Science.gov

Sample records for 5-to-25 element tuned

  1. Design of fast tuning elements for the ITER ICH system

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, D.W.; Goulding, R.H.

    1996-05-01

    The coupling between the ion cyclotron (IC) antenna and the ITER plasma (as expressed by the load resistance the antenna sees) will experience relatively fast variations due to plasma edge profile modifications. If uncompensated, these will cause an increase in the amount of power reflected back to the transmitter and ultimately a decrease in the amount of radio frequency (rf) power to the plasma caused by protective suppression of the amount of rf power generated by the transmitter. The goals of this task were to study several alternate designs for a tuning and matching (T&M) system and to recommend some research and development (R&D) tasks that could be carried out to test some of the most promising concepts. Analyses of five different T&M configurations are presented in this report. They each have different advantages and disadvantages, and the choice among them must be made depending on the requirements for the IC system. Several general conclusions emerge from our study: The use of a hybrid splitter as a passive reflected-power dump [``edge localized mode (ELM)-dump``] appears very promising; this configuration will protect the rf power sources from reflected power during changes in plasma loading due to plasma motion or profile changes (e.g., ELM- induced changes in the plasma scrape-off region) and requires no active control of the rf system. Trade-offs between simplicity of design and capability of the system must be made. Simple system designs with few components near the antenna either have high voltages over considerable distances of transmission lines, or they are not easily tuned to operate at different frequencies. Designs using frequency shifts and/or fast tuning elements can provide fast matching over a wide range of plasma loading; however, the designs studied here require components near the antenna, complicating assembly and maintenance. Capacitor-tuned resonant systems may offer a good compromise.

  2. Finite element analysis of electrically excited quartz tuning fork devices.

    PubMed

    Oria, Roger; Otero, Jorge; González, Laura; Botaya, Luis; Carmona, Manuel; Puig-Vidal, Manel

    2013-05-30

    Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF)-based Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is an important field of research. A suitable model for the QTF is important to obtain quantitative measurements with these devices. Analytical models have the limitation of being based on the double cantilever configuration. In this paper, we present an electromechanical finite element model of the QTF electrically excited with two free prongs. The model goes beyond the state-of-the-art of numerical simulations currently found in the literature for this QTF configuration. We present the first numerical analysis of both the electrical and mechanical behavior of QTF devices. Experimental measurements obtained with 10 units of the same model of QTF validate the finite element model with a good agreement.

  3. An adjustable RF tuning element for microwave, millimeter wave, and submillimeter wave integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubecke, Victor M.; Mcgrath, William R.; Rutledge, David B.

    1991-01-01

    Planar RF circuits are used in a wide range of applications from 1 GHz to 300 GHz, including radar, communications, commercial RF test instruments, and remote sensing radiometers. These circuits, however, provide only fixed tuning elements. This lack of adjustability puts severe demands on circuit design procedures and materials parameters. We have developed a novel tuning element which can be incorporated into the design of a planar circuit in order to allow active, post-fabrication tuning by varying the electrical length of a coplanar strip transmission line. It consists of a series of thin plates which can slide in unison along the transmission line, and the size and spacing of the plates are designed to provide a large reflection of RF power over a useful frequency bandwidth. Tests of this structure at 1 GHz to 3 Ghz showed that it produced a reflection coefficient greater than 0.90 over a 20 percent bandwidth. A 2 GHz circuit incorporating this tuning element was also tested to demonstrate practical tuning ranges. This structure can be fabricated for frequencies as high as 1000 GHz using existing micromachining techniques. Many commercial applications can benefit from this micromechanical RF tuning element, as it will aid in extending microwave integrated circuit technology into the high millimeter wave and submillimeter wave bands by easing constraints on circuit technology.

  4. Evaluation of integrated tuning elements with SIS devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dierichs, M. M. T. M.; Honingh, C. E.; Panhuyzen, R. A.; Feenstra, B. J.; Skalare, A.; Wijnbergen, J. J.; Vanderstadt, H.; Degraauw, T.

    1992-01-01

    The resonance of integrated tuning stubs in combination with SIS detectors is measured and modeled. The predicted resonances are compared with measurements of stubs integrated with Nb/Al2O3/Nb junctions in a log-periodic antenna using a Michelson interferometer. Different stub lengths were made on different substrates (on 200 micron thick quartz and on a 7 micron thick silicon membrane) and the results show a fairly good agreement with the model calculations. Quartz substrates showed resonances up to 580 GHz, silicon membrane stub resonances reach as high as 480 GHz. An observed resonance at 560 GHz is probably a substrate effect from the membrane. The gap frequency for all the samples is 650 GHz and no resonances are detected above this frequency. Up to the maximum detected frequency dispersion is found to be negligible.

  5. Effects of bandwidth-limiting tuning elements in synchronously pumped mode-locked lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zandi, B.; Casperson, L.W.; MacFarlane, D.L. )

    1990-03-01

    A description of bandwidth-limiting tuning filters is introduced into a semiclassical model for synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. The finite phase memory of the molecular wave functions is included as are the isotropic molecular distribution and the finite vibrational relaxation times. The new set of equations has been solved numerically using the best available values for the various parameters. The results have been compared with experimental data obtained using a rhodamine 6G dye laser, which is synchronously pumped using an acousto-optically mode-locked argon laser. Tuning element effects have been studied using two- and three-plate birefringent filters and a tuning wedge, and the experimental results agree with the numerical solutions.

  6. An improved multiscale noise tuning of stochastic resonance for identifying multiple transient faults in rolling element bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2014-12-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR), a noise-assisted tool, has been proved to be very powerful in weak signal detection. The multiscale noise tuning SR (MSTSR), which breaks the restriction of the requirement of small parameters and white noise in classical SR, has been applied to identify the characteristic frequency of a bearing. However, the multiscale noise tuning (MST), which is originally based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT), limits the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvement of SR and the performance in identifying multiple bearing faults. In this paper, the wavelet packet transform (WPT) is developed and incorporated into the MSTSR method to overcome its shortcomings and to further enhance its capability in multiple faults detection of bearings. The WPT-based MST can achieve a finer tuning of multiscale noise and aims at detecting multiple target frequencies separately. By introducing WPT into the MST of SR, this paper proposes an improved SR method particularly suited for the identification of multiple transient faults in rolling element bearings. Simulated and practical bearing signals carrying multiple characteristic frequencies are employed to validate the performance improvement of the proposed method as compared to the original DWT-based MSTSR method. The results confirm the good capability of the proposed method in multi-fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings.

  7. Nb/Al-Al2O3/Nb junctions with inductive tuning elements for a very low noise 205-250 GHz heterodyne receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberger, Arthur W.; Lea, Dallas M.; Mattauch, Robert J.; Lloyd, Frances L.

    1992-01-01

    The superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) junction is the most sensitive nonlinear element for millimeter-wave heterodyne detection. An Nb/Al-Al203/Nb junction fabrication process has been developed which allows the use of planar tuning circuits integrated with the junctions. These tuning elements permit the use of junctions with relatively large areas and small current densities with excellent results. Recent measurements have yielded a double sideband receiver noise temperature less than 50 K from 205 to 240 GHz and 44 K at 230 GHz. This Nb/Al-Al203/Nb trilayer technology is also being extended to the fabrication of sub-square-micron area planar junctions for submillimeter-wavelengths.

  8. Ultra-narrow angle-tunable Fabry-Perot bandpass interference filter for use as tuning element in infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kischkat, Jan; Peters, Sven; Semtsiv, Mykhaylo P.; Wegner, Tristan; Elagin, Mikaela; Monastyrskyi, Grygorii; Flores, Yuri; Kurlov, Sergii; Masselink, W. Ted

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a bandpass infrared interference filter with sufficiently narrow bandwidth to be potentially suitable for tuning a self-stabilizing external-cavity quantum-cascade laser (ECQCL) in single-mode operation and describe the process parameters for fabrication of such filters with central wavelengths in the 3-12 μm range. The filter has a passband width of 6 nm or 0.14% with peak transmission of 55% and a central wavelength of approximately 4.0 μm. It can be tuned through over 4% by tilting with respect to the incident beam and offers orders of magnitude larger angular dispersion than diffraction gratings. We compare filters with single-cavity and coupled-cavity Fabry-Perot designs.

  9. Success Is in the Details. No Element of Tech Prep Escapes the Fine-Tuned Planning of Oregon's Design Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buhl, Cheryl L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Articles describe elements of Oregon's' tech prep program: "New Software Helps Students Visualize a Career Path" (Buhl); "Bridge Construction Ahead" (Roach); and "To Track Students, Oregon Goes to the Bar" (Dutson). (JOW)

  10. Tuned electronic, optical and mechanical properties of pristine and hetero nanotubes of group IV elements (C, Si and Ge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, Surjeet Kumar; Kumar, Arun; Sharma, Raman; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2015-09-01

    Density functional theory has been used to investigate the structural, electronic, optical and mechanical properties of pristine nanotubes of carbon, silicon, germanium and their hetero nanotubes having armchair conformation with chirality (6,6). In the pristine nanotubes it is found that the cohesive energy per atom is more for CNT as compared to other nanotubes under investigation. However, in hetero systems under study its value is highest for SiCNT system and least for GeCNT. GeNT and SiGeNT have been observed to be more puckered in comparison to other systems. All the pristine and heteronanotubes in our study are found to be semiconducting in nature, except GeNT, which is found to be metallic in nature with a conductance of 2G0, indicating GeNT to be an ideal material for ballistic transport. Three different types of hetero nanotubes have wide band gap spectrum which opens up an arena for band gap selective engineered devices. The band gap for SiCNT and GeCNT lie in the visible region, while the band gap for other systems lie in the infrared region. The tuning of electronic band structure by means of compression, tensile strain and external electric field indicates that the band gap can be altered considerably. There is a band gap closure under both compression and expansion at a certain value in all the cases except SiCNT, revealing that its band gap can be varied considerably. The decreasing order of tensile strength is CNT > SiCNT > GeCNT > SiNT > GeNT > SiGeNT. The effective mass of holes decreases for pristine systems on the application of compression. Under no strain the effective mass of electrons is generally found to be larger than holes in hetero systems, while it is reverse in pristine systems. In case of unstrained systems, we generally observed that the more the effective mass of electron, the more is the band gap in the corresponding system. Electronic band structure and corresponding total and partial DOS for pristine and heteronanotubes. In the

  11. Computer assisted accelerator tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.K.

    1993-04-14

    The challenge of tuning an induction accelerator in real time has been addressed with the new TUNE GUIDE code. The code initializes a beam at a particular position using a tracer particle representation of the phase space. The particles are transported, using a matrix formulation, element by element along the beamline assuming that the field of a solenoid, or steering element is constant over its length. The other allowed elements are gaps and drift sections. A great deal of effort has been spent programming TUNE GUIDE to operate under the IBMPC Windows 3.1 system. This system features an intuitive, menu driven interface, which provides an ability to rapidly change beamline component parameter values. Consequently various accelerator setups can be explored and new values determined in real time while the accelerator is operating. In addition the code has the capability of varying a capability value over a range and then plotting the resulting beam properties, such as radius or centroid position, at a down stream position. Element parameter editing is also included along with an on-line hyper text oriented help package.

  12. Beam tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    A program for configuring the linac, based on previously run configurations for any desired beam was used during the past year. This program uses only a small number of empirical tunes to scale resonator fields to properly accelerate a beam with a different charge-to-mass (q/A) ratio from the original tune configuration. The program worked very well for the PII linac section where we can easily match a new beam`s arrival phase and velocity to the tuned value. It was also fairly successful for the Booster and ATLAS sections of the linac, but not as successful as for the PII linac. Most of the problems are associated with setting the beam arrival time correctly for each major linac section. This problem is being addressed with the development of the capacitive pickup beam phase monitor discussed above. During the next year we expect to improve our ability to quickly configure the linac for new beams and reduce the time required for linac tuning. Already the time required for linac tuning as a percentage of research hours has decreased from 22% in FY 1993 to 15% in the first quarter of FY 1995.

  13. Acoustically-tuned optical spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sklar, E.

    1981-01-01

    Lens arrangement corrects for aberrations and gives resolution of 0.7 seconds of arc. In spectrometer, light from telescope is relayed by doublet lens to acoustically tuned optical filter. Selected wavelengths are relayed by triplet lens to charge coupled device camera. Intervening cylindrical lens, tilted at 12 degree angle, corrects for astigmatism and coma introduced by two element birefringent crystal in filter.

  14. Fine-tuning key parameters of an integrated reactor system for the simultaneous removal of COD, sulfate and ammonium and elemental sulfur reclamation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Chen, Chuan; Liang, Bin; Huang, Cong; Zhao, Youkang; Xu, Xijun; Tan, Wenbo; Zhou, Xu; Gao, Shuang; Sun, Dezhi; Lee, Duujong; Zhou, Jizhong; Wang, Aijie

    2014-03-30

    In this paper, we proposed an integrated reactor system for simultaneous removal of COD, sulfate and ammonium (integrated C-S-N removal system) and investigated the key parameters of the system for a high level of elemental sulfur (S(0)) production. The system consisted of 4 main units: sulfate reduction and organic carbon removal (SR-CR), autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifying sulfide removal (A&H-DSR), sulfur reclamation (SR), and aerated filter for aerobic nitrification (AN). In the system, the effects of key operational parameters on production of elemental sulfur were investigated, including hydraulic retention time (HRT) of each unit, sulfide/nitrate (S(2-)-S/NO3(-)-N) ratios, reflux ratios between the A&H-DSR and AN units, and loading rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate and ammonium. Physico-chemical characteristics of biosulfur were studied for acquiring efficient S(0) recovery. The experiments successfully explored the optimum parameters for each unit and demonstrated 98% COD, 98% sulfate and 78% nitrogen removal efficiency. The optimum HRTs for SR-CR, A&H-DSR and AN were 12h, 3h and 3h, respectively. The reflux ratio of 3 could provide adequate S(2-)-S/NO3(-)-N ratio (approximately 1:1) to the A&H-DSR unit for obtaining maximum sulfur production. In this system, the maximum production of S(0) reached 90%, but only 60% S(0) was reclaimed from effluent. The S(0) that adhered to the outer layer of granules was deposited in the bottom of the A&H-DSR unit. Finally, the microbial community structure of the corresponding unit at different operational stage were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene based high throughput Illumina MiSeq sequencing and the potential function of dominant species were discussed.

  15. TUNE FEEDBACK AT RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON,P.; CERNIGLIA,P.; CONNOLLY,R.; CUPOLO,J.; DAWSON,W.C.; DEGEN,C.; DELLAPENNA,A.; DELONG,J.; DREES,A.; HUHN,A.; KESSELMAN,M.; MARUSIC,A.; OERTER,B.; MEAD,J.; SCHULTHEISS,C.; SIKORA,R.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    Preliminary phase-locked loop betatron tune measurement results were obtained during RHIC 2000 with a resonant Beam Position Monitor. These results suggested the possibility of incorporating PLL tune measurement into a tune feedback system for RHIC 2001. Tune feedback is useful in a superconducting accelerator, where the machine cycle time is long and inefficient acceleration due to resonance crossing is not comfortably tolerated. This is particularly true with the higher beam intensities planned for RHIC 2001. We present descriptions of a PLL tune measurement system implemented in the DSP/FPGA environment of a RHIC BPM electronics module and the feedback system into which the measurement is incorporated to regulate tune. In addition, we present results from the commissioning of this system during RHIC 2001.

  16. Tuning Properties in Silver Clusters.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Chakra P; Bootharaju, Megalamane S; Bakr, Osman M

    2015-08-01

    The properties of Ag nanoclusters are not as well understood as those of their more precious Au cousins. However, a recent surge in the exploration of strategies to tune the physicochemical characteristics of Ag clusters addresses this imbalance, leading to new insights into their optical, luminescence, crystal habit, metal-core, ligand-shell, and environmental properties. In this Perspective, we provide an overview of the latest strategies along with a brief introduction of the theoretical framework necessary to understand the properties of silver nanoclusters and the basis for their tuning. The advances in cluster research and the future prospects presented in this Perspective will eventually guide the next large systematic study of nanoclusters, resulting in a single collection of data similar to the periodic table of elements. PMID:26267198

  17. Tuning Higher Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Bradley

    2011-03-01

    In April 2009, the Lumina Foundation launched its Tuning USA project. Faculty teams in selected disciplines from Indiana, Minnesota, and Utah started pilot Tuning programs at their home institutions. Using Europe's Bologna Process as a guide, Utah physicists worked to reach a consensus about the knowledge and skills that should characterize the 2-year, batchelor's, and master's degree levels. I will share my experience as a member of Utah's physics Tuning team, and describe our progress, frustrations, and evolving understanding of the Tuning project's history, methods, and goals.

  18. Tuning the engine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the last years post-transcriptional regulation (PTR) of gene expression has been increasingly recognized to be a powerful and general determinant of the quantitative changes in proteomes, and therefore a driving force for cell phenotypes. By means of networks of trans-factors on one hand, and cis-elements found primarily in untranslated regions (UTRs) of mRNA on the other hand, mRNA availability to translation and translation rates are tightly controlled and can be rapidly tuned according to the changing state of the cell. A number of dedicated resources and tools, including databases and predictive algorithms, have been proposed as bioinformatics aids for the study of this fundamental layer of gene expression regulation. Their use, however, is rendered difficult by heterogeneity and fragmentation. This review aims to locate these resources in their proper space, classifying them according to their goals, limitations and integration capabilities and, in the end, to provide the user with an initial toolbox for the bioinformatic analysis of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The accompanying website, available at www.ptrguide.org, lists all resources, provides summary and features for each one and will be regularly updated in the future. PMID:22995832

  19. Tuning method for microresonators and microresonators made thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Michael David; Olsson, Roy H.; Greth, Karl Douglas; Young, Travis Ryan; Nguyen, Janet; Stevens, James E.

    2015-12-01

    A micromechanical resonator is disclosed. The resonator includes a resonant micromechanical element. A film of annealable material can be deposited on a facial surface of the element. The resonance of the element can be tuned by annealing the deposited film. Also disclosed are methods of applying a film on a resonator and annealing the film, thereby tuning one or more resonant properties of the resonator.

  20. Tuning fork decay.

    PubMed

    Miller, G W

    1979-03-01

    Tuning fork tests are used routinely by many otologists. A different group of otologists find the tests inconsistent and unreliable. This controversy has probably developed because the audiometer has replaced the tuning fork in hearing measurement. As a result, the art of use of the tuning fork is poorly learned. This study examines decay, one of the physical parameters of tuning forks. Measurements of acoustic (sound wave) and vibration (stem movement) decay were made. Alteration in decay due to pressure changes on the fork stem were studied. Acoustic signals were generated in an anechoic chamber. Vibration measurements were obtained using an artificial mastoid. Analysis of the signals was accomplished by a system of amplifiers, filters, tape recorders, and a graphic recorder. Tuning fork sound decay is a property of the instrument which occurs every time the fork is struck. The decay is a constant in decibels per second. The acoustic mode and the vibration mode decay at similar rates for the same fork. The strike frequency (a higher frequency than the fundamental produced when the fork is struck) also has a constant decay rate in decibels per second, and it is reported here for the first time. Force of 800 gm. and less applied to the bottom of the stem in vibration measurement caused minimal decay constant changes. When the physical parameters of the tuning fork (including this information on damping) are fully studied, tuning fork testing should become more of a science and less of an art.

  1. Tuning Monte Carlo generators: The Perugia tunes

    SciTech Connect

    Skands, Peter Z.

    2010-10-01

    We present 9 new tunes of the p{sub perpendicular}-ordered shower and underlying-event model in Pythia 6.4. These 'Perugia' tunes update and supersede the older 'S0' family. The data sets used to constrain the models include hadronic Z{sup 0} decays at LEP, Tevatron min-bias data at 630, 1800, and 1960 GeV, Tevatron Drell-Yan data at 1800 and 1960 GeV, and SPS min-bias data at 200, 546, and 900 GeV. In addition to the central parameter set, called 'Perugia 0', we introduce a set of 8 related 'Perugia variations' that attempt to systematically explore soft, hard, parton density, and color structure variations in the theoretical parameters. Based on these variations, a best-guess prediction of the charged track multiplicity in inelastic, nondiffractive minimum-bias events at the LHC is made. Note that these tunes can only be used with Pythia 6, not with Pythia 8.

  2. TUNE: Compiler-Directed Automatic Performance Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Mary

    2014-09-18

    This project has developed compiler-directed performance tuning technology targeting the Cray XT4 Jaguar system at Oak Ridge, which has multi-core Opteron nodes with SSE-3 SIMD extensions, and the Cray XE6 Hopper system at NERSC. To achieve this goal, we combined compiler technology for model-guided empirical optimization for memory hierarchies with SIMD code generation, which have been developed by the PIs over the past several years. We examined DOE Office of Science applications to identify performance bottlenecks and apply our system to computational kernels that operate on dense arrays. Our goal for this performance-tuning technology has been to yield hand-tuned levels of performance on DOE Office of Science computational kernels, while allowing application programmers to specify their computations at a high level without requiring manual optimization. Overall, we aim to make our technology for SIMD code generation and memory hierarchy optimization a crucial component of high-productivity Petaflops computing through a close collaboration with the scientists in national laboratories.

  3. Tuning magnet power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.M.; Karady, G.G.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    The particles in a Rapid Cycling Accelerator are accelerated by rf cavities, which are tuned by dc biased ferrite cores. The tuning is achieved by the regulation of bias current, which is produced by a power supply. The tuning magnet power supply utilizes a bridge circuit, supplied by a three phase rectifier. During the rise of the current, when the particles are accelerated, the current is controlled with precision by the bridge which operates a power amplifier. During the fall of the current, the bridge operates in a switching mode and recovers the energy stored in the ferrites. The recovered energy is stored in a capacitor bank. The bridge circuit is built with 150 power transistors. The drive, protection and control circuit were designed and built from commercial component. The system will be used for a rf cavity experiment in Los Alamos and will serve as a prototype tuning power supply for future accelerators. 1 ref., 7 figs.

  4. Complier-Directed Automatic Performance Tuning (TUNE) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chame, Jacqueline

    2013-06-07

    TUNE was created to develop compiler-directed performance tuning technology targeting the Cray XT4 system at Oak Ridge. TUNE combines compiler technology for model-guided empirical optimization for memory hierarchies with SIMD code generation. The goal of this performance-tuning technology is to yield hand-tuned levels of performance on DOE Office of Science computational kernels, while allowing application programmers to specify their computations at a high level without requiring manual optimization. Overall, TUNE aims to make compiler technology for SIMD code generation and memory hierarchy optimization a crucial component of high-productivity Petaflops computing through a close collaboration with the scientists in national laboratories.

  5. Tuning with Triangles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkleroad, Leon

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines three historical geometric constructions for handcrafting stringed instruments. Using elementary geometry--in particular, triangles--these methods can provide quite good rational approximations to the irrationals that arise from tuning instruments in equal temperament. Interestingly, continued fractions help explain the…

  6. Tuning the Blend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    "Tuning the blend" is a phrase that educators hear a lot these days. It refers to finding the correct balance of online activities and face-to-face instruction in hybrid--or blended--courses. Finding a mix that meets the needs of both faculty and students requires experimentation, experience, and constant tweaking. And, as with coffee, the same…

  7. Tuning toward Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Marcus; Kalina, Michelle; Chapman, Adina

    2013-01-01

    The Obama administration and the Lumina Foundation have been the principal drivers focusing the nation on increasing the number of high-quality degrees and credentials. Tuning, a faculty-driven process for defining clear student learning outcomes--what a student should know, understand, and be able to do--is one of the ways to support this goal.

  8. Fine-tuning silencing.

    PubMed

    Panning, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) modifies chromatin to silence many embryonic patterning genes, restricting their expression to the appropriate cell populations. Two reports in Cell by Peng et al. (2009) and Shen et al. (2009) identify Jarid2/Jumonji, a new component of PRC2, which inhibits PRC2 enzymatic activity to fine-tune silencing.

  9. Field flatness tuning of TM110 mode cavities with closely spaced modes

    SciTech Connect

    Leo Bellantoni et al.

    2003-10-31

    Superconducting cavities for the CKM RF separated kaon beamline at Fermilab have modes that are closely spaced compared to the resonance bandwidths when warm, and this complicates the field flatness (warm) tuning process. Additionally, it is necessary to maintain the azimuthal orientation of the mode during the tuning deformations. the authors present two analytic techniques to warm-tune cavities with overlapping modes, a finite-element analysis of the tuning process, the design of a warm tuner which maintains mode polarization, and the results of tuning a cavity in which initial manufacturing variations caused the desired {pi} and nearby {pi}-1 modes to be indistinguishable before field flatness tuning.

  10. Boiler - tuning basics, part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Leopold, T.

    2009-03-15

    Tuning power plant controls takes nerves of steel and an intimate knowledge of plant systems gained only by experience. Tuning controls also requires equal parts art and science, which probably is why there are so few tuning experts in the power industry. In part 1 of a two-part series, the author explores a mix of the theoretical and practical aspects of tuning boiler control. 5 figs.

  11. Active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase tuning

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo O.; Zhao, Junming; Feng, Yijun

    2013-01-01

    Impedance metasurface is composed of electrical small scatters in two dimensional plane, of which the surface impedance can be designed to produce desired reflection phase. Tunable reflection phase can be achieved by incorporating active element into the scatters, but the tuning range of the reflection phase is limited. In this paper, an active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase control is presented to remove the phase tuning deficiency in conventional approach. The unit cell of the metasurface is a multiple resonance structure with two resonance poles and one resonance zero, capable of providing 360° reflection phase variation and active tuning within a finite frequency band. Linear reflection phase tuning can also be obtained. Theoretical analysis and simulation are presented and validated by experiment at microwave frequency. The proposed approach can be applied to many cases where fine and full phase tuning is needed, such as beam steering in reflectarray antennas. PMID:24162366

  12. Electronically tuned optical filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, J. A.; Pasierb, E. F.; Oh, C. S.; Mccaffrey, M. T.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed account is given of efforts to develop a three layer, polychromic filter that can be tuned electronically. The operation of the filter is based on the cooperative alignment of pleochroic dye molecules by nematic liquid crystals activated by electric fields. This orientation produces changes in the optical density of the material and thus changes in the color of light transmitted through the medium. In addition, attempts to improve materials and devices which employ field induced changes of a cholesteric to a nematic liquid crystal are presented.

