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Sample records for 5-segment solid rocket

  1. Modal Survey of ETM-3, A 5-Segment Derivative of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, D.; Townsend, J.; Kappus, K.; Driskill, T.; Torres, I.; Parks, R.

    2005-01-01

    The complex interactions between internal motor generated pressure oscillations and motor structural vibration modes associated with the static test configuration of a Reusable Solid Rocket Motor have potential to generate significant dynamic thrust loads in the 5-segment configuration (Engineering Test Motor 3). Finite element model load predictions for worst-case conditions were generated based on extrapolation of a previously correlated 4-segment motor model. A modal survey was performed on the largest rocket motor to date, Engineering Test Motor #3 (ETM-3), to provide data for finite element model correlation and validation of model generated design loads. The modal survey preparation included pretest analyses to determine an efficient analysis set selection using the Effective Independence Method and test simulations to assure critical test stand component loads did not exceed design limits. Historical Reusable Solid Rocket Motor modal testing, ETM-3 test analysis model development and pre-test loads analyses, as well as test execution, and a comparison of results to pre-test predictions are discussed.

  2. Solid propellant rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowler, W. L.; Shafer, J. I.; Behm, J. W.; Strand, L. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of a solid propellant rocket engine with a controlled rate of thrust buildup to a desired thrust level are discussed. The engine uses a regressive burning controlled flow solid propellant igniter and a progressive burning main solid propellant charge. The igniter is capable of operating in a vacuum and sustains the burning of the propellant below its normal combustion limit until the burning propellant surface and combustion chamber pressure have increased sufficiently to provide a stable chamber pressure.

  3. General view of the Solid Rocket Booster's (SRB) Solid Rocket ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the Solid Rocket Booster's (SRB) Solid Rocket Motor Segments in the Surge Building of the Rotation Processing and Surge Facility at Kennedy Space Center awaiting transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building and subsequent mounting and assembly on the Mobile Launch Platform. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  4. Thiokol Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on thiokol solid rocket motors. The topics include: 1) Communications; 2) Military and government intelligence; 3) Positioning satellites; 4) Remote sensing; 5) Space burial; 6) Science; 7) Space manufacturing; 8) Advertising; 9) Space rescue space debris management; 10) Space tourism; 11) Space settlements; 12) Hazardous waste disposal; 13) Extraterrestrial resources; 14) Fast package delivery; and 15) Space utilities.

  5. Solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Ronn L.

    1993-01-01

    Structural requirements, materials and, especially, processing are critical issues that will pace the introduction of new types of solid rocket motors. Designers must recognize and understand the drivers associated with each of the following considerations: (1) cost; (2) energy density; (3) long term storage with use on demand; (4) reliability; (5) safety of processing and handling; (6) operability; and (7) environmental acceptance.

  6. Dynamic characterization of solid rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The structural dynamics of solid rockets in-general was studied. A review is given of the modes of vibration and bending that can exist for a solid propellant rocket, and a NASTRAN computer model is included. Also studied were the dynamic properties of a solid propellant, polybutadiene-acrylic acid-acrylonitrile terpolymer, which may be used in the space shuttle rocket booster. The theory of viscoelastic materials (i.e, Poisson's ratio) was employed in describing the dynamic properties of the propellant. These studies were performed for an eventual booster stage development program for the space shuttle.

  7. Small Solid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    It was three-two-one to brilliant fire as NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center tested a small solid rocket motor designed to mimic NASA's Space Launch System booster. The Mar. 14 test provides a qui...

  8. Solid rocket motor internal insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twichell, S. E. (Editor); Keller, R. B., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Internal insulation in a solid rocket motor is defined as a layer of heat barrier material placed between the internal surface of the case propellant. The primary purpose is to prevent the case from reaching temperatures that endanger its structural integrity. Secondary functions of the insulation are listed and guidelines for avoiding critical problems in the development of internal insulation for rocket motors are presented.

  9. Solid Rocket Motor Acoustic Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.

    1999-03-31

    Acoustic data are often required for the determination of launch and powered flight loads for rocket systems and payloads. Such data are usually acquired during test firings of the solid rocket motors. In the current work, these data were obtained for two tests at a remote test facility where we were visitors. This paper describes the data acquisition and the requirements for working at a remote site, interfacing with the test hosts.

  10. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) that is being developed to replace, in 1997, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor which currently boosts the Space Shuttle. The ASRM will contain features to improve motor safety (fewer potential leak paths, improved seal materials, stronger case material, and fewer nozzle and case joints), an improved ignition system using through-bulkhead initiators, and highly reproducible manufacturing and inspection techniques with a large number of automated procedures. The ASRM will be able to deliver 12,000 lbs greater payloads to any given orbit of the Shuttle. There are also environmental improvements, realized by waste propellant recovery.

  11. Solid rocket motor witness test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Christopher S.

    1991-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motor Witness Test was undertaken to examine the potential for using thermal infrared imagery as a tool for monitoring static tests of solid rocket motors. The project consisted of several parts: data acquisition, data analysis, and interpretation. For data acquisition, thermal infrared data were obtained of the DM-9 test of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor on December 23, 1987, at Thiokol, Inc. test facility near Brigham City, Utah. The data analysis portion consisted of processing the video tapes of the test to produce values of temperature at representative test points on the rocket motor surface as the motor cooled down following the test. Interpretation included formulation of a numerical model and evaluation of some of the conditions of the motor which could be extracted from the data. These parameters included estimates of the insulation remaining following the tests and the thickness of the charred layer of insulation at the end of the test. Also visible was a temperature signature of the star grain pattern in the forward motor segment.

  12. Space Shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, G. B.

    1979-01-01

    Details of the design, operation, testing and recovery procedures of the reusable solid rocket boosters (SRB) are given. Using a composite PBAN propellant, they will provide the primary thrust (six million pounds maximum at 20 s after ignition) within a 3 g acceleration constraint, as well as thrust vector control for the Space Shuttle. The drogues were tested to a load of 305,000 pounds, and the main parachutes to 205,000. Insulation in the solid rocket motor (SRM) will be provided by asbestos-silica dioxide filled acrylonitrile butadiene rubber ('asbestos filled NBR') except in high erosion areas (principally in the aft dome), where a carbon-filled ethylene propylene diene monomer-neopreme rubber will be utilized. Furthermore, twenty uses for the SRM nozzle will be allowed by its ablative materials, which are principally carbon cloth and silica cloth phenolics.

  13. Solid Rocket Booster-Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This illustration is a cutaway of the solid rocket booster (SRB) sections with callouts. The Shuttle's two SRB's are the largest solids ever built and the first designed for refurbishment and reuse. Standing nearly 150-feet high, the twin boosters provide the majority of thrust for the first two minutes of flight, about 5.8 million pounds, augmenting the Shuttle's main propulsion system during liftoff. The major design drivers for the solid rocket motors (SRM's) were high thrust and reuse. The desired thrust was achieved by using state-of-the-art solid propellant and by using a long cylindrical motor with a specific core design that allows the propellant to burn in a carefully controlled marner. At burnout, the boosters separate from the external tank and drop by parachute to the ocean for recovery and subsequent refurbishment. The boosters are designed to survive water impact at almost 60 miles per hour, maintain flotation with minimal damage, and preclude corrosion of the hardware exposed to the harsh seawater environment. Under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the SRB's are assembled and refurbished by the United Space Boosters. The SRM's are provided by the Morton Thiokol Corporation.

  14. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-08-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor will utilize improved design features and automated manufacturing methods to produce an inherently safer propulsive system for the Space Shuttle and future launch systems. This second-generation motor will also provide an additional 12,000 pounds of payload to orbit, enhancing the utility and efficiency of the Shuttle system. The new plant will feature strip-wound, asbestos-free insulation; propellant continuous mixing and casting; and extensive robotic systems. Following a series of static tests at the Stennis Space Center, MS flights are targeted to begin in early 1997.

  15. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor will utilize improved design features and automated manufacturing methods to produce an inherently safer propulsive system for the Space Shuttle and future launch systems. This second-generation motor will also provide an additional 12,000 pounds of payload to orbit, enhancing the utility and efficiency of the Shuttle system. The new plant will feature strip-wound, asbestos-free insulation; propellant continuous mixing and casting; and extensive robotic systems. Following a series of static tests at the Stennis Space Center, MS flights are targeted to begin in early 1997.

  16. Acoustic Measurements for Small Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Models have been developed to predict large solid rocket motor acoustic loads based on the scaling of small solid rocket motors. MSFC has measured several small solid rocket motors in horizontal and launch configurations to anchor these models. Solid Rocket Test Motor (SRTM) has ballistics similar to the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) therefore a good choice for acoustic scaling. Acoustic measurements were collected during the test firing of the Insulation Configuration Extended Length (ICXL) 7,6, and 8 (in firing order) in order to compare to RSRM horizontal firing data. The scope of this presentation includes: Acoustic test procedures and instrumentation implemented during the three SRTM firings and Data analysis method and general trends observed in the data.

  17. Solid rocket motor temperature sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, J.R.; Heister, S.D.

    1994-11-01

    The temperature sensitivity of the propellant and the solid rocket motor are described by several different temperature sensitivity coefficients. This enabled the derivation of three different relationships for the temperature sensitivity coefficient pi(sub K). To demonstrate this, two different propellants were used wherein the values of pi(sub K) were generated and compared. It was observed that the expressions are of equal complexity and offer ease of use. All involve only the burning rate data and the use of the parameters in St. Roberts burning rate low. It is also suggested that the most general expression for the sensitivity coefficient should be used since it is a true pi(sub K) relationship having the partial derivatives taken with the motor geometry held constant. 11 refs.

  18. Ignition transient analysis of solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1990-01-01

    To predict pressure-time and thrust-time behavior of solid rocket motors, a one-dimensional numerical model is developed. The ignition phase of solid rocket motors (time less than 0.4 sec) depends critically on complex interactions among many elements, such as rocket geometry, heat and mass transfer, flow development, and chemical reactions. The present model solves the mass, momentum, and energy equations governing the transfer processes in the rocket chamber as well as the attached converging-diverging nozzle. A qualitative agreement with the SRM test data in terms of head-end pressure gradient and the total thrust build-up is obtained. Numerical results show that the burning rate in the star-segmented head-end section and the erosive burning are two important parameters in the ignition transient of the solid rocket motor (SRM).

  19. Acoustic Measurements of Small Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Rocket acoustic noise can induce loads and vibration on the vehicle as well as the surrounding structures. Models have been developed to predict these acoustic loads based on scaling existing solid rocket motor data. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center acoustics team has measured several small solid rocket motors (thrust below 150,000 lbf) to anchor prediction models. This data will provide NASA the capability to predict the acoustic environments and consequent vibro-acoustic response of larger rockets (thrust above 1,000,000 lbf) such as those planned for the NASA Constellation program. This paper presents the methods used to measure acoustic data during the static firing of small solid rocket motors and the trends found in the data.

  20. A miniature solid propellant rocket motor

    SciTech Connect

    Grubelich, M.C.; Hagan, M.; Mulligan, E.

    1997-08-01

    A miniature solid-propellant rocket motor has been developed to impart a specific motion to an object deployed in space. This rocket motor effectively eliminated the need for a cold-gas thruster system or mechanical spin-up system. A low-energy igniter, an XMC4397, employing a semiconductor bridge was used to ignite the rocket motor. The rocket motor was ground-tested in a vacuum tank to verify predicted space performance and successfully flown in a Sandia National Laboratories flight vehicle program.

  1. NASA, ATK Successfully Test Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Video Gallery

    With a loud roar and mighty column of flame, NASA and ATK Aerospace Systems successfully completed a two-minute, full-scale test of the largest and most powerful solid rocket motor designed for fli...

  2. Environmentally compatible solid rocket propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacox, James L.; Bradford, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Hercules' clean propellant development research is exploring three major types of clean propellant: (1) chloride-free formulations (no chlorine containing ingredients), being developed on the Clean Propellant Development and Demonstration (CPDD) contract sponsored by Phillips Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA; (2) low HCl scavenged formulations (HCl-scavenger added to propellant oxidized with ammonium perchlorate (AP)); and (3) low HCl formulations oxidized with a combination of AN and AP (with or without an HCl scavenger) to provide a significant reduction (relative to current solid rocket boosters) in exhaust HCl. These propellants provide performance approaching that of current systems, with less than 2 percent HCl in the exhaust, a significant reduction (greater than or equal to 70 percent) in exhaust HCl levels. Excellent processing, safety, and mechanical properties were achieved using only readily available, low cost ingredients. Two formulations, a sodium nitrate (NaNO3) scavenged HTPB and a chloride-free hydroxy terminated polyether (HTPE) propellant, were characterized for ballistic, mechanical, and rheological properties. In addition, the hazards properties were demonstrated to provide two families of class 1.3, 'zero-card' propellants. Further characterization is planned which includes demonstration of ballistic tailorability in subscale (one to 70 pound) motors over the range of burn rates required for retrofit into current Hercules space booster designs (Titan 4 SRMU and Delta 2 GEM).

  3. Solid rocket motor cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harney, A. G.; Raphael, L.; Warren, S.; Yakura, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    A systematic and standardized procedure for estimating life cycle costs of solid rocket motor booster configurations. The model consists of clearly defined cost categories and appropriate cost equations in which cost is related to program and hardware parameters. Cost estimating relationships are generally based on analogous experience. In this model the experience drawn on is from estimates prepared by the study contractors. Contractors' estimates are derived by means of engineering estimates for some predetermined level of detail of the SRM hardware and program functions of the system life cycle. This method is frequently referred to as bottom-up. A parametric cost analysis is a useful technique when rapid estimates are required. This is particularly true during the planning stages of a system when hardware designs and program definition are conceptual and constantly changing as the selection process, which includes cost comparisons or trade-offs, is performed. The use of cost estimating relationships also facilitates the performance of cost sensitivity studies in which relative and comparable cost comparisons are significant.

  4. Solid rocket booster retrieval operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Solid Rocket Booster Retrieval operations are discussed in detail. The recovery of expended boosters and associated hardware without damage attributable to retrieval procedures is the main goal. The retrieval force consists tof ship's personnel and retrieval team members, each of whom has been trained and is highly skilled in multi-faceted operations. The retrieval force is equipped with two specially-built, highly maneuverable ships outfitted with parachute reels, retrieval cranes, towing winches, large volume-low pressure air compressors, SCUBA diving gear, inflatable boats with outboard motors and diver-operated SRB dewatering devices. The two ships are deployed in sufficient time to conduct an electronic and visual search of the impact area prior to launch. Upon search completeion, each ship takes station a safe distance from the predetermined impact point initiating both visual and electronic search in the direction of flight path, ensuring SRB acquisition at splashdown. When safe, the ships enter the impact area and commence recovery of all floating flight hardware which is subsequently returned to the Disassembly Facility for refurbishment and reuse. Retrieval techniques have evolved in parallel with equipment and flight hardware configuration changes. Additional changes have been initiated to improve personnel safety.

  5. NASA's Advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) will not only bring increased safety, reliability and performance for the Space Shuttle Booster, it will enhance overall Shuttle safety by effectively eliminating 174 failure points in the Space Shuttle Main Engine throttling system and by reducing the exposure time to aborts due to main engine loss or shutdown. In some missions, the vulnerability time to Return-to-Launch Site aborts is halved. The ASRM uses case joints which will close or remain static under the effects of motor ignition and pressurization. The case itself is constructed of the weldable steel alloy HP 9-4-0.30, having very high strength and with superior fracture toughness and stress corrosion resistance. The internal insulation is strip-wound and is free of asbestos. The nozzle employs light weight ablative parts and is some 5,000 pounds lighter than the Shuttle motor used to date. The payload performance of the ASRM-powered Shuttle is 12,000 pounds higher than that provided by the present motor. This is of particular benefit for payloads delivered to higher inclinations and/or altitudes. The ASRM facility uses state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, including continuous propellant mixing and direct casting.

  6. NASA's Advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) will not only bring increased safety, reliability and performance for the Space Shuttle Booster, it will enhance overall Shuttle safety by effectively eliminating 174 failure points in the Space Shuttle Main Engine throttling system and by reducing the exposure time to aborts due to main engine loss or shutdown. In some missions, the vulnerability time to Return-to-Launch Site aborts is halved. The ASRM uses case joints which will close or remain static under the effects of motor ignition and pressurization. The case itself is constructed of the weldable steel alloy HP 9-4-0.30, having very high strength and with superior fracture toughness and stress corrosion resistance. The internal insulation is strip-wound and is free of asbestos. The nozzle employs light weight ablative parts and is some 5,000 pounds lighter than the Shuttle motor used to date. The payload performance of the ASRM-powered Shuttle is 12,000 pounds higher than that provided by the present motor. This is of particular benefit for payloads delivered to higher inclinations and/or altitudes. The ASRM facility uses state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, including continuous propellant mixing and direct casting.

  7. Advanced Solid Rocket Launcher and Its Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Yasuhiro; Imoto, Takayuki; Habu, Hiroto; Ohtsuka, Hirohito; Hori, Keiichi; Koreki, Takemasa; Fukuchi, Apollo; Uekusa, Yasuyuki; Akiba, Ryojiro

    The research on next generation solid propellant rockets is actively underway in various spectra. JAXA is developing the Advanced Solid Rocket (ASR) as a successor to the M-V launch vehicle, which was utilized over past ten years for space science programs including planetary missions. ASR is a result of the development of the next generation technology including a highly intelligent autonomous check-out system, which is connected to not only the solid rocket but also future transportation systems. It is expected to improve the efficiency of the launch system and double the cost performance. Far beyond this effort, the passion of the volunteers among the industry-government-academia cooperation has been united to establish the society of the freewheeling thinking “Next generation Solid Rocket Society (NSRS)”. It aims at a larger revolution than what the ASR provides so that the order of the cost performance is further improved. A study of the Low melting temperature Thermoplastic Propellant (LTP) is now at the experimental stage, which is expected to reform the manufacturing process of the solid rocket propellant and lead to a significant increase in cost performance. This paper indicates the direction of the big flow towards the next generation solid-propellant rockets: the concept of the intelligent ASR under development; and the innovation behind LTP.

  8. Infrared Imagery of Solid Rocket Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Robert P.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test program consisted of a series of 18 solid rocket motor static firings, simulating the liftoff conditions of the Ares I five-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Vehicle. Primary test objectives included acquiring acoustic and pressure data which will be used to validate analytical models for the prediction of Ares 1 liftoff acoustics and ignition overpressure environments. The test article consisted of a 5% scale Ares I vehicle and launch tower mounted on the Mobile Launch Pad. The testing also incorporated several Water Sound Suppression Systems. Infrared imagery was employed during the solid rocket testing to support the validation or improvement of analytical models, and identify corollaries between rocket plume size or shape and the accompanying measured level of noise suppression obtained by water sound suppression systems.

  9. 24 Inch Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A scaled-down 24-inch version of the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor was successfully fired for 21 seconds at a Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Test Stand. The motor was tested to ensure a replacement material called Lycocel would meet the criteria set by the Shuttle's Solid Motor Project Office. The current material is a heat-resistant, rayon-based, carbon-cloth phenolic used as an insulating material for the motor's nozzle. Lycocel, a brand name for Tencel, is a cousin to rayon and is an exceptionally strong fiber made of wood pulp produced by a special 'solvent-spirning' process using a nontoxic solvent. It will also be impregnated with a phenolic resin. This new material is expected to perform better under the high temperatures experienced during launch. The next step will be to test the material on a 48-inch solid rocket motor. The test, which replicates launch conditions, is part of Shuttle's ongoing verification of components, materials, and manufacturing processes required by MSFC, which oversees the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor project. Manufactured by the ATK Thiokol Propulsion Division in Promontory, California, the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor measures 126 feet (38.4 meters) long and 12 feet (3.6 meters) in diameter. It is the largest solid rocket motor ever flown and the first designed for reuse. During its two-minute burn at liftoff, each motor generates an average thrust of 2.6 million pounds (1.2 million kilograms).

  10. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor case design status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, G. L.; Cash, S. F.; Beck, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case design aimed at achieving a safer and more reliable solid rocket motor for the Space Shuttle system is considered. The ASRM case has a 150.0 inch diameter, three equal length segment, and 9Ni-4CO-0.3C steel alloy. The major design features include bolted casebolted case joints which close during pressurization, plasma arc welded factory joints, integral stiffener for splash down and recovery, and integral External Tank attachment rings. Each mechanical joint has redundant and verifiable o-ring seals.

  11. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor case design status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, G. L.; Cash, S. F.; Beck, J. P.

    1993-06-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case design aimed at achieving a safer and more reliable solid rocket motor for the Space Shuttle system is considered. The ASRM case has a 150.0 inch diameter, three equal length segment, and 9Ni-4CO-0.3C steel alloy. The major design features include bolted casebolted case joints which close during pressurization, plasma arc welded factory joints, integral stiffener for splash down and recovery, and integral External Tank attachment rings. Each mechanical joint has redundant and verifiable o-ring seals.

  12. Analytical investigation of solid rocket nozzle failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, K. E.; Hester, J.

    1985-01-01

    On April 5, 1983, an Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) spacecraft experienced loss of control during the burn of the second of two solid rocket motors. The anomaly investigation showed the cause to be a malfunction of the solid rocket motor. This paper presents a description of the IUS system, a failure analysis summary, an account of the thermal testing and computer modeling done at Marshall Space Flight Center, a comparison of analysis results with thermal data obtained from motor static tests, and describes some of the design enhancement incorporated to prevent recurrence of the anomaly.

  13. Technology for low cost solid rocket boosters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciepluch, C.

    1971-01-01

    A review of low cost large solid rocket motors developed at the Lewis Research Center is given. An estimate is made of the total cost reduction obtainable by incorporating this new technology package into the rocket motor design. The propellant, case material, insulation, nozzle ablatives, and thrust vector control are discussed. The effect of the new technology on motor cost is calculated for a typical expandable 260-in. booster application. Included in the cost analysis is the influence of motor performance variations due to specific impulse and weight changes. It is found for this application that motor costs may be reduced by up to 30% and that the economic attractiveness of future large solid rocket motors will be improved when the new technology is implemented.

  14. Solid Rocket Booster Structural Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The structural test article to be used in the solid rocket booster (SRB) structural and load verification tests is being assembled in a high bay building of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The Shuttle's two SRB's are the largest solids ever built and the first designed for refurbishment and reuse. Standing nearly 150-feet high, the twin boosters provide the majority of thrust for the first two minutes of flight, about 5.8 million pounds, augmenting the Shuttle's main propulsion system during liftoff. The major design drivers for the solid rocket motors (SRM's) were high thrust and reuse. The desired thrust was achieved by using state-of-the-art solid propellant and by using a long cylindrical motor with a specific core design that allows the propellant to burn in a carefully controlled marner. At burnout, the boosters separate from the external tank and drop by parachute to the ocean for recovery and subsequent refurbishment.

  15. Ignition transient analysis of solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    A 1-D numerical model based on the SIMPLE is developed to predict the pressure and thrust behavior of space shuttle solid rocket motors. The present model solves the conservation equations through the attached nozzle as well as in the combustion chamber. Numerical results were seen to agree qualitatively well with the test data by controlling the wetted perimeter in the head-end star-section of the motor and the erosive burning rate of the solid propellent.

  16. Space aging of solid rocket materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Dean M.; Jones, Leon L.; Smalley, R. B., Jr.; Ord, R. Neil

    1991-01-01

    Solid rocket propellant and rocket motor components were aged in a vented container on the interior of the LDEF. The results of aging IPSM-II/PAM-DII space motor components are presented. Ballistic and mechanical properties of the space aged main propellant, igniter propellant, and ignition system were compared with similar data from preflight and ground aged samples. Mechanical properties of the composite materials and bonded joints used in the motor case, insulation, liner, nozzle, exit cone, and skirt were similarly evaluated. The space aging results are compared to data collected in a ground based vacuum aging program on similar components.

  17. Atmospheric scavenging of solid rocket exhaust effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.

    1978-01-01

    Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments; a large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents, while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique used. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity. Characterization of the aluminum oxide particles substantiated the similarity between the constituents of the small scale rocket and the full size vehicles.

  18. Ignition transient analysis of solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1991-01-01

    Measurement data on the performance of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor show wide variations in the head-end pressure changes and the total thrust build-up during the ignition transient periods. To analyze the flow and thermal behavior in the tested solid rocket motors, a 1-dimensional, ideal gas flow model via the SIMPLE algorithm was developed. Numerical results showed that burning patterns in the star-shaped head-end segment of the propellant and the erosive burning rate are two important factors controlling the ignition transients. The objective of this study is to extend the model to include the effects of aluminum particle commonly used in solid propellants. To treat the effects of aluminum-oxide particles in the combustion gas, conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations for the particles are added in the numerical formulation and integrated by an inter-phase-slip algorithm.

  19. Designing for solid rocket booster reusability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevins, C. D.

    1975-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) of the Space Shuttle Program has been designed to be recovered, refurbished, and reused up to 19 times on subsequent launches. The design modifications to the SRB to incorporate this capability include the addition of a parachute recovery system and minor structural modifications to the nose cone, forward skirt, aft skirt, and solid rocket motor structures for withstanding the water impact loading. In addition, the detail design of subsystem hardware requires careful attention to corrosion prevention and facility of refurbishment operations. A cost analysis comparing the reusable SRB with an expendable version shows a substantial reduction in Space Shuttle cost per flight is achieved with the reusable design approach.

  20. Solid rocket booster water impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, F.

    1982-01-01

    Water impact drop tests were performed on the space shuttle solid rocket boosters (SRB). Peak water impact pressures and pressure/time traces were measured for various impact velocities using a two-dimensional, full-scale SRB aft skirt internal ring model. Passive burst disc-type pressure transducers were calibrated for use on flight SRB's. The effects on impact pressure of small ring configuration changes and application of thermal protection system cork layers were found to be negligible.

  1. Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Dennis; Phelps, Jack; Perkins, Fred

    2010-01-01

    RSRM is a highly reliable human-rated Solid Rocket Motor: a) Largest diameter SRM to achieve flight status; b) Only human-rated SRM. RSRM reliability achieved by: a)Applying special attention to Process Control, Testing, and Postflight; b) Communicating often; c) Identifying and addressing issues in a disciplined approach; d) Identifying and fully dispositioning "out-of-family" conditions; e) Addressing minority opinions; and f) Learning our lessons.

  2. IUS solid rocket motor contamination prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, C. R.; Kearnes, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    A series of computer codes were developed to predict solid rocket motor produced contamination to spacecraft sensitive surfaces. Subscale and flight test data have confirmed some of the analytical results. Application of the analysis tools to a typical spacecraft has provided early identification of potential spacecraft contamination problems and provided insight into their solution; e.g., flight plan modifications, plume or outgassing shields and/or contamination covers.

  3. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt sitting on ground support equipment in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center while being prepared for mating with the Frustum-Nose Cap Assembly and the Forward Rocket Motor Segment. The prominent feature in this view is the electrical, data, telemetry and safety systems terminal which connects to the Aft Skirt Assembly systems via the Systems Tunnel that runs the length of the Rocket Motor. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  4. Space aging of solid rocket materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Dean M.; Jones, Leon L.; Smalley, R. B., Jr.; Ord, R. Neil

    1992-01-01

    Solid rocket propellant and rocket motor components were aged in a vented container on the interior of the LDEF. This paper will present the results of aging the Improved Performance Space Motor-II/Payload Assist Module-Delta II (IPSM-II/PAM-DII) space motor components. Ballistic and mechanical properties of the space aged main propellant, igniter propellant, and ignition system were compared with similar data from preflight and ground aged samples. Mechanical properties of the composite materials and bonded joints used in the motor case, insulation, liner, nozzle, exit cone, and skirt were similarly evaluated. The space aging results will be compared to data collected in a ground based vacuum aging program on similar components. The operation of the vacuum actuated venting valve and pressure actuated resealing of the container will also be addressed. The materials tested showed no significant changes due to space aging. These results indicate that properly designed solid rocket motors can be expected to perform reliably after extended periods of exposure to a space environment.

  5. Acceleration effects in solid propellant rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhenry, M. T.

    1986-01-01

    The performance variations due to acceleration loads imposed on spinning solid propellant rocket motors are investigated. The four potentially most significant modes of acceleration-induced phenomena are identified from a study of the literature and modeled. The four modes are a mechanical mode which deals with deformations of the propellant and case: a thermodynamic mode which covers acceleration-induced combustion phenomena; a stress mode which covers the stressed propellant's effect on burn rate; and a gas dynamic mode which deals with changes in gas flow in the chamber and through the nozzle. Simplified models of each mode are developed or taken from the literature and are added to an internal ballistics evaluation computer program. The resulting analysis is the first to include all of the modes. In order to do this an original analysis of the mechanical and stress modes was necessary. However, the analysis shows that the stress mode is not important for the circular perforated grains studied. The other effects are shown to have a significant influence on solid rocket motor performance. The magnitude of the different mode effects are such that one may not be ignored over the others as has been done in the past. The results of the analysis are compared to published rocket motor data. The comparisons indicate an erosive burning effect that is a function of spin rate. A qualitative explanation of the erosive effect is presented.

  6. Space Shuttle solid rocket booster dewatering system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishel, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    After the launch of the Space Shuttle, the two solid rocket boosters (SRB's) are jettisoned into the ocean where they float in a spar (vertical) mode. It is cost effective to recover the SRB's. A remote controlled submersible vehicle has been developed to aid in their recovery. The vehicle is launched from a support ship, maneuvered to the SRB, then taken to depth and guided into the rocket nozzle. It then dewaters the SRB, using compressed air from the ship, and seals the nozzle. When dewatered, the SRB floats in a log (horizontal) mode and can be towed to port for reuse. The design of the remote controlled vehicle and its propulsion system is presented.

  7. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt, Frustum and Nose Cap mated assembly undergoing final preparations in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center. In this view the access panel on the Forward Skirt is removed and you can see a small portion of the interior of the Forward Skirt. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  8. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster Frustum and Nose ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster Frustum and Nose Cap assembly undergoing preparations and close-out procedures in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The Nose Cap contains the Pilot and Drogue Chutes and the Frustum contains the three Main Parachutes, Altitude Switches and forward booster Separation Motors. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  9. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket Booster Disassembly & Refurbishment Complex, Thrust Vector Control Deservicing Facility, Hangar Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  10. Radiation from advanced solid rocket motor plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to develop an understanding of solid rocket motor (SRM) plumes in sufficient detail to accurately explain the majority of plume radiation test data. Improved flowfield and radiation analysis codes were developed to accurately and efficiently account for all the factors which effect radiation heating from rocket plumes. These codes were verified by comparing predicted plume behavior with measured NASA/MSFC ASRM test data. Upon conducting a thorough review of the current state-of-the-art of SRM plume flowfield and radiation prediction methodology and the pertinent data base, the following analyses were developed for future design use. The NOZZRAD code was developed for preliminary base heating design and Al2O3 particle optical property data evaluation using a generalized two-flux solution to the radiative transfer equation. The IDARAD code was developed for rapid evaluation of plume radiation effects using the spherical harmonics method of differential approximation to the radiative transfer equation. The FDNS CFD code with fully coupled Euler-Lagrange particle tracking was validated by comparison to predictions made with the industry standard RAMP code for SRM nozzle flowfield analysis. The FDNS code provides the ability to analyze not only rocket nozzle flow, but also axisymmetric and three-dimensional plume flowfields with state-of-the-art CFD methodology. Procedures for conducting meaningful thermo-vision camera studies were developed.

  11. Solid Rocket Launch Vehicle Explosion Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, E. H.; Blackwood, J. M.; Hays, M. J.; Skinner, T.

    2014-01-01

    Empirical explosion data from full scale solid rocket launch vehicle accidents and tests were collected from all available literature from the 1950s to the present. In general data included peak blast overpressure, blast impulse, fragment size, fragment speed, and fragment dispersion. Most propellants were 1.1 explosives but a few were 1.3. Oftentimes the data from a single accident was disjointed and/or missing key aspects. Despite this fact, once the data as a whole was digitized, categorized, and plotted clear trends appeared. Particular emphasis was placed on tests or accidents that would be applicable to scenarios from which a crew might need to escape. Therefore, such tests where a large quantity of high explosive was used to initiate the solid rocket explosion were differentiated. Also, high speed ground impacts or tests used to simulate such were also culled. It was found that the explosions from all accidents and applicable tests could be described using only the pressurized gas energy stored in the chamber at the time of failure. Additionally, fragmentation trends were produced. Only one accident mentioned the elusive "small" propellant fragments, but upon further analysis it was found that these were most likely produced as secondary fragments when larger primary fragments impacted the ground. Finally, a brief discussion of how this data is used in a new launch vehicle explosion model for improving crew/payload survival is presented.

  12. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt sitting on ground support equipment in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center while being prepared for mating with the Frustum-Nose Cap Assembly and the Forward Rocket Motor Segment. The prominent feature in this view is the Forward Thrust Attach Fitting which mates up with the Forward Thrust Attach Fitting of the External Tank (ET) at the ends of the SRB Beam that runs through the ET's Inter Tank Assembly. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  13. Shuttle Upgrade Using 5-Segment Booster (FSB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauvageau, Donald R.; Huppi, Hal D.; McCool, A. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In support of NASA's continuing effort to improve the over-all safety and reliability of the Shuttle system- a 5-segment booster (FSB) has been identified as an approach to satisfy that overall objective. To assess the feasibility of a 5-segment booster approach, NASA issued a feasibility study contract to evaluate the potential of a 5-segment booster to improve the overall capability of the Shuttle system, especially evaluating the potential to increase the system reliability and safety. In order to effectively evaluate the feasibility of the 5-segment concept, a four-member contractor team was established under the direction of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). MSFC provided the overall program oversight and integration as well as program contractual management. The contractor team consisted of Thiokol, Boeing North American Huntington Beach (BNA), Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems (LMMSS) and United Space Alliance (USA) and their subcontractor bd Systems (Control Dynamics Division, Huntsville, AL). United Space Alliance included the former members of United Space Booster Incorporated (USBI) who managed the booster element portion of the current Shuttle solid rocket boosters. Thiokol was responsible for the overall integration and coordination of the contractor team across all of the booster elements. They were also responsible for all of the motor modification evaluations. Boeing North American (BNA) was responsible for all systems integration analyses, generation of loads and environments. and performance and abort mode capabilities. Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems (LMMSS) was responsible for evaluating the impacts of any changes to the booster on the external tank (ET), and evaluating any design changes on the external tank necessary to accommodate the FSB. USA. including the former USBI contingent. was responsible for evaluating any modifications to facilities at the launch site as well as any booster component design modifications.

  14. General view of a fully assembled Solid Rocket Booster sitting ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of a fully assembled Solid Rocket Booster sitting atop the Mobile Launch Platform in the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  15. The method of solid rocket motors firings environmental engineering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Baojun; Xu, Ke; Peng, Keke; Mi, Yaoqi

    The solid rocket motors firings is one main source of space debris, the solid rocket motors firings model is a part of space debris engineering model. In this paper, researching the NASA and ESA model to achieve an appropriate firing model, using the discrete method to model the solid rocket motors firings; application of the long-term approximation orbit evolution algorithm to calculate the evolution of firings generated by a single solid rocket motors ignition event in space; finally, application of space debris environment space debris density algorithm to calculate the distribution of firings generated by a single solid rocket motors ignition event in space, analysing the influence on the space environment and spacecraft.

  16. The Chameleon Solid Rocket Propulsion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2010-01-28

    The Khoury and Weltman (2004a and 2004b) Chameleon Model presents an addition to the gravitation force and was shown by the author (Robertson, 2009a and 2009b) to present a new means by which one can view other forces in the Universe. The Chameleon Model is basically a density-dependent model and while the idea is not new, this model is novel in that densities in the Universe to include the vacuum of space are viewed as scalar fields. Such an analogy gives the Chameleon scalar field, dark energy/dark matter like characteristics; fitting well within cosmological expansion theories. In respect to this forum, in this paper, it is shown how the Chameleon Model can be used to derive the thrust of a solid rocket motor. This presents a first step toward the development of new propulsion models using density variations verse mass ejection as the mechanism for thrust. Further, through the Chameleon Model connection, these new propulsion models can be tied to dark energy/dark matter toward new space propulsion systems utilizing the vacuum scalar field in a way understandable by engineers, the key toward the development of such systems. This paper provides corrections to the Chameleon rocket model in Robertson (2009b).

  17. Ocean recovery of Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junker, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Cost effective recovery of the expended Space-Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB) from the ocean will result in significant overall cost savings to the Space Shuttle Program. The ocean recovery mission begins with the dispatching of the recovery team to the predicted splashdown area. The SRBs, drogue parachutes and main parachutes must be tracked, located, retrieved, and transported to land where they will be refurbished and recycled for reuse. Trade studies to be conducted will consider the recovery mission requirements and weigh the advantages, disadvantages and costs of various candidate recovery systems. Major parameters effecting the selection of the final system will ensure that the system will meet overall objectives. Large- and small-scale SRB model testing has been conducted to establish characteristics of SRBs during water entry, floating free and under tow.

  18. Solid rocket motor nozzle flexseal design sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donat, James R.

    1993-02-01

    On solid rocket motors, direction is controlled by controlling the thrust vector. To achieve this, the nozzle usually incorporates a flexseal that allows the nozzle to vector (or rotate) in any direction. The flexseal has a core of alternating layers of elastomer pads and metal or composite shims. Flexseal core design is an iterative process. An estimate of the flexseal core geometry is made. The core is then analyzed for performance characteristics such as stress, weight, and the torque required to vector the core. Based on a comparison between the requirements/constraints and analysis results, another estimate of the geometry is then made. Understanding the effects changes in the core geometry have on the performance characteristics greatly decreases the number of iterations and time required to optimize the design. This paper documents a study undertaken to better understand these effects and how sensitive performance characteristics are to core geometry changes.

  19. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor nozzle development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, W. J.; Moss, J. D.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents a status update of the design and development of an improved nozzle for the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The ASRM nozzle incorporates advanced state-of-the-art design features and materials which contribute to enhanced safety, reliability, performance, and producibility for the space shuttle boosters. During 1992 the nozzle design progressed through a successful Preliminary Design Review (PDR). An improved ablative material development program also culminated in the selection of new standard and low density carbon cloth phenolic prepreg offering reduced variability and improved process attributes. A subscale motor test series to evaluate new materials and design features was also completed. An overview update of the matured design characteristics, supporting analysis, key development-program results and program status and plans is reported.

  20. Experimental investigation of a solid rocket combustion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Robert A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The response of solid rocket motor materials to high-temperature corrosive gases is usually accomplished by testing the materials in a subscale solid rocket motor. While this imposes the proper thermal and chemical environment, a solid rocket motor does not provide practical features that would enhance systematic evaluations such as: the ability to throttle for margin testing, on/off capability, low test cost, and a low-hazards test article. Solid Rocket Combustion Simulators (SRCS) are being evaluated by NASA to test solid rocket nozzle materials and incorporate these essential practical features into the testing of rocket materials. The SRCS is designed to generate the thermochemical environment of a solid rocket. It uses hybrid rocket motor technology in which gaseous oxygen (Gox) is injected into a chamber containing a solid fuel grain. Specific chemicals are injected in the aft mixing chamber so that the gases entering the test section match the temperature and a non-dimensional erosion factor B' to insure similarity with a solid motor. Because the oxygen flow can be controlled, this approach allows margin testing, the ability to throttle, and an on/off capability. The fuel grains are inert which makes the test article very safe to handle. The objective of this work was to establish the baseline operating characteristics of a Labscale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator (LSRCS). This included establishing the baseline burning rates of plexiglass fuels and the evaluation of a combustion instability for hydroxy-terminated polybutadyene (HTPB) propellants. The scope of the project included: (1) activation of MSFC Labscale Hybrid Combustion Simulator; (2) testing of plexiglass fuel at Gox ranges from 0.025 to 0.200 lb/s; (3) burning HTPB fuels at a Gox rate of 0.200 lb/s using four different mixing chamber configurations; and (4) evaluating the fuel regression and chamber pressure responses of each firing.

  1. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt, Frustum and Nose Cap mated assembly undergoing final preparations in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The prominent feature in this view is the Forward Thrust Attach Fitting which mates up with the Forward Thrust Attach Fitting of the External Tank (ET) at the ends of the SRB Beam that runs through the ET's Inter Tank Assembly. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  2. General view of a Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle in the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of a Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle in the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center, being prepared to be mated with the Aft Skirt. In this view you can see the attach brackets where the Thrust Vector Control System actuators connect to the nozzle which can swivel the nozzle up to 3.5 degrees to redirect the thrust to steer and maintain the Shuttle's programmed trajectory. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  3. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Nose Caps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Nose Caps mounted on ground support equipment in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center as they are being prepared for attachment to the SRB Frustum. The Nose Cap contains the Pilot and Drogue Chutes that are deployed prior to the main chutes as the SRBs descend to a splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean where they are recovered refurbished and reused. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  4. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster Frustum and Nose ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster Frustum and Nose Cap assembly undergoing preparations and assembly procedures in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The Nose Cap contains the Pilot and Drogue Chutes and the Frustum contains the three Main Parachutes, Altitude Switches and forward booster Separation Motors. In this view the assembly is rotated so that the four Separation Motors are in view and aligned with the approximate centerline of the image. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  5. Study of solid rocket motor for space shuttle booster, volume 2, book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The technical requirements for the solid propellant rocket engine to be used with the space shuttle orbiter are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) propulsion system definition, (2) solid rocket engine stage design, (3) solid rocket engine stage recovery, (4) environmental effects, (5) manrating of the solid rocket engine stage, (6) system safety analysis, and (7) ground support equipment.

  6. The development of space solid rocket motors in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianding, Huang; Dingyou, Ye

    1997-01-01

    China has undertaken to research and develop composite solid propellant rocket motors since 1958. At the request of the development of space technology, composite solid propellant rocket motor has developed from small to large, step by step. For the past thirty eight years, much progress has made, many technical obstacles, such as motor design, case materials and their processing technology, propellant formulations and manufacture, nozzles and thrust vector control, safe ignition, environment tests, nondestructive inspection and quality assurance, static firing test and measurement etc. have been solved. A serial of solid rocket motors have been offered for China's satellites launch. The systems of research, design, test and manufacture of solid rocket motors have been formed.

  7. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 4: Program listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    All subprograms or routines associated with the solid rocket booster performance evaluation model are indexed in this computer listing. An alphanumeric list of each routine in the index is provided in a table of contents.

  8. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Joins Propulsion Park Display

    NASA Video Gallery

    A crane lifts a space shuttle solid rocket booster into its final position in the “propulsion park” outside Building 4205, the Propulsion Research & Development Laboratory at the Marshall Cente...

  9. Probabilistic failure assessment with application to solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell L.; Davidson, Barry D.; Moore, Nicholas R.

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative methodology is being developed for assessment of risk of failure of solid rocket motors. This probabilistic methodology employs best available engineering models and available information in a stochastic framework. The framework accounts for incomplete knowledge of governing parameters, intrinsic variability, and failure model specification error. Earlier case studies have been conducted on several failure modes of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Work in progress on application of this probabilistic approach to large solid rocket boosters such as the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor for the Space Shuttle is described. Failure due to debonding has been selected as the first case study for large solid rocket motors (SRMs) since it accounts for a significant number of historical SRM failures. Impact of incomplete knowledge of governing parameters and failure model specification errors is expected to be important.

  10. Radial slot flows in solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbing, J. H.; Heister, S. D.

    1993-06-01

    A series of parametric numerical solutions have been generated to characterize the two-dimensional flowfield due to the presence of a radial slot in a solid rocket propellant grain. Results have been parameterized in terms of upstream core Mach number, slot contraction ratio, and slot-to-core mass flow and momentum ratios. Numerical solutions of the axisymmetric Euler equations have been obtained on a 'generic' slot geometry using a cell-centered, finite volume scheme. Results indicate that both the stagnation pressure loss and grain suction force on the propellant segment downstream of the slot correlate well with slot-to-core momentum ratio; a parameter which has not been used in previous studies. Significant differences (in stagnation pressure losses) have been identified between the 2-D numerical results and the 1-D methods applied in current state-of-the-art ballistics codes. We anticipate that the correlations derived through this parametric study can be used in preliminary performance and grain stress analyses performed during the motor development process.

  11. Analyses of Noise from Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Firings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Kent L.; Kenny, R. Jeremy; Jerome, Trevor W.; Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Hobbs, Christopher M.; James, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA s Space Launch Vehicle (SLS) program has chosen the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor V (RSRMV) as the booster system for initial flights. Lift off acoustics continue to be a consideration in overall vehicle vibroacoustic evaluations and launch pad modifications. Work started with the Ares program to understand solid rocket noise mechanisms is continuing through SLS program in conjunction with BYU/Blue Ridge Research Consulting.

  12. General view of the Aft Solid Rocket Motor Segment mated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the Aft Solid Rocket Motor Segment mated with the Aft Skirt Assembly and External Tank Attach Ring in the Rotation Processing and Surge Facility at Kennedy Space Center and awaiting transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building where it will be mounted onto the Mobile Launch Platform. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  13. Hybrid rockets - Combining the best of liquids and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Jerry R.; Goldberg, Ben E.; Estey, Paul N.; Wiley, Dan R.

    1992-07-01

    Hybrid rockets employing liquid oxidizer and solid fuel grain answers to cost, safety, reliability, and environmental impact concerns that have become as prominent as performance in recent years. The oxidizer-free grain has limited sensitivity to grain anomalies, such as bond-line separations, which can cause catastrophic failures in solid rocket motors. An account is presently given of the development effort associated with the AMROC commercial hybrid booster and component testing efforts at NASA-Marshall. These hybrid rockets can be fired, terminated, inspected, evaluated, and restarted for additional testing.

  14. Hybrid rockets - Combining the best of liquids and solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jerry R.; Goldberg, Ben E.; Estey, Paul N.; Wiley, Dan R.

    1992-01-01

    Hybrid rockets employing liquid oxidizer and solid fuel grain answers to cost, safety, reliability, and environmental impact concerns that have become as prominent as performance in recent years. The oxidizer-free grain has limited sensitivity to grain anomalies, such as bond-line separations, which can cause catastrophic failures in solid rocket motors. An account is presently given of the development effort associated with the AMROC commercial hybrid booster and component testing efforts at NASA-Marshall. These hybrid rockets can be fired, terminated, inspected, evaluated, and restarted for additional testing.

  15. Additional historical solid rocket motor burns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, Carsten; Homeister, Maren; Oswald, Michael; Stabroth, Sebastian; Klinkrad, Heiner; Vörsmann, Peter

    2009-06-01

    The use of orbital solid rocket motors (SRM) is responsible for the release of a high number of slag and Al 2O 3 dust particles which contribute to the space debris environment. This contribution has been modeled for the ESA space debris model MASTER (Meteoroid and Space Debris Terrestrial Environment Reference). The current model version, MASTER-2005, is based on the simulation of 1076 orbital SRM firings which mainly contributed to the long-term debris environment. SRM firings on very low earth orbits which produce only short living particles are not considered. A comparison of the modeled flux with impact data from returned surfaces shows that the shape and quantity of the modeled SRM dust distribution matches that of recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array measurements very well. However, the absolute flux level for dust is under-predicted for some of the analyzed Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) surfaces. This indicates that some past SRM firings are not included in the current event database. Thus it is necessary to investigate, if additional historical SRM burns, like the retro-burn of low orbiting re-entry capsules, may be responsible for these dust impacts. The most suitable candidates for these firings are the large number of SRM retro-burns of return capsules. This paper focuses on the SRM retro-burns of Russian photoreconnaissance satellites, which were used in high numbers during the time of the LDEF mission. It is discussed which types of satellites and motors may have been responsible for this historical contribution. Altogether, 870 additional SRM retro-burns have been identified. An important task is the identification of such missions to complete the current event data base. Different types of motors have been used to de-orbit both large satellites and small film return capsules. The results of simulation runs are presented.

  16. Past and Present Large Solid Rocket Motor Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Robert R.; Owen, David B., II

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to identify the current and historical trends in the capability of solid rocket motor testing in the United States. The study focused on test positions capable of testing solid rocket motors of at least 10,000 lbf thrust. Top-level information was collected for two distinct data points plus/minus a few years: 2000 (Y2K) and 2010 (Present). Data was combined from many sources, but primarily focused on data from the Chemical Propulsion Information Analysis Center s Rocket Propulsion Test Facilities Database, and heritage Chemical Propulsion Information Agency/M8 Solid Rocket Motor Static Test Facilities Manual. Data for the Rocket Propulsion Test Facilities Database and heritage M8 Solid Rocket Motor Static Test Facilities Manual is provided to the Chemical Propulsion Information Analysis Center directly from the test facilities. Information for each test cell for each time period was compiled and plotted to produce a graphical display of the changes for the nation, NASA, Department of Defense, and commercial organizations during the past ten years. Major groups of plots include test facility by geographic location, test cells by status/utilization, and test cells by maximum thrust capability. The results are discussed.

  17. On the history of the development of solid-propellant rockets in the Soviet Union

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pobedonostsev, Y. A.

    1977-01-01

    Pre-World War II Soviet solid-propellant rocket technology is reviewed. Research and development regarding solid composite preparations of pyroxyline TNT powder is described, as well as early work on rocket loading calculations, problems of flight stability, and aircraft rocket launching and ground rocket launching capabilities.

  18. The Solid Rocket Booster Auxiliary Power Unit: Meeting the Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    The thrust vector control systems of the solid rocket boosters are turbine-powered, electrically controlled hydraulic systems which function through hydraulic actuators to gimbal the nozzles of the solid rocket boosters and provide vehicle steering for the Space Shuttle. Turbine power for the thrust vector control systems is provided through hydrazine fueled auxiliary power units which drive the hydraulic pumps. The solid rocket booster auxiliary power unit resulted from trade studies which indicated significant advantages would result if an existing engine could be found to meet the program goal of 20 missions reusability and adapted to meet the seawater environments associated with ocean landings. During its maturation, the auxiliary power unit underwent many design iterations and provided its flight worthiness through full qualification programs both as a component and as part of the thrust vector control system. More significant, the auxiliary power unit has successfully completed six Shuttle missions.

