needed but physically based data is absent or open to interpretation. More specifically, it can be used to: (1) predict future events; (2) provide estimates on new, rare, complex or poorly understood phenomena; (3) integrate or interpret existing information; or (4) determine what is currently known, how well it is known or what is worth learning in a field. Expert elicitation can be informal or formal. The informal application of expert judgment is frequently used. Although it can produce good results, it often provides demonstrably biased or otherwise flawed answers to problems. This along with the absence of transparency can result in a loss of confidence when experts speak on issues. More formal expert elicitation is a structured process that makes use of people knowledgeable in certain areas to make assessments. The reason for advocating formal use is that the quality and accuracy of expert judgment comes from the completeness of the expert's understanding of the phenomena and the process used to elicit and analyze the data. The use of a more formal process to obtain, lU1derstand and analyze expert

  10. Very High-Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP)

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, David Lewis

    2011-10-01

    This report documents the detailed background information that has been compiled to support the preparation of a much shorter white paper on the design features and fuel cycles of Very High-Temperature Reactors (VHTRs), including the proposed Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), to identify the important proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR&PP) aspects of the proposed concepts. The shorter white paper derived from the information in this report was prepared for the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Science and Technology for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) VHTR Systems Steering Committee (SSC) as input to the GIF Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Working Group (PR&PPWG) (http://www.gen-4.org/Technology/horizontal/proliferation.htm). The short white paper was edited by the GIF VHTR SCC to address their concerns and thus may differ from the information presented in this supporting report. The GIF PR&PPWG will use the derived white paper based on this report along with other white papers on the six alternative Generation IV design concepts (http://www.gen-4.org/Technology/systems/index.htm) to employ an evaluation methodology that can be applied and will evolve from the earliest stages of design. This methodology will guide system designers, program policy makers, and external stakeholders in evaluating the response of each system, to determine each system's resistance to proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and terrorism threats, and thereby guide future international cooperation on ensuring safeguards in the deployment of the Generation IV systems. The format and content of this report is that specified in a template prepared by the GIF PR&PPWG. Other than the level of detail, the key exception to the specified template format is the addition of Appendix C to document the history and status of coated-particle fuel reprocessing technologies, which fuel reprocessing technologies have yet to be deployed

  11. Crystal structures of Apo and GMP bound hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase from Legionella pneumophila and the implications in gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nannan; Gong, Xiaojian; Lu, Min; Chen, Xiaofang; Qin, Ximing; Ge, Honghua

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) (EC 2.4.2.8) reversibly catalyzes the transfer of the 5-phophoribosyl group from 5-phosphoribosyl-alpha-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to hypoxanthine or guanine to form inosine monophosphate (IMP) or guanosine monophosphate (GMP) in the purine salvage pathway. To investigate the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme in the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila, we determined the crystal structures of the L. pneumophila HGPRT (LpHGPRT) both in its apo-form and in complex with GMP. The structures reveal that LpHGPRT comprises a core domain and a hood domain which are packed together to create a cavity for GMP-binding and the enzymatic catalysis. The binding of GMP induces conformational changes of the stable loop II. This new binding site is closely related to the Gout arthritis-linked human HGPRT mutation site (Ser103Arg). Finally, these structures of LpHGPRT provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of HGPRT.

  12. Comprehensive X-Ray Structural Studies of the Quinolinate Phosphoribosyl Transferase (BNA6) From Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    di Luccio, E.; Wilson, D.K.

    2009-05-14

    Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19) is a 32 kDa enzyme encoded by the BNA6 gene in yeast and catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide from quinolinate and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). QAPRTase plays a key role in the tryptophan degradation pathway via kynurenine, leading to the de novo biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} and clearing the neurotoxin quinolinate. To improve our understanding of the specificity of the eukaryotic enzyme and the course of events associated with catalysis, we have determined the crystal structures of the apo and singly bound forms with the substrates quinolinate and PRPP. This reveals that the enzyme folds in a manner similar to that of various prokaryotic forms which are {approx}30% identical in sequence. In addition, the structure of the Michaelis complex is approximated by PRPP and the quinolinate analogue phthalate bound to the active site. These results allow insight into the kinetic mechanism of QAPRTase and provide an understanding of structural diversity in the active site of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae enzyme when compared to prokaryotic homologues.

  13. Biochemical characterization of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Villela, Anne Drumond; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Rosado, Leonardo Astolfi; Bloch, Carlos Junior; Prates, Maura Vianna; Gonçalves, Danieli Cristina; Ramos, Carlos Henrique Inacio; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diogenes Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) catalyzes the conversion of uracil and 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) and pyrophosphate (PP(i)). UPRT plays an important role in the pyrimidine salvage pathway since UMP is a common precursor of all pyrimidine nucleotides. Here we describe cloning, expression and purification to homogeneity of upp-encoded UPRT from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtUPRT). Mass spectrometry and N-terminal amino acid sequencing unambiguously identified the homogeneous protein as MtUPRT. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that native MtUPRT follows a monomer-tetramer association model. MtUPRT is specific for uracil. GTP is not a modulator of MtUPRT ativity. MtUPRT was not significantly activated or inhibited by ATP, UTP, and CTP. Initial velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry studies suggest that catalysis follows a sequential ordered mechanism, in which PRPP binding is followed by uracil, and PP(i) product is released first followed by UMP. The pH-rate profiles indicated that groups with pK values of 5.7 and 8.1 are important for catalysis, and a group with a pK value of 9.5 is involved in PRPP binding. The results here described provide a solid foundation on which to base upp gene knockout aiming at the development of strategies to prevent tuberculosis.

  14. Biochemical Characterization of Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Villela, Anne Drumond; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Rosado, Leonardo Astolfi; Bloch, Carlos Junior; Prates, Maura Vianna; Gonçalves, Danieli Cristina; Ramos, Carlos Henrique Inacio; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diogenes Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) catalyzes the conversion of uracil and 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to uridine 5′-monophosphate (UMP) and pyrophosphate (PPi). UPRT plays an important role in the pyrimidine salvage pathway since UMP is a common precursor of all pyrimidine nucleotides. Here we describe cloning, expression and purification to homogeneity of upp-encoded UPRT from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtUPRT). Mass spectrometry and N-terminal amino acid sequencing unambiguously identified the homogeneous protein as MtUPRT. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that native MtUPRT follows a monomer-tetramer association model. MtUPRT is specific for uracil. GTP is not a modulator of MtUPRT ativity. MtUPRT was not significantly activated or inhibited by ATP, UTP, and CTP. Initial velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry studies suggest that catalysis follows a sequential ordered mechanism, in which PRPP binding is followed by uracil, and PPi product is released first followed by UMP. The pH-rate profiles indicated that groups with pK values of 5.7 and 8.1 are important for catalysis, and a group with a pK value of 9.5 is involved in PRPP binding. The results here described provide a solid foundation on which to base upp gene knockout aiming at the development of strategies to prevent tuberculosis. PMID:23424660

  15. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is an enzyme with unusual kinetic properties and a crystal structure that suggests it evolved from a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Christoffersen, Stig; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Mølgaard, Anne; Kadziola, Anders

    2015-04-14

    The adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRTase) encoded by the open reading frame SSO2342 of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 was subjected to crystallographic, kinetic, and ligand binding analyses. The enzyme forms dimers in solution and in the crystals, and binds one molecule of the reactants 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and adenine or the product adenosine monophosphate (AMP) or the inhibitor adenosine diphosphate (ADP) in each active site. The individual subunit adopts an overall structure that resembles a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase (PRTase) more than known APRTases implying that APRT functionality in Crenarchaeotae has its evolutionary origin in this family of PRTases. Only the N-terminal two-thirds of the polypeptide chain folds as a traditional type I PRTase with a five-stranded β-sheet surrounded by helices. The C-terminal third adopts an unusual three-helix bundle structure that together with the nucleobase-binding loop undergoes a conformational change upon binding of adenine and phosphate resulting in a slight contraction of the active site. The inhibitor ADP binds like the product AMP with both the α- and β-phosphates occupying the 5'-phosphoribosyl binding site. The enzyme shows activity over a wide pH range, and the kinetic and ligand binding properties depend on both pH and the presence/absence of phosphate in the buffers. A slow hydrolysis of PRPP to ribose 5-phosphate and pyrophosphate, catalyzed by the enzyme, may be facilitated by elements in the C-terminal three-helix bundle part of the protein. PMID:25790177

  16. Biosynthesis of D-arabinose in mycobacteria - a novel bacterial pathway with implications for antimycobacterial therapy.

    PubMed

    Wolucka, Beata A

    2008-06-01

    Decaprenyl-phospho-arabinose (beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-1-O-monophosphodecaprenol), the only known donor of d-arabinose in bacteria, and its precursor, decaprenyl-phospho-ribose (beta-D-ribofuranosyl-1-O-monophosphodecaprenol), were first described in 1992. En route to D-arabinofuranose, the decaprenyl-phospho-ribose 2'-epimerase converts decaprenyl-phospho-ribose to decaprenyl-phospho-arabinose, which is a substrate for arabinosyltransferases in the synthesis of the cell-wall arabinogalactan and lipoarabinomannan polysaccharides of mycobacteria. The first step of the proposed decaprenyl-phospho-arabinose biosynthesis pathway in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and related actinobacteria is the formation of D-ribose 5-phosphate from sedoheptulose 7-phosphate, catalysed by the Rv1449 transketolase, and/or the isomerization of d-ribulose 5-phosphate, catalysed by the Rv2465 d-ribose 5-phosphate isomerase. d-Ribose 5-phosphate is a substrate for the Rv1017 phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase which forms 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). The activated 5-phosphoribofuranosyl residue of PRPP is transferred by the Rv3806 5-phosphoribosyltransferase to decaprenyl phosphate, thus forming 5'-phosphoribosyl-monophospho-decaprenol. The dephosphorylation of 5'-phosphoribosyl-monophospho-decaprenol to decaprenyl-phospho-ribose by the putative Rv3807 phospholipid phosphatase is the committed step of the pathway. A subsequent 2'-epimerization of decaprenyl-phospho-ribose by the heteromeric Rv3790/Rv3791 2'-epimerase leads to the formation of the decaprenyl-phospho-arabinose precursor for the synthesis of the cell-wall arabinans in Actinomycetales. The mycobacterial 2'-epimerase Rv3790 subunit is similar to the fungal D-arabinono-1,4-lactone oxidase, the last enzyme in the biosynthesis of D-erythroascorbic acid, thus pointing to an evolutionary link between the D-arabinofuranose- and L-ascorbic acid-related pathways. Decaprenyl-phospho-arabinose has been a lead compound for the

  17. The PurR regulon in Lactococcus lactis - transcriptional regulation of the purine nucleotide metabolism and translational machinery.

    PubMed

    Jendresen, Christian Bille; Martinussen, Jan; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2012-08-01

    Purine nucleotides are either synthesized de novo from 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) or salvaged from the environment. In Lactococcus lactis, transcription of the de novo synthesis operons, purCSQLF and purDEK, has genetically been shown to be activated by the PurR protein when bound to a conserved PurBox motif present on the DNA at a fixed distance from the promoter -10 element. PurR contains a PRPP-binding site, and activation occurs when the intracellular PRPP pool is high as a consequence of low exogenous purine nucleotide pools. By an iterative approach of bioinformatics searches and motif optimization, 21 PurR-regulated genes were identified and used in a redefinition of the PurBox consensus sequence. In the process a new motif, the double-PurBox, which is present in a number of promoters and contains two partly overlapping PurBox motifs, was established. Transcriptional fusions were used to analyse wild-type promoters and promoters with inactivating PurBox mutations to confirm the relevance of the PurBox motifs as PurR-binding sites. The promoters of several operons were shown to be devoid of any -35 sequence, and found to be completely dependent on PurR-mediated activation. This suggests that binding of the PurR protein to the PurBox takes over the role of the -35 sequence. The study has expanded the PurR regulon to include promoters in nucleotide metabolism, C(1) compound metabolism, phosphonate transport, pyrophosphatase activity, (p)ppGpp metabolism, and translation-related functions. Of special interest is the presence of PurBox motifs in rrn promoters, suggesting a novel connection between nucleotide availability and the translational machinery.

  18. Biochemical Characterization of Quinolinic Acid Phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and Inhibition of Its Activity by Pyrazinamide

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun; Shibayama, Keigo; Rimbara, Emiko; Mori, Shigetarou

    2014-01-01

    Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19) is a key enzyme in the de novo pathway of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis and a target for the development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. QAPRTase catalyzes the synthesis of nicotinic acid mononucleotide from quinolinic acid (QA) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) through a phosphoribosyl transfer reaction followed by decarboxylation. The crystal structure of QAPRTase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (MtQAPRTase) has been determined; however, a detailed functional analysis of MtQAPRTase has not been published. Here, we analyzed the enzymatic activities of MtQAPRTase and determined the effect on catalysis of the anti-tuberculosis drug pyrazinamide (PZA). The optimum temperature and pH for MtQAPRTase activity were 60°C and pH 9.2. MtQAPRTase required bivalent metal ions and its activity was highest in the presence of Mg2+. Kinetic analyses revealed that the Km values for QA and PRPP were 0.08 and 0.39 mM, respectively, and the kcat values for QA and PRPP were 0.12 and 0.14 [s-1], respectively. When the amino acid residues of MtQAPRTase, which may interact with QA, were substituted with alanine residues, catalytic activity was undetectable. Further, PZA, which is an anti-tuberculosis drug and a structural analog of QA, markedly inhibited the catalytic activity of MtQAPRTase. The structure of PZA may provide the basis for the design of new inhibitors of MtQAPRTase. These findings provide new insights into the catalytic properties of MtQAPRTase. PMID:24949952

  19. Phenolic Amides Are Potent Inhibitors of De Novo Nucleotide Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pisithkul, Tippapha; Jacobson, Tyler B; O'Brien, Thomas J; Stevenson, David M; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    An outstanding challenge toward efficient production of biofuels and value-added chemicals from plant biomass is the impact that lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have on microbial fermentations. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie their toxicity is critical for developing strategies to overcome them. Here, using Escherichia coli as a model system, we investigated the metabolic effects and toxicity mechanisms of feruloyl amide and coumaroyl amide, the predominant phenolic compounds in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates. Using metabolomics, isotope tracers, and biochemical assays, we showed that these two phenolic amides act as potent and fast-acting inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways. Feruloyl or coumaroyl amide exposure leads to (i) a rapid buildup of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), a key precursor in nucleotide biosynthesis, (ii) a rapid decrease in the levels of pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates, and (iii) a long-term generalized decrease in nucleotide and deoxynucleotide levels. Tracer experiments using (13)C-labeled sugars and [(15)N]ammonia demonstrated that carbon and nitrogen fluxes into nucleotides and deoxynucleotides are inhibited by these phenolic amides. We found that these effects are mediated via direct inhibition of glutamine amidotransferases that participate in nucleotide biosynthetic pathways. In particular, feruloyl amide is a competitive inhibitor of glutamine PRPP amidotransferase (PurF), which catalyzes the first committed step in de novo purine biosynthesis. Finally, external nucleoside supplementation prevents phenolic amide-mediated growth inhibition by allowing nucleotide biosynthesis via salvage pathways. The results presented here will help in the development of strategies to overcome toxicity of phenolic compounds and facilitate engineering of more efficient microbial producers of biofuels and chemicals.