  13. Tuning Broadband Microwave Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Alaniz, Gabriel

    2003-09-05

    The PEP-II/DA {Phi} NE/ALS longitudinal feedback systems are complex wide bandwidth systems requiring analog, digital and microwave circuits. The solid-state amplifier is one of the components in the microwave circuit that is required to suppress the coupled bunch instabilities that exist in the PEP-II accelerator. The suppression is achieved by using an antenna as a kicker structure that provides an electric field in order to increase or decrease the energy of particles passing through the structure. The amplifier is made up of sixteen 30 to 35W microstrip GaAs FET modules that are combined to obtain 500W over a bandwidth of 850MHz to 1850MHz. The amplifier malfunctioned causing a reduction in the functionality and power output of the individual GaAs FET modules. The amplifier must be repaired. After repair, the amplifier must be tuned to optimize the gain while maintaining proper power output. The amplifier is tuned using microstrip circuit techniques. A variety of microstrip methods are used to obtain the proper line impedance. The result is a working amplifier that operates efficiently.

  14. Tuning and scanning control system for high resolution alexandrite lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James C.; Schwemmer, Geary K.

    1988-01-01

    An alexandrite laser is spectrally narrowed and tuned by the use of three optical elements. Each element provides a successively higher degree of spectral resolution. The digitally controlled tuning and scanning control servo system simultaneously positions all three optical elements to provide continuous high resolution laser spectral tuning. The user may select manual, single, or continuous modes of automated scanning of ranges up to 3.00/cm and at scan rates up to 3.85/cm/min. Scanning over an extended range of up to 9.999/cm may be achieved if the highest resolution optic is removed from the system. The control system is also capable of being remotely operated by another computer or controller via standard RS-232 serial data link.

  15. LCLS Undulator Tuning And Fiducialization

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary; Kaplounenko, Vsevolod; Levashov, Yury; Weidemann, Achim; /SLAC

    2007-11-02

    The LCLS project at SLAC requires 40 undulators: 33 in the beam line, 6 spares, and one reference undulator. A new facility was constructed at SLAC for tuning and fiducializing the undulators. The throughput of the facility must be approximately one undulator per week. The undulator tuning has been partially automated. Fiducialization techniques have been devised. The new facility, the tuning techniques, and the fiducialization techniques will be discussed.

  16. Nanoplasmonics tuned "click chemistry".

    PubMed

    Tijunelyte, I; Guenin, E; Lidgi-Guigui, N; Colas, F; Ibrahim, J; Toury, T; Lamy de la Chapelle, M

    2016-04-01

    Nanoplasmonics is a growing field of optical condensed matter science dedicated to optical phenomena at the nanoscale level in metal systems. Extensive research on noble metallic nanoparticles (NPs) has emerged within the last two decades due to their ability to keep the optical energy concentrated in the vicinity of NPs, in particular, the ability to create optical near-field enhancement followed by heat generation. We have exploited these properties in order to induce a localised "click" reaction in the vicinity of gold nanostructures under unfavourable experimental conditions. We demonstrate that this reaction can be controlled by the plasmonic properties of the nanostructures and we propose two physical mechanisms to interpret the observed plasmonic tuning of the "click" chemistry.

  17. Differential Resonant Ring YIG Tuned Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Ronald A.

    2010-01-01

    A differential SiGe oscillator circuit uses a resonant ring-oscillator topology in order to electronically tune the oscillator over multi-octave bandwidths. The oscillator s tuning is extremely linear, because the oscillator s frequency depends on the magnetic tuning of a YIG sphere, whose resonant frequency is equal to a fundamental constant times the DC magnetic field. This extremely simple circuit topology uses two coupling loops connecting a differential pair of SiGe bipolar transistors into a feedback configuration using a YIG tuned filter creating a closed-loop ring oscillator. SiGe device technology is used for this oscillator in order to keep the transistor s 1/f noise to an absolute minimum in order to achieve minimum RF phase noise. The single-end resonant ring oscillator currently has an advantage in fewer parts, but when the oscillation frequency is greater than 16 GHz, the package s parasitic behavior couples energy to the sphere and causes holes and poor phase noise performance. This is because the coupling to the YIG is extremely low, so that the oscillator operates at near the unloaded Q. With the differential resonant ring oscillator, the oscillation currents are just in the YIG coupling mechanisms. The phase noise is even better, and the physical size can be reduced to permit monolithic microwave integrated circuit oscillators. This invention is a YIG tuned oscillator circuit making use of a differential topology to simultaneously achieve an extremely broadband electronic tuning range and ultra-low phase noise. As a natural result of its differential circuit topology, all reactive elements, such as tuning stubs, which limit tuning bandwidth by contributing excessive open loop phase shift, have been eliminated. The differential oscillator s open-loop phase shift is associated with completely non-dispersive circuit elements such as the physical angle of the coupling loops, a differential loop crossover, and the high-frequency phase shift of the n

  18. Computational issues in optimal tuning and placement of passive dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. C.; Milman, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    The effectiveness of viscous elements in introducing damping in a structure is a function of several variables including their number, their location in the structure, and their physical properties. In this paper, the optimal damper placement and tuning problem is posed to optimize these variables. Both discrete and continuous optimization problems are formulated and solved corresponding, respectively, to the problems of placement of passive elements and to the tuning of their parameters. The paper particularly emphasizes the critical computational issues resulting from the optimization formulations. Numerical results involving a lightly damped testbed structure are presented.

  19. Fine-Tuning Corrective Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong

    2001-01-01

    Explores the notion of "fine-tuning" in connection with the corrective feedback process. Describes a longitudinal case study, conducted in the context of Norwegian as a second a language, that shows how fine-tuning and lack thereof in the provision of written corrective feedback differentially affects a second language learner's restructuring of…

  20. The neuromechanical tuning hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Arthur; Yakovenko, Sergiy

    2007-01-01

    Simulations performed with neuromechanical models are providing insight into the neural control of locomotion that would be hard if not impossible to obtain in any other way. We first discuss the known properties of the neural mechanisms controlling locomotion, with a focus on mammalian systems. The rhythm-generating properties of central pattern generators (CPGs) are discussed in light of results indicating that cycle characteristics may be preset by tonic drive to spinal interneuronal networks. We then describe neuromechanical simulations that have revealed some basic rules of interaction between CPGs, sensory-mediated switching mechanisms and the biomechanics of locomotor movements. We posit that the spinal CPG timer and the sensory-mediated switch operate in parallel, the former being driven primarily by descending inputs and the latter by the kinematics. The CPG timer produces extensor and flexor phase durations, which covary along specific lines in a plot of phase- versus cycle-duration. We coined the term "phase-duration characteristics" to describe such plots. Descending input from higher centers adjusts the operating points on the phase-duration characteristics according to anticipated biomechanical requirements. In well-predicted movements, CPG-generated phase durations closely match those required by the kinematics, minimizing the corrections in phase duration required of the sensory switching mechanism. We propose the term "neuromechanical tuning" to describe this process of matching the CPG to the kinematics.

  1. Tuning The Laser Heater Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zackary

    2010-12-03

    The laser heater undulator for the LCLS requires different tuning techniques than the main undulators. It is a pure permanent magnet (PPM) undulator, rather than the hybrid design of the main undulators. The PPM design allows analytic calculation of the undulator fields. The calculations let errors be introduced and correction techniques be derived. This note describes how the undulator was modelled, and the methods which were found to correct potential errors in the undulator. The laser heater undulator for the LCLS is a pure permanent magnet device requiring different tuning techniques than the main undulators. In this note, the laser heater undulator is modelled and tuning techniques to compensate various errors are derived.

  2. Tuning of Pectin Methylesterification

    PubMed Central

    Sénéchal, Fabien; L'Enfant, Mélanie; Domon, Jean-Marc; Rosiau, Emeline; Crépeau, Marie-Jeanne; Surcouf, Ogier; Esquivel-Rodriguez, Juan; Marcelo, Paulo; Mareck, Alain; Guérineau, François; Kim, Hyung-Rae; Mravec, Jozef; Bonnin, Estelle; Jamet, Elisabeth; Kihara, Daisuke; Lerouge, Patrice; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Pectin methylesterases (PMEs) catalyze the demethylesterification of homogalacturonan domains of pectin in plant cell walls and are regulated by endogenous pectin methylesterase inhibitors (PMEIs). In Arabidopsis dark-grown hypocotyls, one PME (AtPME3) and one PMEI (AtPMEI7) were identified as potential interacting proteins. Using RT-quantitative PCR analysis and gene promoter::GUS fusions, we first showed that AtPME3 and AtPMEI7 genes had overlapping patterns of expression in etiolated hypocotyls. The two proteins were identified in hypocotyl cell wall extracts by proteomics. To investigate the potential interaction between AtPME3 and AtPMEI7, both proteins were expressed in a heterologous system and purified by affinity chromatography. The activity of recombinant AtPME3 was characterized on homogalacturonans (HGs) with distinct degrees/patterns of methylesterification. AtPME3 showed the highest activity at pH 7.5 on HG substrates with a degree of methylesterification between 60 and 80% and a random distribution of methyl esters. On the best HG substrate, AtPME3 generates long non-methylesterified stretches and leaves short highly methylesterified zones, indicating that it acts as a processive enzyme. The recombinant AtPMEI7 and AtPME3 interaction reduces the level of demethylesterification of the HG substrate but does not inhibit the processivity of the enzyme. These data suggest that the AtPME3·AtPMEI7 complex is not covalently linked and could, depending on the pH, be alternately formed and dissociated. Docking analysis indicated that the inhibition of AtPME3 could occur via the interaction of AtPMEI7 with a PME ligand-binding cleft structure. All of these data indicate that AtPME3 and AtPMEI7 could be partners involved in the fine tuning of HG methylesterification during plant development. PMID:26183897

  3. iTunes U: An Opportunity for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germany, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that, with a bit of creative thinking, elements of certain university-wide projects (in this case study, establishing an iTunes U site) can be incorporated into student studies and assessment as real-world learning opportunities. Design/methodology/approach: Describes three different approaches…

  4. Neuromechanical tuning of nonlinear postural control dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Lena H.; van Antwerp, Keith W.; Scrivens, Jevin E.; McKay, J. Lucas; Welch, Torrence D. J.; Bingham, Jeffrey T.; DeWeerth, Stephen P.

    2009-06-01

    Postural control may be an ideal physiological motor task for elucidating general questions about the organization, diversity, flexibility, and variability of biological motor behaviors using nonlinear dynamical analysis techniques. Rather than presenting "problems" to the nervous system, the redundancy of biological systems and variability in their behaviors may actually be exploited to allow for the flexible achievement of multiple and concurrent task-level goals associated with movement. Such variability may reflect the constant "tuning" of neuromechanical elements and their interactions for movement control. The problem faced by researchers is that there is no one-to-one mapping between the task goal and the coordination of the underlying elements. We review recent and ongoing research in postural control with the goal of identifying common mechanisms underlying variability in postural control, coordination of multiple postural strategies, and transitions between them. We present a delayed-feedback model used to characterize the variability observed in muscle coordination patterns during postural responses to perturbation. We emphasize the significance of delays in physiological postural systems, requiring the modulation and coordination of both the instantaneous, "passive" response to perturbations as well as the delayed, "active" responses to perturbations. The challenge for future research lies in understanding the mechanisms and principles underlying neuromechanical tuning of and transitions between the diversity of postural behaviors. Here we describe some of our recent and ongoing studies aimed at understanding variability in postural control using physical robotic systems, human experiments, dimensional analysis, and computational models that could be enhanced from a nonlinear dynamics approach.

  5. Manganite films: Tuning phase diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailovic, Dragan

    2016-09-01

    Strain engineering can tune a manganite film into an antiferromagnetic insulating state whose extreme photo-susceptibility allows for the ordinary ferromagnetic metal state to then be transiently realized.

  6. Tuning fork tests: forgotten art.

    PubMed

    Girgis, T F; Shambaugh, G E

    1988-01-01

    Four examples are cited in which tuning fork tests helped in proper selection of patients for surgery, after audiometric air and bone tests were equivocal or gave the wrong diagnostic and prognostic indication.

  7. Tuning Forks and Monitor Screens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, M. A. T.

    2000-01-01

    Defines the vibrations of a tuning fork against a computer monitor screen as a pattern that can illustrate or explain physical concepts like wave vibrations, wave forms, and phase differences. Presents background information and demonstrates the experiment. (Author/YDS)

  8. Cochlear microphonic broad tuning curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayat, Mohammad; Teal, Paul D.; Searchfield, Grant D.; Razali, Najwani

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the cochlear microphonic voltage exhibits much broader tuning than does the basilar membrane motion. The most commonly used explanation for this is that when an electrode is inserted at a particular point inside the scala media, the microphonic potentials of neighbouring hair cells have different phases, leading to cancelation at the electrodes location. In situ recording of functioning outer hair cells (OHCs) for investigating this hypothesis is exceptionally difficult. Therefore, to investigate the discrepancy between the tuning curves of the basilar membrane and those of the cochlear microphonic, and the effect of phase cancellation of adjacent hair cells on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves, we use an electromechanical model of the cochlea to devise an experiment. We explore the effect of adjacent hair cells (i.e., longitudinal phase cancellation) on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves in different locations. The results of the experiment indicate that active longitudinal coupling (i.e., coupling with active adjacent outer hair cells) only slightly changes the broadness of the CM tuning curves. The results also demonstrate that there is a π phase difference between the potentials produced by the hair bundle and the soma near the place associated with the characteristic frequency based on place-frequency maps (i.e., the best place). We suggest that the transversal phase cancellation (caused by the phase difference between the hair bundle and the soma) plays a far more important role than longitudinal phase cancellation in the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves. Moreover, by increasing the modelled longitudinal resistance resulting the cochlear microphonic curves exhibiting sharper tuning. The results of the simulations suggest that the passive network of the organ of Corti determines the phase difference between the hair bundle and soma, and hence determines the sharpness of the

  9. Optics Tuning Knobs for Facet

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Yuri; Hogan, Mark J.; Wittmer, Walter; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    FACET is a new facility under construction at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The FACET beam line is designed to provide 23 GeV tightly focused and compressed electron and positron bunches for beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration research and other experiments. Achieving optimal beam parameters for various experimental conditions requires the optics capability for tuning in a sufficiently wide range. This will be achieved by using optics tuning systems (knobs). Design of such systems for FACET is discussed.

  10. Disformally self-tuning gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emond, William T.; Saffin, Paul M.

    2016-03-01

    We extend a previous self-tuning analysis of the most general scalar-tensor theory of gravity in four dimensions with second order field equations by considering a generalized coupling to the matter sector. Through allowing a disformal coupling to matter we are able to extend the Fab Four model and construct a new class of theories that are able to tune away the cosmological constant on Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker backgrounds.

  11. Adaptive Self-Tuning Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, H. A.; Draelos, T.; Young, C. J.; Lawry, B.; Chael, E. P.; Faust, A.; Peterson, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The quality of automatic detections from seismic sensor networks depends on a large number of data processing parameters that interact in complex ways. The largely manual process of identifying effective parameters is painstaking and does not guarantee that the resulting controls are the optimal configuration settings. Yet, achieving superior automatic detection of seismic events is closely related to these parameters. We present an automated sensor tuning (AST) system that learns near-optimal parameter settings for each event type using neuro-dynamic programming (reinforcement learning) trained with historic data. AST learns to test the raw signal against all event-settings and automatically self-tunes to an emerging event in real-time. The overall goal is to reduce the number of missed legitimate event detections and the number of false event detections. Reducing false alarms early in the seismic pipeline processing will have a significant impact on this goal. Applicable both for existing sensor performance boosting and new sensor deployment, this system provides an important new method to automatically tune complex remote sensing systems. Systems tuned in this way will achieve better performance than is currently possible by manual tuning, and with much less time and effort devoted to the tuning process. With ground truth on detections in seismic waveforms from a network of stations, we show that AST increases the probability of detection while decreasing false alarms.

  12. Tuning sperm chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Adán; Wood, Christopher D; Nishigaki, Takuya; Carneiro, Jorge; Darszon, Alberto

    2010-10-01

    Sperm chemotaxis is a long-term puzzle and most of our knowledge comes from studying marine animals that are external fertilizers. Sperm are attracted by diffusible chemical factors (chemoattractants) released from the egg which redirect their swimming paths towards their source. This redirection is driven by increases in flagellar curvature that correlate with transient flagellar Ca(2+) increases. Recent experimental and modelling results provide insights into the signal flow underlying the translation of an external chemical gradient into an intracellular molecular and motor response. A fundamental element of sea-urchin sperm chemotaxis lies in the ability of these cells to suppress Ca(2+)-mediated increases in flagellar curvature while experiencing an increasing chemoattractant gradient. The article considers this new evidence and summarizes the known underlying cellular mechanisms and behavioural strategies that sperm use to locate and fertilize the oocyte.

  13. Tuning a Tetrahertz Wire Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, Qi; Williams, Benjamin S.; Kumar, Sushil; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    Tunable terahertz lasers are desirable in applications in sensing and spectroscopy because many biochemical species have strong spectral fingerprints at terahertz frequencies. Conventionally, the frequency of a laser is tuned in a similar manner to a stringed musical instrument, in which pitch is varied by changing the length of the string (the longitudinal component of the wave vector) and/ or its tension (the refractive index). However, such methods are difficult to implement in terahertz semiconductor lasers because of their poor outcoupling efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate a novel tuning mechanism based on a unique 'wire laser' device for which the transverse dimension w is much much less than lambda. Placing a movable object close to the wire laser manipulates a large fraction of the waveguided mode propagating outside the cavity, thereby tuning its resonant frequency. Continuous single-mode redshift and blueshift tuning is demonstrated for the same device by using either a dielectric or metallic movable object. In combination, this enables a frequency tuning of approximately equal to 137 GHz (3.6%) from a single laser device at approximately equal to 3.8 THz.

  14. Converting normal insulators into topological insulators via tuning orbital levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wu-Jun; Liu, Junwei; Xu, Yong; Xiong, Shi-Jie; Wu, Jian; Duan, Wenhui

    2015-11-01

    Tuning the spin-orbit coupling strength via foreign element doping and modifying bonding strength via strain engineering are the major routes to convert normal insulators to topological insulators. We here propose an alternative strategy to realize topological phase transition by tuning the orbital level. Following this strategy, our first-principles calculations demonstrate that a topological phase transition in the cubic perovskite-type compounds CsGeBr3 and CsSnBr3 could be facilitated by carbon substitutional doping. Such a unique topological phase transition predominantly results from the lower orbital energy of the carbon dopant, which can pull down the conduction bands and even induce band inversion. Beyond conventional approaches, our finding of tuning the orbital level may greatly expand the range of topologically nontrivial materials.

  15. Dual mode tuning strategy of a slightly asymmetric ring.

    PubMed

    Park, Han Gil; Kang, Yeon June; Kim, Seock Hyun

    2008-03-01

    Clear beats with proper periods in the first and the second vibration modes are very important factors for the sound of the Korean bell. In this study, the Korean bell is expressed as a circular ring with multiple point masses and a dual mode tuning strategy for clear beat with proper period. For the dual mode tuning, a dual mode equivalent ring model is composed with two point masses, which satisfies the mode pair conditions of the first mode and second mode simultaneously. By adding a suitable amount of additional masses to the dual mode equivalent ring model at appropriate positions, a clear beat with proper period in both of the two important modes is generated. The position and amount of the additional masses are determined analytically. Analytical tuning results are compared and verified with those of the finite element analysis. PMID:18345827

  16. Integrated tuned vibration absorbers: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Gardonio, Paolo; Zilletti, Michele

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a simulation study on two integrated tuned vibration absorbers (TVAs) designed to control the global flexural vibration of lightly damped thin structures subject to broad frequency band disturbances. The first one consists of a single axial switching TVA composed by a seismic mass mounted on variable axial spring and damper elements so that the characteristic damping and natural frequency of the absorber can be switched iteratively to control the resonant response of three flexural modes of the hosting structure. The second one consists of a single three-axes TVA composed by a seismic mass mounted on axial and rotational springs and dampers, which are arranged in such a way that the suspended mass is characterized by uncoupled heave and pitch-rolling vibrations. In this case the three damping and natural frequency parameters of the absorber are tuned separately to control three flexural modes of the hosting structure. The simulation study shows that the proposed single-unit absorbers produce, respectively, 5.3 and 8.7 dB reductions of the global flexural vibration of a rectangular plate between 20 and 120 Hz.

  17. Color-tuned channelrhodopsins for multiwavelength optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Prigge, Matthias; Schneider, Franziska; Tsunoda, Satoshi P; Shilyansky, Carrie; Wietek, Jonas; Deisseroth, Karl; Hegemann, Peter

    2012-09-14

    Channelrhodopsin-2 is a light-gated ion channel and a major tool of optogenetics. It is used to control neuronal activity via blue light. Here we describe the construction of color-tuned high efficiency channelrhodopsins (ChRs), based on chimeras of Chlamydomonas channelrhodopsin-1 and Volvox channelrhodopsin-1. These variants show superb expression and plasma membrane integration, resulting in 3-fold larger photocurrents in HEK cells compared with channelrhodopsin-2. Further molecular engineering gave rise to chimeric variants with absorption maxima ranging from 526 to 545 nm, dovetailing well with maxima of channelrhodopsin-2 derivatives ranging from 461 to 492 nm. Additional kinetic fine-tuning led to derivatives in which the lifetimes of the open state range from 19 ms to 5 s. Finally, combining green- with blue-absorbing variants allowed independent activation of two distinct neural cell populations at 560 and 405 nm. This novel panel of channelrhodopsin variants may serve as an important toolkit element for dual-color cell stimulation in neural circuits. PMID:22843694

  18. PID Tuning Using Extremum Seeking

    SciTech Connect

    Killingsworth, N; Krstic, M

    2005-11-15

    Although proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers are widely used in the process industry, their effectiveness is often limited due to poor tuning. Manual tuning of PID controllers, which requires optimization of three parameters, is a time-consuming task. To remedy this difficulty, much effort has been invested in developing systematic tuning methods. Many of these methods rely on knowledge of the plant model or require special experiments to identify a suitable plant model. Reviews of these methods are given in [1] and the survey paper [2]. However, in many situations a plant model is not known, and it is not desirable to open the process loop for system identification. Thus a method for tuning PID parameters within a closed-loop setting is advantageous. In relay feedback tuning [3]-[5], the feedback controller is temporarily replaced by a relay. Relay feedback causes most systems to oscillate, thus determining one point on the Nyquist diagram. Based on the location of this point, PID parameters can be chosen to give the closed-loop system a desired phase and gain margin. An alternative tuning method, which does not require either a modification of the system or a system model, is unfalsified control [6], [7]. This method uses input-output data to determine whether a set of PID parameters meets performance specifications. An adaptive algorithm is used to update the PID controller based on whether or not the controller falsifies a given criterion. The method requires a finite set of candidate PID controllers that must be initially specified [6]. Unfalsified control for an infinite set of PID controllers has been developed in [7]; this approach requires a carefully chosen input signal [8]. Yet another model-free PID tuning method that does not require opening of the loop is iterative feedback tuning (IFT). IFT iteratively optimizes the controller parameters with respect to a cost function derived from the output signal of the closed-loop system, see [9

  19. Apparatuses and methods for tuning center frequencies

    DOEpatents

    Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Olsson, Roy H.

    2016-02-23

    Apparatuses and methods for tuning center frequencies are described herein. Examples of tuning described herein including tuning using feedback from the resonator. Variable gain feedback for tuning of acoustic wave resonators is provided in some examples. An example apparatus may include a resonator and a feedback loop. The resonator may be configured to receive a tuning signal and to provide a feedback signal. The feedback signal may be based on the tuning signal. The feedback loop may be configured to receive the feedback signal from the resonator. The feedback loop further may be configured to provide the tuning signal to actively tune a center frequency of the resonator. The tuning signal may be based on the feedback signal.

  20. Tuning the Catalytic Activity of Subcellular Nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Jakobson, Christopher M; Chen, Yiqun; Slininger, Marilyn F; Valdivia, Elias; Kim, Edward Y; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2016-07-31

    Bacterial microcompartments are naturally occurring subcellular organelles of bacteria and serve as a promising scaffold for the organization of heterologous biosynthetic pathways. A critical element in the design of custom biosynthetic organelles is quantitative control over the loading of heterologous enzymes to the interior of the organelles. We demonstrate that the loading of heterologous proteins to the 1,2-propanediol utilization microcompartment of Salmonella enterica can be controlled using two strategies: by modulating the transcriptional activation of the microcompartment container and by coordinating the expression of the microcompartment container and the heterologous cargo. These strategies allow general control over the loading of heterologous proteins localized by two different N-terminal targeting peptides and represent an important step toward tuning the catalytic activity of bacterial microcompartments for increased biosynthetic productivity.

  1. Tuning the DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    2012-04-24

    Flash radiography of large hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives is a well-known diagnostic technique in use at many laboratories, and the Dual-Axis Radiography for Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos produces flash radiographs of large hydrodynamic experiments. Two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) make the bremsstrahlung radiographic source spots for orthogonal views of each test. The 2-kA, 20-MeV Axis-I LIA creates a single 60-ns radiography pulse. The 1.7-kA, 16.5-MeV Axis-II LIA creates up to four radiography pulses by kicking them out of a longer pulse that has a 1.6-{mu}s flattop. The Axis-II injector, LIA, kicker, and downstream transport (DST) to the bremsstrahlung converter are described. Adjusting the magnetic focusing and steering elements to optimize the electron-beam transport through an LIA is often called 'tuning.' As in all high-current LIAs, the focusing field is designed to be as close to that of the ideal continuous solenoid as physically possible. In ideal continuous solenoidal transport a smoothly varying beam size can easily be found for which radial forces balance, and the beam is said to be 'matched' to the focusing field. A 'mismatched' beam exhibits unwanted oscillations in size, which are a source of free energy that contributes to emittance growth. This is undesirable, because in the absence of beam-target effects, the radiographic spot size is proportional to the emittance. Tuning the Axis-II LIA is done in two steps. First, the solenoidal focusing elements are set to values designed to provide a matched beam with little or no envelope oscillations, and little or no beam-breakup (BBU) instability growth. Then, steering elements are adjusted to minimize the motion of the centroid of a well-centered beam at the LIA exit. This article only describes the design of the tune for the focusing solenoids. The DARHT Axis-II LIA was required to be re-tuned after installing an accelerator cell to replace a failed

  2. Introduction to LCLS Undulator Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Z.

    2005-01-31

    This note gives a general introduction to undulator tuning for the LCLS. It starts with a theoretical discussion in which the equations necessary to understand undulator tuning are derived. The trajectory of an electron in an undulator and the relation between the electron motion and a radiation wave are analyzed. Common terms are defined such as slippage, K{sub eff}, and B{sub eff}. The radiation wavelength is derived. After the theoretical discussion, the results are illustrated with simulations. A program was written which gives simulated undulator field measurements along with an assortment of possible field errors. The simulated measurements are sent to the analysis program we are developing and the effect of various field errors is studied. The shims used to correct the field errors are discussed.