  19. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Frustum mounted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Frustum mounted on ground support equipment in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center as it is being prepared to be mated with the Nose Cap and Forward Skirt. The Frustum contains the three Main Parachutes, Altitude Switches and forward booster Separation Motors. The Separation Motors burn for one second to ensure the SRBs drift away from the External Tank and Orbiter at separation. The three main parachutes are deployed to reduce speed as the SRBs descend to a splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean where they are recovered refurbished and reused. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  20. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Frustum mounted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Frustum mounted on ground support equipment in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center as it is being prepared to be mated with the Nose Cap and Forward Skirt. The Frustum contains the three Main Parachutes, Altitude Switches and forward booster Separation Motors. The Separation Motors burn for one second to ensure the SRBs drift away from the External Tank and Orbiter at separation. The three main parachutes are deployed to reduce speed as the SRBs descend to a splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean where they are recovered refurbished and reused. In this view the assembly is rotated so that the four Separation Motors are in view and aligned with the approximate centerline of the image. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  1. Reduced hazard chemicals for solid rocket motor production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caddy, Larry A.; Bowman, Ross; Richards, Rex A.

    1995-01-01

    During the last three years. the NASA/Thiokol/industry team has developed and started implementation of an environmentally sound manufacturing plan for the continued production of solid rocket motors. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Thiokol Corporation have worked with other industry representatives and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to prepare a comprehensive plan to eliminate all ozone depleting chemicals from manufacturing processes and reduce the use of other hazardous materials used to produce the space shuttle reusable solid rocket motors. The team used a classical approach for problem-solving combined with a creative synthesis of new approaches to attack this challenge.

  2. Space shuttle solid rocket booster recovery system definition, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The performance requirements, preliminary designs, and development program plans for an airborne recovery system for the space shuttle solid rocket booster are discussed. The analyses performed during the study phase of the program are presented. The basic considerations which established the system configuration are defined. A Monte Carlo statistical technique using random sampling of the probability distribution for the critical water impact parameters was used to determine the failure probability of each solid rocket booster component as functions of impact velocity and component strength capability.

  3. Measuring the Internal Environment of Solid Rocket Motors During Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenberg, Brent; Smith, Doug; Speas, Kyle; Corliss, Adam

    2003-01-01

    A new instrumentation system has been developed to measure the internal environment of solid rocket test motors during motor ignition. The system leverages conventional, analog gages with custom designed, electronics modules to provide safe, accurate, high speed data acquisition capability. To date, the instrumentation system has been demonstrated in a laboratory environment and on subscale static fire test motors ranging in size from 5-inches to 24-inches in diameter. Ultimately, this system is intended to be installed on a full-scale Reusable Solid Rocket Motor. This paper explains the need for the data, the components and capabilities of the system, and the test results.

  4. Combustion of metal agglomerates in a solid rocket core flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Filippo; Dossi, Stefano; DeLuca, Luigi T.

    2013-12-01

    The need for access to space may require the use of solid propellants. High thrust and density are appealing features for different applications, spanning from boosting phase to other service applications (separation, de-orbiting, orbit insertion). Aluminum is widely used as a fuel in composite solid rocket motors because metal oxidation increases enthalpy release in combustion chamber and grants higher specific impulse. Combustion process of metal particles is complex and involves aggregation, agglomeration and evolution of reacting particulate inside the core flow of the rocket. It is always stated that residence time should be enough in order to grant complete metal oxidation but agglomerate initial size, rocket grain geometry, burning rate, and other factors have to be reconsidered. New space missions may not require large rocket systems and metal combustion efficiency becomes potentially a key issue to understand whether solid propulsion embodies a viable solution or liquid/hybrid systems are better. A simple model for metal combustion is set up in this paper. Metal particles are represented as single drops trailed by the core flow and reacted according to Beckstead's model. The fluid dynamics is inviscid, incompressible, 1D. The paper presents parametric computations on ideal single-size particles as well as on experimental agglomerate populations as a function of operating rocket conditions and geometries.

  5. Modeling of nonlinear longitudinal instability in solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Joseph D.; Levine, Jay N.

    A comprehensive model of nonlinear longitudinal combustion instability in solid rocket motors has been developed. The two primary elements of this stability analysis are a finite difference solution of the two phase flow in the combustion chamber and a coupled solution of the nonlinear transient propellant burning rate. A new combination finite difference scheme gives the analysis the ability to treat the type of multiple travelling shock wave instabilities that are frequently observed in reduced smoke tactical solid rocket motors. Models for predicting the behavior of both gas ejection and solid ejecta pulses were developed and incorporated into the analysis. Extensive comparisons between model predictions and experimental data from pulsed solid rocket motor firings have been carried out. The nonlinear instability analysis was found to be capable of predicting the complete range of nonlinear behavior observed in actual motor firing data. Good agreement between measured and predicted initial pulse amplitude, pulse evolution, limit cycle amplitude and mean pressure shift was obtained. This investigation has also provided new insight into the nature of nonlinear pulse triggered instability and the factors which influence its occurrence and severity. This new instability analysis should significantly enhance our capability to design tactical solid rocket motors that are free from troublesome and expensive nonlinear combusion instability problems.

  6. Hydrodynamic Stability Analysis of Particle-Laden Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, T. S.; Majdalani, J.

    2014-11-01

    Fluid-wall interactions within solid rocket motors can result in parietal vortex shedding giving rise to hydrodynamic instabilities, or unsteady waves, that translate into pressure oscillations. The oscillations can result in vibrations observed by the rocket, rocket subsystems, or payload, which can lead to changes in flight characteristics, design failure, or other undesirable effects. For many years particles have been embedded in solid rocket propellants with the understanding that their presence increases specific impulse and suppresses fluctuations in the flowfield. This study utilizes a two dimensional framework to understand and quantify the aforementioned two-phase flowfield inside a motor case with a cylindrical grain perforation. This is accomplished through the use of linearized Navier-Stokes equations with the Stokes drag equation and application of the biglobal ansatz. Obtaining the biglobal equations for analysis requires quantification of the mean flowfield within the solid rocket motor. To that end, the extended Taylor-Culick form will be utilized to represent the gaseous phase of the mean flowfield while the self-similar form will be employed for the particle phase. Advancing the mean flowfield by quantifying the particle mass concentration with a semi-analytical solution the finalized mean flowfield is combined with the biglobal equations resulting in a system of eight partial differential equations. This system is solved using an eigensolver within the framework yielding the entire spectrum of eigenvalues, frequency and growth rate components, at once. This work will detail the parametric analysis performed to demonstrate the stabilizing and destabilizing effects of particles within solid rocket combustion.

  7. Five-Segment Reusable Solid Rocket Booster Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauvageau, Don

    1999-01-01

    The Five Segment Reusable Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) feasibility status is presented in viewgraph form. The Five Segment Booster (FSB) objective is to provide a low cost, low risk approach to increase reliability and safety of the Shuttle system. Topics include: booster upgrade requirements; design summary; reliability issues; booster trajectories; launch site assessment; and enhanced abort modes.

  8. 7. Credit BG. View looking west into small solid rocket ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Credit BG. View looking west into small solid rocket motor testing bay of Test Stand 'E' (Building 4259/E-60). Motors are mounted on steel table and fired horizontally toward the east. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand E, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 2: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    This users manual for the solid rocket booster performance evaluation model (SRB-II) contains descriptions of the model, the program options, the required program inputs, the program output format and the program error messages. SRB-II is written in FORTRAN and is operational on both the IBM 370/155 and the MSFC UNIVAC 1108 computers.

  10. Closeup view of the External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters at the Launch Pad at Kennedy Space Center. Note the Hydrogen Vent Arm extending out from the Fixed Service Structure at attached to the Intertank segment of the External Tank. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  11. ASRM plume deflector analysis program. [advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Michael C.; Douglas, Freddie, III; Orlin, Peter A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents analytical conclusions resulting from subscale solid rocket motor tests and flowfield modeling for a plume deflector. Loads, flow characteristics, and corresponding material behavior were predicted or observed and will be used in final design of the deflector. The efforts resulted in quantifiable size reductions and lower cost material selections, which will significantly reduce the deflector cost while meeting performance requirements.

  12. Study of solid rocket motor for space shuttle booster, volume 2, book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A technical analysis of the solid propellant rocket engines for use with the space shuttle is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) solid rocket motor stage recovery, (2) environmental effects, (3) man rating of the solid propellant rocket engines, (4) system safety analysis, (5) ground support equipment, and (6) transportation, assembly, and checkout.

  13. Solid rocket technology advancements for space tug and IUS applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ascher, W.; Bailey, R. L.; Behm, J. W.; Gin, W.

    1975-01-01

    In order for the shuttle tug or interim upper stage (IUS) to capture all the missions in the current mission model for the tug and the IUS, an auxiliary or kick stage, using a solid propellant rocket motor, is required. Two solid propellant rocket motor technology concepts are described. One concept, called the 'advanced propulsion module' motor, is an 1800-kg, high-mass-fraction motor, which is single-burn and contains Class 2 propellent. The other concept, called the high energy upper stage restartable solid, is a two-burn (stop-restartable on command) motor which at present contains 1400 kg of Class 7 propellant. The details and status of the motor design and component and motor test results to date are presented, along with the schedule for future work.

  14. Development of Thermal Barriers for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed using conventional 0-ring seals. The 5500+F combustion gases are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of insulation. Special joint-fill compounds are used to fill the joints in the insulation to prevent a direct flowpath to the seals. On a number of occasions. NASA has observed in several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints hot gas penetration through defects in the joint- fill compound. The current nozzle-to-case joint design incorporates primary, secondary and wiper (inner-most) 0-rings and polysulfide joint-fill compound. In the current design, 1 out of 7 motors experience hot gas to the wiper 0-ring. Though the condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas to the wiper 0-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. NASA and solid rocket motor manufacturer Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and a thermal barrier, This paper presents burn-resistance, temperature drop, flow and resiliency test results for several types of NASA braided carbon-fiber thermal barriers. Burn tests were performed to determine the time to burn through each of the thermal barriers when exposed to the flame of an oxy-acetylene torch (5500 F), representative of the 5500 F solid rocket motor combustion temperatures. Thermal barriers braided out of carbon fibers endured the flame for over 6 minutes, three times longer than solid rocket motor burn time. Tests were performed on two thermal barrier braid architectures, denoted Carbon-3 and Carbon-6, to measure the temperature drop across and along the barrier in a compressed state when subjected to the flame of an oxyacetylene torch. Carbon-3 and Carbon-6 thermal barriers were excellent insulators causing temperature drops through their diameter of up to a 2800 and 2560 F. respectively. Gas temperature 1/4" downstream of the thermal barrier were within the

  15. Expendable solid rocket motor upper stages for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. P.; Jones, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    A family of expendable solid rocket motor upper stages has been conceptually defined to provide the payloads for the Space Shuttle with performance capability beyond the low earth operational range of the Shuttle Orbiter. In this concept-feasibility assessment, three new solid rocket motors of fixed impulse are defined for use with payloads requiring levels of higher energy. The conceptual design of these motors is constrained to limit thrusting loads into the payloads and to conserve payload bay length. These motors are combined in various vehicle configurations with stage components derived from other programs for the performance of a broad range of upper-stage missions from spin-stabilized, single-stage transfers to three-axis stabilized, multistage insertions. Estimated payload delivery performance and combined payload mission loading configurations are provided for the upper-stage configurations.

  16. Reusable solid rocket motor case - Optimum probabilistic fracture control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.

    1979-01-01

    A methodology for the reliability analysis of a reusable solid rocket motor case is discussed in this paper. The analysis is based on probabilistic fracture mechanics and probability distribution for initial flaw sizes. The developed reliability analysis can be used to select the structural design variables of the solid rocket motor case on the basis of minimum expected cost and specified reliability bounds during the projected design life of the case. Effects on failure prevention plans such as nondestructive inspection and the material erosion between missions can also be considered in the developed procedure for selection of design variables. The reliability-based procedure that has been discussed in this paper can easily be modified to consider other similar structures of reusable space vehicle systems with different fracture control plans.

  17. Star 48 solid rocket motor nozzle analyses and instrumented firings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The analyses and testing performed by NASA in support of an expanded and improved nozzle design data base for use by the U.S. solid rocket motor industry is presented. A production nozzle with a history of one ground failure and two flight failures was selected for analyses and testing. The stress analysis was performed with the Champion computer code developed by the U.S. Navy. Several improvements were made to the code. Strain predictions were made and compared to test data. Two short duration motor firings were conducted with highly instrumented nozzles. The first nozzle had 58 thermocouples, 66 strain gages, and 8 bondline pressure measurements. The second nozzle had 59 thermocouples, 68 strain measurements, and 8 bondline pressure measurements. Most of this instrumentation was on the nonmetallic parts, and provided significantly more thermal and strain data on the nonmetallic components of a nozzle than has been accumulated in a solid rocket motor test to date.

  18. Space transportation system solid rocket booster thrust vector control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, fail-safe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system has completed the major portion of qualification and verification tests and is prepared to be cleared for the first Shuttle flight (STS-1). Substantiation data will include analytical and test data.

  19. Space Transportation System solid rocket booster thrust vector control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, failsafe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system completed the required qualification and verification tests and is certified for the intended application. Substantiation data include analytical and test data.

  20. Placement Of O-Rings In Solid Rocket Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Brief report proposes to modify placement of O-ring seals in joints of Solid Rocket Booster of Space Shuttle. Modified joint and seal essentially "inside-out" version of old joint and seal. O-rings placed between outer side of tang and clevis. Joint rotation pushes tang harder against O-rings, thereby making even tighter seal. Proposal derived from analysis of Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, attributed to failure of these O-ring seals.

  1. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Lightweight Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Dean; Runkle, Roy E.

    1995-01-01

    The cancellation of the Advanced Solid Rocket Booster Project and the earth-to-orbit payload requirements for the Space Station dictated that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) look at performance enhancements from all Space Transportation System (STS) elements (Orbiter Project, Space Shuttle Main Engine Project, External Tank Project, Solid Rocket Motor Project, & Solid Rocket Booster Project). The manifest for launching of Space Station components indicated that an additional 12-13000 pound lift capability was required on 10 missions and 15-20,000 pound additional lift capability is required on two missions. Trade studies conducted by all STS elements indicate that by deleting the parachute Recovery System (and associated hardware) from the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBS) and going to a lightweight External Tank (ET) the 20,000 pound additional lift capability can be realized for the two missions. The deletion of the parachute Recovery System means the loss of four SRBs and this option is two expensive (loss of reusable hardware) to be used on the other 10 Space Station missions. Accordingly, each STS element looked at potential methods of weight savings, increased performance, etc. As the SRB and ET projects are non-propulsive (i.e. does not have launch thrust elements) their only contribution to overall payload enhancement can be achieved by the saving of weight while maintaining adequate safety factors and margins. The enhancement factor for the SRB project is 1:10. That is for each 10 pounds saved on the two SRBS; approximately 1 additional pound of payload in the orbiter bay can be placed into orbit. The SRB project decided early that the SRB recovery system was a prime candidate for weight reduction as it was designed in the early 1970s and weight optimization had never been a primary criteria.

  2. Space shuttle program solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The recovery of the Solid Rocket Boosters presented a major challenge. The SRB represents the largest payload ever recovered and presents the added complication that it is continually emitting hot gases and burning particles of insulation and other debris. Some items, such as portions of the nozzle, are large enough to burn through the nylon parachute material. The SRB Decelerator Subsystem program was highly successful in that no SRB has been lost as a result of inadequate performance of the DSS.

  3. Space shuttle solid rocket booster redesign and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    The redesigned solid rocket motor of the Space Shuttle is described. Improvements over the model that led to the loss of the Space Shuttle Challenger are outlined. Scale and full-size tests carried out to verify the quality of the redesign are described. A unique feature of the test program is the introduction of deliberate flaws into some test articles. Post-flight evaluation of the redesigned boosters show excellent results.

  4. Post-impact behavior of composite solid rocket motor cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highsmith, Alton L.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, composite materials have seen increasing use in advanced structural applications because of the significant weight savings they offer when compared to more traditional engineering materials. The higher cost of composites must be offset by the increased performance that results from reduced structural weight if these new materials are to be used effectively. At present, there is considerable interest in fabricating solid rocket motor cases out of composite materials, and capitalizing on the reduced structural weight to increase rocket performance. However, one of the difficulties that arises when composite materials are used is that composites can develop significant amounts of internal damage during low velocity impacts. Such low velocity impacts may be encountered in routine handling of a structural component like a rocket motor case. The ability to assess the reduction in structural integrity of composite motor cases that experience accidental impacts is essential if composite rocket motor cases are to be certified for manned flight. The study described herein was an initial investigation of damage development and reduction of tensile strength in an idealized composite subjected to low velocity impacts.

  5. Failure analysis of solid rocket apogee motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    The analysis followed five selected motors through initial design, development, test, qualification, manufacture, and final flight reports. An audit was conducted at the manufacturing plants to complement the literature search with firsthand observations of the current philosophies and practices that affect reliability of the motors. A second literature search emphasized acquisition of spacecraft and satellite data bearing on solid motor reliability. It was concluded that present practices at the plants yield highly reliable flight hardware. Reliability can be further improved by new developments of aft-end bonding and initiator/igniter nondestructive test methods, a safe/arm device, and an insulation formulation. Minimum diagnostic instrumentation is recommended for all motor flights. Surplus motors should be used in margin testing. Criteria should be established for pressure and zone curing. The motor contractor should be represented at launch. New design analyses should be made of stretched motors and spacecraft/motor pairs.

  6. Thermal Barriers Developed for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Space shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed with conventional O-ring seals that are shielded from 5500 F combustion gases by thick layers of insulation and by special joint-fill compounds that fill assembly splitlines in the insulation. On a number of occasions, NASA has observed hot gas penetration through defects in the joint-fill compound of several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints. In the current nozzle-to-case joint, NASA has observed penetration of hot combustion gases through the joint-fill compound to the inboard wiper O-ring in one out of seven motors. Although this condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas penetration to the wiper O-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. The solid rocket motor manufacturer (Thiokol) approached the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field about the possibility of applying Glenn's braided fiber preform seal as a thermal barrier to protect the O-ring seals. Glenn and Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and by using a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier that would resist any hot gases that the J-leg does not block.

  7. Environmental Effects of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, B.; Pergament, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    The deposition of NOx and HCl in the stratosphere from the space shuttle solid rocket motors (SRM) and exhaust plume is discussed. A detailed comparison between stratospheric deposition rates using the baseline SRM propellant and an alternate propellant, which replaces ammonium perchlorate by ammonium nitrate, shows the total NOx deposition rate to be approximately the same for each propellant. For both propellants the ratio of the deposition rates of NOx to total chlorine-containing species is negligibly small. Rocket exhaust ground cloud transport processes in the troposphere are also examined. A brief critique of the multilayer diffusion models (presently used for predicting pollutant deposition in the troposphere) is presented, and some detailed cloud rise calculations are compared with data for Titan 3C launches. The results show that, when launch time meteorological data are used as input, the model can reasonably predict measured cloud stabilization heights.

  8. High-pressure burning rate studies of solid rocket propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, A. I.; Ford, K. P.; Wheeler, C. J.

    2013-03-01

    Increased rocket motor performance is a major driver in the development of solid rocket propellant formulations for chemical propulsion systems. The use of increased operating pressure is an option to improve performance potentially without the cost of reformulation. A technique has been developed to obtain burning rate data across a range of pressures from ambient to 345 MPa. The technique combines the use of a low loading density combustion bomb with a high loading density closed bomb technique. A series of nine ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellants were used to demonstrate the use of the technique, and the results were compared to the neat AP burning rate "barrier". The effect of plasticizer, oxidizer particle size, catalyst, and binder type were investigated.

  9. Fluid-solid coupled simulation of the ignition transient of solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Liu, Peijin; He, Guoqiang

    2015-05-01

    The first period of the solid rocket motor operation is the ignition transient, which involves complex processes and, according to chronological sequence, can be divided into several stages, namely, igniter jet injection, propellant heating and ignition, flame spreading, chamber pressurization and solid propellant deformation. The ignition transient should be comprehensively analyzed because it significantly influences the overall performance of the solid rocket motor. A numerical approach is presented in this paper for simulating the fluid-solid interaction problems in the ignition transient of the solid rocket motor. In the proposed procedure, the time-dependent numerical solutions of the governing equations of internal compressible fluid flow are loosely coupled with those of the geometrical nonlinearity problems to determine the propellant mechanical response and deformation. The well-known Zeldovich-Novozhilov model was employed to model propellant ignition and combustion. The fluid-solid coupling interface data interpolation scheme and coupling instance for different computational agents were also reported. Finally, numerical validation was performed, and the proposed approach was applied to the ignition transient of one laboratory-scale solid rocket motor. For the application, the internal ballistics were obtained from the ground hot firing test, and comparisons were made. Results show that the integrated framework allows us to perform coupled simulations of the propellant ignition, strong unsteady internal fluid flow, and propellant mechanical response in SRMs with satisfactory stability and efficiency and presents a reliable and accurate solution to complex multi-physics problems.

  10. Studies of the exhaust products from solid propellant rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawbarn, R.; Kinslow, M.

    1976-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of conducting environmental chamber tests on the physical processes which occur when a solid rocket motor exhaust mixes with the ambient atmosphere. Of particular interest was the interaction between hydrogen chloride, aluminum oxide, and water vapor. The program consisted of three phases: (1) building a small rocket motor and using it to provide the exhaust species in a controlled environment; (2) evaluating instruments used to detect and measure HCl concentrations and if possible determining whether the HCl existed in the gaseous state or as an acid aerosol; (3) monitoring a series of 6.4-percent scale space shuttle motor tests and comparing the results to the environmental chamber studies. Eighteen firings were conducted in an environmental chamber with the initial ambient relative humidity set at values from 29 to 100 percent. Two additional firings were made in a large shed, and four were made on an open concrete apron. Six test firings at MSFC were monitored, and the ground level concentrations are reported. Evidence is presented which shows that the larger Al2O3 (5 to 50 micrometers) particles from the rocket motor can act as condensation nuclei. Under appropriate ambient conditions where there is sufficient water vapor this results in the formation of an acid aerosol. Droplets of this acid were detected both in the environmental chamber and in the scaled shuttle engine tests.

  11. Development of Thermal Barriers For Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Joints in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors are sealed by O-rings to contain combustion gases inside the rocket that reach pressures of up to 900 psi and temperatures of up to 5500 F. To provide protection for the O-rings, the motors are insulated with either phenolic or rubber insulation. Gaps in the joints leading up to the O-rings are filled with polysulfide joint-fill compounds as an additional level of protection. The current RSRM nozzle-to-case joint design incorporating primary, secondary, and wiper O-rings experiences gas paths through the joint-fill compound to the innermost wiper O-ring in about one out of every seven motors. Although this does not pose a safety hazard to the motor, it is an undesirable condition that NASA and rocket manufacturer Thiokol want to eliminate. Each nozzle-to-case joint gas path results in extensive reviews and evaluation before flights can be resumed. Thiokol and NASA Marshall are currently working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design that has been used successfully in the field and igniter joint. They are also planning to incorporate the NASA Glenn braided carbon fiber thermal barrier into the joint. The thermal barrier would act as an additional level of protection for the O-rings and allow the elimination of the joint-fill compound from the joint.

  12. Analysis of quasi-hybrid solid rocket booster concepts for advanced earth-to-orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Rapp, Douglas C.

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the feasibility of quasi-hybrid solid rocket boosters for advanced Earth-to-orbit vehicles. Thermochemical calculations were conducted to determine the effect of liquid hydrogen addition, solids composition change plus liquid hydrogen addition, and the addition of an aluminum/liquid hydrogen slurry on the theoretical performance of a PBAN solid propellant rocket. The space shuttle solid rocket booster was used as a reference point. All three quasi-hybrid systems theoretically offer higher specific impulse when compared with the space shuttle solid rocket boosters. However, based on operational and safety considerations, the quasi-hybrid rocket is not a practical choice for near-term Earth-to-orbit booster applications. Safety and technology issues pertinent to quasi-hybrid rocket systems are discussed.

  13. Solid Rocket Fuel Constitutive Theory and Polymer Cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ream, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Solid Rocket Fuel is a complex composite material for which no general constitutive theory, based on first principles, has been developed. One of the principles such a relation would depend on is the morphology of the binder. A theory of polymer curing is required to determine this morphology. During work on such a theory an algorithm was developed for counting the number of ways a polymer chain could assemble. The methods used to develop and check this algorithm led to an analytic solution to the problem. This solution is used in a probability distribution function which characterizes the morphology of the polymer.

  14. Solid rocket booster thermal radiation model, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, G. H.; Lee, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    A solid rocket booster (SRB) thermal radiation model, capable of defining the influence of the plume flowfield structure on the magnitude and distribution of thermal radiation leaving the plume, was prepared and documented. Radiant heating rates may be calculated for a single SRB plume or for the dual SRB plumes astride the space shuttle. The plumes may be gimbaled in the yaw and pitch planes. Space shuttle surface geometries are simulated with combinations of quadric surfaces. The effect of surface shading is included. The computer program also has the capability to calculate view factors between the SRB plumes and space shuttle surfaces as well as surface-to-surface view factors.

  15. Facility for cold flow testing of solid rocket motor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchus, D. L.; Hill, O. E.; Whitesides, R. Harold

    1992-02-01

    A new cold flow test facility was designed and constructed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for the purpose of characterizing the flow field in the port and nozzle of solid propellant rocket motors (SRM's). A National Advisory Committee was established to include representatives from industry, government agencies, and universities to guide the establishment of design and instrumentation requirements for the new facility. This facility design includes the basic components of air storage tanks, heater, submicron filter, quiet control valve, venturi, model inlet plenum chamber, solid rocket motor (SRM) model, exhaust diffuser, and exhaust silencer. The facility was designed to accommodate a wide range of motor types and sizes from small tactical motors to large space launch boosters. This facility has the unique capability of testing ten percent scale models of large boosters such as the new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM), at full scale motor Reynolds numbers. Previous investigators have established the validity of studying basic features of solid rocket motor development programs include the acquisition of data to (1) directly evaluate and optimize the design configuration of the propellant grain, insulation, and nozzle; and (2) provide data for validation of the computational fluid dynamics, (CFD), analysis codes and the performance analysis codes. A facility checkout model was designed, constructed, and utilized to evaluate the performance characteristics of the new facility. This model consists of a cylindrical chamber and converging/diverging nozzle with appropriate manifolding to connect it to the facility air supply. It was designed using chamber and nozzle dimensions to simulate the flow in a 10 percent scale model of the ASRM. The checkout model was recently tested over the entire range of facility flow conditions which include flow rates from 9.07 to 145 kg/sec (20 to 320 Ibm/sec) and supply pressure from 5.17 x 10 exp 5 to 8.27 x 10 exp 6 Pa. The

  16. Structural behavior of solid rocket motor field joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, Michael F.; Wingate, Robert T.

    1987-01-01

    Structural analysis studies conducted on three concepts for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor field joints are summarized. Deflections and stresses in the Challenger clevis-tang joint are compared with a proposed capture-tang replacement joint and with an alternate bolted joint design. Results indicate deflections and stresses are subsequently reduced in both the capture-tang and bolted joint concepts. The capture-tang and bolted joint designs are respectively 24 and 70 percent heavier than the baseline clevis-tang joint.

  17. Solid rocket motor case insulation bond nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas K.

    1990-01-01

    An effective insulator is needed to isolate the motor case from the hot combustion gases in such large solid rocket motors (SRMs) as those of the Space Shuttle, in order to preserve motor case integrity. An account is presently given of the ultrasonic NDE techniques employed to characterize the Space Shuttle's redesigned SRM. It is noted that current inspection procedures are sensitive to conditions that could result in anomalous ultrasonic indications; these conditions encompass (1) inner-outer surface nonparallelism, (2) sensor-surface nonparallelism, (3) contact pressure variation, (4) transducer coupling shoe wear, and (5) surface waviness. Both short-term and long-term NDE procedure recommendations are made.

  18. SRM (Solid Rocket Motor) propellant and polymer materials structural modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Carleton J.

    1988-01-01

    The following investigation reviews and evaluates the use of stress relaxation test data for the structural analysis of Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellants and other polymer materials used for liners, insulators, inhibitors, and seals. The stress relaxation data is examined and a new mathematical structural model is proposed. This model has potentially wide application to structural analysis of polymer materials and other materials generally characterized as being made of viscoelastic materials. A dynamic modulus is derived from the new model for stress relaxation modulus and is compared to the old viscoelastic model and experimental data.

  19. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Program - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccool, A. A.; Ray, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is given of the most important lessons learned concerning the Space Shuttle's Solid Rocket Motors with respect to flight safety, reuse requirements, system reliability, structural integrity, and hardware damage due to reentry, water impact, and retrieval. Within the major categories of flight safety, performance, and reuse/cost, priorities are identified for implementation of envisioned improvements; schedule and cost considerations are noted to have been substantially downgraded in favor of flight safety. The consequences of the primacy of flight safety are discussed in the areas of primary systems design, redundant systems, manufacturing and assembly processing, and launch constraints.

  20. Thrust vector control for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, D. N.; Brinton, B. C.

    1975-01-01

    Thrust vector control (TVC) for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) is obtained by omniaxis vectoring of the nozzle. The development and integration of the system are under the cognizance of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The nozzle and flexible bearing have been designed and will be built by Thiokol Corporation/Wasatch Division. The vector requirements of the system, the impact of multiple reuse on the components, and the unique problems associated with a large flexible bearing are discussed. The design details of each of the major TVC subcomponents are delineated. The subscale bearing development program and the overall development schedule also are presented.

  1. ASRM subscale plume deflector testing. [advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Freddie, III; Dawson, Michael C.; Orlin, Peter A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the scale model (1/22) testing of candidate refractory materials to be used as surface coatings for a solid rocket motor plume deflector structure. Five ROM tests were conducted to acquire data to support the selection, thickness determination, and placement of the materials. All data acquisition was achieved through nonintrusive methods. The tests demonstrated that little or no reductions in performance of the full-scale deflector would be experienced if the most economical materials were selected for construction.

  2. Solid Rocket Motor Backflow Analysis For CONTOUR Mishap Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2005-05-01

    A procedure developed for free molecule modeling of plume backflow from a STAR™ 30BP solid rocket motor is presented for work performed in support of the Comet Nucleus Tour spacecraft mishap investigation. Good general agreement is established with DSMC flowfield results, with interesting deviations developing as the plume backflow approaches the spacecraft surfaces closely, providing insights regarding characteristics of the surface Knudsen layer. Also, investigation of related free expansion results indicate significant discrepancies exist between the rarefied techniques and the continuum results from which their starting surfaces were created. The nature of these differences suggests that convective fluxes to CONTOUR may have been much higher than the rarefied analyses indicated.

  3. Ignition transient calculations in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Rhonald M.; Foster, Winfred A., Jr.

    1993-07-01

    The work presented is part of an effort to develop a multidimensional ignition transient model for large solid propellant rocket motors. On the Space Shuttle, the ignition transient in the slot is induced when the igniter, itself a small rocket motor, is fired into the head-end portion of the main rocket motor. The computational results presented in this paper consider two different igniter configurations. The first configuration is a simulated Space Shuttle RSRM igniter which has one central nozzle that is parallel to the centerline of the motor. The second igniter configuration has a nozzle which is canted at an angle of 45 deg from the centerline of the motor. This paper presents a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses of certain flow field characteristics inside the solid propellant star grain slot of the Space Shuttle during the ignition transient period of operation for each igniter configuration. The majority of studies made to date regarding ignition transient performance in solid rocket motors have concluded that the key parameter to be determined is the heat transfer rate to the propellant surface and hence the heat transfer coefficient between the gas and the propellant. In this paper the heat transfer coefficients, pressure and velocity distributions are calculated in the star slot. In order to validate the computational method and to attempt to establish a correlation between the flow field characteristics and the heat transfer rates a series of cold flow experimental investigations were conducted. The results of these experiments show excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement with the pressure and velocity distributions obtained from the CFD analysis. The CFD analysis utilized a classical pipe flow type correlation for the heat transfer rates. The experimental results provide an excellent qualitative comparison with regard to spatial distribution of the heat transfer rates as a function of nozzle configuration and igniter pressure. The

  4. Ignition Transient Calculations in the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Rhonald M.; Foster, Winfred A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The work presented is part of an effort to develop a multidimensional ignition transient model for large solid propellant rocket motors. On the Space Shuttle, the ignition transient in the slot is induced when the igniter, itself a small rocket motor, is fired into the head-end portion of the main rocket motor. The computational results presented in this paper consider two different igniter configurations. The first configuration is a simulated Space Shuttle RSRM igniter which has one central nozzle that is parallel to the centerline of the motor. The second igniter configuration has a nozzle which is canted at an angle of 45 deg from the centerline of the motor. This paper presents a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses of certain flow field characteristics inside the solid propellant star grain slot of the Space Shuttle during the ignition transient period of operation for each igniter configuration. The majority of studies made to date regarding ignition transient performance in solid rocket motors have concluded that the key parameter to be determined is the heat transfer rate to the propellant surface and hence the heat transfer coefficient between the gas and the propellant. In this paper the heat transfer coefficients, pressure and velocity distributions are calculated in the star slot. In order to validate the computational method and to attempt to establish a correlation between the flow field characteristics and the heat transfer rates a series of cold flow experimental investigations were conducted. The results of these experiments show excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement with the pressure and velocity distributions obtained from the CFD analysis. The CFD analysis utilized a classical pipe flow type correlation for the heat transfer rates. The experimental results provide an excellent qualitative comparison with regard to spatial distribution of the heat transfer rates as a function of nozzle configuration and igniter pressure. The

  5. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 1: Engineering description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The space shuttle solid rocket booster performance evaluation model (SRB-II) is made up of analytical and functional simulation techniques linked together so that a single pass through the model will predict the performance of the propulsion elements of a space shuttle solid rocket booster. The available options allow the user to predict static test performance, predict nominal and off nominal flight performance, and reconstruct actual flight and static test performance. Options selected by the user are dependent on the data available. These can include data derived from theoretical analysis, small scale motor test data, large motor test data and motor configuration data. The user has several options for output format that include print, cards, tape and plots. Output includes all major performance parameters (Isp, thrust, flowrate, mass accounting and operating pressures) as a function of time as well as calculated single point performance data. The engineering description of SRB-II discusses the engineering and programming fundamentals used, the function of each module, and the limitations of each module.

  6. Five-Segment Solid Rocket Motor Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priskos, Alex S.

    2012-01-01

    In support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing a new, more powerful solid rocket motor for space launch applications. To minimize technical risks and development costs, NASA chose to use the Space Shuttle s solid rocket boosters as a starting point in the design and development. The new, five segment motor provides a greater total impulse with improved, more environmentally friendly materials. To meet the mass and trajectory requirements, the motor incorporates substantial design and system upgrades, including new propellant grain geometry with an additional segment, new internal insulation system, and a state-of-the art avionics system. Significant progress has been made in the design, development and testing of the propulsion, and avionics systems. To date, three development motors (one each in 2009, 2010, and 2011) have been successfully static tested by NASA and ATK s Launch Systems Group in Promontory, UT. These development motor tests have validated much of the engineering with substantial data collected, analyzed, and utilized to improve the design. This paper provides an overview of the development progress on the first stage propulsion system.

  7. Fluid-structure interaction of solid rocket motor inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, R. L.; Gramoll, K.; Weaver, M.; Flandro, G. A.

    1992-07-01

    The deformation of solid rocket motor inhibitor material due to loads imposed by the gas flow is studied in this effort. The flow field is computed around an infinitely stiff inhibitor using a Navier-Stokes solution procedure which provides the stress distributions on the inhibitor. These stresses are then fed into a structural finite element analysis code, ANSYS to determine the deflection based on these stresses and a realistic stiffness. The deformed shape is fed back into the Navier-Stokes solution procedure and a new grid and stress distribution are obtained. The process continues until the inhibitor deflection becomes fixed or periodic. While this is a somewhat crude approach, the availability of the two codes without modifications provide a tempting way to take a first look at a fluid-structure interaction problem and to help in the design of truly coupled approach. The geometry used is typical of those found in large solid rocket boosters of the type used on the Space Shuttle system and the Titan III series.

  8. Demonstration of a sterilizable solid rocket motor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastrolia, E. J.; Santerre, G. M.; Lambert, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A solid propellant rocket motor containing 60.9 Kg (134-lb) of propellant was successfully static fired after being subjected to eight heat sterilization cycles (three 54-hour cycles plus five 40-hour cycles) at 125 C (257 F). The test motor, a modified SVM-3 chamber, incorporated a flexible grain retention system of EPR rubber to relieve thermal shrinkage stresses. The propellant used in the motor was ANB-3438, and 84 wt% solids system (18 wt% aluminum) containing 66 wt% stabilized ammonium perchlorate oxidizer and a saturated hydroxylterminated polybutadiene binder. Bonding of the propellant to the EPR insulation (GenGard V-4030) was provided by the use of SD-886, an epoxy urethane restriction.

  9. Shuttle solid rocket motor nozzle alternate ablative evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.; Morrison, B. H.

    1981-01-01

    A series of subscale tests are shown to suggest that a lower-cost ablative material than the rayon-based carbon ablative currently used in the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) may be used as a substitute. Six such ablatives with outstanding performance characteristics, using spun PAN and continuous pitch and PAN fibers instead of the present, continuous rayon, were identified in the course of tests with HTPB/AL/AP solid propellant grains with a burn time of 12 sec. The test nozzle features an initial throat diameter of 2.2 in. and a 6.1 expansion ratio. In addition to nozzle structural feature drawings, extensive test data tables and propellant formulation and properties tables are provided.

  10. A Review of Large Solid Rocket Motor Free Field Acoustics, Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, Debbie; Kenny, Robert Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    At the ATK facility in Utah, large full scale solid rocket motors are tested. The largest is a five segment version of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor, which is for use on future launch vehicles. Since 2006, Acoustic measurements have been taken on large solid rocket motors at ATK. Both the four segment RSRM and the five segment RSRMV have been instrumented. Measurements are used to update acoustic prediction models and to correlate against vibration responses of the motor. Presentation focuses on two major sections: Part I) Unique challenges associated with measuring rocket acoustics Part II) Acoustic measurements summary over past five years

  11. Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Program Overview and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Stan R.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) program is provided with a summary of lessons learned since the first test firing in 1977. Fifteen different lessons learned are discussed that fundamentally changed the motor's design, processing, and RSRM program risk management systems. The evolution of the rocket motor design is presented including the baseline or High Performance Solid Rocket Motor (HPM), the Filament Wound Case (FWC), the RSRM, and the proposed Five-Segment Booster (FSB).

  12. Solid rocket booster internal flow analysis by highly accurate adaptive computational methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Tworzydlo, W.; Oden, J. T.; Bass, J. M.; Cullen, C.; Vadaketh, S.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop an adaptive finite element flow solver for simulating internal flows in the solid rocket booster. Described here is a unique flow simulator code for analyzing highly complex flow phenomena in the solid rocket booster. New methodologies and features incorporated into this analysis tool are described.

  13. Overview of the manufacturing sequence of the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John S.; Nix, Michael B.

    1992-01-01

    The manufacturing sequence of NASA's new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor, developed as a replacement of the Space Shuttle's existing Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor, is overviewed. Special attention is given to the case preparation, the propellant mix/cast, the nondestructuve evaluation, the motor finishing, and the refurbishment. The fabrication sequences of the case, the nozzle, and the igniter are described.

  14. Solid rocket motor certification to meet space shuttle requirements from challenge to achievement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. Q.; Kilminster, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Three solid rocket motor (SRM) design requirements for the Space Shuttle were discussed. No existing solid rocket motor experience was available for the requirement for a thrust-time trace, twenty uses for the principle hardware, and a moveable nozzle with an 8 deg. omnivaxial vectoring capability. The solutions to these problems are presented.

  15. Maturation of Structural Health Management Systems for Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quing, Xinlin; Beard, Shawn; Zhang, Chang

    2011-01-01

    Concepts of an autonomous and automated space-compliant diagnostic system were developed for conditioned-based maintenance (CBM) of rocket motors for space exploration vehicles. The diagnostic system will provide real-time information on the integrity of critical structures on launch vehicles, improve their performance, and greatly increase crew safety while decreasing inspection costs. Using the SMART Layer technology as a basis, detailed procedures and calibration techniques for implementation of the diagnostic system were developed. The diagnostic system is a distributed system, which consists of a sensor network, local data loggers, and a host central processor. The system detects external impact to the structure. The major functions of the system include an estimate of impact location, estimate of impact force at impacted location, and estimate of the structure damage at impacted location. This system consists of a large-area sensor network, dedicated multiple local data loggers with signal processing and data analysis software to allow for real-time, in situ monitoring, and longterm tracking of structural integrity of solid rocket motors. Specifically, the system could provide easy installation of large sensor networks, onboard operation under harsh environments and loading, inspection of inaccessible areas without disassembly, detection of impact events and impact damage in real-time, and monitoring of a large area with local data processing to reduce wiring.

  16. Exploring the Solid Rocket Boosters and Properties of Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffett, Amy

    2007-01-01

    I worked for the United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) with the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Materials and Process engineers (M&P). I was assigned a project in which I needed to research and collect chemical and physical properties information, material safety data sheets (MSDS), and other product information from the vendor's websites and existing "inhouse" files for a select group of materials used in building and refurbishing the SRBs. This information was then compiled in a report that summarized the information collected. My work site was at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This allowed for many opportunities to visit and tour sites operated by NASA, by USA, and by the Air Force. This included the vehicle assembly building (VAB), orbital processing facilities (OPF), the crawler with the mobile launch pad (MLP), and the SRB assembly and refurbishment facility (ARF), to name a few. In addition, the launch, of STS- 117 took place within the first week of employment allowing a day by day following of that mission including post flight operations for the SRBs. Two Delta II rockets were also launched during these 7 weeks. The sights were incredible and the operations witnessed were amazing. I learned so many things I never knew about the entire program and the shuttle itself. The entire experience, especially my work with the SRB materials, inspired my plan for implementation into the classroom.

  17. Environmental impact statement Space Shuttle advanced solid rocket motor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The proposed action is design, development, testing, and evaluation of Advanced Solid Rocket Motors (ASRM) to replace the motors currently used to launch the Space Shuttle. The proposed action includes design, construction, and operation of new government-owned, contractor-operated facilities for manufacturing and testing the ASRM's. The proposed action also includes transport of propellant-filled rocket motor segments from the manufacturing facility to the testing and launch sites and the return of used and/or refurbished segments to the manufacturing site. Sites being considered for the new facilities include John C. Stennis Space Center, Hancock County, Mississippi; the Yellow Creek site in Tishomingo County, Mississippi, which is currently in the custody and control of the Tennessee Valley Authority; and John F. Kennedy Space Center, Brevard County, Florida. TVA proposes to transfer its site to the custody and control of NASA if it is the selected site. All facilities need not be located at the same site. Existing facilities which may provide support for the program include Michoud Assembly Facility, New Orleans Parish, Louisiana; and Slidell Computer Center, St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana. NASA's preferred production location is the Yellow Creek site, and the preferred test location is the Stennis Space Center.

  18. Design and Experimental Study on Spinning Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Heng; Jiang, Chunlan; Wang, Zaicheng

    The study on spinning solid rocket motor (SRM) which used as power plant of twice throwing structure of aerial submunition was introduced. This kind of SRM which with the structure of tangential multi-nozzle consists of a combustion chamber, propellant charge, 4 tangential nozzles, ignition device, etc. Grain design, structure design and prediction of interior ballistic performance were described, and problem which need mainly considered in design were analyzed comprehensively. Finally, in order to research working performance of the SRM, measure pressure-time curve and its speed, static test and dynamic test were conducted respectively. And then calculated values and experimental data were compared and analyzed. The results indicate that the designed motor operates normally, and the stable performance of interior ballistic meet demands. And experimental results have the guidance meaning for the pre-research design of SRM.

  19. Cathodic protection deployment on space shuttle solid rocket boosters

    SciTech Connect

    Zook, L.M.

    1999-07-01

    Corrosion protection of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters incorporates the use of cathodic protection (anodes) in concert with several coatings systems. The SRB design has large carbon/carbon composite (motor nozzle) electrically connected to an aluminum alloy structure. Early in the STS program, the aluminum structures incurred tremendous corrosive attack at coating damage locations due primarily to galvanic coupling with the carbon/carbon nozzle. Also contributing to the galvanic corrosion problem were stainless steel and titanium alloy components housed within the aluminum structures and electrically connected to the aluminum structures. This paper highlights the evolution in the protection of the aluminum structures, providing historical information and summary data from the operation of the corrosion protection systems. Also, data and information are included regarding the evaluation and application of inorganic zinc rich primers to provide anode area on the aluminum structures.

  20. Space shuttle solid rocket booster water entry cavity collapse loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, R. T.; Rawls, E. A.; Kross, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Solid rocket booster cavity collapse flight measurements included external pressures on the motor case and aft skirt, internal motor case pressures, accelerometers located in the forward skirt, mid-body area, and aft skirt, as well as strain gages located on the skin of the motor case. This flight data yielded applied pressure longitudinal and circumferential distributions which compare well with model test predictions. The internal motor case ullage pressure, which is below atmospheric due to the rapid cooling of the hot internal gas, was more severe (lower) than anticipated due to the ullage gas being hotter than predicted. The structural dynamic response characteristics were as expected. Structural ring and wall damage are detailed and are considered to be attributable to the direct application of cavity collapse pressure combined with the structurally destabilizing, low internal motor case pressure.

  1. The Effects of Orbital Distribution from Solid Rocket Motor Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Keke; Pang, Baojun; Xiao, Weike

    2013-08-01

    Solid rocket motor (SRM) firings are an important source of space debris environment. The resulting by-products are generally divided into two categories: slag and dust. Dust will re-entry sharply and do not pose a significant hazard. Slag debris can achieve centimeter level, these particles have a serious effect on risk assessment and defend structural design of spacecraft. It is important to understand the size distribution and orbital behavior of slag in order to predict the hazard posed both currently and in the future. Utilizing previous researches on SRM slag and 8-year launch cycle, we have analyzed the orbital distribution of SRM slag. The results indicate that SRM slag is a crucial component of the space debris environment. In order to sustainable utilization outer space, human should forbid the use of SRM in the future, especially for the medium Earth orbit (MEO) and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) regions.

  2. Stability of solid rocket motor with spray-liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Hu, Naihe

    1992-12-01

    Dynamic equations were developed for every link of the feedback control system of a solid rocket motor (SRM) with fuel injection. Using transfer functions and the parameter stability theory, equilibrium steady boundary equations and steady criteria were obtained and solved. It is shown that, the injection ratio, the pressure exponent, and tank pressure are the main design parameters affecting stability; therefore, the stability analysis of an SRM with fuel injection should concentrate on the initial phase of the motor operation. It was found that the motor stability of an SRM with fuel injection improves with the increase of the injection ratio, the free volume of the combustion chamber, and the value of the pressure exponent.

  3. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joint 5 Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, R. C.; Stratton, T. C.; LaMont, D. T.

    2003-01-01

    Torque tension testing of a newly designed Reusable Solid Rocket Motor nozzle bolted assembly was successfully completed. Test results showed that the 3-sigma preload variation was as expected at the required input torque level and the preload relaxation were within the engineering limits. A shim installation technique was demonstrated as a simple process to fill a shear lip gap between nozzle housings in the joint region. A new automated torque system was successfully demonstrated in this test. This torque control tool was found to be very precise and accurate. The bolted assembly performance was further evaluated using the Nozzle Structural Test Bed. Both current socket head cap screw and proposed multiphase alloy bolt configurations were tested. Results indicated that joint skip and bolt bending were significantly reduced with the new multiphase alloy bolt design. This paper summarizes all the test results completed to date.

  4. Nonlinear shell analysis of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, N. F., Jr.; Gillian, R. E.; Nemeth, M. P.

    1990-01-01

    A variety of structural analyses have been performed on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's) to provide information that would contribute to the understanding of the failure which destroyed the Space Shuttle Challenger. This paper describes nonlinear shell analyses that were performed to characterize the behavior of an overall SRB structure and a segment of the SRB in the vicinity of the External Tank Attachment (ETA) ring. Shell finite element models were used that would accurately reflect the global load transfer in an SRB in a manner such that nonlinear shell collapse and ovalization could be assessed. The purpose of these analyses was to calculate the overall deflection and stress distributions for these SRB models when subjected to mechanical loads corresponding to critical times during the launch sequence. Static analyses of these SRB models were performed using a 'snapshot picture' of the loads. Analytical results obtained using these models show no evidence of nonlinear shell collapse for the pre-liftoff loading cases considered.

  5. The 260: The Largest Solid Rocket Motor Ever Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crimmins, P.; Cousineau, M.; Rogers, C.; Shell, V.

    1999-01-01

    Aerojet in the mid 1960s, under contract to NASA, built and static hot fire tested the largest solid rocket motor (SRM) in history for the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of utilizing large SRMs for space exploration. This program successfully fabricated two high strength steel chambers, loaded each with approximately 1,68 million pounds of propellant, and static test fired these giants with their nozzles up from an underground silo located adjacent to the Florida everglades. Maximum thrust and total impulse in excess of 5,000,000 lbf and 3,470,000,000 lbf-sec were achieved. Flames from the second firing, conducted at night, were seen over eighty miles away. For comparative purposes: the thrust developed was nearly 100 times that of a Minuteman III second stage and the 260 in.-dia cross-section was over 3 times that of the Space Shuttle SRM.

  6. Stability analysis and numerical simulation of simplified solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, G.; Casalis, G.; Estivalèzes, J.-L.

    2013-08-01

    This paper investigates the Parietal Vortex Shedding (PVS) instability that significantly influences the Pressure Oscillations of the long and segmented solid rocket motors. The eigenmodes resulting from the stability analysis of a simplified configuration, namely, a cylindrical duct with sidewall injection, are presented. They are computed taking into account the presence of a wall injection defect, which is shown to induce hydrodynamic instabilities at discrete frequencies. These instabilities exhibit eigenfunctions in good agreement with the measured PVS vortical structures. They are successfully compared in terms of temporal evolution and frequencies to the unsteady hydrodynamic fluctuations computed by numerical simulations. In addition, this study has shown that the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with the PVS are the driving force of the flow dynamics, since they are responsible for the emergence of pressure waves propagating at the same frequency.

  7. Cathodic Protection Deployment on Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, Lee M.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protection of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters incorporates the use of cathodic protection(anodes) in concert with several coatings systems. The SRB design has large carbon/carbon composites(motor nozzle) electrically connected to an aluminum alloy structure. Early in the STS program, the aluminum structures incurred tremendous corrosive attack due primarily to the galvanic couple to the carbon/carbon nozzle at coating damage locations. Also contributing to the galvanic corrosion problem were stainless steel and titanium alloy components housed within the aluminum structures and electrically connected to the aluminum structures. This paper will highlight the evolution in the protection of the aluminum structures, providing historical information and summary data from the operation of the corrosion protection systems. Also, data and information will be included regarding the evaluation and deployment of inorganic zinc rich primers as anode area on the aluminum structures.