  20. Phenolic Amides Are Potent Inhibitors of De Novo Nucleotide Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pisithkul, Tippapha; Jacobson, Tyler B.; O'Brien, Thomas J.; Stevenson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    An outstanding challenge toward efficient production of biofuels and value-added chemicals from plant biomass is the impact that lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have on microbial fermentations. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie their toxicity is critical for developing strategies to overcome them. Here, using Escherichia coli as a model system, we investigated the metabolic effects and toxicity mechanisms of feruloyl amide and coumaroyl amide, the predominant phenolic compounds in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates. Using metabolomics, isotope tracers, and biochemical assays, we showed that these two phenolic amides act as potent and fast-acting inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways. Feruloyl or coumaroyl amide exposure leads to (i) a rapid buildup of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), a key precursor in nucleotide biosynthesis, (ii) a rapid decrease in the levels of pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates, and (iii) a long-term generalized decrease in nucleotide and deoxynucleotide levels. Tracer experiments using 13C-labeled sugars and [15N]ammonia demonstrated that carbon and nitrogen fluxes into nucleotides and deoxynucleotides are inhibited by these phenolic amides. We found that these effects are mediated via direct inhibition of glutamine amidotransferases that participate in nucleotide biosynthetic pathways. In particular, feruloyl amide is a competitive inhibitor of glutamine PRPP amidotransferase (PurF), which catalyzes the first committed step in de novo purine biosynthesis. Finally, external nucleoside supplementation prevents phenolic amide-mediated growth inhibition by allowing nucleotide biosynthesis via salvage pathways. The results presented here will help in the development of strategies to overcome toxicity of phenolic compounds and facilitate engineering of more efficient microbial producers of biofuels and chemicals. PMID:26070680

  1. Phenolic Amides Are Potent Inhibitors of De Novo Nucleotide Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pisithkul, Tippapha; Jacobson, Tyler B; O'Brien, Thomas J; Stevenson, David M; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    An outstanding challenge toward efficient production of biofuels and value-added chemicals from plant biomass is the impact that lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have on microbial fermentations. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie their toxicity is critical for developing strategies to overcome them. Here, using Escherichia coli as a model system, we investigated the metabolic effects and toxicity mechanisms of feruloyl amide and coumaroyl amide, the predominant phenolic compounds in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates. Using metabolomics, isotope tracers, and biochemical assays, we showed that these two phenolic amides act as potent and fast-acting inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways. Feruloyl or coumaroyl amide exposure leads to (i) a rapid buildup of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), a key precursor in nucleotide biosynthesis, (ii) a rapid decrease in the levels of pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates, and (iii) a long-term generalized decrease in nucleotide and deoxynucleotide levels. Tracer experiments using (13)C-labeled sugars and [(15)N]ammonia demonstrated that carbon and nitrogen fluxes into nucleotides and deoxynucleotides are inhibited by these phenolic amides. We found that these effects are mediated via direct inhibition of glutamine amidotransferases that participate in nucleotide biosynthetic pathways. In particular, feruloyl amide is a competitive inhibitor of glutamine PRPP amidotransferase (PurF), which catalyzes the first committed step in de novo purine biosynthesis. Finally, external nucleoside supplementation prevents phenolic amide-mediated growth inhibition by allowing nucleotide biosynthesis via salvage pathways. The results presented here will help in the development of strategies to overcome toxicity of phenolic compounds and facilitate engineering of more efficient microbial producers of biofuels and chemicals. PMID:26070680

  2. Identification of the regulatory domain of the mammalian multifunctional protein CAD by the construction of an Escherichia coli hamster hybrid carbamyl-phosphate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Guy, H I; Evans, D R

    1994-11-01

    Carbamyl-phosphate synthetases from different organisms have similar catalytic mechanisms and amino acid sequences, but their structural organization, sub-unit structure, and mode of regulation can be very different. Escherichia coli carbamyl-phosphate synthetase (CPSase), a monofunctional protein consisting of amido-transferase and synthetase subunits, is allosterically inhibited by UMP and activated by NH3, IMP, and ornithine. In contrast, mammalian CPSase II, part of the large multifunctional polypeptide, CAD, is inhibited by UTP and activated by 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). Previous photoaffinity labeling studies of E. coli CPSase showed that allosteric effectors bind near the carboxyl-terminal end of the synthetase subunit. This region of the molecule may be a regulatory subdomain common to all CPSases. An E. coli mammalian hybrid CPSase gene has been constructed and expressed in E. coli. The hybrid consists of the E. coli CPSase synthetase catalytic subdomains, residues 1-900 of the 1073 residue polypeptide, fused to the amino-terminal end of the putative 190-residue regulatory subdomain of the mammalian protein. The hybrid CPSase had normal activity, but was no longer regulated by the prokaryotic allosteric effectors. Instead, the glutamine- and ammonia-dependent CPSase activities and both ATP-dependent partial reactions were activated by PRPP and inhibited by UTP, indicating that the binding sites of both of these ligands are located in a regulatory region at the carboxyl-terminal end of the CPSase domain of CAD. The apparent ligand dissociation constants and extent of inhibition by UTP are similar in the hybrid and the wild type mammalian protein, but PRPP binds 4-fold more weakly to the hybrid. The allosteric ligands affected the steady state kinetic parameters of the hybrid differently, suggesting that while the linkage between the catalytic and regulatory subdomains has been preserved, there may be qualitative differences in interdomain

  3. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss-Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  4. Identification of the Bacillus subtilis pur operon repressor.

    PubMed

    Weng, M; Nagy, P L; Zalkin, H

    1995-08-01

    Transcription of the Bacillus subtilis pur operon is repressed in response to a signal of excess adenine. We have purified the repressor protein and have identified, cloned, and overexpressed the purR regulatory gene that controls transcription initiation of the operon. B. subtilis purR encodes a 62-kDa homodimer that binds to the pur operon control region. The PurR binding site which overlaps the promoter encompasses approximately 110 bp. The protein-DNA interaction is inhibited by 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate. A mutation that deletes the repressor binding site or one that disrupts purR abolishes binding activity in vitro and repression of transcription in vivo in response to the excess adenine signal. These results lead to a model in which an excess-adenine signal is transmitted to PurR via the 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate pool. In addition, purR is autoregulated. There is no structural or mechanistic similarity between the B. subtilis and Escherichia coli purine repressors.

  5. Biochemical-genetic study of the first enzyme of histidine biosynthesis in Salmonella typhimurium: substrate and feedback binding regions.

    PubMed Central

    Wainscott, V J; Ferretti, J J

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-five strains of Salmonella typhimurium containing different mutations in the first gene of histidine biosynthesis were studied to correlate regions of the genetic map with biochemical functions. These strains contained either missense, double-frameshift, or suppressed nonsense mutations, all of which resulted in altered, though active, enzymes. Each mutant enzyme was assayed for activity in the presence of varying concentrations of the feedback inhibitor L-histidine or the substrates ATP and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate. The feedback properties and substrate kinetics of each mutant enzyme were compared to wild-type values, and these results indicated that the following functions were correlated with regions of the hisG gene: feedback inhibition in two general areas, including regions IA and IB and regions V, VI, and VII; ATP binding in two general areas, including regions IA, IB, and II and regions V, VI, and VII; and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate binding in two general areas, including regions IB, II, and III and regions V and VI. PMID:22534

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, V. I. Abramchik, Yu. A. Zhukhlistova, N. E. Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6{sub 3}22 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6322 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  8. A Qualitative Assessment of Diversion Scenarios for an Example Sodium Fast Reactor Using the GEN IV PR&PP Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Therios, Ike

    2012-01-20

    FAST REACTORS;NUCLEAR ENERGY;NUCLEAR MATERIALS MANAGEMENT;PROLIFERATION;SAFEGUARDS;THEFT; A working group was created in 2002 by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for the purpose of developing an internationally accepted methodology for assessing the Proliferation Resistance of a nuclear energy system (NES) and its individual elements. A two year case study is being performed by the experts group using this methodology to assess the proliferation resistance of a hypothetical NES called the Example Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR). This work demonstrates how the PR and PP methodology can be used to provide important information at various levels of details to NES designers, safeguard administrators and decision makers. The study analyzes the response of the complete ESFR nuclear energy system to different proliferation and theft strategies. The challenges considered include concealed diversion, concealed misuse and 'break out' strategies. This paper describes the work done in performing a qualitative assessment of concealed diversion scenarios from the ESFR.

  9. Pathway Aggregation in the Risk Assessment of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP) of Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aldemir, Tunc; Denning, Richard; Catalyurek, Umit; Yilmaz, Alper; Yue, Meng; Cheng, Lap-Yan

    2015-01-23

    The framework for Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR & PP) evaluation is to define a set of challenges, to obtain the system responses, and to assess the outcomes. The assessment of outcomes heavily relies on pathways, defined as sequences of events or actions that could potentially be followed by a State or a group of individuals in order to achieve a proliferation objective, with the defined threats as initiating events. There may be large number of segments connecting pathway stages (e.g. acquisition, processing, and fabrication for PR) which can lead to even larger number of pathways or scenarios through possible different combinations of segment connections, each with associated probabilities contributing to the overall risk. Clustering of these scenarios in specified stage attribute intervals is important for their tractable analysis and outcome assessment. A software tool for scenario generation and clustering (OSUPR) is developed that utilizes the PRCALC code developed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory for scenario generation and the K- means, mean shift and adaptive mean shift algorithms as possible clustering schemes. The results of the study using the Example Sodium Fast Breeder as an example system show that clustering facilitates the probabilistic or deterministic analysis of scenarios to identify system vulnerabilities and communication of the major risk contributors to stakeholders. The results of the study also show that the mean shift algorithm has the most potential for assisting the analysis of the scenarios generated by PRCALC.

  10. Modified pathway to synthesize ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate in methanogenic archaea.

    PubMed

    Finn, Michael W; Tabita, F Robert

    2004-10-01

    Several sequencing projects unexpectedly uncovered the presence of genes that encode ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) in anaerobic archaea. RubisCO is the key enzyme of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) reductive pentose phosphate pathway, a scheme that does not appear to contribute greatly, if at all, to net CO2 assimilation in these organisms. Recombinant forms of the archaeal enzymes do, however, catalyze a bona fide RuBP-dependent CO2 fixation reaction, and it was recently shown that Methanocaldococcus (Methanococcus) jannaschii and other anaerobic archaea synthesize catalytically active RubisCO in vivo. To complete the CBB pathway, there is a need for an enzyme, i.e., phosphoribulokinase (PRK), to catalyze the formation of RuBP, the substrate for the RubisCO reaction. Homology searches, as well as direct enzymatic assays with M. jannaschii, failed to reveal the presence of PRK. The apparent lack of PRK raised the possibility that either there is an alternative pathway to generate RuBP or RubisCO might use an alternative substrate in vivo. In the present study, direct enzymatic assays performed with alternative substrates and extracts of M. jannsachii provided evidence for a previously uncharacterized pathway for RuBP synthesis from 5-phospho-D-ribose-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) in M. jannaschii and other methanogenic archaea. Proteins and genes involved in the catalytic conversion of PRPP to RuBP were identified in M. jannaschii (Mj0601) and Methanosarcina acetivorans (Ma2851), and recombinant Ma2851 was active in extracts of Escherichia coli. Thus, in this work we identified a novel means to synthesize the CO2 acceptor and substrate for RubisCO in the absence of a detectable kinase, such as PRK. We suggest that the conversion of PRPP to RuBP might be an evolutional link between purine recycling pathways and the CBB scheme.

  11. Development of Pyrimidine-metabolizing Enzymes in Cotyledons of Germinating Peas 1

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Cleon; Murray, Michael G.