  3. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  4. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  5. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  6. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  7. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  8. Eighth-Grade Violinists' Instrument Tuning Ability: A Comparison of Pitch Perception and Tuning Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between eighth-grade violinists' pitch perception and instrument tuning skill. The perceptual task was a researcher-developed computer-based Violin Tuning Perception Test. The instrument tuning task involved tuning two violins, one mistuned flat and the other mistuned sharp. Participants (N…

  9. Thermo-optically tuned photonic resonators with concurrent electrical connection and thermal isolation

    DOEpatents

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Kekatpure, Rohan Deodatta; Zortman, William A.; Savignon, Daniel J.

    2016-06-14

    A photonic resonator system is designed to use thermal tuning to adjust the resonant wavelength of each resonator in the system, with a separate tuning circuit associated with each resonator so that individual adjustments may be made. The common electrical ground connection between the tuning circuits is particularly formed to provide thermal isolation between adjacent resonators by including a capacitor along each return path to ground, where the presence of the capacitor's dielectric material provides the thermal isolation. The use of capacitively coupling necessarily requires the use of an AC current as an input to the heater element (conductor/resistor) of each resonator, where the RMS value of the AC signal is indicative of the amount of heat that is generated along the element and the degree of wavelength tuning that is obtained.

  10. Theoretical model and optimization of a novel temperature sensor based on quartz tuning fork resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Xu; Bo, You; Xin, Li; Juan, Cui

    2007-12-01

    To accurately measure temperatures, a novel temperature sensor based on a quartz tuning fork resonator has been designed. The principle of the quartz tuning fork temperature sensor is that the resonant frequency of the quartz resonator changes with the variation in temperature. This type of tuning fork resonator has been designed with a new doubly rotated cut work at flexural vibration mode as temperature sensor. The characteristics of the temperature sensor were evaluated and the results sufficiently met the target of development for temperature sensor. The theoretical model for temperature sensing has been developed and built. The sensor structure was analysed by finite element method (FEM) and optimized, including tuning fork geometry, tine electrode pattern and the sensor's elements size. The performance curve of output versus measured temperature is given. The results from theoretical analysis and experiments indicate that the sensor's sensitivity can reach 60 ppm °C-1 with the measured temperature range varying from 0 to 100 °C.

  11. Precision Measurements of Tune-out Wavelengths with an Atom Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubko, Raisa; Gregoire, Maxwell; Cronin, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Tune-out wavelengths occur were there is a root in the dynamic polarizability between two resonances. Precision measurements of tune-out wavelengths serve as a benchmark test for atomic structure calculations of ratios of dipole matrix elements. We present a new measurement of the longest tune-out wavelength in potassium, with a preliminary result of λzero = 768.9702(8) nm. We describe experimental improvements such as adding an optical cavity that allows us to reach sub-picometer precision. We discuss systematic errors due to broadband laser light and the Earths' rotation. We also show preliminary results for Rb.

  12. Electronically tuned Cr:ZnSe laser pumped with Q-switched Tm:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Masaki; Saito, Norihito; Takagi, Utako; Wada, Satoshi

    2015-09-21

    We demonstrated a Q-switched, Tm:YAG-laser-pumped electronically tuned Cr:ZnSe laser, which was equipped with an acousto-optic tunable filter as a wavelength-tuning element. A tuning range from 2.17 to 2.71 μm and a maximum output energy of 7.9 mJ at 2.41 μm were realized. The energy conversion efficiency reached 34.1% at 2.41 μm. In addition, the Cr:ZnSe laser produced a high-quality beam in the TEM(00) mode. PMID:26406701

  13. Tuning magnetofluidic spreading in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaomeng; Varma, V. B.; Wang, Z. P.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetofluidic spreading (MFS) is a phenomenon in which a uniform magnetic field is used to induce spreading of a ferrofluid core cladded by diamagnetic fluidic streams in a three-stream channel. Applications of MFS include micromixing, cell sorting and novel microfluidic lab-on-a-chip design. However, the relative importance of the parameters which govern MFS is still unclear, leading to non-optimal control of MFS. Hence, in this work, the effect of various key parameters on MFS was experimentally and numerically studied. Our multi-physics model, which combines magnetic and fluidic analysis, showed excellent agreement between theory and experiment. It was found that spreading was mainly due to cross-sectional convection induced by magnetic forces, and can be enhanced by tuning various parameters. Smaller flow rate ratio, higher magnetic field, higher core stream or lower cladding stream dynamic viscosity, and larger magnetic particle size can increase MFS. These results can be used to tune magnetofluidic spreading in microchannels.

  14. POET: Parameterized Optimization for Empirical Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Q; Seymour, K; You, H; Vuduc, R; Quinlan, D

    2007-01-29

    The excessive complexity of both machine architectures and applications have made it difficult for compilers to statically model and predict application behavior. This observation motivates the recent interest in performance tuning using empirical techniques. We present a new embedded scripting language, POET (Parameterized Optimization for Empirical Tuning), for parameterizing complex code transformations so that they can be empirically tuned. The POET language aims to significantly improve the generality, flexibility, and efficiency of existing empirical tuning systems. We have used the language to parameterize and to empirically tune three loop optimizations-interchange, blocking, and unrolling-for two linear algebra kernels. We show experimentally that the time required to tune these optimizations using POET, which does not require any program analysis, is significantly shorter than that when using a full compiler-based source-code optimizer which performs sophisticated program analysis and optimizations.

  15. Electric tuning of direct-indirect optical transitions in silicon.

    PubMed

    Noborisaka, J; Nishiguchi, K; Fujiwara, A

    2014-01-01

    Electronic band structures in semiconductors are uniquely determined by the constituent elements of the lattice. For example, bulk silicon has an indirect bandgap and it prohibits efficient light emission. Here we report the electrical tuning of the direct/indirect band optical transition in an ultrathin silicon-on-insulator (SOI) gated metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) light-emitting diode. A special Si/SiO2 interface formed by high-temperature annealing that shows stronger valley coupling enables us to observe phononless direct optical transition. Furthermore, by controlling the gate field, its strength can be electrically tuned to 16 times that of the indirect transition, which is nearly 800 times larger than the weak direct transition in bulk silicon. These results will therefore assist the development of both complementary MOS (CMOS)-compatible silicon photonics and the emerging "valleytronics" based on the control of the valley degree of freedom. PMID:25377598

  16. Electric tuning of direct-indirect optical transitions in silicon.

    PubMed

    Noborisaka, J; Nishiguchi, K; Fujiwara, A

    2014-11-07

    Electronic band structures in semiconductors are uniquely determined by the constituent elements of the lattice. For example, bulk silicon has an indirect bandgap and it prohibits efficient light emission. Here we report the electrical tuning of the direct/indirect band optical transition in an ultrathin silicon-on-insulator (SOI) gated metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) light-emitting diode. A special Si/SiO2 interface formed by high-temperature annealing that shows stronger valley coupling enables us to observe phononless direct optical transition. Furthermore, by controlling the gate field, its strength can be electrically tuned to 16 times that of the indirect transition, which is nearly 800 times larger than the weak direct transition in bulk silicon. These results will therefore assist the development of both complementary MOS (CMOS)-compatible silicon photonics and the emerging "valleytronics" based on the control of the valley degree of freedom.

  17. Electronically tuned Ti:sapphire laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, S.; Akagawa, K.; Tashiro, H.

    1996-05-01

    We have applied a birefringent acousto-optic crystal for wavelength tuning of a Ti:sapphire laser. A continuous-tuning range of 12 nm, which was limited by wavelength-dependent angle deviation of the beam deflection in the crystal, was extended to over 100 nm by optical correction. Fast and random access of lasing wavelengths by direct electronic tuning was demonstrated at a pulsed operation of 10 Hz. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  18. Auto-tuning of cascade control systems.

    PubMed

    Song, Sihai; Cai, Wenjian; Wang, Ya-Gang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a novel auto-tuning method for a cascade control system is proposed. By employing a simple relay feedback test, both inner and outer loop model parameters can be simultaneously identified. Consequently, well-established proportional-integral-derivative (PID) tuning rules can be applied to tune both loops. Compared with existing methods, the new method is simpler and yet more effective. It can be directly integrated into commercially available industrial auto-tuning systems. Some examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  19. Tune measurement methods of the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng-Yang Tan; Xiaolong Zhang; Paul Lebrun

    2003-06-10

    We will discuss several methods for measuring the tunes in the Tevatron. These methods can be separated into three classes: active, passive and hybrid. In the active method, the beam is tickled in order to obtain a frequency response. In the passive method, a Schottky detector which uses a resonant stripline is used to measure the Schottky spectrum of the beam. In the hybrid method, we tickle the beam using kickers, or the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) in order to bring the tune signal above the noise floor of the Schottky detectors. An automatic tune fitting algorithm is also under development which allows us to measure the tune without human intervention.

  20. Tuning universality far from equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Markus; Nowak, Boris; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Possible universal dynamics of a many-body system far from thermal equilibrium are explored. A focus is set on meta-stable non-thermal states exhibiting critical properties such as self-similarity and independence of the details of how the respective state has been reached. It is proposed that universal dynamics far from equilibrium can be tuned to exhibit a dynamical transition where these critical properties change qualitatively. This is demonstrated for the case of a superfluid two-component Bose gas exhibiting different types of long-lived but non-thermal critical order. Scaling exponents controlled by the ratio of experimentally tuneable coupling parameters offer themselves as natural smoking guns. The results shed light on the wealth of universal phenomena expected to exist in the far-from-equilibrium realm. PMID:23928853

  1. Tuning the Nucleophilicity in Cyclopropenylidenes

    PubMed Central

    Schoeller, Wolfgang W.; Frey, Guido D.; Bertrand, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Cyclopropenylidenes are Hückel aromatic π-systems in which one of the ring atoms is a carbene center. Quantum chemical calculations at density functional level, supplemented by coupled-cluster calculations, indicate that these species have a sizeable energy separation between the lowest energy singlet and triplet states. Amino groups considerably increase the energy difference between these two states, while electron-withdrawing substituents decrease it. The 1.1-dimerization products of cyclopropenylidenes, namely triafulvalenes, are investigated. The calculations show that, without steric hindrance and considerable electronic stabilization, cyclopropenylidenes are kinetically not stable and dimerize. Different substituents (alkyl, silyl, terphenyl, amino, and posphaneiminato) were probed to tune the energy levelling of the frontier orbitals in cyclopropenylidenes. Accordingly, it is predicted that by a suitable choice of substituents at the olefinic positions, cyclopropenylidenes can be more nucleophilic than their five-membered ring congeners, namely imidazol-2-ylidenes. PMID:18404754

  2. Self-tuning fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunton, Steven L.; Kutz, J. N.; Fu, Xing

    2016-03-01

    Advanced methods in data science are driving the characterization and control of nonlinear dynamical systems in optics. In this work, we investigate the use of machine learning, sparsity methods and adaptive control to develop a self-tuning fiber laser, which automatically learns and adapts to maintain high-energy ultrashort pulses. In particular, a two-stage procedure is introduced consisting of a machine learning algorithm to recognize different dynamical regimes with distinct behavior, followed by an adaptive control algorithm to reject disturbances and track optimal solutions despite stochastically varying system parameters. The machine learning algorithm, called sparse representation for classification, comes from machine vision and is typically used for image recognition. The adaptive control algorithm is extremum-seeking control, which has been applied to a wide range of systems in engineering; extremum-seeking is beneficial because of rigorous stability guarantees and ease of implementation.

  3. Saccade Preparation Reshapes Sensory Tuning.

    PubMed

    Li, Hsin-Hung; Barbot, Antoine; Carrasco, Marisa

    2016-06-20

    Human observers make large rapid eye movements-saccades-to bring behaviorally relevant information into the fovea, where spatial resolution is high. In some visual tasks [1-4], performance at the location of a saccade target improves before the eyes move. Although these findings provide evidence that extra-retinal signals evoked by saccades can enhance visual perception, it remains unknown whether and how presaccadic modulations change the processing of feature information and thus modulate visual representations. To answer this question, one must go beyond the use of methods that only probe performance accuracy (d') in different tasks. Here, using a psychophysical reverse correlation approach [5-8], we investigated how saccade preparation influences the processing of orientation and spatial frequency-two building blocks of early vision. We found that saccade preparation selectively enhanced the gain of high spatial frequency information and narrowed orientation tuning at the upcoming saccade landing position. These modulations were time locked to saccade onset, peaking right before the eyes moved (-50-0 ms). Moreover, merely deploying covert attention within the same temporal interval without preparing a saccade did not alter performance. The observed presaccadic tuning changes may correspond to the presaccadic enhancement [9-11] and receptive field shifts reported in neurophysiological studies [12-14]. Saccade preparation may support transaccadic integration by reshaping the representation of the saccade target to be more fovea-like just before the eyes move. The presaccadic modulations on spatial frequency and orientation processing illustrate a strong perception-action coupling by revealing that the visual system dynamically reshapes feature selectivity contingent upon eye movements.

  4. Birefringence of solid-state laser media: broadband tuning discontinuities and application to laser line narrowing

    SciTech Connect

    Krasinski, J.S.; Band, Y.B.; Chin, T.; Heller, D.F.; Morris, R.C.; Papanestor, P.

    1989-04-15

    Spectral consequences that result from using birefringent media with broadband gain inside of laser cavities containing polarizing elements are described. We show that the laser intensity is modulated as a function of the output frequency unless the cavity elements are carefully aligned so that their polarization axis coincides with a principal optical axis of the gain medium. Analysis of the tuning characteristics of a birefringent polarization-dependent gain medium is exploited to provide a simple method for line narrowing the laser output. By introduction of an intracavity birefringent compensator the narrow-band output can be continuously tuned. Experimental results for alexandrite lasers are presented.

  5. Synaptic mechanisms shaping delay-tuned combination-sensitivity in the auditory thalamus of mustached bats.

    PubMed

    Butman, John A; Suga, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    For the processing of target-distance information, delay-tuned auditory neurons of the mustached bat show facilitative responses to a combination of signal elements of a biosonar pulse-echo pair with a specific echo delay. They are initially produced in the inferior colliculus by facilitative responses based on the coincidence of the rebound response following glycinergic inhibition to the first harmonic of the pulse and a short-latency response to the 2nd-4th harmonics of its echo. Here, we report that further facilitative responses to pulse-echo pairs of thalamic delay-tuned neurons are mediated by glutamate receptors (NMDA and non-NMDA receptors), and that GABAergic inhibition shortens the duration of facilitative responses mediated by NMDA-receptors, without changing the delay tuning of thalamic delay-tuned neurons. Different from collicular delay-tuned neurons, thalamic ones respond much more to pulse-echo pairs than individual signal elements. The neural mechanisms involved in shaping thalamic delay-tuning support a model of hierarchical signal processing in the auditory system. PMID:26519094

  6. Dual band tuned radomes for radar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, E. C.; Naor, M.; Smolski, A. P.

    Highly effective dual-band tuning methods have been developed for sandwich panel-structure radome joints, simultaneously reducing perturbations to the joints in both the PSR and SSR bands. The new methodology, which solves the logistic problems associated with the previously used zoned tuning method, allows greater flexibility in the use of the same radome with different radars.

  7. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stiffness variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by a plurality of force transmitting mechanisms which contact the noise radiating element. Each one of the force transmitting mechanisms includes an expandable element and a spring in contact with the noise radiating element so that excitation of the element varies the spring force applied to the noise radiating element. The elements are actuated by a controller which receives input of a signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the elements and causes the spring force applied to the noise radiating element to be varied. The force transmitting mechanisms can be arranged to either produce bending or linear stiffness variations in the noise radiating element.

  8. Temporal tuning in the bat auditory cortex is sharper when studied with natural echolocation sequences

    PubMed Central

    Beetz, M. Jerome; Hechavarría, Julio C.; Kössl, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Precise temporal coding is necessary for proper acoustic analysis. However, at cortical level, forward suppression appears to limit the ability of neurons to extract temporal information from natural sound sequences. Here we studied how temporal processing can be maintained in the bats’ cortex in the presence of suppression evoked by natural echolocation streams that are relevant to the bats’ behavior. We show that cortical neurons tuned to target-distance actually profit from forward suppression induced by natural echolocation sequences. These neurons can more precisely extract target distance information when they are stimulated with natural echolocation sequences than during stimulation with isolated call-echo pairs. We conclude that forward suppression does for time domain tuning what lateral inhibition does for selectivity forms such as auditory frequency tuning and visual orientation tuning. When talking about cortical processing, suppression should be seen as a mechanistic tool rather than a limiting element. PMID:27357230

  9. Temporal tuning in the bat auditory cortex is sharper when studied with natural echolocation sequences.

    PubMed

    Beetz, M Jerome; Hechavarría, Julio C; Kössl, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Precise temporal coding is necessary for proper acoustic analysis. However, at cortical level, forward suppression appears to limit the ability of neurons to extract temporal information from natural sound sequences. Here we studied how temporal processing can be maintained in the bats' cortex in the presence of suppression evoked by natural echolocation streams that are relevant to the bats' behavior. We show that cortical neurons tuned to target-distance actually profit from forward suppression induced by natural echolocation sequences. These neurons can more precisely extract target distance information when they are stimulated with natural echolocation sequences than during stimulation with isolated call-echo pairs. We conclude that forward suppression does for time domain tuning what lateral inhibition does for selectivity forms such as auditory frequency tuning and visual orientation tuning. When talking about cortical processing, suppression should be seen as a mechanistic tool rather than a limiting element. PMID:27357230

  10. Novel tune diagnostics for the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    In the Tevatron collider, protons and antiprotons share the same beam pipe. This poses a challenge in the measurement of tunes for both species simultaneously because of the possibility of signal contamination from the other species. The tune of each bunch is also very different because of beam-beam effects from parasitic crossing points. This means that the tune diagnostics must be able to differentiate between protons and anti-protons, it also has to measure tunes from each bunch. There are three different tune pickups used in the Tevatron: 1.7 GHz Schottky pickups, 21.4 MHz Schottky pickups and baseband pickups. These devices will be discussed in detail in this paper.

  11. Neural processing of auditory signals in the time domain: delay-tuned coincidence detectors in the mustached bat.

    PubMed

    Suga, Nobuo

    2015-06-01

    The central auditory system produces combination-sensitive neurons tuned to a specific combination of multiple signal elements. Some of these neurons act as coincidence detectors with delay lines for the extraction of spectro-temporal information from sounds. "Delay-tuned" neurons of mustached bats are tuned to a combination of up to four signal elements with a specific delay between them and form a delay map. They are produced in the inferior colliculus by the coincidence of the rebound response following glycinergic inhibition to the first harmonic of a biosonar pulse with the short-latency response to the 2nd-4th harmonics of its echo. Compared with collicular delay-tuned neurons, thalamic and cortical ones respond more to pulse-echo pairs than individual sounds. Cortical delay-tuned neurons are clustered in the three separate areas. They interact with each other through a circuit mediating positive feedback and lateral inhibition for adjustment and improvement of the delay tuning of cortical and subcortical neurons. The current article reviews the mechanisms for delay tuning and the response properties of collicular, thalamic and cortical delay-tuned neurons in relation to hierarchical signal processing. PMID:25752443

  12. Algorithms to Automate LCLS Undulator Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-03

    Automation of the LCLS undulator tuning offers many advantages to the project. Automation can make a substantial reduction in the amount of time the tuning takes. Undulator tuning is fairly complex and automation can make the final tuning less dependent on the skill of the operator. Also, algorithms are fixed and can be scrutinized and reviewed, as opposed to an individual doing the tuning by hand. This note presents algorithms implemented in a computer program written for LCLS undulator tuning. The LCLS undulators must meet the following specifications. The maximum trajectory walkoff must be less than 5 {micro}m over 10 m. The first field integral must be below 40 x 10{sup -6} Tm. The second field integral must be below 50 x 10{sup -6} Tm{sup 2}. The phase error between the electron motion and the radiation field must be less than 10 degrees in an undulator. The K parameter must have the value of 3.5000 {+-} 0.0005. The phase matching from the break regions into the undulator must be accurate to better than 10 degrees. A phase change of 113 x 2{pi} must take place over a distance of 3.656 m centered on the undulator. Achieving these requirements is the goal of the tuning process. Most of the tuning is done with Hall probe measurements. The field integrals are checked using long coil measurements. An analysis program written in Matlab takes the Hall probe measurements and computes the trajectories, phase errors, K value, etc. The analysis program and its calculation techniques were described in a previous note. In this note, a second Matlab program containing tuning algorithms is described. The algorithms to determine the required number and placement of the shims are discussed in detail. This note describes the operation of a computer program which was written to automate LCLS undulator tuning. The algorithms used to compute the shim sizes and locations are discussed.

  13. Nylon Sleeve for Cavity Amplifier Holds Tuning Despite Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derr, Lloyd

    1964-01-01

    The problem: Detuning of cavity amplifiers with change in temperature. This results in deterioration of the performance of the amplifier at its design frequency. In cavity amplifiers and filters it is desirable that constant performance be maintained regardless of thermal changes. These changes often cause an "off resonance shift" in a cavity filter and a deterioration of performance in a cavity amplifier. The solution: Mount the tuning probe in a nylon sleeve. Thermal expansion and contraction of the nylon nullifies unwanted capacitive and inductive changes in the resonant elements.

  14. An automatic data system for vibration modal tuning and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salyer, R. A.; Jung, E. J., Jr.; Huggins, S. L.; Stephens, B. L.

    1975-01-01

    A digitally based automatic modal tuning and analysis system developed to provide an operational capability beginning at 0.1 hertz is described. The elements of the system, which provides unique control features, maximum operator visibility, and rapid data reduction and documentation, are briefly described; and the operational flow is discussed to illustrate the full range of capabilities and the flexibility of application. The successful application of the system to a modal survey of the Skylab payload is described. Information about the Skylab test article, coincident-quadrature analysis of modal response data, orthogonality, and damping calculations is included in the appendixes. Recommendations for future application of the system are also made.

  15. Design of a Slender Tuned Ultrasonic Needle for Bone Penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Rebecca; Mathieson, Andrew; Wallace, Robert; Simpson, Hamish; Lucas, Margaret

    This paper reports on an ultrasonic bone biopsy needle, particularly focusing on design guidelines applicable for any slender tuned ultrasonic device component. Ultrasonic surgical devices are routinely used to cut a range of biological tissues, such as bone. However the realisation of an ultrasonic bone biopsy needle is particularly challenging. This is due to the requirement to generate sufficient vibrational amplitude capable of penetrating mineralised tissue, while avoiding flexural vibrational responses, which are known to reduce the performance and reliability of slender ultrasonic devices. This investigation uses finite element analysis (FEA) to predict the vibrational behaviour of a resonant needle which has dimensions that match closely to an 8Gx4inch bone marrow biopsy needle. Features of the needle, including changes in material and repeated changes in diameter, have been included and systematically altered to demonstrate that the location of and geometry of these features can significantly affect the resonant frequency of bending and torsional modes of vibration while having a limited effect on the frequency and shape of the tuned longitudinal mode. Experimental modal analysis was used to identify the modal parameters of the selected needle design, validating the FEA model predictions of the longitudinal mode and the close flexural modes. This verifies that modal coupling can be avoided by judicious small geometry modifications. Finally, the tuned needle assembly was driven under typical operational excitation conditions to demonstrate that an ultrasonic biopsy needle can be designed to operate in a purely longitudinal motion.

  16. How the Ear Tunes In to Sounds: A Physics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Florian; Saase, Victor; Buchheim, Nikolaus; Stoop, Ruedi

    2014-02-01

    Listening is a complex sound selection process thought to be located in the auditory cortex. A biophysically motivated Hopf model of the mammalian cochlea reveals that pitch, a main characteristic in the perception of sound, is already materialized at the level of the mammalian hearing sensor. Here, we provide evidence that major elements of listening may similarly be implemented at the auditory periphery by means of efferent connections to the cochlea that tune the hearing sensor towards an auditory object of interest. The cochlea model we use in our investigations is advocated by its performance quality, the simplicity by which efferent control can be implemented, and by the closeness of the control results compared to the biological data. We tune the Hopf parameters to target on a sound, using pitch as the guiding feature. How well we achieve our goal is tested on real-world sounds and measured by a specifically developed tuning-error measure. The results provide a first estimate of how much the peripheral hearing system can assist a listener in focusing on an auditory signal and, thus, what is contributed by the auditory cortex.

  17. Ionic liquid tunes microemulsion curvature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liping; Bauduin, Pierre; Zemb, Thomas; Eastoe, Julian; Hao, Jingcheng

    2009-02-17

    Middle-phase microemulsions formed from cationic dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODMAC), anionic sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), n-butanol, and n-heptane were studied. An ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim][BF4]), was employed as the electrolyte in the aqueous media instead of inorganic salts usually used in microemulsion formulation. Studies have been carried out as a function of the concentrations of [bmim][BF4], n-butanol, total surfactant (cDODMAC+SDS), and temperature on the phase behavior and the ultralow interfacial tensions in which the anionic component is present in excess in the catanionic film. Ultralow interfacial tension measurements confirmed the formation of middle-phase microemulsions and the necessary conditions for stabilizing middle-phase microemulsions. Electrical conductivity, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments were also performed, indicating that the typical heptane domain size has an average radius of 360 A and the ionic liquid induces softening of the charged catanionic film. Most interestingly, the IL concentration (cIL) is shown to act as an effective interfacial curvature-control parameter, representing a new approach to tuning the formulation of microemulsions and emulsions. The results expand the potential uses of ILs but also point to the design of new ILs that may achieve superefficient control over interfacial and self-assembly systems. PMID:19161325

  18. A STUDY OF RAPID CAVITY TUNING.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO, Y.

    2001-07-12

    An FFAG moot likely requires rapid cavity tuning. The cavity must also have a very high gradient. To satisfy both the high power and rapid tuning requirements is a big challenge. Detailed investigation of the possibility is addressed. Included are general thoughts, dual-loop and simple loop analyses, and a study of using ferrite or PIN diodes. Also proposed is a phase control scheme, which may be a better solution if the needed components can be developed. Finally, an energy analysis reveals the difficult of high power tuning.

  19. Androgens Alter the Tuning of Electroreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlan Meyer, J.; Zakon, Harold H.

    1982-08-01

    Weakly electric fish possess electroreceptors that are tuned to their individual electric organ discharge frequencies. One genus, Sternopygus, displays both ontogenetic and seasonal shifts in these frequencies, possibly because of endocrine influences. Systemic treatment with androgens lowers the discharge frequencies in these animals. Concomitant with these changes in electric organ discharge frequencies are decreases in electroreceptor best frequencies; hence the close match between discharge frequency and receptor tuning is maintained. These findings indicate that the tuning of electroreceptors is dynamic and that it parallels natural shifts in electric organ discharge frequency.