  8. Ecological effects and environmental fate of solid rocket exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nimmo, B.; Stout, I. J.; Mickus, J.; Vickers, D.; Madsen, B.

    1974-01-01

    Specific target processes were classified as to the chemical, chemical-physical, and biological reactions and toxic effects of solid rocket emissions within selected ecosystems at Kennedy Space Center. Exposure of Citris seedlings, English peas, and bush beans to SRM exhaust under laboratory conditions demonstrated reduced growth rates, but at very high concentrations. Field studies of natural plant populations in three diverse ecosystems failed to reveal any structural damage at the concentration levels tested. Background information on elemental composition of selected woody plants from two terrestrial ecosystems is reported. LD sub 50 for a native mouse (peromysous gossypinus) exposed to SRM exhaust was determined to be 50 ppm/g body weight. Results strongly indicate that other components of the SRM exhaust act synergically to enhance the toxic effects of HCl gas when inhaled. A brief summary is given regarding the work on SRM exhaust and its possible impact on hatchability of incubating bird eggs.

  9. Robotic NDE inspection of advanced solid rocket motor casings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneelege, Glenn E.; Sarantos, Chris

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor program determined the need to inspect ASRM forgings and segments for potentially catastrophic defects. To minimize costs, an automated eddy current inspection system was designed and manufactured for inspection of ASRM forgings in the initial phases of production. This system utilizes custom manipulators and motion control algorithms and integrated six channel eddy current data acquisition and analysis hardware and software. Total system integration is through a personal computer based workcell controller. Segment inspection demands the use of a gantry robot for the EMAT/ET inspection system. The EMAT/ET system utilized similar mechanical compliancy and software logic to accommodate complex part geometries. EMAT provides volumetric inspection capability while eddy current is limited to surface and near surface inspection. Each aspect of the systems are applicable to other industries, such as, inspection of pressure vessels, weld inspection, and traditional ultrasonic inspection applications.

  10. Determination of failure limits for sterilizable solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, W. L.; Mastrolia, E. J.; Mcconnell, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A structural evaluation to establish probable failure limits and a series of environmental tests involving temperature cycling, sustained acceleration, and vibration were conducted on an 18-inch diameter solid rocket motor. Despite the fact that thermal, acceleration and vibration loads representing a severe overtest of conventional environmental requirements were imposed on the sterilizable motor, no structural failure of the grain or flexible support system was detected. The following significant conclusions are considered justified. It is concluded that: (1) the flexible grain retention system, which permitted heat sterilization at 275 F on the test motor, can readily be adopted to meet the environmental requirements of an operational motor design, and (2) if further substantiation of structural integrity is desired, the motor used is considered acceptable for static firing.

  11. Space Shuttle solid rocket motor slag expulsion mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopson, Charles B.

    1995-01-01

    A 13 psi pressure perturbation occurred at approximately 68 seconds on the right Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) during the STS-54 space shuttle mission. While pressure perturbations are a normal characteristic of RSRM operation, the magnitude of the STS-54 perturbation and the resulting thrust imbalance between the left and right motors was outside of flight experience. A joint Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Thiokol Corporation (RSRM manufacturer) team soon narrowed the probable cause to a temporary nozzle restriction due to slag expulsion. In support of the team, Rockwell Aerospace performed fluid finite element simulations and vehicle flight dynamic correlations to investigate possible slag expulsion mechanisms responsible for pressure perturbations. Results of the simulations and analyses provided evidence that the combination of flight induced accelerations acting on accumulated slag and nozzle vectoring were the most probable cause of RSRM slag expulsion.

  12. Economics of the solid rocket booster for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines economics of the solid rocket booster for the Space Shuttle. Costs have been held down by adapting existing technology to the 146 in. SRB selected, with NASA reducing the cost of expendables and reusing the expensive nonexpendable hardware. Drop tests of Titan III motor cases and nozzles proved that boosters can survive water impact at vertical velocities of 100 ft/sec so that SRB components can be reused. The cost of expendables was minimized by selecting proven propellants, insulation, and nozzle ablatives of known costs; the propellant has the lowest available cost formulation, and low cost ablatives, such as pitch carbon fibers, will be used when available. Thus, the use of proven technology and low cost expendables will make the SRB an economical booster for the Space Shuttle.

  13. Evidence of erosive burning in shuttle solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. L.

    1983-01-01

    Known models of Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) performance have failed to produce pressure-time traces which accurately matched actual motor performance, especially during the first 5 seconds after ignition and during the last quarter of web burn time. Efforts to compensate for these differences in model reconstruction and actual performance resulted in resorting to the use of a Burning Anomaly Rate Function (BARF). It was suspected that propellant erosive burning was primarily responsible for the variation of model from actual results. The three dimensional Hercules Grain Design and Internal Ballistics Evaluation Program was made operational and slightly modified and an extensive trial and error effort was begun to test the hypothesis of erosive burning as an explanation of the burning anomaly. It was found that introduction of erosive burning (using Green's erosive burning equation) over portions of the aft segment grain and above a threshold gas Mach number did, in fact, give excellent agreement with the actual motor trace.

  14. Thrust imbalance of the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, W. A., Jr.; Sforzini, R. H.; Shackelford, B. W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The Monte Carlo statistical analysis of thrust imbalance is applied to both the Titan IIIC and the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors (SRMs) firing in parallel, and results are compared with those obtained from the Space Shuttle program. The test results are examined in three phases: (1) pairs of SRMs selected from static tests of the four developmental motors (DMs 1 through 4); (2) pairs of SRMs selected from static tests of the three quality assurance motors (QMs 1 through 3); (3) SRMs on the first flight test vehicle (STS-1A and STS-1B). The simplified internal ballistic model utilized for computing thrust from head-end pressure measurements on flight tests is shown to agree closely with measured thrust data. Inaccuracies in thrust imbalance evaluation are explained by possible flight test instrumentation errors.

  15. Ignition Transients of Large Segmented Solid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caveny, L. H.; Kuo, K. K.

    1976-01-01

    A model is described which provides a means for analyzing the complexities of ignition transients and pressure peaks of large, high performance, segmented solid rocket boosters. The method accounts for: (1) temporal and spatial development of the flow field set up by the head end igniter discharge, (2) ignition and flame spreading coupled to chamber flow, (3) the steep velocity, pressure, and temperature gradients that occur during the early phases of ignition, and (4) the interactions that produce ignition spikes (i.e., compression of chamber gases during pressurization, erosive burning, and mass added effect of igniter discharge). The technique differs from earlier models in that the flow interactions between the slots and main chamber are accounted for, and the original computer program for monolithic motors is improved. The procedures were used to predict the ignition transients of the current design for the space shuttle booster.

  16. Nonlinear shell analyses of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Gillian, Ronnie E.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    1989-01-01

    A variety of structural analyses have been performed on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's) to provide information that would contribute to the understanding of the failure which destroyed the Space Shuttle Challenger. This paper describes nonlinear shell analyses that were performed to characterize the behavior of an overall SRB structure and a segment of the SRB in the vicinity of the External Tank Attachment (ETA) ring. Shell finite element models were used that would accurately reflect the global load transfer in an SRB in a manner such that nonlinear shell collapse and ovalization could be assessed. The purpose of these analyses was to calculate the overall deflection and stress distributions for these SRB models when subjected to mechanical loads corresponding to critical times during the launch sequence. Static analyses of these SRB models were performed using a snapshot picture of the loads. Analytical results obtained using these models show no evidence of nonlinear shell collapse for the pre-liftoff loading cases considered.

  17. Verification of thermal analysis codes for modeling solid rocket nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyhani, M.

    1993-05-01

    One of the objectives of the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program (SPIP) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is development of thermal analysis codes capable of accurately predicting the temperature field, pore pressure field and the surface recession experienced by decomposing polymers which are used as thermal barriers in solid rocket nozzles. The objective of this study is to provide means for verifications of thermal analysis codes developed for modeling of flow and heat transfer in solid rocket nozzles. In order to meet the stated objective, a test facility was designed and constructed for measurement of the transient temperature field in a sample composite subjected to a constant heat flux boundary condition. The heating was provided via a steel thin-foil with a thickness of 0.025 mm. The designed electrical circuit can provide a heating rate of 1800 W. The heater was sandwiched between two identical samples, and thus ensure equal power distribution between them. The samples were fitted with Type K thermocouples, and the exact location of the thermocouples were determined via X-rays. The experiments were modeled via a one-dimensional code (UT1D) as a conduction and phase change heat transfer process. Since the pyrolysis gas flow was in the direction normal to the heat flow, the numerical model could not account for the convection cooling effect of the pyrolysis gas flow. Therefore, the predicted values in the decomposition zone are considered to be an upper estimate of the temperature. From the analysis of the experimental and the numerical results the following are concluded: (1) The virgin and char specific heat data for FM 5055 as reported by SoRI can not be used to obtain any reasonable agreement between the measured temperatures and the predictions. However, use of virgin and char specific heat data given in Acurex report produced good agreement for most of the measured temperatures. (2) Constant heat flux heating process can produce a much higher

  18. Verification of thermal analysis codes for modeling solid rocket nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyhani, M.

    1993-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program (SPIP) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is development of thermal analysis codes capable of accurately predicting the temperature field, pore pressure field and the surface recession experienced by decomposing polymers which are used as thermal barriers in solid rocket nozzles. The objective of this study is to provide means for verifications of thermal analysis codes developed for modeling of flow and heat transfer in solid rocket nozzles. In order to meet the stated objective, a test facility was designed and constructed for measurement of the transient temperature field in a sample composite subjected to a constant heat flux boundary condition. The heating was provided via a steel thin-foil with a thickness of 0.025 mm. The designed electrical circuit can provide a heating rate of 1800 W. The heater was sandwiched between two identical samples, and thus ensure equal power distribution between them. The samples were fitted with Type K thermocouples, and the exact location of the thermocouples were determined via X-rays. The experiments were modeled via a one-dimensional code (UT1D) as a conduction and phase change heat transfer process. Since the pyrolysis gas flow was in the direction normal to the heat flow, the numerical model could not account for the convection cooling effect of the pyrolysis gas flow. Therefore, the predicted values in the decomposition zone are considered to be an upper estimate of the temperature. From the analysis of the experimental and the numerical results the following are concluded: (1) The virgin and char specific heat data for FM 5055 as reported by SoRI can not be used to obtain any reasonable agreement between the measured temperatures and the predictions. However, use of virgin and char specific heat data given in Acurex report produced good agreement for most of the measured temperatures. (2) Constant heat flux heating process can produce a much higher

  19. Efficient solid rocket propulsion for access to space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Filippo; Bandera, Alessio; Galfetti, Luciano; De Luca, Luigi T.; Jackson, Thomas L.

    2010-06-01

    Space launch activity is expected to grow in the next few years in order to follow the current trend of space exploitation for business purpose. Granting high specific thrust and volumetric specific impulse, and counting on decades of intense development, solid rocket propulsion is a good candidate for commercial access to space, even with common propellant formulations. Yet, some drawbacks such as low theoretical specific impulse, losses as well as safety issues, suggest more efficient propulsion systems, digging into the enhancement of consolidated techniques. Focusing the attention on delivered specific impulse, a consistent fraction of losses can be ascribed to the multiphase medium inside the nozzle which, in turn, is related to agglomeration; a reduction of agglomerate size is likely. The present paper proposes a model based on heterogeneity characterization capable of describing the agglomeration trend for a standard aluminized solid propellant formulation. Material microstructure is characterized through the use of two statistical descriptors (pair correlation function and near-contact particles) looking at the mean metal pocket size inside the bulk. Given the real formulation and density of a propellant, a packing code generates the material representative which is then statistically analyzed. Agglomerate predictions are successfully contrasted to experimental data at 5 bar for four different formulations.

  20. Solid rocket motor aft field joint flow field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabnis, Jayant S.; Gibeling, Edward J.; Mcdonald, Henry

    1987-01-01

    An efficient Navier-Stokes analysis was successfully applied to simulate the complex flow field in the vicinity of a slot in a solid rocket motor with segment joints. The capability of the computer code to resolve the flow near solid surfaces without using a wall function assumption was demonstrated. In view of the complex nature of the flow field in the vicinity of the slot, this approach is considered essential. The results obtained from these calculations provide valuable design information, which would otherwise be extremely difficult to obtain. The results of the axisymmetric calculations indicate the presence of a region of reversed axial flow at the aft-edge of the slot and show the over-pressure in the slot to be only about 10 psi. The results of the asymmetric calculations indicate that a pressure asymmetry more than two diameters downstream of the slot has no noticeable effect on the flow field in the slot. They also indicate that the circumferential pressure differential caused in the slot due to failure of a 15 deg section of the castable inhibitor will be approximately 1 psi.

  1. Development of a new generation solid rocket motor ignition computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Winfred A., Jr.; Jenkins, Rhonald M.; Ciucci, Alessandro; Johnson, Shelby D.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the results of experimental and numerical investigations of the flow field in the head-end star grain slots of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor. This work provided the basis for the development of an improved solid rocket motor ignition transient code which is also described in this report. The correlation between the experimental and numerical results is excellent and provides a firm basis for the development of a fully three-dimensional solid rocket motor ignition transient computer code.

  2. Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Instability Modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability modeling of Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) remains a topic of active research. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process, acoustics, and steady-state gas dynamics. Recent advances in defining the energy transport of disturbances within steady flow-fields have been applied by combustion stability modelers to improve the analysis framework [1, 2, 3]. Employing this more accurate global energy balance requires a higher fidelity model of the SRM flow-field and acoustic mode shapes. The current industry standard analysis tool utilizes a one dimensional analysis of the time dependent fluid dynamics along with a quasi-three dimensional propellant grain regression model to determine the SRM ballistics. The code then couples with another application that calculates the eigenvalues of the one dimensional homogenous wave equation. The mean flow parameters and acoustic normal modes are coupled to evaluate the stability theory developed and popularized by Culick [4, 5]. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The current study employs the COMSOL multiphysics finite element framework to model the steady flow-field parameters and acoustic normal modes of a generic SRM. The study requires one way coupling of the CFD High Mach Number Flow (HMNF) and mathematics module. The HMNF module evaluates the gas flow inside of a SRM using St. Robert's law to model the solid propellant burn rate, no slip boundary conditions, and the hybrid outflow condition. Results from the HMNF model are verified by comparing the pertinent ballistics parameters with the industry standard code outputs (i.e. pressure drop, thrust, ect.). These results are then used by the coefficient form of the mathematics module to determine the complex eigenvalues of the

  3. Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Flight System Integration at Its Best

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, T. David; Kanner, Howard S.; Freeland, Donna M.; Olson, Derek T.

    2011-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) element integrates all the subsystems needed for ascent flight, entry, and recovery of the combined Booster and Motor system. These include the structures, avionics, thrust vector control, pyrotechnic, range safety, deceleration, thermal protection, and retrieval systems. This represents the only human-rated, recoverable and refurbishable solid rocket ever developed and flown. Challenges included subsystem integration, thermal environments and severe loads (including water impact), sometimes resulting in hardware attrition. Several of the subsystems evolved during the program through design changes. These included the thermal protection system, range safety system, parachute/recovery system, and others. Because the system was recovered, the SRB was ideal for data and imagery acquisition, which proved essential for understanding loads, environments and system response. The three main parachutes that lower the SRBs to the ocean are the largest parachutes ever designed, and the SRBs are the largest structures ever to be lowered by parachutes. SRB recovery from the ocean was a unique process and represented a significant operational challenge; requiring personnel, facilities, transportation, and ground support equipment. The SRB element achieved reliability via extensive system testing and checkout, redundancy management, and a thorough postflight assessment process. However, the in-flight data and postflight assessment process revealed the hardware was affected much more strongly than originally anticipated. Assembly and integration of the booster subsystems required acceptance testing of reused hardware components for each build. Extensive testing was done to assure hardware functionality at each level of stage integration. Because the booster element is recoverable, subsystems were available for inspection and testing postflight, unique to the Shuttle launch vehicle. Problems were noted and corrective actions were implemented as needed

  4. Numerical investigation of two-phase flow in solid rocket thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the research is to develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code which can accurately and efficiently predict the effects of metallized particles in the multiphase turbulent flow on solid rocket motor performance. The time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations, including a second-order turbulence model, are numerically integrated by using a four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme to predict the internal gas flowfield of solid rockets. A recently developed statistical transport model for particle dispersion was adopted to describe the metallized particle trajectory. The current status of the developed CFD code allows for prediction of non reacting two-dimensional, two phase, internal solid rocket combustor flows with a low particle loading ratio. Calculations for trajectories of different-sized particles within a simplified solid rocket combustor are presented.

  5. Block 2 Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) conceptual design study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Segmented and monolithic Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) design concepts were evaluated with emphasis on joints and seals. Particular attention was directed to eliminating deficiencies in the SRM High Performance Motor (HPM). The selected conceptual design is described and discussed.

  6. Block 2 Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) conceptual design study. Volume 1: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The design studies task implements the primary objective of developing a Block II Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) design offering improved flight safety and reliability. The SRM literature was reviewed. The Preliminary Development and Validation Plan is presented.

  7. A rocket-borne energy spectrometer using multiple solid-state detectors for particle identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fries, K. L.; Smith, L. G.; Voss, H. D.

    1979-01-01

    A rocket-borne experiment using energy spectrometers that allows particle identification by the use of multiple solid-state detectors is described. The instrumentation provides information regarding the energy spectrum, pitch-angle distribution, and the type of energetic particles present in the ionosphere. Particle identification was accomplished by considering detector loss mechanisms and their effects on various types of particles. Solid state detectors with gold and aluminum surfaces of several thicknesses were used. The ratios of measured energies for the various detectors were compared against known relationships during ground-based analysis. Pitch-angle information was obtained by using detectors with small geometrical factors mounted with several look angles. Particle flux was recorded as a function of rocket azimuth angle. By considering the rocket azimuth, the rocket precession, and the location of the detectors on the rocket, the pitched angle of the incident particles was derived.

  8. Solid-propellant rocket motor ballistic performance variation analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sforzini, R. H.; Foster, W. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of research aimed at improving the assessment of off-nominal internal ballistic performance including tailoff and thrust imbalance of two large solid-rocket motors (SRMs) firing in parallel. Previous analyses using the Monte Carlo technique were refined to permit evaluation of the effects of radial and circumferential propellant temperature gradients. Sample evaluations of the effect of the temperature gradients are presented. A separate theoretical investigation of the effect of strain rate on the burning rate of propellant indicates that the thermoelastic coupling may cause substantial variations in burning rate during highly transient operating conditions. The Monte Carlo approach was also modified to permit the effects on performance of variation in the characteristics between lots of propellants and other materials to be evaluated. This permits the variabilities for the total SRM population to be determined. A sample case shows, however, that the effect of these between-lot variations on thrust imbalances within pairs of SRMs is minor in compariosn to the effect of the within-lot variations. The revised Monte Carlo and design analysis computer programs along with instructions including format requirements for preparation of input data and illustrative examples are presented.

  9. Residual Silicone Detection. [external tank and solid rocket booster surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T.

    1980-01-01

    Both photoelectron emission and ellipsometry proved successful in detecting silicone contamination on unpainted and epoxy painted metal surfaces such as those of the external tank and the solid rocket booster. Great success was achieved using photoelectron emission (PEE). Panels were deliberately contaminated to controlled levels and then mapped with PEE to reveal the areas and levels that were contaminated. The panels were then tested with regard to adhesive properties. Tapes were bonded over the contaminated and uncontaminated regions and the peel force was measured, or the contaminated panels were bonded (with CPR 483 foam) to uncontaminated panels and made into lap shear specimens. Other panels were bonded and made into wedge specimens for hydrothermal stress endurance tests. Strong adhesion resulted if the PEE signal fell within an acceptance window, but was poor outside the acceptance window. A prototype instrument is being prepared which can automatically be scanned over the external liquid hydrogen tank and identify those regions that are contaminated and will cause bond degradation.

  10. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Nozzle Joint 2 Gas Path Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, R. C.; Hyer, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Each Space Shuttle solid rocket nozzle contains five joints. By design, each nozzle joint utilizes room-temperature vulcanized (RTV) rubber as a thermal barrier to protect the nozzle metal parts and O-rings from heat degradation due to motor combustion gas. Typically, combustion gas does not penetrate through the RTV in nozzle Joints. However, Joint currently experiences gas penetration through the RTV over 90 percent of the time. The occurrence of Joint gas paths is a very complex phenomenon with several known contributors such as the unique geometry of the joint, motor pressure, nozzle vectoring, manufacturing induced RTV voids. RTV material capability, and joint skip (relative radial displacement of joint components). The occurrence of Joint gas paths appears to be a combination of these causes. To better understand the causes of gas paths in Joint, the circumferential locations of gas paths in the RTV were identified and correlated with nozzle vectoring, RTV closeour locations (where the RTV backfill is completed), and X-ray low-density. anomaly (LDA) indications. Results that no specific cause was determined.

  11. Effects of Slag Ejection on Solid Rocket Motor Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Purinton, David C.; Hengel, John E.; Skelley, Stephen E.

    1995-01-01

    In past firings of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) both static test and flight motors have shown small pressure perturbations occurring primarily between 65 and 80 seconds. A joint NASA/Thiokol team investigation concluded that the cause of the pressure perturbations was the periodic ingestion and ejection of molten aluminum oxide slag from the cavity around the submerged nozzle nose which tends to trap and collect individual aluminum oxide droplets from the approach flow. The conclusions of the team were supported by numerous data and observations from special tests including high speed photographic films, real time radiography, plume calorimeters, accelerometers, strain gauges, nozzle TVC system force gauges, and motor pressure and thrust data. A simplistic slag ballistics model was formulated to relate a given pressure perturbation to a required slag quantity. Also, a cold flow model using air and water was developed to provide data on the relationship between the slag flow rate and the chamber pressure increase. Both the motor and the cold flow model exhibited low frequency oscillations in conjunction with periods of slag ejection. Motor and model frequencies were related to scaling parameters. The data indicate that there is a periodicity to the slag entrainment and ejection phenomena which is possibly related to organized oscillations from instabilities in the dividing streamline shear layer which impinges on the underneath surface of the nozzle.

  12. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joint-4 Thermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2001-01-01

    This study provides for development and test verification of a thermal model used for prediction of joint heating environments, structural temperatures and seal erosions in the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Nozzle Joint-4. The heating environments are a result of rapid pressurization of the joint free volume assuming a leak path has occurred in the filler material used for assembly gap close out. Combustion gases flow along the leak path from nozzle environment to joint O-ring gland resulting in local heating to the metal housing and erosion of seal materials. Analysis of this condition was based on usage of the NASA Joint Pressurization Routine (JPR) for environment determination and the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA) for structural temperature prediction. Model generated temperatures, pressures and seal erosions are compared to hot fire test data for several different leak path situations. Investigated in the hot fire test program were nozzle joint-4 O-ring erosion sensitivities to leak path width in both open and confined joint geometries. Model predictions were in generally good agreement with the test data for the confined leak path cases. Worst case flight predictions are provided using the test-calibrated model. Analysis issues are discussed based on model calibration procedures.

  13. NDE of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor field joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.

    One of the most critical areas for inspection in the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motors is the bond between the steel case and rubber insulation in the region of the field joints. The tang-and-clevis geometry of the field joints is sufficiently complex to prohibit the use of resonance-based techniques. One approach we are investigating is to interrogate the steel-insulation bondline in the tang and clevis regions using surface-travelling waves. A low-frequency contact surface wave transmitting array transducer is under development at our laboratory for this purpose. The array is placed in acoustic contact with the steel and surface waves are launched on the inside surface or the clevis leg which propagate along the steel-insulation interface. As these surface waves propagate along the bonded surface, the magnitude of the ultrasonic energy leaking into the steel is monitored on the outer surface of the case. Our working hypothesis is that the magnitude of energy received at the outer surface of the case is dependent upon the integrity of the case-insulation bond, with less attenuation for propagation along a disbond due to imperfect acoustic coupling between the steel and rubber. Measurements on test specimens indicate a linear relationship between received signal amplitude and the length of good bend between the transmitter and receiver, suggesting the validity of this working hypothesis.

  14. Lidar measurements of solid rocket propellant fire particle plumes.

    PubMed

    Brown, David M; Brown, Andrea M; Willitsford, Adam H; Dinello-Fass, Ryan; Airola, Marc B; Siegrist, Karen M; Thomas, Michael E; Chang, Yale

    2016-06-10

    This paper presents the first, to our knowledge, direct measurement of aerosol produced by an aluminized solid rocket propellant (SRP) fire on the ground. Such fires produce aluminum oxide particles small enough to loft high into the atmosphere and disperse over a wide area. These results can be applied to spacecraft launchpad accidents that expose spacecraft to such fires; during these fires, there is concern that some of the plutonium from the spacecraft power system will be carried with the aerosols. Accident-related lofting of this material would be the net result of many contributing processes that are currently being evaluated. To resolve the complexity of fire processes, a self-consistent model of the ground-level and upper-level parts of the plume was determined by merging ground-level optical measurements of the fire with lidar measurements of the aerosol plume at height during a series of SRP fire tests that simulated propellant fire accident scenarios. On the basis of the measurements and model results, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) team was able to estimate the amount of aluminum oxide (alumina) lofted into the atmosphere above the fire. The quantification of this ratio is critical for a complete understanding of accident scenarios, because contaminants are transported through the plume. This paper provides an estimate for the mass of alumina lofted into the air. PMID:27409023

  15. Solid Rocket Booster Hydraulic Pump Port Cap Joint Load Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, W. R.; Murphy, N. C.

    2004-01-01

    The solid rocket booster uses hydraulic pumps fabricated from cast C355 aluminum alloy, with 17-4 PH stainless steel pump port caps. Corrosion-resistant steel, MS51830 CA204L self-locking screw thread inserts are installed into C355 pump housings, with A286 stainless steel fasteners installed into the insert to secure the pump port cap to the housing. In the past, pump port cap fasteners were installed to a torque of 33 Nm (300 in-lb). However, the structural analyses used a significantly higher nut factor than indicated during tests conducted by Boeing Space Systems. When the torque values were reassessed using Boeing's nut factor, the fastener preload had a factor of safety of less than 1, with potential for overloading the joint. This paper describes how behavior was determined for a preloaded joint with a steel bolt threaded into steel inserts in aluminum parts. Finite element models were compared with test results. For all initial bolt preloads, bolt loads increased as external applied loads increased. For higher initial bolt preloads, less load was transferred into the bolt, due to external applied loading. Lower torque limits were established for pump port cap fasteners and additional limits were placed on insert axial deformation under operating conditions after seating the insert with an initial preload.

  16. NDE of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor field joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most critical areas for inspection in the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motors is the bond between the steel case and rubber insulation in the region of the field joints. The tang-and-clevis geometry of the field joints is sufficiently complex to prohibit the use of resonance-based techniques. One approach we are investigating is to interrogate the steel-insulation bondline in the tang and clevis regions using surface-travelling waves. A low-frequency contact surface wave transmitting array transducer is under development at our laboratory for this purpose. The array is placed in acoustic contact with the steel and surface waves are launched on the inside surface or the clevis leg which propagate along the steel-insulation interface. As these surface waves propagate along the bonded surface, the magnitude of the ultrasonic energy leaking into the steel is monitored on the outer surface of the case. Our working hypothesis is that the magnitude of energy received at the outer surface of the case is dependent upon the integrity of the case-insulation bond, with less attenuation for propagation along a disbond due to imperfect acoustic coupling between the steel and rubber. Measurements on test specimens indicate a linear relationship between received signal amplitude and the length of good bend between the transmitter and receiver, suggesting the validity of this working hypothesis.

  17. Multiple Changes to Reusable Solid Rocket Motors, Identifying Hidden Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhalgh, Phillip O.; McCann, Bradley Q.

    2003-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) baseline is subject to various changes. Changes are necessary due to safety and quality improvements, environmental considerations, vendor changes, obsolescence issues, etc. The RSRM program has a goal to test changes on full-scale static test motors prior to flight due to the unique RSRM operating environment. Each static test motor incorporates several significant changes and numerous minor changes. Flight motors often implement multiple changes simultaneously. While each change is individually verified and assessed, the potential for changes to interact constitutes additional hidden risk. Mitigating this risk depends upon identification of potential interactions. Therefore, the ATK Thiokol Propulsion System Safety organization initiated the use of a risk interaction matrix to identify potential interactions that compound risk. Identifying risk interactions supports flight and test motor decisions. Uncovering hidden risks of a full-scale static test motor gives a broader perspective of the changes being tested. This broader perspective compels the program to focus on solutions for implementing RSRM changes with minimal/mitigated risk. This paper discusses use of a change risk interaction matrix to identify test challenges and uncover hidden risks to the RSRM program.

  18. Analysis of the measured effects of the principal exhaust effluents from solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawbarn, R.; Kinslow, M.; Watson, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of conducting environmental chamber tests using a small rocket motor to study the physical processes which occur when the exhaust products from solid motors mix with the ambient atmosphere was investigated. Of particular interest was the interaction between hydrogen chloride, aluminum oxide, and water vapor. Several types of instruments for measuring HCl concentrations were evaluated. Under some conditions it was noted that acid aerosols were formed in the ground cloud. These droplets condensed on Al2O3 nuclei and were associated with the rocket exhaust cooling during the period of plume rise to stabilization. Outdoor firings of the solid rocket motors of a 6.4 percent scaled model of the space shuttle were monitored to study the interaction of the exhaust effluents with vegetation downwind of the test site. Data concerning aluminum oxide particles produced by solid rocket motors were evaluated.

  19. Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Instability Modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability modeling of Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) remains a topic of active research. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process, acoustics, and steady-state gas dynamics. Recent advances in defining the energy transport of disturbances within steady flow-fields have been applied by combustion stability modelers to improve the analysis framework. Employing this more accurate global energy balance requires a higher fidelity model of the SRM flow-field and acoustic mode shapes. The current industry standard analysis tool utilizes a one dimensional analysis of the time dependent fluid dynamics along with a quasi-three dimensional propellant grain regression model to determine the SRM ballistics. The code then couples with another application that calculates the eigenvalues of the one dimensional homogenous wave equation. The mean flow parameters and acoustic normal modes are coupled to evaluate the stability theory developed and popularized by Culick. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The current study employs the COMSOL Multiphysics finite element framework to model the steady flow-field parameters and acoustic normal modes of a generic SRM. This work builds upon previous efforts to verify the use of the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) laid out by Campos. The acoustic velocity potential (psi) describing the acoustic wave motion in the presence of an inhomogeneous steady high-speed flow is defined by, del squared psi - (lambda/c) squared psi - M x [M x del((del)(psi))] - 2((lambda)(M)/c + M x del(M) x (del)(psi) - 2(lambda)(psi)[M x del(1/c)] = 0. with M as the Mach vector, c as the speed of sound, and ? as the complex eigenvalue. The study requires one way coupling of the CFD High Mach Number Flow (HMNF

  20. Dynamic Response Study of Flexible Nozzle in Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongbin; Hou, Xiao

    2002-01-01

    system, solid rocket motor and control system must be examined jointly many times during the course of the flexible nozzle study. With the aim of acquiring the responses of flexible to different excitation, there is much experiment to be done. Those different excitation signals are accomplished when different forces applied to the supports in divergent section. While the deformation of the nozzle, especially the deformation of supports ,which attach control system to divergent section, relates directly to control problems. During the course of thrust vector control, the forces are applied in the shape of stronger impact force. In the condition of excitation force applied, the better we know about deformation of the divergent section, especially the local deformation of the supports in the divergent section, the more control is accurate. In fact, all control is accomplished in dynamic state. The information of swing angle not only includes displacement in the condition of control force applied but also includes velocity and acceleration where control force applied. Only all that deformation and deformation process are comprehend comprehensively, can control efficiency and control accuracy be improved. in which the flexible joint is simply treated as distributed spring. With finite element method, the dynamic responses of the flexible nozzle model is studied in condition of dynamic load applied in finite element method. The dynamic response Results are presented in this paper when triangular wave excitation, sine wave Excitation and arc sine wave excitation applied. displacement of sine wave and arc sine wave lag 0.025s than maximal load. Velocity response has also the property lagging than load, which is little than displacement hysteresis effect. Maximal velocity lag 0.005s than maximal load. in the condition of above three sorts load applied, acceleration response shows obvious property of oscillating. These results can play important in flexible nozzle structure

  1. Embeddable structural sensors for SHM of solid rocket grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelner, Herb; Buswell, Jim

    2006-05-01

    Structural Health Monitoring is essential in that any event that may compromise the solid rocket motor must be detected. The magnitude, position and time of any imposed event that may damage the propellant grain, bonding system or integrity of the case must be detected and identified for safe operation of the motor. The current embedded sensor technology has been developed to monitor the effect of these events on the propellant grain. Normal bond stress and temperature can be measured using DBST sensors and the output interpreted to confirm integrity. It has been shown that the presences of de-bond and cracks can be determined. Current work is in progress to establish if these embedded sensors can be used to determine position and size of such defects. The stress distribution in a typical propellant grain also has a shear component particularly near the ends and around any flaps, slots or stress relieving devices. This can be the critical stress under certain loads and in complex geometries. Therefore, a recent addition to the range is a sensor to measure shear stress in the same body as the DBST. Motors can be stored for long periods before being used so the sensor system must also be reliable and stable for at least twenty years of operation. Similar sensors stored for ten years have shown little change and tests are being undertaken to establish the confidence that the sensor system will last the life of the motor. This paper will review the recent development and testing of these embeddable sensors, and results to date will be discussed.

  2. A system level model for preliminary design of a space propulsion solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Daniel M.

    Preliminary design of space propulsion solid rocket motors entails a combination of components and subsystems. Expert design tools exist to find near optimal performance of subsystems and components. Conversely, there is no system level preliminary design process for space propulsion solid rocket motors that is capable of synthesizing customer requirements into a high utility design for the customer. The preliminary design process for space propulsion solid rocket motors typically builds on existing designs and pursues feasible rather than the most favorable design. Classical optimization is an extremely challenging method when dealing with the complex behavior of an integrated system. The complexity and combinations of system configurations make the number of the design parameters that are traded off unreasonable when manual techniques are used. Existing multi-disciplinary optimization approaches generally address estimating ratios and correlations rather than utilizing mathematical models. The developed system level model utilizes the Genetic Algorithm to perform the necessary population searches to efficiently replace the human iterations required during a typical solid rocket motor preliminary design. This research augments, automates, and increases the fidelity of the existing preliminary design process for space propulsion solid rocket motors. The system level aspect of this preliminary design process, and the ability to synthesize space propulsion solid rocket motor requirements into a near optimal design, is achievable. The process of developing the motor performance estimate and the system level model of a space propulsion solid rocket motor is described in detail. The results of this research indicate that the model is valid for use and able to manage a very large number of variable inputs and constraints towards the pursuit of the best possible design.

  3. Detailed modal testing of a solid rocket motor using a portable test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glozman, Vladimir; Brillhart, Ralph D.

    1990-01-01

    Modern analytical techniques have expended the ability to evaluate solid rocket motors used in launch vehicles. As more detailed models of solid rocket motors were developed, testing methods were required to verify the models. Experimental modal analysis (modal testing) of space structures and launch vehicles has been a requirement for model validation for many years. However, previous testing of solid rocket motors has not typically involved dynamic modal testing of full scale motors for verification of solid propellant or system assembly properties. Innovative approaches to the testing of solid rocket motors were developed and modal testing of a full scale, two segment Titan 34D Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) was performed to validate detailed computer modeling. Special modifications were made to convert an existing facility into a temporary modal test facility which would accommodate the test article. The assembly of conventional data acquisition equipment into a multiple channel count portable system has made modal testing in the field feasible. Special purpose hydraulic exciters were configured to apply the dynamic driving forces required. All instrumentation and data collection equipment were installed at the test site for the duration of the test program and removed upon completion. Conversion of an existing test facility into a temporary modal test facility, and use of a multiple channel count portable test data acquisition system allowed all test objectives to be met and resulted in validation of the computer model in a minimum time.

  4. Ignition transient analysis of a solid rocket motor using a one dimensional two fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardue, Byron A.; Han, Samuel S.

    1992-07-01

    A one dimensional two fluid numerical model has been used to study the ignition transient stage of a Space Shuttle solid rocket motor. During the ignition phase of a solid rocket motor a pressure transient is induced by complex transport processes involving the igniter gas heat transfer to the propellant, chemical reactions at the propellant surface, and the interaction of the fluid with the attached rocket nozzle. One dimensional models used in the past neglected the aluminum oxide particles which are present in the combustion gases. The current model uses the IPSA (Inter-Phase-Slip-Algorithm) to solve the transient compressible flow equations for the rocket chamber and attached nozzle. Numerical results for head end pressure changes and overall thrust are compared with both measurement data and predictions of a one dimensional one fluid model.

  5. The effects of solid rocket motor effluents on selected surfaces and solid particle size, distribution, and composition for simulated shuttle booster separation motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, D. W.; Linton, R. C.; Russell, W. M.; Trenkle, J. J.; Wilkes, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A series of three tests was conducted using solid rocket propellants to determine the effects a solid rocket plume would have on thermal protective surfaces (TPS). The surfaces tested were those which are baselined for the shuttle vehicle. The propellants used were to simulate the separation solid rocket motors (SSRM) that separate the solid rocket boosters (SRB) from the shuttle launch vehicle. Data cover: (1) the optical effects of the plume environment on spacecraft related surfaces, and (2) the solid particle size, distribution, and composition at TPS sample locations.

  6. Comparisons Between Stability Prediction and Measurements for the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    The Space Transportation System has used the solid rocket boosters for lift-off and ascent propulsion over the history of the program. Part of the structural loads assessment of the assembled vehicle is the contribution due to solid rocket booster thrust oscillations. These thrust oscillations are a consequence of internal motor pressure oscillations active during operation. Understanding of these pressure oscillations is key to predicting the subsequent thrust oscillations and vehicle loading. The pressure oscillation characteristics of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) design are reviewed in this work. Dynamic pressure data from the static test and flight history are shown, with emphasis on amplitude, frequency, and timing of the oscillations. Physical mechanisms that cause these oscillations are described by comparing data observations to predictions made by the Solid Stability Prediction (SSP) code.

  7. Solid rocket technology advancement for Space Tug and IUS applications. [Interim Upper Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ascher, W.; Bailey, R. L.; Behm, J. W.; Gin, W.

    1975-01-01

    Two-burn restartable solid propellant rocket motors for the kick stage (auxiliary stage) of the Shuttle Tug, or Interim Upper Stage, are described, with details on features and test results of the ignition and quench (thrust termination) systems and procedures, fabrication of propellant and insulation, explosion hazards of propellants, and comparative data on present and future motor design. These rocket motor systems are designed for upper stage augmentation of launch vehicles and possible service in Shuttle-launched outer planet spacecraft.

  8. Solid Rocket Booster Large Main and Drogue Parachute Reliability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, Courtenay B.; Hengel, John E.

    2009-01-01

    The parachutes on the Space Transportation System (STS) Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) are the means for decelerating the SRB and allowing it to impact the water at a nominal vertical velocity of 75 feet per second. Each SRB has one pilot, one drogue, and three main parachutes. About four minutes after SRB separation, the SRB nose cap is jettisoned, deploying the pilot parachute. The pilot chute then deploys the drogue parachute. The drogue chute provides initial deceleration and proper SRB orientation prior to frustum separation. At frustum separation, the drogue pulls the frustum from the SRB and allows the main parachutes that are mounted in the frustum to unpack and inflate. These chutes are retrieved, inspected, cleaned, repaired as needed, and returned to the flight inventory and reused. Over the course of the Shuttle Program, several improvements have been introduced to the SRB main parachutes. A major change was the replacement of the small (115 ft. diameter) main parachutes with the larger (136 ft. diameter) main parachutes. Other modifications were made to the main parachutes, main parachute support structure, and SRB frustum to eliminate failure mechanisms, improve damage tolerance, and improve deployment and inflation characteristics. This reliability analysis is limited to the examination of the SRB Large Main Parachute (LMP) and drogue parachute failure history to assess the reliability of these chutes. From the inventory analysis, 68 Large Main Parachutes were used in 651 deployments, and 7 chute failures occurred in the 651 deployments. Logistic regression was used to analyze the LMP failure history, and it showed that reliability growth has occurred over the period of use resulting in a current chute reliability of R = .9983. This result was then used to determine the reliability of the 3 LMPs on the SRB, when all must function. There are 29 drogue parachutes that were used in 244 deployments, and no in-flight failures have occurred. Since there are no

  9. The solid-core heat-exchanger nuclear rocket program

    SciTech Connect

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1994-12-31

    As measured by the results of its accomplishments, the nuclear rocket program was a success. Why, then, was it cancelled? In my opinion, the cancellation resulted from the success of the Apollo program. President Kennedy declared that putting a man on the moon by 1969 would be a national objective. Upon the Apollo program`s completion, space spectaculars lost their attraction, and the manned exploration of Mars, which could have been accomplished with nuclear rockets, was shelved. Perhaps another generation of physicists and engineers will experience the thrill and satisfaction of participating in a nuclear-propulsion-based program for space exploration in decades to come.

  10. Numerical study of the unsteady flow in a simulated solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. M.; Roach, R. L.; Flandro, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Recently conducted experiments by Brown et al. and analysis by Flandro have demonstrated that the acoustically driven flow in a cold flow solid rocket simulator varies greatly from the simple plane wave model. The magnitude of the axial velocity component near the wall is almost double the centerline magnitude and the phase shift is nearly zero. Interaction of the acoustic signal with the vorticity field in the mean flow accounts for this strange behavior. This work reports the progress on the development of a procedure to capture the delicate unsteady acoustic/vorticity transport phenomena in acoustically excited solid rocket motors. The numerical scheme is based on the Beam and Warming approximate factorization scheme that solves the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations as applied to the flows in solid rocket motors.

  11. The space shuttle advanced solid rocket motor: Quality control and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Congressional committees that authorize the activities of NASA requested that the National Research Council (NRC) review the testing and quality assurance programs for the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) program. The proposed ASRM design incorporates numerous features that are significant departures from the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). The NRC review concentrated mainly on these features. Primary among these are the steel case material, welding rather than pinning of case factory joints, a bolted field joint designed to close upon firing the rocket, continuous mixing and casting of the solid propellant in place of the current batch processes, use of asbestos-free insulation, and a lightweight nozzle. The committee's assessment of these and other features of the ASRM are presented in terms of their potential impact on flight safety.

  12. Atmospheric Manmade Glowings Phenomena Observed During the Launches of Solid Propellant Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernouss, S. A.; Platov, V. V.; Upspensky, M. V.; Alpatov, V. V.; Kirillov, A. S.

    2015-09-01

    Exotic types of luminosities observed in the upper atmosphere always take place during the launch and flight of solid-propellant rockets We consider a large-scale geometry and dynamic features of such phenomena also physics of the intense turquoise (blue-green) glow observed in twilight conditions in the region of missile flight. This study has been based on numerous observations of different rocket flights in the atmosphere over Russia and Scandinavia. Formation of the monoxide aluminum clouds observed in the upper atmosphere is a result of interaction of the exhausted propellant products with the atomic oxygen. The sunlight excited the monoxide aluminum EA1O*) resonance emissions in the atmosphere. Careful studies of spectra of the manmade luminosities during rocket launch/flight permit us to know chemical, thermal and mechanical processes in the atmosphere similar as it is doing in experiments with the artificial cloud release from sounding rockets in the high latitude atmosphere.

  13. Combustion diagnosis for analysis of solid propellant rocket abort hazards: Role of spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, W.; Cruz-Cabrera, A. A.; Donaldson, A. B.; Lim, J.; Sivathanu, Y.; Bystrom, E.; Haug, A.; Sharp, L.; Surmick, D. M.

    2014-11-01

    Solid rocket propellant plume temperatures have been measured using spectroscopic methods as part of an ongoing effort to specify the thermal-chemical-physical environment in and around a burning fragment of an exploded solid rocket at atmospheric pressures. Such specification is needed for launch safety studies where hazardous payloads become involved with large fragments of burning propellant. The propellant burns in an off-design condition producing a hot gas flame loaded with burning metal droplets. Each component of the flame (soot, droplets and gas) has a characteristic temperature, and it is only through the use of spectroscopy that their temperature can be independently identified.

  14. Development and evaluation of an ablative closeout material for solid rocket booster thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    A trowellable closeout/repair material designated as MTA-2 was developed and evaluated for use on the Solid Rocket Booster. This material is composed of an epoxy-polysulfide binder and is highly filled with phenolic microballoons for density control and ablative performance. Mechanical property testing and thermal testing were performed in a wind tunnel to simulate the combined Solid Rocket Booster trajectory aeroshear and heating environments. The material is characterized by excellent thermal performance and was used extensively on the Space Shuttle STS-1 and STS-2 flight hardware.

  15. A facility for testing the acoustic combustion instability characteristics of solid rocket propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathes, H. B.

    1980-01-01

    A facility is described that has been specifically designed for small-scale laboratory testing of solid rocket propellants. A description of the facility is provided which includes the general plan of the facility and features related to personnel safety. One of the major activities in the facility is testing solid rocket propellants for combustion response to acoustic perturbations. A detailed discussion of acoustic instability testing is given including specially designed combustion apparatus, data acquisition, and signal conditioning. Techniques of data reduction are reviewed and some of the instrumentation problems that arise in this type of testing are mentioned along with practical solutions.

  16. Molded composite pyrogen igniter for rocket motors. [solid propellant ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.; Lucy, M. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A lightweight pyrogen igniter assembly including an elongated molded plastic tube adapted to contain a pyrogen charge was designed for insertion into a rocket motor casing for ignition of the rocket motor charge. A molded plastic closure cap provided for the elongated tube includes an ignition charge for igniting the pyrogen charge and an electrically actuated ignition squib for igniting the ignition charge. The ignition charge is contained within a portion of the closure cap, and it is retained therein by a noncorrosive ignition pellet retainer or screen which is adapted to rest on a shoulder of the elongated tube when the closure cap and tube are assembled together. A circumferentially disposed metal ring is provided along the external circumference of the closure cap and is molded or captured within the plastic cap in the molding process to provide, along with O-ring seals, a leakproof rotary joint.

  17. Coated oxidizers for combustion stability in solid-propellant rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmy, A. M.; Ramohalli, K. N. R.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments are conducted in a laboratory-scale (6.25-cm diameter) end-burning rocket motor with state-of-the-art, ammonium perchlorate hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), nonmetallized propellants. The concept of tailoring the stability characteristics with a small amount (less than 1 percent by weight) of COATING on the oxidizer is explored. The thermal degradation characteristics of the coat chemical are deduced through theoretical arguments on thermal diffusivity of the composite material (propellant). Several candidate coats are selected and propellants are cast. These propellants (with coated oxidizers) are fired in a laboratory-scale end-burning rocket motor, and real-time pressure histories are recorded. The control propellant (with no coating) is also tested for comparison. The uniformity of the coating, confirmed by SEM pictures and BET adsorption measurements, is thought to be an advance in technology. The frequency of bulk mode instability (BMI), the pressure fluctuation amplitudes, and stability boundaries are correlated with parameters related to the characteristic length (L-asterisk) of the rocket motor. The coated oxidizer propellants, in general, display greater combustion stability than the control (state-of-the-art). The correlations of the various parameters are thought to be new to a field filled with much uncertainty.

  18. Study of solid rocket motor for space, shuttle booster, volume 2, book 4 appendices B thru D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The mass properties and related data for the solid propellant rocket engine for use with the space shuttle are presented. Data for three solid propellant rocket engines are provided. The three designs considered are: (1) baseline parallel burn, (2) optional parallel burn, and (3) baseline series burn. Layouts of the respective designs to show design and dimensional data are included.

  19. Solid rocket combustion simulator technology using the hybrid rocket for simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar

    1994-01-01

    The hybrid rocket is reexamined in light of several important unanswered questions regarding its performance. The well-known heat transfer limited burning rate equation is quoted, and its limitations are pointed out. Several inconsistencies in the burning rate determination through fuel depolymerization are explicitly discussed. The resolution appears to be through the postulate of (surface) oxidative degradation of the fuel. Experiments are initiated to study the fuel degradation in mixtures of nitrogen/oxygen in the 99.9 percent/0.1 percent to 98 percent/2 percent range. The overall hybrid combustion behavior is studied in a 2 in-diameter rocket motor, where a PMMA tube is used as the fuel. The results include detailed, real-time infrared video images of the combustion zone. Space- and time-averaged images give a broad indication of the temperature reached in the gases. A brief outline is shown of future work, which will specifically concentrate on the exploration of the role of the oxidizer transport to the fuel surface, and the role of the unburned fuel that is reported to escape below the classical time-averaged boundary layer flame.

  20. Features of optical phenomena connected with launches of solid-propellant ballistic rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platov, Yu. V.; Chernouss, S. A.; Alpatov, V. V.

    2013-04-01

    Specific optical phenomena observed in the upper atmosphere layers and connected with launches of powerful solid-propellant rockets are considered: the development of spherically symmetric gas-dust formations having the shape of an extending torus in the image plane and the formation of regions with intense blue-green (turquoise) glow observed under twilight conditions along a rocket's flight path. The development of clouds can be represented by the model of a strong explosion occurring at the stage separation of solid-propellant rockets in the upper atmosphere. A turquoise glow arises as a result of resonance scattering of solar radiation on AlO molecules that are formed when metallic aluminum in the composition of fuel interacts with atmosphere components and combustion products.

  1. Ice nucleus activity measurements of solid rocket motor exhaust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The ice Nucleus activity of exhaust particles generated from combustion of Space Shuttle propellant in small rocket motors has been measured. The activity at -20 C was substantially lower than that of aerosols generated by unpressurized combustion of propellant samples in previous studies. The activity decays rapidly with time and is decreased further in the presence of moist air. These tests corroborate the low effectivity ice nucleus measurement results obtained in the exhaust ground cloud of the Space Shuttle. Such low ice nucleus activity implies that Space Shuttle induced inadvertent weather modification via an ice phase process is extremely unlikely.

  2. Solid propellant processing factor in rocket motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The ways are described by which propellant processing is affected by choices made in designing rocket engines. Tradeoff studies, design proof or scaleup studies, and special design features are presented that are required to obtain high product quality, and optimum processing costs. Processing is considered to include the operational steps involved with the lining and preparation of the motor case for the grain; the procurement of propellant raw materials; and propellant mixing, casting or extrusion, curing, machining, and finishing. The design criteria, recommended practices, and propellant formulations are included.