    1971-01-01

    Mechanisms controlling conversion of orotic acid-6-14C to uridine-5′-phosphate in cotyledons of germinating Alaska peas (Pisum sativum L.) were investigated. The content of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate was very low in dry seeds, increased to a maximum after about 12 hours of imbibition, and then rapidly declined. Orotidine-5′-phosphate pyrophosphorylase and orotidine-5′-phosphate decarboxylase activities more than doubled during the first 24 hours of germination and then also decreased. These results do not account for the continuous increases of orotate anabolism in such cotyledons as we observed previously. The initial increases in activities of these two enzymes were unaffected by cycloheximide, while the subsequent decreases were less rapid in the presence of this inhibitor. Activities of cotyledonary cytidine deaminase and uridine hydrolase also increased during imbibition, but the activity of only the latter showed a decrease after imbibition was completed. Cycloheximide inhibited the initial rapid increase in uridine hydrolase activity but had little effect on its subsequent decline. Cycloheximide had only slight inhibitory effects on the development of cytidine deaminase activity during the first 62 hours. The evidence suggests that uridine hydrolase might be synthesized de novo during the first few days of germination, but that the other three enzymes might not be. PMID:16657849

  12. Targeting the histidine pathway in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Juleane; Nunes, José Eduardo S; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Machado, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, tuberculosis is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality due to a single bacterial pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The increasing prevalence of this disease, the emergence of multi-, extensively, and totally drug-resistant strains, complicated by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus, and the length of tuberculosis chemotherapy have led to an urgent and continued need for the development of new and more effective antitubercular drugs. Within this context, the L-histidine biosynthetic pathway, which converts 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate to L-histidine in ten enzymatic steps, has been reported as a promising target of antimicrobial agents. This pathway is found in bacteria, archaebacteria, lower eukaryotes, and plants but is absent in mammals, making these enzymes highly attractive targets for the drug design of new antimycobacterial compounds with selective toxicity. Moreover, the biosynthesis of L-histidine has been described as essential for Mtb growth in vitro. Accordingly, a comprehensive overview of Mycobacterium tuberculosis histidine pathway enzymes as attractive targets for the development of new antimycobacterial agents is provided, mainly summarizing the previously reported inhibition data for Mtb or orthologous proteins. PMID:24111909

  13. Aldolase as a Chirality Intersection of L-Amino Acids and D-Sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munegumi, Toratane

    2015-06-01

    Aldolase plays an important role in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis to produce D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (D-FBP) from dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHP) and D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (D-GAP). This reaction is stereoselective and retains the D-GAP 2R configuration and yields D-FBP (with the configuration: 3S, 4S, 5R). The 3- and 4-position carbons are the newly formed chiral carbons because the 5-position carbon of D-FBP comes from the 2-position of D-GAP. Although four diastereomeric products, ( 3S, 4R, 5R), ( 3R, 4R, 5R), ( 3R, 4S, 5R), ( 3S, 4S, 5R), are expected in the nonenzymatic reaction, only the ( 3S, 4S, 5R) diastereomer (D-FBP) is obtained. Therefore, the chirality in the 3- and 4-positions is induced by the chirality of the enzyme composed of L-amino acid residues. D-Glucose-6-phosphate (D-G6P), which is generated from D-FBP in the gluconeogenesis pathway, produces D-ribose-5-phosphate (D-R5P) in the pentose phosphate pathway. D-R5P is converted to PRPP (5-phosphoribosyl-α-pyrophosphate), which is used for the de novo synthesis of nucleotides. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) uses the nucleotides as building blocks. The configurations of the 4R-carbon and of the 3S-carbon are retained. The stereochemical structure of RNA is based on 3S as well as 4R (D). The consideration above suggests that aldolase is a key enzyme that determines the 3S configuration in D-R5P. It is thus a chirality intersection between amino acids and sugars, because the sugar chirality is determined by the chiral environment of an L-amino acid protein, aldolase, to produce D-FBP.

  14. Aldolase as a chirality intersection of L-amino acids and D-sugars.

    PubMed

    Munegumi, Toratane

    2015-06-01

    Aldolase plays an important role in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis to produce D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (D-FBP) from dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHP) and D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (D-GAP). This reaction is stereoselective and retains the D-GAP 2R configuration and yields D-FBP (with the configuration: 3S, 4S, 5R). The 3- and 4-position carbons are the newly formed chiral carbons because the 5-position carbon of D-FBP comes from the 2-position of D-GAP. Although four diastereomeric products, (3S, 4R, 5R), (3R, 4R, 5R), (3R, 4S, 5R), (3S, 4S, 5R), are expected in the nonenzymatic reaction, only the (3S, 4S, 5R) diastereomer (D-FBP) is obtained. Therefore, the chirality in the 3- and 4-positions is induced by the chirality of the enzyme composed of L-amino acid residues. D-Glucose-6-phosphate (D-G6P), which is generated from D-FBP in the gluconeogenesis pathway, produces D-ribose-5-phosphate (D-R5P) in the pentose phosphate pathway. D-R5P is converted to PRPP (5-phosphoribosyl-α-pyrophosphate), which is used for the de novo synthesis of nucleotides. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) uses the nucleotides as building blocks. The configurations of the 4R-carbon and of the 3S-carbon are retained. The stereochemical structure of RNA is based on 3S as well as 4R (D). The consideration above suggests that aldolase is a key enzyme that determines the 3S configuration in D-R5P. It is thus a chirality intersection between amino acids and sugars, because the sugar chirality is determined by the chiral environment of an L-amino acid protein, aldolase, to produce D-FBP.

  15. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sigoillot, Frederic D; Berkowski, J Andrew; Sigoillot, Severine M; Kotsis, Damian H; Guy, Hedeel I

    2003-01-31

    De novo pyrimidine biosynthesis is activated in proliferating cells in response to an increased demand for nucleotides needed for DNA synthesis. The pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway in baby hamster kidney cells, synchronized by serum deprivation, was found to be up-regulated 1.9-fold during S phase and subsequently down-regulated as the cells progressed through the cycle. The nucleotide pools were depleted by serum starvation and were not replenished during the first round of cell division, suggesting that the rate of utilization of the newly synthesized nucleotides closely matched their rate of formation. The activation and subsequent down-regulation of the pathway can be attributed to altered allosteric regulation of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase-aspartate carbamoyltransferase-dihydroorotase), a multifunctional protein that initiates mammalian pyrimidine biosynthesis. As the culture approached S-phase there was an increased sensitivity to the allosteric activator, 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate, and a loss of UTP inhibition, changes that were reversed when cells emerged from S phase. The allosteric regulation of CAD is known to be modulated by MAP kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylations as well as by autophosphorylation. CAD was found to be fully autophosphorylated in the synchronized cells, but the level remained invariant throughout the cycle. Although the MAPK activity increased early in G(1), the phosphorylation of the CAD MAPK site was delayed until just before the onset of S phase, probably due to antagonistic phosphorylation by PKA that persisted until late G(1). Once activated, pyrimidine biosynthesis remained elevated until rephosphorylation of CAD by PKA and dephosphorylation of the CAD MAPK site late in S phase. Thus, the cell cycle-dependent regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis results from the sequential phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of CAD under the control of

  16. Variant human phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase altered in regulatory and catalytic functions.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, M A; Raivio, K O; Bakay, B; Adams, W B; Nyhan, W L

    1980-01-01

    An inherited, structurally abnormal and superactive form of the enzyme 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PP-ribose-P) synthetase (EC 2.7.6.1) has been characterized in fibroblasts cultured from a 14-yr-old male (S.M.) with clinical manifestations of uric acid overproduction present since infancy. PP-ribose-P synthetase from the cells of this child showed four- to fivefold greater than normal resistance to purine nucleotide (ADP and GDP) feedback inhibition of enzyme activity and hyperbolic rather than sigmoidal inorganic phosphate (Pi) activation in incompletely dialyzed extracts. Excessive maximal velocity of the enzyme reaction catalyzed by the mutant enzyme was indicated by: enzyme activities twice those of normal at all concentrations of Pi in chromatographed fibroblast extracts; normal affinity constants for substrates and for the activator, Mg2+; and twofold greater than normal activity per immunoreactive enzyme molecule. The mutant enzyme thus possessed deficient regulatory and superactive catalytic properties, two mechanisms previously demonstrated individually to underlie the excessive PPRribose-P and uric acid synthesis of affected members of families with superactive PP-ribose-P synthetases. Increased PP-ribose-P concentration (4-fold) and generation (2.7-fold) and enhanced rates of PP-ribose-P dependent purine synthetic reactions, including purine synthesis de novo, in S.M. fibroblasts confirmed the functional significance of this patient's mutant enzyme. Diminished stability of the variant PP-ribose-P synthetase was manifested in vitro by increased thermal lability and in vivo by deficiency of enzyme activity at Pi concentrations greater than 0.3 mM in hemolysates and by an accelerated, age-related decrement in enzyme activity in lysates of erythrocytes separated by specific density. Despite the diminished amount of PP-ribose-P synthetase in the S.M. erythrocyte population, S.M. erythrocytes had increased PP-ribose-P concentration and increased rates

  17. Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase activity affects growth and riboflavin production in Ashbya gossypii

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Alberto; Santos, María A; Revuelta, José L

    2008-01-01

    Background Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) is a central compound for cellular metabolism and may be considered as a link between carbon and nitrogen metabolism. PRPP is directly involved in the de novo and salvage biosynthesis of GTP, which is the immediate precursor of riboflavin. The industrial production of this vitamin using the fungus Ashbya gossypii is an important biotechnological process that is strongly influenced by substrate availability. Results Here we describe the characterization and manipulation of two genes of A. gossypii encoding PRPP synthetase (AGR371C and AGL080C). We show that the AGR371C and AGL080C gene products participate in PRPP synthesis and exhibit inhibition by ADP. We also observed a major contribution of AGL080C to total PRPP synthetase activity, which was confirmed by an evident growth defect of the Δagl080c strain. Moreover, we report the overexpression of wild-type and mutant deregulated isoforms of Agr371cp and Agl080cp that significantly enhanced the production of riboflavin in the engineered A. gossypii strains. Conclusion It is shown that alterations in PRPP synthetase activity have pleiotropic effects on the fungal growth pattern and that an increase in PRPP synthetase enzymatic activity can be used to enhance riboflavin production in A. gossypii. PMID:18782443

  18. Effect of treatment on erythrocyte phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase and glutathione reductase activity in patients with primary gout.

    PubMed Central

    Braven, J; Hardwell, T R; Hickling, P; Whittaker, M

    1986-01-01

    The activities of erythrocyte phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase and glutathione reductase (GTR) were studied in 26 patients with primary gout who were receiving no treatment or treatment with either allopurinol or azapropazone, and compared with the activity in a group of healthy controls. The activity of PRPP synthetase was significantly higher in the gout group and was not influenced by either drug. No significant difference in the activity of GTR was observed. The failure of either drug to suppress the increased activity of PRPP synthetase associated with gout is discussed. PMID:3024593

  19. Anti-proliferative activity of L-651,582 correlates with calcium-mediated regulation of nucleotide metabolism at phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Hupe, D.J.; Behrens, N.D.; Boltz, R. )

    1990-09-01

    L-651,582, 5-amino-(4-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-3,5-dichlorobenzyl)-1, 2,3-triazole-4-carboxamide, is an antiproliferative and antiparasitic agent which inhibits nucleotide metabolism in mammalian cells. The drug equivalently inhibited 3H-hypoxanthine, 14C-adenine, and 14C-formate incorporation into nucleotide pools in Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells, suggesting depletion of the supply of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate, (PRPP), required for each of these independent pathways. Inhibition of nucleotide metabolism correlated with inhibition of proliferation for three cell types with differing sensitivities toward the drug. L-651,582 inhibited incorporation of 3H-hypoxanthine into nucleotide pools with either glucose, uridine, or ribose as carbon source suggesting a block at PRPP synthetase, rather than a block in a pathway supplying ribose-5-phosphate. PRPP synthetase was not inhibited directly by the compound, indicating regulation of the enzyme in intact cells. Drug treatment did not kill cells but reduced the fraction of cells in S and G2/M while increasing the population in G1. Inhibition of uptake of 45Ca was demonstrated at concentrations identical to those required for inhibition of nucleotide metabolism or proliferation. Inhibition of cellular PRPP biosynthesis rates were also observed using EGTA to lower calcium levels. These data suggest a previously unrecognized link between calcium entry, the regulation of nucleotide biosynthesis at PRPP synthetase, and the rate of proliferation of mammalian cells.

  20. Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase in Plant Tissues: Some Effects of Kinetin on Enzymic Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, P. B.; Murray, A. W.

    1968-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activity was measured in extracts of soybean (Glycine max var. Acme) callus and of senescing barley leaves (Hordeum distichon c.v. Prior). The enzyme from soybean callus had Michaelis constants for adenine and 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate of 1.5 and 7.5 μm respectively and was inhibited by AMP and stimulated by ATP. The presence of kinetin was found to considerably increase the activity of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase in extracts of soybean callus and senescing barley leaves. PMID:16656820

  1. Transcriptome analysis guided metabolic engineering of Bacillus subtilis for riboflavin production.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Zhigang; Chen, Xun; Zhao, Xueming

    2009-01-01

    A comparative transcriptome profiling between a riboflavin-producing Bacillus subtilis strain RH33 and the wild-type strain B. subtilis 168 was performed, complemented with metabolite pool and nucleotide sequence analysis, to rationally identify new targets for improving riboflavin production. The pur operon (purEKBCSQLFMNHD) together with other PurR-regulated genes (glyA, guaC, pbuG, xpt-pbuX, yqhZ-folD, and pbuO) was all down-regulated in RH33, which consequently limited the supply of the riboflavin precursors. As 5-phospho-ribosyl-1(a)-pyrophosphate (PRPP) strongly inhibits the binding of PurR to its targets, it was inferred that the reduced expression of PurR-regulated genes might be caused by a low PRPP pool, which was subsequently confirmed by metabolite analysis. Thus, we selected and co-overexpressed prs and ywlF genes in RH33, which are involved in the biosynthetic pathway of PRPP from ribulose-5-phosphate. This co-amplification led to an elevated PRPP pool and thus the increased transcript abundances of PurR-regulated genes participated in riboflavin precursor biosynthesis. The riboflavin titer was increased by 25% (up to 15 g l(-1)) in fed-batch fermentation.

  2. Metabolic Engineering of the Purine Pathway for Riboflavin Production in Ashbya gossypii†

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Alberto; Santos, María A.; Pompejus, Markus; Revuelta, José L.