  20. Automated tuning of an eight-channel cardiac transceive array at 7 tesla using piezoelectric actuators

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Graeme A; Rodgers, Christopher T; Hess, Aaron T; Snyder, Carl J; Vaughan, J Thomas; Robson, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ultra-high field (UHF) MR scanning in the body requires novel coil designs due to B1 field inhomogeneities. In the transverse electromagnetic field (TEM) design, maximum B1 transmit power can only be achieved if each individual transmit element is tuned and matched for different coil loads, which requires a considerable amount of valuable scanner time. Methods An integrated system for autotuning a multichannel parallel transmit (pTx) cardiac TEM array was devised, using piezoelectric actuators, power monitoring equipment and control software. The reproducibility and performance of the system were tested and the power responses of the coil elements were profiled. An automated optimization method was devised and evaluated. Results The time required to tune an eight-element pTx cardiac RF array was reduced from a mean of 30 min to less than 10 min with the use of this system. Conclusion Piezoelectric actuators are an attractive means of tuning RF coil arrays to yield more efficient B1 transmission into the subject. An automated mechanism for tuning these elements provides a practical solution for cardiac imaging at UHF, bringing this technology closer to clinical use. Magn Reson Med 73:2390–2397, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. PMID:24986525

  1. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  2. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  3. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  4. Tuning the Response in Disordered Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashine, Nidhi; Rocks, Jason W.; Bischofberger, Irmgard; Goodrich, Carl P.; Nagel, Sidney R.; Liu, Andrea J.

    The fact that amorphous materials are structurally different from crystals has important consequences for how the properties of a disordered structure can be tuned. We have used jamming as a method to create spring networks in both two and three dimensions. By selectively removing a small percentage of bonds, we can tune the network to have a desired response. For example, we can tune the network's Poisson ratio anywhere between the auxetic and incompressible limits. We can also produce a targeted response at a local scale; by perturbing the positions of pair of particles at one point we can tune in a desired response a large distance away. This response is similar to the allosteric regulation in proteins where a reaction at one site activates another site of the protein molecule. Experimentally, we have successfully demonstrated such mechanical networks in 2D (by laser cutting) or in 3D (3D printing).

  5. Learning and Tuning of Fuzzy Rules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1997-01-01

    In this chapter, we review some of the current techniques for learning and tuning fuzzy rules. For clarity, we refer to the process of generating rules from data as the learning problem and distinguish it from tuning an already existing set of fuzzy rules. For learning, we touch on unsupervised learning techniques such as fuzzy c-means, fuzzy decision tree systems, fuzzy genetic algorithms, and linear fuzzy rules generation methods. For tuning, we discuss Jang's ANFIS architecture, Berenji-Khedkar's GARIC architecture and its extensions in GARIC-Q. We show that the hybrid techniques capable of learning and tuning fuzzy rules, such as CART-ANFIS, RNN-FLCS, and GARIC-RB, are desirable in development of a number of future intelligent systems.

  6. Electronic tuning of site-selectivity.

    PubMed

    Wilcock, Brandon C; Uno, Brice E; Bromann, Gretchen L; Clark, Matthew J; Anderson, Thomas M; Burke, Martin D

    2012-12-01

    Site-selective functionalizations of complex small molecules can generate targeted derivatives with exceptional step efficiency, but general strategies for maximizing selectivity in this context are rare. Here, we report that site-selectivity can be tuned by simply modifying the electronic nature of the reagents. A Hammett analysis is consistent with linking this phenomenon to the Hammond postulate: electronic tuning to a more product-like transition state amplifies site-discriminating interactions between a reagent and its substrate. This strategy transformed a minimally site-selective acylation reaction into a highly selective and thus preparatively useful one. Electronic tuning of both an acylpyridinium donor and its carboxylate counterion further promoted site-divergent functionalizations. With these advances, we achieve a range of modifications to just one of the many hydroxyl groups appended to the ion channel-forming natural product amphotericin B. Thus, electronic tuning of reagents represents an effective strategy for discovering and optimizing site-selective functionalization reactions.

  7. Thermodynamically Tuned Nanophase Materials for reversible Hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Ping Liu; John J. Vajo

    2010-02-28

    This program was devoted to significantly extending the limits of hydrogen storage technology for practical transportation applications. To meet the hydrogen capacity goals set forth by the DOE, solid-state materials consisting of light elements were developed. Many light element compounds are known that have high capacities. However, most of these materials are thermodynamically too stable, and they release and store hydrogen much too slowly for practical use. In this project we developed new light element chemical systems that have high hydrogen capacities while also having suitable thermodynamic properties. In addition, we developed methods for increasing the rates of hydrogen exchange in these new materials. The program has significantly advanced (1) the application of combined hydride systems for tuning thermodynamic properties and (2) the use of nanoengineering for improving hydrogen exchange. For example, we found that our strategy for thermodynamic tuning allows both entropy and enthalpy to be favorably adjusted. In addition, we demonstrated that using porous supports as scaffolds to confine hydride materials to nanoscale dimensions could improve rates of hydrogen exchange by > 50x. Although a hydrogen storage material meeting the requirements for commercial development was not achieved, this program has provided foundation and direction for future efforts. More broadly, nanoconfinment using scaffolds has application in other energy storage technologies including batteries and supercapacitors. The overall goal of this program was to develop a safe and cost-effective nanostructured light-element hydride material that overcomes the thermodynamic and kinetic barriers to hydrogen reaction and diffusion in current materials and thereby achieve > 6 weight percent hydrogen capacity at temperatures and equilibrium pressures consistent with DOE target values.

  8. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme for uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.

  9. It's elemental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Periodic Table of the elements will now have to be updated. An international team of researchers has added element 110 to the Earth's armory of elements. Though short-lived—of the order of microseconds, element 110 bottoms out the list as the heaviest known element on the planet. Scientists at the Heavy Ion Research Center in Darmstadt, Germany, made the 110-proton element by colliding a lead isotope with nickel atoms. The element, which is yet to be named, has an atomic mass of 269.

  10. Characteristics of vibration energy harvesting using giant magnetostrictive cantilevers with resonant tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kotaro; Horibe, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Shigekazu; Shindo, Yasuhide; Narita, Fumio

    2015-12-01

    This work deals with the dynamic bending and energy harvesting characteristics of giant magnetostrictive cantilevers with resonant tuning both numerically and experimentally. The giant magnetostrictive cantilever is fabricated using a thin Terfenol-D layer, SUS layer, movable proof mass, etc, and, is designed to automatically adjust its own resonant frequency to match the external vibration frequency in real time. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was conducted, and the resonant frequency, induced voltage and stress in the magnetostrictive cantilevers were predicted. The resonant frequency and induced voltage were also measured, and comparison was made between simulation and experiment. The time-varying behavior and self-tuning ability are discussed in detail.

  11. Tuning fork shear-force feedback.

    PubMed

    Ruiter, A G; van der Werf, K O; Veerman, J A; Garcia-Parajo, M F; Rensen, W H; van Hulst, N F

    1998-03-01

    Investigations have been performed on the dynamics of a distance regulation system based on an oscillating probe at resonance. This was examined at a tuning fork shear-force feedback system, which is used as a distance control mechanism in near-field scanning optical microscopy. In this form of microscopy, a tapered optical fiber is attached to the tuning fork and scanned over the sample surface to be imaged. Experiments were performed measuring both amplitude and phase of the oscillation of the tuning fork as a function of driving frequency and tip-sample distance. These experiments reveal that the resonance frequency of the tuning fork changes upon approaching the sample. Both the amplitude and the phase of the tuning fork can be used as distance control parameter in the feedback system. Using the amplitude a second-order behavior is observed, while with phase only a first-order behavior is observed. Numerical calculations confirm these observations. This first-order behavior results in an improved stability of the feedback system. As an example, a sample consisting of DNA strands on mica was imaged which showed the height of the DNA as 1.4 +/- 0.2 nm.

  12. Duration tuning in the mouse auditory midbrain.

    PubMed

    Brand, A; Urban, R; Grothe, B

    2000-10-01

    Temporal cues, including sound duration, are important for sound identification. Neurons tuned to the duration of pure tones were first discovered in the auditory system of frogs and bats and were discussed as specific adaptations in these animals. More recently duration sensitivity has also been described in the chinchilla midbrain and the cat auditory cortex, indicating that it might be a more general phenomenon than previously thought. However, it is unclear whether duration tuning in mammals is robust in face of changes of stimulus parameters other than duration. Using extracellular single-cell recordings in the mouse inferior colliculus, we found 55% of cells to be sensitive to stimulus duration showing long-pass, short-pass, or band-pass filter characteristics. For most neurons, a change in some other stimulus parameter, (e.g., intensity, frequency, binaural conditions, or using noise instead of pure tones) altered and sometimes abolished duration-tuning characteristics. Thus in many neurons duration tuning is interdependent with other stimulus parameters and, hence, might be context dependent. A small number of inferior colliculus neurons, in particular band-pass neurons, exhibited stable filter characteristics and could therefore be referred to as "duration selective." These findings support the idea that duration tuning is a general phenomenon in the mammalian auditory system.

  13. PSS Parameters Tuning Using Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulrahim, M.; Almoula, Zakaria Fadl; Al-Hafid, Hafid

    2008-10-01

    Optimal tuning of power system stabilizer (PSS) parameters using genetic algorithm with single objective function is presented in this paper. A Single Machine Infinite Bus (SMIB) system is considered. The main objective of this research paper is to investigate the suitability of genetic algorithm for effective tuning of parameters of the power system stabilizer in a single machine infinite bus system. A conventional speed based lead-lag PSS is used. A simple and effective method of tuning the parameters of PSS is proposed which is posed as an optimization formulation by maximizing the damping of modes of oscillations of the SMIB system over a wide range of loading conditions and different system configurations. It is found that GA based PSS with single objective design shows improved dynamic performance over Conventional PSS over a wide range of operating conditions and different system parameters.

  14. Resonant tuning fork detector for electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Willer, Ulrike; Bauer, Christoph; Schade, Wolfgang

    2009-02-01

    A mechanical quartz microresonator (tuning fork) is used to detect electromagnetic radiation. The detection scheme is based on forces created due to the incident electromagnetic radiation on the piezoelectric tuning fork. A force can be created due to the transfer of the photon momentum of the incident electromagnetic radiation. If the surfaces of the tuning fork are nonuniformly heated, a second force acts on it, the so-called photophoretic force. These processes occur for all wavelengths of the incident radiation, making the detector suitable for sensing of ultraviolet, visible, and mid-infrared light, even THz-radiation. Here the detector is characterized in the visible range; noise analysis is performed for 650 nm and 5.26 microm. A linear power characteristic and the dependence on pulse lengths of the incoming light are shown. Examples for applications for the visible and mid-infrared spectral region are given by 2f and absorption spectroscopy of oxygen and nitric oxide, respectively.

  15. High-Q ferrite-tuned cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, L.M.; Thiessen, H.A.; Carlini, R.D.; Potter, J.M.

    1983-08-01

    Rapid-cycling proton synchrotrons, such as the proposed LAMPF II accelerator, require approximately 10 MV per turn rf with 17% tuning range near 50 MHz. The traditional approach to ferrite-tuned cavities uses a ferrite which is longitudinally biased (rf magnetic field parallel to bias field). This method leads to unacceptably high losses in the ferrite. At Los Alamos, we are developing a cavity with transverse bias (rf magnetic field perpendicular to the bias field) that makes use of the tensor permeability of the ferrite. Initial tests of a small (10-cm-diam) quarter-wave singly re-entrant cavity tuned by several different ferrites indicate that the losses in the ferrite can be made negligible compared with the losses due to the surface resistivity of the copper cavity.

  16. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    DOE PAGES

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme formore » uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.« less

  17. Localized electrical fine tuning of passive microwave and radio frequency devices

    DOEpatents

    Findikoglu, Alp T.

    2001-04-10

    A method and apparatus for the localized electrical fine tuning of passive multiple element microwave or RF devices in which a nonlinear dielectric material is deposited onto predetermined areas of a substrate containing the device. An appropriate electrically conductive material is deposited over predetermined areas of the nonlinear dielectric and the signal line of the device for providing electrical contact with the nonlinear dielectric. Individual, adjustable bias voltages are applied to the electrically conductive material allowing localized electrical fine tuning of the devices. The method of the present invention can be applied to manufactured devices, or can be incorporated into the design of the devices so that it is applied at the time the devices are manufactured. The invention can be configured to provide localized fine tuning for devices including but not limited to coplanar waveguides, slotline devices, stripline devices, and microstrip devices.

  18. Turbine bucket natural frequency tuning rib

    DOEpatents

    Wang, John Zhiqiang; Norton, Paul Francis; Barb, Kevin Joseph; Jacala, Ariel Caesar-Prepena

    2002-01-01

    A tuning rib is added preferably in the aft cavity of a cored turbine bucket to alter the bucket's natural frequencies. The tuning rib may be a solid rib or a segmented rib and is particularly suited for altering high order frequency modes such as 2T, 4F and 1-3S. As such, detrimental crossings of natural bucket frequencies and gas turbine stimuli can be avoided to thereby improve the reliability of a gas turbine without impacting other features of the bucket that are important to the performance of the gas turbine.

  19. Research and development of tuned dry gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeuchi, M.; Tahara, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Takizawa, Y.; Otsuki, M.

    The design concepts, physical characteristics, and performance test results of the Tuned Dry Gyro (TDG), a two-degrees-of-freedom gyro employing the Dynamically Tuned Free Rotor Theory, are presented. The size, weight, angular momentum, drift stability, and torquer scale factor stability for the three developed TDG models are given along with data for the basic performance requirements of the third model. Data on the rotor, suspension, torquer, spin motor, and pickoff of the third model are given along with the specification and typical values for its G-insensitive drift, G-sensitive drift, torquer scale factor, anisoelasticity, magnetic moment, angular vibration sensitivity, life, and long-term stability.

  20. Elemental ZOO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helser, Terry L.

    2003-04-01

    This puzzle uses the symbols of 39 elements to spell the names of 25 animals found in zoos. Underlined spaces and the names of the elements serve as clues. To solve the puzzle, students must find the symbols that correspond to the elemental names and rearrange them into the animals' names.

  1. Optimal tuning and calibration of bendable mirrors with slope measuring profilers

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Wayne; Kirschman, Jonathan; MacDowell, Alastair; Warwick, Tony; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2009-06-22

    We describe a technique to optimally tune and calibrate bendable x-ray optics for sub-micron focusing. The focusing is divided between two elliptically cylindrical reflecting elements, a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) pair. Each optic is shaped by applying unequal bending couples to each end of a flat mirror. The developed technique allowsoptimal tuning of these systems using surface slope data obtained with a slope measuring instrument, the long trace profiler (LTP). Due to the near linearity of the problem, the minimal set of data necessary for the tuning of each bender, consists of only three slope traces measured before and after a single adjustment of each bending couple. The data are analyzed with software realizing a method of regression analysis with experimentally found characteristic functions of the benders. The resulting approximation to the functional dependence of the desired shape provides nearly final settings. Moreover, the characteristic functions of the benders found in the course of tuning, can be used for retuning to a new desired shape without removal from the beamline and re-measuring. We perform a ray trace, using profiler data for the finally tuned optics, predicting the performance to be expected during use of the optics on the beamline.

  2. Extension of IMC tuning correlations for non-self regulating (integrating) processes.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Jeffrey E; Cooper, Douglas J

    2007-06-01

    The filter term of a PID with Filter controller reduces the impact of measurement noise on the derivative action of the controller. This impact is quantified by the controller output travel defined as the total movement of the controller output per unit time. Decreasing controller output travel is important to reduce wear in the final control element. Internal Model Control (IMC) tuning correlations are widely published for PI, PID, and PID with Filter controllers for self regulating processes. For non-self regulating (or integrating) processes, IMC tuning correlations are published for PI and PID controllers but not for PID with Filter controllers. The important contribution of this work is that it completes the set of IMC tuning correlations with an extension to the PID with Filter controller for non-self regulating processes. Other published correlations (not based upon the IMC framework) for PID with Filter controllers fix the filter time constant at one-tenth the derivative time regardless of the model of the process. In contrast, the novel IMC correlations presented in this paper calculate a filter time constant based upon the model of the process and the user's choice for the closed-loop time constant. The set point tracking and disturbance rejection performance of the proposed IMC tunings is demonstrated using simulation studies and a bench-scale experimental system. The proposed IMC tunings are shown to perform as well as various PID correlations (with and without a filter term) while requiring considerably less controller action.

  3. Tuning Ice Nucleation with Supercharged Polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huige; Ma, Chao; Li, Kaiyong; Liu, Kai; Loznik, Mark; Teeuwen, Rosalie; van Hest, Jan C M; Zhou, Xin; Herrmann, Andreas; Wang, Jianjun

    2016-07-01

    Supercharged unfolded polypeptides (SUPs) are exploited for controlling ice nucleation via tuning the nature of charge and charge density of SUPs. The results show that positively charged SUPs facilitate ice nucleation, while negatively charged ones suppress it. Moreover, the charge density of the SUP backbone is another parameter to control it. PMID:27119590

  4. Active tuning of all-dielectric metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Sautter, Jürgen; Staude, Isabelle; Decker, Manuel; Rusak, Evgenia; Neshev, Dragomir N; Brener, Igal; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2015-04-28

    All-dielectric metasurfaces provide a powerful platform for highly efficient flat optical devices, owing to their strong electric and magnetic dipolar response accompanied by negligible losses at near-infrared frequencies. Here we experimentally demonstrate dynamic tuning of electric and magnetic resonances in all-dielectric silicon nanodisk metasurfaces in the telecom spectral range based on the temperature-dependent refractive-index change of a nematic liquid crystal. We achieve a maximum resonance tuning range of 40 nm and a pronounced change in the transmittance intensity up to a factor of 5. Strongly different tuning rates are observed for the electric and the magnetic response, which allows for dynamically adjusting the spectral mode separation. Furthermore, we experimentally investigate the influence of the anisotropic (temperature-dependent) dielectric environment provided by the liquid crystal on both the electric and magnetic resonances. We demonstrate that the phase transition of the liquid crystal from its nematic to its isotropic phase can be used to break the symmetry of the optical metasurface response. As such, our approach allows for spectral tuning of electric and magnetic resonances of all-dielectric metasurfaces as well as switching of the anisotropy of the optical response of the device.

  5. Dreams, mnemonics, and tuning for criticality.

    PubMed

    Pearlmutter, Barak A; Houghton, Conor J

    2013-12-01

    According to the tuning-for-criticality theory, the essential role of sleep is to protect the brain from super-critical behaviour. Here we argue that this protective role determines the content of dreams and any apparent relationship to the art of memory is secondary to this.

  6. Fine-Tuning Your Ensemble's Jazz Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Antonio J.

    1991-01-01

    Proposes instructional strategies for directors of jazz groups, including guidelines for developing of skills necessary for good performance. Includes effective methods for positive changes in ensemble style. Addresses jazz group problems such as beat, tempo, staying in tune, wind power, and solo/ensemble lines. Discusses percussionists, bassists,…

  7. Understanding the Fine Tuning in Our Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Bernard L.

    2008-01-01

    It is often stated that the physical properties of our universe are "fine tuned"--that is, they must be almost exactly as they are to make the development of intelligent life possible. The implications of this statement, called the "anthropic principle," have been widely discussed in a philosophical context, but the scientific basis for the…

  8. Does Face Inversion Change Spatial Frequency Tuning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willenbockel, Verena; Fiset, Daniel; Chauvin, Alan; Blais, Caroline; Arguin, Martin; Tanaka, James W.; Bub, Daniel N.; Gosselin, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined spatial frequency (SF) tuning of upright and inverted face identification using an SF variant of the Bubbles technique (F. Gosselin & P. G. Schyns, 2001). In Experiment 1, they validated the SF Bubbles technique in a plaid detection task. In Experiments 2a-c, the SFs used for identifying upright and inverted inner facial…

  9. Tuning Response Curves for Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology may be viewed as an effort to establish, formalize, and develop an engineering discipline in the context of biological systems. The ability to tune the properties of individual components is central to the process of system design in all fields of engineering, and synthetic biology is no exception. A large and growing number of approaches have been developed for tuning the responses of cellular systems, and here we address specifically the issue of tuning the rate of response of a system: given a system where an input affects the rate of change of an output, how can the shape of the response curve be altered experimentally? This affects a system’s dynamics as well as its steady-state properties, both of which are critical in the design of systems in synthetic biology, particularly those with multiple components. We begin by reviewing a mathematical formulation that captures a broad class of biological response curves and use this to define a standard set of varieties of tuning: vertical shifting, horizontal scaling, and the like. We then survey the experimental literature, classifying the results into our defined categories, and organizing them by regulatory level: transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational. PMID:23905721

  10. Electronic Tuning of Site-Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Wilcock, Brandon C.; Uno, Brice E.; Bromann, Gretchen L.; Clark, Matthew J.; Anderson, Thomas M.; Burke, Martin D.

    2012-01-01

    Site-selective functionalizations of complex small molecules can generate targeted derivatives with exceptional step-efficiency, but general strategies for maximizing selectivity in this context are rare. Here we report that site-selectivity can be tuned by simply modifying the electronic nature of the reagents. A Hammett analysis is consistent with linking of this phenomenon to the Hammond postulate: electronic tuning to a more product-like transition state amplifies site-discriminating interactions between a reagent and its substrate. This strategy transformed a minimally site-selective acylation reaction into a highly selective and thus preparatively useful one. Electronic tuning of both an acylpyridinium donor and its carboxylate counterion further promoted site-divergent functionalizations. With these advances, a range of modifications to just one of the many hydroxyl groups appended to the ion channel-forming natural product amphotericin B was achieved. Thus, electronic tuning of reagents represents an effective strategy for discovering and optimizing site-selective functionalization reactions. PMID:23174979

  11. Procedures for Tuning a Multiresonator Photonic Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    Two procedures have been devised for tuning a photonic filter that comprises multiple whispering-gallery mode (WGM) disk resonators. As used here, tuning signifies locking the filter to a specific laser frequency and configuring the filter to obtain a desired high-order transfer function. The main problem in tuning such a filter is how to select the correct relative loading of the resonators to realize a prescribed filter function. The first of the two procedures solves this problem. As temperature gradients develop during operation, the spectra of individual resonators tend to drift, primarily because of the thermorefractive effect. Thus, there arises the additional problem of how to adjust the tuning during operation to maintain the desired transfer function. The second of the two procedures solves this problem. To implement the procedures, it is necessary to incorporate the resonators into an apparatus like that of Figure 1. In this apparatus, the spectrum of each resonator can be adjusted individually, via the electro-optical effect, by adjusting a bias voltage applied to that resonator. In addition, the positions of the coupling prisms and resonators can be adjusted to increase or reduce the gaps between them, thereby reducing or increasing, respectively, the optical coupling between them. The optical power (Pi) in resonator i is monitored by use of a tracking photodiode. Another tracking diode monitors the power reflected from the input terminal (Pr), and still others monitor the input power (Pin) and output power (Po). The readings of these photodiodes are used to guide the tuning adjustments described in this paper.

  12. Observation of cosmic ray positrons from 5 to 25 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, R. L.; Mauger, B. G.; Horan, S.; Badhwar, G. D.; Lacy, J. L.; Zipse, J. E.; Daniel, R. R.; Stephens, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The positron data gathered in conjunction with electron data published elsewhere is reported. The basic recognition scheme was to look for low mass positive particles that cause a cascade in a 7 radiation length shower counter. The mass criteria is imposed by selecting particles that were accompanied by Cherenkov light but whose rigidity was below the proton Cherenkov threshold. Thus the proton Cherenkov threshold represents an upper limit to the range of the experiment.

  13. Application of a system modification technique to dynamic tuning of a spinning rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spain, C. V.

    1987-01-01

    An important consideration in the development of modern helicopters is the vibratory response of the main rotor blade. One way to minimize vibration levels is to ensure that natural frequencies of the spinning main rotor blade are well removed from integer multiples of the rotor speed. A technique for dynamically tuning a finite-element model of a rotor blade to accomplish that end is demonstrated. A brief overview is given of the general purpose finite element system known as Engineering Analysis Language (EAL) which was used in this work. A description of the EAL System Modification (SM) processor is then given along with an explanation of special algorithms developed to be used in conjunction with SM. Finally, this technique is demonstrated by dynamically tuning a model of an advanced composite rotor blade.

  14. Application of genetic algorithms to tuning fuzzy control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espy, Todd; Vombrack, Endre; Aldridge, Jack

    1993-01-01

    Real number genetic algorithms (GA) were applied for tuning fuzzy membership functions of three controller applications. The first application is our 'Fuzzy Pong' demonstration, a controller that controls a very responsive system. The performance of the automatically tuned membership functions exceeded that of manually tuned membership functions both when the algorithm started with randomly generated functions and with the best manually-tuned functions. The second GA tunes input membership functions to achieve a specified control surface. The third application is a practical one, a motor controller for a printed circuit manufacturing system. The GA alters the positions and overlaps of the membership functions to accomplish the tuning. The applications, the real number GA approach, the fitness function and population parameters, and the performance improvements achieved are discussed. Directions for further research in tuning input and output membership functions and in tuning fuzzy rules are described.

  15. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stress variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by an expandable ring embedded in the noise radiating element. Excitation of the ring causes expansion or contraction of the ring, thereby varying the stress in the noise radiating element. The ring is actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the ring, causing the ring to expand or contract. Instead of a single ring embedded in the noise radiating panel, a first expandable ring can be bonded to one side of the noise radiating element, and a second expandable ring can be bonded to the other side.

  16. Evolutionary Computation Applied to the Tuning of MEMS Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Fink, Wolfgang; Ferguson, Michael I.; Peay, Chris; Oks, Boris; Terrile, Richard; Yee, Karl

    2005-01-01

    We propose a tuning method for MEMS gyroscopes based on evolutionary computation to efficiently increase the sensitivity of MEMS gyroscopes through tuning and, furthermore, to find the optimally tuned configuration for this state of increased sensitivity. The tuning method was tested for the second generation JPL/Boeing Post-resonator MEMS gyroscope using the measurement of the frequency response of the MEMS device in open-loop operation.