  3. Erosive burning threshold conditions in solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Cohen, N. S.

    1989-01-01

    Erosive burning has been predicted to be enhanced by factors that increase the level of turbulence close to the propellant surface, such a high cross flow velocity, low surface blowing rate, propellant surface roughness, and adverse pressure gradient. A study is reported which was carried out with the objective of measuring the effects of these parameters on the scaling to larger rocket motor sizes of the transition to, or threshold conditions for, erosive burning rate augmentation. The results are used to develop a scaling criterion for the threshold conditions for erosive burning.

  4. Development of high temperature materials for solid propellant rocket nozzle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, C. R., Jr.; Lineback, L. D.

    1974-01-01

    Aspects of the development and characteristics of thermal shock resistant hafnia ceramic material for use in solid propellant rocket nozzles are presented. The investigation of thermal shock resistance factors for hafnia based composites, and the preparation and analysis of a model of elastic materials containing more than one crack are reported.

  5. Loads analysis and testing of flight configuration solid rocket motor outer boot ring segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Rafiq

    1990-01-01

    The loads testing on in-house-fabricated flight configuration Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) outer boot ring segments. The tests determined the bending strength and bending stiffness of these beams and showed that they compared well with the hand analysis. The bending stiffness test results compared very well with the finite element data.

  6. SRB-3D Solid Rocket Booster performance prediction program. Volume 2: Sample case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The sample case presented in this volume is an asymmetrical eight sector thermal gradient performance prediction for the solid rocket motor. This motor is the TC-227A-75 grain design and the initial grain geometry is assumed to be symmetrical about the motors longitudinal axis.

  7. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Appendix B: Prime item development specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The specifications for the performance, design, development, and test requirements of the P2-156, S3-156, and S6-120 space shuttle booster solid rocket motors are presented. The applicable documents which form a part of the specifications are listed.

  8. Experimental investigation of laboratory-scale rocket engine fed on solid polyethylene rod as fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yemets, V. V.; Sanin, F. P. Dzhur, Ye. O.; Masliany, M. V.; Kostritsyn, O. Yu.; Minteev, G. V.; Ushkanov, V. M.

    Fire testing of the laboratory-scale rocket engine with the consumable solid polyethylene rod as fuel is described. The experimental data on heat flows, gasification rate and heat transfer coefficient are presented. Results of the testing may be useful for designing launch vehicles with combustible polyethylene tank shells.

  9. Solid rocket booster thermal protection system materials development. [space shuttle boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. G.

    1978-01-01

    A complete run log of all tests conducted in the NASA-MSFC hot gas test facility during the development of materials for the space shuttle solid rocket booster thermal protection system are presented. Lists of technical reports and drawings generated under the contract are included.

  10. SRB-3D Solid Rocket Booster performance prediction program. Volume 3: Programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The programmer's manual for the Modified Solid Rocket Booster Performance Prediction Program (SRB-3D) describes the major control routines of SRB-3D, followed by a super index listing of the program and a cross-reference of the program variables.

  11. Study of solid rocket motor for space shuttle booster, volume 2, book 3, appendix A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A systems requirements analysis for the solid propellant rocket engine to be used with the space shuttle was conducted. The systems analysis was developed to define the physical and functional requirements for the systems and subsystems. The operations analysis was performed to identify the requirements of the various launch operations, mission operations, ground operations, and logistic and flight support concepts.

  12. Study of solid rocket motor for space shuttle booster, Volume 3: Program acquisition planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The program planning acquisition functions for the development of the solid propellant rocket engine for the space shuttle booster is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) program management, (2) contracts administration, (3) systems engineering, (4) configuration management, and (5) maintenance engineering. The plans for manufacturing, testing, and operations support are included.

  13. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Volume 3: Program acquisition planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderesch, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Plans for conducting Phase C/D for a solid rocket motor booster vehicle are presented. Methods for conducting this program with details of scheduling, testing, and program management and control are included. The requirements of the space shuttle program to deliver a minimum cost/maximum reliability booster vehicle are examined.

  14. The Use of Ion Vapor Deposited Aluminum (IVD) for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph representation provides an overview of the use of ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD) for use in the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB). Topics considered include: schematics of ion vapor deposition system, production of ion vapor deposition system, IVD vs. cadmium coated drogue ratchets, corrosion exposure facilities and tests, seawater immersion facilities and tests and continued research and development issues.

  15. Solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem verification test (V-2) report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, B.

    1979-01-01

    The results of the verification testing sequence V-2 performed on the space shuttle solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem are presented. A detailed history of the hot firings plus additional discussion of the auxiliary power unit and the hydraulic component performance is presented. The test objectives, data, and conclusions are included.

  16. Draft environmental impact statement: Space Shuttle Advanced Solid Rocket Motor Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The proposed action is design, development, testing, and evaluation of Advanced Solid Rocket Motors (ASRM) to replace the motors currently used to launch the Space Shuttle. The proposed action includes design, construction, and operation of new government-owned, contractor-operated facilities for manufacturing and testing the ASRM's. The proposed action also includes transport of propellant-filled rocket motor segments from the manufacturing facility to the testing and launch sites and the return of used and/or refurbished segments to the manufacturing site.

  17. Dynamics of variable mass systems with application to the star 48 solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eke, F. O.

    1984-01-01

    Existing methods for the derivation of equations of motion of variable mass systems are reviewed and compared, the end product being a system of general dynamical equations for variable mass systems. These equations are used to study the lateral stability problem associated with the Star 48 solid rocket engine. It is shown that the shape of the combustion chamber could have a significant effect on the lateral stability of the rocket; specifically, a short and wide combustion chamber is destabilizing, while a long and narrow chamber is stabilizing.

  18. Extension of a simplified computer program for analysis of solid-propellant rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sforzini, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    A research project to develop a computer program for the preliminary design and performance analysis of solid propellant rocket engines is discussed. The following capabilities are included as computer program options: (1) treatment of wagon wheel cross sectional propellant configurations alone or in combination with circular perforated grains, (2) calculation of ignition transients with the igniter treated as a small rocket engine, (3) representation of spherical circular perforated grain ends as an alternative to the conical end surface approximation used in the original program, and (4) graphical presentation of program results using a digital plotter.

  19. Terminology and assessment methods of solid propellant rocket exhaust signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-02-01

    The Propulsion and Energetics Panel's Specialists' Meeting in autumn 1985 on Smokeless Propellants demonstrated that no common standard was available in this field and that the lack of common understanding led to misunderstanding amongst the NATO community. After some preparatory discussion, the Panel, therefore, formed Working Group Number 21 with the objectives of defining methods for the assessment of rocket motor exhaust optical properties in the visible and in the infrared range, and of recommending a terminology based on quantitative criteria. The Working Group discussed the subject in a total of eight sessions and prepared this Advisory Report. Following an Introduction and Summary there are six chapters, commencing with an Overview and continuing with Propellant Smoke Classification, Plume Primary Smoke, Plume Secondary Smoke, Plume Radiation and Plume Microwave Properties. In most cases, the conclusions and recommendations follow the chapters and are not repeated at the end of the report.

  20. Measured particulate behavior in a subscale solid propellant rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, W. D.; Hovland, D. L.; Netzer, D. W.

    1992-10-01

    Particulate matter are sized in the exhaust nozzle and plume of small rocket motors of varying geometry to assess the effects of the expansion process on particle size. Both converging and converging-diverging nozzles are considered, and particle sizing is accomplished at pressures of up to 4.36 MPa with aluminum loadings of 2.0 and 4.7 percent. An instrument based on Fraunhofer diffraction is used to measure the particle-size distributions showing that: (1) high burning rates reduce particle agglomeration and increase C* efficiency; (2) high pressures lead to small and monomodal D32 entering the nozzle; and (3) D32 sizes increase appreciably at the tailoff. Some variations in plume signature are theorized to be caused by the tailoff phenomenon, and particle collisions and/or surface effects in the nozzle convergence are suggested by the reduced number of larger particles at the nozzle convergence.

  1. Erosive burning research. [for solid-propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L.; Yang, L. C.; Nguyen, M. H.; Cohen, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    A status report is given on the results for the completed tests in a series of motor firings being carried out to measure the effects of the parameters that are considered to most strongly influence the scaling to larger rocket motor sizes of the transition to/or threshold conditions for erosive burning rate augmentation. Propellant burning rates at locations along the axis of the test motors are measured with a newly developed plasma capacitance gauge technique. The measured results are compared with erosive-burning predictions from a supporting ballistics analysis. The completed motor firings have successfully demonstrated response to the designed test variables. The trends with varying propellant burning rate, chamber pressure, and mass flow rate are consistent with existing results, but no pronounced effect of surface roughness has been observed. Rather, the influence of propellant oxidizer particle size on erosive burning is through its effect on the base, no-corssflow burning rate.

  2. Measurement and Characterization of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Jeremy; Hobbs, Chris; Plotkin, Ken; Pilkey, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    Lift-off acoustic environments generated by the future Ares I launch vehicle are assessed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) acoustics team using several prediction tools. This acoustic environment is directly caused by the Ares I First Stage booster, powered by the five-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRMV). The RSRMV is a larger-thrust derivative design from the currently used Space Shuttle solid rocket motor, the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). Lift-off acoustics is an integral part of the composite launch vibration environment affecting the Ares launch vehicle and must be assessed to help generate hardware qualification levels and ensure structural integrity of the vehicle during launch and lift-off. Available prediction tools that use free field noise source spectrums as a starting point for generation of lift-off acoustic environments are described in the monograph NASA SP-8072: "Acoustic Loads Generated by the Propulsion System." This monograph uses a reference database for free field noise source spectrums which consist of subscale rocket motor firings, oriented in horizontal static configurations. The phrase "subscale" is appropriate, since the thrust levels of rockets in the reference database are orders of magnitude lower than the current design thrust for the Ares launch family. Thus, extrapolation is needed to extend the various reference curves to match Ares-scale acoustic levels. This extrapolation process yields a subsequent amount of uncertainty added upon the acoustic environment predictions. As the Ares launch vehicle design schedule progresses, it is important to take every opportunity to lower prediction uncertainty and subsequently increase prediction accuracy. Never before in NASA s history has plume acoustics been measured for large scale solid rocket motors. Approximately twice a year, the RSRM prime vendor, ATK Launch Systems, static fires an assembled RSRM motor in a horizontal configuration at their test facility

  3. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Appendix E: Environmental impact statement, solid rocket motor, space shuttle booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An analysis of the combustion products resulting from the solid propellant rocket engines of the space shuttle booster is presented. Calculation of the degree of pollution indicates that the only potentially harmful pollutants, carbon monoxide and hydrochloric acid, will be too diluted to constitute a hazard. The mass of products ejected during a launch within the troposphere is insignificant in terms of similar materials that enter the atmosphere from other sources. Noise pollution will not exceed that obtained from the Saturn 5 launch vehicle.

  4. On the nature of the fragment environment created by the range destruction or random failure of solid rocket motor casings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, M.; Mukunda, M.

    1988-01-01

    Given here are predictions of fragment velocities and azimuths resulting from the Space Transportation System Solid Rocket Motor range destruct, or random failure occurring at any time during the 120 seconds of Solid Rocket Motor burn. Results obtained using the analytical methods described showed good agreement between predictions and observations for two specific events. It was shown that these methods have good potential for use in predicting the fragmentation process of a number of generically similar casing systems. It was concluded that coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian calculational methods of the type described here provide a powerful tool for predicting Solid Rocket Motor response.

  5. Trend analysis for large solid rocket motors - A program level approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babbitt, Norman E., III

    1992-01-01

    This paper defines a program-level trend analysis effort that can be applied to large solid rocket motors. The effort is especially applicable to large segmented rocket motors such as the Space Transportation System's solid rocket boosters. Five types of trend analysis are discussed for different aspects of a rocket motor program, (performance, reliability, problem, supportability, and programmatic). Ideas are offered for implementing and performing a program-level trend analysis effort by giving suggestions for selecting computer capabilities, choosing parameters, selecting statistical processes, routine screening for trends, analyzing significant trends (for example, looking for related trends and determining if adverse trends are resolved), and reporting results of trend analysis. The use of program-level trending allows for the ability to easily transfer data between organizations and easily use the data to correlate trends from the various organizations to find causal relationships. Efficiency is enhanced from upper level management to the shop floor at vendor locations by using the same trend analysis software and methodology at all organizations.

  6. Combustion Stability Assessments of the Black Brant Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The Black Brant variation of the Standard Brant developed in the 1960's has been a workhorse motor of the NASA Sounding Rocket Project Office (SRPO) since the 1970's. In March 2012, the Black Brant Mk1 used on mission 36.277 experienced combustion instability during a flight at White Sands Missile Range, the third event in the last four years, the first occurring in November, 2009, the second in April 2010. After the 2010 event the program has been increasing the motor's throat diameter post-delivery with the goal of lowering the chamber pressure and increasing the margin against combustion instability. During the most recent combustion instability event, the vibrations exceeded the qualification levels for the Flight Termination System. The present study utilizes data generated from T-burner testing of multiple Black Brant propellants at the Naval Air Warfare Center at China Lake, to improve the combustion stability predictions for the Black Brant Mk1 and to generate new predictions for the Mk2. Three unique one dimensional (1-D) stability models were generated, representing distinct Black Brant flights, two of which experienced instabilities. The individual models allowed for comparison of stability characteristics between various nozzle configurations. A long standing "rule of thumb" states that increased stability margin is gained by increasing the throat diameter. In contradiction to this experience based rule, the analysis shows that little or no margin is gained from a larger throat diameter. The present analysis demonstrates competing effects resulting from an increased throat diameter accompanying a large response function. As is expected, more acoustic energy was expelled through the nozzle, but conversely more acoustic energy was generated due to larger gas velocities near the propellant surfaces.

  7. A computer simulation of the afterburning processes occurring within solid rocket motor plumes in the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomberg, R. I.; Stewart, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    As part of a continuing study of the environmental effects of solid rocket motor (SRM) operations in the troposphere, a numerical model was used to simulate the afterburning processes occurring in solid rocket motor plumes and to predict the quantities of potentially harmful chemical species which are created. The calculations include the effects of finite-rate chemistry and turbulent mixing. It is found that the amount of NO produced is much less than the amount of HCl present in the plume, that chlorine will appear predominantly in the form of HCl although some molecular chlorine is present, and that combustion is complete as is evident from the predominance of carbon dioxide over carbon monoxide.

  8. Investigation of gas/particle heat transfer rates in solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moylan, B.; Sulyma, P.

    1992-07-01

    The ability of the current Nusselt number prediction technique developed by Kavanau (1955) to accurately predict alumina particle heat transfer rates in solid rocket nozzles and plumes is investigated. For the solid rocket motors SRMS) analyzed, the transitional regime is the dominant regime for the majority of particles in the flowfield. The analytical approach to determine accuracy of the Kavanau correlation utilized the G2R Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code. With this method, both sphere drag, and heat transfer rates were predicted. The sphere drag prediction were compared to the Hermsen, and Henderson drag correlations, while the heat transfer results were compared to the current theory. Results have indicated, that the predicted drag coefficient is bounded by the drag correlations considered. However, the Nusselt number varies significantly from the extrapolated profile through all flowfield regimes.

  9. Effects of entrained water and strong turbulence on afterburning within solid rocket motor plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomberg, R. I.; Wilmoth, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    During the first few seconds of the space shuttle trajectory, the solid rocket boosters will be in the proximity of the launch pad. Because of the launch pad structures and the surface of the earth, the turbulent mixing experienced by the exhaust gases will be greatly increased over that for the free flight situation. In addition, a system will be present, designed to protect the lifting vehicle from launch structure vibrations, which will inject quantities of liquid water into the hot plume. The effects of these two phenomena on the temperatures, chemical composition, and flow field present in the afterburning solid rocket motor exhaust plumes of the space shuttle were studied. Results are included from both a computational model of the afterburning and supporting measurements from Titan 3 exhaust plumes taken at Kennedy Space Center with infrared scanned radiometers.

  10. Ignition transient modelling for the Space Shuttle Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagar, M. A.; Luke, G. D.; Stockham, L. W.

    1993-06-01

    Prediction of the ignition transient for the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) for the Space Shuttle presents an unusual set of modelling challenges because of its high length-to-diameter ratio and complex internal flow environment. A review of ignition modelling experience on the Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM), which is similar in size and configuration to the ASRM, reveals that classical igniter design theory and modelling methods under-predict, by a factor of two, the measured pressure and thrust rise rates experienced on the RSRM. This paper (1) reviews the Titan and Shuttle SRM test experience, (2) presents the results of 0-Dimensional (0-D) and 1-Dimensional (1-D) analysis of the RSRM and ASRM motors, and (3) addresses the need for advanced analysis techniques, as they relate to ASRM ignition transient modelling requirements and igniter design drivers.

  11. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) for the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. L.; Blacklock, K.; Langhenry, M. T.

    1988-01-01

    The recertification of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) and Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) has included an extensive rewriting of the Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL). The evolution of the groundrules and methodology used in the analysis is discussed and compared to standard FMEA techniques. Especially highlighted are aspects of the FMEA/CIL which are unique to the analysis of an SRM. The criticality category definitions are presented and the rationale for assigning criticality is presented. The various data required by the CIL and contribution of this data to the retention rationale is also presented. As an example, the FMEA and CIL for the SRM nozzle assembly is discussed in detail. This highlights some of the difficulties associated with the analysis of a system with the unique mission requirements of the Space Shuttle.

  12. The Repair and Return to Flight of Solid Rocket Booster Forward Skirt Serial Number 20022

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, T. W.; Jones, C. S.; Honeycutt, J. H., Sr.

    2008-01-01

    On April 5, 1991, a solid rocket booster (SRB) forward skirt serial number (S/N) 20022 sustained buckling damage during water impact after the launch of Space Transportation System Flight 37 (STS-37). As of that date, five forward skirts had been lost during water impact. Repair attempts began with the least damaged skirt available (S/N 20022). Sp ecial hydraulic tooling was used to remove buckled areas of the skirt. Afterwards, its aft clevis pinholes were found to be out of alignment with the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) check gauge, but weld passes were used to correct this condition. Meanwhile, USA Analytics generated mechanical property data for buckled and subsequently debuckled material. Their analysis suggested that structural integrity might be improved by adding stringer reinforcements, stiffeners, to the aft bay section of the skirt. This improvement was recommended as a fleet modification to be implemented on a case-by-case basis.

  13. Contamination Control Changes to the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Program: A Ten Year Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushman, David M.

    1998-01-01

    During the post Challenger period, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Thiokol implemented changes to the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) contract to include provisions for contamination control to enhance the production environment. During the ten years since those agreements for contamination controls were made, many changes have taken place in the production facilities at Thiokol. These changes have led to the production of much higher quality shuttle solid rocket motors and improved cleanliness and safety of operations in the production facilities. The experience in contamination control over this past decade highlights the value these changes have brought to the RSRM program, and how the system can be improved to meet the challenges the program will face in the next ten years.

  14. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics and Optimum Fracture Control Analytical Procedures for a Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.

    1977-01-01

    A methodology for the reliability analysis of a reusable solid rocket motor case is discussed. The analysis is based on probabilistic fracture mechanics and probability distribution for initial flaw sizes. The developed reliability analysis is used to select the structural design variables of the solid rocket motor case on the basis of minimum expected cost and specified reliability bounds during the projected design life of the case. Effects of failure prevention plans such as nondestructive inspection and the material erosion between missions are also considered in the developed procedure for selection of design variables. The reliability-based procedure can be modified to consider other similar structures of reusable space vehicle systems with different failure prevention plans.

  15. The historical contribution of solid rocket motors to the one centimeter debris population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Albert; Eichler, Peter; Reynolds, Robert; Potter, Andrew; Johnson, Nicholas

    1997-01-01

    The measured small particle population in earth orbit contains cm-sized objects that are not accounted for by breakup fragments. It was proposed that slag ejection during solid rocket motor burn is a contributor to this population. The direct evidence for such slag ejection follows from: observations of the exhausts of vehicles in flight, and engineering data from static firings. A source model is presented to account for the contribution of slag expulsion from solid rocket motors to the debris population. The mass and velocity distribution of the slag effluents are taken into account and used as a source term in the debris environment model. The model is based on the available observation data and on models for slag development and ejection.

  16. Characterization of welded HP 9-4-30 steel for the advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watt, George William

    1990-01-01

    Solid rocket motor case materials must be high-strength, high-toughness, weldable alloys. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) cases currently being developed will be made from a 9Ni-4Co quench and temper steel called HP 9-4-30. These ultra high-strength steels must be carefully processed to give a very clean material and a fine grained microstructure, which insures excellent ductility and toughness. The HP 9-4-30 steels are vacuum arc remelted and carbon deoxidized to give the cleanliness required. The ASRM case material will be formed into rings and then welded together to form the case segments. Welding is the desired joining technique because it results in a lower weight than other joining techniques. The mechanical and corrosion properties of the weld region material were fully studied.

  17. Preliminary 2-D shell analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Gillian, Ronnie E.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional shell model of an entire solid rocket booster (SRB) has been developed using the STAGSC-1 computer code and executed on the Ames CRAY computer. The purpose of these analyses is to calculate the overall deflection and stress distributions for the SRB when subjected to mechanical loads corresponding to critical times during the launch sequence. The mechanical loading conditions for the full SRB arise from the external tank (ET) attachment points, the solid rocket motor (SRM) pressure load, and the SRB hold down posts. The ET strut loads vary with time after the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) ignition. The SRM internal pressure varies axially by approximately 100 psi. Static analyses of the full SRB are performed using a snapshot picture of the loads. The field and factory joints are modeled by using equivalent stiffness joints instead of detailed models of the joint. As such, local joint behavior cannot be obtained from this global model.

  18. Circumferential flow analysis at the aft field joint of the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok K.; Whitesides, R. Harold; Jenkins, Susan L.; Bacchus, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Flow analyses have been performed to determine the nature of the three-dimensional flow field in the vicinity of the aft-most field joint of the Space Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). Specific objectives included the quantification of the circumferential pressure and velocity gradients at the joint location which might be caused by the non-uniform erosion of the rubber inhibitor which protrudes from the wall into the flow field. Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations have been solved in conjunction with the conservation equation for the turbulence energy and the dissipation rate. The numerical predictions have been compared with the measurements from a 7.5 percent scale cold flow model of the redesigned solid rocket motor.

  19. Assessment of tbe Performance of Ablative Insulators Under Realistic Solid Rocket Motor Operating Conditions (a Doctoral Dissertation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Heath Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Ablative insulators are used in the interior surfaces of solid rocket motors to prevent the mechanical structure of the rocket from failing due to intense heating by the high-temperature solid-propellant combustion products. The complexity of the ablation process underscores the need for ablative material response data procured from a realistic solid rocket motor environment, where all of the potential contributions to material degradation are present and in their appropriate proportions. For this purpose, the present study examines ablative material behavior in a laboratory-scale solid rocket motor. The test apparatus includes a planar, two-dimensional flow channel in which flat ablative material samples are installed downstream of an aluminized solid propellant grain and imaged via real-time X-ray radiography. In this way, the in-situ transient thermal response of an ablator to all of the thermal, chemical, and mechanical erosion mechanisms present in a solid rocket environment can be observed and recorded. The ablative material is instrumented with multiple micro-thermocouples, so that in-depth temperature histories are known. Both total heat flux and thermal radiation flux gauges have been designed, fabricated, and tested to characterize the thermal environment to which the ablative material samples are exposed. These tests not only allow different ablative materials to be compared in a realistic solid rocket motor environment but also improve the understanding of the mechanisms that influence the erosion behavior of a given ablative material.

  20. Analysis of solid-rocket effluents for aluminum, silicon, and other trace elements by neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furr, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    The sensitivity and reliability of neutron activation analysis in detecting trace elements in solid rocket effluents are discussed. Special attention was given to Al and Si contaminants. The construction and performance of a thermal column irradiation unit was reported.

  1. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderesch, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    The factors affecting the choice of the 156 inch diameter, parallel burn, solid propellant rocket engine for use with the space shuttle booster are presented. Primary considerations leading to the selection are: (1) low booster vehicle cost, (2) the largest proven transportable system, (3) a demonstrated design, (4) recovery/reuse is feasible, (5) abort can be easily accomplished, and (6) ecological effects are minor.

  2. Palynological Investigation of Post-Flight Solid Rocket Booster Foreign Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Linda; Jarzen, David

    2008-01-01

    Investigations of foreign material in a drain tube, from the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) of a recent Space Shuttle mission, was identified as pollen. The source of the pollen is from deposits made by bees, collecting pollen from plants found at the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The pollen is determined to have been present in the frustum drain tubes before the shuttle flight. During the flight the pollen did not undergo thermal maturation.

  3. Ariane 5 solid rocket booster dynamic behavior with respect to pressure oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durin, G.; Bouvier, F.; Mastrangelo, G.; Robert, E.

    2011-10-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to simulate the dynamic behavior of the Ariane 5 Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) excited by internal pressure oscillations. These pressure oscillations have sliding frequencies close to acoustic natural frequencies and changing amplitudes. Because the modal behavior of the booster is also continuously changing during the flight due to propellant burning, predictions with finite-element (FE) modeling (modal analyses, harmonic and transient responses) are necessary to predict and understand the dynamic behavior of the booster.

  4. Space shuttle solid rocket booster sting interference wind tunnel test analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conine, B.; Boyle, W.

    1981-01-01

    Wind tunnel test results from shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB) sting interference tests were evaluated, yielding the general influence of the sting on the normal force and pitching moment coefficients and the side force and yawing moment coefficients. The procedures developed to determine the sting interference, the development of the corrected aerodynamic data, and the development of a new SRB aerodynamic mathematical model are documented.

  5. Solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem test report (D-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, B.

    1978-01-01

    The results of the sequence of tests performed on the space shuttle solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem are presented. The operational characteristics of the thrust vector control subsystem components, as determined from the tests, are discussed. Special analyses of fuel consumption, basic steady state characteristics, GN2 spin, and actuator displacement were reviewed which will aid in understanding the performance of the auxiliary power unit. The possibility of components malfunction is also discussed.

  6. Method and apparatus for suppressing ignition overpressure in solid rocket propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guest, S. H.; Jones, J. H. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    The transient overpressure wave produced upon ignition of a solid rocket booster is suppressed by providing within the launch platform, a plurality of pipes and spray heads disposed around the periphery of the exhaust gas plume near its upper end and spraying water into the upper end of the plume during ignition. A large amount of water, preferably equivalent in mass of exhaust products being ejected, is sprayed into the plume in a direction generally perpendicular to plume flow.

  7. Wind tunnel tests of space shuttle solid rocket booster insulation material in the aerothermal tunnel c

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, A. S.; Nutt, K. W.

    1982-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of the space shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Insulation were conducted in the von Karman Gas Dynamics Facility Tunnel C. For these tests, Tunnel C was run at Mach 4 with a total temperature of 1100-1440 and a total pressure of 100 psia. Cold wall heating rates were changed by varying the test article support wedge angle. Selected results are presented to illustrate the test techniques and typical data obtained.

  8. Space shuttle redesigned solid rocket motor Certificate of Qualification (COQ) data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duersch, Fred, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Certification Program provides confidence that the RSRM and its components/subsystems meet or exceed Mission Oriented Requirements when manufactured per design requirements and specified/approved processes. Certification is based on documented results of tests, analyses, inspections, similarity, and demonstrations. Evidencing information is provided to certify that each RSRM component/subsystem satisfies design, mission related requirements and objectives.

  9. Results of Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin E.; Cook, Jerry

    1993-06-01

    The Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator (SSRCS) program was established at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and used a government/industry team consisting of Hercules Aerospace Corporation, Aerotherm Corporation, United Technology Chemical Systems Division, Thiokol Corporation and MSFC personnel to study the feasibility of simulating the combustion species, temperatures and flow fields of a conventional solid rocket motor (SRM) with a versatile simulator system. The SSRCS design is based on hybrid rocket motor principles. The simulator uses a solid fuel and a gaseous oxidizer. Verification of the feasibility of a SSRCS system as a test bed was completed using flow field and system analyses, as well as empirical test data. A total of 27 hot firings of a subscale SSRCS motor were conducted at MSFC. Testing of the Small-scale SSRCS program was completed in October 1992. This paper, a compilation of reports from the above team members and additional analysis of the instrumentation results, will discuss the final results of the analyses and test programs.

  10. Results of Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin E.; Cook, Jerry

    1993-01-01

    The Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator (SSRCS) program was established at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and used a government/industry team consisting of Hercules Aerospace Corporation, Aerotherm Corporation, United Technology Chemical Systems Division, Thiokol Corporation and MSFC personnel to study the feasibility of simulating the combustion species, temperatures and flow fields of a conventional solid rocket motor (SRM) with a versatile simulator system. The SSRCS design is based on hybrid rocket motor principles. The simulator uses a solid fuel and a gaseous oxidizer. Verification of the feasibility of a SSRCS system as a test bed was completed using flow field and system analyses, as well as empirical test data. A total of 27 hot firings of a subscale SSRCS motor were conducted at MSFC. Testing of the Small-scale SSRCS program was completed in October 1992. This paper, a compilation of reports from the above team members and additional analysis of the instrumentation results, will discuss the final results of the analyses and test programs.

  11. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - Accomplishments, Lessons, and a Culture of Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Dennis R.; Phelps, Willie J.

    2011-01-01

    The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor represents the largest solid rocket motor ever flown and the only human rated solid motor. Each Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) provides approximately 3-million lb of thrust to lift the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle from the launch pad. The motors burn out approximately 2 minutes later, separate from the vehicle and are recovered and refurbished. The size of the motor and the need for high reliability were challenges. Thrust shaping, via shaping of the propellant grain, was needed to limit structural loads during ascent. The motor design evolved through several block upgrades to increase performance and to increase safety and reliability. A major redesign occurred after STS-51L with the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor. Significant improvements in the joint sealing systems were added. Design improvements continued throughout the Program via block changes with a number of innovations including development of low temperature o-ring materials and incorporation of a unique carbon fiber rope thermal barrier material. Recovery of the motors and post flight inspection improved understanding of hardware performance, and led to key design improvements. Because of the multidecade program duration material obsolescence was addressed, and requalification of materials and vendors was sometimes needed. Thermal protection systems and ablatives were used to protect the motor cases and nozzle structures. Significant understanding of design and manufacturing features of the ablatives was developed during the program resulting in optimization of design features and processing parameters. The project advanced technology in eliminating ozone-depleting materials in manufacturing processes and the development of an asbestos-free case insulation. Manufacturing processes for the large motor components were unique and safety in the manufacturing environment was a special concern. Transportation and handling approaches were also needed for the large

  12. State Machine Modeling of the Space Launch System Solid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Joshua A.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System is a Shuttle-derived heavy-lift vehicle currently in development to serve as NASA's premiere launch vehicle for space exploration. The Space Launch System is a multistage rocket with two Solid Rocket Boosters and multiple payloads, including the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle. Planned Space Launch System destinations include near-Earth asteroids, the Moon, Mars, and Lagrange points. The Space Launch System is a complex system with many subsystems, requiring considerable systems engineering and integration. To this end, state machine analysis offers a method to support engineering and operational e orts, identify and avert undesirable or potentially hazardous system states, and evaluate system requirements. Finite State Machines model a system as a finite number of states, with transitions between states controlled by state-based and event-based logic. State machines are a useful tool for understanding complex system behaviors and evaluating "what-if" scenarios. This work contributes to a state machine model of the Space Launch System developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The Space Launch System Solid Rocket Booster avionics and ignition subsystems are modeled using MATLAB/Stateflow software. This model is integrated into a larger model of Space Launch System avionics used for verification and validation of Space Launch System operating procedures and design requirements. This includes testing both nominal and o -nominal system states and command sequences.

  13. Performance of reinforced polymer ablators exposed to a solid rocket motor exhaust. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, C.; Burgess, T.; Bowen, J.; Deloach, K.; Talmy, I.

    1992-10-01

    Summarized in this report is the effort by the Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) and FMC Corporation (a launcher manufacturer) to identify new high performance ablators suitable for use on Navy guided missile launchers (GML) and ships' structures. The goal is to reduce ablator erosion by 25 to 50 percent compared to that of the existing ablators such as MXBE350 (rubbermodified phenolic containing glass fiber reinforcement). This reduction in erosion would significantly increase the number of new missiles with higher-thrust, longer burn rocket motors that can be launched prior to ablator refurbishment. In fact, there are a number of new Navy missiles being considered for development and introduction into existing GML: e.g., the Antisatellite Missile (ASM) and the Theater High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) Missile. The U.S. Navy experimentally evaluated the eight best fiber-reinforced, polymer composites from a possible field of 25 off-the-shelf ablators previously screened by FMC Corporation. They were tested by the Navy in highly aluminized solid rocket motor exhaust plumes to determine their ability to resist erosion and to insulate.... Ablator, Guided Missile Launchers, Erosion, Tactical missiles, Convective heating, Solid rocket motors, Aluminum oxide particles.

  14. Injection and swirl driven flowfields in solid and liquid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Anand B.

    In this work, we seek approximate analytical solutions to describe the bulk flow motion in certain types of solid and liquid rocket motors. In the case of an idealized solid rocket motor, a cylindrical double base propellant grain with steady regression rate is considered. The well known inviscid profile determined by Culick is extended here to include the effects of viscosity and steady grain regression. The approximate analytical solution for the cold flow is obtained from similarity principles, perturbation methods and the method of variation of parameters. The velocity, vorticity, pressure gradient and the shear stress distributions are determined and interpreted for different rates of wall regression and injection Reynolds number. The liquid propellant rocket engine considered here is based on a novel design that gives rise to a cyclonic flow. The resulting bidirectional motion is triggered by the tangential injection of an oxidizer just upstream of the chamber nozzle. Velocity, vorticity and pressure gradient distributions are determined for the bulk gas dynamics using a non-reactive inviscid model. Viscous corrections are then incorporated to explain the formation of a forced vortex near the core. Our results compare favorably with numerical simulations and experimental measurements obtained by other researchers. They also indicate that the bidirectional vortex in a cylindrical chamber is a physical solution of the Euler equations. In closing, we investigate the possibility of multi-directional flow behavior as predicted by Euler's equation and as reported recently in laboratory experiments.

  15. Measurement and Characterization of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Robert Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    NASA's current models to predict lift-off acoustics for launch vehicles are currently being updated using several numerical and empirical inputs. One empirical input comes from free-field acoustic data measured at three Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) static firings. The measurements were collected by a joint collaboration between NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center, Wyle Labs, and ATK Launch Systems. For the first time NASA measured large-thrust solid rocket motor plume acoustics for evaluation of both noise sources and acoustic radiation properties. Over sixty acoustic free-field measurements were taken over the three static firings to support evaluation of acoustic radiation near the rocket plume, far-field acoustic radiation patterns, plume acoustic power efficiencies, and apparent noise source locations within the plume. At approximately 67 m off nozzle centerline and 70 m downstream of the nozzle exit plan, the measured overall sound pressure level of the RSRM was 155 dB. Peak overall levels in the far field were over 140 dB at 300 m and 50-deg off of the RSRM thrust centerline. The successful collaboration has yielded valuable data that are being implemented into NASA's lift-off acoustic models, which will then be used to update predictions for Ares I and Ares V liftoff acoustic environments.

  16. Development of a miniature solid propellant rocket motor for use in plume simulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baran, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    A miniature solid propellant rocket motor has been developed to be used in a program to determine those parameters which must be duplicated in a cold gas flow to produce aerodynamic effects on an experimental model similar to those produced by hot, particle-laden exhaust plumes. Phenomena encountered during the testing of the miniature solid propellant motors included erosive propellant burning caused by high flow velocities parallel to the propellant surface, regressive propellant burning as a result of exposed propellant edges, the deposition of aluminum oxide on the nozzle surfaces sufficient to cause aerodynamic nozzle throat geometry changes, and thermal erosion of the nozzle throat at high chamber pressures. A series of tests was conducted to establish the stability of the rocket chamber pressure and the repeatibility of test conditions. Data are presented which define the tests selected to represent the final test matrix. Qualitative observations are also presented concerning the phenomena experienced based on the results of a large number or rocket tests not directly applicable to the final test matrix.

  17. Lessons from half a century experience of Japanese solid rocketry since Pencil rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matogawa, Yasunori

    2007-12-01

    50 years have passed since a tiny rocket "Pencil" was launched horizontally at Kokubunji near Tokyo in 1955. Though there existed high level of rocket technology in Japan before the end of the second World War, it was not succeeded by the country after the War. Pencil therefore was the substantial start of Japanese rocketry that opened the way to the present stage. In the meantime, a rocket group of the University of Tokyo contributed to the International Geophysical Year in 1957-1958 by developing bigger rockets, and in 1970, the group succeeded in injecting first Japanese satellite OHSUMI into earth orbit. It was just before the launch of OHSUMI that Japan had built up the double feature system of science and applications in space efforts. The former has been pursued by ISAS (the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science) of the University of Tokyo, and the latter by NASDA (National Space Development Agency). This unique system worked quite efficiently because space activities in scientific and applicational areas could develop rather independently without affecting each other. Thus Japan's space science ran up rapidly to the international stage under the support of solid propellant rocket technology, and, after a 20 year technological introduction period from the US, a big liquid propellant launch vehicle, H-II, at last was developed on the basis of Japan's own technology in the early 1990's. On October 1, 2003, as a part of Governmental Reform, three Japanese space agencies were consolidated into a single agency, JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), and Japan's space efforts began to walk toward the future in a globally coordinated fashion, including aeronautics, astronautics, space science, satellite technology, etc., at the same time. This paper surveys the history of Japanese rocketry briefly, and draws out the lessons from it to make a new history of Japan's space efforts more meaningful.

  18. Structural and mechanical design challenges of space shuttle solid rocket boosters separation and recovery subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodis, W. R.; Runkle, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The design of the space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB) subsystems for reuse posed some unique and challenging design considerations. The separation of the SRBs from the cluster (orbiter and external tank) at 150,000 ft when the orbiter engines are running at full thrust meant the two SRBs had to have positive separation forces pushing them away. At the same instant, the large attachments that had reacted launch loads of 7.5 million pounds thrust had to be servered. These design considerations dictated the design requirements for the pyrotechnics and separation rocket motors. The recovery and reuse of the two SRBs meant they had to be safely lowered to the ocean, remain afloat, and be owed back to shore. In general, both the pyrotechnic and recovery subsystems have met or exceeded design requirements. In twelve vehicles, there has only been one instance where the pyrotechnic system has failed to function properly.

  19. Response of selected plant and insect species to simulated solid rocket exhaust mixtures and to exhaust components from solid rocket fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heck, W. W.; Knott, W. M.; Stahel, E. P.; Ambrose, J. T.; Mccrimmon, J. N.; Engle, M.; Romanow, L. A.; Sawyer, A. G.; Tyson, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of solid rocket fuel (SRF) exhaust on selected plant and and insect species in the Merritt Island, Florida area was investigated in order to determine if the exhaust clouds generated by shuttle launches would adversely affect the native, plants of the Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge, the citrus production, or the beekeeping industry of the island. Conditions were simulated in greenhouse exposure chambers and field chambers constructed to model the ideal continuous stirred tank reactor. A plant exposure system was developed for dispensing and monitoring the two major chemicals in SRF exhaust, HCl and Al203, and for dispensing and monitoring SRF exhaust (controlled fuel burns). Plants native to Merritt Island, Florida were grown and used as test species. Dose-response relationships were determined for short term exposure of selected plant species to HCl, Al203, and mixtures of the two to SRF exhaust.

  20. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - Accomplishment, Lessons, and a Culture of Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D. R.; Phelps, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) represents the largest solid rocket motor (SRM) ever flown and the only human-rated solid motor. High reliability of the RSRM has been the result of challenges addressed and lessons learned. Advancements have resulted by applying attention to process control, testing, and postflight through timely and thorough communication in dealing with all issues. A structured and disciplined approach was taken to identify and disposition all concerns. Careful consideration and application of alternate opinions was embraced. Focus was placed on process control, ground test programs, and postflight assessment. Process control is mandatory for an SRM, because an acceptance test of the delivered product is not feasible. The RSRM maintained both full-scale and subscale test articles, which enabled continuous improvement of design and evaluation of process control and material behavior. Additionally RSRM reliability was achieved through attention to detail in post flight assessment to observe any shift in performance. The postflight analysis and inspections provided invaluable reliability data as it enables observation of actual flight performance, most of which would not be available if the motors were not recovered. RSRM reusability offered unique opportunities to learn about the hardware. NASA is moving forward with the Space Launch System that incorporates propulsion systems that takes advantage of the heritage Shuttle and Ares solid motor programs. These unique challenges, features of the RSRM, materials and manufacturing issues, and design improvements will be discussed in the paper.

  1. A Simplified Coupled Structural-Flowfield Analysis Of Solid Rocket Motors Ignition Transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallini, E.; Favini, B.; Serraglia, F.; Di Giacinto, M.; Steelant, J.

    2011-05-01

    Ignition transient of a solid rocket motor can be characterized by strong unsteady phenomena such as waves propagation and pressure oscillations inside the combustion chamber. Depending on their frequencies and their amplitude, these oscillations can generate undesirable effects on the launcher, such as thrust fluctuations and transient loads on structures and-or payload equipments. This paper wants to present a simplified flow field/structural model based on a quasi-1D unsteady model of the ignition transient internal ballistics (SPIT) coupled with a simplified structural model, able to account for the radial dynamics of the grain and SRM casing, with the assumption of a standard linear elastic behavior of the structure. The parametric analysis performed with the coupled internal ballistics/structural model allows to show and evaluate some effects in the chamber pressurization rate, when reducing the elastic modulus of the grain propellant towards small values. Concerning the dynamics aspects of the fluid/structural coupled system, instead, a small but clear coupling between the acoustic flow field phenomena and structural dynamics is possible especially, as expected, when both fundamental oscillatory phenomena fall in the same range of frequency. The results and the parametric analysis with the fluid- structural model developed are shown for two solid rocket motors of the new European launcher VEGA: P80FW, first solid stage and Zefiro 9 old version of the third solid stage.

  2. Modeling of heat generation in ammonia-treated solid rocket propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Raun, R.L.; Isom, K.B.

    1995-06-01

    With the end of the Cold War, safe, environmentally sound separation, recycling, and disposal of ingredients in solid rocket propellants and munitions has become a national priority. One approach to demilitarize solid rocket propellants is treatment with ammonia. Ammonia extracts the oxidizers ammonium perchlorate and HMX, yielding a solid reside that is more suitable for incineration and less sensitive to impact and other modes of accidental initiation. Ammonia treatment of nitroglycerin-containing propellants is complicated by an exothermic reaction between ammonia and nitroglycerin. If not removed, the heat generated by this reaction can cause propellant ignition. To help design safe treatment processes, a model for the ammonia-propellant reaction was developed, which integrates transient energy and species conservation equations to simulate ammonia diffusion, heat generation, and heat flow in a propellant and in the solid residue resulting from ammonia treatment. It was calibrated using residue thickness and thermocouple data for one propellant. The calibrated model was used to predict conditions leading to ignition of thin propellant strips. The results agree well with experimental observations.

  3. Flight demonstration of flight termination system and solid rocket motor ignition using semiconductor laser initiated ordnance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.; Maxfield, B.; Boucher, C.

    1995-01-01

    Solid State Laser Initiated Ordnance (LIO) offers new technology having potential for enhanced safety, reduced costs, and improved operational efficiency. Concerns over the absence of programmatic applications of the technology, which has prevented acceptance by flight programs, should be abated since LIO has now been operationally implemented by the Laser Initiated Ordnance Sounding Rocket Demonstration (LOSRD) Program. The first launch of solid state laser diode LIO at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) occurred on March 15, 1995 with all mission objectives accomplished. This project, Phase 3 of a series of three NASA Headquarters LIO demonstration initiatives, accomplished its objective by the flight of a dedicated, all-LIO sounding rocket mission using a two-stage Nike-Orion launch vehicle. LIO flight hardware, made by The Ensign-Bickford Company under NASA's first Cooperative Agreement with Profit Making Organizations, safely initiated three demanding pyrotechnic sequence events, namely, solid rocket motor ignition from the ground and in flight, and flight termination, i.e., as a Flight Termination System (FTS). A flight LIO system was designed, built, tested, and flown to support the objectives of quickly and inexpensively putting LIO through ground and flight operational paces. The hardware was fully qualified for this mission, including component testing as well as a full-scale system test. The launch accomplished all mission objectives in less than 11 months from proposal receipt. This paper concentrates on accomplishments of the ordnance aspects of the program and on the program's implementation and results. While this program does not generically qualify LIO for all applications, it demonstrated the safety, technical, and operational feasibility of those two most demanding applications, using an all solid state safe and arm system in critical flight applications.

  4. Electrets used to measure exhaust cloud effluents from Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) during demonstration model (DM-2) static test firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susko, M.

    1978-01-01

    Electrets were compared with fixed flow samplers during static test firing. The measurement of the rocket exhaust effluents by samplers and electrets indicated that the Solid Rocket Motor had no significant effect on the air quality in the area sampled. The results show that the electrets (a passive device which needs no power) can be used effectively alongside existing measuring devices (which need power). By placing electrets in areas where no power is available, measurements may be obtained. Consequently, it is a valuable complementary instrument in measuring rocket exhaust effluents in areas where other measuring devices may not be able to assess the contaminants.

  5. Description of a mathematical model and computer simulation of separation of the nose cap from the solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwaniger, A. J., Jr.; Murphree, H. I.

    1982-01-01

    A system of equations which models the motion of the Solid Rocket Booster Nose Cap upon separation is described. The computer program which utilizes these equations to generate nose cap trajectories is described in detail. Application of the program to simulate a rocket sled test of the nose cap separation is discussed and the results of the applications are presented. With the information given a user should be able to exercise the computer program with a minimum of effort.

  6. Coupled Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor with Flexible Inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff; Harris, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Flexible inhibitors are generally used in solid rocket motors (SRMs) as a means to control the burning of propellant. Vortices generated by the flow of propellant around the flexible inhibitors have been identified as a driving source of instabilities that can lead to thrust oscillations in launch vehicles. Potential coupling between the SRM thrust oscillations and structural vibration modes is an important risk factor in launch vehicle design. As a means to predict and better understand these phenomena, a multidisciplinary simulation capability that couples the NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with CFDRC's structural finite element code, CoBi, has been developed. This capability is crucial to the development of NASA's new space launch system (SLS). This paper summarizes the efforts in applying the coupled software to demonstrate and investigate fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena between pressure waves and flexible inhibitors inside reusable solid rocket motors (RSRMs). The features of the fluid and structural solvers are described in detail, and the coupling methodology and interfacial continuity requirements are then presented in a general Eulerian-Lagrangian framework. The simulations presented herein utilize production level CFD with hybrid RANS/LES turbulence modeling and grid resolution in excess of 80 million cells. The fluid domain in the SRM is discretized using a general mixed polyhedral unstructured mesh, while full 3D shell elements are utilized in the structural domain for the flexible inhibitors. Verifications against analytical solutions for a structural model under a steady uniform pressure condition and under dynamic modal analysis show excellent agreement in terms of displacement distribution and eigenmode frequencies. The preliminary coupled results indicate that due to acoustic coupling, the dynamics of one of the more flexible inhibitors shift from its first modal frequency to the first acoustic frequency of the solid rocket motor

  7. Advanced Multi-phase Flow CFD Model Development for Solid Rocket Motor Flowfield Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Yen-Sen

    1995-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes code, finite difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS), is used to analyze the complicated internal flowfield of the SRM (solid rocket motor) to explore the impacts due to the effects of chemical reaction, particle dynamics, and slag accumulation on the solid rocket motor (SRM). The particulate multi-phase flowfield with chemical reaction, particle evaporation, combustion, breakup, and agglomeration models are included in present study to obtain a better understanding of the SRM design. Finite rate chemistry model is applied to simulate the chemical reaction effects. Hermsen correlation model is used for the combustion simulation. The evaporation model introduced by Spalding is utilized to include the heat transfer from the particulate phase to the gase phase due to the evaporation of the particles. A correlation of the minimum particle size for breakup expressed in terms of the Al/Al2O3 surface tension and shear force was employed to simulate the breakup of particles. It is assumed that the breakup occurs when the Weber number exceeds 6. A simple L agglomeration model is used to investigate the particle agglomeration. However, due to the large computer memory requirements for the agglomeration model, only 2D cases are tested with the agglomeration model. The VOF (Volume of Fluid) method is employed to simulate the slag buildup in the aft-end cavity of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM). Monte Carlo method is employed to calculate the turbulent dispersion effect of the particles. The flowfield analysis obtained using the FDNS code in the present research with finite rate chemical reaction, particle evaporation, combustion, breakup, agglomeration, and VOG models will provide a design guide for the potential improvement of the SRM including the use of materials and the shape of nozzle geometry such that a better performance of the SRM can be achieved. The simulation of the slag buildup in the aft-end cavity can assist the designer to improve the design of

  8. Development of Displacement Gages Exposed to Solid Rocket Motor Internal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, D. E.; Cook, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) has three non-vented segment-to-segment case field joints. These joints use an interference fit J-joint that is bonded at assembly with a Pressure Sensitive Adhesive (PSA) inboard of redundant O-ring seals. Full-scale motor and sub-scale test article experience has shown that the ability to preclude gas leakage past the J-joint is a function of PSA type, joint moisture from pre-assembly humidity exposure, and the magnitude of joint displacement during motor operation. To more accurately determine the axial displacements at the J-joints, two thermally durable displacement gages (one mechanical and one electrical) were designed and developed. The mechanical displacement gage concept was generated first as a non-electrical, self-contained gage to capture the maximum magnitude of the J-joint motion. When it became feasible, the electrical displacement gage concept was generated second as a real-time linear displacement gage. Both of these gages were refined in development testing that included hot internal solid rocket motor environments and simulated vibration environments. As a result of this gage development effort, joint motions have been measured in static fired RSRM J-joints where intentional venting was produced (Flight Support Motor #8, FSM-8) and nominal non-vented behavior occurred (FSM-9 and FSM-10). This data gives new insight into the nominal characteristics of the three case J-joint positions (forward, center and aft) and characteristics of some case J-joints that became vented during motor operation. The data supports previous structural model predictions. These gages will also be useful in evaluating J-joint motion differences in a five-segment Space Shuttle solid rocket motor.