    2005-01-01

    Purine nucleotides are essential precursors for living organisms because they are involved in many important processes, such as nucleic acid synthesis, energy supply, and the biosynthesis of several amino acids and vitamins such as riboflavin. GTP is the immediate precursor for riboflavin biosynthesis, and its formation through the purine pathway is subject to several regulatory mechanisms in different steps. Extracellular purines repress the transcription of most genes required for de novo ATP and GTP synthesis. Additionally, three enzymes of the pathway, phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) amidotransferase, adenylosuccinate synthetase, and IMP dehydrogenase, are subject to feedback inhibition by their end products. Here we report the characterization and manipulation of the committed step in the purine pathway of the riboflavin overproducer Ashbya gossypii. We report that phosphoribosylamine biosynthesis in A. gossypii is negatively regulated at the transcriptional level by extracellular adenine. Furthermore, we show that ATP and GTP exert a strong inhibitory effect on the PRPP amidotransferase from A. gossypii. We constitutively overexpressed the AgADE4 gene encoding PRPP amidotransferase in A. gossypii, thereby abolishing the adenine-mediated transcriptional repression. In addition, we replaced the corresponding residues (aspartic acid310, lysine333, and alanine417) that have been described to be important for PRPP amidotransferase feedback inhibition in other organisms by site-directed mutagenesis. With these manipulations, we managed to enhance metabolic flow through the purine pathway and to increase the production of riboflavin in the triple mutant strain 10-fold (228 mg/liter). PMID:16204483

  3. Studies on the energy metabolism of opossum (Didelphis virginiana) erythrocytes: V. Utilization of hypoxanthine for the synthesis of adenine and guanine nucleotides in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlenfalvay, N.C.; White, J.C.; Chadwick, E.; Lima, J.E. )

    1990-06-01

    High pressure liquid radiochromatography was used to test the ability of opossum erythrocytes to incorporate tracer amounts of (G-{sup 3}H) hypoxanthine (Hy) into ({sup 3}H) labelled triphosphates of adenine and guanine. In the presence of supraphysiologic (30 mM) phosphate which is optimal for PRPP synthesis, both ATP and GTP are extensively labelled. When physiologic (1 mM) medium phosphate is used, red cells incubated under an atmosphere of nitrogen accumulate ({sup 3}H) ATP in a linear fashion suggesting ongoing PRPP synthesis in red cells whose hemoglobin is deoxygenated. In contrast, a lesser increase of labelled ATP is observed in cells incubated under oxygen, suggesting that conditions for purine nucleotide formation from ambient Hy are more favorable in the venous circulation.

  4. The purine repressor of Bacillus subtilis: a novel combination of domains adapted for transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sangita C; Krahn, Joseph; Shin, Byung Sik; Tomchick, Diana R; Zalkin, Howard; Smith, Janet L

    2003-07-01

    The purine repressor from Bacillus subtilis, PurR, represses transcription from a number of genes with functions in the synthesis, transport, and metabolism of purines. The 2.2-A crystal structure of PurR reveals a two-domain protein organized as a dimer. The larger C-terminal domain belongs to the PRT structural family, in accord with a sequence motif for binding the inducer phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). The PRT domain is fused to a smaller N-terminal domain that belongs to the winged-helix family of DNA binding proteins. A positively charged surface on the winged-helix domain likely binds specific DNA sequences in the recognition site. A second positively charged surface surrounds the PRPP site at the opposite end of the PurR dimer. Conserved amino acids in the sequences of PurR homologs in 21 gram-positive bacteria cluster on the proposed recognition surface of the winged-helix domain and around the PRPP binding site at the opposite end of the molecule, supporting a common function of DNA and PRPP binding for all of the proteins. The structure supports a binding mechanism in which extended regions of DNA interact with extensive protein surface. Unlike most PRT proteins, which are phosphoribosyltransferases (PRTases), PurR lacks catalytic activity. This is explained by a tyrosine side chain that blocks the site for a nucleophile cosubstrate in PRTases. Thus, B. subtilis has adapted an enzyme fold to serve as an effector-binding domain and has used it in a novel combination with the DNA-binding winged-helix domain as a repressor of purine genes.

  5. Regulation of an Escherichia coli/mammalian chimeric carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sahay, N; Guy, H I; Liu, X; Evans, D R

    1998-11-20

    Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase (CPSase) consists of a 120-kDa synthetase domain (CPS) that makes carbamoyl phosphate from ATP, bicarbonate, and ammonia usually produced by a separate glutaminase domain. CPS is composed of two subdomains, CPS.A and CPS.B. Although CPS.A and CPS.B have specialized functions in intact CPSase, the separately cloned subdomains can catalyze carbamoyl phosphate synthesis. This report describes the construction of a 58-kDa chimeric CPSase composed of Escherichia coli CPS.A catalytic subdomains and the mammalian regulatory subdomain. The catalytic parameters are similar to those of the E. coli enzyme, but the activity is regulated by the mammalian effectors and protein kinase A phosphorylation. The chimera has a single site that binds phosphoribosyl 5'-pyrophosphate (PRPP) with a dissociation constant of 25 microM. The dissociation constant for UTP of 0.23 mM was inferred from its effect on PRPP binding. Thus, the regulatory subdomain is an exchangeable ligand binding module that can control both CPS.A and CPS.B domains, and the pathway for allosteric signal transmission is identical in E. coli and mammalian CPSase. A deletion mutant that truncates the polypeptide within a postulated regulatory sequence is as active as the parent chimera but is insensitive to effectors. PRPP and UTP bind to the mutant, suggesting that the carboxyl half of the subdomain is essential for transmitting the allosteric signal but not for ligand binding. PMID:9813025

  6. MEHODOLOGY FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE FOR ADVANCE NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    YUE, M.; CHANG, L.Y.; BARI, R.

    2006-01-30

    The Technology Goals for Generation IV nuclear energy systems highlight Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP) as one of the four goal areas for Generation 1V nuclear technology. Accordingly, an evaluation methodology is being developed by a PR&PP Experts Group. This paper presents a possible approach, which is based on Markov modeling, to the evaluation methodology for Generation IV nuclear energy systems being developed for PR&PP. Using the Markov model, a variety of proliferation scenarios can be constructed and the proliferation resistance measures can be quantified, particularly the probability of detection. To model the system with increased fidelity, the Markov model is further developed to incorporate multiple safeguards approaches in this paper. The approach to the determination of the associated parameters is presented. Evaluations of diversion scenarios for an example sodium fast reactor (ESFR) energy system are used to illustrate the methodology. The Markov model is particularly useful because it can provide the probability density function of the time it takes for the effort to be detected at a specific stage of the proliferation effort.

  7. Methodology Development and Applications of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Evaluation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, R.A.; Peterson, P.F., Therios, I.U., Whitlock, J.J.

    2010-04-11

    We present an overview of the program on the evaluation methodology for proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR&PP) of advanced nuclear energy systems (NESs) sponsored by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). For a proposed NES design, the methodology defines a set of challenges, analyzes system response to these challenges, and assesses outcomes. The challenges to the NES are the threats posed by potential actors (proliferant States or sub-national adversaries). The characteristics of Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate the response of the system and to determine its resistance against proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and terrorism threats. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of a set of measures, which are the high-level PR&PP characteristics of the NES. The methodology is organized to allow evaluations to be performed at the earliest stages of system design and to become more detailed and more representative as the design progresses. It can thus be used to enable a program in safeguards by design or to enhance the conceptual design process of an NES with regard to intrinsic features for PR&PP.

  8. Analysis of the sexual development-promoting region of Schizophyllum commune TRP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sen, Kikuo; Kinoshita, Hideki; Tazuke, Kazuyuki; Maki, Yoshinori; Yoshiura, Yumi; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Shibai, Hiroshiro; Kurosawa, Shin-Ichi

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to elucidate the mechanism of sexual development of basidiomycetous mushrooms from mating to fruit body formation. Sequencing analysis showed the TRP1 gene of basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune encoded an enzyme with three catalytic regions of GAT (glutamine amidotransferase), IGPS (indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase), and PRAI (5-phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase); among these three regions, the trp1 mutant (Trp(-)) had a missense mutation (L→F) of a 338th amino acid residue of the TRP1 protein within the IGPS region. To investigate the function of IGPS region related to sexual development, dikaryons with high, usual, and no expression of the IGPS region of TRP1 gene were made. The dikaryotic mycelia with high expression of the IGPS formed mature fruit bodies earlier than those with usual and no expression of the IGPS. These results showed that the IGPS region in TRP1 gene promoted sexual development of S. commune. PMID:27296855

  9. Analysis of the sexual development-promoting region of Schizophyllum commune TRP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sen, Kikuo; Kinoshita, Hideki; Tazuke, Kazuyuki; Maki, Yoshinori; Yoshiura, Yumi; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Shibai, Hiroshiro; Kurosawa, Shin-Ichi

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to elucidate the mechanism of sexual development of basidiomycetous mushrooms from mating to fruit body formation. Sequencing analysis showed the TRP1 gene of basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune encoded an enzyme with three catalytic regions of GAT (glutamine amidotransferase), IGPS (indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase), and PRAI (5-phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase); among these three regions, the trp1 mutant (Trp(-)) had a missense mutation (L→F) of a 338th amino acid residue of the TRP1 protein within the IGPS region. To investigate the function of IGPS region related to sexual development, dikaryons with high, usual, and no expression of the IGPS region of TRP1 gene were made. The dikaryotic mycelia with high expression of the IGPS formed mature fruit bodies earlier than those with usual and no expression of the IGPS. These results showed that the IGPS region in TRP1 gene promoted sexual development of S. commune.

  10. Folate-Dependent Purine Nucleotide Biosynthesis in Humans.

    PubMed

    Baggott, Joseph E; Tamura, Tsunenobu

    2015-09-01

    Purine nucleotide biosynthesis de novo (PNB) requires 2 folate-dependent transformylases-5'-phosphoribosyl-glycinamide (GAR) and 5'-phosphoribosyl-5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR) transformylases-to introduce carbon 8 (C8) and carbon 2 (C2) into the purine ring. Both transformylases utilize 10-formyltetrahydrofolate (10-formyl-H4folate), where the formyl-carbon sources include ring-2-C of histidine, 3-C of serine, 2-C of glycine, and formate. Our findings in human studies indicate that glycine provides the carbon for GAR transformylase (exclusively C8), whereas histidine and formate are the predominant carbon sources for AICAR transformylase (C2). Contrary to the previous notion, these carbon sources may not supply a general 10-formyl-H4folate pool, which was believed to equally provide carbons to C8 and C2. To explain these phenomena, we postulate that GAR transformylase is in a complex with the trifunctional folate-metabolizing enzyme (TFM) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase to channel carbons of glycine and serine to C8. There is no evidence for channeling carbons of histidine and formate to AICAR transformylase (C2). GAR transformylase may require the TFM to furnish 10-formyl-H4folate immediately after its production from serine to protect its oxidation to 10-formyldihydrofolate (10-formyl-H2folate), whereas AICAR transformylase can utilize both 10-formyl-H2folate and 10-formyl-H4folate. Human liver may supply AICAR to AICAR transformylase in erythrocytes/erythroblasts. Incorporation of ring-2-C of histidine and formate into C2 of urinary uric acid presented a circadian rhythm with a peak in the morning, which corresponds to the maximum DNA synthesis in the bone marrow, and it may be useful in the timing of the administration of drugs that block PNB for the treatment of cancer and autoimmune disease. PMID:26374178

  11. Investigation of various genotype characteristics for inosine accumulation in Escherichia coli W3110.

    PubMed

    Matsui, H; Kawasaki, H; Shimaoka, M; Kurahashi, O

    2001-03-01

    For the derivation of an inosine-overproducing strain from the wild type microorganism, it is known that the addition of an adenine requirement, removal of purine nucleoside hydrolyzing activity, removal of the feedback inhibition, and repression of key enzymes in the purine nucleotides biosynthetic pathway are essential. Thus, the disruption of purA (adenine requirement), deoD (removal of purine nucleosides phosphorylase activity), purR (derepression of the regulation of purine nucleotides biosynthetic pathway), and the insensitivity of the feedback inhibition of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) amidotransferase by adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) and guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) were done in the Escherichia coli strain W3110, and then the inosine productivity was estimated. In the case of using a plasmid harboring the PRPP amidotransferase gene (purF) that encoded a desensitized PRPP amidotransferase, purF disrupted mutants were used as the host strains. It was found that the innovation of the four genotypes brought about a small amount of inosine accumulation. Furthermore, an adenine auxotrophic mutant of E. coli showed inappropriate adenine use because its growth could not respond efficiently to the concentration of adenine added. As the presence of adenosine deaminase is well known in E. coli and it is thought to be involved in adenine use, a mutant disrupted adenosine deaminase gene (add) was constructed and tested. The mutant, which is deficient in purF, purA, deoD, purR, and add genes, and harboring the desensitized purF as a plasmid, accumulated about 1 g of inosine per liter. Although we investigated the effects of purR disruption and purF gene improvement, unexpectedly an increase in the inosine productivity could not be found with this mutant.

  12. Functional dissection of the Bacillus subtilis pur operator site.

    PubMed

    Bera, Aloke Kumar; Zhu, Jianghai; Zalkin, Howard; Smith, Janet L

    2003-07-01

    Bacillus subtilis PurR represses transcription of several genes involved in purine synthesis, metabolism, and transport and cofactor synthesis. PurR binds specifically to DNAs containing an inverted repeat of a 14-nucleotide "PurBox" located in the upstream control regions of genes in the PurR regulon. Further biochemical investigation of the interaction of PurR with a series of shortened upstream DNA fragments of the pur operon determined the minimum length and specificity elements of the operator. The relative affinities of the two PurBoxes differ significantly, such that upstream PurBox1 (-81 to -68 relative to the transcription start site) is designated "strong" and downstream PurBox2 (-49 to -36) is designated "weak." Two PurBoxes are required for high-affinity PurR binding, and one of these must be strong. The shortest DNA construct with high affinity for PurR is a 74-bp perfect palindrome in which weak PurBox2 and its flanking sequences are replaced by strong PurBox1 and flanking sequences. Two PurR dimers bind to this symmetric construct. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP), the effector molecule that reduces affinity of PurR for DNA, requires one weak PurBox in the DNA construct to inhibit PurR binding. PRPP binds, as expected, to a PRPP-motif in PurR. A tracks outside the central conserved CGAA sequence of the PurBox may facilitate DNA bending, leading to a proposal for strong and weak designations of PurBoxes in the control regions of other genes regulated by PurR.