  17. Tectorial Membrane Traveling Waves Underlie Sharp Auditory Tuning in Humans.

    PubMed

    Farrahi, Shirin; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Sellon, Jonathan B; Nakajima, Hideko H; Freeman, Dennis M

    2016-09-01

    Our ability to understand speech requires neural tuning with high frequency resolution, but the peripheral mechanisms underlying sharp tuning in humans remain unclear. Sharp tuning in genetically modified mice has been attributed to decreases in spread of excitation of tectorial membrane traveling waves. Here we show that the spread of excitation of tectorial membrane waves is similar in humans and mice, although the mechanical excitation spans fewer frequencies in humans-suggesting a possible mechanism for sharper tuning.

  18. Logic elements for reactor period meter

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William P.; Bobis, James P.

    1976-01-01

    Logic elements are provided for a reactor period meter trip circuit. For one element, first and second inputs are applied to first and second chopper comparators, respectively. The output of each comparator is O if the input applied to it is greater than or equal to a trip level associated with each input and each output is a square wave of frequency f if the input applied to it is less than the associated trip level. The outputs of the comparators are algebraically summed and applied to a bandpass filter tuned to f. For another element, the output of each comparator is applied to a bandpass filter which is tuned to f to give a sine wave of frequency f. The outputs of the filters are multiplied by an analog multiplier whose output is 0 if either input is 0 and a sine wave of frequency 2f if both inputs are a frequency f.

  19. Quartz tuning fork based microwave impedance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yong-Tao; Ma, Eric Yue; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2016-06-01

    Microwave impedance microscopy (MIM), a near-field microwave scanning probe technique, has become a powerful tool to characterize local electrical responses in solid state samples. We present the design of a new type of MIM sensor based on quartz tuning fork and electrochemically etched thin metal wires. Due to a higher aspect ratio tip and integration with tuning fork, such design achieves comparable MIM performance and enables easy self-sensing topography feedback in situations where the conventional optical feedback mechanism is not available, thus is complementary to microfabricated shielded stripline-type probes. The new design also enables stable differential mode MIM detection and multiple-frequency MIM measurements with a single sensor.

  20. Interior noise reduction by alternate resonance tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.; Gottwald, James A.; Bryce, Jeffrey W.

    1987-01-01

    Existing interior noise reduction techniques for aircraft fuselages perform reasonably well at higher frequencies, but are inadequate at low frequencies, particularly with respect to the low blade passage harmonics with high forcing levels found in propeller aircraft. A method is studied which considers aircraft fuselages lined with panels alternately tuned to frequencies above and below the frequency that must be attenuated. Adjacent panel would oscillate at equal amplitude, to give equal acoustic source strength, but with opposite phase. Provided these adjacent panels are acoustically compact, the resulting cancellation causes the interior acoustic modes to be cut off, and therefore be nonpropagating and evanescent. This interior noise reduction method, called Alternate Resonance Tuning (ART), is being investigated theoretically and experimentally. Progress to date is discussed.

  1. Fine tuning may not be enough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, S. P.; Woodard, R. P.

    2015-09-01

    We argue that the fine tuning problems of scalar-driven inflation may be worse than is commonly believed. The reason is that reheating requires the inflaton to be coupled to other matter fields whose vacuum fluctuations alter the inflaton potential. The usual response has been that even more fine-tuning of the classical potential V(varphi) can repair any damage done in this way. We point out that the effective potential in de Sitter background actually depends in a complicated way upon the dimensionless combination of varphi/H. We also show that the factors of H which occur in de Sitter do not even correspond to local functionals of the metric for general geometries, nor are they Planck-suppressed.

  2. Tevatron B0 low beta tuning report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.

    1982-05-05

    A detailed study of the low beta insertion for the B0 experimental area has been carried out and is described below. This insertion is similar to the Type C low beta previously report, anti p Note 169, although some changes have been made to the quadrupole lengths and positions. This insertion is designated Type E. The purpose of the study was to see if it is possible to turn the insertion on in a smooth and continuous manner and tune the insertion to a value of ..beta..* of less than one meter while maintaining the overall tune of the j Tevatron to a constant value. This was found to be possible. An examination of chromaticity corrections for the Tevatron with the low beta insertion on in various configurations was also undertaken.

  3. Tuning decoherence with a voltage probe.

    PubMed

    Roulleau, P; Portier, F; Roche, P; Cavanna, A; Faini, G; Gennser, U; Mailly, D

    2009-06-12

    We present an experiment where we tune the decoherence in a quantum interferometer using one of the simplest objects available in the physics of quantum conductors: an Ohmic contact. For that purpose, we designed an electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometer which has one of its two arms connected to an Ohmic contact through a quantum point contact. At low temperature, we observe quantum interference patterns with a visibility up to 57%. Increasing the connection between one arm of the interferometer to the floating Ohmic contact, the voltage probe, reduces quantum interference as it probes the electron trajectory. This unique experimental realization of a voltage probe works as a trivial which-path detector whose efficiency can be simply tuned by a gate voltage.

  4. I Tune, You Tube, We Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shida, R. Y.; Gater, W.

    2007-10-01

    The website YouTube was created in 2005 and has rapidly become one of the most popular entertainment websites on the internet. It is riding the online video wave today like few other online companies and is currently more popular than the video sections of either Yahoo or Google. iTunes, a digital media application created by Apple in 2001, where one can download and play music and videos, has had a similar success. There is little doubt that they both represent important communication channels in a world heavily influenced by online media, especially among teenagers and young adults. As science communicators we can use this direct route to a younger audience to our advantage. This article aims to give a taste of these applications with a few selected examples demonstrating that both YouTube and iTunes are excellent tools to teach and inspire the general public.

  5. Elemental health

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.

    1997-01-01

    Trace elements used in nutritional supplements and vitamins are discussed in the article. Relevant studies are briefly cited regarding the health effects of selenium, chromium, germanium, silicon, zinc, magnesium, silver, manganese, ruthenium, lithium, and vanadium. The toxicity and food sources are listed for some of the elements. A brief summary is also provided of the nutritional supplements market.

  6. Musician's and Physicist's View on Tuning Keyboard Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubenow, Martin; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2007-01-01

    The simultaneous sound of several voices or instruments requires proper tuning to achieve consonance for certain intervals and chords. Most instruments allow enough frequency variation to enable pure tuning while being played. Keyboard instruments such as organ and piano have given frequencies for individual notes and the tuning must be based on a…

  7. Tune measurement in the APS ring

    SciTech Connect

    Sellyey, W.; Kahana, E.; Wang, X.

    1993-07-01

    The APS system will contain three rings. The first is a positron accumulator ring (PAR). Its function is to coalesce 24, 30-ns-long positron bunches into one 290-ps bunch. The second is the injector synchrotron (IS). It accelerates the 450-MeV positron bunches to 7 Gev for injection into the storage ring (SR). Betatron and synchrotron motion frequently occurs in circular machines, without any deliberate excitation. However, the amplitudes of this motion cannot be predicted. Therefore, it is desirable to have controlled ways to excite these modes. Two types of devices will be used to excite the beam. One will be a magnetic kicker or bumper. All rings already have these devices planned for the horizontal direction for injecting and extracting beams. Some of these magnets will be used for exiting horizontal betatron motion. In the storage ring, a special kicker will be installed to produce up to 1 mm amplitude motion in the vertical direction. Two 8.4-in striplines (SL) (1/4 wavelength at 352 MHz) will be installed on all rings. One stripline in each ring will be used to drive all three tunes, and the other stripline will be used as a pickup. In the PAR and IS, the pickup stripline will be in a dispersive region. This will allow observation of both betatron and synchrotron motions. In the SR, the stripline will be in a nondispersive region because it is not practical to install it in a dispersive region. To do synchrotron tune measurements in the SR, one of the button BPMs located in a dispersive region will be used. To minimize development effort, as much of the BPM system electronics as possible will be used in the tune measurement system. The BPM electronics uses the AMP/PM conversion technique. This system operates at 352 MHz. Thus, tune measurement components were also designed to operate at 352 MHz.

  8. Turbine blade with tuned damping structure

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Christian X.; Messmann, Stephen J.

    2015-09-01

    A turbine blade is provided comprising: a root; an airfoil comprising an external wall extending radially from the root and having a radially outermost portion; and a damping structure. The external wall may comprise first and second side walls joined together to define an inner cavity of the airfoil. The damping structure may be positioned within the airfoil inner cavity and coupled to the airfoil so as to define a tuned mass damper.

  9. Non linear effects in ferrite tuned cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.; Walling, L.; Enegren, T.; Hulsey, G. ); Yakoviev, V.; Petrov, V. )

    1993-05-01

    The phenomenon of dependence of the resonance shape and frequency on the RF power level in perpendicular biased ferrite-tuned cavities has been observed by G. Hulsey and C. Friedrichs in the SSC test cavity experiment. This paper presents a theoretical as well as numerical analysis of this phenomenon and compares the results with experimental data. The effect of this nonlinearity on the SSC low energy booster prototype cavity is discussed.

  10. Femtosecond laser tuning of silicon microring resonators.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Daniel; Chen, Zhijiang; Prabhu, Ashok M; Fedosejevs, Robert; Tsui, Ying Y; Van, Vien

    2011-12-01

    Femtosecond laser modification is demonstrated as a possible method for postfabrication tuning of silicon microring resonators. Single 400 nm femtosecond laser pulses were used to modify the effective index of crystalline silicon microring waveguides by either amorphization or surface nanomilling depending on the laser fluence. Both blue- and redshifts in the microring resonance could be achieved without imparting significant degradation to the device quality factor.

  11. Tuned Chamber Core Panel Acoustic Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents acoustic testing of tuned chamber core panels, which can be used to supplement the low-frequency performance of conventional acoustic treatment. The tuned chamber core concept incorporates low-frequency noise control directly within the primary structure and is applicable to sandwich constructions with a directional core, including corrugated-, truss-, and fluted-core designs. These types of sandwich structures have long, hollow channels (or chambers) in the core. By adding small holes through one of the facesheets, the hollow chambers can be utilized as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. These resonators can then be used to attenuate low-frequency noise (below 400 Hz) inside a vehicle compartment without increasing the weight or size of the structure. The results of this test program demonstrate that the tuned chamber core concept is effective when used in isolation or combined with acoustic foam treatments. Specifically, an array of acoustic resonators integrated within the core of the panels was shown to improve both the low-frequency absorption and transmission loss of the structure in targeted one-third octave bands.

  12. High-speed random access laser tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.C.; Busch, G.E.; Hewitt, C.J.; Remelius, D.K.; Shimada, T.; Strauss, C.E.; Wilson, C.W.; Zaugg, T.J.

    1999-04-01

    We have developed a technique for laser tuning at rates of 100 kHz or more using a pair of acousto-optic modulators. In addition to all-electronic wavelength control, the same modulators also can provide electronically variable {ital Q}-switching, cavity length and power stabilization, chirp and linewidth control, and variable output coupling, all at rates far beyond what is possible with conventional mechanically tuned components. Tuning rates of 70 kHz have been demonstrated on a radio-frequency-pumped CO{sub 2} laser, with random access to over 50 laser lines spanning a 17{percent} range in wavelength and with wavelength discrimination better than 1 part in 1000. A compact tuner and {ital Q}-switch has been deployed in a 5{endash}10-kHz pulsed lidar system. The modulators each operate at a fixed Bragg angle, with the acoustic frequency determining the selected wavelength. This arrangement doubles the wavelength resolution without introducing an undesirable frequency shift. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  13. Tuning Your Priors to the World

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The idea that perceptual and cognitive systems must incorporate knowledge about the structure of the environment has become a central dogma of cognitive theory. In a Bayesian context, this idea is often realized in terms of “tuning the prior”—widely assumed to mean adjusting prior probabilities so that they match the frequencies of events in the world. This kind of “ecological” tuning has often been held up as an ideal of inference, in fact defining an “ideal observer.” But widespread as this viewpoint is, it directly contradicts Bayesian philosophy of probability, which views probabilities as degrees of belief rather than relative frequencies, and explicitly denies that they are objective characteristics of the world. Moreover, tuning the prior to observed environmental frequencies is subject to overfitting, meaning in this context overtuning to the environment, which leads (ironically) to poor performance in future encounters with the same environment. Whenever there is uncertainty about the environment—which there almost always is—an agent's prior should be biased away from ecological relative frequencies and toward simpler and more entropic priors. PMID:23335572

  14. Broadband, continuous, and fine-tune properties of external-cavity thermoelectric-stabilized mid-infrared quantum-cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chuan; Luo, Guipeng; Le, Han Q

    2003-08-20

    Continuous, broad, and single-mode wavelength tuning of thermoelectrically cooled short-pulse quantum-cascade lasers is demonstrated with a combination of coarse grating tuning and fine phase tuning of the gain element. This approach overcomes the problem of a poor facet antireflection coating of the gain chip by shifting a Fabry-Perot longitudinal mode to coincide with the desired grating-selected wavelength. The 9-microm laser was tested with NH3 gas absorption and showed fine frequency tuning at a rate of 31 MHz/step and a time-averaged linewidth of 500-750 MHz. The total tuning range was 9.08-9.36 microm and was limited only by the intrinsic gain of the device.

  15. Superheavy Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of creating elements with an atomic number of around 114. Describes the underlying physics responsible for the limited extent of the periodic table and enumerates problems that must be overcome in creating a superheavy nucleus. (GS)

  16. Elemental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini; Saat, Rohaida Mohd.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a learning module integrating three disciplines--physics, chemistry, and biology--and based on four elements: carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and silicon. Includes atomic model and silicon-based life activities. (YDS)

  17. High precision tune and coupling measurements and tune/coupling feedback in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.; Curcio, A.; Dawson, C.; Degen, C.; Luo, Y.; Marr, G.; Martin, B.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Oddo, P.; Russo, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schroeder, R.; Schulthiess, C.; Wilinski, M.

    2010-08-01

    Precision measurement and control of the betatron tunes and betatron coupling in RHIC are required for establishing and maintaining both good operating conditions and, particularly during the ramp to high beam energies, high proton beam polarization. While the proof-of-principle for simultaneous tune and coupling feedback was successfully demonstrated earlier, routine application of these systems has only become possible recently. Following numerous modifications for improved measurement resolution and feedback control, the time required to establish full-energy beams with the betatron tunes and coupling regulated by feedback was reduced from several weeks to a few hours. A summary of these improvements, select measurements benefitting from the improved resolution and a review of system performance are the subject of this report.

  18. Sample skewness as a statistical measurement of neuronal tuning sharpness.

    PubMed

    Samonds, Jason M; Potetz, Brian R; Lee, Tai Sing

    2014-05-01

    We propose using the statistical measurement of the sample skewness of the distribution of mean firing rates of a tuning curve to quantify sharpness of tuning. For some features, like binocular disparity, tuning curves are best described by relatively complex and sometimes diverse functions, making it difficult to quantify sharpness with a single function and parameter. Skewness provides a robust nonparametric measure of tuning curve sharpness that is invariant with respect to the mean and variance of the tuning curve and is straightforward to apply to a wide range of tuning, including simple orientation tuning curves and complex object tuning curves that often cannot even be described parametrically. Because skewness does not depend on a specific model or function of tuning, it is especially appealing to cases of sharpening where recurrent interactions among neurons produce sharper tuning curves that deviate in a complex manner from the feedforward function of tuning. Since tuning curves for all neurons are not typically well described by a single parametric function, this model independence additionally allows skewness to be applied to all recorded neurons, maximizing the statistical power of a set of data. We also compare skewness with other nonparametric measures of tuning curve sharpness and selectivity. Compared to these other nonparametric measures tested, skewness is best used for capturing the sharpness of multimodal tuning curves defined by narrow peaks (maximum) and broad valleys (minima). Finally, we provide a more formal definition of sharpness using a shape-based information gain measure and derive and show that skewness is correlated with this definition.

  19. In Situ Electrochemical Oxidation Tuning of Transition Metal Disulfides to Oxides for Enhanced Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Wang, Haotian; Li, Yuzhang; Liu, Yayuan; Sun, Jie; Lee, Sanghan; Lee, Jang-Soo; Cui, Yi

    2015-08-26

    The development of catalysts with earth-abundant elements for efficient oxygen evolution reactions is of paramount significance for clean and sustainable energy storage and conversion devices. Our group demonstrated recently that the electrochemical tuning of catalysts via lithium insertion and extraction has emerged as a powerful approach to improve catalytic activity. Here we report a novel in situ electrochemical oxidation tuning approach to develop a series of binary, ternary, and quaternary transition metal (e.g., Co, Ni, Fe) oxides from their corresponding sulfides as highly active catalysts for much enhanced water oxidation. The electrochemically tuned cobalt-nickel-iron oxides grown directly on the three-dimensional carbon fiber electrodes exhibit a low overpotential of 232 mV at current density of 10 mA cm(-2), small Tafel slope of 37.6 mV dec(-1), and exceptional long-term stability of electrolysis for over 100 h in 1 M KOH alkaline medium, superior to most non-noble oxygen evolution catalysts reported so far. The materials evolution associated with the electrochemical oxidation tuning is systematically investigated by various characterizations, manifesting that the improved activities are attributed to the significant grain size reduction and increase of surface area and electroactive sites. This work provides a promising strategy to develop electrocatalysts for large-scale water-splitting systems and many other applications. PMID:27162978

  20. Continuous and reversible tuning of the disorder-driven superconductor-insulator transition in bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Jeong, Dongchan; Park, Kee-Su; Meir, Yigal; Cha, Min-Chul; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The influence of static disorder on a quantum phase transition (QPT) is a fundamental issue in condensed matter physics. As a prototypical example of a disorder-tuned QPT, the superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) has been investigated intensively over the past three decades, but as yet without a general consensus on its nature. A key element is good control of disorder. Here, we present an experimental study of the SIT based on precise in-situ tuning of disorder in dual-gated bilayer graphene proximity-coupled to two superconducting electrodes through electrical and reversible control of the band gap and the charge carrier density. In the presence of a static disorder potential, Andreev-paired carriers formed close to the Fermi level in bilayer graphene constitute a randomly distributed network of proximity-induced superconducting puddles. The landscape of the network was easily tuned by electrical gating to induce percolative clusters at the onset of superconductivity. This is evidenced by scaling behavior consistent with the classical percolation in transport measurements. At lower temperatures, the solely electrical tuning of the disorder-induced landscape enables us to observe, for the first time, a crossover from classical to quantum percolation in a single device, which elucidates how thermal dephasing engages in separating the two regimes.

  1. In Situ Electrochemical Oxidation Tuning of Transition Metal Disulfides to Oxides for Enhanced Water Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of catalysts with earth-abundant elements for efficient oxygen evolution reactions is of paramount significance for clean and sustainable energy storage and conversion devices. Our group demonstrated recently that the electrochemical tuning of catalysts via lithium insertion and extraction has emerged as a powerful approach to improve catalytic activity. Here we report a novel in situ electrochemical oxidation tuning approach to develop a series of binary, ternary, and quaternary transition metal (e.g., Co, Ni, Fe) oxides from their corresponding sulfides as highly active catalysts for much enhanced water oxidation. The electrochemically tuned cobalt–nickel–iron oxides grown directly on the three-dimensional carbon fiber electrodes exhibit a low overpotential of 232 mV at current density of 10 mA cm–2, small Tafel slope of 37.6 mV dec–1, and exceptional long-term stability of electrolysis for over 100 h in 1 M KOH alkaline medium, superior to most non-noble oxygen evolution catalysts reported so far. The materials evolution associated with the electrochemical oxidation tuning is systematically investigated by various characterizations, manifesting that the improved activities are attributed to the significant grain size reduction and increase of surface area and electroactive sites. This work provides a promising strategy to develop electrocatalysts for large-scale water-splitting systems and many other applications. PMID:27162978

  2. Continuous and reversible tuning of the disorder-driven superconductor-insulator transition in bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Jeong, Dongchan; Park, Kee-Su; Meir, Yigal; Cha, Min-Chul; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The influence of static disorder on a quantum phase transition (QPT) is a fundamental issue in condensed matter physics. As a prototypical example of a disorder-tuned QPT, the superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) has been investigated intensively over the past three decades, but as yet without a general consensus on its nature. A key element is good control of disorder. Here, we present an experimental study of the SIT based on precise in-situ tuning of disorder in dual-gated bilayer graphene proximity-coupled to two superconducting electrodes through electrical and reversible control of the band gap and the charge carrier density. In the presence of a static disorder potential, Andreev-paired carriers formed close to the Fermi level in bilayer graphene constitute a randomly distributed network of proximity-induced superconducting puddles. The landscape of the network was easily tuned by electrical gating to induce percolative clusters at the onset of superconductivity. This is evidenced by scaling behavior consistent with the classical percolation in transport measurements. At lower temperatures, the solely electrical tuning of the disorder-induced landscape enables us to observe, for the first time, a crossover from classical to quantum percolation in a single device, which elucidates how thermal dephasing engages in separating the two regimes. PMID:26310774

  3. Continuous and reversible tuning of the disorder-driven superconductor-insulator transition in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Jeong, Dongchan; Park, Kee-Su; Meir, Yigal; Cha, Min-Chul; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-08-01

    The influence of static disorder on a quantum phase transition (QPT) is a fundamental issue in condensed matter physics. As a prototypical example of a disorder-tuned QPT, the superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) has been investigated intensively over the past three decades, but as yet without a general consensus on its nature. A key element is good control of disorder. Here, we present an experimental study of the SIT based on precise in-situ tuning of disorder in dual-gated bilayer graphene proximity-coupled to two superconducting electrodes through electrical and reversible control of the band gap and the charge carrier density. In the presence of a static disorder potential, Andreev-paired carriers formed close to the Fermi level in bilayer graphene constitute a randomly distributed network of proximity-induced superconducting puddles. The landscape of the network was easily tuned by electrical gating to induce percolative clusters at the onset of superconductivity. This is evidenced by scaling behavior consistent with the classical percolation in transport measurements. At lower temperatures, the solely electrical tuning of the disorder-induced landscape enables us to observe, for the first time, a crossover from classical to quantum percolation in a single device, which elucidates how thermal dephasing engages in separating the two regimes.

  4. Band gap tuning in transition metal oxides by site-specific substitution

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ho Nyung; Chisholm, Jr., Matthew F; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Singh, David J; Choi, Woo Seok

    2013-12-24

    A transition metal oxide insulator composition having a tuned band gap includes a transition metal oxide having a perovskite or a perovskite-like crystalline structure. The transition metal oxide includes at least one first element selected form the group of Bi, Ca, Ba, Sr, Li, Na, Mg, K, Pb, and Pr; and at least one second element selected from the group of Ti, Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt. At least one correlated insulator is integrated into the crystalline structure, including REMO.sub.3, wherein RE is at least one Rare Earth element, and wherein M is at least one element selected from the group of Co, V, Cr, Ni, Mn, and Fe. The composition is characterized by a band gap of less of 4.5 eV.

  5. Stretchable Binary Fresnel Lens for Focus Tuning

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueming; Wei, Lei; Poelma, René H.; Vollebregt, Sten; Wei, Jia; Urbach, Hendrik Paul; Sarro, Pasqualina M.; Zhang, Guo Qi

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a tuneable binary amplitude Fresnel lens produced by wafer-level microfabrication. The Fresnel lens is fabricated by encapsulating lithographically defined vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles inside a polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) layer. The composite lens material combines the excellent optical absorption properties of the CNT with the transparency and stretchability of the PDMS. By stretching the elastomeric composite in radial direction, the lens focal length is tuned. Good focusing response is demonstrated and a large focus change (≥24%) was achieved by stretching lenses up to 11.4%. PMID:27139747

  6. HERA BEAM TAIL SHAPING BY TUNE MODULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.

    2003-05-19

    To study CP violation, the HEM-B experiment uses an internal wire target in the transverse halo of the stored HERA proton beam. Operational experience shows that the resulting interaction rates are extremely sensitive to tiny orbit jitter amplitudes. Various methods have been studied to stabilize these interaction rates by increasing diffusion in the transverse proton beam tails without affecting the luminosity at the electron-proton collider experiments ZEUS and H1. Tune modulation was found to be a promising method for this task. Experiments performed in recent years will be reported.

  7. A cyclic universe approach to fine tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Stephon; Cormack, Sam; Gleiser, Marcelo

    2016-06-01

    We present a closed bouncing universe model where the value of coupling constants is set by the dynamics of a ghost-like dilatonic scalar field. We show that adding a periodic potential for the scalar field leads to a cyclic Friedmann universe where the values of the couplings vary randomly from one cycle to the next. While the shuffling of values for the couplings happens during the bounce, within each cycle their time-dependence remains safely within present observational bounds for physically-motivated values of the model parameters. Our model presents an alternative to solutions of the fine tuning problem based on string landscape scenarios.

  8. Pre - big bang inflation requires fine tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Michael S.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    1997-10-01

    The pre-big-bang cosmology inspired by superstring theories has been suggested as an alternative to slow-roll inflation. We analyze, in both the Jordan and Einstein frames, the effect of spatial curvature on this scenario and show that too much curvature --- of either sign --- reduces the duration of the inflationary era to such an extent that the flatness and horizon problems are not solved. Hence, a fine-tuning of initial conditions is required to obtain enough inflation to solve the cosmological problems.

  9. Space charge effects: tune shifts and resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1986-08-01

    The effects of space charge and beam-beam interactions on single particle motion in the transverse degree of freedom are considered. The space charge force and the resulting incoherent tune shift are described, and examples are given from the AGS and CERN's PSB. Equations of motion are given for resonances in the presence of the space charge force, and particle behavior is examined under resonance and space charge conditions. Resonance phase space structure is described with and without space charge. Uniform and bunched beams are compared. Beam-beam forces and resonances and beam-beam detuning are described. 18 refs., 15 figs. (LEW)

  10. Stretchable Binary Fresnel Lens for Focus Tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xueming; Wei, Lei; Poelma, René H.; Vollebregt, Sten; Wei, Jia; Urbach, Hendrik Paul; Sarro, Pasqualina M.; Zhang, Guo Qi

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a tuneable binary amplitude Fresnel lens produced by wafer-level microfabrication. The Fresnel lens is fabricated by encapsulating lithographically defined vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles inside a polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) layer. The composite lens material combines the excellent optical absorption properties of the CNT with the transparency and stretchability of the PDMS. By stretching the elastomeric composite in radial direction, the lens focal length is tuned. Good focusing response is demonstrated and a large focus change (≥24%) was achieved by stretching lenses up to 11.4%.

  11. Automatic tuning of the reinforcement function

    SciTech Connect

    Touzet, C.; Santos, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    The aim of this work is to present a method that helps tuning the reinforcement function parameters in a reinforcement learning approach. Since the proposal of neural based implementations for the reinforcement learning paradigm (which reduced learning time and memory requirements to realistic values) reinforcement functions have become the critical components. Using a general definition for reinforcement functions, the authors solve, in a particular case, the so called exploration versus exploitation dilemma through the careful computation of the RF parameter values. They propose an algorithm to compute, during the exploration part of the learning phase, an estimate for the parameter values. Experiments with the mobile robot Nomad 200 validate their proposals.