  9. Internal Flow Analysis of Large L/D Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubacher, Brian A.

    2000-01-01

    Traditionally, Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) internal ballistic performance has been analyzed and predicted with either zero-dimensional (volume filling) codes or one-dimensional ballistics codes. One dimensional simulation of SRM performance is only necessary for ignition modeling, or for motors that have large length to port diameter ratios which exhibit an axial "pressure drop" during the early burn times. This type of prediction works quite well for many types of motors, however, when motor aspect ratios get large, and port to throat ratios get closer to one, two dimensional effects can become significant. The initial propellant grain configuration for the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) was analyzed with 2-D, steady, axi-symmetric computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The results of the CFD analysis show that the steady-state performance prediction at the initial burn geometry, in general, agrees well with 1-D transient prediction results at an early time, however, significant features of the 2-D flow are captured with the CFD results that would otherwise go unnoticed. Capturing these subtle differences gives a greater confidence to modeling accuracy, and additional insight with which to model secondary internal flow effects like erosive burning. Detailed analysis of the 2-D flowfield has led to the discovery of its hidden 1-D isentropic behavior, and provided the means for a thorough and simplified understanding of internal solid rocket motor flow. Performance parameters such as nozzle stagnation pressure, static pressure drop, characteristic velocity, thrust and specific impulse are discussed in detail and compared for different modeling and prediction methods. The predicted performance using both the 1-D codes and the CFD results are compared with measured data obtained from static tests of the RSRM. The differences and limitations of predictions using ID and 2-D flow fields are discussed and some suggestions for the design of large L/D motors and

  10. Advanced multi-phase flow CFD model development for solid rocket motor flowfield analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Yen-Sen

    1995-03-01

    A Navier-Stokes code, finite difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS), is used to analyze the complicated internal flowfield of the SRM (solid rocket motor) to explore the impacts due to the effects of chemical reaction, particle dynamics, and slag accumulation on the solid rocket motor (SRM). The particulate multi-phase flowfield with chemical reaction, particle evaporation, combustion, breakup, and agglomeration models are included in present study to obtain a better understanding of the SRM design. Finite rate chemistry model is applied to simulate the chemical reaction effects. Hermsen correlation model is used for the combustion simulation. The evaporation model introduced by Spalding is utilized to include the heat transfer from the particulate phase to the gase phase due to the evaporation of the particles. A correlation of the minimum particle size for breakup expressed in terms of the Al/Al2O3 surface tension and shear force was employed to simulate the breakup of particles. It is assumed that the breakup occurs when the Weber number exceeds 6. A simple L agglomeration model is used to investigate the particle agglomeration. However, due to the large computer memory requirements for the agglomeration model, only 2D cases are tested with the agglomeration model. The VOF (Volume of Fluid) method is employed to simulate the slag buildup in the aft-end cavity of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM). Monte Carlo method is employed to calculate the turbulent dispersion effect of the particles. The flowfield analysis obtained using the FDNS code in the present research with finite rate chemical reaction, particle evaporation, combustion, breakup, agglomeration, and VOG models will provide a design guide for the potential improvement of the SRM including the use of materials and the shape of nozzle geometry such that a better performance of the SRM can be achieved. The simulation of the slag buildup in the aft-end cavity can assist the designer to improve the design of

  11. Computational study on nitronium and nitrosonium oxalate: potential oxidizers for solid rocket propulsion?

    PubMed

    Gökçinar, Elif; Klapötke, Thomas M; Kramer, Michael P

    2010-08-26

    The enthalpies of formation for solid ionic nitrosonium oxalate, [NO](2)[O(2)C-CO(2)], nitronium oxalate, [NO(2)](2)[O(2)C-CO(2)], as well as covalent bis(nitroso)oxalic acid, ON-O(2)C-CO(2)-NO, and oxalic acid dinitrate ester, O(2)N-O(2)C-CO(2)-NO(2), were calculated using the complete basis set (CBS-4M) method of Petersson and coworkers to obtain very accurate energies. For the nitrosonium species, the ionic form ([NO](2)[O(2)C-CO(2)]) was identified as the more stable isomer, whereas for the nitrosonium compound, the covalently bound dinitrate ester (O(2)N-O(2)C-CO(2)-NO(2)) was found to be more stable. The combustion parameters with respect to possible use as ingredients in solid rocket motors for both stable species were calculated using the EXPLO5 and the ICT code. The performance of an aluminized formulation with covalently bound dinitrate ester (O(2)N-O(2)C-CO(2)-NO(2)) was shown to be comparable to that of ammonium perchlorate/aluminum. This makes oxalic acid dinitrate ester a potentially interesting perchlorate-free and environmentally benign oxidizer for solid rocket propulsion. PMID:20302312

  12. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design, development, production, and launch support analysis for determining the solid propellant rocket engine to be used with the space shuttle are discussed. Specific program objectives considered were: (1) definition of engine designs to satisfy the performance and configuration requirements of the various vehicle/booster concepts, (2) definition of requirements to produce booster stages at rates of 60, 40, 20, and 10 launches per year in a man-rated system, and (3) estimation of costs for the defined SRM booster stages.

  13. Numerical study of axial motor oscillation effects on solid rocket internal ballistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greatrix, D. R.

    1994-12-01

    A variety of effects associated with the axial oscillation of solid-propellant rocket motors on internal ballistic behaviour is presented. The internal core flow is modelled using a modified random-choice method numerical code, with the inclusion of pertinent axial acceleration terms in the conservation equations. The internal ballistic performance of various motors undergoing different modes of vibration is predicted, and correlations are made to observed trends from reported motor firing data. Useful equations for predicting the limiting wave amplitude in conventional motors are derived as a complement to the numerical analysis.

  14. Water impact laboratory and flight test results for the space shuttle solid rocket booster aft skirt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kross, D. A.; Murphy, N. C.; Rawls, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    A series of water impact tests was conducted using full-scale segment representations of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) aft skirt structure. The baseline reinforced structural design was tested as well as various alternative design concepts. A major portion of the test program consisted of evaluating foam as a load attenuation material. Applied pressures and response strains were measured for impact velocities from 40 feet per second (ft/s) to 110 ft/s. The structural configurations, test articles, test results, and flight results are described.

  15. Hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous hydrogen chloride partitioning in a cloud contaminated by solid rocket exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Bendura, R. J.; Wornom, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Partitioning of hydrogen chloride between hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous HCl in the lower atmosphere was experimentally investigated in a solid rocket exhaust cloud diluted with humid ambient air. Airborne measurements were obtained of gaseous HCl, total HCl, relative humidity and temperature to evaluate the conditions under which aerosol formation occurs in the troposphere in the presence of hygroscopic HCl vapor. Equilibrium predictions of HCl aerosol formation accurately predict the measured HCl partitioning over a range of total HCl concentrations from 0.6 to 16 ppm.

  16. Redesign of solid rocket booster/external tank attachment ring for the space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, Harvey G., Jr. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    An improved design concept is presented for the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB)/external tank (ET) attachment ring structural component. This component picks up three struts which attach the aft end of each SRB to the ET. The concept is a partial ring with carefully tapered ends to distribute fastener loads safely into the SRB. Extensive design studies and analyses were performed to arrive at the concept. Experiments on structural elements were performed to determine material strength and stiffness characteristics. Materials and fabrication studies were conducted to determine acceptable tolerances for the design concept. An overview is provided of the work along with conclusions and major recommendations.

  17. A systems approach of the nondestructive evaluation techniques applied to Scout solid rocket motors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oaks, A. E.

    1971-01-01

    Review and appraisal of the status of the nondestructive tests applied to Scout solid-propellant rocket motors, using analytical techniques to evaluate radiography for detecting internal discontinuities such as voids and unbonds. Information relating to selecting, performing, controlling, and evaluating the results of NDE tests was reduced to a common simplified format. With these data and the results of the analytical studies performed, it was possible to make the basic appraisals of the ability of a test to meet all pertinent acceptance criteria and, where necessary, provide suggestions to improve the situation.

  18. Recession Curve Generation for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Thermal Protection System Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanner, Howard S.; Stuckey, C. Irvin; Davis, Darrell W.; Davis, Darrell (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ablatable Thermal Protection System (TPS) coatings are used on the Space Shuttle Vehicle Solid Rocket Boosters in order to protect the aluminum structure from experiencing excessive temperatures. The methodology used to characterize the recession of such materials is outlined. Details of the tests, including the facility, test articles and test article processing are also presented. The recession rates are collapsed into an empirical power-law relation. A design curve is defined using a 95-percentile student-t distribution. based on the nominal results. Actual test results are presented for the current acreage TPS material used.

  19. Solid rocket booster thrust vector control V-2 off-nominal testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, B.

    1981-01-01

    The results of the V-2 off nominal test sequence performed on the space shuttle solid rocket booster thrust vector control (SRB TVC) system are reported. The TVC subsystem was subjected to 19 off nominal test conditions. The test sequence consisted of: 8 burp starts, 30 hot firings, 14 GN2 spin tests, and 3 servicing passive system tests. It is concluded that the TVC subsystem operated nominally in response to the given commands and test conditions. Test objectives, detail results, and data are included.

  20. Near-field vector intensity measurements of a small solid rocket motor.

    PubMed

    Gee, Kent L; Giraud, Jarom H; Blotter, Jonathan D; Sommerfeldt, Scott D

    2010-08-01

    Near-field vector intensity measurements have been made of a 12.7-cm diameter nozzle solid rocket motor. The measurements utilized a test rig comprised of four probes each with four low-sensitivity 6.35-mm pressure microphones in a tetrahedral arrangement. Measurements were made with the rig at nine positions (36 probe locations) within six nozzle diameters of the plume shear layer. Overall levels at these locations range from 135 to 157 dB re 20 microPa. Vector intensity maps reveal that, as frequency increases, the dominant source region contracts and moves upstream with peak directivity at greater angles from the plume axis. PMID:20707417

  1. Modal survey of the space shuttle solid rocket motor using multiple input methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillhart, Ralph; Hunt, David L.; Jensen, Brent M.; Mason, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    The ability to accurately characterize propellant in a finite element model is a concern of engineers tasked with studying the dynamic response of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM). THe uncertainties arising from propellant characterization through specimem testing led to the decision to perform a model survey and model correlation of a single segment of the Shuttle SRM. Multiple input methods were used to excite and define case/propellant modes of both an inert segment and, later, a live propellant segment. These tests were successful at defining highly damped, flexible modes, several pairs of which occured with frequency spacing of less than two percent.

  2. Probabilistic Structural Analysis of the Solid Rocket Booster Aft Skirt External Fitting Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, John S.; Peck, Jeff; Ayala, Samuel

    2000-01-01

    NASA has funded several major programs (the Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods Project is an example) to develop probabilistic structural analysis methods and tools for engineers to apply in the design and assessment of aerospace hardware. A probabilistic finite element software code, known as Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress, is used to determine the reliability of a critical weld of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster aft skirt. An external bracket modification to the aft skirt provides a comparison basis for examining the details of the probabilistic analysis and its contributions to the design process. Also, analysis findings are compared with measured Space Shuttle flight data.

  3. Accuracy analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket motor profile measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estler, W. Tyler

    1989-01-01

    The Profile Measuring Device (PMD) was developed at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center following the loss of the Space Shuttle Challenger. It is a rotating gauge used to measure the absolute diameters of mating features of redesigned Solid Rocket Motor field joints. Diameter tolerance of these features are typically + or - 0.005 inches and it is required that the PMD absolute measurement uncertainty be within this tolerance. In this analysis, the absolute accuracy of these measurements were found to be + or - 0.00375 inches, worst case, with a potential accuracy of + or - 0.0021 inches achievable by improved temperature control.

  4. Characterization of large 2219 aluminum alloy hand forgings for the space shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennecke, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical properties, including fracture toughness, and stress corrosion properties of four types of 2219-T852 aluminum alloy hand forgings are presented. Weight of the forgings varied between 450 and 3500 lb at the time of heat treatment and dimensions exceeded the maximum covered in existing specifications. The forgings were destructively tested to develop reliable mechanical property data to replace estimates employed in the design of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) and to establish minimum guaranteed properties for structural refinement and for entry into specification revisions. The report summarizes data required from the forgers and from the SRB Structures contractor.

  5. An automated approach to design of solid rockets utilizing a special internal ballistics model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sforzini, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    A pattern search technique is presented, which is utilized in a computer program that minimizes the sum of the squares of the differences, at various times, between a desired thrust-time trace and that calculated with a special mathematical internal ballistics model of a solid propellant rocket motor. The program is demonstrated by matching the thrust-time trace obtained from static tests of the first Space Shuttle SRM starting with input values of 10 variables which are, in general, 10% different from the as-built SRM. It is concluded that an excellent match is obtained.

  6. Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Hand Cleaning Solvent Replacement at Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keen, Jill M.; DeWeese, Darrell C.; Key, Leigh W.

    1997-01-01

    At Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Thiokol Corporation provides the engineering to assemble and prepare the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) for launch. This requires hand cleaning over 86 surfaces including metals, adhesives, rubber and electrical insulations, various painted surfaces and thermal protective materials. Due to the phase-out of certain ozone depleting chemical (ODC) solvents, all RSRM hand wipe operations being performed at KSC using l,l,1-trichloroethane (TCA) were eliminated. This presentation summarizes the approach used and the data gathered in the effort to eliminate TCA from KSC hand wipe operations.

  7. Solid Propulsion Integrity Program (SPIP) for verifiable enhanced solid rocket motor reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Barry L.

    1993-01-01

    To increase the success rate of U.S. built Rocket Motors (SRM), the approach taken is: (1) set common reliability goals for nozzles, cases, bondline, propellant, and insulation; (2) build a common engineering data base to support standard industry-wide reliability assessment models; (3) structure or enhance existing industry/government/user term to develop the tools, methods needed, and the data to support them; and (4) areas where unreliabilities are found must be improved.

  8. O-ring sealing verification for the space shuttle redesign solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lach, Cynthia L.

    1989-01-01

    As a part of the redesign of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor, the field and nozzle-to-case joints were redesigned to minimize the dynamic flexure caused by internal motor pressurization during ignition. The O-ring seals and glands for the joints were designed to accommodate both structural deflections and to promote pressure assistance. A test program was conducted to determine if a fluorocarbon elastomeric O-ring could meet this criteria in the redesigned gland. Resiliency tests were used to investigate the O-ring response to gap motion while static seal tests were used to verify design criteria of pressure assistance for sealing. All tests were conducted in face seal fixtures mounted in servo-hydraulic test machines. The resiliency of the O-ring was found to be extremely sensitive to the effects of temperature. The External Tank/Solid Rocket Booster attach strut loads had a negligible affect on the ability of the O-ring to track the simulated SRB field joint deflection. In the static pressure-assisted seal tests, as long as physical contact was maintained between the O-ring and the gland sealing surface, pressure assistance induced instantaneous sealing.

  9. A Coupled Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor with Flexible Inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    A capability to couple NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with CFDRC's structural finite element code, CoBi, has been developed. This paper summarizes the efforts in applying the installed coupling software to demonstrate/investigate fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between pressure wave and flexible inhibitor inside reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM). First a unified governing equation for both fluid and structure is presented, then an Eulerian-Lagrangian framework is described to satisfy the interfacial continuity requirements. The features of fluid solver, Loci/CHEM and structural solver, CoBi, are discussed before the coupling methodology of the solvers is described. The simulation uses production level CFD LES turbulence model with a grid resolution of 80 million cells. The flexible inhibitor is modeled with full 3D shell elements. Verifications against analytical solutions of structural model under steady uniform pressure condition and under dynamic condition of modal analysis show excellent agreements in terms of displacement distribution and eigen modal frequencies. The preliminary coupled result shows that due to acoustic coupling, the dynamics of one of the more flexible inhibitors shift from its first modal frequency to the first acoustic frequency of the solid rocket motor.

  10. Stratospheric plume dispersion: Measurements from STS and Titan solid rocket motor exhaust. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Beiting, E.J.

    1999-04-20

    Plume expansion was measured from nine Space Shuttle and Titan IV vehicles at altitudes of 18, 24, and 30 km in the stratosphere. The plume diameters were inferred from electronic images of polarized, near-infrared solar radiation scattered from the exhaust particles, and these diameters were found to increase linearly with time. The expansion rate was measured for as long as 50 min after the vehicle reached altitude. Measurements made simultaneously at multiple altitudes showed that the expansion rate increased with increasing altitude for six measurements made at Cape Canaveral but decreased between 24 and 30 km for the one measurement made at Vandenberg AFB. The average expansion rates for all measurements are 4.3 {+-} 1.0 m/s at 18 km, 6.8 {+-} 1.9 m/s at 24 km, and 8.7 {+-} 2.5 m/s at 30 km. Expansion rates varied from launch to launch by as much as a factor of 1.6 at 18 km, 2.2 at 24 km, and 2.7 at 30 km. No correlation between the expansion rate and wind speed or shear was evident. These data are compared to several models for diffusivity and are used to update a comprehensive particle model of solid rocket motor exhaust in the stratosphere. The expansion rates are required by models to calculate the spatial extent and temporal persistence of the local stratospheric ozone depletion cause by solid rocket exhaust.

  11. Investigation of Post-Flight Solid Rocket Booster Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Linda A.

    2006-01-01

    After every Shuttle mission, the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) are recovered and observed for missing material. Most of the SRB is covered with a cork-based thermal protection material (MCC-l). After the most recent shuttle mission, STS-114, the forward section of the booster appeared to have been impacted during flight. The darkened fracture surfaces indicated that this might have occurred early in flight. The scope of the analysis included microscopic observations to assess the degree of heat effects and locate evidence of the impact source as well as chemical analysis of the fracture surfaces and recovered foreign material using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. The amount of heat effects and presence of soot products on the fracture surface indicated that the material was impacted prior to SRB re-entry into the atmosphere. Fragments of graphite fibers found on these fracture surfaces were traced to slag inside the Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) that forms during flight as the propellant is spent and is ejected throughout the descent of the SRB after separation. The direction of the impact mark matches with the likely trajectory of SRBs tumbling prior to re-entry.

  12. A field study of solid rocket exhaust impacts on the near-field environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Keller, Vernon W.

    1990-01-01

    Large solid rocket motors release large quantities of hydrogen chloride and aluminum oxide exhaust during launch and testing. Measurements and analysis of the interaction of this material with the deluge water spray and other environmental factors in the near field (within 1 km of the launch or test site) are summarized. Measurements of mixed solid and liquid deposition (typically 2 normal HCl) following space shuttle launches and 6.4 percent scale model tests are described. Hydrogen chloride gas concentrations measured in the hours after the launch of STS 41D and STS 51A are reported. Concentrations of 9 ppm, which are above the 5 ppm exposure limits for workers, were detected an hour after STS 51A. A simplified model which explains the primary features of the gas concentration profiles is included.

  13. NASA Lewis Thermal Barrier Feasibility Investigated for Use in Space Shuttle Solid-Rocket Motor Nozzle-to-Case Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Assembly joints of modern solid-rocket motor cases are usually sealed with conventional O-ring seals. The 5500 F combustion gases produced by rocket motors are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of insulation and by special compounds that fill assembly split-lines in the insulation. On limited occasions, NASA has observed charring of the primary O-rings of the space shuttle solid-rocket nozzle-assembly joints due to parasitic leakage paths opening up in the gap-fill compounds during rocket operation. Thus, solid-rocket motor manufacturer Thiokol approached the NASA Lewis Research Center about the possibility of applying Lewis braided-fiber preform seal as a thermal barrier to protect the O-ring seals. This thermal barrier would be placed upstream of the primary O-rings in the nozzle-to-case joints to prevent hot gases from impinging on the O-ring seals (see the following illustration). The illustration also shows joints 1 through 5, which are potential sites where the thermal barrier could be used.

  14. Coupled Solid Rocket Motor Ballistics and Trajectory Modeling for Higher Fidelity Launch Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ables, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Multi-stage launch vehicles with solid rocket motors (SRMs) face design optimization challenges, especially when the mission scope changes frequently. Significant performance benefits can be realized if the solid rocket motors are optimized to the changing requirements. While SRMs represent a fixed performance at launch, rapid design iterations enable flexibility at design time, yielding significant performance gains. The streamlining and integration of SRM design and analysis can be achieved with improved analysis tools. While powerful and versatile, the Solid Performance Program (SPP) is not conducive to rapid design iteration. Performing a design iteration with SPP and a trajectory solver is a labor intensive process. To enable a better workflow, SPP, the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST), and the interfaces between them have been improved and automated, and a graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed. The GUI enables real-time visual feedback of grain and nozzle design inputs, enforces parameter dependencies, removes redundancies, and simplifies manipulation of SPP and POST's numerous options. Automating the analysis also simplifies batch analyses and trade studies. Finally, the GUI provides post-processing, visualization, and comparison of results. Wrapping legacy high-fidelity analysis codes with modern software provides the improved interface necessary to enable rapid coupled SRM ballistics and vehicle trajectory analysis. Low cost trade studies demonstrate the sensitivities of flight performance metrics to propulsion characteristics. Incorporating high fidelity analysis from SPP into vehicle design reduces performance margins and improves reliability. By flying an SRM designed with the same assumptions as the rest of the vehicle, accurate comparisons can be made between competing architectures. In summary, this flexible workflow is a critical component to designing a versatile launch vehicle model that can accommodate a volatile

  15. Solid rocket motor conceptual design - The development of a design optimization expert system with a hypertext user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegern, James B.

    1993-06-01

    Solid rocket motor (SRM) design prototypes can be rapidly formulated and evaluated by the use of advanced computer-based methodologies that apply expert system and artificial intelligence software to the SRM design optimization processes. The research program that was carried out, and is reported in this paper, was to formulate a computer-based SRM expert system for motor design and optimization, with the assistance of a hypertext software algorithm that provides a user-friendly interface. With this interface for parameter input, the design engineer can quickly obtain rocket motor designs that satisfy the performance mission of the SRM, as well as meet criteria for optimized (minimum) motor mass. The computer-based software has been designated as the Solid Rocket Motor Conceptual Design Optimization System (SRMCDOS). The main purpose of this SRM design system is to aid the SRM design engineer in making the best initial design selections and thereby reducing the overall 'design cycle time' of a project.

  16. Advanced Multi-Phase Flow CFD Model Development for Solid Rocket Motor Flowfield Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.; Doran, Denise

    1993-01-01

    It is known that the simulations of solid rocket motor internal flow field with AL-based propellants require complex multi-phase turbulent flow model. The objective of this study is to develop an advanced particulate multi-phase flow model which includes the effects of particle dynamics, chemical reaction and hot gas flow turbulence. The inclusion of particle agglomeration, particle/gas reaction and mass transfer, particle collision, coalescence and breakup mechanisms in modeling the particle dynamics will allow the proposed model to realistically simulate the flowfield inside a solid rocket motor. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes numerical code FDNS is used to simulate the steady-state multi-phase particulate flow field for a 3-zone 2-D axisymmetric ASRM model and a 6-zone 3-D ASRM model at launch conditions. The 2-D model includes aft-end cavity and submerged nozzle. The 3-D model represents the whole ASRM geometry, including additional grain port area in the gas cavity and two inhibitors. FDNS is a pressure based finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver with time-accurate adaptive second-order upwind schemes, standard and extended k-epsilon models with compressibility corrections, multi zone body-fitted formulations, and turbulence particle interaction model. Eulerian/Lagrangian multi-phase solution method is applied for multi-zone mesh. To simulate the chemical reaction, penalty function corrected efficient finite-rate chemistry integration method is used in FDNS. For the AL particle combustion rate, the Hermsen correlation is employed. To simulate the turbulent dispersion of particles, the Gaussian probability distribution with standard deviation equal to (2k/3)(exp 1/2) is used for the random turbulent velocity components. The computational results reveal that the flow field near the juncture of aft-end cavity and the submerged nozzle is very complex. The effects of the turbulent particles affect the flow field significantly and provide better

  17. Indirect and direct methods for measuring a dynamic throat diameter in a solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbaugh, Lauren

    In a solid rocket motor, nozzle throat erosion is dictated by propellant composition, throat material properties, and operating conditions. Throat erosion has a significant effect on motor performance, so it must be accurately characterized to produce a good motor design. In order to correlate throat erosion rate to other parameters, it is first necessary to know what the throat diameter is throughout a motor burn. Thus, an indirect method and a direct method for determining throat diameter in a solid rocket motor are investigated in this thesis. The indirect method looks at the use of pressure and thrust data to solve for throat diameter as a function of time. The indirect method's proof of concept was shown by the good agreement between the ballistics model and the test data from a static motor firing. The ballistics model was within 10% of all measured and calculated performance parameters (e.g. average pressure, specific impulse, maximum thrust, etc.) for tests with throat erosion and within 6% of all measured and calculated performance parameters for tests without throat erosion. The direct method involves the use of x-rays to directly observe a simulated nozzle throat erode in a dynamic environment; this is achieved with a dynamic calibration standard. An image processing algorithm is developed for extracting the diameter dimensions from the x-ray intensity digital images. Static and dynamic tests were conducted. The measured diameter was compared to the known diameter in the calibration standard. All dynamic test results were within +6% / -7% of the actual diameter. Part of the edge detection method consists of dividing the entire x-ray image by an average pixel value, calculated from a set of pixels in the x-ray image. It was found that the accuracy of the edge detection method depends upon the selection of the average pixel value area and subsequently the average pixel value. An average pixel value sensitivity analysis is presented. Both the indirect

  18. Advanced multi-phase flow CFD model development for solid rocket motor flowfield analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.; Doran, Denise

    1993-07-01

    It is known that the simulations of solid rocket motor internal flow field with AL-based propellants require complex multi-phase turbulent flow model. The objective of this study is to develop an advanced particulate multi-phase flow model which includes the effects of particle dynamics, chemical reaction and hot gas flow turbulence. The inclusion of particle agglomeration, particle/gas reaction and mass transfer, particle collision, coalescence and breakup mechanisms in modeling the particle dynamics will allow the proposed model to realistically simulate the flowfield inside a solid rocket motor. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes numerical code FDNS is used to simulate the steady-state multi-phase particulate flow field for a 3-zone 2-D axisymmetric ASRM model and a 6-zone 3-D ASRM model at launch conditions. The 2-D model includes aft-end cavity and submerged nozzle. The 3-D model represents the whole ASRM geometry, including additional grain port area in the gas cavity and two inhibitors. FDNS is a pressure based finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver with time-accurate adaptive second-order upwind schemes, standard and extended k-epsilon models with compressibility corrections, multi zone body-fitted formulations, and turbulence particle interaction model. Eulerian/Lagrangian multi-phase solution method is applied for multi-zone mesh. To simulate the chemical reaction, penalty function corrected efficient finite-rate chemistry integration method is used in FDNS. For the AL particle combustion rate, the Hermsen correlation is employed. To simulate the turbulent dispersion of particles, the Gaussian probability distribution with standard deviation equal to (2k/3)(exp 1/2) is used for the random turbulent velocity components. The computational results reveal that the flow field near the juncture of aft-end cavity and the submerged nozzle is very complex. The effects of the turbulent particles affect the flow field significantly and provide better

  19. Formulation and Testing of Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels Containing Energetic Additives for Hybrid Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Daniel B.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs,Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Story, George

    2012-01-01

    Many approaches have been considered in an effort to improve the regression rate of solid fuels for hybrid rocket applications. One promising method is to use a fuel with a fast burning rate such as paraffin wax; however, additional performance increases to the fuel regression rate are necessary to make the fuel a viable candidate to replace current launch propulsion systems. The addition of energetic and/or nano-sized particles is one way to increase mass-burning rates of the solid fuels and increase the overall performance of the hybrid rocket motor.1,2 Several paraffin-based fuel grains with various energetic additives (e.g., lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH4) have been cast in an attempt to improve regression rates. There are two major advantages to introducing LiAlH4 additive into the solid fuel matrix: 1) the increased characteristic velocity, 2) decreased dependency of Isp on oxidizer-to-fuel ratio. The testing and characterization of these solid-fuel grains have shown that continued work is necessary to eliminate unburned/unreacted fuel in downstream sections of the test apparatus.3 Changes to the fuel matrix include higher melting point wax and smaller energetic additive particles. The reduction in particle size through various methods can result in more homogeneous grain structure. The higher melting point wax can serve to reduce the melt-layer thickness, allowing the LiAlH4 particles to react closer to the burning surface, thus increasing the heat feedback rate and fuel regression rate. In addition to the formulation of LiAlH4 and paraffin wax solid-fuel grains, liquid additives of triethylaluminum and diisobutylaluminum hydride will be included in this study. Another promising fuel formulation consideration is to incorporate a small percentage of RDX as an additive to paraffin. A novel casting technique will be used by dissolving RDX in a solvent to crystallize the energetic additive. After dissolving the RDX in a solvent chosen for its compatibility

  20. Convective Heat Transfer in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor of the Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This simulation involved a two-dimensional axisymmetric model of a full motor initial grain of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) of the Space Transportation System (STS). It was conducted with CFD (computational fluid dynamics) commercial code FLUENT. This analysis was performed to: a) maintain continuity with most related previous analyses, b) serve as a non-vectored baseline for any three-dimensional vectored nozzles, c) provide a relatively simple application and checkout for various CFD solution schemes, grid sensitivity studies, turbulence modeling and heat transfer, and d) calculate nozzle convective heat transfer coefficients. The accuracy of the present results and the selection of the numerical schemes and turbulence models were based on matching the rocket ballistic predictions of mass flow rate, head end pressure, vacuum thrust and specific impulse, and measured chamber pressure drop. Matching these ballistic predictions was found to be good. This study was limited to convective heat transfer and the results compared favorably with existing theory. On the other hand, qualitative comparison with backed-out data of the ratio of the convective heat transfer coefficient to the specific heat at constant pressure was made in a relative manner. This backed-out data was devised to match nozzle erosion that was a result of heat transfer (convective, radiative and conductive), chemical (transpirating), and mechanical (shear and particle impingement forces) effects combined.

  1. Grease-Resistant O Rings for Joints in Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Albert R.; Feldman, Harold

    2003-01-01

    There is a continuing effort to develop improved O rings for sealing joints in solid-fuel rocket motors. Following an approach based on the lessons learned in the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger, investigators have been seeking O-ring materials that exhibit adequate resilience for effective sealing over a broad temperature range: What are desired are O rings that expand far and fast enough to maintain seals, even when metal sealing surfaces at a joint move slightly away from each other shortly after ignition and the motor was exposed to cold weather before ignition. Other qualities desired of the improved O rings include adequate resistance to ablation by hot rocket gases and resistance to swelling when exposed to hydrocarbon-based greases used to protect some motor components against corrosion. Five rubber formulations two based on a fluorosilicone polymer and three based on copolymers of epichlorohydrin with ethylene oxide were tested as candidate O-ring materials. Of these, one of the epichlorohydrin/ethylene oxide formulations was found to offer the closest to the desired combination of properties and was selected for further evaluation.

  2. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Volume 2, book 3: Cost estimating data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderesch, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Cost estimating data for the 156 inch diameter, parallel burn solid rocket propellant engine selected for the space shuttle booster are presented. The costing aspects on the baseline motor are initially considered. From the baseline, sufficient data is obtained to provide cost estimates of alternate approaches.

  3. SRB-3D Solid Rocket Booster performance prediction program. Volume 1: Engineering description/users information manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The modified Solid Rocket Booster Performance Evaluation Model (SRB-3D) was developed as an extension to the internal ballistics module of the SRB-2 performance program. This manual contains the engineering description of SRB-3D which describes the approach used to develop the 3D concept and an explanation of the modifications which were necessary to implement these concepts.

  4. Water impact test of aft skirt end ring, and mid ring segments of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The results of water impact loads tests using aft skirt end ring, and mid ring segments of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) are examined. Dynamic structural response data is developed and an evaluation of the model in various configurations is presented. Impact velocities are determined for the SRB with the larger main chute system. Various failure modes are also investigated.

  5. Materials and processes for shuttle engine, external tank, and solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The Shuttle flight system is composed of the Orbiter, an External Tank (ET) that contains the ascent propellant to be used by the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), and two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB). The ET is expended on each launch; the Orbiter and SRB's are reusable. It is the requirement for reuse which poses the exciting new materials and processes challenges in the development of the Space Shuttle. A brief description of the Space Shuttle and the mission profile is given. The Shuttle configuration is then described with emphasis on the SSME, ET, and SRB. The materials selection, tracking, and control system used to assure reliability and to minimize cost are described, and salient features and challenges in materials and processes associated with the SSME, ET, and SRB are subsequently discussed.

  6. SRB/SLEEC (Solid Rocket Booster/Shingle Lap Extendible Exit Cone) feasibility study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, William H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary design and analysis was completed for a SLEEC (Shingle Lap Extendible Exit Cone) which could be incorporated on the Space Transportation System (STS) Solid Rocket Booster (SRB). Studies were completed which predicted weights and performance increases and development plans were prepared for the full-scale bench and static test of SLEEC. In conjunction with the design studies, a series of supporting analyses were performed to assure the validity and feasibility of performance, fabrication, cost, and reliability for the selected design. The feasibility and required amounts of bench, static firing, and flight tests considered necessary for the successful incorporation of SLEEC on the Shuttle SRBs were determined. Preliminary plans were completed which define both a follow on study effort and a development program.

  7. Lightweight structural design of a bolted case joint for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Stein, Peter A.; Bush, Harold G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the structural design of a bolted joint with a static face seal which can be used to join Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) case segments. Results from numerous finite element parametric studies indicate that the bolted joint meets the design requirement of preventing joint opening at the O-ring locations during SRM pressurization. A final design recommended for further development has the following parameters: 180 1-inch-diameter studs, stud center line offset of .5 inches radially inward from the shell wall center line, flange thickness of 0.75 inches, bearing plate thickness of 0.25 inches, studs prestressed to 70 percent of ultimate load, and the intermediate alcove. The design has a mass penalty of 1096 lbm, which is 164 lbm greater than the currently proposed capture tang redesign.

  8. Lightweight structural design of a bolted case joint for the space shuttle solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Stein, Peter A.; Bush, Harold G.

    1988-01-01

    The structural design of a bolted joint with a static face seal which can be used to join Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) case segments is given. Results from numerous finite element parametric studies indicate that the bolted joint meets the design requirement of preventing joint opening at the O-ring locations during SRM pressurization. A final design recommended for further development has the following parameters: 180 one-in.-diam. studs, stud centerline offset of 0.5 in radially inward from the shell wall center line, flange thickness of 0.75 in, bearing plate thickness of 0.25 in, studs prestressed to 70 percent of ultimate load, and the intermediate alcove. The design has a mass penalty of 1096 lbm, which is 164 lbm greater than the currently proposed capture tang redesign.

  9. Structural optimization of an alternate design for the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster field joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.; Rogers, James L., Jr.; Chang, Kwan J.

    1987-01-01

    A structural optimization procedure is used to determine the shape of an alternate design for the Shuttle's solid rocket booster field joint. In contrast to the tang and clevis design of the existing joint, this alternate design consists of two flanges bolted together. Configurations with 150 studs of 1 1/8 in diameter and 135 studs of 1 3/16 in diameter are considered. Using a nonlinear programming procedure, the joint weight is minimized under constraints on either von Mises or maximum normal stresses, joint opening and geometry. The procedure solves the design problem by replacing it by a sequence of approximate (convex) subproblems; the pattern of contact between the joint halves is determined every few cycles by a nonlinear displacement analysis. The minimum weight design has 135 studs of 1 3/16 in diameter and is designed under constraints on normal stresses. It weighs 1144 lb per joint more than the current tang and clevis design.

  10. Structural optimization of an alternate design for the space shuttle solid rocket booster field joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, J.-F. M.; Chang, K. J.; Rogers, J. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A structural optimization procedure is used to determine the shape of an alternate design for the shuttle solid rocket booster field joint. In contrast to the tang and clevis design of the existing joint, this alternate design consists of two flanges bolted together. Configurations with 150 studs of 1 1/8 in. diameter and 135 studs of 1 3/16 in. diameter are considered. Using a nonlinear programming procedure, the joint weight is minimized under constraints on either von Mises or maximum normal stresses, joint opening and geometry. The procedure solves the design problem by replacing it by a sequence of approximate (convex) subproblems; the pattern of contact between the joint halves is determined every few cycles by a nonliner displacement analysis. The minimum weight design has 135 studs of 1 3/16 in. diameter and is designed under constraints on normal stresses. It weighs 1144 lb per joint more than the current tang and clevis design.

  11. Space shuttle solid rocket booster main parachute damage reduction team report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, G.

    1993-01-01

    This report gives the findings of the space shuttle solid rocket booster main parachute damage reduction team. The purpose of the team was to investigate the causes of main parachute deployment damage and to recommend methods to eliminate or substantially reduce the damage. The team concluded that the two primary causes of significant damage during deployment are vent entanglement and contact of the parachutes with the main parachute support structure. As an inexpensive but effective step towards damage reduction, the team recommends modification of the parachute packing procedure to eliminate vent entanglement. As the most effective design change, the team recommends a pilot chute-deployed soft-pack system. Alternative concepts are also recommended that provide a major reduction in damage at a total cost lower than the pilot chute-deployed soft pack.

  12. Evaluation and mitigation of lightning hazards to the space shuttle Solid Rocket Motors (SRM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigden, Gregory J.; Papazian, Peter B.

    1988-01-01

    The objective was to quantify electric field strengths in the Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellant in the event of a worst case lightning strike. Using transfer impedance measurements for selected lightning protection materials and 3D finite difference modeling, a retrofit design approach for the existing dielectric grain cover and railcar covers was evaluated and recommended for SRM segment transport. A safe level of 300 kV/m was determined for the propellant. The study indicated that a significant potential hazard exists for unprotected segments during rail transport. However, modified railcar covers and grain covers are expected to prevent lightning attachment to the SRM and to reduce the levels to several orders of magnitude below 300 kV/m.

  13. NDE of thermal protection system for space shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    Potential nondestructive test (NDE) methods were evaluated for detecting debonds and weak bonds in the thermal protection system (TPS) for the space shuttle solid rocket boosters. The primary thermal protection material is a sprayable, thick epoxy coating that is filled with lightweight and thermal insulating materials. Test panels were fabricated with a wide variety of hidden realistic defects, including contact debonds and weak bonds. Nondestructive test results were obtained. Candidate NDE methods evaluated for booster production applications include laser interferometry (e.g., electronic shearography), infrared thermography, radiography (e.g., computed tomography), acousto-ultrasonics, mechanical/acoustic impedance, ultrasonics, acoustic emission, and the tap test. Capabilities, advantages, disadvantages, and relative performances in defect detection of each test method for TPS bonding applications are reported. Electronic shearography NDE was technically the superior method for detecting debonds.

  14. Particulate multi-phase flowfield analysis for advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Yen-Sen; Shang, Huan-Min; Doran, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Particulate multi-phase flowfield with chemical reaction for a 2D advanced solid rocket motor (ASRM) is analyzed using the finite difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS) code. The flowfield in the aft dome cavity of the ASRM is examined and its significant impact on the motor operation and performance is demonstrated. Chemical reaction analysis is performed for H2O, O2, H2, O, H, OH, CO, CO2, Cl, Cl2, HCl, and N2. The turbulent dispersion effect is calculated with the Monte Carlo method. Result show that a recirculation zone exists at the entry of the aft-dome cavity. The particle impingement could cause the erosion and damage nozzle wall. Accumulating in the impingement area the particles change the wall shape and affect the motor performance.

  15. Workers in the VAB test SRB cables on STS-98 solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Working near the top of a solid rocket booster, NASA and United Space Alliance SRB technicians hook up SRB cables to a Cirris Signature Touch 1 cable tester. From left are Steve Swichkow, with NASA, and Jim Silviano (back to camera) and Jeff Suter, with USA. The SRB is part of Space Shuttle Atlantis, rolled back from Launch Pad 39A in order to conduct tests on the cables. A prior extensive evaluation of NASA'''s SRB cable inventory on the shelf revealed conductor damage in four (of about 200) cables. Shuttle managers decided to prove the integrity of the system tunnel cables already on Atlantis before launching. Workers are conducting inspections, making continuity checks and conducting X-ray analysis on the cables. The launch has been rescheduled no earlier than Feb. 6.

  16. Workers in the VAB test SRB cables on STS-98 solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the Vehicle Assembly Building, United Space Alliance SRB technician Frank Meyer pulls cables out of the solid rocket booster system tunnel. Cable end covers are in a box near his feet. The SRB is part of Space Shuttle Atlantis, rolled back from Launch Pad 39A in order to conduct tests on the cables. A prior extensive evaluation of NASA'''s SRB cable inventory on the shelf revealed conductor damage in four (of about 200) cables. Shuttle managers decided to prove the integrity of the system tunnel cables already on Atlantis before launching. Workers are conducting inspections, making continuity checks and conducting X-ray analysis on the cables. The launch has been rescheduled no earlier than Feb. 6.

  17. Workers in the VAB test SRB cables on STS-98 solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- NASA and United Space Alliance SRB technicians hook up solid rocket booster cables to a Cirris Signature Touch 1 cable tester. From left are Loren Atkinson and Steve Swichkow, with NASA, and Jeff Suter, with USA. The SRB is part of Space Shuttle Atlantis, rolled back from Launch Pad 39A in order to conduct tests on the cables. A prior extensive evaluation of NASA'''s SRB cable inventory on the shelf revealed conductor damage in four (of about 200) cables. Shuttle managers decided to prove the integrity of the system tunnel cables already on Atlantis before launching. Workers are conducting inspections, making continuity checks and conducting X-ray analysis on the cables. The launch has been rescheduled no earlier than Feb. 6.

  18. Workers in the VAB test SRB cables on STS-98 solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- United Space Alliance SRB technician Jim Glass conducts a Flex test on a cable on the solid rocket booster at left. The SRB is part of Space Shuttle Atlantis, rolled back from Launch Pad 39A in order to conduct tests on the cables. A prior extensive evaluation of NASA'''s SRB cable inventory on the shelf revealed conductor damage in four (of about 200) cables. Shuttle managers decided to prove the integrity of the system tunnel cables already on Atlantis before launching. Workers are conducting inspections, making continuity checks and conducting X-ray analysis on the cables. The launch has been rescheduled no earlier than Feb. 6.

  19. Workers in the VAB test SRB cables on STS-98 solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Working near the top of a solid rocket booster, NASA and United Space Alliance SRB technicians hook up SRB cables to a CIRRUS computer for testing. From left are Jim Glass, with USA, performing a Flex test on the cable; Steve Swichkow, with NASA, and Jim Silviano, with USA, check the results on a computer. The SRB is part of Space Shuttle Atlantis, rolled back from Launch Pad 39A in order to conduct tests on the cables. A prior extensive evaluation of NASA'''s SRB cable inventory on the shelf revealed conductor damage in four (of about 200) cables. Shuttle managers decided to prove the integrity of the system tunnel cables already on Atlantis before launching. Workers are conducting inspections, making continuity checks and conducting X-ray analysis on the cables. The launch has been rescheduled no earlier than Feb. 6.

  20. Workers in the VAB test SRB cables on STS-98 solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- United Space Alliance SRB technician Richard Bruns attaches a cable end cover to a cable pulled from the solid rocket booster on Space Shuttle Atlantis. The Shuttle was rolled back from Launch Pad 39A in order to conduct tests on the SRB cables. A prior extensive evaluation of NASA'''s SRB cable inventory on the shelf revealed conductor damage in four (of about 200) cables. Shuttle managers decided to prove the integrity of the system tunnel cables already on Atlantis before launching. Workers are conducting inspections, making continuity checks and conducting X-ray analysis on the cables. The launch has been rescheduled no earlier than Feb. 6.

  1. Structural analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket booster/external tank attach ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.

    1988-01-01

    An External Tank (ET) attach ring is used in the Space Shuttle System to transfer lateral loads between the ET and the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB). Following the Challenger (51-L) accident, the flight performance of the ET attach ring was reviewed, and negative margins of safety and failed bolts in the attach ring were subsequently identified. The analyses described in this report were performed in order to understand the existing ET attach ring structural response to motor case internal pressurization as well as to aid in an ET attach ring redesign effort undertaken by NASA LaRC. The finite element model as well as the results from linear and nonlinear static structural analyses are described.

  2. Testing and environmental exposure of parachute materials for the solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, B. K.

    1978-01-01

    Static tests and evaluation of nonmetallic materials for use in parachutes for recovery of solid rocket boosters used in the space shuttle program are reported. Literature survey and manufacturer and vendor contacts led to the choice of nylon as the fabric most capable of withstanding the extreme loads and environmental conditions during repeated use. The material tests included rupture strength, elongation, abrasion resistance, shrinkage, environmental exposure, and degradation levels. Rinsing and drying procedures were also investigated and a salt-free level for nylon recommended in preparation for reuse. In all possible cases, worst-case conditions were used (e.g., inflation loads, seawater exposure for 3 days per drop-recovery, etc.).

  3. Determination of burning area and port volume in complex burning regions of a solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of the geometry of the burning in both star-cylindrical port interface regions and regions of partially inhibited slots is presented. Some characteristics parameters are defined and illustrated. Methods are proposed for calculating burning areas which functionally depend only on the total distance burned. According to this method, several points are defined where abrupt changes in geometry occur, and these are tracked throughout the burn. Equations are developed for computing port perimeter and port area at pre-established longitudinal positions. Some common formulas and some newly developed formulas are then used to compute burning surface area and port volume. Some specific results are presented for the solid rocket motor committed to the space shuttle project.

  4. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster decelerator subsystem - Air drop test vehicle/B-52 design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runkle, R. E.; Drobnik, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The air drop development test program for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Recovery System required the design of a large drop test vehicle that would meet all the stringent requirements placed on it by structural loads, safety considerations, flight recovery system interfaces, and sequence. The drop test vehicle had to have the capability to test the drogue and the three main parachutes both separately and in the total flight deployment sequence and still be low-cost to fit in a low-budget development program. The design to test large ribbon parachutes to loads of 300,000 pounds required the detailed investigation and integration of several parameters such as carrier aircraft mechanical interface, drop test vehicle ground transportability, impact point ground penetration, salvageability, drop test vehicle intelligence, flight design hardware interfaces, and packaging fidelity.

  5. Solid rocket motor integration on the Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnett, Stephen E.

    1993-06-01

    The structural design, development, and verification testing required to integrate solid rocket motors (SRM) on the Atlas IIAS launch vehicle is described. It is concluded that the next generation Atlas Centaur based on four strap-on Castor IVA SRMs and capable of lifting 7700 pounds to geosynchronous orbit has undergone a rigorous development program. A new system intended to mount and jettison the SRMs from the core vehicle is characterized by robustness and ease of installation. To insulate the aft end of the vehicle against increased SRM-induced heat fluxes and to seal against ingress of potentially hazardous base gases extensive measures were undertaken. They include nonporous engine boots and a thrust section compartment passive pressurization system.

  6. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket booster nozzle flexible seal pivot point dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffin, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) uses an omniaxial flexible seal for vectoring the nozzle. This flexible seal, being built under the technical management of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, is the first ever to be used on a manned spacecraft booster. Since no test history on the particular type of flexible seal being used was available and since flexible seal dynamics characteristics affect many vehicle hardware design and manufacture requirements, a rigorous test program to assess the integrity and operating characteristics of the seal was developed and executed. Vector requirements of the SRM flexible seal and results of subscale and full-scale prototype seal verification tests are included. The advantages of an improved method of calculating actuator stroke versus vector angle and pressure over the more classical method of calculating actuator strokes using pivot point envelopes are discussed. Results presented show that the SRM seal design will satisfy flight requirements.

  7. Use of System Safety Risk Assessments for the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhalgh, Phillip O.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the System Safety approach used to assess risk for the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). Previous to the first RSRM flight in the fall of 1988, all systems were analyzed extensively to assure that hazards were identified, assessed and that the baseline risk was understood and appropriately communicated. Since the original RSRM baseline was established, Thiokol and NASA have implemented a number of initiatives that have further improved the RSRM. The robust design, completion of rigorous testing and flight success of the RSRM has resulted in a wise reluctance to make changes. One of the primary assessments required to accompany the documentation of each proposed change and aid in the decision making process is a risk assessment. Documentation supporting proposed changes, including the risk assessments from System Safety, are reviewed and assessed by Thiokol and NASA technical management. After thorough consideration, approved changes are implemented adding improvements to and reducing risk of the Space Shuttle RSRM.

  8. Numerical techniques for solving nonlinear instability problems in smokeless tactical solid rocket motors. [finite difference technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, J. D.; Levine, J. N.

    1980-01-01

    The selection of a satisfactory numerical method for calculating the propagation of steep fronted shock life waveforms in a solid rocket motor combustion chamber is discussed. A number of different numerical schemes were evaluated by comparing the results obtained for three problems: the shock tube problems; the linear wave equation, and nonlinear wave propagation in a closed tube. The most promising method--a combination of the Lax-Wendroff, Hybrid and Artificial Compression techniques, was incorporated into an existing nonlinear instability program. The capability of the modified program to treat steep fronted wave instabilities in low smoke tactical motors was verified by solving a number of motor test cases with disturbance amplitudes as high as 80% of the mean pressure.

  9. Test data from small solid propellant rocket motor plume measurements (FA-21)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, L. M.; Somers, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    A program is described for obtaining a reliable, parametric set of measurements in the exhaust plumes of solid propellant rocket motors. Plume measurements included pressures, temperatures, forces, heat transfer rates, particle sampling, and high-speed movies. Approximately 210,000 digital data points and 15,000 movie frames were acquired. Measurements were made at points in the plumes via rake-mounted probes, and on the surface of a large plate impinged by the exhaust plume. Parametric variations were made in pressure altitude, propellant aluminum loading, impinged plate incidence angle and distance from nozzle exit to plate or rake. Reliability was incorporated by continual use of repeat runs. The test setup of the various hardware items is described along with an account of test procedures. Test results and data accuracy are discussed. Format of the data presentation is detailed. Complete data are included in the appendix.

  10. Verification of spatial and temporal pressure distributions in segmented solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salita, Mark

    1989-01-01

    A wide variety of analytical tools are in use today to predict the history and spatial distributions of pressure in the combustion chambers of solid rocket motors (SRMs). Experimental and analytical methods are presented here that allow the verification of many of these predictions. These methods are applied to the redesigned space shuttle booster (RSRM). Girth strain-gage data is compared to the predictions of various one-dimensional quasisteady analyses in order to verify the axial drop in motor static pressure during ignition transients as well as quasisteady motor operation. The results of previous modeling of radial flows in the bore, slots, and around grain overhangs are supported by approximate analytical and empirical techniques presented here. The predictions of circumferential flows induced by inhibitor asymmetries, nozzle vectoring, and propellant slump are compared to each other and to subscale cold air and water tunnel measurements to ascertain their validity.