  13. Prokaryotic Expression, Identification and Bioinformatics Analysis of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3807c Gene Encoding the Putative Enzyme Committed to Decaprenylphosphoryl-d-arabinose Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lina; Zhao, Xiaojiao; Jiang, Tao; Qiu, Juanjuan; Owusu, Lawrence; Ma, Yufang; Wang, Bo; Xin, Yi

    2014-03-01

    Decaprenylphosphoryl-d-arabinofuranosyl (DPA), the immediate donor for the polymerized d-Araf residues of mycobacterial arabinan, is synthesized from 5-phosphoribose-1-diphosphate (PRPP) in three-step reactions. (i) PRPP is transferred to decaprenyl-phosphate (DP) to form decaprenylphosphoryl-d-5-phosphoribose (DPPR). (ii) DPPR is dephosphorylated to form decaprenylphosphoryl-d-ribose (DPR). (iii) DPR is formed to DPA by the epimerase. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3806c and heteromeric Rv3790/Rv3791 have been identified as the PRPP: decaprenyl-phosphate 5-phosphoribosyltransferase and the epimerase respectively. Rv3807c, however, as the candidate of phospholipid phosphatase, catalyzing the biosynthesis of decapreny-l-phosphoryl-ribose (DPR) from decaprenylphosphoryl-β-d-5-phosphoribose by dephosphorylating, has no direct experimental evidence of its essentiality in any species of mycobacterium. In this study, Rv3807c gene was amplified from the genome of M. tuberculosis H37Rv by PCR, and was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) via the recombinant plasmid pColdII-Rv3807c. The resulting protein with the 6× His-tag was identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The protein was predicted through bioinformatics to contain three transmembrane domains, the N-terminal peptide, and a core structure with phosphatidic acid phosphatase type2/haloperoxidase. This study provides biochemical and bioinformatics evidence for the importance of Rv3807c in mycobacteria, and further functional studies will be conducted for validating Rv3807c as a promising phospholipid phosphatase in the synthetic pathway of DPA.

  14. Regulation of nucleotide and pentose synthesis in resting and stimulated 3T6 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, J M; Smith, M L; Smith, R J

    1982-01-01

    A two-step procedure has been used to follow the activation of one metabolic system involved in the return of cells to a proliferative state after resting in a Go state as a result of serum limitation. One feature of the resting state is a limited capacity to synthesize nucleotides. The limitation apparently is in the rate of synthesis of 5-phosphoribosylpyrophosphate from glucose and indirectly in the capacity of the resting cells to turn over the triphosphopyridine nucleotide pair, NADPH:NADP+. A reaction utilizing NADPH is apparently greatly diminished in resting cells and is substantially increased by only brief contact of cells with the hormonal elements in dialyzed calf serum. Insulin together with platelet-derived growth factor can substitute for calf serum. Aside from stimulating the turnover of the pyridine nucleotide coenzyme pair, serum also stimulates the utilization and reformation of ATP, principally from AMP. Among the NADPH-linked reactions that have been examined for their physiological significance in the initiation of growth stimulation are two steps in the conversion of glutamate to proline in the cytoplasm. Pyrroline 5-carboxylate, an intermediate in this metabolic pathway, has been shown to stimulate PRPP synthesis when added to cultures of resting 3T6 cells. Proline, the product of the reduction of this 5-membered heterocycle is also a stimulant of PRPP synthesis. In addition, dehydroascorbic acid is a potent stimulant of PRPP synthesis. As a working hypothesis, we are exploring the role of a series of reactions that form a pyrroline 5-carboxylate/proline cycle operating between the cytoplasm and mitochondria. The net result is the oxidation of NADPH by molecular oxygen to yield NADP+ and water. The NADP+ is then used in the hexose monophosphate pathway for the conversion of glucose to PRPP. We wish to determine whether dehydroascorbate is operating in this cycle as an oxidant of proline in the mitochondria or whether it participates in some

  15. Dynamic Metabolite Profiling in an Archaeon Connects Transcriptional Regulation to Metabolic Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Todor, Horia; Gooding, Jessica; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Schmid, Amy K.

    2015-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated that the TrmB transcription factor is responsible for regulating the expression of many enzyme-coding genes in the hypersaline-adapted archaeon Halobacterium salinarum via a direct interaction with a cis-regulatory sequence in their promoters. This interaction is abolished in the presence of glucose. Although much is known about the effects of TrmB at the transcriptional level, it remains unclear whether and to what extent changes in mRNA levels directly affect metabolite levels. In order to address this question, here we performed a high-resolution metabolite profiling time course during a change in nutrients using a combination of targeted and untargeted methods in wild-type and ΔtrmB strain backgrounds. We found that TrmB-mediated transcriptional changes resulted in widespread and significant changes to metabolite levels across the metabolic network. Additionally, the pattern of growth complementation using various purines suggests that the mis-regulation of gluconeogenesis in the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose results in low phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) levels. We confirmed these low PRPP levels using a quantitative mass spectrometric technique and found that they are associated with a metabolic block in de novo purine synthesis, which is partially responsible for the growth defect of the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose. In conclusion, we show how transcriptional regulation of metabolism affects metabolite levels and ultimately, phenotypes. PMID:26284786

  16. A role for a highly conserved protein of unknown function in regulation of Bacillus subtilis purA by the purine repressor.

    PubMed

    Rappu, P; Shin, B S; Zalkin, H; Mäntsälä, P

    1999-06-01

    Regulation of the purine biosynthetic gene purA was examined by using a transcriptional fusion to a luciferase reporter gene. Transcription was repressed about 10-fold by the addition of adenine and increased approximately 4.5-fold by the addition of guanosine. This regulation is mediated by a purine repressor (PurR). In a purR mutant, basal expression was increased 10-fold, and there was no further stimulation by guanosine or repression by adenine. An open reading frame, yabJ, immediately downstream from purR was found to have a role in the repression of purA by adenine. Repression by adenine was perturbed in a purR+ yabJ mutant, although guanosine regulation was retained. Mutations in the PurR PRPP binding motif abolished guanosine regulation in the yabJ mutant. Thus, PRPP appears to be required for upregulation by guanosine. The amino acid sequence of YabJ is homologous to the YER057c/YjgF protein family of unknown function.

  17. Dynamic Metabolite Profiling in an Archaeon Connects Transcriptional Regulation to Metabolic Consequences.

    PubMed

    Todor, Horia; Gooding, Jessica; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Schmid, Amy K

    2015-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated that the TrmB transcription factor is responsible for regulating the expression of many enzyme-coding genes in the hypersaline-adapted archaeon Halobacterium salinarum via a direct interaction with a cis-regulatory sequence in their promoters. This interaction is abolished in the presence of glucose. Although much is known about the effects of TrmB at the transcriptional level, it remains unclear whether and to what extent changes in mRNA levels directly affect metabolite levels. In order to address this question, here we performed a high-resolution metabolite profiling time course during a change in nutrients using a combination of targeted and untargeted methods in wild-type and ΔtrmB strain backgrounds. We found that TrmB-mediated transcriptional changes resulted in widespread and significant changes to metabolite levels across the metabolic network. Additionally, the pattern of growth complementation using various purines suggests that the mis-regulation of gluconeogenesis in the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose results in low phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) levels. We confirmed these low PRPP levels using a quantitative mass spectrometric technique and found that they are associated with a metabolic block in de novo purine synthesis, which is partially responsible for the growth defect of the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose. In conclusion, we show how transcriptional regulation of metabolism affects metabolite levels and ultimately, phenotypes.

  18. Limiting Future Proliferation and Security Risks

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, R.

    2011-03-13

    A major new technical tool for evaluation of proliferation and security risks has emerged over the past decade as part the activities of the Generation IV International Forum. The tool has been developed by a consensus group from participating countries and organizations and is termed the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP) Evaluation Methodology. The methodology defines a set of challenges, analyzes system response to these challenges, and assesses outcomes. The challenges are the threats posed by potential actors (proliferant states or sub-national adversaries). It is of paramount importance in an evaluation to establish the objectives, capabilities, resources, and strategies of the adversary as well as the design and protection contexts. Technical and institutional characteristics are both used to evaluate the response of the system and to determine its resistance against proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and terrorism threats. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of a set of measures, which thereby define the PR&PP characteristics of the system. This paper summarizes results of applications of the methodology to nuclear energy systems including reprocessing facilities and large and small modular reactors. The use of the methodology in the design phase a facility will be discussed as it applies to future safeguards concepts.

  19. Generation IV PR and PP Methods and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bari,R.A.

    2008-10-13

    This paper presents an evaluation methodology for proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR&PP) of Generation IV nuclear energy systems (NESs). For a proposed NES design, the methodology defines a set of challenges, analyzes system response to these challenges, and assesses outcomes. The challenges to the NES are the threats posed by potential actors (proliferant States or sub-national adversaries). The characteristics of Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate the response of the system and determine its resistance against proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and terrorism threats. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of six measures for PR and three measures for PP, which are the high-level PR&PP characteristics of the NES. The methodology is organized to allow evaluations to be performed at the earliest stages of system design and to become more detailed and more representative as design progresses. Uncertainty of results are recognized and incorporated into the evaluation at all stages. The results are intended for three types of users: system designers, program policy makers, and external stakeholders. Particular current relevant activities will be discussed in this regard. The methodology has been illustrated in a series of demonstration and case studies and these will be summarized in the paper.

  20. Difficulties with multitasking on return to work after TBI: a critical case study.

    PubMed

    Bootes, Kylie; Chapparo, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Work performance research highlights that psychometric cognitive measures and cognitive component information processing measures are strong predictors of success in multitasking work environments [14]. People with a mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) returning to a job requiring multitasking, may have difficulty succeeding despite pre-morbid equivalent cognitive scores. A critical case study is presented to begin to determine what aspects of information processing contribute to difficulties in multitasking work performance, for people with a TBI. The Perceive Recall Plan and Perform (PRPP) System of Task Analysis: Workplace Interview (i.e. PRPP@WORK) is used with the employer to obtain information processing scores. Results indicate substantial information processing deficits were perceived by the employer for the employee with a TBI. Future larger studies of people with a TBI who return to work that requires multitasking are needed to more clearly indicate: the level of multitasking they perform; what aspects of information processing hinder their work performance; the impact on performance of perceived cognitive load by the person with a TBI and the type and impact of support provided to improve their work performance.

  1. MARKOV Model Application to Proliferation Risk Reduction of an Advanced Nuclear System

    SciTech Connect

    Bari,R.A.

    2008-07-13

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) emphasizes proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR&PP) as a main goal for future nuclear energy systems. The GIF PR&PP Working Group has developed a methodology for the evaluation of these systems. As an application of the methodology, Markov model has been developed for the evaluation of proliferation resistance and is demonstrated for a hypothetical Example Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR) system. This paper presents the case of diversion by the facility owner/operator to obtain material that could be used in a nuclear weapon. The Markov model is applied to evaluate material diversion strategies. The following features of the Markov model are presented here: (1) An effective detection rate has been introduced to account for the implementation of multiple safeguards approaches at a given strategic point; (2) Technical failure to divert material is modeled as intrinsic barriers related to the design of the facility or the properties of the material in the facility; and (3) Concealment to defeat or degrade the performance of safeguards is recognized in the Markov model. Three proliferation risk measures are calculated directly by the Markov model: the detection probability, technical failure probability, and proliferation time. The material type is indicated by an index that is based on the quality of material diverted. Sensitivity cases have been done to demonstrate the effects of different modeling features on the measures of proliferation resistance.

  2. purU, a source of formate for purT-dependent phosphoribosyl-N-formylglycinamide synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, P L; McCorkle, G M; Zalkin, H

    1993-01-01

    A gene designated purU has been identified and characterized. purU is adjacent to tyrT at min 27.7 on the Escherichia coli chromosome. The gene codes for a 280-amino-acid protein. The C-terminal segment of PurU from residues 84 to 280 exhibits 27% identity with 5'-phosphoribosylglycinamide (GAR) transformylase, the product of purN. Primer extension mapping and assays of lacZ in a promoter probe vector identified two promoters giving mono- and bi-cistronic purU mRNA. Neither mRNA was regulated by purines. Mutations in either of two pairs of genes are required to block synthesis of 5'-phosphoribosyl-N-formylglycinamide (FGAR) from GAR: purN purT (purT encodes an alternative formate-dependent GAR transformylase) or purN purU. On the basis of the growth of purU, purN, and purU purN mutants, it appears that PurU provides the major source of formate for the purT-dependent synthesis of FGAR. Images PMID:8226647

  3. Wild-Type Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate Synthase (PRS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Bacterial Class II PRS?

    PubMed Central

    Breda, Ardala; Martinelli, Leonardo K. B.; Bizarro, Cristiano V.; Rosado, Leonardo A.; Borges, Caroline B.; Santos, Diógenes S.; Basso, Luiz A.

    2012-01-01

    The 5-phospho-α-D-ribose 1-diphosphate (PRPP) metabolite plays essential roles in several biosynthetic pathways, including histidine, tryptophan, nucleotides, and, in mycobacteria, cell wall precursors. PRPP is synthesized from α-D-ribose 5-phosphate (R5P) and ATP by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis prsA gene product, phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase (MtPRS). Here, we report amplification, cloning, expression and purification of wild-type MtPRS. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking results suggest that MtPRS predominates as a hexamer, presenting varied oligomeric states due to distinct ligand binding. MtPRS activity measurements were carried out by a novel coupled continuous spectrophotometric assay. MtPRS enzyme activity could be detected in the absence of Pi. ADP, GDP and UMP inhibit MtPRS activity. Steady-state kinetics results indicate that MtPRS has broad substrate specificity, being able to accept ATP, GTP, CTP, and UTP as diphosphoryl group donors. Fluorescence spectroscopy data suggest that the enzyme mechanism for purine diphosphoryl donors follows a random order of substrate addition, and for pyrimidine diphosphoryl donors follows an ordered mechanism of substrate addition in which R5P binds first to free enzyme. An ordered mechanism for product dissociation is followed by MtPRS, in which PRPP is the first product to be released followed by the nucleoside monophosphate products to yield free enzyme for the next round of catalysis. The broad specificity for diphosphoryl group donors and detection of enzyme activity in the absence of Pi would suggest that MtPRS belongs to Class II PRS proteins. On the other hand, the hexameric quaternary structure and allosteric ADP inhibition would place MtPRS in Class I PRSs. Further data are needed to classify MtPRS as belonging to a particular family of PRS proteins. The data here presented should help augment our understanding of MtPRS mode of action. Current efforts are toward experimental structure determination of Mt

  4. Wild-type phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase (PRS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a bacterial class II PRS?