  12. Transcriptional coregulators: fine-tuning metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mouchiroud, Laurent; Eichner, Lillian J.; Shaw, Reuben; Auwerx, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis requires that cellular energy levels are adapted to environmental cues. This adaptation is largely regulated at the transcriptional level, through the interaction between transcription factors, coregulators, and the basal transcriptional machinery. Coregulators, which function both as metabolic sensors and transcriptional effectors, are ideally positioned to synchronize metabolic pathways to environmental stimuli. The balance between inhibitory actions of corepressors and stimulatory effects of coactivators enables the fine-tuning of metabolic processes. The tight regulation opens therapeutic opportunities to manage metabolic dysfunction, by directing the activity of cofactors towards specific transcription factors, pathways, or cells/tissues, thereby restoring whole body metabolic homeostasis. PMID:24794975

  13. Linking Behavioral and Neurophysiological Indicators of Perceptual Tuning to Language

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Eswen; Hull, Rachel; Bortfeld, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the neural mechanisms that underlie tuning to the native language(s) in early infancy. Here we review language tuning through the lens of type and amount of language experience and introduce a new manner in which to conceptualize the phenomenon of language tuning: the relative speed of tuning hypothesis. This hypothesis has as its goal a characterization of the unique time course of the tuning process, given the different components (e.g., phonology, prosody, syntax, semantics) of one or more languages as they become available to infants, and biologically based maturational constraints. In this review, we first examine the established behavioral findings and integrate more recent neurophysiological data on neonatal development, which together demonstrate evidence of early language tuning given differential language exposure even in utero. Next, we examine traditional accounts of sensitive and critical periods to determine how these constructs complement current data on the neural mechanisms underlying language tuning. We then synthesize the extant infant behavioral and neurophysiological data on monolingual, bilingual, and sensory deprived tuning, thereby scrutinizing the effect of these three different language profiles on the specific timing, progression, and outcome of language tuning. Finally, we discuss future directions researchers might pursue to further understand this aspect of language development, advocating our relative speed of tuning hypothesis as a useful framework for conceptualizing the complex process by which language experience works together with biological constraints to shape language development. PMID:21866226

  14. Otoacoustic Estimation of Cochlear Tuning: Validation in the Chinchilla

    PubMed Central

    Guinan, John J.; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze published auditory-nerve and otoacoustic measurements in chinchilla to test a network of hypothesized relationships between cochlear tuning, cochlear traveling-wave delay, and stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs). We find that the physiological data generally corroborate the network of relationships, including predictions from filter theory and the coherent-reflection model of OAE generation, at locations throughout the cochlea. The results support the use of otoacoustic emissions as noninvasive probes of cochlear tuning. Developing this application, we find that tuning ratios—defined as the ratio of tuning sharpness to SFOAE phase-gradient delay in periods—have a nearly species-invariant form in cat, guinea pig, and chinchilla. Analysis of the tuning ratios identifies a species-dependent parameter that locates a transition between “apical-like” and “basal-like” behavior involving multiple aspects of cochlear physiology. Approximate invariance of the tuning ratio allows determination of cochlear tuning from SFOAE delays. We quantify the procedure and show that otoacoustic estimates of chinchilla cochlear tuning match direct measures obtained from the auditory nerve. By assuming that invariance of the tuning ratio extends to humans, we derive new otoacoustic estimates of human cochlear tuning that remain mutually consistent with independent behavioral measurements obtained using different rationales, methodologies, and analysis procedures. The results confirm that at any given characteristic frequency (CF) human cochlear tuning appears sharper than that in the other animals studied, but varies similarly with CF. We show, however, that the exceptionality of human tuning can be exaggerated by the ways in which species are conventionally compared, which take no account of evident differences between the base and apex of the cochlea. Finally, our estimates of human tuning suggest that the spatial spread of excitation of a pure tone

  15. Nonlinear analysis of a family of LC tuned inverters. [dc to square wave circuits for power conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C. Y.; Wilson, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    A family of four dc-to-square-wave LC tuned inverters are analyzed using singular point. Limit cycles and waveshape characteristics are given for three modes of oscillation: quasi-harmonic, relaxation, and discontinuous. An inverter in which the avalanche breakdown of the transistor emitter-to-base junction occurs is discussed and the starting characteristics of this family of inverters are presented. The LC tuned inverters are shown to belong to a family of inverters with a common equivalent circuit consisting of only three 'series' elements: a five-segment piecewise-linear current-controlled resistor, linear inductor, and linear capacitor.

  16. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Bean, R.W.

    1963-11-19

    A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

  17. Cloverleaf microgyroscope with electrostatic alignment and tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A micro-gyroscope (10) having closed loop output operation by a control voltage (V.sub.ty), that is demodulated by a drive axis (x-axis) signal V.sub.thx of the sense electrodes (S1, S2), providing Coriolis torque rebalance to prevent displacement of the micro-gyroscope (10) on the output axis (y-axis) V.sub.thy.about.0. Closed loop drive axis torque, V.sub.tx maintains a constant drive axis amplitude signal, V.sub.thx. The present invention provides independent alignment and tuning of the micro-gyroscope by using separate electrodes and electrostatic bias voltages to adjust alignment and tuning. A quadrature amplitude signal, or cross-axis transfer function peak amplitude is used to detect misalignment that is corrected to zero by an electrostatic bias voltage adjustment. The cross-axis transfer function is either V.sub.thy/V.sub.ty or V.sub.tnx/V.sub.tx. A quadrature signal noise level, or difference in natural frequencies estimated from measurements of the transfer functions is used to detect residual mistuning, that is corrected to zero by a second electrostatic bias voltage adjustment.

  18. Automatic spike sorting using tuning information.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Valérie

    2009-09-01

    Current spike sorting methods focus on clustering neurons' characteristic spike waveforms. The resulting spike-sorted data are typically used to estimate how covariates of interest modulate the firing rates of neurons. However, when these covariates do modulate the firing rates, they provide information about spikes' identities, which thus far have been ignored for the purpose of spike sorting. This letter describes a novel approach to spike sorting, which incorporates both waveform information and tuning information obtained from the modulation of firing rates. Because it efficiently uses all the available information, this spike sorter yields lower spike misclassification rates than traditional automatic spike sorters. This theoretical result is verified empirically on several examples. The proposed method does not require additional assumptions; only its implementation is different. It essentially consists of performing spike sorting and tuning estimation simultaneously rather than sequentially, as is currently done. We used an expectation-maximization maximum likelihood algorithm to implement the new spike sorter. We present the general form of this algorithm and provide a detailed implementable version under the assumptions that neurons are independent and spike according to Poisson processes. Finally, we uncover a systematic flaw of spike sorting based on waveform information only.

  19. Grating tuned unstable resonator laser cavity

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Larry C.

    1982-01-01

    An unstable resonator to be used in high power, narrow line CO.sub.2 pump lasers comprises an array of four reflectors in a ring configuration wherein spherical and planar wavefronts are separated from each other along separate optical paths and only the planar wavefronts are impinged on a plane grating for line tuning. The reflector array comprises a concave mirror for reflecting incident spherical waves as plane waves along an output axis to form an output beam. A plane grating on the output axis is oriented to reflect a portion of the output beam off axis onto a planar relay mirror spaced apart from the output axis in proximity to the concave mirror. The relay mirror reflects plane waves from the grating to impinge on a convex expanding mirror spaced apart from the output axis in proximity to the grating. The expanding mirror reflects the incident planar waves as spherical waves to illuminate the concave mirror. Tuning is provided by rotating the plane grating about an axis normal to the output axis.

  20. Fast tuning of superconducting microwave cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, M.; Wilson, C. M.; Persson, F.; Johansson, G.; Shumeiko, V.; Bauch, T.; Duty, T.; Delsing, P.

    2008-11-07

    Photons are fundamental excitations of electromagnetic fields and can be captured in cavities. For a given cavity with a certain size, the fundamental mode has a fixed frequency f which gives the photons a specific 'color'. The cavity also has a typical lifetime {tau}, which results in a finite linewidth {delta}f. If the size of the cavity is changed fast compared to {tau}, and so that the frequency change {delta}f>>{delta}f, then it is possible to change the 'color' of the captured photons. Here we demonstrate superconducting microwave cavities, with tunable effective lengths. The tuning is obtained by varying a Josephson inductance at one end of the cavity. We show data on four different samples and demonstrate tuning by several hundred linewidths in a time {delta}t<<{tau}. Working in the few photon limit, we show that photons stored in the cavity at one frequency will leak out from the cavity with the new frequency after the detuning. The characteristics of the measured devices make them suitable for different applications such as dynamic coupling of qubits and parametric amplification.

  1. A Philosopher's Look at Model-Tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, M.

    2014-12-01

    Model tuning is unavoidable in climate models. This raises the question whether data used in tuning or calibration can also be used in evaluating a model's performance or skill. In the philosophical literature this question is discussed as the problem of old evidence: is a model more highly confirmed by novel evidence predicted by the model or is evidence that is accommodated by the model during model construction equally as confirmatory of the model? In this paper I present several conditions under which a weak predictivism holds—conditions under which predictive success is more highly confirmatory of a model's empirical performance than mere accommodation—and argue that these conditions are met in the case of climate modeling. In particular, I argue that predictive success can be evidence that a model has certain 'good-making' features that are 'epistemically opaque'—that is, the presence of which is difficult to detect otherwise. I also propose a Bayesian formulation of the predictivist thesis.

  2. Tuning the Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kolhatkar, Arati G.; Jamison, Andrew C.; Litvinov, Dmitri; Willson, Richard C.; Lee, T. Randall

    2013-01-01

    The tremendous interest in magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is reflected in published research that ranges from novel methods of synthesis of unique nanoparticle shapes and composite structures to a large number of MNP characterization techniques, and finally to their use in many biomedical and nanotechnology-based applications. The knowledge gained from this vast body of research can be made more useful if we organize the associated results to correlate key magnetic properties with the parameters that influence them. Tuning these properties of MNPs will allow us to tailor nanoparticles for specific applications, thus increasing their effectiveness. The complex magnetic behavior exhibited by MNPs is governed by many factors; these factors can either improve or adversely affect the desired magnetic properties. In this report, we have outlined a matrix of parameters that can be varied to tune the magnetic properties of nanoparticles. For practical utility, this review focuses on the effect of size, shape, composition, and shell-core structure on saturation magnetization, coercivity, blocking temperature, and relaxation time. PMID:23912237

  3. RF cavities with transversely biased ferrite tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, W.R.; Brophy, T.G.; Carlini, R.D.; Friedrichs, C.C.; Grisham, D.L.; Spalek, G.; Wilkerson, L.C.

    1985-10-01

    Earley et al. suggested that ferrite tuned rf cavities have lower ferrite power dissipation if the ferrite bias field is perpendicular rather than parallel to the rf magnetic field. A 50-84 MHz cavity has been constructed in which ferrite can be biased either way. Low power measurements of six microwave ferrites show that the magnetic Q's of these ferrites under perpendicular bias are much higher than under parallel bias, and that the high Q region extends over a much wider range of rf permeability. TDK Y-5 ferrite was found to have a magnetic Q of 10,800, 4,800, 1,200 and 129 at rf permeabilities of 1.2, 2.4, 3.7 and 4.5, respectively. Measurements of perpendicularly biased ferrite at various power levels were made in a coaxial line cavity. The Q of Y-5 ferrite was found to decrease by less than a factor of 2 as the power density in the ferrite was increased to 1.3 W/cmT. A cavity design for a 6 GeV, high current, rapid cycling synchrotron using transversely biased ferrite tuning is described.

  4. Element Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Describes a research assignment for 8th grade students on the elements of the periodic table. Students use web-based resources and a chemistry handbook to gather information, construct concept maps, and present the findings to the full class using the mode of their choice: a humorous story, a slideshow or gameboard, a brochure, a song, or skit.…

  5. Mercury, elemental

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercury , elemental ; CASRN 7439 - 97 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  6. Spectral tuning of a locally bent microfiber taper interferometer with a nanosized liquid crystal overlay.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haimei; Wang, Changjing; Ji, Yinghua; Yuan, Wen; Zhang, Guoping; Wang, Yifan; Hong, Zehua; Wang, Xianping

    2016-09-10

    In this paper, the tuning characteristics of locally bent microfiber taper covered with a nanosized high-refractive-index liquid crystal (LC) layer under different temperatures and electric field intensities have been theoretically analyzed and experimentally investigated. A locally bent microfiber taper interferometer with a waist diameter of ∼3.72  μm is fabricated by using the flame brushing technique, followed by bending the transition region of the taper to form a modal interferometer and later by placing a ∼200  nm LC layer over the uniform taper waist region. Experimental results indicate that a high-efficiency thermal or electric tuning of an LC-coated locally bent microfiber taper interferometer could be achieved. This suggests a potential application of this device as tunable all-fiber photonic devices, such as filters, modulators, and sensing elements.

  7. Spectral tuning of a locally bent microfiber taper interferometer with a nanosized liquid crystal overlay.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haimei; Wang, Changjing; Ji, Yinghua; Yuan, Wen; Zhang, Guoping; Wang, Yifan; Hong, Zehua; Wang, Xianping

    2016-09-10

    In this paper, the tuning characteristics of locally bent microfiber taper covered with a nanosized high-refractive-index liquid crystal (LC) layer under different temperatures and electric field intensities have been theoretically analyzed and experimentally investigated. A locally bent microfiber taper interferometer with a waist diameter of ∼3.72  μm is fabricated by using the flame brushing technique, followed by bending the transition region of the taper to form a modal interferometer and later by placing a ∼200  nm LC layer over the uniform taper waist region. Experimental results indicate that a high-efficiency thermal or electric tuning of an LC-coated locally bent microfiber taper interferometer could be achieved. This suggests a potential application of this device as tunable all-fiber photonic devices, such as filters, modulators, and sensing elements. PMID:27661380

  8. Extended tuning of mid-ir quantum cascade lasers using integrated resistive heaters.

    PubMed

    Bismuto, Alfredo; Bidaux, Yves; Tardy, Camille; Terazzi, Romain; Gresch, Tobias; Wolf, Johanna; Blaser, Stéphane; Muller, Antoine; Faist, Jerome

    2015-11-16

    We present single mode quantum cascade lasers including a microscopic heater for spectral emission tuning. Through the use of a buried heater element, the active region temperature can be modified without changing the submount one. Emission frequency tuning in continuous-wave as large as 9 cm(-1) at 1270 cm(-1) and 14 cm(-1) at 2040 cm(-1) are observed, corresponding to an increase of the active region temperatures of ∼ 90 K. Due to the proximity of the heaters to the active region, emission can be modulated at several kHz range and the absence of moving parts guarantees the mechanical stability of the system. This method can be successfully applied to all buried heterostructure lasers, becoming an attractive solution for molecular spectroscopy in the IR. Using the presented devices, molecular absorptions of N(2)O have been measured between 1270 cm(-1) and 1280 cm(-1) and are in agreement with data from the HITRAN database.

  9. Superheavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, S.

    The nuclear shell model predicts that the next doubly magic shell closure beyond 208Pb is at a proton number Z=114, 120, or 126 and at a neutron number N=172 or 184. The outstanding aim of experimental investigations is the exploration of this region of spherical `SuperHeavy Elements' (SHEs). Experimental methods have been developed which allowed for the identification of new elements at production rates of one atom per month. Using cold fusion reactions which are based on lead and bismuth targets, relatively neutron-deficient isotopes of the elements from 107 to 113 were synthesized at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, and/or at RIKEN in Wako, Japan. In hot fusion reactions of 48Ca projectiles with actinide targets more neutron-rich isotopes of the elements from 112 to 116 and even 118 were produced at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. Recently, part of these data which represent the first identification of nuclei located on the predicted island of SHEs were confirmed in two independent experiments. The decay data reveal that for the heaviest elements, the dominant decay mode is α emission rather than fission. Decay properties as well as reaction cross-sections are compared with results of theoretical studies. Finally, plans are presented for the further development of the experimental set-up and the application of new techniques. At a higher sensitivity, the detailed exploration of the region of spherical SHEs will be in the center of interest of future experimental work. New data will certainly challenge theoretical studies on the mechanism of the synthesis, on the nuclear decay properties, and on the chemical behavior of these heaviest atoms at the limit of stability.

  10. Small Commercial Building Re-tuning: A Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Underhill, Ronald M.; Fernandez, Nicholas; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2013-09-30

    To help building owners and managers address issues related to energy-efficient operation of small buildings, DOE has developed a Small Building Re-tuning training curriculum. This "primer" provides additional background information to understand some of the concepts presented in the Small Building Re-tuning training. The intent is that those who are less familiar with the buidling energy concepts will review this material before taking the building re-tuning training class.

  11. Heading Tuning in Macaque Area V6

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Reuben H.; Liu, Sheng; DeAngelis, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical areas, such as the dorsal subdivision of the medial superior temporal area (MSTd) and the ventral intraparietal area (VIP), have been shown to integrate visual and vestibular self-motion signals. Area V6 is interconnected with areas MSTd and VIP, allowing for the possibility that V6 also integrates visual and vestibular self-motion cues. An alternative hypothesis in the literature is that V6 does not use these sensory signals to compute heading but instead discounts self-motion signals to represent object motion. However, the responses of V6 neurons to visual and vestibular self-motion cues have never been studied, thus leaving the functional roles of V6 unclear. We used a virtual reality system to examine the 3D heading tuning of macaque V6 neurons in response to optic flow and inertial motion stimuli. We found that the majority of V6 neurons are selective for heading defined by optic flow. However, unlike areas MSTd and VIP, V6 neurons are almost universally unresponsive to inertial motion in the absence of optic flow. We also explored the spatial reference frames of heading signals in V6 by measuring heading tuning for different eye positions, and we found that the visual heading tuning of most V6 cells was eye-centered. Similar to areas MSTd and VIP, the population of V6 neurons was best able to discriminate small variations in heading around forward and backward headings. Our findings support the idea that V6 is involved primarily in processing visual motion signals and does not appear to play a role in visual–vestibular integration for self-motion perception. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT To understand how we successfully navigate our world, it is important to understand which parts of the brain process cues used to perceive our direction of self-motion (i.e., heading). Cortical area V6 has been implicated in heading computations based on human neuroimaging data, but direct measurements of heading selectivity in individual V6 neurons have been lacking. We

  12. Tune tracking with a PLL in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.

    2005-11-01

    The Tevatron tune tracker is based on the idea that the phase of the transverse frequency response of the beam can be measured quickly and accurately enough so that the phase at the betatron tune resonance can be tracked by a phase locked loop (PLL). In this paper, a mathematical model of this idea is discussed and is used as the basis for the realization of the tune tracker hardware. The tune tracker has been successfully tested under different beam conditions and is now operational in the Tevatron.

  13. Tune splitting in the presence of linear coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Parzen, G.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of random skew quadrupole field errors will couple the x and y motions. The x and y motions are then each given by the sum of 2 normal modes with the tunes v{sub 1} and v{sub 2}, which may differ appreciably from v{sub x} and v{sub y}, the unperturbed tunes. This is often called tune splitting since {vert bar}v{sub 1} {minus} v{sub 2}{vert bar} is usually larger than {vert bar}v{sub x} {minus} v{sub y}{vert bar}. This tune splitting may be large in proton accelerators using superconducting magnets, because of the relatively large random skew quadrupole field errors that are expected in these magnets. This effect is also increased by the required insertions in proton colliders which generate large {beta}-functions in the insertion region. This tune splitting has been studied in the RHIC accelerator. For RHIC, a tune splitting as large as 0.2 was found in one worse case. A correction system has been developed for correcting this large tune splitting which uses two families of skew quadrupole correctors. It has been found that this correction system corrects most of the large tune splitting, but a residual tune splitting remains that is still appreciable. This paper discusses the corrections to this residual time.

  14. High tuning stability of sampled grating quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Kalchmair, Stefan; Blanchard, Romain; Mansuripur, Tobias S; de Naurois, Guy-Mael; Pfluegl, Christian; Witinski, Mark F; Diehl, Laurent; Capasso, Federico; Loncar, Marko

    2015-06-15

    Predictable tuning behavior and stable laser operation are both crucial for laser spectroscopy measurements. We report a sampled grating quantum cascade laser (QCL) with high spectral tuning stability over the entire tuning range. We have determined the minimum loss margin required to suppress undesired lasing modes in order to ensure predictable tuning behavior. We have quantified power fluctuations and drift of our devices by measuring the Allan deviation. To demonstrate the feasibility of sampled grating QCLs for high-precision molecular spectroscopy, we have built a simple transmission spectroscopy setup. Our results prove that sampled grating QCLs are suitable light sources for highly sensitive spectroscopy measurements.

  15. A Numerical Optimization Approach for Tuning Fuzzy Logic Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Garg, Devendra P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper develops a method to tune fuzzy controllers using numerical optimization. The main attribute of this approach is that it allows fuzzy logic controllers to be tuned to achieve global performance requirements. Furthermore, this approach allows design constraints to be implemented during the tuning process. The method tunes the controller by parameterizing the membership functions for error, change-in-error and control output. The resulting parameters form a design vector which is iteratively changed to minimize an objective function. The minimal objective function results in an optimal performance of the system. A spacecraft mounted science instrument line-of-sight pointing control is used to demonstrate results.

  16. ADVANCES TOWARDS THE MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL LHC TUNE AND CHROMATICITY

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON, P.; CUPOLO, J.; DEGEN, C.; DELLAPENNA, A.; HOFF, L.; MEAD, J.; SIKORA, R.

    2005-06-06

    Requirements for tune and chromaticity control in most superconducting hadron machines, and in particular the LHC, are stringent. In order to reach nominal operation, the LHC will almost certainly require feedback on both tune and chromaticity. Experience at RHIC has also shown that coupling control is crucial to successful tune feedback. A prototype baseband phase-locked loop (PLL) tune measurement system has recently been brought into operation at RHIC as part of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP). We report on the performance of that system and compare it with the extensive accumulation of data from the RHIC 245MHz PLL.

  17. Spatial tuning of a RF frequency selective surface through origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchi, Kazuko; Buskohl, Philip R.; Bazzan, Giorgio; Durstock, Michael F.; Joo, James J.; Reich, Gregory W.; Vaia, Richard A.

    2016-05-01

    Origami devices have the ability to spatially reconfigure between 2D and 3D states through folding motions. The precise mapping of origami presents a novel method to spatially tune radio frequency (RF) devices, including adaptive antennas, sensors, reflectors, and frequency selective surfaces (FSSs). While conventional RF FSSs are designed based upon a planar distribution of conductive elements, this leaves the large design space of the out of plane dimension underutilized. We investigated this design regime through the computational study of four FSS origami tessellations with conductive dipoles. The dipole patterns showed increased resonance shift with decreased separation distances, with the separation in the direction orthogonal to the dipole orientations having a more significant effect. The coupling mechanisms between dipole neighbours were evaluated by comparing surface charge densities, which revealed the gain and loss of coupling as the dipoles moved in and out of alignment via folding. Collectively, these results provide a basis of origami FSS designs for experimental study and motivates the development of computational tools to systematically predict optimal fold patterns for targeted frequency response and directionality.

  18. Fine tuning points of generating function construction for linear recursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yolcu, Bahar; Demiralp, Metin

    2014-10-01

    Recursions are quite important mathematical tools since many systems are mathematically modelled to ultimately take us to these equations because of their rather easy algebraic natures. They fit computer programming needs quite well in many circumstances to produce solutions. However, it is generally desired to find the asymptotic behaviour of the general term in the relevant sequence for convergence and therefore practicality issues. One of the general tendencies to find the general term asymptotic behaviour, when its ordering number grows unboundedly, is the integral representation over a generating function which does not depend on individual sequence elements. This is tried to be done almost for all types of recursions, even though the linear cases gain more importance than the others because they can be more effectively investigated by using many linear algebraic tools. Despite this may seem somehow to be rather trivial, there are a lot of theoretical fine tuning issues in the construction of true integral representations over true intervals on real axis or paths in complex domains. This work is devoted to focus on this issue starting from scratch for better understanding of the matter. The example cases are chosen to best illuminate the situations to get information for future generalization even though the work can be considered at somehow introductory level.

  19. Maximum likelihood tuning of a vehicle motion filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trankle, Thomas L.; Rabin, Uri H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the use of maximum likelihood parameter estimation unknown parameters appearing in a nonlinear vehicle motion filter. The filter uses the kinematic equations of motion of a rigid body in motion over a spherical earth. The nine states of the filter represent vehicle velocity, attitude, and position. The inputs to the filter are three components of translational acceleration and three components of angular rate. Measurements used to update states include air data, altitude, position, and attitude. Expressions are derived for the elements of filter matrices needed to use air data in a body-fixed frame with filter states expressed in a geographic frame. An expression for the likelihood functions of the data is given, along with accurate approximations for the function's gradient and Hessian with respect to unknown parameters. These are used by a numerical quasi-Newton algorithm for maximizing the likelihood function of the data in order to estimate the unknown parameters. The parameter estimation algorithm is useful for processing data from aircraft flight tests or for tuning inertial navigation systems.