  11. Crew Launch Vehicle Mobile Launcher Solid Rocket Motor Plume Induced Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Sulyma, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The plume-induced environment created by the Ares 1 first stage, five-segment reusable solid rocket motor (RSRMV) will impose high heating rates and impact pressures on Launch Complex 39. The extremes of these environments pose a potential threat to weaken or even cause structural components to fail if insufficiently designed. Therefore the ability to accurately predict these environments is critical to assist in specifying structural design requirements to insure overall structural integrity and flight safety. This paper presents the predicted thermal and pressure environments induced by the launch of the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) from Launch Complex (LC) 39. Once the environments are predicted, a follow-on thermal analysis is required to determine the surface temperature response and the degradation rate of the materials. An example of structures responding to the plume-induced environment will be provided.

  12. Axisymmetric shell analysis of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster field joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Anderson, Melvin S.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Challenger (STS 51-L) accident led to an intense investigation of the structural behavior of the solid rocket booster (SRB) tang and clevis field joints. The presence of structural deformations between the clevis inner leg and the tang, substantial enough to prevent the O-ring seals from eliminating hot gas flow through the joints, has emerged as a likely cause of the vehicle failure. This paper presents results of axisymmetric shell analyses that parametrically assess the structural behavior of SRB field joints subjected to quasi-steady-state internal pressure loading for both the original joint flown on mission STS 51-L and the redesigned joint recently flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery. Discussion of axisymmetric shell modeling issues and details is presented and a generic method for simulating contact between adjacent shells of revolution is described. Results are presented that identify the performance trends of the joints for a wide range of joint parameters.

  13. Structural analysis of a bolted joint concept for the Space Shuttle's solid rocket motor casing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindell, Michael C.; Stalnaker, Winifred A.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Challenger accident is thought to have been caused by the failure of one of the tang-clevis joints which join together the casing segments of the Solid Rocket Motors (SRM). Excessive displacement between the tang and clevis, possibly unseating the O-ring seals, may have initiated the resulting accident. An effort was undertaken at NASA's Langley Research Center to design an alternative concept for mating the casing segments. A bolted flanged joint concept was designed and analyzed to determine if the concept would effectively maintain a seal while minimizing joint weight and controlling stress levels. It is shown that under the loading condition analyzed the seal area of the joint remains seated. The only potential stress problem is a stress concentration in the flange at the edge of the bolt hole, which is highly localized. While heavier than the existing joint, this concept does have some advantages which make the bolted joint an attractive alternative.

  14. Probabilistic fracture mechanics and optimum fracture control of the solid rocket motor case of the shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.

    1977-01-01

    Development of a procedure for the reliability analysis of the solid rocket motor case of the space shuttle is described. The analysis is based on probabilistic fracture mechanics and consideration of a probability distribution for the initial flaw sizes. The reliability analysis can be used to select design variables, such as the thickness of the SRM case, projected design life and proof factor, on the basis of minimum expected cost and specified reliability bounds. Effects of fracture control plans such as the non-destructive inspections and the material erosion between missions can also be considered in the developed methodology for selection of design variables. The reliability-based procedure can be easily modified to consider other similar structures and different fracture control plans.

  15. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Pressure and Heat Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonEckroth, Wulf; Struchen, Leah; Trovillion, Tom; Perez, Ravael; Nereolich, Shaun; Parlier, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Main Flame Deflector (MFD) at Launch Complex 39A was instrumented with sensors to measure heat rates, pressures, and temperatures on the last three Space Shuttle launches. Because the SRB plume is hot and erosive, a robust Tungsten Piston Calorimeter was developed to compliment the measurements made by off-the-shelf sensors. Witness materials were installed and their melting and erosion response to the Mach 2 / 4500 F / 4-second duration plume was observed. The data show that the specification document used for the design of the MFD thermal protection system over-predicted heat rates by a factor of 3 and under-predicted pressures by a factor of 2. These findings will be used to baseline NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics models and develop innovative MFD designs for the Space Launch System (SLS) before this vehicle becomes operational in 2017.

  16. Alternate propellants for the space shuttle solid rocket booster motors. [for reducing environmental impact of launches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    As part of the Shuttle Exhaust Effects Panel (SEEP) program for fiscal year 1973, a limited study was performed to determine the feasibility of minimizing the environmental impact associated with the operation of the solid rocket booster motors (SRBMs) in projected space shuttle launches. Eleven hypothetical and two existing limited-experience propellants were evaluated as possible alternates to a well-proven state-of-the-art reference propellant with respect to reducing emissions of primary concern: namely, hydrogen chloride (HCl) and aluminum oxide (Al2O3). The study showed that it would be possible to develop a new propellant to effect a considerable reduction of HCl or Al2O3 emissions. At the one extreme, a 23% reduction of HCl is possible along with a ll% reduction in Al2O3, whereas, at the other extreme, a 75% reduction of Al2O3 is possible, but with a resultant 5% increase in HCl.

  17. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, Thomas J.; Larsen, David V.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A series of full-scale buckling tests were performed on the space shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) cylinders. The tests were performed to determine the buckling capability of the cylinders and to provide data for analytical comparison. A nonlinear ANSYS Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model was used to represent and evaluate the testing. Analytical results demonstrated excellent correlation to test results, predicting the failure load within 5%. The analytical value was on the conservative side, predicting a lower failure load than was applied to the test. The resulting study and analysis indicated the important parameters for FEA to accurately predict buckling failure. The resulting method was subsequently used to establish the pre-launch buckling capability of the space shuttle system.

  18. Effects of natural environment on first generation solid rocket booster thermal protection system materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. D.

    1988-01-01

    The effort to demonstrate, by real-time exposure, the effects of the natural environment at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, upon the Thermal Protection System (TPS) of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) is summarized, and that the overall SRB TPS configuration is verified to meet all requirements for resistance to the conditions associated with outdoor weathering, including: solar radiation; temperature; humidity; precipitation; wind; sand/dust abrasion; static electricity; salt spray; fungus; and atmospheric oxidants. The evaluation criterion for this project was based upon flatwise tensile properties, visual inspection, color change, and thermal performance. Based upon the evaluation of the changes in these properties, it is concluded that properly applied and topcoat-protected TPS can satisfactorily withstand the conditions of the natural environment at KSC for exposures up to six months.

  19. A study of two statistical methods as applied to shuttle solid rocket booster expenditures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlmutter, M.; Huang, Y.; Graves, M.

    1974-01-01

    The state probability technique and the Monte Carlo technique are applied to finding shuttle solid rocket booster expenditure statistics. For a given attrition rate per launch, the probable number of boosters needed for a given mission of 440 launches is calculated. Several cases are considered, including the elimination of the booster after a maximum of 20 consecutive launches. Also considered is the case where the booster is composed of replaceable components with independent attrition rates. A simple cost analysis is carried out to indicate the number of boosters to build initially, depending on booster costs. Two statistical methods were applied in the analysis: (1) state probability method which consists of defining an appropriate state space for the outcome of the random trials, and (2) model simulation method or the Monte Carlo technique. It was found that the model simulation method was easier to formulate while the state probability method required less computing time and was more accurate.

  20. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Decelerator Subsystem Drop Test 3 - Anatomy of a failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runkle, R. E.; Woodis, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    A test failure dramatically points out a design weakness or the limits of the material in the test article. In a low budget test program, with a very limited number of tests, a test failure sparks supreme efforts to investigate, analyze, and/or explain the anomaly and to improve the design such that the failure will not recur. The third air drop of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Recovery System experienced such a dramatic failure. On air drop 3, the 54-ft drogue parachute was totally destroyed 0.7 sec after deployment. The parachute failure investigation, based on analysis of drop test data and supporting ground element test results is presented. Drogue design modifications are also discussed.

  1. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 3: Sample case. [propellant combustion simulation/internal ballistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The solid rocket booster performance evaluation model (SRB-11) is used to predict internal ballistics in a sample motor. This motor contains a five segmented grain. The first segment has a 14 pointed star configuration with a web which wraps partially around the forward dome. The other segments are circular in cross-section and are tapered along the interior burning surface. Two of the segments are inhibited on the forward face. The nozzle is not assumed to be submerged. The performance prediction is broken into two simulation parts: the delivered end item specific impulse and the propellant properties which are required as inputs for the internal ballistics module are determined; and the internal ballistics for the entire burn duration of the motor are simulated.

  2. Analytical flow/thermal modeling of combustion gas flows in Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor test joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, G. H.; Knox, E. C.; Pond, J. E.; Bacchus, D. L.; Hengel, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    A one-dimensional analytical tool, TOPAZ (Transient One-dimensional Pipe flow AnalyZer), was used to model the flow characteristics of hot combustion gases through Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) joints and to compute the resultant material surface temperatures and o-ring seal erosion of the joints. The capabilities of the analytical tool were validated with test data during the Seventy Pound Charge (SPC) motor test program. The predicted RSRM joint thermal response to ignition transients was compared with test data for full-scale motor tests. The one-dimensional analyzer is found to be an effective tool for simulating combustion gas flows in RSRM joints and for predicting flow and thermal properties.

  3. Pressure Sensitive Tape in the Manufacture of Reusable Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champneys, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    ATK Launch Systems Inc. manufactures the reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM) for NASA's Space Shuttle program. They are used in pairs to launch the Space Shuttle. Pressure sensitive tape (PST) is used throughout the RSRM manufacturing process. A few PST functions are: 1) Secure labels; 2) Provide security seals; and 3) Protect tooling and flight hardware during various inert and live operations. Some of the PSTs used are: Cloth, Paper, Reinforced Teflon, Double face, Masking, and Vinyl. Factors given consideration for determining the type of tape to be used are: 1) Ability to hold fast; 2) Ability to release easily; 3) Ability to endure abuse; 4) Strength; and 5) Absence of adhesive residue after removal.

  4. Structural analysis of a bolted joint concept for the space shuttle's solid rocket motor casing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindell, Michael C.; Stalnaker, Winifred A.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Challenger accident is thought to have been caused by the failure of one of the tang-clevis joints joining together the casing segments of the Solid Rocket Motors (SRM). Excessive displacement between the tang and clevis, possibly unseating the O-ring seals, may have initiated the resulting accident. An effort was made at NASA Langley Research Center to design an alternative concept for mating the casing segments. A bolted flange joint concept was designed and analyzed to determine if the concept would effectively maintain a seal while minimizing joint weight and controlling stress levels. It is shown that under the loading conditions analyzed the seal area of the joint remains seated. The only potential stress problem is a stress concentration in the flange at the edge of the bolt hole, which is highly localized. While heavier than the existing joint, this concept does have some advantages making the bolted joint an attractive alternative.

  5. Space Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor nozzle natural frequency variations with burn time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, C. Y.; Mason, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of erosion and thermal degradation on the Space Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle's structural dynamic characteristics were analytically evaluated. Also considered was stiffening of the structure due to internal pressurization. A detailed NASTRAN finite element model of the nozzle was developed and used to evaluate the influence of these effects at several discrete times during motor burn. Methods were developed for treating erosion and thermal degradation, and a procedure was developed to account for internal pressure stiffening using differential stiffness matrix techniques. Results were verified using static firing test accelerometer data. Fast Fourier Transform and Maximum Entropy Method techniques were applied to the data to generate waterfall plots which track modal frequencies with burn time. Results indicate that the lower frequency nozzle 'vectoring' modes are only slightly affected by erosion, thermal effects and internal pressurization. The higher frequency shell modes of the nozzle are, however, significantly reduced.

  6. Overview of CFD Analyses Supporting the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Program at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric; McConnaughey, P.; Lin, J.; Reske, E.; Doran, D.; Whitesides, R. H.; Chen, Y.-S.

    1996-01-01

    During the past year, various computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses were performed at Marshall Space Flight Center to support the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor program. The successful completion of these analyses involved application of the CFD codes FDNS and CELMINT. The topics addressed by the analyses were: (1) the design and prediction of slag pool accumulation within the five inch test motor, (2) prediction of slag pool behavior and its response to lateral accelerations, (3) the clogging of potential insulation debonds within the nozzle by slag accumulation, (4) the behavior of jets within small voids inside nozzle joint gaps, (5) The effect of increased inhibitor stiffness on motor acoustics, and (6) the effect of a nozzle defect on particle impingement enhanced erosion. The emphasis of this presentation will be to further discuss the work in topics 3, 4, and 5.

  7. Supplemental final environmental impact statement for advanced solid rocket motor testing at Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Since the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision on the FEIS describing the potential impacts to human health and the environment associated with the program, three factors have caused NASA to initiate additional studies regarding these issues. These factors are: (1) The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) agreed to use the same comprehensive procedures to identify and delineate wetlands; (2) EPA has given NASA further guidance on how best to simulate the exhaust plume from the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) testing through computer modeling, enabling more realistic analysis of emission impacts; and (3) public concerns have been raised concerning short and long term impacts on human health and the environment from ASRM testing.

  8. Real-Time Inhibitor Recession Measurements in Two Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWhorter, B. B.; Ewing, M. E.; Bolton, D. E.; Albrechtsen, K. U.; Earnest, T. E.; Noble, T. C.; Longaker, M.

    2003-01-01

    Real-time internal motor insulation char line recession measurements have been evaluated for two full-scale static tests of the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). These char line recession measurements were recorded on the forward facing propellant grain inhibitors to better understand the thermal performance of these inhibitors. The RSRM propellant grain inhibitors are designed to erode away during motor operation, thus making it difficult to use post-fire observations to determine inhibitor thermal performance. Therefore, this new internal motor instrumentation is invaluable in establishing an accurate understanding of inhibitor recession versus motor operation time. The data for the first test was presented at the 37th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference and Exhibit (AIAA 2001-3280) in July 2001. Since that time, a second full scale static test has delivered additional real-time data on inhibitor thermal performance. The evaluation of this data is presented in this paper. The second static test, in contrast to the first test, used a slightly different arrangement of instrumentation in the inhibitors. This instrumentation has yielded a better understanding of the inhibitor time dependent inboard tip recession. Graphs of inhibitor recession profiles with time are presented. Inhibitor thermal ablation models have been created from theoretical principals. The model predictions compare favorably with data from both tests. This verified modeling effort is important to support new inhibitor designs for a five segment Space Shuttle solid rocket motor. The internal instrumentation project on RSRM static tests is providing unique opportunities for other real-time internal motor measurements that could not otherwise be directly quantified.

  9. Internal Flow Simulation of Enhanced Performance Solid Rocket Booster for the Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An enhanced performance solid rocket booster concept for the space shuttle system has been proposed. The concept booster will have strong commonality with the existing, proven, reliable four-segment Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM) with individual component design (nozzle, insulator, etc.) optimized for a five-segment configuration. Increased performance is desirable to further enhance safety/reliability and/or increase payload capability. Performance increase will be achieved by adding a fifth propellant segment to the current four-segment booster and opening the throat to accommodate the increased mass flow while maintaining current pressure levels. One development concept under consideration is the static test of a "standard" RSRM with a fifth propellant segment inserted and appropriate minimum motor modifications. Feasibility studies are being conducted to assess the potential for any significant departure in component performance/loading from the well-characterized RSRM. An area of concern is the aft motor (submerged nozzle inlet, aft dome, etc.) where the altered internal flow resulting from the performance enhancing features (25% increase in mass flow rate, higher Mach numbers, modified subsonic nozzle contour) may result in increased component erosion and char. To assess this issue and to define the minimum design changes required to successfully static test a fifth segment RSRM engineering test motor, internal flow studies have been initiated. Internal aero-thermal environments were quantified in terms of conventional convective heating and discrete phase alumina particle impact/concentration and accretion calculations via Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two sets of comparative CFD simulations of the RSRM and the five-segment (IBM) concept motor were conducted with CFD commercial code FLUENT. The first simulation involved a two-dimensional axi-symmetric model of the full motor, initial grain RSRM. The second set of analyses

  10. Static firing test of the H-2 launch vehicle solid rocket booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Yukio

    1988-06-01

    The National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) conducted the first static firing test of the H-2 Launch Vehicle solid rocket booster (SRB) on April 15, 1988 at the static firing test facility for solid motors in the Tanegashima Space Center using a full-size SRB. The firing test was intended to verify the basic firing characteristics of the solid motor and the heat resistance of the nozzle, to obtain data of the dynamic characteristics of the movable nozzle and to measure the environmental conditions (acoustics, vibration, heat, etc.) during motor firing. The SRB was set horizontally and was ignited. The SRB was fired normally for approx. 93 seconds, during which time an operational test to drive the movable nozzle to its maximum rudder angle of 5 degrees was performed. Roughly 290 pieces of data were obtained, such as thrust, motor internal pressure, distortion and heat radiation. The test was successful in that motor firing performance almost reached the forecasted values. The movable nozzle was operated smoothly during firing and the thrust vector control (TVC) system functions presented no problems. The nozzle errosion value was less than the design value, indicating that the design value has a sufficient error margin.

  11. Flight Investigation of the Performance of a Two-stage Solid-propellant Nike-deacon (DAN) Meteorological Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heitkotter, Robert H

    1956-01-01

    A flight investigation of two Nike-Deacon (DAN) two-stage solid-propellant rocket vehicles indicated satisfactory performance may be expected from the DAN meteorological sounding rocket. Peak altitudes of 356,000 and 350,000 feet, respectively, were recorded for the two flight tests when both vehicles were launched from sea level at an elevation angle of 75 degrees. Performance calculations based on flight-test results show that altitudes between 358,000 feet and 487,000 feet may be attained with payloads varying between 60 pounds and 10 pounds.

  12. Hybrid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A 10,000-pound thrust hybrid rocket motor is tested at Stennis Space Center's E-1 test facility. A hybrid rocket motor is a cross between a solid rocket and a liquid-fueled engine. It uses environmentally safe solid fuel and liquid oxygen.

  13. A Preliminary Investigation on the Destruction of Solid-Propellant Rocket Motors by Impact from Small Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, David J., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine whether solid-propellant rocket motors could be ignited and destroyed by small-particle impacts at particle velocities up to a approximately 10,940 feet per second. Spheres ranging from 1/16 to 7/32 inch in diameter were fired into simulated rocket motors containing T-22 propellant over a range of ambient pressures from sea level to 0.12 inch of mercury absolute. Simulated cases of stainless steel, aluminum alloy, and laminated Fiberglas varied in thickness from 1/50 to 1/8 inch. Within the scope of this investigation, it was found that ignition and explosive destruction of simulated steel-case rocket motors could result from impacts by steel spheres at the lowest attainable pressure.

  14. High temperature reformation of aluminum and chlorine compounds behind the Mach disk of a solid-fuel rocket exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1976-01-01

    Chemical reactions expected to occur among the constituents of solid-fuel rocket engine effluents in the hot region behind a Mach disk are analyzed theoretically. With the use of a rocket plume model that assumes the flow to be separated in the base region, and a chemical reaction scheme that includes evaporation of alumina and the associated reactions of 17 gas species, the reformation of the effluent is calculated. It is shown that AlClO and AlOH are produced in exchange for a corresponding reduction in the amounts of HCl and Al2O3. For the case of the space shuttle booster engines, up to 2% of the original mass of the rocket fuel can possibly be converted to these two new species and deposited in the atmosphere between the altitudes of 10 and 40 km. No adverse effects on the atmospheric environment are anticipated with the addition of these two new species.

  15. Vibration characteristics of 1/8-scale dynamic models of the space-shuttle solid-rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leadbetter, S. A.; Stephens, W.; Sewall, J. L.; Majka, J. W.; Barret, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Vibration tests and analyses of six 1/8 scale models of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters are reported. Natural vibration frequencies and mode shapes were obtained for these aluminum shell models having internal solid fuel configurations corresponding to launch, midburn (maximum dynamic pressure), and near endburn (burnout) flight conditions. Test results for longitudinal, torsional, bending, and shell vibration frequencies are compared with analytical predictions derived from thin shell theory and from finite element plate and beam theory. The lowest analytical longitudinal, torsional, bending, and shell vibration frequencies were within + or - 10 percent of experimental values. The effects of damping and asymmetric end skirts on natural vibration frequency were also considered. The analytical frequencies of an idealized full scale space shuttle solid rocket boosted structure are computed with and without internal pressure and are compared with the 1/8 scale model results.

  16. Static measurement of the thickness of the ablative coating of the solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Harry C.

    1996-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's) used to launch the Space Shuttle are coated with a layer of ablative material to prevent thermal damage when they reenter the earth's atmosphere. The coating consists of a mixture of cork, glass, and resin. A new coating (Marshall Convergent Coating, MCC-2) was recently developed that is environmentally complaint. The coating must meet certain minimum thickness standards in order to protect the SRB. The coating is applied by a robot controlled nozzle that moves from the bottom to top, as the rocket part rotates on a table. Several coats are applied, building up to the desired thickness. Inspectors do a limited amount of destructive 'wet' testing. This involves an inspector inserting a rod in the wet coating and removing the rod. This results in a hole that, of course, must be patched later. The material is cured and the thickness is measured. There is no real-time feedback as the coating is being applied. Although this might seem like the best way to control thickness, the problems with 'blowback' (reflected material covering the sensor) are formidable, and have not been solved. After the thermal coating is applied, a protective top coat is applied. The SRB part is then placed in a oven and baked to harden the surface. The operations personnel then measure the thickness of the layer using the Kaman 7200 Displacement Measuring System. The probe is placed on the surface. One person (the inspector) reads the instrument, while another(the technician) records the thickness. Measurements are taken at one foot intervals. After the measurements are taken, the number of low readings is tabulated. If more than 10 percent of the points fall below the minimum value, there is a design review, and the part may be stripped of coating, and a new coating is applied. There is no other analysis.

  17. An Analysis of the Orbital Distribution of Solid Rocket Motor Slag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Matthew F.; Mulrooney, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The contribution made by orbiting solid rocket motors (SRMs) to the orbital debris environment is both potentially significant and insufficiently studied. A combination of rocket motor design and the mechanisms of the combustion process can lead to the emission of sufficiently large and numerous by-products to warrant assessment of their contribution to the orbital debris environment. These particles are formed during SRM tail-off, or the termination of burn, by the rapid expansion, dissemination, and solidification of the molten Al2O3 slag pool accumulated during the main burn phase of SRMs utilizing immersion-type nozzles. Though the usage of SRMs is low compared to the usage of liquid fueled motors, the propensity of SRMs to generate particles in the 100 m and larger size regime has caused concern regarding their contributing to the debris environment. Particle sizes as large as 1 cm have been witnessed in ground tests conducted under vacuum conditions and comparable sizes have been estimated via ground-based telescopic and in-situ observations of sub-orbital SRM tail-off events. Using sub-orbital and post recovery observations, a simplistic number-size-velocity distribution of slag from on-orbit SRM firings was postulated. In this paper we have developed more elaborate distributions and emission scenarios and modeled the resultant orbital population and its time evolution by incorporating a historical database of SRM launches, propellant masses, and likely location and time of particulate deposition. From this analysis a more comprehensive understanding has been obtained of the role of SRM ejecta in the orbital debris environment, indicating that SRM slag is a significant component of the current and future population.

  18. Evaluation of Solid Rocket Motor Component Data Using a Commercially Available Statistical Software Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanski, Philip L.

    2015-01-01

    Commercially available software packages today allow users to quickly perform the routine evaluations of (1) descriptive statistics to numerically and graphically summarize both sample and population data, (2) inferential statistics that draws conclusions about a given population from samples taken of it, (3) probability determinations that can be used to generate estimates of reliability allowables, and finally (4) the setup of designed experiments and analysis of their data to identify significant material and process characteristics for application in both product manufacturing and performance enhancement. This paper presents examples of analysis and experimental design work that has been conducted using Statgraphics®(Registered Trademark) statistical software to obtain useful information with regard to solid rocket motor propellants and internal insulation material. Data were obtained from a number of programs (Shuttle, Constellation, and Space Launch System) and sources that include solid propellant burn rate strands, tensile specimens, sub-scale test motors, full-scale operational motors, rubber insulation specimens, and sub-scale rubber insulation analog samples. Besides facilitating the experimental design process to yield meaningful results, statistical software has demonstrated its ability to quickly perform complex data analyses and yield significant findings that might otherwise have gone unnoticed. One caveat to these successes is that useful results not only derive from the inherent power of the software package, but also from the skill and understanding of the data analyst.

  19. Solid-propellant rocket motor internal ballistic performance variation analysis, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sforzini, R. H.; Foster, W. A., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method was used to investigate thrust imbalance and its first time derivative throughtout the burning time of pairs of solid rocket motors firing in parallel. Results obtained compare favorably with Titan 3 C flight performance data. Statistical correlations of the thrust imbalance at various times with corresponding nominal trace slopes suggest several alternative methods of predicting thrust imbalance. The effect of circular-perforated grain deformation on internal ballistics is discussed, and a modified design analysis computer program which permits such an evaluation is presented. Comparisons with SRM firings indicate that grain deformation may account for a portion of the so-called scale factor on burning rate between large motors and strand burners or small ballistic test motors. Thermoelastic effects on burning rate are also investigated. Burning surface temperature is calculated by coupling the solid phase energy equation containing a strain rate term with a model of gas phase combustion zone using the Zeldovich-Novozhilov technique. Comparisons of solutions with and without the strain rate term indicate a small but possibly significant effect of the thermoelastic coupling.

  20. Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) - Evolution and Lessons Learned During the Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanner, Howard S.; Freeland, Donna M.; Olson, Derek T.; Wood, T. David; Vaccaro, Mark V.

    2011-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) element integrates all the subsystems needed for ascent flight, entry, and recovery of the combined Booster and Motor system. These include the structures, avionics, thrust vector control, pyrotechnic, range safety, deceleration, thermal protection, and retrieval systems. This represents the only human-rated, recoverable and refurbishable solid rocket ever developed and flown. Challenges included subsystem integration, thermal environments and severe loads (including water impact), sometimes resulting in hardware attrition. Several of the subsystems evolved during the program through design changes. These included the thermal protection system, range safety system, parachute/recovery system, and others. Obsolescence issues occasionally required component recertification. Because the system was recovered, the SRB was ideal for data and imagery acquisition, which proved essential for understanding loads and system response. The three main parachutes that lower the SRBs to the ocean are the largest parachutes ever designed, and the SRBs are the largest structures ever to be lowered by parachutes. SRB recovery from the ocean was a unique process and represented a significant operational challenge; requiring personnel, facilities, transportation, and ground support equipment. The SRB element achieved reliability via extensive system testing and checkout, redundancy management, and a thorough postflight assessment process. Assembly and integration of the booster subsystems was a unique process and acceptance testing of reused hardware components was required for each build. Extensive testing was done to assure hardware functionality at each level of stage integration. Because the booster element is recoverable, subsystems were available for inspection and testing postflight, unique to the Shuttle launch vehicle. Problems were noted and corrective actions were implemented as needed. The postflight assessment process was quite detailed and a

  1. Lightning tests and analyses of tunnel bond straps and shielded cables on the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druen, William M.

    1993-01-01

    The purposes of the tests and analyses described in this report are as follows: (1) determine the lightning current survivability of five alternative changed designs of the bond straps which electrically bond the solid rocket booster (SRB) systems tunnel to the solid rocket motor (SRM) case; (2) determine the amount of reduction in induced voltages on operational flight (OF) tunnel cables obtained by a modified design of tunnel bond straps (both tunnel cover-to-cover and cover-to-motor case); (3) determine the contribution of coupling to the OF tunnel cables by ground electrical and instrumentation (GEI) cables which enter the systems tunnel from unshielded areas on the surfaces of the motor case; and (4) develop a model (based on test data) and calculate the voltage levels at electronic 'black boxes' connected to the OF cables that run in the systems tunnel.

  2. Space shuttle SRM plume expansion sensitivity analysis. [flow characteristics of exhaust gases from solid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.; Tevepaugh, J. A.; Penny, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    The exhaust plumes of the space shuttle solid rocket motors can have a significant effect on the base pressure and base drag of the shuttle vehicle. A parametric analysis was conducted to assess the sensitivity of the initial plume expansion angle of analytical solid rocket motor flow fields to various analytical input parameters and operating conditions. The results of the analysis are presented and conclusions reached regarding the sensitivity of the initial plume expansion angle to each parameter investigated. Operating conditions parametrically varied were chamber pressure, nozzle inlet angle, nozzle throat radius of curvature ratio and propellant particle loading. Empirical particle parameters investigated were mean size, local drag coefficient and local heat transfer coefficient. Sensitivity of the initial plume expansion angle to gas thermochemistry model and local drag coefficient model assumptions were determined.

  3. Vibration, acoustic, and shock design and test criteria for components on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB), Lightweight External Tank (LWT), and Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The vibration, acoustics, and shock design and test criteria for components and subassemblies on the space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB), lightweight tank (LWT), and main engines (SSME) are presented. Specifications for transportation, handling, and acceptance testing are also provided.

  4. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Volume 2, book 1: Analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An analysis of the factors which determined the selection of the solid rocket propellant engines for the space shuttle booster is presented. The 156 inch diameter, parallel burn engine was selected because of its transportability, cost effectiveness, and reliability. Other factors which caused favorable consideration are: (1) recovery and reuse are feasible and offer substantial cost savings, (2) abort can be easily accomplished. and (3) ecological effects are acceptable.

  5. Development of forward and aft separation bolts for the NASA Space Shuttle solid rocket booster separation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nein, H.; Williams, V.

    1979-01-01

    A program is underway to design, develop, fabricate, and qualify large high-load forward and aft separation bolts for the Space Shuttle; the bolts will serve as attachment between two solid rocket boosters and the external tank. This paper reviews bolt development, with emphasis on the scaling of components, the use of high strength maraging steel for the internal components, and the use of lead as a hydraulic fluid.

  6. Solid propellant rocket motor internal ballistics performance variation analysis, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sforzini, R. H.; Foster, W. A., Jr.; Murph, J. E.; Adams, G. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Results of research aimed at improving the predictability of off nominal internal ballistics performance of solid propellant rocket motors (SRMs) including thrust imbalance between two SRMs firing in parallel are reported. The potential effects of nozzle throat erosion on internal ballistic performance were studied and a propellant burning rate low postulated. The propellant burning rate model when coupled with the grain deformation model permits an excellent match between theoretical results and test data for the Titan IIIC, TU455.02, and the first Space Shuttle SRM (DM-1). Analysis of star grain deformation using an experimental model and a finite element model shows the star grain deformation effects for the Space Shuttle to be small in comparison to those of the circular perforated grain. An alternative technique was developed for predicting thrust imbalance without recourse to the Monte Carlo computer program. A scaling relationship used to relate theoretical results to test results may be applied to the alternative technique of predicting thrust imbalance or to the Monte Carlo evaluation. Extended investigation into the effect of strain rate on propellant burning rate leads to the conclusion that the thermoelastic effect is generally negligible for both steadily increasing pressure loads and oscillatory loads.

  7. Effect of silicone oil on nozzle heat transfer in solid propellant rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of reducing heat transfer rates to inert nozzle walls in solid rockets by addition of silicone oil as a propellant ingredient is explored experimentally. A metallized control propellant and its counterpart with 1% silicone oil are fired in a 2 1/2-in. diameter end burning all-metal burner. Pressure-time histories are obtained; temperature-time data at the nozzle throat are obtained in some of the runs. The heat loss by the product gases to the cold inert walls of the nozzle lower the temperature of the gases leading to the condensation of aluminum oxide on the walls. This condensation is used as an index of the heat transfer rate to the nozzle. On a statistical basis it is found that the silicone propellant gives practically no condensation in 70% of the firings contrasted with 21% for its counterpart with no silicone oil in it. The gas temperature at the nozzle throat is experimentally seen to be generally higher with the silicone propellant than with its counterpart; this higher temperature is consistent with a preliminary analysis that is used here to relate the nozzle surface temperature to the heat transfer from the product gases.

  8. Effect of silicone oil on solid propellant combustion in small motors. [for rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of reducing troublesome nozzle blockage (by condensation deposits) in laboratory-scale solid rockets by addition of a silicone oil as a propellant ingredient was explored experimentally. An aluminized composite propellant and its counterpart with 1% silicone oil replacing part of the binder were fired in a 63.5 mm diameter, end-burning, all-metal burner. Pressure-time histories were recorded for all of the tests by a Taber gauge mounted at the downstream end of the chamber; temperature-time data at the nozzle throat were obtained in some of the runs by thermocouples having junctions positioned at the wall but insulated from the metal. Deposition of condensables on the nozzle walls causing a progressive increase in the chamber pressure with time was noted. The fraction of firings exhibiting practically no condensation was 59% with silicone and 32% without. On the average, temperature readings at the nozzle throat were higher with the silicone propellants. Although various phenomena may contribute to these findings, the results are not understood completely.

  9. Space Shuttle solid rocket booster initial water impact loads and dynamics - Analysis, tests, and flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kross, D. A.; Kiefling, L. A.; Murphy, N. C.; Rawls, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    A series of scale model tests, finite element dynamic response analyses and full scale segment tests have been performed for purposes of developing design criteria for the initial water impact loading conditions applied to the internal stiffener rings located in the aft skirt portion of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB). In addition, flight experience has yielded information relative to structural reinforcement requirements. This paper discusses the test and analysis methods and summarizes significant results. It is noted that, although scale model test data are valuable for identifying trends, they have shortcomings concerning definition of full scale design loads criteria. Also, the frequently used static equivalent loads definition approach is not applicable for this type impact loading condition applied to an aft skirt type structure. Various types of ring structural fixes, including the addition of selected types of foam, are presented as well as associated full scale segment test results. Depending on the type and contour shape of the foam, reductions on applied pressures and peak measured strains over 50 percent are noted.

  10. High performance Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) submerged nozzle/combustion cavity flowfield assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, J. A.; Chan, J. S.; Murph, J. E.; Xiques, K. E.

    1987-01-01

    Two and three dimensional internal flowfield solutions for critical points in the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster burn time were developed using the Lockheed Huntsville GIM/PAID Navier-Stokes solvers. These perfect gas, viscous solutions for the high performance motor characterize the flow in the aft segment and nozzle of the booster. Two dimensional axisymmetric solutions were developed at t = 20 and t = 85 sec motor burn times. The t = 85 sec solution indicates that the aft segment forward inhibitor stub produces vortices with are shed and convected downwards. A three dimensional 3.5 deg gimbaled nozzle flowfield solution was developed for the aft segment and nozzle at t = 9 sec motor burn time. This perfect gas, viscous analysis, provided a steady state solution for the core region and the flow through the nozzle, but indicated that unsteady flow exists in the region under the nozzle nose and near the flexible boot and nozzle/case joint. The flow in the nozzle/case joint region is characterized by low magnitude pressure waves which travel in the circumferential direction. From the two and three dimensional flowfield calculations presented it can be concluded that there is no evidence from these results that steady state gas dynamics is the primary mechanism resulting in the nozzle pocketing erosion experienced on SRM nozzles 8A or 17B. The steady state flowfield results indicate pocketing erosion is not directly initiated by a steady state gas dynamics phenomenon.

  11. Rotational inviscid flow in laterally burning solid-propellant rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, G.; Linan, A.; Williams, F. A.

    1992-12-01

    A theoretical analysis to determine the effects of mass addition on the inviscid but rotational and compressible flowfield in a porous duct with the injection rate dependent on the local pressure is performed for large ratios of length-to-duct diameter. The problem of describing the flow is reduced to the solution of a single integral equation. The ratio of specific heat gamma, and a constant pressure exponent n, measuring the dependence of the rate of mass injection on the local pressure, are the parameters of the solutions. The integral equation is solved numerically, and parametric results are presented for gamma, varying from 1 to 5/3 and for n varying from 0 to 1. A choking phenomenon is exhibited at a critical length of the duct in the vicinity of which the Mach number approaches unity. The choking condition, which is relevant to the operation of nozzleless solid-propellant rocket motors, is obtained parametrically in the present study and compared with corresponding results for irrotational, quasi-one-dimensional flow. The rotationality reduces the choking pressure.

  12. Development of an On-board Failure Diagnostics and Prognostics System for Solid Rocket Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Luchinsky, Dmitry G.; Osipov, Vyatcheslav V.; Timucin, Dogan A.; Uckun, Serdar

    2009-01-01

    We develop a case breach model for the on-board fault diagnostics and prognostics system for subscale solid-rocket boosters (SRBs). The model development was motivated by recent ground firing tests, in which a deviation of measured time-traces from the predicted time-series was observed. A modified model takes into account the nozzle ablation, including the effect of roughness of the nozzle surface, the geometry of the fault, and erosion and burning of the walls of the hole in the metal case. The derived low-dimensional performance model (LDPM) of the fault can reproduce the observed time-series data very well. To verify the performance of the LDPM we build a FLUENT model of the case breach fault and demonstrate a good agreement between theoretical predictions based on the analytical solution of the model equations and the results of the FLUENT simulations. We then incorporate the derived LDPM into an inferential Bayesian framework and verify performance of the Bayesian algorithm for the diagnostics and prognostics of the case breach fault. It is shown that the obtained LDPM allows one to track parameters of the SRB during the flight in real time, to diagnose case breach fault, and to predict its values in the future. The application of the method to fault diagnostics and prognostics (FD&P) of other SRB faults modes is discussed.

  13. A Monte Carlo investigation of thrust imbalance of solid rocket motor pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sforzini, R. H.; Foster, W. A., Jr.; Johnson, J. S., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for theoretical, statistical evaluation of the thrust imbalance of pairs of solid-propellant rocket motors (SRMs) firing in parallel. Sets of the significant variables, determined as a part of the research, are selected using a random sampling technique and the imbalance calculated for a large number of motor pairs. The performance model is upgraded to include the effects of statistical variations in the ovality and alignment of the motor case and mandrel. Effects of cross-correlations of variables are minimized by selecting for the most part completely independent input variables, over forty in number. The imbalance is evaluated in terms of six time - varying parameters as well as eleven single valued ones which themselves are subject to statistical analysis. A sample study of the thrust imbalance of 50 pairs of 146 in. dia. SRMs of the type to be used on the space shuttle is presented. The FORTRAN IV computer program of the analysis and complete instructions for its use are included. Performance computation time for one pair of SRMs is approximately 35 seconds on the IBM 370/155 using the FORTRAN H compiler.

  14. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - V(RSRMV)Nozzle Forward Nose Ring Thermo-Structural Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2012-01-01

    During the developmental static fire program for NASAs Reusable Solid Rocket Motor-V (RSRMV), an anomalous erosion condition appeared on the nozzle Carbon Cloth Phenolic nose ring that had not been observed in the space shuttle RSRM program. There were regions of augmented erosion located on the bottom of the forward nose ring (FNR) that measured nine tenths of an inch deeper than the surrounding material. Estimates of heating conditions for the RSRMV nozzle based on limited char and erosion data indicate that the total heat loading into the FNR, for the new five segment motor, is about 40-50% higher than the baseline shuttle RSRM nozzle FNR. Fault tree analysis of the augmented erosion condition has lead to a focus on a thermomechanical response of the material that is outside the existing experience base of shuttle CCP materials for this application. This paper provides a sensitivity study of the CCP material thermo-structural response subject to the design constraints and heating conditions unique to the RSRMV Forward Nose Ring application. Modeling techniques are based on 1-D thermal and porous media calculations where in-depth interlaminar loading conditions are calculated and compared to known capabilities at elevated temperatures. Parameters such as heat rate, in-depth pressures and temperature, degree of char, associated with initiation of the mechanical removal process are quantified and compared to a baseline thermo-chemical material removal mode. Conclusions regarding postulated material loss mechanisms are offered.

  15. Analysis of pressure blips in aft-finocyl solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giacinto, M.; Favini, B.; Cavallini, E.

    2016-07-01

    Ballistic anomalies have frequently occurred during the firing of several solid rocket motors (SRMs) (Inertial Upper Stage, Space Shuttle Redesigned SRM (RSRM) and Titan IV SRM Upgrade (SRMU)), producing even relevant and unexpected variations of the SRM pressure trace from its nominal profile. This paper has the purpose to provide a numerical analysis of the following possible causes of ballistic anomalies in SRMs: an inert object discharge, a slag ejection, and an unexpected increase in the propellant burning rate or in the combustion surface. The SRM configuration under investigation is an aft-finocyl SRM with a first-stage/small booster design. The numerical simulations are performed with a quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) unsteady model of the SRM internal ballistics, properly tailored to model each possible cause of the ballistic anomalies. The results have shown that a classification based on the head-end pressure (HEP) signature, relating each other the HEP shape and the ballistic anomaly cause, can be made. For each cause of ballistic anomalies, a deepened discussion of the parameters driving the HEP signatures is provided, as well as qualitative and quantitative assessments of the resultant pressure signals.

  16. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 1; Injection Induced Water-Flow Tests from Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Yeh, Y. P.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Prior to selecting a proper porous material for use in simulating the internal port flow of a solid rocket motor (SRM), in cold-flow testing, the flow emerging from porous materials is experimentally investigated. The injection-flow emerging from a porous matrix always exhibits a lumpy velocity profile that is spatially stable and affects the development of the longitudinal port flow. This flow instability, termed pseudoturbulence, is an inherent signature of the porous matrix and is found to generally increase with the wall porosity and with the injection flow rate. Visualization studies further show that the flow from porous walls made from shaving-type material (sintered stainless-steel) exhibits strong recirculation zones that are conspicuously absent in walls made from nodular or spherical material (sintered bronze). Detailed flow visualization observations and hot-film measurements are reported from tests of injection-flow and a coupled cross-flow from different porous wall materials. Based on the experimental data, discussion is provided on the choice of suitable material for SRM model testing while addressing the consequences and shortcomings from such a test.

  17. Real-Time Measurements of Aft Dome Insulation Erosion on Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWhorter, Bruce; Ewing, Mark; Albrechtsen, Kevin; Noble, Todd; Longaker, Matt

    2004-01-01

    Real-time erosion of aft dome internal insulation was measured with internal instrumentation on a static test of a lengthened version of the Space Shuffle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). This effort marks the first time that real-time aft dome insulation erosion (Le., erosion due to the combined effects of thermochemical ablation and mechanical abrasion) was measured in this kind of large motor static test [designated as Engineering Test Motor number 3 (ETM3)I. This paper presents data plots of the erosion depth versus time. The data indicates general erosion versus time behavior that is in contrast to what would be expected from earlier analyses. Engineers have long known that the thermal environment in the aft dome is severe and that the resulting aft dome insulation erosion is significant. Models of aft dome erosion involve a two-step process of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and material ablation modeling. This modeling effort is complex. The time- dependent effects are difficult to verify with only prefire and postfire insulation measurements. Nozzle vectoring, slag accumulation, and changing boundary conditions will affect the time dependence of aft dome erosion. Further study of this data and continued measurements on future motors will increase our understanding of the aft dome flow and erosion environment.

  18. Finite Element Simulation of Solid Rocket Booster Separation Motors During Motor Firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu. Weiping; Crane, Debora J.

    2007-01-01

    One of the toughest challenges facing Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) engineers is to ensure that any design changes made to the Shuttle-Derived Booster Separation Motors (BSM) for future space exploration vehicles is able to withstand the increasingly hostile motor firing environment without cracking its critical component - the graphite throat. This paper presents a critical analysis methodology and techniques for assessing effects of BSM design changes with great accuracy and precision. For current Space Shuttle operation, the motor firing occurs at SRB separation - approximately 125 seconds after Shuttle launch at an altitude of about 28 miles. The motor operation event lasts about two seconds, however, the surface temperature of the graphite throat increases approximately 3400 F in less than one second with a corresponding increase in surface pressure of approximately 2200 pounds per square inch (psi) in less than one-tenth of a second. To capture this process fully and accurately, a two-phase sequentially coupled thermal-mechanical finite element approach was developed. This method allows the time- and location-dependent pressure fields to interact with the spatial-temporal thermal fields throughout the operation. The material properties of graphite throat are orthotropic and temperature-dependent. The analysis involves preload and multiple body contacts.

  19. Computation of underexpanded solid rocket plume and its effects on the mated Shuttle configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. L.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ota, D. K.; Rajagopal, K.; Wisneski, J.

    A numerical study of underexpanded solid rocket booster (SRB) plume and its effects on the mated Space Shuttle configuration are presented. The overall structure of some underexpanded plumes has been computed. The characteristics of the first shock cell such as barrel shock, Mach disk, plume slipstream, Mach disk slip stream and plume induced shock have been well captured. The plume structure depends on the freestream velocity, real gas effects and viscous diffusion. Solutions for perfect gas plume and for two species flow with different species in the plume and the external flow with different physical properties, especially different values for the ratio of specific heats (alpha), are discussed. Comparisons have been made between SRB plume-off and plume-on cases. The results indicate that the plume upstream effects occur for this low supersonic free-stream flow case (freestream Mach number = 1.25, alpha = 5.1 deg) because of a large local subsonic pocket upstream of the plume region. The two-species model results in larger wing load increments than the single-species model when compared with the plumeoff case.

  20. The Solid Rocket Motor Slag Population: Results of a Radar-based Regressive Statistical Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Matthew F.; Xu, Yu-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Solid rocket motor (SRM) slag has been identified as a significant source of man-made orbital debris. The propensity of SRMs to generate particles of 100 m and larger has caused concern regarding their contribution to the debris environment. Radar observation, rather than in-situ gathered evidence, is currently the only measurable source for the NASA/ODPO model of the on-orbit slag population. This simulated model includes the time evolution of the resultant orbital populations using a historical database of SRM launches, propellant masses, and estimated locations and times of tail-off. However, due to the small amount of observational evidence, there can be no direct comparison to check the validity of this model. Rather than using the assumed population developed from purely historical and physical assumptions, a regressional approach was used which utilized the populations observed by the Haystack radar from 1996 to present. The estimated trajectories from the historical model of slag sources, and the corresponding plausible detections by the Haystack radar, were identified. Comparisons with observational data from the ensuing years were made, and the SRM model was altered with respect to size and mass production of slag particles to reflect the historical data obtained. The result is a model SRM population that fits within the bounds of the observed environment.

  1. Correlation of Slag Expulsion with Ballistic Anomalies in Shuttle Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambamurthi, Jay K.; Alvarado, Alexis; Mathias, Edward C.

    1996-01-01

    During the Shuttle launches, the solid rocket motors (SRM) occasionally experience pressure perturbations (8-13 psi) between 65-75 s into the motor burn time. The magnitudes of these perturbations are very small in comparison with the operating motor chamber pressure, which is over 600 psi during this time frame. These SRM pressure perturbations are believed to he caused primarily by the expulsion of slag (aluminum oxide). Two SRM static tests, TEM-11 and FSM-4, were instrumented extensively for the study of the phenomena associated with pressure perturbations. The test instrumentation used included nonintrusive optical and infrared diagnostics of the plume, such as high-speed photography, radiometers, and thermal image cameras. Results from all of these nonintrusive observations provide substantial circumstantial evidence to support the scenario that the pressure perturbation event in the Shuttle SRM is caused primarily by the expulsion of molten slag. In the static motor tests, the slag was also expelled preferentially near the bottom of the nozzle because of slag accumulation at the bottom of the aft end of the horizontally oriented motor.

  2. Axisymmetric shell analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket booster field joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Anderson, Melvin S.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Challenger (STS 51-L) accident led to an intense investigation of the structural behavior of the solid rocket booster (SRB) tang and clevis field joints. Results are presented of axisymmetric shell analyses that parametrically assess the structural behavior of SRB field joints subjected to quasi-steady-state internal pressure loading for both the original joint flown on mission STS 51-L and the redesigned joint flown for the first time after the STS 51-L accident on the Space Shuttle Discovery. Discussion of axisymmetric shell modeling issues and details is presented and a generic method for simulating contact between adjacent shells of revolution is described. Results are presented that identify the performance trends of the joints for a wide range of joint parameters. An important finding is that the redesigned joint exhibits significantly smaller O-ring gap changes and much less sensitivity to joint clearances than the original joint. For a wide range of joint parameters, the result presented indicate that the redesigned joint provides a much better pressure seal than the original joint.

  3. Computation of the space shuttle solid rocket booster nozzle start-up transient flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, M.C.; Wilmoth, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    The first NASA Space Shuttle flight (STS-1) produced an overpressure wave that exceeded preflight predictions by as much as 5 to 1. This second overpressure wave occurred just after the solid rocket booster (SRB) igniter wave. To understand this overpressure phenomenon, a numerical simulation effort was undertaken. Both the SRB static firing test and STS-1 geometries were studied for two-dimensional, inviscid and viscous flow. The inviscid calculations did not produce significant second overpressure waves. However, the viscous calculations did produce second overpressure waves that qualitatively agree with experiment. These overpressure waves were present in both the static firing test and STS-1 geometries. This second overpressure wave is generated by the motion of the boundary layer separation point and the subsequent radial motion of the exhaust jet during the start-up of the SRB nozzle flow. The presence of the mobile launch platform exhaust hole wall amplifies this wave, but does not appear to be the source of any additional overpressure waves. The lack of good quantitative agreement between theory and experiment indicates that other overpressure sources, not accounted for by this simulation, may be present.

  4. The effect of nonsymmetric pressure stiffness on the dynamic characteristics of Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of pressure on the dynamics of pre-stiffened structures such as the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). Previous work in which the stiffness terms resulting from constant pressure were derived has been extended to enable modeling of nonconstant pressure applied over nonenclosed volumes. These conditions will result in nonsymmetric terms in the global stiffness matrix which will not cancel out. Three new pressure stiffness elements incorporating these nonsymmetric terms have been implemented as dummy elements in COSMIC NASTRAN and have been tested on various simple examples as well as an existing ASRM NASTRAN finite element model. The results indicate that for all load cases of practical interest to the ASRM program, the nonsymmetric terms have very little effect on the dynamic characteristics. In addition, the pressure stiffness elements developed in the previous work which assumed constant pressure gave virtually the same results as the new elements even for problems in which the pressures are not constant. The original elements appear to work well as long as the pressure gradient across any individual element is no larger than about 0.75 psi/inch. The new elements are therefore most useful for determining the conditions under which the original pressure stiffness elements can be used.

  5. NASTRAN cyclic symmetry capability. [application to solid rocket propellant grains and space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macneal, R. H.; Harder, R. L.; Mason, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    A development for NASTRAN which facilitates the analysis of structures made up of identical segments symmetrically arranged with respect to an axis is described. The key operation in the method is the transformation of the degrees of freedom for the structure into uncoupled symmetrical components, thereby greatly reducing the number of equations which are solved simultaneously. A further reduction occurs if each segment has a plane of reflective symmetry. The only required assumption is that the problem be linear. The capability, as developed, will be available in level 16 of NASTRAN for static stress analysis, steady state heat transfer analysis, and vibration analysis. The paper includes a discussion of the theory, a brief description of the data supplied by the user, and the results obtained for two example problems. The first problem concerns the acoustic modes of a long prismatic cavity imbedded in the propellant grain of a solid rocket motor. The second problem involves the deformations of a large space antenna. The latter example is the first application of the NASTRAN Cyclic Symmetry capability to a really large problem.