    PubMed

    Breda, Ardala; Martinelli, Leonardo K B; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Rosado, Leonardo A; Borges, Caroline B; Santos, Diógenes S; Basso, Luiz A

    2012-01-01

    The 5-phospho-α-D-ribose 1-diphosphate (PRPP) metabolite plays essential roles in several biosynthetic pathways, including histidine, tryptophan, nucleotides, and, in mycobacteria, cell wall precursors. PRPP is synthesized from α-D-ribose 5-phosphate (R5P) and ATP by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis prsA gene product, phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase (MtPRS). Here, we report amplification, cloning, expression and purification of wild-type MtPRS. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking results suggest that MtPRS predominates as a hexamer, presenting varied oligomeric states due to distinct ligand binding. MtPRS activity measurements were carried out by a novel coupled continuous spectrophotometric assay. MtPRS enzyme activity could be detected in the absence of P(i). ADP, GDP and UMP inhibit MtPRS activity. Steady-state kinetics results indicate that MtPRS has broad substrate specificity, being able to accept ATP, GTP, CTP, and UTP as diphosphoryl group donors. Fluorescence spectroscopy data suggest that the enzyme mechanism for purine diphosphoryl donors follows a random order of substrate addition, and for pyrimidine diphosphoryl donors follows an ordered mechanism of substrate addition in which R5P binds first to free enzyme. An ordered mechanism for product dissociation is followed by MtPRS, in which PRPP is the first product to be released followed by the nucleoside monophosphate products to yield free enzyme for the next round of catalysis. The broad specificity for diphosphoryl group donors and detection of enzyme activity in the absence of P(i) would suggest that MtPRS belongs to Class II PRS proteins. On the other hand, the hexameric quaternary structure and allosteric ADP inhibition would place MtPRS in Class I PRSs. Further data are needed to classify MtPRS as belonging to a particular family of PRS proteins. The data here presented should help augment our understanding of MtPRS mode of action. Current efforts are toward experimental structure determination of

  5. An Expert Elicitation Based Study of the Proliferation Resistance of a Suite of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Zentner, Michael D.; Therios, Ike; Bari, Robert A.; Cheng, Lap; Yue, Meng; Wigeland, Roald; Hassberger, Jim; Boyer, Brian; Pilat, Joseph

    2010-08-11

    In 2008, a multi-laboratory research team completed a study evaluating the proliferation resistance (PR) characteristics of a diverse suite of four advanced nuclear reactor designs. The systems evaluated included: • a light water reactor (a pressurized-water reactor), • a heavy water reactor, • a high temperature gas reactor (with a prismatic-block reactor core), • a sodium-cooled fast reactor. The team used an expert elicitation assessment approach based on the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP) methodology. The team evaluated three general types of proliferation threats: 1) concealed diversion of material, 2) concealed misuse of the reactor to produce material, and 3) breakout. The evaluations took into account the intrinsic PR characteristics of each reactor and the extrinsic PR characteristics provided by generic safeguards the team considered appropriate for each reactor, based on the team’s experience and available conceptual design information.

  6. A Comparison of Proliferation Resistance Measures of Misuse Scenarios Using a Markov Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yue,M.; Cheng, L.-Y.; Bari, R.

    2008-05-11

    Misuse of declared nuclear facilities is one of the important proliferation threats. The robustness of a facility against these threats is characterized by a number of proliferation resistance (PR) measures. This paper evaluates and compares PR measures for several misuse scenarios using a Markov model approach to implement the pathway analysis methodology being developed by the PR&PP (Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection) Expert Group. Different misue strategies can be adopted by a proliferator and each strategy is expected to have different impacts on the proliferator's success. Selected as the probabilistic measure to represent proliferation resistance, the probabilities of the proliferator's success of misusing a hypothetical ESFR (Example Sodium Fast Reactor) facility system are calculated using the Markov model based on the pathways constructed for individual misuse scenarios. Insights from a comparison of strategies that are likely to be adopted by the proliferator are discussed in this paper.

  7. A structured model for vegetative growth and sporulation in Bacillus thuringiensis

    SciTech Connect

    Starzak, M.; Bajpai, R.K.

    1991-12-31

    A mathematical model has been developed for the 6-endotoxin producing Bacillus thuringiensis. The structure of the model involves the processes taking place during vegetative growth, those leading to the initiation of sporulation under conditions of carbon and/or nitrogen limitation, and the sporulation events. The key features in the model are the pools of compounds, such as PRPP, IMP, ADP/ATP, GDP/GTP, pyrimidine nucleotides, NAD/NADH{sub 2}, amino acids, nucleic acids, cell wall, and vegetative and sporulation proteins. These, along with a-factors that control the nature of RNA-polymerase during the different phases, effectively stimulate the vegetative growth and sporulation. The initiation of sporulation is controlled by the intracellular concentration of GTP. Results of simulation of vegetative growth, initiation of sporulation, spore protein formation, and production of {delta}-endotoxin under C- or N-limitation are presented.

  8. The purine efflux pump PbuE in Bacillus subtilis modulates expression of the PurR and G-box (XptR) regulons by adjusting the purine base pool size.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Per; Saxild, Hans H

    2005-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, the expression of genes encoding enzymes and other proteins involved in purine de novo synthesis and salvage is affected by purine bases and phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). The transcription of the genes belonging to the PurR regulon is negatively regulated by the PurR protein and PRPP. The expression of the genes belonging to the G-box (XptR) regulon, including the pbuE gene, is negatively regulated by a riboswitch-controlled transcription termination mechanism. The G-box regulon effector molecules are hypoxanthine and guanine. pbuE encodes a purine base efflux pump and is now recognized as belonging to a third purine regulon. The expression of the pbuE gene is positively regulated by a riboswitch that recognizes adenine. Here we show that the expression of pbuE'-lacZ transcriptional fusions are induced by adenine to the highest extent in mutants which do not express a functional PbuE pump. In a mutant defective in the metabolism of adenine, the ade apt mutant, we found a high intracellular level of adenine and constitutive high levels of PbuE. A growth test using a purine auxotroph provided further evidence for the role of PbuE in lowering the intracellular concentration of purine bases, including adenine. Purine analogs also affect the expression of pbuE, which might be of importance for the protection against toxic analogs. In a mutant that overexpresses PbuE, the expression of genes belonging to the PurR regulon was increased. Our findings provide further evidence for important functions of the PbuE protein, such as acting as a pump that lowers the purine base pool and affects the expression of the G-box and PurR regulons, including pbuE itself, and as a pump involved in protection against toxic purine base analogs.

  9. A Comparison of the Safety Analysis Process and the Generation IV Proliferation Resistance/Physical Protection Assessment Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    T. A. Bjornard; M. D. Zentner

    2006-05-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is a vehicle for the cooperative international development of future nuclear energy systems. The Generation IV program has established primary objectives in the areas of sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, and Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP). In order to help meet the latter objective a program was launched in December 2002 to develop a rigorous means to assess nuclear energy systems with respect to PR&PP. The study of Physical Protection of a facility is a relatively well established methodology, but an approach to evaluate the Proliferation Resistance of a nuclear fuel cycle is not. This paper will examine the Proliferation Resistance (PR) evaluation methodology being developed by the PR group, which is largely a new approach and compare it to generally accepted nuclear facility safety evaluation methodologies. Safety evaluation methods have been the subjects of decades of development and use. Further, safety design and analysis is fairly broadly understood, as well as being the subject of federally mandated procedures and requirements. It is therefore extremely instructive to compare and contrast the proposed new PR evaluation methodology process with that used in safety analysis. By so doing, instructive and useful conclusions can be derived from the comparison that will help to strengthen the PR methodological approach as it is developed further. From the comparison made in this paper it is evident that there are very strong parallels between the two processes. Most importantly, it is clear that the proliferation resistance aspects of nuclear energy systems are best considered beginning at the very outset of the design process. Only in this way can the designer identify and cost effectively incorporate intrinsic features that might be difficult to implement at some later stage. Also, just like safety, the process to implement proliferation resistance should be a dynamic

  10. The effect of MSMEG_6402 gene disruption on the cell wall structure of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; He, Lianqi; Zhan, Yaoyao; Zang, Shizhu; Ma, Yufang; Zhao, Xiaojiao; Zhang, Cuili; Xin, Yi

    2011-09-01

    Arabinogalactan (AG) of mycobacterial cell wall consists of arabinan region, galactan region and disaccharide linker. The arabinan is composed of D-arabinofuranose residues, and decaprenyphosphoryl-D-arabinose (DPA) is the donor of the D-arabinofuranose residues. DPA is formed from phosphoribose diphosphate (PRPP) in a four-step process catalyzed by transferase, phosphatase and epimerase, respectively. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3806c has been identified as PRPP: decaprenyl-phosphate 5-phosphoribosyltransferase, and heteromeric Rv3790/Rv3791 has epimerase activity. Rv3807c is putative phospholipid phosphatase. However, there is no direct biochemical evidence since expression of Rv3807c has been unsuccessful. Mycobacterium smegmatis MSMEG_6402 is ortholog of Rv3807c. To investigate the function of MSMEG_6402 on AG biosynthesis, a conditional MSMEG_6402 gene knock out (M. sm-ΔM_6402) strain was constructed through homologous recombination technique. The morphological and compositional changes of cell wall were examined in the M. sm-ΔM_6402 strain. The M. sm-ΔM_6402 strain grew at non-permissive temperature slower than that at permissive temperature, indicating that MSMEG_6402 is non-essential for growth of M. smegmatis. The change of cell shape and detectable bulging on the cell surface of M. sm-ΔM_6402 strain were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and curled as well as deformed cell wall of M. sm-ΔM_6402 strain was revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Analysis of sugar composition in the cell wall by HPLC indicated that the ratio of arabinofuran to galactofuran in M. sm-ΔM_6402 strain was changed to 1.7:1 comparing with 2:1 in the wild type. It demonstrates that the lacking MSMEG_6402 interferes the biosynthesis of arabinan. Analyzing 5' P-DPR and DPR from both M. sm-ΔM_6402 strain and wild type M. smegmatis is undergoing in this lab.

  11. Functional identification of MSMEG_6402 protein from Mycobacterium smegmatis in decaprenylphosphoryl-D-arabinose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Cai, Lina; Zhao, Xiaojiao; He, Lianqi; Ma, Yufang; Zang, Shizhu; Zhang, Cuili; Li, Xinli; Xin, Yi

    2014-11-01

    The arabinogalactan (AG) of the mycobacterial cell wall consists of an arabinan region, a galactan region and a disaccharide linker. Decaprenylphosphoryl-D-arabinose (DPA) is the donor for arabinofuran residues, which are formed from phosphoribose diphosphate (PRPP) and decaprenyl phosphate (DP). DP is sequentially catalyzed by a three-step process that involves a transferase, a phosphatase and an epimerase. Rv3807c is a putative phospholipid phosphatase that might generate the intermediate product of decaprenyl-phosphoryl-ribose (DPR) in DPA biosynthesis. Mycobacterium smegmatis MSMEG_6402 is a homolog gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3807c and was substituted for the functional identification of Rv3807c. Previously, we generated a conditional MSMEG_6402 gene knockout strain (M. sm-ΔM_6402) that exhibited significantly affected cell wall structure. To understand the function of MSMEG_6402 in DPA biosynthesis, this gene was amplified and expressed, and the resulting protein was identified and purified using a His-tagged approach. A MSMEG_6402 enzymatic reaction system with PRPP and DP as substrates was utilized, and the reaction products were separated using thin layer chromatography (TLC). The results revealed a specific lipid-linked sugar band that appeared in the reaction with the addition of MSMEG_6402. Furthermore, ESI-MS detection was utilized in this study, and the results revealed that the enzymatic reaction products involving MSMEG_6402 included DPPR and a sodium ion adduct of DPR. Additionally, the phosphatase activity of MSMEG_6402 was also determined through phosphate group detection using the colorimetric method. Based on our results together with the results of previous studies, including the functional identification and bioinformatics analysis of M. tuberculosis Rv3807c, we propose that MSMEG_6402, as a phosphatase, has an intimate relationship with DPA biosynthesis.

  12. Regulation of the mammalian carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II by effectors and phosphorylation. Altered affinity for ATP and magnesium ions measured using the ammonia-dependent part reaction.