  20. Photon induced L3 vacancy alignment at tuned photon energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Himani; Kaur, Gurpreet; Tiwari, Manoj K.; Mittal, Raj

    2016-04-01

    Photon induced L3 X-ray measurements for Lα/Lℓ cross-section ratios in elements, 66 ⩽ Z ⩽ 83, at tuned photon energies on synchrotron Beamline-16 at Indus-2, India have been used to study the effect of Coster-Kronig (CK) transitions and photon energies on alignment of L3 vacancies. Certainty and reliability of the measurements were checked from comparison of measured Lα and Lℓ fluorescence cross-sections at E1 excitation with available theoretical/empirical/experimental values that required additional measurements for source, geometry and efficiency factor S0GɛLα/ℓ in the used set-up. Fall/rise trend of the ratios with energy for different Z's was found to resemble the off/on-set pattern of CK transitions as pointed out by Bambynek et al. and Campbell. Evaluated alignment parameter A2 values are very much within the limits, 0.05

  1. An Engineered Metal Sensor Tunes the Kinetics of Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Chantell S.; Ruhl, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The Ca2+ sensor synaptotagmin-1 (syt-1) regulates neurotransmitter release by interacting with anionic phospholipids. Here we test the idea that the intrinsic kinetics of syt–membrane interactions determine, in part, the time course of synaptic transmission. To tune the kinetics of this interaction, we grafted structural elements from the slowest isoform, syt-7, onto the fastest isoform, syt-1, resulting in a chimera with intermediate kinetic properties. Moreover, the chimera coupled a physiologically irrelevant metal, Sr2+, to membrane fusion in vitro. When substituted for syt-1 in mouse hippocampal neurons, the chimera slowed the kinetics of synaptic transmission. Neurons expressing the chimera also evinced rapid and efficient Sr2+ triggered release, in contrast to the weak response of neurons expressing syt-1. These findings reveal presynaptic sensor–membrane interactions as a major factor regulating the speed of the release machinery. Finally, the chimera failed to clamp the elevated spontaneous fusion rate exhibited by syt-1 KO neurons, indicating that the metal binding loops of syt-1 regulate the two modes of release by distinct mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In calcium, synaptotagmin-1 triggers neurotransmitter release by interacting with membranes. Here, we demonstrate that intrinsic properties of this interaction control the time course of synaptic transmission. We engineered a “chimera” using synaptotagmin-1 and elements of a slower isoform, synaptotagmin-7. When expressed in neurons, the chimera slowed the rate of neurotransmitter release. Furthermore, unlike native synaptotagmin-1, the chimera was able to function robustly in the presence of strontium–a metal not present in cells. We exploited this ability to show that a key function of synaptotagmin-1 is to penetrate cell membranes. This work sheds light on fundamental mechanisms of neurotransmitter release. PMID:26311762

  2. Tuning of superconducting niobium nitride terahertz metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingbo; Jin, Biaobing; Xue, Yuhua; Zhang, Caihong; Dai, Hao; Zhang, Labao; Cao, Chunhai; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2011-06-20

    Superconducting planar terahertz (THz) metamaterials (MMs), with unit cells of different sizes, are fabricated on 200 nm-thick niobium nitride (NbN) films deposited on MgO substrates. They are characterized using THz time domain spectroscopy over a temperature range from 8.1 K to 300 K, crossing the critical temperature of NbN films. As the gap frequency (f(g) = 2Δ0/h, where Δ0 is the energy gap at 0 K and h is the Plank constant) of NbN is 1.18 THz, the experimentally observed THz spectra span a frequency range from below f(g) to above it. We have found that, as the resonance frequency approaches f(g), the relative tuning range of MMs is quite wide (30%). We attribute this observation to the large change of kinetic inductance of superconducting film.

  3. Wireless tuning fork gyroscope for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jose K.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Sarukesi, K.

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the development of a Bluetooth enabled wireless tuning fork gyroscope for the biomedical applications, including gait phase detection system, human motion analysis and physical therapy. This gyroscope is capable of measuring rotation rates between -90 and 90 and it can read the rotation information using a computer. Currently, the information from a gyroscope can trigger automobile airbag deployment during rollover, improve the accuracy and reliability of GPS navigation systems and stabilize moving platforms such as automobiles, airplanes, robots, antennas, and industrial equipment. Adding wireless capability to the existing gyroscope could help to expand its applications in many areas particularly in biomedical applications, where a continuous patient monitoring is quite difficult. This wireless system provides information on several aspects of activities of patients for real-time monitoring in hospitals.

  4. Fine tuning of cytosolic Ca 2+ oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Ca 2+ oscillations, a widespread mode of cell signaling, were reported in non-excitable cells for the first time more than 25 years ago. Their fundamental mechanism, based on the periodic Ca 2+ exchange between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cytoplasm, has been well characterized. However, how the kinetics of cytosolic Ca 2+ changes are related to the extent of a physiological response remains poorly understood. Here, we review data suggesting that the downstream targets of Ca 2+ are controlled not only by the frequency of Ca 2+ oscillations but also by the detailed characteristics of the oscillations, such as their duration, shape, or baseline level. Involvement of non-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ stores, mainly mitochondria and the extracellular medium, participates in this fine tuning of Ca 2+ oscillations. The main characteristics of the Ca 2+ exchange fluxes with these compartments are also reviewed.

  5. Interphase tuning for stronger and tougher composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livanov, Konstantin; Yang, Lin; Nissenbaum, Asaf; Wagner, H. Daniel

    2016-05-01

    The development of composite materials that are simultaneously strong and tough is one of the most active topics of current material science. Observations of biological structural materials show that adequate introduction of reinforcements and interfaces, or interphases, at different scales usually improves toughness, without reduction in strength. The prospect of interphase properties tuning may lead to further increases in material toughness. Here we use evaporation-driven self-assembly (EDSA) to deposit a thin network of multi-wall carbon nanotubes on ceramic surfaces, thereby generating an interphase reinforcing layer in a multiscale laminated ceramic composite. Both strength and toughness are improved by up to 90%, while keeping the overall volume fraction of nanotubes in a composite below 0.012%, making it a most effective toughening and reinforcement technique.

  6. Fine tuning of cytosolic Ca (2+) oscillations.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Ca (2+) oscillations, a widespread mode of cell signaling, were reported in non-excitable cells for the first time more than 25 years ago. Their fundamental mechanism, based on the periodic Ca (2+) exchange between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cytoplasm, has been well characterized. However, how the kinetics of cytosolic Ca (2+) changes are related to the extent of a physiological response remains poorly understood. Here, we review data suggesting that the downstream targets of Ca (2+) are controlled not only by the frequency of Ca (2+) oscillations but also by the detailed characteristics of the oscillations, such as their duration, shape, or baseline level. Involvement of non-endoplasmic reticulum Ca (2+) stores, mainly mitochondria and the extracellular medium, participates in this fine tuning of Ca (2+) oscillations. The main characteristics of the Ca (2+) exchange fluxes with these compartments are also reviewed. PMID:27630768

  7. Tuning quantum properties in bilayer ruthenates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xianglin

    The mutual coupling among spin, charge, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom in transition-metal oxide materials often leads to the competition of various types of energetic states. This makes such materials dramatically susceptible to external parameters, giving rise to novel physical properties and rich phase diagrams. In this talk, I shall use a bilayer ruthenate, Ca3Ru2O7, as an example to discuss the emergent phenomena achieved by systematically tuning materials magnetic and electronic properties via chemical doping, magnetic field, and pressure. I shall show that this system provides a rare opportunity to investigate the interplay between correlated metal and Mott insulator. This work was done in collaboration with M. Zhu, T. Tao, S. D. Mahanti, Z. Q. Mao, J. Peng, T. Hong, W. Tian, H. Cao, C. R. dela Cruz, D. Singh, and K. Prokes.

  8. Tuning the dials of Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Arpino, James A. J.; Hancock, Edward J.; Anderson, James; Barahona, Mauricio; Stan, Guy-Bart V.; Polizzi, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic Biology is the ‘Engineering of Biology’ – it aims to use a forward-engineering design cycle based on specifications, modelling, analysis, experimental implementation, testing and validation to modify natural or design new, synthetic biology systems so that they behave in a predictable fashion. Motivated by the need for truly plug-and-play synthetic biological components, we present a comprehensive review of ways in which the various parts of a biological system can be modified systematically. In particular, we review the list of ‘dials’ that are available to the designer and discuss how they can be modelled, tuned and implemented. The dials are categorized according to whether they operate at the global, transcriptional, translational or post-translational level and the resolution that they operate at. We end this review with a discussion on the relative advantages and disadvantages of some dials over others. PMID:23704788

  9. Fine tuning of cytosolic Ca 2+ oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Ca 2+ oscillations, a widespread mode of cell signaling, were reported in non-excitable cells for the first time more than 25 years ago. Their fundamental mechanism, based on the periodic Ca 2+ exchange between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cytoplasm, has been well characterized. However, how the kinetics of cytosolic Ca 2+ changes are related to the extent of a physiological response remains poorly understood. Here, we review data suggesting that the downstream targets of Ca 2+ are controlled not only by the frequency of Ca 2+ oscillations but also by the detailed characteristics of the oscillations, such as their duration, shape, or baseline level. Involvement of non-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ stores, mainly mitochondria and the extracellular medium, participates in this fine tuning of Ca 2+ oscillations. The main characteristics of the Ca 2+ exchange fluxes with these compartments are also reviewed. PMID:27630768

  10. Interphase tuning for stronger and tougher composites

    PubMed Central

    Livanov, Konstantin; Yang, Lin; Nissenbaum, Asaf; Wagner, H. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The development of composite materials that are simultaneously strong and tough is one of the most active topics of current material science. Observations of biological structural materials show that adequate introduction of reinforcements and interfaces, or interphases, at different scales usually improves toughness, without reduction in strength. The prospect of interphase properties tuning may lead to further increases in material toughness. Here we use evaporation-driven self-assembly (EDSA) to deposit a thin network of multi-wall carbon nanotubes on ceramic surfaces, thereby generating an interphase reinforcing layer in a multiscale laminated ceramic composite. Both strength and toughness are improved by up to 90%, while keeping the overall volume fraction of nanotubes in a composite below 0.012%, making it a most effective toughening and reinforcement technique. PMID:27230418

  11. Interphase tuning for stronger and tougher composites.

    PubMed

    Livanov, Konstantin; Yang, Lin; Nissenbaum, Asaf; Wagner, H Daniel

    2016-05-27

    The development of composite materials that are simultaneously strong and tough is one of the most active topics of current material science. Observations of biological structural materials show that adequate introduction of reinforcements and interfaces, or interphases, at different scales usually improves toughness, without reduction in strength. The prospect of interphase properties tuning may lead to further increases in material toughness. Here we use evaporation-driven self-assembly (EDSA) to deposit a thin network of multi-wall carbon nanotubes on ceramic surfaces, thereby generating an interphase reinforcing layer in a multiscale laminated ceramic composite. Both strength and toughness are improved by up to 90%, while keeping the overall volume fraction of nanotubes in a composite below 0.012%, making it a most effective toughening and reinforcement technique.

  12. Chemical and biological sensing using tuning forks

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Nongjian; Boussaad, Salah

    2012-07-10

    A device for sensing a chemical analyte is disclosed. The device is comprised of a vibrating structure having first and second surfaces and having an associated resonant frequency and a wire coupled between the first and second surfaces of the vibrating structure, wherein the analyte interacts with the wire and causes a change in the resonant frequency of the vibrating structure. The vibrating structure can include a tuning fork. The vibrating structure can be comprised of quartz. The wire can be comprised of polymer. A plurality of vibrating structures are arranged in an array to increase confidence by promoting a redundancy of measurement or to detect a plurality of chemical analytes. A method of making a device for sensing a chemical analyte is also disclosed.

  13. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Zumwalt, L.R.

    1961-11-28

    A fuel element was developed for a gas cooled nuclear reactor. The element is constructed in the form of a compacted fuel slug including carbides of fissionable material in some cases with a breeder material carbide and a moderator which slug is disposed in a canning jacket of relatively impermeable moderator material. Such canned fuel slugs are disposed in an elongated shell of moderator having greater gas permeability than the canning material wherefore application of reduced pressure to the space therebetween causes gas diffusing through the exterior shell to sweep fission products from the system. Integral fission product traps and/or exterior traps as well as a fission product monitoring system may be employed therewith. (AEC)

  14. Performance Optimization and Auto-Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark

    2012-10-01

    In the broader computational research community, one subject of recent research is the problem of adapting algorithms to make effective use of multi- and many-core processors. Effective use of these architectures, which have complex memory hierarchies with many layers of cache, typically involves a careful examination of how an algorithm moves data through the memory hierarchy. Unfortunately, there is often a non-obvious relationship between algorithmic parameters like blocking strategies, and their impact on memory utilization, and, in turn, the relationship with runtime performance. Auto-tuning is an empirical method used to discover optimal values for tunable algorithmic parameters under such circumstances. The challenge is compounded by the fact that the settings that produce the best performance for a given problem and a given platform may not be the best for a different problem on the same platform, or the same problem on a different platform. The high performance visualization research community has begun to explore and adapt the principles of auto-tuning for the purpose of optimizing codes on modern multi- and many-core processors. This report focuses on how performance optimization studies reveal a dramatic variation in performance for two fundamental visualization algorithms: one based on a stencil operation having structured, uniform memory access, and the other is ray casting volume rendering, which uses unstructured memory access patterns. The two case studies highlighted in this report show the extra effort required to optimize such codes by adjusting the tunable algorithmic parameters can return substantial gains in performance. Additionally, these case studies also explore the potential impact of and the interaction between algorithmic optimizations and tunable algorithmic parameters, along with the potential performance gains resulting from leveraging architecture-specific features.

  15. Continuous Tuning and Calibration of Vibratory Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayworth, Ken

    2003-01-01

    A method of control and operation of an inertial reference unit (IRU) based on vibratory gyroscopes provides for continuously repeated cycles of tuning and calibration. The method is intended especially for application to an IRU containing vibratory gyroscopes that are integral parts of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and that have cloverleaf designs, as described in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The method provides for minimization of several measures of spurious gyroscope output, including zero-rate offset (ZRO), angle random walk (ARW), and rate drift. These benefits are afforded both at startup and thereafter during continuing operation, in the presence of unknown rotation rates and changes in temperature. A vibratory gyroscope contains a precision mechanically resonant structure containing two normal modes of vibration nominally degenerate in frequency and strongly coupled via a Coriolis term. In the case of the cloverleaf design MEMS gyro, these normal modes of vibration are plate rocking modes. The rocking motion of the plate is described by giving two angles, theta(sub 1) and theta(sub 2). A proof mass consisting of a post orthogonal to the plate ensures a high degree of Coriolis coupling of vibratory energy from one mode into the other under inertial rotation. The plate is driven and sensed capacitively across a few-microns-wide gap, and the normal mode frequencies can be tuned electrostatically by DC voltages applied across this gap. In order to sense rotation, the resonator plate is caused to rock in the theta(sub 1) direction, then any small motions in the theta(sub 2) direction are sensed, rebalanced, and interpreted as inertial rotation. In this scenario, the "drive" has been assigned to the theta(sub 1) direction, and the "sense" has been assigned to the theta(sub 2) direction.

  16. The residual tune splitting in the presence of linear coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Parzen, G.

    1990-10-01

    The presence of random skew quadrupole field errors will couple the x and y motions. The x and y motions are then each given by the sum of 2 normal modes with the tunes {nu}{sub 1} and {nu}{sub 2}, which may differ appreciably from {nu}{sub x} and {nu}{sub y}, the unperturbed tunes. This is often called tune splitting. This tune splitting may be large in proton accelerators using superconducting magnets, because of the relatively large random skew quadrupole field errors that are expected in these magnets. This tune splitting has been studied in the RHIC accelerator. A correction system has been developed for correcting this large tune splitting which uses two families of skew quadrupole correctors. It has been found that this correction system corrects most of the large tune splitting, but a residual tune splitting remains that is still appreciable. RHIC has to operate within a box in tune space whose width is {Delta}{nu} = 33 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} in order to avoid all resonances which are tenth order or less. It appears desirable to correct the tune splitting to a level which is much smaller than 33 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}. The residual tune splitting that remained after correction with the 2 family tune splitting correction system was found to be about 18 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}. The residual tune splitting appears to be due to higher order effects of the random a{sub 1} multipole. Loosely speaking, one may say that residual tune splitting is associated with the nearby linear sum resonance, {nu}{sub x}, + {nu}{sub y} = integer. A skew quadrupole correction system has been developed that appears able to correct a large part of the residual tune splitting. This consists of skew quadrupole correctors near the high-{beta} quadrupoles in the insertions, which are excited so as to generate the harmonics that would drive the nearby sum resonances, {nu}{sub x}, + {nu}{sub y} = integer.

  17. Calibration of quartz tuning fork spring constants for non-contact atomic force microscopy: direct mechanical measurements and simulations

    PubMed Central

    Langewisch, Gernot; Schurig, Philipp; Hölscher, Hendrik; Fuchs, Harald; Schirmeisen, André

    2014-01-01

    Summary Quartz tuning forks are being increasingly employed as sensors in non-contact atomic force microscopy especially in the “qPlus” design. In this study a new and easily applicable setup has been used to determine the static spring constant at several positions along the prong of the tuning fork. The results show a significant deviation from values calculated with the beam formula. In order to understand this discrepancy the complete sensor set-up has been digitally rebuilt and analyzed by using finite element method simulations. These simulations provide a detailed view of the strain/stress distribution inside the tuning fork. The simulations show quantitative agreement with the beam formula if the beam origin is shifted to the position of zero stress onset inside the tuning fork base and torsional effects are also included. We further found significant discrepancies between experimental calibration values and predictions from the shifted beam formula, which are related to a large variance in tip misalignment during the tuning fork assembling process. PMID:24778977

  18. Calibration of quartz tuning fork spring constants for non-contact atomic force microscopy: direct mechanical measurements and simulations.

    PubMed

    Falter, Jens; Stiefermann, Marvin; Langewisch, Gernot; Schurig, Philipp; Hölscher, Hendrik; Fuchs, Harald; Schirmeisen, André

    2014-01-01

    Quartz tuning forks are being increasingly employed as sensors in non-contact atomic force microscopy especially in the "qPlus" design. In this study a new and easily applicable setup has been used to determine the static spring constant at several positions along the prong of the tuning fork. The results show a significant deviation from values calculated with the beam formula. In order to understand this discrepancy the complete sensor set-up has been digitally rebuilt and analyzed by using finite element method simulations. These simulations provide a detailed view of the strain/stress distribution inside the tuning fork. The simulations show quantitative agreement with the beam formula if the beam origin is shifted to the position of zero stress onset inside the tuning fork base and torsional effects are also included. We further found significant discrepancies between experimental calibration values and predictions from the shifted beam formula, which are related to a large variance in tip misalignment during the tuning fork assembling process.

  19. Using an Atom Interferometer to Measure Changes in Tune-Out Wavelength caused by Rotation and Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubko, Raisa; Greenberg, James; St. Germaine, Michael T.; Gregoire, Maxwell D.; Hromada, Ivan; Holmgren, William F.; Cronin, Alexander D.

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of tune-out wavelengths made with an atom interferometer are shown to change by 150 pm due to inertial displacements. Because tune-out wavelengths can be measured with picometer precision in our laboratory, we explore how to use shifts in tune-out wavelengths to measure rotation rates with respect to an inertial frame. For example, measuring the earth's rotation rate with an uncertainty of 1% appears possible with this technique. The origin of shifts in measured tune-out wavelengths (λzero , lab) as compared to tune-out wavelengths in an inertial frame (λzero) is explained by dispersive inertial phase shifts, the vector dynamic polarizability αv (ω) , and dispersion compensation. An atom beam with a velocity spread and an ensemble of atomic spin states is required. Because accurate measurements of λzero can be used for reporting ratios of dipole matrix elements, we also discuss methods for reducing systematic errors in measurements of λzero.

  20. Musical-grade tuning forks for emergent audiometric screening.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Rodger J; Poling, Mikaela I

    2015-06-11

    We discuss our experience using high-quality, musical-grade tuning forks for emergent audiometric screening in a 22-year-old woman with sudden-onset unilateral hearing sensation loss. We present a framework for using this method when proper audiometric equipment is unavailable but where musical-grade tuning forks can be rapidly supplied.

  1. Tune-Shift Compensation Using the Tevatron Electron Lens

    SciTech Connect

    Kip Bishofberger et al.

    2003-08-20

    The Tevatron Electron Lens was originally designed to alleviate the tune shift and spread induced in Tevatron antiproton bunches from interactions with the proton bunches. We report recent developments and successful results of such tune-shift compensation. Lifetime measurements are central to our data and the basis of our analysis. Future goals and possible uses for the lens are also discussed.

  2. Tuning Engineering Education into the European Higher Education Orchestra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maffioli, Francesco; Augusti, Giuliano

    2003-01-01

    The 'Bologna Process' promotes fundamental changes throughout European higher education. The EC 'Tuning' project was set up to investigate the feasibility of this process. Summarizes the final report of the Engineering Synergy Group which examined the 'tuning' of engineering education (EE), taking advantage of the work of previous and current…

  3. New Directions for IR, the DQP, and Tuning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowski, Natasha A.; Marshall, David W.

    2015-01-01

    This concluding essay provides a glimpse to the future and alerts IR professionals to related initiatives as well as provides an update to ongoing work with DQP and Tuning. Pulling from the prior chapters it provides some implications for IR offices to consider, not only in their work with the DQP and Tuning, but in terms of general decision…

  4. PSO algorithm enhanced with Lozi Chaotic Map - Tuning experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pluhacek, Michal; Senkerik, Roman; Zelinka, Ivan

    2015-03-10

    In this paper it is investigated the effect of tuning of control parameters of the Lozi Chaotic Map employed as a chaotic pseudo-random number generator for the particle swarm optimization algorithm. Three different benchmark functions are selected from the IEEE CEC 2013 competition benchmark set. The Lozi map is extensively tuned and the performance of PSO is evaluated.

  5. Spatiotemporal frequency and speed tuning in the owl visual wulst.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Lucas; Baron, Jerome

    2009-10-01

    The avian visual wulst is hodologically equivalent to the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1). In contrast to most birds, owls have a massive visual wulst, which shares striking functional similarities with V1. To provide a better understanding of how motion is processed within this area, we used sinusoidal gratings to characterize the spatiotemporal frequency and speed tuning profiles of 131 neurones recorded from awake burrowing owls. Cells were found to be clearly tuned to both spatial and temporal frequencies, and in a way that is similar to what has been reported in the striate cortex of primates and carnivores. Our results also suggest the presence of spatial frequency tuning domains in the wulst. Speed tuning was assessed by several methods devised to measure the degree of dependence between spatial and temporal frequency tuning. Although many neurones were found to be independently tuned, a significant proportion of cells showed at least some degree of dependence, compatible with the idea that some kind of initial transformation towards an explicit representation of speed is being carried out by the owl wulst. Interestingly, under certain constraints, a higher incidence of spatial frequency-invariant speed tuned profiles was obtained by combining our experimentally measured responses using a recent cortical model of speed tuning. Overall, our findings reinforce the notion that, like V1, the owl wulst is an important initial stage for motion processing, a function that is usually attributed to areas of the tectofugal pathway in lateral-eyed birds. PMID:19788573

  6. Dynamic tuning of chemiresistor sensitivity using mechanical strain

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James E; Read, Douglas H

    2014-09-30

    The sensitivity of a chemiresistor sensor can be dynamically tuned using mechanical strain. The increase in sensitivity is a smooth, continuous function of the applied strain, and the effect can be reversible. Sensitivity tuning enables the response curve of the sensor to be dynamically optimized for sensing analytes, such as volatile organic compounds, over a wide concentration range.

  7. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Howard, R.C.; Bokros, J.C.

    1962-03-01

    A fueled matrlx eontnwinlng uncomblned carbon is deslgned for use in graphlte-moderated gas-cooled reactors designed for operatlon at temperatures (about 1500 deg F) at which conventional metallic cladding would ordlnarily undergo undesired carburization or physical degeneratlon. - The invention comprlses, broadly a fuel body containlng uncombined earbon, clad with a nickel alloy contalning over about 28 percent by' weight copper in the preferred embodlment. Thls element ls supporirted in the passageways in close tolerance with the walls of unclad graphite moderator materlal. (AEC)

  8. Otoacoustic Estimates of Cochlear Tuning: Testing Predictions in Macaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher A.; Bergevin, Christopher; Kalluri, Radha; Mc Laughlin, Myles; Michelet, Pascal; van der Heijden, Marcel; Joris, Philip X.

    2011-11-01

    Otoacoustic estimates of cochlear frequency selectivity suggest substantially sharper tuning in humans. However, the logic and methodology underlying these estimates remain untested by direct measurements in primates. We report measurements of frequency tuning in macaque monkeys, Old-World primates phylogenetically closer to humans than the small laboratory animals often taken as models of human hearing (e.g., cats, guinea pigs, and chinchillas). We find that measurements of tuning obtained directly from individual nerve fibers and indirectly using otoacoustic emissions both indicate that peripheral frequency selectivity in macaques is significantly sharper than in small laboratory animals, matching that inferred for humans at high frequencies. Our results validate the use of otoacoustic emissions for noninvasive measurement of cochlear tuning and corroborate the finding of sharper tuning in humans.

  9. A Generalized Framework for Auto-tuning Stencil Computations

    SciTech Connect

    Kamil, Shoaib; Chan, Cy; Williams, Samuel; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Howison, Mark; Bethel, E. Wes; Prabhat,

    2009-05-01

    This work introduces a generalized framework for automatically tuning stencil computations to achieve superior performance on a broad range of multicore architectures. Stencil (nearest-neighbor) based kernels constitute the core of many important scientific applications involving block-structured grids. Auto-tuning systems search over optimization strategies to find the combination of tunable parameters that maximizes computational efficiency for a given algorithmic kernel. Although the auto-tuning strategy has been successfully applied to libraries, generalized stencil kernels are not amenable to packaging as libraries. Studied kernels in this work include both memory-bound kernels as well as a computation-bound bilateral filtering kernel. We introduce a generalized stencil auto-tuning framework that takes a straightforward Fortran expression of a stencil kernel and automatically generates tuned implementations of the kernel in C or Fortran to achieve performance portability across diverse computer architectures.

  10. Stepwise frequency tuning of a gyrotron backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.H.; Chen, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    The gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO) features broadband tunability, but ragged tuning curves are frequently observed experimentally. Accordingly, a Ka-band gyro-BWO experiment with external circuit mismatch was conducted to examine its tuning properties at two reflected strengths: one is slightly mismatched (15 dB reflection) and the other can be categorized as matched (30 dB reflection). Stepwise frequency tunings by varying the magnetic field, the beam voltage, and the beam current were observed under mismatched conditions. A self-locking model was introduced using the concept of injection-locking, where the output and reinjected signals tend to form a stable phase relation, favoring certain discrete oscillation frequencies. The observed frequencies agree closely with the calculated frequencies. Smooth tuning curves were also obtained, revealing a remedy for the stepwise tuning of a gyro-BWO.

  11. Tuning the beam: a physics perspective on beam diagnostic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gulley, Mark S

    2010-01-01

    In a nutshell, the role of a beam diagnostic measurement is to provide information needed to get a particle beam from Point A (injection point) to Point B (a target) in a useable condition, with 'useable' meaning the right energy and size and with acceptable losses. Specifications and performance requirements of diagnostics are based on the physics of the particle beam to be measured, with typical customers of beam parameter measurements being the accelerator operators and accelerator physicists. This tutorial will be a physics-oriented discussion of the interplay between tuning evolutions and the beam diagnostics systems that support the machine tune. This will include the differences between developing a tune and maintaining a tune, among other things. Practical longitudinal and transverse tuning issues and techniques from a variety of proton and electron machines will also be discussed.

  12. Spin tune dependence on closed orbit in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyn, V.; Bai, M.; Roser, T.