  6. Computation of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster nozzle start-up transient flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, M. C.; Wilmoth, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The first NASA Space Shuttle flight (STS-1) produced an overpressure wave that exceeded preflight predictions by as much as 5 to 1. This second overpressure wave occurred just after the solid rocket booster (SRB) igniter wave. To understand this overpressure phenomenon, a numerical simulation effort was undertaken. Both the SRB static firing test and STS-1 geometries were studied for two-dimensional, inviscid and viscous flow. The inviscid calculations did not produce significant second overpressure waves. However, the viscous calculations did produce second overpressure waves that qualitatively agree with experiment. These overpressure waves were present in both the static firing test and STS-1 geometries. This second overpressure wave is generated by the motion of the boundary layer separation point and the subsequent radial motion of the exhaust jet during the start-up of the SRB nozzle flow. The presence of the mobile launch platform exhaust hole wale amplifies this wave, but does not appear to be the source of any additional overpressure waves. The lack of good quantitative agreement between theory and experiment indicates that other overpressure sources, not accounted for by this simulation, may be present.

  7. A new one-man submarine is tested as vehicle for solid rocket booster retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At left, a manipulator arm on a one-man submarine demonstrates its ability to cut tangled parachute riser lines and place a Diver Operator Plug (top right) inside a mock solid rocket booster nozzle (center). Known as DeepWorker 2000, the sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach the DOP to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program.

  8. A new one-man submarine is tested as vehicle for solid rocket booster retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A mockup of a solid rocket booster nozzle is lowered into the waters of the Atlantic during a test of a new booster retrieval method. A one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000 is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program.

  9. A new one-man submarine is tested as vehicle for solid rocket booster retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program.

  10. A new one-man submarine is tested as vehicle for solid rocket booster retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A Diver Operator Plug (DOP) is being pulled down into the ocean by a newly designed one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000. The activity is part of an operation to attach the plug to a mockup of a solid rocket booster nozzle. DeepWorker 2000 is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach the DOP to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program.

  11. A new one-man submarine is tested as vehicle for solid rocket booster retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    From the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships, a crane lowers a one-man submarine into the ocean near Cape Canaveral, Fla. Called DeepWorker 2000, the sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program.

  12. A new one-man submarine is tested as vehicle for solid rocket booster retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    After a successful dive, the one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000 is lifted from Atlantic waters near Cape Canaveral, Fla., onto the deck of the Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. Inside the sub is the pilot, Anker Rasmussen. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program.

  13. An in-situ measurement of particulates from solid rocket motors fired in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alred, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Current models exist that predict the damage caused by the impact of aluminum oxide exhaust particles as well as their lifetime in useable space. In these models, two necessary inputs are the size and flux of the particles. An experiment, referred to as the Plume Witness Plate, was designed for the Remote Manipulator System of the space shuttle orbiter to measure in-situ the flux and material effects of a solid rocket motor (SRM) firing in space. Five different types of samples were used to provide a broad range of substances: (1) fused quartz glass (representative of orbiter windows); (2) germanium micrometeroid capture cells; (3) orbiter HRTS tiles from the thermal protection system; (4) Kapton foil; and (5) metallic disks of aluminum, copper, titanium, graphite epoxy, and gold. The analyses of the data show excellent agreement with ground-based SRM firings in terms of particle size distribution and mass distribution. The Particle Impact Damage Integrator computer model used to calculate potential damage of orbiter surfaces by SRM exhaust plumes agrees favorable with the results in terms of particle size and velocity distributions though it may be conservative by as much as 20%.

  14. Fracture tolerance analysis of the solid rocket booster servo-actuator for the space shuttle

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.H.; Ghadiali, N.D.; Zahoor, A.; Wilson, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    The results of an evaluation of the fracture tolerance of three components of the thrust vector control servo-actuator for the solid rocket booster of the space shuttle are described. These components were considered as being potentially fracture critical and therefore having the potential to fall short of a desired service life of 80 missions (that is, a service life factor of 4.0 on a basic service life of 20 missions). Detailed stress analysis of the rod end, cylinder, and feedback link components was accomplished by three-dimensional finite-element stress analysis methods. A dynamic structural model of the feedback system was used to determine the dynamic inertia loads and reactions to apply to the finite-element model of the feedback link. Twenty mission stress spectra consisting of lift-off, boost, re-entry, and water impact mission segments were developed for each component based on dynamic loadings. Most components were determined to have the potential of reaching a service life of 80 missions or service life factor of 4.0. 22 refs.

  15. Qualification Status of Non-Asbestos Internal Insulation in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Louie

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a status of the qualification efforts associated with NASA's RSRMV non-asbestos internal insulation program. For many years, NASA has been actively engaged in removal of asbestos from the shuttle RSRM motors due to occupation health concerns where technicians are working with an EPA banned material. Careful laboratory and subscale testing has lead to the downselect of a organic fiber known as Polybenzimidazol to replace the asbestos fiber filler in the existing synthetic rubber copolymer Nitrile Butadiene - now named PBI/NBR. Manufacturing, processing, and layup of the new material has been a challenge due to the differences in the baseline shuttle RSRM internal insulator properties and PBI/NBR material properties. For this study, data gathering and reduction procedures for thermal and chemical property characterization for the new candidate material are discussed. Difficulties with test procedures, implementation of properties into the Charring Material Ablator (CMA) codes, and results correlation with static motor fire data are provided. After two successful five segment motor firings using the PBI/NBR insulator, performance results for the new material look good and the material should eventually be qualified for man rated use in large solid rocket motor applications.

  16. Review of Physics Related Research and Development Activities in Nondestructive Characterization of Solid Rocket Motor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Lee H.

    1998-10-01

    The perception that solid rocket motors (srm) are of relatively simple mechanical construction with a long history in private, military, and NASA applications may lead some to believe that little is left to be done in terms of basic and applied research and development in support of this technology. The fact is that srm?s are very complicated primarily because of the complexity of the materials from which they are built. The reliability and performance of srm?s are determined by the ballistic and mechanical properties of each individual material component, and by the manufacturing processes that conjoin these materials. In order to insure reliability and good performance, there are on-going materials research and development activities in the srm community. Included are activities involving the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods used for materials and processes characterization. Typical applications include: detection and characterization of defects in fiber reinforced composite materials, detection of weak bonds and debonds, verification of surface cleanliness prior to bonding, characterization of aging materials and bondlines, measurement of elastic properties in filled polymeric materials, monitoring of cure in polymeric materials, and measurement of film or coating thicknesses. NDE methods and physics principles upon which they are based will be described. Challenges and future research and development directions will be identified.

  17. Real-Time Inhibitor Recession Measurements in the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWhorter, Bruce B.; Ewing, Mark E.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Real-time char line recession measurements were made on propellant inhibitors of the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). The RSRM FSM-8 static test motor propellant inhibitors (composed of a rubber insulation material) were successfully instrumented with eroding potentiometers and thermocouples. The data was used to establish inhibitor recession versus time relationships. Normally, pre-fire and post-fire insulation thickness measurements establish the thermal performance of an ablating insulation material. However, post-fire inhibitor decomposition and recession measurements are complicated by the fact that most of the inhibitor is back during motor operation. It is therefore a difficult task to evaluate the thermal protection offered by the inhibitor material. Real-time measurements would help this task. The instrumentation program for this static test motor marks the first time that real-time inhibitors. This report presents that data for the center and aft field joint forward facing inhibitors. The data was primarily used to measure char line recession of the forward face of the inhibitors which provides inhibitor thickness reduction versus time data. The data was also used to estimate the inhibitor height versus time relationship during motor operation.

  18. Plume particle collection and sizing from static firing of solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambamurthi, Jay K.

    1995-01-01

    A unique dart system has been designed and built at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to collect aluminum oxide plume particles from the plumes of large scale solid rocket motors, such as the space shuttle RSRM. The capability of this system to collect clean samples from both the vertically fired MNASA (18.3% scaled version of the RSRM) motors and the horizontally fired RSRM motor has been demonstrated. The particle mass averaged diameters, d43, measured from the samples for the different motors, ranged from 8 to 11 mu m and were independent of the dart collection surface and the motor burn time. The measured results agreed well with those calculated using the industry standard Hermsen's correlation within the standard deviation of the correlation . For each of the samples analyzed from both MNASA and RSRM motors, the distribution of the cumulative mass fraction of the plume oxide particles as a function of the particle diameter was best described by a monomodal log-normal distribution with a standard deviation of 0.13 - 0.15. This distribution agreed well with the theoretical prediction by Salita using the OD3P code for the RSRM motor at the nozzle exit plane.

  19. Plume Particle Collection and Sizing from Static Firing of Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambamurthi, Jay K.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal radiation from the plume of any solid rocket motor, containing aluminum as one of the propellant ingredients, is mainly from the microscopic, hot aluminum oxide particles in the plume. The plume radiation to the base components of the flight vehicle is primarily determined by the plume flowfield properties, the size distribution of the plume particles, and their optical properties. The optimum design of a vehicle base thermal protection system is dependent on the ability to accurately predict this intense thermal radiation using validated theoretical models. This article describes a successful effort to collect reasonably clean plume particle samples from the static firing of the flight simulation motor (FSM-4) on March 10, 1994 at the T-24 test bed at the Thiokol space operations facility as well as three 18.3% scaled MNASA motors tested at NASA/MSFC. Prior attempts to collect plume particles from the full-scale motor firings have been unsuccessful due to the extremely hostile thermal and acoustic environment in the vicinity of the motor nozzle.

  20. Spectroscopy and multivariate analyses applications related to solid rocket nozzle bondline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendale, W. F.; Hatcher, Richard; Benson, Brian; Workman, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical composition and molecular orientation define the properties of materials. Information related to chemical composition and molecular configuration is obtained by various forms of spectroscopy. Software algorithms developed for multivariate analyses, expert systems, and Artificial Intelligence (AI) are used to conduct repetitive operations. The techniques are believed to be of particular significance toward achieving TQM objectives. The objective was to obtain information related to the quality of the bondline in the solid rocket motor, SRM, nozzle. Hysol 934 NA, a room temperature curing epoxide resin, is used as the bonding agent. A good bond requires that the adhesive be placed on a properly prepared metal surface, the adhesives Part A and B be mixed in appropriate ratio from material within shelf life specifications. Spectroscopic data was obtained for surfaces prepared according to specifications, contaminated metal surfaces, samples of the epoxide adhesive at times that represent shelf aging from 3 months to 2 years, several mix ratio of A to B, and curing material. Temperature was found to be a significant factor. The study concentrated on pot life and mix ratio.

  1. Monte Carlo investigation of thrust imbalance of solid rocket motor pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sforzini, R. H.; Foster, W. A., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method of statistical analysis is used to investigate the theoretical thrust imbalance of pairs of solid rocket motors (SRMs) firing in parallel. Sets of the significant variables are selected using a random sampling technique and the imbalance calculated for a large number of motor pairs using a simplified, but comprehensive, model of the internal ballistics. The treatment of burning surface geometry allows for the variations in the ovality and alignment of the motor case and mandrel as well as those arising from differences in the basic size dimensions and propellant properties. The analysis is used to predict the thrust-time characteristics of 130 randomly selected pairs of Titan IIIC SRMs. A statistical comparison of the results with test data for 20 pairs shows the theory underpredicts the standard deviation in maximum thrust imbalance by 20% with variability in burning times matched within 2%. The range in thrust imbalance of Space Shuttle type SRM pairs is also estimated using applicable tolerances and variabilities and a correction factor based on the Titan IIIC analysis.

  2. Laser Shearography Inspection of TPS (Thermal Protection System) Cork on RSRM (Reusable Solid Rocket Motors)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingbloom, Mike; Plaia, Jim; Newman, John

    2006-01-01

    Laser Shearography is a viable inspection method for detection of de-bonds and voids within the external TPS (thermal protection system) on to the Space Shuttle RSRM (reusable solid rocket motors). Cork samples with thicknesses up to 1 inch were tested at the LTI (Laser Technology Incorporated) laboratory using vacuum-applied stress in a vacuum chamber. The testing proved that the technology could detect cork to steel un-bonds using vacuum stress techniques in the laboratory environment. The next logical step was to inspect the TPS on a RSRM. Although detailed post flight inspection has confirmed that ATK Thiokol's cork bonding technique provides a reliable cork to case bond, due to the Space Shuttle Columbia incident there is a great interest in verifying bond-lines on the external TPS. This interest provided and opportunity to inspect a RSRM motor with Laser Shearography. This paper will describe the laboratory testing and RSRM testing that has been performed to date. Descriptions of the test equipment setup and techniques for data collection and detailed results will be given. The data from the test show that Laser Shearography is an effective technology and readily adaptable to inspect a RSRM.

  3. The effects of particulates from solid rocket motors fired in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Alan C.; Kessler, Donald J.

    Solid rocket motors are currently used to transfer satellites from low Earth to geosynchronous orbit. Since the apogee kick burn is directed out of the orbital plane, most of the aluminum oxide particles making up the plume will not immediately de-orbit. Studies show that the flux (number of impacts/m2/yr) resulting from just one burn can exceed the natural meteoroid flux for particles of like size (1-10 μm). Furthermore, this man-made flux is distributed evenly from low Earth to geosynchronous altitudes. Solar radiation pressure is the dominate perturbation causing the orbital eccentricity to oscillate with a phase dependent on the initial orbital orientation to the Sun. A semi-analytical technique which includes the effects of the J2, solar, and lunar gravitational accelerations as well as radiation pressure and atmospheric drag is developed to analyze the stability of the wide range of particle orbits. A statistically significant random sample of particles are propagated forward in time with the results indicating that less than 5% of all the particles will remain in orbit over one year.

  4. An Assessment of the Role of Solid Rocket Motors in the Generation of Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulrooney, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Through an intensive collection and assimilation effort of Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) related data and resources, the author offers a resolution to the uncertainties surrounding SRM particulate generation, sufficiently so to enable a first-order incorporation of SRMs as a source term in space debris environment definition. The following five key conclusions are derived: 1) the emission of particles in the size regime of greatest concern from an orbital debris hazard perspective (D > 100 micron), and in significant quantities, occurs only during the Tail-off phase of SRM burn activity, 2) the velocity of these emissions is correspondingly small - between 0 and 100 m/s, 3) the total Tail-off emitted mass is between approximately 0.04 and 0.65% of the initial propellant mass, 4) the majority of Tail-off emissions occur during the 30 second period that begins as the chamber pressure declines below approximately 34.5 kPa (5 psia) and 5) the size distribution for the emitted particles ranges from 100 micron

  5. A study of performance and cost improvement potential of the 120 inch (3.05 m) diameter solid rocket motor. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backlund, S. J.; Rossen, J. N.

    1971-01-01

    A parametric study of ballistic modifications to the 120 inch diameter solid propellant rocket engine which forms part of the Air Force Titan 3 system is presented. 576 separate designs were defined and 24 were selected for detailed analysis. Detailed design descriptions, ballistic performance, and mass property data were prepared for each design. It was determined that a relatively simple change in design parameters could provide a wide range of solid propellant rocket engine ballistic characteristics for future launch vehicle applications.

  6. Solid-Fuel Regression Rate for Standard-Flow Hybrid Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Takakazu; Yuasa, Saburo; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Shimada, Toru

    Marxman's diffusion-limited analysis of hybrid rocket combustion has been often used to investigate various combustion problems in hybrid rocket motors. This analysis was developed on the basis of the Reynolds analogy in turbulent boundary layers. This analogy assumes that both molecular and turbulent Prandtl numbers are equal to one. In the present study, a semi-empirical correlation between the Stanton number and the skin-friction coefficient in a turbulent boundary layer was obtained. This is applicable to hybrid rocket combustion, and also includes the effects of the Prandtl numbers variation. Using this correlation, a fuel regression rate equation for standard-flow hybrid rocket motors was obtained, and its characteristics were examined. In addition, the calculated regression rate characteristics were compared with the experimental data from the laboratory-scale hybrid rocket motors that used gaseous oxygen (GOX) as oxidizer and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as fuel.

  7. Simulation of the internal dynamics of solid-fuel rocket engines on the basis of the STAR-CD suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, K. N.; Denisikhin, S. V.; Emel'Yanov, V. N.

    2006-07-01

    Flows in the channels of solid-fuel charges with cross sections having different views in plan and flows in the prenozzle volume and the nozzle unit of a solid-fuel rocket engine have been simulated on the basis of the STAR-CD suite for different types of charges and different designs of the input part of the engine nozzle. The influence of the compressibility, turbulence, geometric factors, and flow rate on the distributions of gasdynamic parameters in the working region of the engine has been investigated.

  8. Design and Fabrication of a 200N Thrust Rocket Motor Based on NH4ClO4+Al+HTPB as Solid Propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Mastura Ab; Ali, Wan Khairuddin Wan

    2010-06-01

    The development of rocket motor using potassium nitrate, carbon and sulphur mixture has successfully been developed by researchers and students from UTM and recently a new combination for solid propellant is being created. The new solid propellant will combine a composition of Ammonium perchlorate, NH4ClO4 with aluminium, Al and Hydroxyl Terminated Polybutadiene, HTPB as the binder. It is the aim of this research to design and fabricate a new rocket motor that will produce a thrust of 200N by using this new solid propellant. A static test is done to obtain the thrust produced by the rocket motor and analyses by observation and also calculation will be done. The experiment for the rocket motor is successful but the thrust did not achieve its required thrust.

  9. Characterization of the non axial thrust generated by large solid propellant rocket motors in three axis stabilized ascent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmann, W. J.; Dionne, E. R.; Klemetson, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Nonaxial thrusts produced by solid rocket motors during three-axis stabilized attitude control have been determined from ascent experience on twenty three Burner II, Burner IIA and Block 5D-1 upper stage vehicles. A data base representing four different rocket motor designs (three spherical and one extended spherical) totaling twenty five three-axis stabilized firings is generated. Solid rocket motor time-varying resultant and lateral side force vector magnitudes, directions and total impulses, and roll torque couple magnitudes, directions, and total impulses are tabulated in the appendix. Population means and three sigma deviations are plotted. Existing applicable ground test side force and roll torque magnitudes and total impulses are evaluated and compared to the above experience data base. Within the spherical motor population, the selected AEDC ground test data consistently underestimated experienced motor side forces, roll torques and total impulses. Within the extended spherical motor population, the selected AEDC test data predicted experienced motor side forces, roll torques, and total impulses, with surprising accuracy considering the very small size of the test and experience populations.

  10. Effects of experimentally measured pressure oscillations on the vibration of a solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenster, J. A.; Pierce, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented of firing a Nike rocket against a backstop for the purpose of obtaining pressure fluctuations in the rocket case and determining their relationship to structural vibrations of the case. Special care was required to obtain these pressure fluctuations because of the much higher static pressure generated in the rocket. Very small pressure fluctuations within the rocket case can cause significant vibration levels. A previously observed high frequency was shown to decrease with time before completely disappearing at about 1 second of burning time. The vibration of the case itself is probably related to the longitudinal structural modes at frequencies below 500 Hz and is dependent on local structural conditions at frequencies above this value.

  11. Solid-propellant rocket motor internal ballistics performance variation analysis, phase 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sforzini, R. H.; Murph, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The results of research aimed at improving the predictability of internal ballistics performance of solid-propellant rocket motors (SRM's) including thrust imbalance between two SRM's firing in parallel are presented. Static test data from the first six Space Shuttle SRM's is analyzed using a computer program previously developed for this purpose. The program permits intentional minor design biases affecting the imbalance between any two SMR's to be removed. Results for the last four of the six SRM's, with only the propellant bulk temperature as a non-random variable, are generally within limits predicted by theory. Extended studies of internal ballistic performance of single SRM's are presented based on an earlier developed mathematical model which includes an assessment of grain deformation. The erosive burning rate law used in the model is upgraded and made more general. Excellent results are obtained in predictions of the performances of five different SRM's of quite different sizes and configurations. These SRM's all employ PBAN type propellants with ammonium perchlorate oxidizer and 16 to 20% aluminum except one which uses carboxyl terminated butadiene binder. The only non-calculated parameters in the burning rate equations that are changed for the different SRM's are the zero crossflow velocity burning rate coefficients and exponents. The results, in general, confirm the importance of grain deformation. The improved internal ballistic model makes practical development of an effective computer program for application of an optimization technique to SRM design which is also demonstrated. The program uses a pattern search technique to minimize the difference between a desired thrust-time trace and one calculated based on the internal ballistic model.

  12. An Internal Thermal Environment Model of an Aluminized Solid Rocket Motor with Experimental Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Heath T.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the severity of the internal solid rocket motor (SRM) environment, very few direct measurements of that environment exist; therefore, the appearance of such data provides a unique opportunity to assess current thermal/fluid modeling capabilities. As part of a previous study of SRM internal insulation performance, the internal thermal environment of a laboratory-scale SRM featuring aluminized propellant was characterized with two types of custom heat-flux calorimeters: one that measured the total heat flux to a graphite slab within the SRM chamber and another that measured the thermal radiation flux. Therefore, in the current study, a thermal/fluid model of this lab-scale SRM was constructed using ANSYS Fluent to predict not only the flow field structure within the SRM and the convective heat transfer to the interior walls, but also the resulting dispersion of alumina droplets and the radiative heat transfer to the interior walls. The dispersion of alumina droplets within the SRM chamber was determined by employing the Lagrangian discrete phase model that was fully coupled to the Eulerian gas-phase flow. The P1-approximation was engaged to model the radiative heat transfer through the SRM chamber where the radiative contributions of the gas phase were ignored and the aggregate radiative properties of the alumina dispersion were computed from the radiative properties of its individual constituent droplets, which were sourced from literature. The convective and radiative heat fluxes computed from the thermal/fluid model were then compared with those measured in the lab-scale SRM test firings and the modeling approach evaluated.

  13. NARC Rayon Replacement Program for the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle: Screening Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, R. V.; Fairbourn, M. W.; Wendel, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Thiokol Corporation and NASA MSFC are jointly developing a replacement for North American Rayon Corporation (NARC) Aerospace Grade Rayon (1650/720 continuous filament), the precursor for the Carbon Cloth Phenolic (CCP) ablatives used in the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Nozzles. NARC discontinued production of Aerospace Grade Rayon in September 1997. NASA maintains a stockpile of NARC Rayon to support RSRM production through the summer of 2005. The program plan for selection and qualification of a replacement for NARC rayon was approved in August 1998. Screening activities began in February 1999. The intent of this paper is to provide a summary of the data generated during the screening phase of the NARC Rayon Replacement Program. Twelve cellulose based fibers (rayon and lyocell) were evaluated. These fibers were supplied by three independent vendors. Many of these fibers were carbonized by two independent carbonizers. Each candidate was tested according to standard acceptance test methods at each step of the manufacturing process. Additional testing was performed with the candidate CCPS, including hot fire tests, Process studies and mechanical and thermal characterization. Six of the twelve fiber candidates tested were dropped at the conclusion of Phase 1. The reasons for the elimination of these candidates included; difficulties in processing the material in the whitegoods, carbon and CCP forms; poor composite mechanical performance; and future availability concerns. The remaining six fibers demonstrated enough promise to merit continued evaluation and optimization of the CCP fabrication process. Note: Certain CCP data falls under the restrictions of US export laws, (ITAR, etc.) and will not be included in this paper.

  14. Time-Accurate Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of a Pair of Moving Solid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Williams, Brandon R.

    2011-01-01

    Since the Columbia accident, the threat to the Shuttle launch vehicle from debris during the liftoff timeframe has been assessed by the Liftoff Debris Team at NASA/MSFC. In addition to engineering methods of analysis, CFD-generated flow fields during the liftoff timeframe have been used in conjunction with 3-DOF debris transport methods to predict the motion of liftoff debris. Early models made use of a quasi-steady flow field approximation with the vehicle positioned at a fixed location relative to the ground; however, a moving overset mesh capability has recently been developed for the Loci/CHEM CFD software which enables higher-fidelity simulation of the Shuttle transient plume startup and liftoff environment. The present work details the simulation of the launch pad and mobile launch platform (MLP) with truncated solid rocket boosters (SRBs) moving in a prescribed liftoff trajectory derived from Shuttle flight measurements. Using Loci/CHEM, time-accurate RANS and hybrid RANS/LES simulations were performed for the timeframe T0+0 to T0+3.5 seconds, which consists of SRB startup to a vehicle altitude of approximately 90 feet above the MLP. Analysis of the transient flowfield focuses on the evolution of the SRB plumes in the MLP plume holes and the flame trench, impingement on the flame deflector, and especially impingment on the MLP deck resulting in upward flow which is a transport mechanism for debris. The results show excellent qualitative agreement with the visual record from past Shuttle flights, and comparisons to pressure measurements in the flame trench and on the MLP provide confidence in these simulation capabilities.

  15. Asbestos Free Insulation Development for the Space Shuttle Solid Propellant Rocket Motor (RSRM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Larry D.; Eddy, Norman F.; McCool, A. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Asbestos has been used for many years as an ablation inhibitor in insulating materials. It has been a constituent of the AS/NBR insulation used to protect the steel case of the RSRM (Reusable Solid Rocket Motor) since its inception. This paper discusses the development of a potential replacement RSRM insulation design, several of the numerous design issues that were worked and processing problems that were resolved. The earlier design demonstration on FSM-5 (Flight Support Motor) of the selected 7% and 11% Kevlar(registered) filled EPDM (KF/EPDM) candidate materials was expanded. Full-scale process simulation articles were built and FSM-8 was manufactured using multiple Asbestos Free (AF) components and materials. Two major problems had to be overcome in developing the AF design. First, bondline corrosion, which occurred in the double-cured region of the aft dome, had to be eliminated. Second, KF/EPDM creates high levels of electrostatic energy (ESE), which does not readily dissipate from the insulation surface. An uncontrolled electrostatic discharge (ESD) of this surface energy during many phases of production could create serious safety hazards. Numerous processing changes were implemented and a conductive paint was developed to prevent exposed external insulation surfaces from generating ESE/ESD. Additionally, special internal instrumentation was incorporated into FSM-8 to record real-time internal motor environment data. These data included inhibitor insulation erosion rates and internal thermal environments. The FSM-8 static test was successfully conducted in February 2000 and much valuable data were obtained to characterize the AF insulation design.

  16. Experimental determination of convective heat transfer coefficients in the separated flow region of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Majumdar, Alok K.; Jenkins, Susan L.; Bacchus, David L.

    1990-01-01

    A series of cold flow heat transfer tests was conducted with a 7.5-percent scale model of the Space Shuttle Rocket Motor (SRM) to measure the heat transfer coefficients in the separated flow region around the nose of the submerged nozzle. Modifications were made to an existing 7.5 percent scale model of the internal geometry of the aft end of the SRM, including the gimballed nozzle in order to accomplish the measurements. The model nozzle nose was fitted with a stainless steel shell with numerous thermocouples welded to the backside of the thin wall. A transient 'thin skin' experimental technique was used to measure the local heat transfer coefficients. The effects of Reynolds number, nozzle gimbal angle, and model location were correlated with a Stanton number versus Reynolds number correlation which may be used to determine the convective heating rates for the full scale Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor nozzle.

  17. The development of an erosive burning model for solid rocket motors using direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Brian A.

    A method for developing an erosive burning model for use in solid propellant design-and-analysis interior ballistics codes is described and evaluated. Using Direct Numerical Simulation, the primary mechanisms controlling erosive burning (turbulent heat transfer, and finite rate reactions) have been studied independently through the development of models using finite rate chemistry, and infinite rate chemistry. Both approaches are calibrated to strand burn rate data by modeling the propellant burning in an environment with no cross-flow, and adjusting thermophysical properties until the predicted regression rate matches test data. Subsequent runs are conducted where the cross-flow is increased from M = 0.0 up to M = 0.8. The resulting relationship of burn rate increase versus Mach Number is used in an interior ballistics analysis to compute the chamber pressure of an existing solid rocket motor. The resulting predictions are compared to static test data. Both the infinite rate model and the finite rate model show good agreement when compared to test data. The propellant considered is an AP/HTPB with an average AP particle size of 37 microns. The finite rate model shows that as the cross-flow increases, near wall vorticity increases due to the lifting of the boundary caused by the side injection of gases from the burning propellant surface. The point of maximum vorticity corresponds to the outer edge of the APd-binder flame. As the cross-flow increases, the APd-binder flame thickness becomes thinner; however, the point of highest reaction rate moves only slightly closer to the propellant surface. As such, the net increase of heat transfer to the propellant surface due to finite rate chemistry affects is small. This leads to the conclusion that augmentation of thermal transport properties and the resulting heat transfer increase due to turbulence dominates over combustion chemistry in the erosive burning problem. This conclusion is advantageous in the development of

  18. Enhanced Large Solid Rocket Motor Understanding Through Performance Margin Testing: RSRM Five-Segment Engineering Test Motor (ETM-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppi, Hal; Tobias, Mark; Seiler, James

    2003-01-01

    The Five-Segment Engineering Test Motor (ETM-3) is an extended length reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM) intended to increase motor performance and internal environments above the current four-segment RSRM flight motor. The principal purpose of ETM-3 is to provide a test article for RSRM component margin testing. As the RSRM and Space Shuttle in general continue to age, replacing obsolete materials becomes an ever-increasing issue. Having a five-segment motor that provides environments in excess of normal opera- tion allows a mechanism to subject replacement materials to a more severe environment than experienced in flight. Additionally, ETM-3 offers a second design data point from which to develop and/or validate analytical models that currently have some level of empiricism associated with them. These enhanced models have the potential to further the understanding of RSRM motor performance and solid rocket motor (SRM) propulsion in general. Furthermore, these data could be leveraged to support a five-segment booster (FSB) development program should the Space Shuttle program choose to pursue this option for abort mode enhancements during the ascent phase. A tertiary goal of ETM-3 is to challenge both the ATK Thiokol Propulsion and NASA MSFC technical personnel through the design and analysis of a large solid rocket motor without the benefit of a well-established performance database such as the RSRM. The end result of this undertaking will be a more competent and experienced workforce for both organizations. Of particular interest are the motor design characteristics and the systems engineering approach used to conduct a complex yet successful large motor static test. These aspects of ETM-3 and more will be summarized.

  19. Study of solid rocket motor for space shuttle booster, volume 2, book 5, appendices E thru H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Preliminary parametric studies were performed to establish size, weight and packaging arrangements for aerodynamic decelerator devices that could be used for recovery of the expended solid propellant rocket motors used in the launch phase of the Space Shuttle System. Computations were made using standard engineering analysis techniques. Terminal stage parachutes were sized to provide equilibrium descent velocities for water entry that are presently thought to be acceptable without developing loads that could exceed the boosters structural integrity. The performance characteristics of the aerodynamic parachute decelerator devices considered are based on analysis and prior test results for similar configurations and are assumed to be maintained at the scale requirements of the present problem.

  20. Space shuttle solid rocket booster recovery system definition. Volume 2: SRB water impact Monte Carlo computer program, user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The HD 220 program was created as part of the space shuttle solid rocket booster recovery system definition. The model was generated to investigate the damage to SRB components under water impact loads. The random nature of environmental parameters, such as ocean waves and wind conditions, necessitates estimation of the relative frequency of occurrence for these parameters. The nondeterministic nature of component strengths also lends itself to probabilistic simulation. The Monte Carlo technique allows the simultaneous perturbation of multiple independent parameters and provides outputs describing the probability distribution functions of the dependent parameters. This allows the user to determine the required statistics for each output parameter.

  1. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Volume 2, book 3, addendum 1: Cost estimating data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderesch, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    A second iteration of the program baseline configuration and cost for the solid propellant rocket engines used with the space shuttle booster system is presented. The purpose of the study was to ensure that total program costs were complete and to review areas where costs might be overly conservative and could be reduced. Labor and material were analyzed in more depth, more definition was prepared to separate recurring from nonrecurring costs, and the operations portions of the engine and stage were separated into more identifiable activities.

  2. Metallized solid rocket propellants based on AN/AP and PSAN/AP for access to space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, S.; Signoriello, D.; Gabardi, A.; Molinari, M.; Galfetti, L.; Deluca, L. T.; Cianfanelli, S.; Klyakin, G. F.

    2009-09-01

    Solid rocket propellants based on dual mixes of inorganic crystalline oxidizers (ammonium nitrate (AN) and ammonium perchlorate (AP)) with binder and a mixture of micrometric-nanometric aluminum were investigated. Ammonium nitrate is a low-cost oxidizer, producing environment friendly combustion products but with lower specific impulse compared to AP. The better performance obtained with AP and the low quantity of toxic emissions obtained by using AN have suggested an interesting compromise based on a dual mixture of the two oxidizers. To improve the thermal response of raw AN, different types of phase stabilized AN (PSAN) and AN/AP co-crystals were investigated.

  3. The Solid Rocket Motor Slag Population: Results of a Radar-Based Regressive Statistical Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Matthew F.; Xu, Yu-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Solid rocket motor (SRM) slag has been identified as a potential source of man-made orbital debris. The possibility that SRMs (in addition to generating dust particles in the sub-millimeter range) may generate particles up to centimeters in size has caused concern regarding their contribution to the debris environment. Returned surfaces from space do not have sufficient area or exposure time to provide a clear picture of the SRM millimeter and centimeter debris population. Currently, radar observation is probably the only way to collect data showing the debris contribution from SRMs. Such observation is used to sample the debris environment, but it is difficult to obtain accurate orbital elements for the detected debris objects. NASA has developed several models to describe the different orbital debris populations, based on assumed debris production mechanisms to create clouds of debris objects that can be propagated in time. The NASA model, LEGEND (LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris), functions as a time-tested debris model for most debris sources. However, the current LEGEND model does not include contributions from the SRM population. An SRM model has recently been developed by NASA, based on purely theoretical details of SRM production and known SRM launches, but verification with hard data is needed. Because the detections of individual SRM objects cannot be deterministically separated from the total debris observed by radar, the validation of the SRM model can only be done by combining it with the LEGEND breakup model and comparing it with data. By applying observational constraints, the degree of SRM slag contribution to the environment may be estimated. This serves as an observationally sound method from which to calibrate a purely theoretical model into something more realistic. For this study, we use the populations observed by the Haystack radar from 1996 to present. For the SRM debris, we use a historical database of SRM launches, propellant masses, and

  4. Global stratospheric effects of the alumina emissions by solid-fueled rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Shia, R.-L.; Ko, M. K. W.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Sze, N. D.; Lamb, J. J.; Smith, T. W.; Lohn, P. D.; Prather, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    We simulate accumulation of Al2O3 particles in the atmosphere produced by solid-fueled rocket motors by using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies/University of California at Irvine three-dimensional (3-D) chemistry-transport model (CTM). Our study differs from Jackman et al. (1998) by applying a 3-D CTM, considering 13 size bins for the emitted particles from 0.025 to 10 μm and taking into account their washout, gravitational sedimentation, and coagulation with background sulfate aerosol. We assume an initial trimodal size distribution of Al2O3 particles (Beiting, 1997) with 2.8% by mass of the alumina emitted as particles with radius of less than 1 μm. Our test case adopts a stratospheric source of 1120 tons/yr equivalent to nine space Shuttle and four Titan IV launches annually. The calculated steady state surface area density (SAD) and mass density for the scenarios with sedimentation of alumina particles have maximum values in the lower stratosphere in the Northern Hemisphere of up to 7×10-4 μm2/cm3 and 0.09 ng/m3, respectively, or about 1000 times smaller than those of the background sulfate aerosol. Our results are sensitive to the emitted mass fractionation of alumina (EMFA) showing the values for the SAD or mass density higher or lower by an order of magnitude owing to a poorly known EMFA. Chemical implications of alumina particle accumulation for the ozone balance are estimated by using the Atmospheric and Environmental Research 2-D model assuming chlorine activation on Al2O3 surfaces via the C1ONO2 + HCl → Cl2 + HNO3 reaction with a probability of 0.02 (Molina et al., 1997). Owing to the very small Al2O3 SAD, any additional ozone depletion due to Al2O3 emissions is also small (0.0028% on a global annually averaged basis for the scenario with sedimentation, or about 4 times smaller than the ozone response to chlorine emissions only). The ozone depletion potential of the alumina emissions is about 0.03-0.08 for the scenarios using the EMFA of

  5. Nonideal detonation and initiation behavior of a composite solid rocket propellant. [HMX/AP/Al

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    Shock initiation and detonation behavior of an HMX/AP/Al rocket propellant were studied for nonideal character. Low detonation velocities and unusual shock initiation behavior were observed. Failure to propagate steady detonation in cylinders of the propellant was also noted.

  6. Effect of temperature and gap opening rate on the resiliency of candidate solid rocket booster O-ring materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lach, Cynthia L.

    1992-01-01

    In the redesign of the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor following the Challenger accident, the field and nozzle-to-case joints were designed to minimize gap opening caused by internal motor pressurization during ignition. The O-ring seals and glands for these joints were designed both to accommodate structural deflections and to promote pressure assisted sealing. The resiliency behavior of several candidate O-ring materials was evaluated for the effects of temperature and gap opening rates. The performance of three of the elastomeric materials was tested under the specific redesign gap opening requirement. Dynamic flexure conditions unique to launch produce low frequency vibrations in the gap opening. The effect of these vibrations on the ability of the O-ring to maintain contact with the sealing surface was addressed. The resiliency of the O-ring materials was found to be extremely sensitive to variations in temperature and gap opening rate. The top three elastomeric materials tracked the simulated solid rocket booster (SRB) field joint deflection at 75 and 120 F. The external tank/SRB attach strut load vibrations had a negligible effect on the ability of the O-ring to track the simulated SRB field joint deflection.

  7. Computer model predictions of the local effects of large, solid-fuel rocket motors on stratospheric ozone. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Zittel, P.F.

    1994-09-10

    The solid-fuel rocket motors of large space launch vehicles release gases and particles that may significantly affect stratospheric ozone densities along the vehicle's path. In this study, standard rocket nozzle and flowfield computer codes have been used to characterize the exhaust gases and particles through the afterburning region of the solid-fuel motors of the Titan IV launch vehicle. The models predict that a large fraction of the HCl gas exhausted by the motors is converted to Cl and Cl2 in the plume afterburning region. Estimates of the subsequent chemistry suggest that on expansion into the ambient daytime stratosphere, the highly reactive chlorine may significantly deplete ozone in a cylinder around the vehicle track that ranges from 1 to 5 km in diameter over the altitude range of 15 to 40 km. The initial ozone depletion is estimated to occur on a time scale of less than 1 hour. After the initial effects, the dominant chemistry of the problem changes, and new models are needed to follow the further expansion, or closure, of the ozone hole on a longer time scale.

  8. Initial Test Firing Results for Solid CO/GOX Cryogenic Hybrid Rocket Engine for Mars ISRU Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Eric E.; St. Clair, Christopher P.; Chiaverini, Martin J.; Knuth, William H.; Gustafson, Robert J.; Gramer, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    ORBITEC is developing methods for producing, testing, and utilizing Mars-based ISRU fuel/oxidizer combinations to support low cost, planetary surface and flight propulsion and power systems. When humans explore Mars we will need to use in situ resources that are available, such as: energy (solar); gases or liquids for life support, ground transportation, and flight to and from other surface locations and Earth; and materials for shielding and building habitats and infrastructure. Probably the easiest use of Martian resources to reduce the cost of human exploration activities is the use of the carbon and oxygen readily available from the CO2 in the Mars atmosphere. ORBITEC has conducted preliminary R&D that will eventually allow us to reliably use these resources. ORBITEC is focusing on the innovative use of solid CO as a fuel. A new advanced cryogenic hybrid rocket propulsion system is suggested that will offer advantages over LCO/LOX propulsion, making it the best option for a Mars sample return vehicle and other flight vehicles. This technology could also greatly support logistics and base operations by providing a reliable and simple way to store solar or nuclear generated energy in the form of chemical energy that can be used for ground transportation (rovers/land vehicles) and planetary surface power generators. This paper describes the overall concept and the test results of the first ever solid carbon monoxide/oxygen rocket engine firing.

  9. Finite element method for viscoelastic medium with damage and the application to structural analysis of solid rocket motor grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bin; Shen, ZhiBin; Duan, JingBo; Tang, GuoJin

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the damage-viscoelastic behavior of composite solid propellants of solid rocket motors (SRM). Based on viscoelastic theories and strain equivalent hypothesis in damage mechanics, a three-dimensional (3-D) nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating with damage is developed. The resulting viscoelastic constitutive equations are numerically discretized by integration algorithm, and a stress-updating method is presented by solving nonlinear equations according to the Newton-Raphson method. A material subroutine of stress-updating is made up and embedded into commercial code of Abaqus. The material subroutine is validated through typical examples. Our results indicate that the finite element results are in good agreement with the analytical ones and have high accuracy, and the suggested method and designed subroutine are efficient and can be further applied to damage-coupling structural analysis of practical SRM grain.

  10. Introduction of laser initiation for the 48-inch Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) test motors at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Chris J.; Litzinger, Gerald E.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor is a new design for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. The new design will provide more thrust and more payload capability, as well as incorporating many design improvements in all facets of the design and manufacturing process. A 48-inch (diameter) test motor program is part of the ASRM development program. This program has multiple purposes for testing of propellent, insulation, nozzle characteristics, etc. An overview of the evolution of the 48-inch ASRM test motor ignition system which culminated with the implementation of a laser ignition system is presented. The laser system requirements, development, and operation configuration are reviewed in detail.

  11. Results of an experimental investigation of the flow field in the head-end star slot section of a Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciucci, A.; Foster, Winfred A., Jr.; Jenkins, Rhonald M.

    1992-01-01

    Cold flow tests of a one-tenth scale model based on the geometry of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor, SRM, head-end section and its single-port igniter, along with two models of a four port igniter, have been conducted. The tests were done to establish quantitative as well as qualitative data on the behavior of the flow inside the star slot during the early part of the ignition transient. This paper presents the data obtained from these tests and discusses the implications of the data with respect to ignition transients of solid rocket motors which have head-end star grains.

  12. Assessment of Various Flow Solvers Used to Predict the Thermal Environment inside Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qun-Zhen

    2002-01-01

    It is very important to accurately predict the gas pressure, gas and solid temperature, as well as the amount of O-ring erosion inside the space shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) joints in the event of a leak path. The scenarios considered are typically hot combustion gas rapid pressurization events of small volumes through narrow and restricted flow paths. The ideal method for this prediction is a transient three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation with a computational domain including both combustion gas and surrounding solid regions. However, this has not yet been demonstrated to be economical for this application due to the enormous amount of CPU time and memory resulting from the relatively long fill time as well as the large pressure and temperature rising rate. Consequently, all CFD applications in RSRM joints so far are steady-state simulations with solid regions being excluded from the computational domain by assuming either a constant wall temperature or no heat transfer between the hot combustion gas and cool solid walls.

  13. Calculation of vibration mode and its experimental study in solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Junwei; Sun, Weishen; Xing, Chunjing

    1992-05-01

    A method for the calculation of vibration mode in rocket motors is presented, and a corresponding program is worked out. Values calculated with this program are consistent with theoretical and experimental results, indicating that the program is soundly based. A new type of vibration excitation apparatus-turbo vibration exciter is also introduced and used for determination of natural frequency of acoustic cavities and of acoustic damping coefficients of motor.

  14. Real-Time X-ray Radiography Diagnostics of Components in Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cortopassi, A. C.; Martin, H. T.; Boyer, E.; Kuo, K. K.

    2012-01-01

    Solid rocket motors (SRMs) typically use nozzle materials which are required to maintain their shape as well as insulate the underlying support structure during the motor operation. In addition, SRMs need internal insulation materials to protect the motor case from the harsh environment resulting from the combustion of solid propellant. In the nozzle, typical materials consist of high density graphite, carbon-carbon composites and carbon phenolic composites. Internal insulation of the motor cases is typically a composite material with carbon, asbestos, Kevlar, or silica fibers in an ablative matrix such as EPDM or NBR. For both nozzle and internal insulation materials, the charring process occurs when the hot combustion products heat the material intensely. The pyrolysis of the matrix material takes away a portion of the thermal energy near the wall surface and leaves behind a char layer. The fiber reinforcement retains the porous char layer which provides continued thermal protection from the hot combustion products. It is of great interest to characterize both the total erosion rates of the material and the char layer thickness. By better understanding of the erosion process for a particular ablative material in a specific flow environment, the required insulation material thickness can be properly selected. The recession rates of internal insulation and nozzle materials of SRMs are typically determined by testing in some sort of simulated environment; either arc-jet testing, flame torch testing, or subscale SRMs of different size. Material recession rates are deduced by comparison of pre- and post-test measurements and then averaging over the duration of the test. However, these averaging techniques cannot be used to determine the instantaneous recession rates of the material. Knowledge of the variation in recession rates in response to the instantaneous flow conditions during the motor operation is of great importance. For example, in many SRM configurations

  15. Thermal-Flow Code for Modeling Gas Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qunzhen; Mathias, Edward C.; Heman, Joe R.; Smith, Cory W.

    2000-01-01

    A new, thermal-flow simulation code, called SFLOW. has been developed to model the gas dynamics, heat transfer, as well as O-ring and flow path erosion inside the space shuttle solid rocket motor joints by combining SINDA/Glo, a commercial thermal analyzer. and SHARPO, a general-purpose CFD code developed at Thiokol Propulsion. SHARP was modified so that friction, heat transfer, mass addition, as well as minor losses in one-dimensional flow can be taken into account. The pressure, temperature and velocity of the combustion gas in the leak paths are calculated in SHARP by solving the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations while the heat conduction in the solid is modeled by SINDA/G. The two codes are coupled by the heat flux at the solid-gas interface. A few test cases are presented and the results from SFLOW agree very well with the exact solutions or experimental data. These cases include Fanno flow where friction is important, Rayleigh flow where heat transfer between gas and solid is important, flow with mass addition due to the erosion of the solid wall, a transient volume venting process, as well as some transient one-dimensional flows with analytical solutions. In addition, SFLOW is applied to model the RSRM nozzle joint 4 subscale hot-flow tests and the predicted pressures, temperatures (both gas and solid), and O-ring erosions agree well with the experimental data. It was also found that the heat transfer between gas and solid has a major effect on the pressures and temperatures of the fill bottles in the RSRM nozzle joint 4 configuration No. 8 test.

  16. Solid amine-boranes as high performance hypergolic hybrid rocket fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeil, Mark A.

    Hypergolic hybrid rockets have the potential of providing systems that are simple, reliable, have high performance, and allow for energy management. Such a propulsion system can be applied to fields that need a single tactical motor with flexible mission requirements of either high speed to target or extended loitering. They also provide the possibility for alternative fast response dynamic altitude control systems if ignition delays are sufficiently short. Amines are the traditional fuel of choice when selecting a hypergolic combination as these tend to react readily with both nitric acid and dinitrogen tertroxide based oxidizers. It has been found that the addition of a borane adduct to an amine fuel tends to reduce the ignition delay by up to an order of magnitude with white fuming nitric acid (WFNA). The borane addition has resulted in fuels with very short ignition delays between 2-10 ms - the fastest times for an amine based fuel reacting with nitric acid based oxidizers. The incorporation of these amine-boranes, specifically ethylenediamine bisborane (EDBB), into various fuel binders has also been found to result in ignition delays between 3-10 ms - the fastest times again for amine based fuels. It was found that the addition of a borane to an amine increased theoretical performance of the amine resulting in high performance fuels. The amine-borane/fuel binder combinations also produced higher theoretical performance values than previously used hypergolic hybrid rockets. Some of the theoretical values are on par or higher than the current toxic liquid hypergolic fuels, making amine boranes an attractive replacement. The higher performing amine-borane/fuel binder combinations also have higher performance values than the traditional rocket fuels, excluding liquid hydrogen. Thus, amine-borane based fuels have the potential to influence various area in the rocket field. An EDBB/ferrocene/epoxy fuel was tested in a hypergolic hybrid with pure nitric acid as the

  17. Acceleration effects on the performance of solid-propellant rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, M. H.; Jones, I. W.; Stephens, M. V.

    1976-01-01

    Some acceleration effects on rocket performance have been well publicized. The dynamic process, characterized by marked increases in 'localized' burning rate, produces excessive case heating, slag retention, pressure buildup, and/or internal flow alterations. Data are presented illustrating drastic effects at low accelerations for sustainer type propellants and its relevance to several recent failures. Normalized orientation dependence of rate augmentation appears coupled to acceleration level and base burning rate. Effects appear influenced by propellant composition. Predictions using subscale motor data show good agreement with observed performance for ground spin and flight tests. Subscale test methods and results are also discussed.

  18. Rocket pollution reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Geisler, R.L.

    1994-01-04

    A system is provided for reducing the emissions of hydrochloric acid (HCl) from solid fuel rockets, especially during ground disposal. An aqueous solution of an alkali metal hydroxide is injected as a mist into the rocket chamber as the rocket fuel is burned. The reaction of the alkali metal with hydrogen chloride (HCl) produces a salt and thereby minimizes the presence of hydrochloric acid in the rocket exhaust. An injected neutralizing material which reduces hydrochloric acid, but which produces less thrust than an equal weight of rocket fuel, can be injected into an operating rocket which carries a payload high above the earth, with the injected material being injected only while the rocket is at a lower altitude when hydrochloric acid is most undesirable. The injected material can be produced by a small auxiliary rocket device whose exhaust is delivered directly to the main rocket chamber, and with the exhaust of the auxiliary rocket device including a high proportion of magnesium to react with the hydrochloric acid with minimal degradation of rocket performance. 4 figs.

  19. Technical report analysis and design: Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster, volume 2, book 1, supplement 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An analysis and design effort was conducted as part of the study of solid rocket motor for a space shuttle booster. The 156-inch-diameter, parallel burn solid rocket motor was selected as its baseline because it is transportable and is the most cost-effective, reliable system that has been developed and demonstrated. The basic approach was to concentrate on the selected baseline design, and to draw from the baseline sufficient data to describe the alternate approaches also studied. The following conclusions were reached with respect to technical feasibility of the use of solid rocket booster motors for the space shuttle vehicle: (1) The 156-inch, parallel-burn baseline SRM design meets NASA's study requirements while incorporating conservative safety factors. (2) The solid rocket motor booster represents a cost-effective approach. (3) Baseline costs are conservative and are based on a demonstrated design. (4) Recovery and reuse are feasible and offer substantial cost savings. (5) Abort can be accomplished successfully. (6) Ecological effects are acceptable.

  20. Lithium cell tests at Marshall Space Flight Center. [batteries for range safety and frustrum location aid in the shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschal, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Three 18 AH Li-CF batteries with a polypropylene separator and using dimethyl sulfite in Li as F6 for the electrolyte will be placed in each shuttle solid rocket booster for range safety and frustrum location aid. Mechanical vibration, acceleration, random and design vibration, and discharge evaluation tests are discussed.