    PubMed

    Shaw, S M; Carrey, E A

    1992-08-01

    We have measured the 'core' mammalian carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) activity, using NH4Cl as the nitrogen-donating substrate and trapping carbamoyl phosphate as urea through its reaction with ammonium ions. When ATP and magnesium ion concentrations are close to those found in the cell, the substrate saturation curves for ammonia and bicarbonate are hyperbolic, giving Km (NH3) values of 166 microM at high ATP concentrations and 26 microM at low ATP concentrations, while the Km (bicarbonate) is 1.4 mM at both ATP concentrations used. These values for the Km (NH3) are lower than previously reported for CPS II, and closer to the values for the mitochondrial counterpart. The Km for ammonia and bicarbonate are not altered by phosphorylation of the multienzyme polypeptide CAD, which contains the first three enzyme activities of pyrimidine biosynthesis. The CPS II activity is lower with an excess of either ATP or magnesium ions, causing the apparently sigmoid dependence of activity upon ATP concentration to be enhanced at low concentrations of free magnesium ions. The feedback inhibitor, UTP, acts by stabilising a state with a low affinity for magnesium ions and for ATP. In the presence of the activator, 5-phosphoribosyl diphosphate (PRibPP), the enzyme has a higher affinity for magnesium ions and thus the ATP dependence of the activity is hyperbolic. Phosphorylation of CAD similarly activates the CPS II enzyme by increasing the affinity for magnesium ions and by pushing the equilibrium away from the low-affinity UTP-stabilised state. Using our improved assay procedure, we observe a very large activation by PRibPP of carbamoylphosphate synthesis at low concentrations of magnesium ions, and we find that unlike UTP, the activator PRibPP is able to act on the phosphorylated enzyme. PMID:1499569

  13. Deregulation of purine pathway in Bacillus subtilis and its use in riboflavin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Purine nucleotides are essential metabolites for living organisms because they are involved in many important processes, such as nucleic acid synthesis, energy supply, and biosynthesis of several amino acids and riboflavin. Owing to the pivotal roles of purines in cell physiology, the pool of intracellular purine nucleotides must be maintained under strict control, and hence the de novo purine biosynthetic pathway is tightly regulated by transcription repression and inhibition mechanism. Deregulation of purine pathway is essential for this pathway engineering in Bacillus subtilis. Results Deregulation of purine pathway was attempted to improve purine nucleotides supply, based on a riboflavin producer B. subtilis strain with modification of its rib operon. To eliminate transcription repression, the pur operon repressor PurR and the 5’-UTR of pur operon containing a guanine-sensing riboswitch were disrupted. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the relative transcription levels of purine genes were up-regulated about 380 times. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis was successfully introduced into PRPP amidotransferase (encoded by purF) to remove feedback inhibition by homologous alignment and analysis. Overexpression of the novel mutant PurF (D293V, K316Q and S400W) significantly increased PRPP amidotransferase activity and triggered a strong refractory effect on purine nucleotides mediated inhibition. Intracellular metabolite target analysis indicated that the purine nucleotides supply in engineered strains was facilitated by a stepwise gene-targeted deregulation. With these genetic manipulations, we managed to enhance the metabolic flow through purine pathway and consequently increased riboflavin production 3-fold (826.52 mg/L) in the purF-VQW mutant strain. Conclusions A sequential optimization strategy was applied to deregulate the rib operon and purine pathway of B. subtilis to create genetic diversities and to improve riboflavin production

  14. A reciprocal allosteric mechanism for efficient transfer of labile intermediates between active sites in CAD, the mammalian pyrimidine-biosynthetic multienzyme polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Irvine, H S; Shaw, S M; Paton, A; Carrey, E A

    1997-08-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate is the product of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS II) activity and the substrate of the aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) activity, each of which is found in CAD, a large 240-kDa multienzyme polypeptide in mammals that catalyses the first three steps in pyrimidine biosynthesis. In our study of the transfer of the labile intermediate between the two active sites, we have used assays that differentiate the synthesis of carbamoyl phosphate from the overall reaction of CPS II and ATCase that produces carbamoyl aspartate. We provided excess exogenous carbamoyl phosphate and monitored its access to the respective active sites through the production of carbamoyl phosphate and carbamoyl aspartate from radiolabelled bicarbonate. Three features indicate interactions between the folded CPS II and ATCase domains causing reciprocal conformational changes. First, even in the presence of approximately 1 mM unlabelled carbamoyl phosphate, when the aspartate concentration is high ATCase uses endogenous carbamoyl phosphate for the synthesis of radiolabelled carbamoyl aspartate. In contrast, the isolated CPS II forward reaction is inhibited by excess unlabelled carbamoyl phosphate. Secondly, the affinity of the ATCase for carbamoyl phosphate and aspartate is modulated when substrates bind to CPS II. Thirdly, the transition-state analogue phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate is a less efficient inhibitor of the ATCase when the substrates for CPS II are present. All these effects operate when CPS II is in the more active P state, which is induced by high concentrations of ATP and magnesium ions and when 5'-phosphoribosyl diphosphate (the allosteric activator) is present with low concentrations of ATP; these are conditions that would be met during active biosynthesis in the cell. We propose a phenomenon of reciprocal allostery that encourages the efficient transfer of the labile intermediate within the multienzyme polypeptide CAD. In this model, binding of aspartate to

  15. An Unexpected Route to an Essential Cofactor: Escherichia coli Relies on Threonine for Thiamine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bazurto, Jannell V.; Farley, Kristen R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metabolism consists of biochemical reactions that are combined to generate a robust metabolic network that can respond to perturbations and also adapt to changing environmental conditions. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are closely related enterobacteria that share metabolic components, pathway structures, and regulatory strategies. The synthesis of thiamine in S. enterica has been used to define a node of the metabolic network by analyzing alternative inputs to thiamine synthesis from diverse metabolic pathways. To assess the conservation of metabolic networks in organisms with highly conserved components, metabolic contributions to thiamine synthesis in E. coli were investigated. Unexpectedly, we found that, unlike S. enterica, E. coli does not use the phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) amidotransferase (PurF) as the primary enzyme for synthesis of phosphoribosylamine (PRA). In fact, our data showed that up to 50% of the PRA used by E. coli to make thiamine requires the activities of threonine dehydratase (IlvA) and anthranilate synthase component II (TrpD). Significantly, the IlvA- and TrpD-dependent pathway to PRA functions in S. enterica only in the absence of a functional reactive intermediate deaminase (RidA) enzyme, bringing into focus how these closely related bacteria have distinct metabolic networks. PMID:26733068

  16. Site-directed substitution of Ser1406 of hamster CAD with glutamic acid alters allosteric regulation of carbamyl phosphate synthetase II.

    PubMed

    Banerjei, L C; Davidson, J N

    1997-01-01

    Ser1406 of the allosteric region of the hamster CAD enzyme, carbamyl phosphate synthetase II (CPSase), is known to be phosphorylated in vitro by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Metabolic labeling experiments described here demonstrate that CAD is phosphorylated in somatic cells in culture. Phosphorylation is stimulated by treating cells with 8-bromo-cAMP, a PKA activator. The stimulation is essentially prevented by pretreatment with H-89, a PKA specific inhibitor. Substitution of Ser1406 with alanine results in an enzyme with kinetics and allosteric regulation indistinguishable from unsubstituted CAD. However, substitution to glutamic acid increases CPSase activity by reducing the apparent Km (ATP). The UTP concentration required to give 50% inhibition is increased rendering this altered enzyme significantly less sensitive to feedback inhibition, but allosteric activation by PRPP is unaffected. While these data do not prove that Ser1406 is phosphorylated in vivo, they do indicate that a specific alteration at this residue can affect allosteric regulation. PMID:9218000

  17. Directed breeding of an Arthrobacter mutant for high-yield production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate by N + ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, He; Chen, Xiaochun; Cao, Jiaming; Fang, Ting; Bai, Jianxin; Xiong, Jian; Ying, Hanjie

    2010-08-01

    To obtain a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) high-yield production strain, Arthrobacter NG-1 was mutated by N + ion implantation with an energy level of 10 keV and dose of 7×10 15 ions/cm 2. Combined with directed screening methods, a xanthine-defective and 8-azaguanine (8-AG)-resistant mutant Arthrobacter A302 was selected. The concentration of cAMP produced by this mutant was 41.7% higher than that of the original strain and reached 9.78 g/L. Through ten-generation investigation, the capability of cAMP production of A302 was found to be stable. Compared with the original strain, the special activities of key enzymes in A302, which influenced the cAMP biosynthesis, was analyzed. IMP dehydrogenase activity was defective, whereas PRPP amidotransferase, sAMP synthetase and adenylate cyclase activities were increased by 61.5%, 147% and 21.7%, respecitively, which might explain the mutagenesis mechanism by N + ions implantation under the enzymatic level.

  18. Anthranilate phosphoribosyl transferase (TrpD) generates phosphoribosylamine for thiamine synthesis from enamines and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, Jennifer A; Downs, Diana M

    2013-01-18

    Anthranilate phosphoribosyl transferase (TrpD) has been well characterized for its role in the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway. Here, we characterized a new reaction catalyzed by TrpD that resulted in the formation of the purine/thiamine intermediate metabolite phosphoribosylamine (PRA). The data showed that 4- and 5-carbon enamines served as substrates for TrpD, and the reaction product was predicted to be a phosphoribosyl-enamine adduct. Isotopic labeling data indicated that the TrpD reaction product was hydrolyzed to PRA. Variants of TrpD that were proficient for tryptophan synthesis were unable to support PRA formation in vivo in Salmonella enterica. These protein variants had substitutions at residues that contributed to binding substrates anthranilate or phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP). Taken together the data herein identified a new reaction catalyzed by a well-characterized biosynthetic enzyme, and both illustrated the robustness of the metabolic network and identified a role for an enamine that accumulates in the absence of reactive intermediate deaminase RidA.

  19. Arabinan-deficient mutants of Corynebacterium glutamicum and the consequent flux in decaprenylmonophosphoryl-D-arabinose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Alderwick, Luke J; Dover, Lynn G; Seidel, Mathias; Gande, Roland; Sahm, Hermann; Eggeling, Lothar; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2006-11-01

    The arabinogalactan (AG) of Corynebacterianeae is a critical macromolecule that tethers mycolic acids to peptidoglycan, thus forming a highly impermeable cell wall matrix termed the mycolyl-arabinogalactan peptidoglycan complex (mAGP). The front line anti-tuberculosis drug, ethambutol (Emb), targets the Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Corynebacterium glutamicum arabinofuranosyltransferase Mt-EmbA, Mt-EmbB and Cg-Emb enzymes, respectively, which are responsible for the biosynthesis of the arabinan domain of AG. The substrate utilized by these important glycosyltransferases, decaprenylmonophosphoryl-D-arabinose (DPA), is synthesized via a decaprenylphosphoryl-5-phosphoribose (DPPR) synthase (UbiA), which catalyzes the transfer of 5-phospho-ribofuranose-pyrophosphate (pRpp) to decaprenol phosphate to form DPPR. Glycosyl compositional analysis of cell walls extracted from a C. glutamicum::ubiA mutant revealed a galactan core consisting of alternating beta(1-->5)-Galf and beta(1-->6)-Galf residues, completely devoid of arabinan and a concomitant loss of cell-wall-bound mycolic acids. In addition, in vitro assays demonstrated a complete loss of arabinofuranosyltransferase activity and DPA biosynthesis in the C. glutamicum::ubiA mutant when supplemented with p[14C]Rpp, the precursor of DPA. Interestingly, in vitro arabinofuranosyltransferase activity was restored in the C. glutamicum::ubiA mutant when supplemented with exogenous DP[14C]A substrate, and C. glutamicum strains deficient in ubiA, emb, and aftA all exhibited different levels of DPA biosynthesis.

  20. Structure of pyrR (Rv1379) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A persistence gene and protein drug target

    SciTech Connect

    Kantardjieff, K A; Vasquez, C; Castro, P; Warfel, N M; Rho, B; Lekin, T; Kim, C; Segelke, B W; Terwilliger, T C; Rupp, B

    2004-09-24

    The 1.9 {angstrom} native structure of pyrimidine biosynthesis regulatory protein encoded by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis pyrR gene (Rv1379) is reported. Because pyrimidine biosynthesis is an essential step in the progression of TB, pyrR is an attractive antitubercular drug target. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis pyrR gene (Rv1379) encodes a protein that regulates expression of pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis (pyr) genes in a UMP-dependent manner. Because pyrimidine biosynthesis is an essential step in the progression of TB, the gene product pyrR is an attractive antitubercular drug target. We report the 1.9 {angstrom} native structure of Mtb pyrR determined by the TB Structural Genomics Consortium facilities (PDB entry 1W30) in trigonal space group P3{sub 1}21, with cell dimensions at 120K of a = 66.64 {angstrom}, c = 154.72 {angstrom}, and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The 3D structure and residual uracil phosphoribosyltransferase activity point to a common PRTase ancestor for pyrR. However, while PRPP and UMP binding sites have been retained in Mtb pyrR, a novel dimer interaction among subunits creates a deep, positively charged cleft capable of binding pyr mRNA. In silico screening of pyrimidine nucleoside analogs has revealed a number of potential leads compounds that, if bound to Mtb pyrR, could facilitate transcriptional attenuation, particularly cyclopentenyl nucleosides.

  1. Carbon dioxide fixation in 'Archaeoglobus lithotrophicus': are there multiple autotrophic pathways?

    PubMed

    Estelmann, Sebastian; Ramos-Vera, Walter Hugo; Gad'on, Nasser; Huber, Harald; Berg, Ivan A; Fuchs, Georg

    2011-06-01

    Several representatives of the euryarchaeal class Archaeoglobi are able to grow facultative autotrophically using the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway, with 'Archaeoglobus lithotrophicus' being an obligate autotroph. However, genome sequencing revealed that some species harbor genes for key enzymes of other autotrophic pathways, i.e. 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase of the dicarboxylate/hydroxybutyrate cycle and the hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) of the Calvin-Benson cycle. This raised the question of whether only one or multiple autotrophic pathways are operating in these species. We searched for the presence of enzyme activities specific for the dicarboxylate/hydroxybutyrate or the hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycles in 'A. lithotrophicus', but such enzymes could not be detected. Low Rubisco activity was detected that could not account for the carbon dioxide (CO(2)) fixation rate; in addition, phosphoribulokinase activity was not found. The generation of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate from 5-phospho-D-ribose 1-pyrophosphate was observed, but not from AMP; these sources for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate have been proposed before. Our data indicate that the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway is the only functioning CO(2) fixation pathway in 'A. lithotrophicus'.

  2. Kinetic analysis and chemical modification studies of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase from yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NaPRTase) from Baker's yeast catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate from phosphoribosyl {alpha}-1-pyrophosphate and nicotinate, concomitant with ATP hydrolysis. Using purified NaPRTase, initial velocity measurements were performed varying one substrate concentration at different fixed levels of the second substrate and maintaining the third substrate constant. Subsequently, an exchange of label was observed between ATP and ({sup 14}C)-ADP. This rate of exchange was inhibited by PRibPP and pyrophosphate. Incubations of NaPRTase with pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate followed by sodium borohydride reduction led to inactivation of the enzyme. Pyridoxal was a less effective inhibitor than pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate. The inactivation of the enzyme by pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate was reversible upon flow dialysis, whereas reduction of the enzyme-pyridoxal complex with sodium borohydride rendered the inhibition irreversible. The presence of ATP or PRibPP, with or with Mg{sup 2+}, provided protection against this inactivation, while a kinetic analysis revealed the inhibition to be competitive, and noncompetitive, respectively. One mole of ({sup 3}H)-pyridoxal phosphate was required to completely inactivate the enzyme, which was reduced in the presence of MgATP and MgPRibPP to 0.2 and 0.6, respectively. No incorporation of pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate was observed in the combination of both of the two substrates.

  3. Modulation of Hexa-Acyl Pyrophosphate Lipid A Population under Escherichia coli Phosphate (Pho) Regulon Activation▿

    PubMed Central

    Lamarche, Martin G.; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Crépin, Sébastien; Mourez, Michael; Bertrand, Nicolas; Bishop, Russell E.; Dubreuil, J. Daniel; Harel, Josée

    2008-01-01

    Environmental phosphate is an important signal for microorganism gene regulation, and it has recently been shown to trigger some key bacterial virulence mechanisms. In many bacteria, the Pho regulon is the major circuit involved in adaptation to phosphate limitation. The Pho regulon is controlled jointly by the two-component regulatory system PhoR/PhoB and by the phosphate-specific transport (Pst) system, which both belong to the Pho regulon. We showed that a pst mutation results in virulence attenuation in extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains. Our results indicate that the bacterial cell surface of the pst mutants is altered. In this study, we show that pst mutants of ExPEC strains display an increased sensitivity to different cationic antimicrobial peptides and vancomycin. Remarkably, the hexa-acylated 1-pyrophosphate form of lipid A is significantly less abundant in pst mutants. Among differentially expressed genes in the pst mutant, lpxT coding for an enzyme that transfers a phosphoryl group to lipid A, forming the 1-diphosphate species, was found to be downregulated. Our results strongly suggest that the Pho regulon is involved in lipid A modifications, which could contribute to bacterial surface perturbations. Since the Pho regulon and the Pst system are conserved in many bacteria, such a lipid A modification mechanism could be widely distributed among gram-negative bacterial species. PMID:18515419

  4. Proliferation resistance: issues, initiatives and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    The vision of a nuclear renaissance has highlighted the issue of proliferation resistance. The prospects for a dramatic growth in nuclear power may depend on the effectiveness of, and the resources devoted to, plans to develop and implement technologies and approaches that strengthen proliferation resistance. The GenIV International Forum (GIF) and others have devoted attention and resources to proliferation resistance. However, the hope of finding a way to make the peaceful uses of nuclear energy resistant to proliferation has reappeared again and again in the history of nuclear power with little practical consequence. The concept of proliferation resistance has usually focused on intrinsic (technological) as opposed to extrinsic (institutional) factors. However, if there are benefits that may yet be realized from reactors and other facilities designed to minimize proliferation risks, it is their coupling with effective safeguards and other nonproliferation measures that likely will be critical. Proliferation resistance has also traditionally been applied only to state threats. Although there are no technologies that can wholly eliminate the risk of proliferation by a determined state, technology can play a limited role in reducing state threats and perhaps in eliminating many non-state threats. These and other issues are not academic. They affect efforts to evaluate proliferation resistance, including the methodology developed by GIF's Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP) Working Group as well as the proliferation resistance initiatives that are being pursued or may be developed in the future. This paper will offer a new framework for thinking about proliferation resistance issues, including the ways the output of the methodology could be developed to inform the decisions that states, the International Atomic Energy (IAEA) and others will have to make in order to fully realize the promise of a nuclear renaissance.

  5. Proliferation resistance assessments during the design phase of a recycling facility as a means of reducing proliferation risks

    SciTech Connect

    Lindell, M.A.; Grape, S.; Haekansson, A.; Jacobsson Svaerd, S.

    2013-07-01

    The sustainability criterion for Gen IV nuclear energy systems inherently presumes the availability of efficient fuel recycling capabilities. One area for research on advanced fuel recycling concerns safeguards aspects of this type of facilities. Since a recycling facility may be considered as sensitive from a non-proliferation perspective, it is important to address these issues early in the design process, according to the principle of Safeguards By Design. Presented in this paper is a mode of procedure, where assessments of the proliferation resistance (PR) of a recycling facility for fast reactor fuel have been performed so as to identify the weakest barriers to proliferation of nuclear material. Two supplementing established methodologies have been applied; TOPS (Technological Opportunities to increase Proliferation resistance of nuclear power Systems) and PR-PP (Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection evaluation methodology). The chosen fuel recycling facility belongs to a small Gen IV lead-cooled fast reactor system that is under study in Sweden. A schematic design of the recycling facility, where actinides are separated using solvent extraction, has been examined. The PR assessment methodologies make it possible to pinpoint areas in which the facility can be improved in order to reduce the risk of diversion. The initial facility design may then be slightly modified and/or safeguards measures may be introduced to reduce the total identified proliferation risk. After each modification of design and/or safeguards implementation, a new PR assessment of the revised system can then be carried out. This way, each modification can be evaluated and new ways to further enhance the proliferation resistance can be identified. This type of iterative procedure may support Safeguards By Design in the planning of new recycling plants and other nuclear facilities. (authors)

  6. The Catalytic Zinc Site and Mechanism of the Metalloenzyme PR-AMP Cyclohydrolase

    PubMed Central

    D'Ordine, Robert L.; Linger, Rebecca S.; Thai, Carolyn J.; Davisson, V. Jo

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme N1-(5'-phosphoribosyl) adenosine-5'-monophosphate cyclohydrolase (PR-AMP cyclohydrolase) is a Zn2+ metalloprotein encoded by the hisI gene. It catalyzes the third step of histidine biosynthesis (Scheme 1), an uncommon ring opening of a purine heterocycle for use in primary metabolism. A three dimensional structure of the enzyme from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum has revealed that three conserved cysteine residues occur at the dimer interface and likely form the catalytic site. To investigate of the functions of these cysteines in the enzyme from Methanococcus vannielii, a series of biochemical studies were pursued to test the basic hypothesis regarding their roles in catalysis. Inactivation of the enzyme activity by methyl methane thiosulfonate (MMTS) or 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) also compromised the Zn2+ binding properties of the protein inducing loss of up to 90% of the metal. Overall reaction stoichiometry and the potassium cyanide (KCN) induced cleavage of the protein suggested that all three cysteines were modified in the process. The enzyme was protected from DTNB-induced inactivation by inclusion of the substrate PR-AMP while Mg2+, a metal required for catalytic activity, enhanced the rate of inactivation. Site directed mutations of the conserved C93, C109, C116 and the double mutant C109/C116 were prepared and analyzed for catalytic activity, Zn2+ content, and reactivity with DTNB. Substitution of alanine for each of the conserved cysteines showed no measurable catalytic activity and only the C116A was still capable of binding Zn2+. Reactions of DTNB with the C109A/C116A double mutant showed that C93 is completely modified within 0.5 s. A model consistent with these data involves a DTNB-induced mixed disulfide linkage between C93 and C109 or C116, followed by ejection of the active site Zn2+ and provides further evidence that the Zn2+ coordination site involves the three conserved cysteine residues. The C93 reactivity is

  7. Investigation of reductive dechlorination supported by natural organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rectanus, H.V.; Widdowson, M.A.; Chapelle, F.H.; Kelly, C.A.; Novak, J.T.

    2007-01-01

    Because remediation timeframes using monitored natural attenuation may span decades or even centuries at chlorinated solvent sites, new approaches are needed to assess the long-term sustainability of reductive dechlorination in ground water systems. In this study, extraction procedures were used to investigate the mass of indigenous organic carbon in aquifer sediment, and experiments were conducted to determine if the extracted carbon could support reductive dechlorination of chloroethenes. Aquifer sediment cores were collected from a site without an anthropogenic source of organic carbon where organic carbon varied from 0.02% to 0.12%. Single extraction results showed that 1% to 28% of sediment-associated organic carbon and 2% to 36% of the soft carbon were removed depending on nature and concentration of the extracting solution (Nanopure water; 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1.0% sodium pyrophosphate; and 0.5 N sodium hydroxide). Soft carbon is defined as organic carbon oxidized with potassium persulfate and is assumed to serve as a source of biodegradable carbon within the aquifer. Biodegradability studies demonstrated that 20% to 40% of extracted organic carbon was biodegraded aerobically and anaerobically by soil microorganisms in relatively brief tests (45 d). A five-step extraction procedure consisting of 0.1% pyrophosphate and base solutions was investigated to quantify bioavailable organic carbon. Using the extracted carbon as the sole electron donor source, tetrachloroethene was transformed to cis-1,2- dichloroethene and vinyl chloride in anaerobic enrichment culture experiments. Hydrogen gas was produced at levels necessary to sustain reductive dechlorination (>1 nM). ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  8. Myocardial infarction determined by technetium-99m pyrophosphate single-photon tomography complicating elective coronary artery bypass grafting for angina pectoris

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.J.; Gladstone, P.J.; Tremblay, P.C.; Feindel, C.M.; Salter, D.R.; Lipton, I.H.; Ogilvie, R.R.; David, T.E.

    1989-06-15

    The incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) complicating coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) has previously been based on concordance of electrocardiographic, enzymatic and scintigraphic criteria. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-PPi) single-photon emission computed tomography now enables detection of AMI with high sensitivity and specificity. Using this technique, perioperative AMI was detected in 12 of 58 patients (21%) undergoing successful elective CABG for stable angina pectoris. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to compare the predictive value of preoperative (New York Heart Association class, left ventricular ejection fraction and use of beta blockers) and intraoperative (number of grafts constructed, use of internal mammary anastomoses, use of sequential saphenous vein grafts, smallest grafted distal vessel lumen caliber and aortic cross-clamp time) variables. Preoperative New York Association class (p = 0.04) and smallest grafted distal vessel lumen caliber (p = 0.03) were significant multivariate predictors of perioperative AMI. Only 1 perioperative patient with AMI (and 1 pyrophosphate-negative patient) developed new Q waves. Serum creatine kinase-MB was higher in patients with AMI by repeated measures analysis of variance (p = 0.0003). Five AMIs occurred in myocardial segments revascularized using sequential saphenous vein grafts, and 7 in segments perfused by significantly stenosed epicardial vessels with distal lumen diameter and perfusion territory considered too small to warrant CABG. At 6-month follow-up, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction increased from 0.61 to 0.65 in Tc-PPI-negative patients (p = 0.01), but not in perioperative patients with AMI.

  9. Cardiopulmonary Function, Exercise Capacity, and Echocardiography Finding of Pediatric Patients With Kawasaki Disease: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Sheng-Hui; Li, Min-Hui; Hsu, Miao-Ju; Tsai, Yun-Jeng; Chen, Yin-Han; Liao, Tin-Yun; Lin, Ko-Long

    2016-01-01

    assess and monitor cardiovascular risk of KD patients. Max-Z of CA correlates with PRPP modest inversely and might be used as a follow-up indicator of CA reserve during exercise after acute stage of KD. PMID:26765431

  10. Evaluation Methodology For Proliferation Resistance And Physical Protection Of Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    T. Bjornard; R. Bari; R. Nishimura; P. Peterson; J. Roglans; D. Bley; J. Cazalet; G.G.M. Cojazzi; P. Delaune; M. Golay; G. Rendad; G. Rochau; M. Senzaki; I. Therios; M. Zentner

    2006-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: 1.System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. 2.Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. 3.Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include

  11. EVALUATION METHODOLOGY FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF GENERATION IV NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEMS: AN OVERVIEW.

    SciTech Connect

    BARI, R.; ET AL.

    2006-03-01

    This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: (1) System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. (2) Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. (3) Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include

  12. Facility Safeguardability Analysis In Support of Safeguards-by-Design

    SciTech Connect

    Philip Casey Durst; Roald Wigeland; Robert Bari; Trond Bjornard; John Hockert; Michael Zentner

    2010-07-01

    The following report proposes the use of Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) to: i) compare and evaluate nuclear safeguards measures, ii) optimize the prospective facility safeguards approach, iii) objectively and analytically evaluate nuclear facility safeguardability, and iv) evaluate and optimize barriers within the facility and process design to minimize the risk of diversion and theft of nuclear material. As proposed by the authors, Facility Safeguardability Analysis would be used by the Facility Designer and/or Project Design Team during the design and construction of the nuclear facility to evaluate and optimize the facility safeguards approach and design of the safeguards system. Through a process of “Safeguards-by-Design” (SBD), this would be done at the earliest stages of project conceptual design and would involve domestic and international nuclear regulators and authorities, including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The benefits of the Safeguards-by-Design approach is that it would clarify at a very early stage the international and domestic safeguards requirements for the Construction Project Team, and the best design and operating practices for meeting these requirements. It would also minimize the risk to the construction project, in terms of cost overruns or delays, which might otherwise occur if the nuclear safeguards measures are not incorporated into the facility design at an early stage. Incorporating nuclear safeguards measures is straight forward for nuclear facilities of existing design, but becomes more challenging with new designs and more complex nuclear facilities. For this reason, the facility designer and Project Design Team require an analytical tool for comparing safeguards measures, options, and approaches, and for evaluating the “safeguardability” of the facility. The report explains how preliminary diversion path analysis and the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PRPP) evaluation

  13. Teleconference highlights-NE-NA proliferation resistance review

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael C

    2009-01-01

    Herczeg gave a readout from the kickoff meeting with Paul Lisowski - namely develop a common definition of proliferation resistance (for use by S-1, other upper management, public affairs, etc.), and to evaluate possible framework where a metric could be assigned for fuel cycle comparisons (integral, easy to communicate). Sprinkle raised concern about 'trivializing' notion of proliferation resistance (PR), with idea of making sure we don't lose the concept that strong safeguards and security are required within a nonproliferation framework that support U.S. policy goals. Integrated Safeguards by Design notion was brought up in this context. Round table discussion of the term PR, its misuse (even unintentional), fact that Chu is using term and apparently in context of proliferation proof. It was noted that there has been much work already done in this area and we should not reinvent the wheel. One of the first tasks needs to be gathering up old reports (TOPS, Como, PRPP, etc) and distributing to group (action item for all). It was also noted that there are multiple definitions of PR, including the recent NPIA, supporting the need for this type of activity. Miller described the current work package under AFCI, with $50k of funding from the campaign management account. Herczeg asked about additional funds should it become clear that a larger effort is required (tension between current program and getting something out relatively soon). Goldner to look into potential additional funds. Miller notes that within current work package, easy to engage LANL participants and that Per Peterson can participate under UCB funding (a new center is being established with UC fee awards from LANL and LLNL - the Berkeley Nuclear Research Center). Consensus that Per would be a good external member of the group. Sprinkle notes that held like to coordinate the NE and NA work packages. Miller and Sprinkle to work offline. Wallace talked about the possibility of being more quantitative in