  1. Numerical investigation of the influence of crystallization of ultrafine particles of aluminum oxide on energy characteristics of solid-propellant rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, N. N.; Dyachenko, L. I.

    2014-08-01

    The results of numerical investigation of a multiphase flow considering coagulation, crushing and crystallization of the particles of polydispersed condensate in the nozzles of solid-propellant rocket engine are presented. The influence of particles crystallization on the energy characteristics of the engine is shown.

  2. An Acoustical Comparison of Sub-Scale and Full-Scale Far-Field Measurements for the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, Jared; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Recently, members of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Fluid Dynamics Branch and Wyle Labs measured far-field acoustic data during a series of three Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) horizontal static tests conducted in Promontory, Utah. The test motors included the Technical Evaluation Motor 13 (TEM-13), Flight Verification Motor 2 (FVM-2), and the Flight Simulation Motor 15 (FSM-15). Similar far-field data were collected during horizontal static tests of sub-scale solid rocket motors at MSFC. Far-field acoustical measurements were taken at multiple angles within a circular array centered about the nozzle exit plane, each positioned at a radial distance of 80 nozzle-exit-diameters from the nozzle. This type of measurement configuration is useful for calculating rocket noise characteristics such as those outlined in the NASA SP-8072 "Acoustic Loads Generated by the Propulsion System." Acoustical scaling comparisons are made between the test motors, with particular interest in the Overall Sound Power, Acoustic Efficiency, Non-dimensional Relative Sound Power Spectrum, and Directivity. Since most empirical data in the NASA SP-8072 methodology is derived from small rockets, this investigation provides an opportunity to check the data collapse between a sub-scale and full-scale rocket motor.

  3. Structural design of an in-line bolted joint for the space shuttle solid rocket motor case segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Stein, Peter A.; Bush, Harold G.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a structural design study of an in-line bolted joint concept which can be used to assemble Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) case segments are presented. Numerous parametric studies are performed to characterize the in-line bolted joint behavior as major design variables are altered, with the primary objective always being to keep the inside of the joint (where the O-rings are located) closed during the SRM firing. The resulting design has 180 1-inch studs, an eccentricity of -0.5 inch, a flange thickness of 3/4 inch, a bearing plate thickness of 1/4 inch, and the studs are subjected to a preload which is 70% of ultimate. The mass penalty per case segment joint for the in-line design is 346 lbm more than the weight penalty for the proposed capture tang fix.

  4. Finite Element Simulation of a Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Aft Skirt Splashdown Using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-eulerian Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.

    2003-01-01

    Explicit finite element techniques employing an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methodology, within the transient dynamic code LS-DYNA, are used to predict splashdown loads on a proposed replacement/upgrade of the hydrazine tanks on the thrust vector control system housed within the aft skirt of a Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. Two preliminary studies are performed prior to the full aft skirt analysis: An analysis of the proposed tank impacting water without supporting aft skirt structure, and an analysis of space capsule water drop tests conducted at NASA's Langley Research Center. Results from the preliminary studies provide confidence that useful predictions can be made by applying the ALE methodology to a detailed analysis of a 26-degree section of the skirt with proposed tank attached. Results for all three studies are presented and compared to limited experimental data. The challenges of using the LS-DYNA ALE capability for this type of analysis are discussed.

  5. Testing of Environmentally Preferable Aluminum Pretreatments and Coating Systems for Use on Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, C.; Raley, R.; Zook, L.

    2001-01-01

    The solid rocket booster (SRB) has historically used a chromate conversion coating prior to protective finish application. After conversion coating, an organic paint system consisting of a chromated epoxy primer and polyurethane topcoat is applied. An overall systems approach was selected to reduce waste generation from the coatings application and removal processes. While the most obvious waste reduction opportunity involved elimination of the chromate conversion coating, several other coating system configurations were explored in an attempt to reduce the total waste. This paper will briefly discuss the use of a systems view to reduce waste generation from the coating process and present the results of the qualification testing of nonchromated aluminum pretreatments and alternate coating systems configurations.

  6. Transfer impedance measurements of the space shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) joints, wire meshes and a carbon graphite motor case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papazian, Peter B.; Perala, Rodney A.; Curry, John D.; Lankford, Alan B.; Keller, J. David

    1988-01-01

    Using three different current injection methods and a simple voltage probe, transfer impedances for Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) joints, wire meshes, aluminum foil, Thorstrand and a graphite composite motor case were measured. In all cases, the surface current distribution for the particular current injection device was calculated analytically or by finite difference methods. The results of these calculations were used to generate a geometric factor which was the ratio of total injected current to surface current density. The results were validated in several ways. For wire mesh measurements, results showed good agreement with calculated results for a 14 by 18 Al screen. SRM joint impedances were independently verified. The filiment wound case measurement results were validated only to the extent that their curve shape agrees with the expected form of transfer impedance for a homogeneous slab excited by a plane wave source.

  7. Methods for data reduction and loads analysis of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster model water impact tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The methodology used to predict full scale space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB) water impact loads from scale model test data is described. Tests conducted included 12.5 inch and 120 inch diameter models of the SRB. Geometry and mass characteristics of the models were varied in each test series to reflect the current SRB baseline configuration. Nose first and tail first water entry modes were investigated with full-scale initial impact vertical velocities of 40 to 120 ft/sec, horizontal velocities of 0 to 60 ft/sec., and off-vertical angles of 0 to plus or minus 30 degrees. The test program included a series of tests with scaled atmospheric pressure.

  8. Experimental investigation of the flow field in the head-end star slot section of a solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciucci, A.; Foster, Winfred A., Jr.; Jenkins, Rhonald M.

    1991-01-01

    A test program has been developed to investigate the complex flowfield in the head-end, star grain section of a solid rocket motor. Documentation of the flowfield pattern is to be obtained using both flow visualization techniques and quantitative methods, including static pressure measurements, heat transfer coefficient measurements, and hot-wire anemometry. A cold-flow, one-tenth-scale model based on the geometry of the Space Shuttle SRM head-end section and its single-port igniter, along with two models of a four-port igniter, have been constructed. The scale factor is derived from a scaling analysis which matches Reynolds number between the model and the full-scale flowfield in the star grain section. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center 14 x 14 inch trisonic wind tunnel will be utilized for the cold flow tests. Since the work is still in progress, no results are included.

  9. Finite Element Simulation of a Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Aft Skirt Splashdown Using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, Matthew E.

    2003-01-01

    Explicit finite element techniques employing an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methodology, within the transient dynamic code LS-DYNA, are used to predict splashdown loads on a proposed replacement/upgrade of the hydrazine tanks on the thrust vector control system housed within the aft skirt of a Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. Two preliminary studies are performed prior to the full aft skirt analysis: An analysis of the proposed tank impacting water without supporting aft skirt structure, and an analysis of space capsule water drop tests conducted at NASA's Langley Research Center. Results from the preliminary studies provide confidence that useful predictions can be made by applying the ALE methodology to a detailed analysis of a 26-degree section of the skirt with proposed tank attached. Results for all three studies are presented and compared to limited experimental data. The challenges of using the LS-DYNA ALE capability for this type of analysis are discussed.

  10. Shear strength of fillet welds in aluminum alloy 2219. [for use on the solid rocket motor and external tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1978-01-01

    Fillet size is discussed in terms of theoretical or design dimensions versus as-welded dimensions, drawing attention to the inherent conservatism in the design load sustaining capabilities of fillet welds. Emphasis is placed on components for the solid rocket motor, external tank, and other aerospace applications. Problems associated with inspection of fillet welds are addresses and a comparison is drawn between defect counts obtained by radiographic inspection and by visual examination of the fracture plane. Fillet weld quality is related linearly to ultimate shear strength. Correlation coefficients are obtained by simple straight line regression analysis between the variables of ultimate shear strength and accumulative discontinuity summation. Shear strength allowables are found to be equivalent to 57 percent of butt weld A allowables (F sub tu.)

  11. Study to determine the aquatic biological effects on the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB). [technique for monitoring marine microbial fouling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, R. R.; Zachary, A.

    1979-01-01

    The surface of the reusable solid rocket boosters (SRB), which are jettisoned from the Shuttle Orbiter to parachute in the sea, are studied for colonization by marine life. Techniques for monitoring the marine microbial fouling of SRB materials are presented. An assessment of the nature and degree of the biofouling expected on the SRB materials in the recovery zone is reported. A determination of the degree and the effects of seasonal variation occurring on microbial fouling in the retrieval zone waters is made. The susceptibility of the SRB parachute recovery system to microbial fouling and biodeterioration is investigated. The development of scanning electron microscopy and epifluorescence microscopic observation techniques for rapid assessment of microbial fouling is discussed.

  12. In situ measurement of the aerosol size distribution in stratospheric solid rocket motor exhaust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M. N.; Whitefield, P. D.; Hagen, D. E.; Hopkins, A. R.

    The concentration and size distribution of aerosol in the stratospheric exhaust plumes of two Space Shuttle rockets and one Titan IV rocket were measured using a two component aerosol sampling system carried aboard a WB-57F aircraft. Aerosol size distribution in the 0.01 µm to 4 µm diameter size range was measured using a two component sampling system. The measured distributions display a trimodal form with modes near 0.005 µm, 0.09 µm, and 2.03 µm and are used to infer the relative mass fractionation among the three modes. While the smallest mode has been estimated to contain as much as 10% of the total mass of SRM exhaust alumina, we find show that the smallest mode contains less than 0.05% of the alumina mass. This fraction is so small so as to significantly reduce the likelihood that heterogeneous reactions on the SRM alumina surfaces could produce a significant global impact on stratospheric chemistry.

  13. Effect of water to ablative performance under solid rocket exhaust environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. J.; Koo, J. H.; Sickler, F. M.; Lecureux, F.; Dash, S. M.

    1993-06-01

    The local environment during a missile firing is particularly hostile. Thermal protection of the missile launcher structure is often achieved with ablatives. Ablatives erode when subjected to high-temperature rocket exhaust, but the backside temperature of the protected structure remains relatively cool due to the insulative nature of ablatives. Multiple missile firings can completely erode the ablative, exposing the launching system components to an extremely high temperature. This investigation addresses the concept of injecting water into the missile plume to reduce the amount of ablative erosion per missile firing. This concept also reduces the amount of ablative materials needed in missile launching systems. Injecting water into the exhaust plume in a controlled laboratory environment was performed. Heat flux and material erosion measurements were compared in this study.

  14. Hydromining a full-scale class 1.1 solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. F.; Chleborad, O. W.; Cova, P. J.; Eccli, D. B.; Glad, T. J.; Kunkle, D. M.

    1993-11-01

    A class 1.1 full-scale Stage 2 Small Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (SICBM) was successfully deloaded using high pressure water jets at approximately 689 N (10,000 psia). The SICBM Stage 2 rocket motor contains approximately 2948 kg (6500 lb) of Class 1.1 propellant (nitrato ester polyester based propellant). A vertical hydromining facility was constructed to simulate a production operational mode in which the system water was continuously recycled to the high pressure water jet nozzles. A series of four in-line carbon absorption filter pairs were used to reduce nitrato ester concentrations to acceptable safety levels (e.g., less than 1 ppm of nitroglycerin). This paper will summarize the operating conditions used and the results of the successful study.

  15. Continued investigation of solid propulsion economics. Task 1B: Large solid rocket motor case fabrication methods - Supplement process complexity factor cost technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, J.

    1967-01-01

    This supplement to Task lB-Large Solid Rocket Motor Case Fabrication Methods supplies additional supporting cost data and discusses in detail the methodology that was applied to the task. For the case elements studied, the cost was found to be directly proportional to the Process Complexity Factor (PCF). The PCF was obtained for each element by identifying unit processes that are common to the elements and their alternative manufacturing routes, by assigning a weight to each unit process, and by summing the weighted counts. In three instances of actual manufacture, the actual cost per pound equaled the cost estimate based on PCF per pound, but this supplement, recognizes that the methodology is of limited, rather than general, application.

  16. Conjugate (solid/fluid) computational fluid dynamics analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket motor nozzle/case and case field joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doran, D.; Keeton, L. W.; Dionne, P. J.; Singhal, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional, conjugate (solid/fluid) heat transfer analyses of new designs of the Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) nozzle/case and case field joints are described. The main focus was to predict the consequences of multiple rips (or debonds) in the ambient cure adhesive packed between the nozzle/case joint surfaces and the bond line between the mating field joint surfaces. The models calculate the transient temperature responses of the various materials neighboring postulated flow/leakpaths into, past, and out from the nozzle/case primary O-ring cavity and case field capture O-ring cavity. These results were used to assess if the design was failsafe (i.e., no potential O-ring erosion) and reusable (i.e., no excessive steel temperatures). The models are adaptions and extensions of the general purpose PHOENICS fluid dynamics code. A non-orthogonal coordinate system was employed and 11,592 control cells for the nozzle/case and 20,088 for the case field joints are used with non-uniform distribution. Physical properties of both fluid and solids are temperature dependent. A number of parametric studies were run for both joints with results showing temperature limits for reuse for the steel case on the nozzle joint being exceeded while the steel case temperatures for the field joint were not. O-ring temperatures for the nozzle joint predicted erosion while for the field joint they did not.

  17. Rocket Motor Microphone Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, Debbie; Herrera, Eric; Gee, Kent L.; Giraud, Jerom H.; Young, Devin J.

    2010-01-01

    At ATK's facility in Utah, large full-scale solid rocket motors are tested. The largest is a five-segment version of the reusable solid rocket motor, which is for use on the Ares I launch vehicle. As a continuous improvement project, ATK and BYU investigated the use of microphones on these static tests, the vibration and temperature to which the instruments are subjected, and in particular the use of vent tubes and the effects these vents have at low frequencies.

  18. The development of a solid-state hydrogen sensor for rocket engine leakage detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun

    1994-01-01

    Hydrogen propellant leakage poses significant operational problems in the rocket propulsion industry as well as for space exploratory applications. Vigorous efforts have been devoted to minimizing hydrogen leakage in assembly, test, and launch operations related to hydrogen propellant. The objective has been to reduce the operational cost of assembling and maintaining hydrogen delivery systems. Specifically, efforts have been made to develop a hydrogen leak detection system for point-contact measurement. Under the auspices of Lewis Research Center, the Electronics Design Center at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, has undertaken the development of a point-contact hydrogen gas sensor with potential applications to the hydrogen propellant industry. We envision a sensor array consisting of numbers of discrete hydrogen sensors that can be located in potential leak sites. Silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining techniques are used in the fabrication of these sensor prototypes. Evaluations of the sensor are carried out in-house at Case Western Reserve University as well as at Lewis Research Center and GenCorp Aerojet, Sacramento, California. The hydrogen gas sensor is not only applicable in a hydrogen propulsion system, but also usable in many other civilian and industrial settings. This includes vehicles or facility use, or in the production of hydrogen gas. Dual space and commercial uses of these point-contacted hydrogen sensors are feasible and will directly meet the needs and objectives of NASA as well as various industrial segments.

  19. Feasibility of an advanced thrust termination assembly for a solid propellant rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A total of 68 quench tests were conducted in a vented bomb assembly (VBA). Designed to simulate full-scale motor operating conditions, this laboratory apparatus uses a 2-inch-diameter, end-burning propellant charge and an insulated disc of consolidated hydrated aluminum sulfate along with the explosive charge necessary to disperse the salt and inject it onto the burning surface. The VBA was constructed to permit variation of motor design parameters of interest; i.e., weight of salt per unit burning surface area, weight of explosive per unit weight of salt, distance from salt surface to burning surface, incidence angle of salt injection, chamber pressure, and burn time. Completely satisfactory salt quenching, without re-ignition, occurred in only two VBA tests. These were accomplished with a quench charge ratio (QCR) of 0.023 lb salt per square inch of burning surface at dispersing charge ratios (DCR) of 13 and 28 lb of salt per lb of explosive. Candidate materials for insulating salt charges from the rocket combustion environment were evaluated in firings of 5-inch-diameter, uncured end-burner motors. A pressed, alumina ceramic fiber material was selected for further evaluation and use in the final demonstration motor.

  20. Common Cause Case Study: An Estimated Probability of Four Solid Rocket Booster Hold-Down Post Stud Hang-ups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Until Solid Rocket Motor ignition, the Space Shuttle is mated to the Mobil Launch Platform in part via eight (8) Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) hold-down bolts. The bolts are fractured using redundant pyrotechnics, and are designed to drop through a hold-down post on the Mobile Launch Platform before the Space Shuttle begins movement. The Space Shuttle program has experienced numerous failures where a bolt has hung up. That is, it did not clear the hold-down post before liftoff and was caught by the SRBs. This places an additional structural load on the vehicle that was not included in the original certification requirements. The Space Shuttle is currently being certified to withstand the loads induced by up to three (3) of eight (8) SRB hold-down experiencing a "hang-up". The results of loads analyses performed for (4) stud hang-ups indicate that the internal vehicle loads exceed current structural certification limits at several locations. To determine the risk to the vehicle from four (4) stud hang-ups, the likelihood of the scenario occurring must first be evaluated. Prior to the analysis discussed in this paper, the likelihood of occurrence had been estimated assuming that the stud hang-ups were completely independent events. That is, it was assumed that no common causes or factors existed between the individual stud hang-up events. A review of the data associated with the hang-up events, showed that a common factor (timing skew) was present. This paper summarizes a revised likelihood evaluation performed for the four (4) stud hang-ups case considering that there are common factors associated with the stud hang-ups. The results show that explicitly (i.e. not using standard common cause methodologies such as beta factor or Multiple Greek Letter modeling) taking into account the common factor of timing skew results in an increase in the estimated likelihood of four (4) stud hang-ups of an order of magnitude over the independent failure case.

  1. Common Cause Case Study: An Estimated Probability of Four Solid Rocket Booster Hold-down Post Stud Hang-ups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Until Solid Rocket Motor ignition, the Space Shuttle is mated to the Mobil Launch Platform in part via eight (8) Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) hold-down bolts. The bolts are fractured using redundant pyrotechnics, and are designed to drop through a hold-down post on the Mobile Launch Platform before the Space Shuttle begins movement. The Space Shuttle program has experienced numerous failures where a bolt has "hung-up." That is, it did not clear the hold-down post before liftoff and was caught by the SRBs. This places an additional structural load on the vehicle that was not included in the original certification requirements. The Space Shuttle is currently being certified to withstand the loads induced by up to three (3) of eight (8) SRB hold-down post studs experiencing a "hang-up." The results af loads analyses performed for four (4) stud-hang ups indicate that the internal vehicle loads exceed current structural certification limits at several locations. To determine the risk to the vehicle from four (4) stud hang-ups, the likelihood of the scenario occurring must first be evaluated. Prior to the analysis discussed in this paper, the likelihood of occurrence had been estimated assuming that the stud hang-ups were completely independent events. That is, it was assumed that no common causes or factors existed between the individual stud hang-up events. A review of the data associated with the hang-up events, showed that a common factor (timing skew) was present. This paper summarizes a revised likelihood evaluation performed for the four (4) stud hang-ups case considering that there are common factors associated with the stud hang-ups. The results show that explicitly (i.e. not using standard common cause methodologies such as beta factor or Multiple Greek Letter modeling) taking into account the common factor of timing skew results in an increase in the estimated likelihood of four (4) stud hang-ups of an order of magnitude over the independent failure case.

  2. Space Shuttle: Status of advanced solid rocket motor program. Report to the Chair, Subcommittee on Government Activities and Transportation, Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-11-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor is one of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) most expensive and controversial programs. Two reusable solid rocket motors are attached to the Space Shuttle to provide most of the thrust needed to lift it into orbit. The advanced motor is being designed to replace the current motor, which is a redesigned version of the motor that caused the January 1986 Challenger accident. The Chair of the Subcommittee on Government Activities and Transportation, House Committee on Government Operations, requested that GAO review the program's status. The specific objectives were to: (1) assess the extent to which the need for the program has changed; and (2) determine the reasons for cost growth and schedule slippage.

  3. Performance of a UTC FW-4S solid propellant rocket motor under the command effects of simulated altitude and rotational spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merryman, H. L.; Smith, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    One United Technology Center FW-4S solid-propellant rocket motor was fired at an average simulated altitude of 103,000 ft while spinning about its axial centerline at 180 rpm. The objectives of the test program were to determine motor altitude ballistic performance including the measurement of the nonaxial thrust vector and to demonstrate structural integrity of the motor case and nozzle. These objectives are presented and discussed.

  4. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Solid Rocket Propellants at 14.1 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, W. E.; Merwin, L. H.; Cory, D. G.

    1997-11-01

    Proton NMR images of solid propellant materials, consisting of a polybutadiene binder material filled with 82% solid particles, have been obtained at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 T and at a resolution of 8.5 × 8.5 μm. The images are the first of elastomeric materials obtained at a proton frequency of 600 MHz and have the highest spatial resolution yet reported. The images display a high contrast and are rich in information content. They reveal the distribution of individual filler particles in the polymer matrix as well as a thin polymer film of about 10-30 μm which is found to surround some of the larger filler particles.

  5. Propellant grain dynamics in aft attach ring of shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical technique for implementing simultaneously the temperature, dynamic strain, real modulus, and frequency properties of solid propellant in an unsymmetrical vibrating ring mode is presented. All dynamic parameters and sources are defined for a free vibrating ring-grain structure with initial displacement and related to a forced vibrating system to determine the change in real modulus. Propellant test data application is discussed. The technique was developed to determine the aft attach ring stiffness of the shuttle booster at lift-off.

  6. The starting transient of solid propellant rocket motors with high internal gas velocities. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretz, A.; Caveny, L. H.; Kuo, K. K.; Summerfield, M.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model which considers time and space development of the flow field in solid propellant rocket motors with high volumetric loading density is described. The gas dynamics in the motor chamber is governed by a set of hyperbolic partial differential equations, that are coupled with the ignition and flame spreading events, and with the axial variation of mass addition. The flame spreading rate is calculated by successive heating-to-ignition along the propellant surface. Experimental diagnostic studies have been performed with a rectangular window motor (50 cm grain length, 5 cm burning perimeter and 1 cm hydraulic port diameter), using a controllable head-end gaseous igniter. Tests were conducted with AP composite propellant at port-to-throat area ratios of 2.0, 1.5, 1.2, and 1.06, and head-end pressures from 35 to 70 atm. Calculated pressure transients and flame spreading rates are in very good agreement with those measured in the experimental system.

  7. Identifying, Assessing, and Mitigating Risk of Single-Point Inspections on the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhalgh, Phillip O.

    2004-01-01

    In the production of each Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM), over 100,000 inspections are performed. ATK Thiokol Inc. reviewed these inspections to ensure a robust inspection system is maintained. The principal effort within this endeavor was the systematic identification and evaluation of inspections considered to be single-point. Single-point inspections are those accomplished on components, materials, and tooling by only one person, involving no other check. The purpose was to more accurately characterize risk and ultimately address and/or mitigate risk associated with single-point inspections. After the initial review of all inspections and identification/assessment of single-point inspections, review teams applied risk prioritization methodology similar to that used in a Process Failure Modes Effects Analysis to derive a Risk Prioritization Number for each single-point inspection. After the prioritization of risk, all single-point inspection points determined to have significant risk were provided either with risk-mitigating actions or rationale for acceptance. This effort gave confidence to the RSRM program that the correct inspections are being accomplished, that there is appropriate justification for those that remain as single-point inspections, and that risk mitigation was applied to further reduce risk of higher risk single-point inspections. This paper examines the process, results, and lessons learned in identifying, assessing, and mitigating risk associated with single-point inspections accomplished in the production of the Space Shuttle RSRM.

  8. Development and Validation of a Computational Model for Predicting the Behavior of Plumes from Large Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Jason E.; Black, David L.; Taylor, Casey L.

    2013-01-01

    Exhaust plumes from large solid rocket motors fired at ATK's Promontory test site carry particulates to high altitudes and typically produce deposits that fall on regions downwind of the test area. As populations and communities near the test facility grow, ATK has become increasingly concerned about the impact of motor testing on those surrounding communities. To assess the potential impact of motor testing on the community and to identify feasible mitigation strategies, it is essential to have a tool capable of predicting plume behavior downrange of the test stand. A software package, called PlumeTracker, has been developed and validated at ATK for this purpose. The code is a point model that offers a time-dependent, physics-based description of plume transport and precipitation. The code can utilize either measured or forecasted weather data to generate plume predictions. Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) data and field observations from twenty-three historical motor test fires at Promontory were collected to test the predictive capability of PlumeTracker. Model predictions for plume trajectories and deposition fields were found to correlate well with the collected dataset.

  9. Qualification Testing of Solid Rocket Booster Diagonal Strut Restraint Cable Assembly Part Number 10176-0031-102/103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, T. W.

    2006-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum presents qualification test results for solid rocket booster diagonal strut restraint cable part number 101276-00313-102/103. During flight this assembly is exposed to a range of temperatures. MIL-W-83420 shows the breaking strength of the cable as 798 kg (1,760 lb) at room temperature but does not define cable strength at the maximum temperature to which the cable is exposed during the first 2 min of flight; 669 C (1,236 F). The cable, which can be built from different corrosion resistant steel alloys, may also vary in its chemical, physical, and mechanical properties at temperature. Negative margins of safety were produced by analysis of the cable at temperature using standard knockdown factors. However, MSFC-HDBK-5 allows the use of a less conservative safety factor of 1.4 and knockdown factors verified by testing. Test results allowed a calculated knockdown factor of 0.1892 to be determined for the restraint cables, which provides a minimum breaking strength of 151 kg (333 lb) at 677 C (1,250 F) when combined with the minimum breaking strength of 0.317-cm (0.125- or 1/8-in) diameter, type 1 composition rope.

  10. Thermal Analysis of a Carbon Fiber Rope Barrier for Use in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joint-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie; Phelps, Lisa (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This study provides for development and verification of analysis methods used to assess performance of a carbon fiber rope (CFR) thermal barrier system that is currently being qualified for use in Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle joint-2. Modeled geometry for flow calculations considers the joint to be vented with the porous CFR barriers placed in the "open' assembly gap. Model development is based on a 1-D volume filling approach where flow resistances (assembly gap and CFRs) are defined by serially connected internal flow and the porous media "Darcy" relationships. Combustion gas flow rates are computed using the volume filling code by assuming a lumped distribution total joint fill volume on a per linear circumferential inch basis. Gas compressibility, friction and heat transfer are included in the modeling. Gas-to-wall heat transfer is simulated by concurrent solution of the compressible flow equations and a large thermal 2-D finite element (FE) conduction grid. The derived numerical technique loosely couples the FE conduction matrix with the compressible gas flow equations, Free constants that appear in the governing equations are calibrated by parametric model comparison to hot fire subscale test results. The calibrated model is then used to make full-scale motor predictions using RSRM aft dome environments. Model results indicate that CFR thermal barrier systems will provide a thermally benign and controlled pressurization environment for the RSRM nozzle joint-2 primary seal activation.

  11. Survey of recent Al2O3 droplet size data in solid rocket chambers, nozzles, and plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salita, Mark

    1994-10-01

    The size distribution of Al2O3 droplets in a solid propellant rocket is very different in the chamber, nozzle, and plume, primarily due to breakup and collision/coalescence in the nozzle. This paper attempts to summarize, evaluate, and relate the results of 19 recent experimental and analytical studies of droplet size in order to construct a unified model of droplet size evolution from the chamber through the nozzle and into the plume. It is believed that the distribution of droplet mass in the chamber is bimodal log-normal, with 1 micron smoke comprising about 80% of the mass and 50-100 micron caps comprising the remaining 20%. During passage through the nozzle, the caps shatter to product droplets whose diameters are about 10% of the caps but still 10 times those of smoke, while all but 1-2% of the smoke mass collides and coalesces with the shatter products to generate an essentially monomodal mass distribution at the nozzle exit whose D43 agrees with Hermsen's correlation and whose standard deviation alpha approximately or equal to 0.13 is smaller than both the chamber smoke (alpha approximately or equal to 0.40) or caps (alpha approximately or equal to 0.20).

  12. Survey of recent Al2O3 droplet size data in solid rocket chambers, nozzles, and plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salita, Mark

    1994-10-01

    The size distribution of Al2O3 droplets in a solid propellant rocket is very different in the chamber, nozzle, and plume, primarily due to breakup and collision/coalescence in the nozzle. This paper attempts to summarize, evaluate, and relate the results of 19 recent experimental and analytical studies of droplet size in order to construct a unified model of droplet size evolution from the chamber through the nozzle and into the plume. It is believed that the distribution of droplet mass in the chamber is bimodal lognormal, with 1 micrometer smoke comprising about 80 percent of the mass and 50-100 micrometer caps comprising the remaining 20 percent. During passage through the nozzle, the caps shatter to product droplets whose diameters are about 10 percent of the caps but still 10 times those of smoke, while all but 1-2 percent of the smoke mass collides and coalesces with the shatter products to generate an essentially monomodal mass distribution at the nozzle exit whose D(sub 43) agrees with Hermsen's correlation and whose standard deviation sigma approximately equals 0.13 is smaller than both the chamber smoke (sigma approximately equals 0.40) or caps (sigma approximately equals 0.20).

  13. Evaluation of shuttle solid rocket booster case materials. Corrosion and stress corrosion susceptibility of several high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pionke, L. J.; Garland, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    Candidate alloys for the Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) case were tested under simulated service conditions to define subcritical flaw growth behavior under both sustained and cyclic loading conditions. The materials evaluated were D6AC and 18 Ni maraging steel, both heat treated to a nominal yield strength of 1380 MN/sq m (200 ksi). The sustained load tests were conducted by exposing precracked, stressed specimens of both alloys to alternate immersion in synthetic sea water. It was found that the corrosion and stress corrosion resistance of the 18 Ni maraging steel were superior to that of the D6AC steel under these test conditions. It was also found that austenitizing temperature had little influence on the threshold stress intensity of the D6AC. The cyclic tests were conducted by subjecting precracked surface-flawed specimens of both alloys to repeated load/thermal/environmental profiles which were selected to simulate the SRB missions. It was found that linear removal operations that involve heating to 589 K (600 F) cause a decrease in cyclic life of D6AC steel relative to those tests conducted with no thermal cycling.

  14. Semi-coupled flow and thermal analysis of the field joint during rapid pressurization of the redesigned solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Benny; Majumdar, Alok K.; Colbert, Robert; Clayton, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    A transient, semi-coupled, multi-dimensional thermal and flow analysis methodology was developed to predict the thermal/gas dynamic conditions in the field joint region of the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). Transient temperature response, pressure history, and combustion gas flow rate (within the field joint region), were of principle interest, in the course of this study. The thermal environment in the field joint was modeled using SINDA, a finite difference based thermal network analyzer. The combustion gas flow boundary condition was generated using the FLAP code; this code performs a transient, lumped-parameter, control volume analysis to solve the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations. The FLAP computer code was modified to account for erosion of the NBR insulation material, following ignition. An independent grid sensitivity study was conducted to determine an appropriate grid distribution near the wall. The predicted results, obtained using an optimum grid distribution and computer generated flow boundary condition, were compared with subscale test data.

  15. Thermal Analysis of a Carbon Fiber Rope Barrier for Use in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joint-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2002-01-01

    This study provides development and verification of analysis methods used to assess performance of a carbon fiber rope (CFR) thermal barrier system that is currently being qualified for use in Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle joint-2. Modeled geometry for flow calculations considers the joint to be vented with the porous CFR barriers placed in the 'open' assembly gap. Model development is based on a 1-D volume filling approach where flow resistances (assembly gap and CFRs) are defined by serially connected internal flow and the porous media 'Darcy' relationships. Combustion gas flow rates are computed using the volume filling code by assuming a lumped distribution total joint fill volume on a per linear circumferential inch basis. Gas compressibility, friction and heat transfer are included in the modeling. Gas-to-wall heat transfer is simulated by concurrent solution of the compressible flow equations and a large thermal 2-D finite element (FE) conduction grid. The derived numerical technique loosely couples the FE conduction matrix with the compressible gas flow equations. Free constants that appear in the governing equations are calibrated by parametric model comparison to hot fire subscale test results. The calibrated model is then used to make full-scale motor predictions using RSRM aft dome environments. Model results indicate that CFR thermal barrier systems will provide a thermally benign and controlled pressurization environment for the RSRM nozzle joint-2 primary seal activation.

  16. Development of technology for modeling of a 1/8-scale dynamic model of the shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, A.; Zalesak, J.; Bernstein, M.; Mason, P. W.

    1974-01-01

    A NASTRAN analysis of the solid rocket booster (SRB) substructure of the space shuttle 1/8-scale structural dynamics model. The NASTRAN finite element modeling capability was first used to formulate a model of a cylinder 10 in. radius by a 200 in. length to investigate the accuracy and adequacy of the proposed grid point spacing. Results were compared with a shell analysis and demonstrated relatively accurate results for NASTRAN for the lower modes, which were of primary interest. A finite element model of the full SRB was then formed using CQUAD2 plate elements containing membrane and bending stiffness and CBAR offset bar elements to represent the longerons and frames. Three layers of three-dimensional CHEXAI elements were used to model the propellant. This model, consisting of 4000 degrees of freedom (DOF) initially, was reduced to 176 DOF using Guyan reduction. The model was then submitted for complex Eigenvalue analysis. After experiencing considerable difficulty with attempts to run the complete model, it was split into two substructres. These were run separately and combined into a single 116 degree of freedom A set which was successfully run. Results are reported.

  17. Development of X-ray computed tomography inspection facility for the H-II solid rocket boosters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Fujita, T.; Fukushima, Y.; Shimizu, M.; Itoh, S.; Satoh, A.; Miyamoto, H.

    The National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) initiated the development of an X-ray computed tomography (CT) equipment for the H-II solid rocket boosters (SRBs) in 1987 for the purpose of minimizing inspection time and achieving high cost-effectiveness. The CT facility has been completed in Jan. 1991 in Tanegashima Space Center for the inspection of the SRBs transported from the manufacturer's factory to the launch site. It was first applied to the qualification model SRB from Feb. to Apr. in 1991. Through the CT inspection of the SRB, it has been confirmed that inspection time decreased significantly compared with the X-ray radiography method and that even an unskilled inspector could find various defects. As a result, the establishment of a new reliable inspection method for the SRB has been verified. In this paper, the following are discussed: (1) the defect detectability of the CT equipment using a dummy SRB with various artificial defects, (2) the performance comparison between the CT method and the X-ray radiography method, (3) the reliability of the CT equipment, and (4) the radiation shield design of the nondestructive test building.

  18. Real-time radiography of Titan IV Solid Rocket Motor Upgrade (SRMU) static firing test QM-2

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, K.W.; Curnow, G.M.; Perkins, D.E.; Schneberk, D.J.; Costerus, B.W.; La Chapell, M.J.; Turner, D.E.; Wallace, P.W.

    1994-03-08

    Real-time radiography was successfully applied to the Titan-IV Solid Rocket Motor Upgrade (SRMU) static firing test QM-2 conducted February 22, 1993 at Phillips Laboratory, Edwards AFB, CA. The real-time video data obtained in this test gave the first incontrovertible evidence that the molten slag pool is low (less than 5 to 6 inches in depth referenced to the bottom of the aft dome cavity) before T + 55 seconds, builds fairly linearly from this point in time reaching a quasi-equilibrium depth of 16 to 17 inches at about T + 97 seconds, which is well below the top of the vectored nozzle, and maintains that level until T + 125 near the end motor burn. From T + 125 seconds to motor burn-out at T + 140 seconds the slag pool builds to a maximum depth of about 20 to 21 inches, still well below the top of the nozzle. The molten slag pool was observed to interact with motions of the vectored nozzle, and exhibit slosh and wave mode oscillations. A few slag ejection events were also observed.

  19. Design, analysis, fabrication and test of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster motor case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapp, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The motor case used in the solid propellant booster for the Space Shuttle is unique in many respects, most of which are indigenous to size and special design requirements. The evolution of the case design from initial requirements to finished product is discussed, with increased emphasis of reuse capability, special design features, fracture mechanics and corrosion control. Case fabrication history and the resulting procedure are briefly reviewed with respect to material development, processing techniques and special problem areas. Case assembly, behavior and performance during the DM-1 static firing are reviewed, with appropriate comments and conclusions.

  20. X-ray fluorescence analysis for prediction of Space Shuttle solid rocket motor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulsipher, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of uncured solid propellant by X-ray fluorescence has been conducted on mixes prepared for four development motors produced for the Space Shuttle SRM Project. X-ray readings for chlorine (ammonium perchlorate) and iron (ferric oxide) were recorded for each mix during processing of the propellant. These values were used to predict burning rates for uncured acceptance, uncured acoustic emission and cured acoustic emission strands. Predicted burning rates all fell within control limits and when compared to actual burning rates, most were within experimental error. The X-ray analysis required one-third the time of current methods and met casting schedules.

  1. Removing hydrochloric acid exhaust products from high performance solid rocket propellant using aluminum-lithium alloy.

    PubMed

    Terry, Brandon C; Sippel, Travis R; Pfeil, Mark A; Gunduz, I Emre; Son, Steven F

    2016-11-01

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) pollution from perchlorate based propellants is well known for both launch site contamination, as well as the possible ozone layer depletion effects. Past efforts in developing environmentally cleaner solid propellants by scavenging the chlorine ion have focused on replacing a portion of the chorine-containing oxidant (i.e., ammonium perchlorate) with an alkali metal nitrate. The alkali metal (e.g., Li or Na) in the nitrate reacts with the chlorine ion to form an alkali metal chloride (i.e., a salt instead of HCl). While this technique can potentially reduce HCl formation, it also results in reduced ideal specific impulse (ISP). Here, we show using thermochemical calculations that using aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy can reduce HCl formation by more than 95% (with lithium contents ≥15 mass%) and increase the ideal ISP by ∼7s compared to neat aluminum (using 80/20 mass% Al-Li alloy). Two solid propellants were formulated using 80/20 Al-Li alloy or neat aluminum as fuel additives. The halide scavenging effect of Al-Li propellants was verified using wet bomb combustion experiments (75.5±4.8% reduction in pH, ∝ [HCl], when compared to neat aluminum). Additionally, no measurable HCl evolution was detected using differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared absorption. PMID:27289269

  2. Measurement of Solid Rocket Propellant Burning Rate Using X-ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Matthew D.

    The burning rate of solid propellants can be difficult to measure for unusual burning surface geometries, but X-ray imaging can be used to measure burning rate. The objectives of this work were to measure the baseline burning rate of an electrically-controlled solid propellant (ESP) formulation with real-time X-ray radiography and to determine the uncertainty of the measurements. Two edge detection algorithms were written to track the burning surface in X-ray videos. The edge detection algorithms were informed by intensity profiles of simulated 2-D X-ray images. With a 95% confidence level, the burning rates measured by the Projected-Slope Intersection algorithm in the two combustion experiments conducted were 0.0839 in/s +/-2.86% at an average pressure of 407 psi +/-3.6% and 0.0882 in/s +/-3.04% at 410 psi +/-3.9%. The uncertainty percentages were based on the statistics of a Monte Carlo analysis on burning rate.

  3. Regression rate and pyrolysis behavior of HTPB-based solid fuels in a hybrid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaverini, Martin John

    An experimental investigation on the regression rate and pyrolysis behavior of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene-based solid fuels has been conducted. The overall objective was to obtain a better understanding of the physical processes governing solid-fuel regression and pyrolysis under different operating regimes. Experiments were conducted using a windowed, slab geometry hybrid motor and a conductive-heating induced thermal pyrolysis test rig. Gaseous oxygen was employed as the oxidizer in the 1-m long, lab-scale hybrid motor, which had realistic operating conditions. A real-time X-ray radiography system and an ultrasonic pulse-echo system were both used to obtain the local, instantaneous solid fuel regression rates. A semi-empirical approach was developed to analyze the experimental results and to correlate the regression rates with physically descriptive, dimensionless parameters. For relatively high surface temperatures above 722 K, the activation energy of pure HTPB was 4.91 kcal/mole, indicating that the pyrolysis process was governed by formation and desorption of high molecular weight fragments from the fuel surface. The conductive-heating induced pyrolysis rates of HTPB, conducted at atmospheric pressure, were very similar to those measured in the hybrid motor tests at much higher pressures. This result implies that the regression rate of HTPB was governed primarily by thermal decomposition processes and not influenced by heterogeneous surface reactions. Radiant heat transfer had a significant effect on the overall regression rate behavior of HTPB. Radiation from soot generally accounted for about 80 to 90% of the total radiant heat flux. Two separate expressions, one for the developing flow regime and one for fully-developed flow, were used to correlate the regression rate data. Both correlations show that standard hybrid boundary layer correlations must be modified to account for the effects of variable fluid properties across the boundary layer and

  4. Uncertainties in the characterization of the thermal environment of a solid rocket propellant fire

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, J.C.

    1993-10-01

    There has been an interest in developing models capable of predicting the response of systems to Minuteman (MM) III third-stage solid propellant fires. Input parameters for such an effort include the boundary conditions that describe the fire temperature, heat flux, emissivity, and propellant burn rate. In this study scanning spectroscopy and pyrometry were used to infer plume temperatures. Each diagnostic system possessed strengths and weaknesses. The intention was to use various supportive methods to infer plume temperature and emissivity, because no one diagnostic had proven capabilities for determining temperature under these conditions. Furthermore, these diagnostics were being used near the limit of their applicability. All these points created some uncertainty in the data collected.

  5. Scientific predictability of solid rocket performance: Analyses of the processing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Daniel Lizarraga

    The objective is to present a computational model of the suspensions composing uncured composite solid propellant. Highly concentrated suspensions of more than 50 pct. solid volume were examined with attendence to bimodal mixtures. Study of propellant processing was conducted to determine how this model can be applied to processing. Experimental work was conducted to supply data for comparison to the computational results. This involved data gathered from an orifice viscometer on viscosity and flow behavior. This model is a tool to study goodness of mixing throughout the processing stages of the propellant. The study into processing focused both on mixing and casting of the suspension. By studying this model for concentration, velocity and thermal behaviors, a better understanding of how well the propellant composition progresses in processing was obtained. A multiple mixture approach was taken. This involved a continuum description for the mixture and each constituent. A Fortran program was written to construct this routine. It was run on both a VAXstation 3100, Model 40 using VMS Digital operating system, and a SUN IPX, using SUN UNIX operating system. The code examined two-dimensional monomodal and bimodal mixture flows through a pipe. It examined concentration between 65 and 75 pcts. Due to the high concentration, it was necessary to apply all inertial and viscous terms within each constituent and the entire mixture. Proper boundary conditions and initial conditions to produce stable runs were found. Both monomodal and biomodal computational results showed good correlations with the experimental data, although a slight dilatation was produced by the program. No dilatation appeared in the experimental work.

  6. Small-Scale Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    Engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. successfully tested a sub-scale solid rocket motor on May 27. Testing a sub-scale version of a rocket motor is a cost-effective ...

  7. Development of Erosive Burning Models for CFD Predictions of Solid Rocket Motor Internal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qun-Zhen

    2003-01-01

    Four erosive burning models, equations (11) to (14). are developed in this work by using a power law relationship to correlate (1) the erosive burning ratio and the local velocity gradient at propellant surfaces; (2) the erosive burning ratio and the velocity gradient divided by centerline velocity; (3) the erosive burning difference and the local velocity gradient at propellant surfaces; and (4) the erosive burning difference and the velocity gradient divided by centerline velocity. These models depend on the local velocity gradient at the propellant surface (or the velocity gradient divided by centerline velocity) only and, unlike other empirical models, are independent of the motor size. It was argued that, since the erosive burning is a local phenomenon occurring near the surface of the solid propellant, the erosive burning ratio should be independent of the bore diameter if it is correlated with some local flow parameters such as the velocity gradient at the propellant surface. This seems to be true considering the good results obtained by applying these models, which are developed from the small size 5 inch CP tandem motor testing, to CFD simulations of much bigger motors.

  8. Congreve Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812. As a result Francis Scott Key coined the phrase the 'rocket's red glare.' Congreve had used a 16-foot guide stick to help stabilize his rocket. William Hale, another British inventor, invented the stickless rocket in 1846. The U.S. Army used the Hale rocket more than 100 years ago in the war with Mexico. Rockets were also used to a limited extent by both sides in the American Civil War.

  9. Rocket Flight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Evera, Bill; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an activity for designing, building, and launching rockets that provides students with an intrinsically motivating and real-life application of what could have been classroom-only concepts. Includes rocket design guidelines and a sample grading rubric. (KHR)

  10. Mechanical and Combustion Performance of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as an Additive to Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels for Hybrid Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Daniel B.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs, Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth, K.; Koo, Joseph H.; Story, George

    2012-01-01

    Paraffin-based solid fuels for hybrid rocket motor applications are recognized as a fastburning alternative to other fuel binders such as HTPB, but efforts to further improve the burning rate and mechanical properties of paraffin are still necessary. One approach that is considered in this study is to use multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) as an additive to paraffin wax. Carbon nanotubes provide increased electrical and thermal conductivity to the solid-fuel grains to which they are added, which can improve the mass burning rate. Furthermore, the addition of ultra-fine aluminum particles to the paraffin/MWNT fuel grains can enhance regression rate of the solid fuel and the density impulse of the hybrid rocket. The multi-walled carbon nanotubes also present the possibility of greatly improving the mechanical properties (e.g., tensile strength) of the paraffin-based solid-fuel grains. For casting these solid-fuel grains, various percentages of MWNT and aluminum particles will be added to the paraffin wax. Previous work has been published about the dispersion and mixing of carbon nanotubes.1 Another manufacturing method has been used for mixing the MWNT with a phenolic resin for ablative applications, and the manufacturing and mixing processes are well-documented in the literature.2 The cost of MWNT is a small fraction of single-walled nanotubes. This is a scale-up advantage as future applications and projects will require low cost additives to maintain cost effectiveness. Testing of the solid-fuel grains will be conducted in several steps. Dog bone samples will be cast and prepared for tensile testing. The fuel samples will also be analyzed using thermogravimetric analysis and a high-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM). The SEM will allow for examination of the solid fuel grain for uniformity and consistency. The paraffin-based fuel grains will also be tested using two hybrid rocket test motors located at the Pennsylvania State University s High Pressure

  11. Comparison of vibrations of a combination of solid-rocket launch vehicle and payload during a ground firing and launching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenster, J. A.; Pierce, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study into the environmental vibrations of a payload mounted on the Nike rocket launch vehicle were presented. Data were obtained during the flight acceptance test of the payload, the firing of the total vehicle in a special test stand, and the powered and unpowered flights of the vehicle. The vibrational response of the structure was measured. Data were also obtained on the fluctuating pressure on the outside surface of the vehicle and inside the forward and after ends of the rocket chamber. A comparison of the data from the three test conditions indicated that external pressure fluctuations were the major source of vibrations in the payload area, and pressure fluctuations within the rocket motor were the major source of vibrations contiguous to the payload area.

  12. A comparative study of the effects of inhibitor stub length on solid rocket motor combustion chamber pressure oscillations: RSRM at T = 80 seconds, preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasman, D.; Burnette, D.; Holt, J.; Farr, R.

    1992-01-01

    Results from a continuing, time-accurate computational study of the combustion gas flow inside the Space Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) are presented. These computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses duplicate unsteady flow effects which interact in the RSRM to produce pressure oscillations, and resulting thrust oscillations, at nominally 15, 30, and 45 Hz. Results of the Navier-Stokes computations made at mean pressure and flow conditions corresponding to 80 seconds after motor ignition both with and without a protruding, rigid inhibitor at the forward joint cavity are presented here.

  13. Space shuttle: Determination of the aerodynamic interference between the space shuttle orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket booster on a 0.004 scale ascent configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, P. E.; Buchholz, R.; Allen, E. C. JR.; Dehart, J.

    1973-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to determine the aerodynamic interference between the space shuttle orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket booster on a 0.004 scale ascent configuration. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded over an angle of attack range from minus 10 to plus 10 degrees at zero degree sideslip. A sideslip range of minus 10 to plus 10 degrees at zero degree angle of attack was also tested. The Mach number range was varied from 0.6 to 4.96 with Reynolds number varying between 4.9 and 6.8 times one million per foot.

  14. An evaluation of the total quality management implementation strategy for the advanced solid rocket motor project at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. M.S. Thesis - Tennessee Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Sullivan, Kenneth W.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation of the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) strategy to implement Total Quality Management (TQM) in the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) Project is presented. The evaluation of the implementation strategy reflected the Civil Service personnel perspective at the project level. The external and internal environments at MSFC were analyzed for their effects on the ASRM TQM strategy. Organizational forms, cultures, management systems, problem solving techniques, and training were assessed for their influence on the implementation strategy. The influence of ASRM's effort was assessed relative to its impact on mature projects as well as future projects at MSFC.

  15. The dynamics of a gas-dust cloud expansion in the upper atmosphere at a shutdown of solid-propellant rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaishvili, S. Sh.; Platov, Yu. V.; Chernouss, S. A.

    2015-09-01

    The velocity of spherical gas-dust cloud expansion in the situation when the stages of solid-propellant rocket separate in the upper atmosphere have been determined. The measured velocity vary from 2.5 to 7.5 km/s. The dispersed component accelerates at the front of a shock that develops at engine-thrust shutdown. The model calculations of the gas-dust cloud luminosity intensity qualitatively coincide with the photometric profiles of object images. Such formations can vary from almost homogeneous ball-shaped clouds to rather thin spherical shells depending on the gas-dust cloud mass and the matter distribution within this cloud.

  16. Coal-Fired Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Floyd A.

    1987-01-01

    Brief report describes concept for coal-burning hybrid rocket engine. Proposed engine carries larger payload, burns more cleanly, and safer to manufacture and handle than conventional solid-propellant rockets. Thrust changeable in flight, and stops and starts on demand.

  17. Program ELM: A tool for rapid thermal-hydraulic analysis of solid-core nuclear rocket fuel elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, James T.

    1992-01-01

    This report reviews the state of the art of thermal-hydraulic analysis codes and presents a new code, Program ELM, for analysis of fuel elements. ELM is a concise computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in a nuclear thermal rocket reactor with axial coolant passages. The program was developed as a tool to swiftly evaluate various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations generated for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition which have been used in previous programs. Thus, a consistent comparison of these correlations was performed, as well as a comparison with data from the NRX reactor experiments from the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) project. This report describes the ELM Program algorithm, input/output, and validation efforts and provides a listing of the code.

  18. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components, and, with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives, functionally required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g., powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf-life characteristics.

  19. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components and with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives functionally-required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g. powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf life characteristics.

  20. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components, and, with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives, functionally required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g., powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf-life characteristics.