    2010-05-23

    Polarized proton beams are accelerated in RHIC to 250 GeV energy with the help of Siberian Snakes. The pair of Siberian Snakes in each RHIC ring holds the design spin tune at 1/2 to avoid polarization loss during acceleration. However, in the presence of closed orbit errors, the actual spin tune can be shifted away from the exact 1/2 value. It leads to a corresponding shift of locations of higher-order ('snake') resonances and limits the available betatron tune space. The largest closed orbit effect on the spin tune comes from the horizontal orbit angle between the two snakes. During RHIC Run in 2009 dedicated measurements with polarized proton beams were taken to verify the dependence of the spin tune on the local orbits at the Snakes. The experimental results are presented along with the comparison with analytical predictions.

  13. Otoacoustic Estimates of Cochlear Tuning: Testing Predictions in Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Shera, Christopher A.; Bergevin, Christopher; Kalluri, Radha; Laughlin, Myles Mc; Michelet, Pascal; van der Heijden, Marcel; Joris, Philip X.

    2013-01-01

    Otoacoustic estimates of cochlear frequency selectivity suggest substantially sharper tuning in humans. However, the logic and methodology underlying these estimates remain untested by direct measurements in primates. We report measurements of frequency tuning in macaque monkeys, Old-World primates phylogenetically closer to humans than the small laboratory animals often taken as models of human hearing (e.g., cats, guinea pigs, and chinchillas). We find that measurements of tuning obtained directly from individual nerve fibers and indirectly using otoacoustic emissions both indicate that peripheral frequency selectivity in macaques is significantly sharper than in small laboratory animals, matching that inferred for humans at high frequencies. Our results validate the use of otoacoustic emissions for noninvasive measurement of cochlear tuning and corroborate the finding of sharper tuning in humans. PMID:24701000

  14. Compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.; Wang, G.

    2015-05-03

    The effects of space charge play a significant role in modern-day accelerators, frequently constraining the beam parameters attainable in an accelerator or in an accelerator chain. They also can limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with sub-TeV high-brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Using an appropriate electron beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam in a coasting beam. But these methods cannot compensate space charge tune spread in a bunched hadron beam. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with mismatched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread.

  15. Tuning optical radiation for visual and nonvisual impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Michael P.

    2011-12-01

    Spectral tuning---the allocation of radiant energy emitted by a lamp---is a fundamental element of illuminating engineering. Proper placement of optical radiation allows for reduced energy consumption, increased brightness perception, and improved color rendition. It can also result in lamps that have a greater impact on nonvisual human functions such as circadian rhythms, sleep, mood, and cognition. For an architectural lighting system, careful consideration must be given to all of these areas; recent advancements in understanding nonvisual photoreception must be balanced with the traditional emphasis on visual quality and energy efficiency. The three research projects described herein investigated spectral tuning by examining the effects of optical radiation or seeking ideal spectral power distributions. In all three cases, emphasis was placed on developing an architectural lighting system based on red, green, and blue (RGB) light emitting diodes (LEDs) that is capable of providing maximum stimulation to nonvisual systems while maintaining visual quality standards. In particular, the elderly were considered as a target population because they have an increased risk of developing disorders linked to illumination deficits. The three endeavors can be summarized as follows: Light Therapy for Seniors in Long-term Care AIM: To examine the effect of optical radiation on circadian rhythms, sleep, mood, and cognition for frail elderly in a long-term care environment. METHODOLOGY: A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of light therapy was conducted using circadian-effective short-wavelength (blue) optical radiation to treat a sample of residents recruited for participation without bias for existing medical diagnoses. KEY FINDINGS: Light therapy treatment improved cognitive functioning compared to placebo but no changes were detected in nighttime sleep statistics, reports of daytime sleepiness, circadian rhythms, or depression inventory parameters. Perceived

  16. Tuning optical radiation for visual and nonvisual impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Michael P.

    2011-12-01

    Spectral tuning---the allocation of radiant energy emitted by a lamp---is a fundamental element of illuminating engineering. Proper placement of optical radiation allows for reduced energy consumption, increased brightness perception, and improved color rendition. It can also result in lamps that have a greater impact on nonvisual human functions such as circadian rhythms, sleep, mood, and cognition. For an architectural lighting system, careful consideration must be given to all of these areas; recent advancements in understanding nonvisual photoreception must be balanced with the traditional emphasis on visual quality and energy efficiency. The three research projects described herein investigated spectral tuning by examining the effects of optical radiation or seeking ideal spectral power distributions. In all three cases, emphasis was placed on developing an architectural lighting system based on red, green, and blue (RGB) light emitting diodes (LEDs) that is capable of providing maximum stimulation to nonvisual systems while maintaining visual quality standards. In particular, the elderly were considered as a target population because they have an increased risk of developing disorders linked to illumination deficits. The three endeavors can be summarized as follows: Light Therapy for Seniors in Long-term Care AIM: To examine the effect of optical radiation on circadian rhythms, sleep, mood, and cognition for frail elderly in a long-term care environment. METHODOLOGY: A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of light therapy was conducted using circadian-effective short-wavelength (blue) optical radiation to treat a sample of residents recruited for participation without bias for existing medical diagnoses. KEY FINDINGS: Light therapy treatment improved cognitive functioning compared to placebo but no changes were detected in nighttime sleep statistics, reports of daytime sleepiness, circadian rhythms, or depression inventory parameters. Perceived

  17. Mechano-optical wavelength tuning in a photonic crystal microcavity with sub-1 V drive voltage.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Shahina M C; Kauppinen, Lasse J; Krijnen, Gijs J M; de Ridder, René M

    2012-06-01

    A micro-bimorph cantilever with self-aligned nanotips is monolithically integrated with a photonic crystal based device using optical and deep UV lithography techniques. Upon electrostatic actuation, the dielectric nanotips perturb the optical field, providing electromechano-optical modulation of light. Static tuning of the optical transmission spectra by more than 600 pm is measured with a sub-1 V drive voltage, resulting in a modulation as high as 21 dB. The observed strong electromechano-optical effect may find application in power efficient devices for optical communication networks, such as wavelength routing elements.

  18. Simultaneous gains tuning in boiler/turbine PID-based controller clusters using iterative feedback tuning methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Taft, Cyrus W; Bentsman, Joseph; Hussey, Aaron; Petrus, Bryan

    2012-09-01

    Tuning a complex multi-loop PID based control system requires considerable experience. In today's power industry the number of available qualified tuners is dwindling and there is a great need for better tuning tools to maintain and improve the performance of complex multivariable processes. Multi-loop PID tuning is the procedure for the online tuning of a cluster of PID controllers operating in a closed loop with a multivariable process. This paper presents the first application of the simultaneous tuning technique to the multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) PID based nonlinear controller in the power plant control context, with the closed-loop system consisting of a MIMO nonlinear boiler/turbine model and a nonlinear cluster of six PID-type controllers. Although simplified, the dynamics and cross-coupling of the process and the PID cluster are similar to those used in a real power plant. The particular technique selected, iterative feedback tuning (IFT), utilizes the linearized version of the PID cluster for signal conditioning, but the data collection and tuning is carried out on the full nonlinear closed-loop system. Based on the figure of merit for the control system performance, the IFT is shown to deliver performance favorably comparable to that attained through the empirical tuning carried out by an experienced control engineer.

  19. Simultaneous gains tuning in boiler/turbine PID-based controller clusters using iterative feedback tuning methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Taft, Cyrus W; Bentsman, Joseph; Hussey, Aaron; Petrus, Bryan

    2012-09-01

    Tuning a complex multi-loop PID based control system requires considerable experience. In today's power industry the number of available qualified tuners is dwindling and there is a great need for better tuning tools to maintain and improve the performance of complex multivariable processes. Multi-loop PID tuning is the procedure for the online tuning of a cluster of PID controllers operating in a closed loop with a multivariable process. This paper presents the first application of the simultaneous tuning technique to the multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) PID based nonlinear controller in the power plant control context, with the closed-loop system consisting of a MIMO nonlinear boiler/turbine model and a nonlinear cluster of six PID-type controllers. Although simplified, the dynamics and cross-coupling of the process and the PID cluster are similar to those used in a real power plant. The particular technique selected, iterative feedback tuning (IFT), utilizes the linearized version of the PID cluster for signal conditioning, but the data collection and tuning is carried out on the full nonlinear closed-loop system. Based on the figure of merit for the control system performance, the IFT is shown to deliver performance favorably comparable to that attained through the empirical tuning carried out by an experienced control engineer. PMID:22633781

  20. Tuning natural modes of vibration by prestress in the design of a harmonic gong.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Neil; Adams, Ryan; Burvill, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Prestresses are purposefully added to an object to improve its performance, such as tuning a guitar string by adding tension. This paper reports how the normal modes of a sheet metal component can be tuned through the prestresses generated by cold-forging small dimples. Finite element analysis showed that the frequencies of specific mode shapes were differentially affected by the location of residual stress fields due to dimple formation in relation to modal stress fields. The frequencies of overtones were most sensitive to the depth of the dimples located near the maxima of modal stresses. Using this approach a series of musical gongs were designed with up to the first five overtones tuned to within 5% of the harmonic series. The balance of harmonic and inharmonic overtones in these gongs that are well resolved by the human cochlea may constitute a set of recognizable musical timbres with sufficient harmonicity to produce an unambiguous pitch for most listeners. Since many other mechanical properties of sheet metal components are affected by residual stresses this manufacturing technique may have broader application in design engineering. PMID:22280715

  1. Finite element forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Smith, G. C. C.

    1981-01-01

    A capability was added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7 to conduct forced vibration analysis of tuned cyclic structures rotating about their axes of symmetry. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations together with those due to linear acceleration of the axis of rotation were included. The theoretical development of this capability is presented.

  2. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  3. TUNED FINITE-DIFFERENCE DIFFUSION OPERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, Jason; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org

    2009-05-15

    Finite-difference simulations of fluid dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics generally require an explicit diffusion operator, either to maintain stability by attenuating grid-scale structure, or to implement physical diffusivities such as viscosity or resistivity. If the goal is stability only, the diffusion must act at the grid scale, but should affect structure at larger scales as little as possible. For physical diffusivities the diffusion scale depends on the problem, and diffusion may act at larger scales as well. Diffusivity can undesirably limit the computational time step in both cases. We construct tuned finite-difference diffusion operators that minimally limit the time step while acting as desired near the diffusion scale. Such operators reach peak values at the diffusion scale rather than at the grid scale, but behave as standard operators at larger scales. These operators will be useful for simulations with high magnetic diffusivity or kinematic viscosity such as in the simulation of astrophysical dynamos with magnetic Prandtl number far from unity, or for numerical stabilization using hyperdiffusivity.

  4. Structurally tuned iridescent surfaces inspired by nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deparis, Olivier; Rassart, Marie; Vandenbem, Cédric; Welch, Victoria; Pol Vigneron, Jean; Lucas, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    Iridescent surfaces exhibit vivid colours which change with the angle of incidence or viewing due to optical wave interference in the multilayer structure present at the wavelength scale underneath the surface. In nature, one can find examples of iridescent Coleoptera for which the hue changes either greatly or slightly with the angle. Because these species typically make these structures from a single biological material (usually chitin) and air or water as the low refractive index component, they have evolved by adjusting the layer thicknesses in order to display quite different iridescent aspects. Taking inspiration from this proven strategy, we have designed and fabricated periodic TiO2/SiO2 multilayer films in order to demonstrate the concept of structurally tuned iridescent surfaces. Titanium or silicon oxide layers were deposited on a glass substrate using dc reactive or RF magnetron sputtering techniques, respectively. Two structures were designed for which the period and the TiO2/SiO2 layer thickness ratio were varied in such a way that the films displayed radically different iridescent aspects: a reddish-to-greenish changing hue and a stable bluish hue. The fabricated samples were characterized through specular reflectance/transmittance measurements. Modelling of transmittance spectra using standard multilayer film theory confirmed the high quality of the twelve-period Bragg reflectors. The chromaticity coordinates, which were calculated from measured reflectance spectra taken at different angles, were in accordance with theoretical predictions.

  5. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives.

  6. Frequency tuning of THz quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xifeng; Danylov, Andriy A.; Light, Alexander R.; Waldman, Jerry; Erickson, Neal

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces the continuously tunable THz radiation through sideband generation of a free running and solidnitrogen- cooled THz quantum cascade laser. The 2.324 THz QCL operating in a single longitudinal mode (SLM) in continuous-wave (cw) was mixed with a swept synthesized microwave signal by a THz Schottky-diode-balanced mixer. Through sideband generation, two frequency branches were observed at low and high frequency, characterized with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. At low frequency, the sideband generates frequencies from -50 GHz to +50 GHz. At high frequency, it generates sideband frequencies from 70 GHz to 115 GHz. The total +/-100 GHz tuning range can be further expanded with higher frequency millimeter wave amplifier/multiplier source. The sideband generates total 1 μW of output power at both upper and lower frequency with 200 μW of driven power from the THz QCL, showing a power conversion efficiency of 5 × 10-3. The demonstration of this SM, continuously tunable THz source enables its applications where SM, spatially coherent beam is required.

  7. Approaching {lambda} without fine-tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Matarrese, Sabino; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Perrotta, Francesca

    2004-09-15

    We address the fine-tuning problem of dark energy cosmologies which arises when the dark energy density needs to initially lie in a narrow range in order for its present value to be consistent with observations. As recently noticed, this problem becomes particularly severe in canonical quintessence scenarios, when trying to reproduce the behavior of a cosmological constant, i.e., when the dark energy equation of state w{sub Q} approaches -1: these models may be reconciled with a large basin of attraction only by requiring a rapid evolution of w{sub Q} at low redshifts, which is in conflict with the most recent estimates from type Ia Supernovae discovered by Hubble space telescope. Next, we focus on scalar-tensor theories of gravity, discussing the implications of a coupling between the quintessence scalar field and the Ricci scalar ('extended quintessence'). We show that, even if the equation of state today is very close to -1, by virtue of the scalar-tensor coupling the quintessence trajectories still possess the attractive feature which allows to reach the present level of cosmic acceleration starting by a set of initial conditions which covers tens of orders of magnitude; this effect, entirely of gravitational origin, represents a new important consequence of the possible coupling between dark energy and gravity. We illustrate this effect in typical extended quintessence scenarios.

  8. Ordinal neural networks without iterative tuning.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Navarro, Francisco; Riccardi, Annalisa; Carloni, Sante

    2014-11-01

    Ordinal regression (OR) is an important branch of supervised learning in between the multiclass classification and regression. In this paper, the traditional classification scheme of neural network is adapted to learn ordinal ranks. The model proposed imposes monotonicity constraints on the weights connecting the hidden layer with the output layer. To do so, the weights are transcribed using padding variables. This reformulation leads to the so-called inequality constrained least squares (ICLS) problem. Its numerical solution can be obtained by several iterative methods, for example, trust region or line search algorithms. In this proposal, the optimum is determined analytically according to the closed-form solution of the ICLS problem estimated from the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. Furthermore, following the guidelines of the extreme learning machine framework, the weights connecting the input and the hidden layers are randomly generated, so the final model estimates all its parameters without iterative tuning. The model proposed achieves competitive performance compared with the state-of-the-art neural networks methods for OR. PMID:25330430

  9. Wide Tuning Capability for Spacecraft Transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James; Mysoor, Narayan; Shah, Biren; Cook, Brian; Smith, Scott

    2007-01-01

    A document presents additional information on the means of implementing a capability for wide tuning of microwave receiver and transmitter frequencies in the development reported in the immediately preceding article, VCO PLL Frequency Synthesizers for Spacecraft Transponders (NPO- 42909). The reference frequency for a PLL-based frequency synthesizer is derived from a numerically controlled oscillator (NCO) implemented in digital logic, such that almost any reference frequency can be derived from a fixed crystal reference oscillator with microhertz precision. The frequency of the NCO is adjusted to track the received signal, then used to create another NCO frequency used to synthesize the transmitted signal coherent with, and at a specified frequency ratio to, the received signal. The frequencies can be changed, even during operation, through suitable digital programming. The NCOs and the related tracking loops and coherent turnaround logic are implemented in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The interface between the analog microwave receiver and transmitter circuits and the FPGA includes analog-to-digital and digital-toanalog converters, the sampling rates of which are chosen to minimize spurious signals and otherwise optimize performance. Several mixers and filters are used to properly route various signals.

  10. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives. PMID:26513350

  11. Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Face Tuning

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, Marina A.; Heiz, Julie; Sokolov, Alexander N.; Barisnikov, Koviljka

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions), the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing. PMID:27531986

  12. Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Face Tuning.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Marina A; Heiz, Julie; Sokolov, Alexander N; Barisnikov, Koviljka

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions), the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing.

  13. Controllable Tuning Plasmonic Coupling with Nanoscale Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The nanoparticle on mirror (NPoM) construct is ideal for the strong coupling of localized plasmons because of its simple fabrication and the nanometer-scale gaps it offers. Both of these are much harder to control in nanoparticle dimers. Even so, realizing controllable gap sizes in a NPoM remains difficult and continuous tunability is limited. Here, we use reactive metals as the mirror so that the spacing layer of resulting metal oxide can be easily and controllably created with specific thicknesses resulting in continuous tuning of the plasmonic coupling. Using Al as a case study, we contrast different approaches for oxidation including electrochemical oxidation, thermal annealing, oxygen plasma treatments, and photo-oxidation by laser irradiation. The thickness of the oxidation layer is calibrated with depth-mode X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). These all consistently show that increasing the thickness of the oxidation layer blue-shifts the plasmonic resonance peak while the transverse mode remains constant, which is well matched by simulations. Our approach provides a facile and reproducible method for scalable, local and controllable fabrication of NPoMs with tailored plasmonic coupling, suited for many applications of sensing, photochemistry, photoemission, and photovoltaics. PMID:25978297

  14. Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Face Tuning.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Marina A; Heiz, Julie; Sokolov, Alexander N; Barisnikov, Koviljka

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions), the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing. PMID:27531986

  15. Noninteracting control of dynamically tuned dry gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingu, H.; Otsuki, M.

    A new design concept of a rebalance control circuit useful both for the improvement of response characteristics and the removal of interaction is desribed. It is shown that an interaction between input and output of Tuned Dry Gyro (TDG) is caused by angular acceleration. A Direct Rebalance Loop (DRL), which is an additional circuit, has been developed, and its utility evaluated quantitatively by simulation. It is shown, as an example of response characterstics improvement by DRL, that larger amplifier gain can be adopted under stable conditions, and that settling time and overshoot decrease remarkably. However, it is also found that DRL is ineffective in reducing interaction. In order to resolve the problems, a method of reducing such interaction by using subtorquers with the main torquers is proposed. The transfer function of the loop between the signal generator and the subtorquer (NIL) is derived analytically so as to remove the interaction. Next, it is examined to see what degree of interaction can be removed by the use of NIL, and as an instance of numerical simulation, it is shown that the interaction can be reduced by less than one tenth at input frequencies of 0 to 40 Hz. Finally, it is concluded that a fundamental design concept of a noninteracting control has been established.

  16. Varistor piezotronics: Mechanically tuned conductivity in varistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraki, Raschid; Novak, Nikola; Hofstätter, Michael; Supancic, Peter; Rödel, Jürgen; Frömling, Till

    2015-08-01

    The piezoelectric effect of ZnO has been investigated recently with the goal to modify metal/semiconductor Schottky-barriers and p-n-junctions by application of mechanical stress. This research area called "piezotronics" is so far focused on nano structured ZnO wires. At the same time, ZnO varistor materials are already widely utilized and may benefit from a piezotronic approach. In this instance, the grain boundary potential barriers in the ceramic can be tuned by mechanical stress. Polycrystalline varistors exhibit huge changes of resistivity upon applied electrical and mechanical fields and therefore offer descriptive model systems to study the piezotronic effect. If the influence of temperature is contemplated, our current mechanistic understanding can be interrogated and corroborated. In this paper, we present a physical model based on parallel conducting pathways. This affords qualitative and semi-quantitative rationalization of temperature dependent electrical properties. The investigations demonstrate that narrow conductive pathways contribute to the overall current, which becomes increasingly conductive with application of mechanical stress due to lowering of the barrier height. Rising temperature increases the thermionic current through the rest of the material with higher average potential barriers, which are hardly affected by the piezoelectric effect. Hence, relative changes in resistance due to application of stress are higher at low temperature.

  17. Tuning a microcavity-coupled terahertz laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Bianchi, Vezio; Li, Lianhe; Zhu, Jingxuan; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A.; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2015-12-01

    Tunable oscillators are a key component of almost all electronic and photonic systems. Yet, a technology capable of operating in the terahertz (THz)-frequency range and fully suitable for widescale implementation is still lacking. This issue is significantly limiting potential THz applications in gas sensing, high-resolution spectroscopy, hyper-spectral imaging, and optical communications. The THz quantum cascade laser is arguably the most promising solution in terms of output power and spectral purity. In order to achieve reliable, repeatable, and broad tunability, here we exploit the strong coupling between two different cavity mode concepts: a distributed feedback one-dimensional photonic resonator (providing gain) and a mechanically actuated wavelength-size microcavity (providing tuning). The result is a continuously tunable, single-mode emitter covering a 162 GHz spectral range, centered on 3.2 THz. Our source has a few tens of MHz resolution, extremely high differential efficiency, and unprecedented compact and simple design architecture. By unveiling the large potential that lies in this technique, our results provide a robust platform for radically different THz systems exploiting broadly tunable semiconductor lasers.

  18. Tuning a microcavity-coupled terahertz laser

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Bianchi, Vezio; Vitiello, Miriam S.; Li, Lianhe; Zhu, Jingxuan; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A.; Tredicucci, Alessandro

    2015-12-28

    Tunable oscillators are a key component of almost all electronic and photonic systems. Yet, a technology capable of operating in the terahertz (THz)-frequency range and fully suitable for widescale implementation is still lacking. This issue is significantly limiting potential THz applications in gas sensing, high-resolution spectroscopy, hyper-spectral imaging, and optical communications. The THz quantum cascade laser is arguably the most promising solution in terms of output power and spectral purity. In order to achieve reliable, repeatable, and broad tunability, here we exploit the strong coupling between two different cavity mode concepts: a distributed feedback one-dimensional photonic resonator (providing gain) and a mechanically actuated wavelength-size microcavity (providing tuning). The result is a continuously tunable, single-mode emitter covering a 162 GHz spectral range, centered on 3.2 THz. Our source has a few tens of MHz resolution, extremely high differential efficiency, and unprecedented compact and simple design architecture. By unveiling the large potential that lies in this technique, our results provide a robust platform for radically different THz systems exploiting broadly tunable semiconductor lasers.

  19. Bendable X-ray Optics at the ALS: Design, Tuning, Performance and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Church, Matthew N.; Knight, Jason W.; Kunz, Martin; MacDowell, Alastair A.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Tamura, Nabumichi; Warwick, Tony

    2008-09-08

    We review the development at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of bendable x-ray optics widely used for focusing of beams of soft and hard x-rays. Typically, the focusing is divided in the tangential and sagittal directions into two elliptically cylindrical reflecting elements, the so-called Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) pair [1]. Because fabrication of elliptical surfaces is complicated, the cost of directly fabricated tangential elliptical cylinders is often prohibitive. This is in contrast to flat optics, that are simpler to manufacture and easier to measure by conventional interferometry. The figure of a flat substrate can be changed by placing torques (couples) at each end. Equal couples form a tangential cylinder, and unequal couples can approximate a tangential ellipse or parabola. We review the nature of the bending, requirements and approaches to the mechanical design, and describe a technique developed at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory (OML) for optimal tuning of bendable mirrors before installation in the beamline [2]. The tuning technique adapts a method previously used to adjust bendable mirrors on synchrotron radiation beamlines [3]. However, in our case, optimal tuning of a bendable mirror is based on surface slope trace data obtained with a slope measuring instrument--in our case, the long trace profiler (LTP). We show that due to the near linearity of the bending problem, the minimal set of data, necessary for tuning of two benders, consists of only three slope traces measured before and after a single adjustment of each bending couple. We provide an algorithm that was used in dedicated software for finding optimal settings for the mirror benders. The algorithm is based on the method of regression analysis with experimentally found characteristic functions of the benders. The resulting approximation to the functional dependence of the desired slope shape provides nearly final settings for the benders. Moreover, the characteristic functions of the

  20. An infinitely-stiff elastic system via a tuned negative-stiffness component stabilized by rotation-produced gyroscopic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochmann, D. M.; Drugan, W. J.

    2016-06-01

    An elastic system containing a negative-stiffness element tuned to produce positive-infinite system stiffness, although statically unstable as is any such elastic system if unconstrained, is proved to be stabilized by rotation-produced gyroscopic forces at sufficiently high rotation rates. This is accomplished in possibly the simplest model of a composite structure (or solid) containing a negative-stiffness component that exhibits all these features, facilitating a conceptually and mathematically transparent, completely closed-form analysis.

  1. Drifts of a three-axis stabilizer under vibration of the frames and platform with unbalanced dynamically tuned gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbrutskii, A. V.; Sarapulov, S. A.

    1985-10-01

    It is shown that the unbalance of a dynamically tuned gyro, leading to gyro self-excitation through vibration of the platform in a gimball suspension, causes drifts of the stabilizer. The magnitude of the drift depends on the gyro balancing precision, the location of gyros on the platform, and the relationship between the moments of inertia of the suspension elements, the precision of the adjustment, and the ultimate rigidity of the platform. Ways to reduce the drifts of the system are examined.

  2. Architectures for evanescent frequency tuning of microring resonators in micro-opto-electro-mechanical SOI platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoman, Hossam; Dahlem, Marcus S.

    2015-02-01

    Microring resonators are important elements in a wide variety of optical systems, ranging from optical switches and tunable filterbanks to optical sensors. In these structures, the resonant frequencies are normally controlled by tuning the effective index of refraction. In optical switches and filters, this has traditionally been achieved through electro-optic or thermo-optic effects. In sensors, the effective refractive index is changed by the presence of the measurand. Adding a mechanical degree of freedom to these optical systems allows additional evanescent frequency tuning. In particular, the presence of a cantilever in the near-field of the optical mode can tune the effective refractive index. A specific cantilever displacement can therefore induce a desired resonant frequency shift. Alternatively, a measured shift in the resonant frequency can be associated with a cantilever displacement, and be used for pressure or acceleration sensing. In this paper, we explore a geometry that can be used for controlling the resonant frequency of a microring resonator through evanescent field perturbation, using a cantilever defined in the same silicon layer as the optical waveguides, in a silicon-on-insulator platform. The effects of the lateral gap size between the optical waveguide and the cantilever, and the cantilever vertical displacement, on both the resonant frequency and quality factor of the resonator, are evaluated through finite-difference timedomain computations for wavelengths centered at 1550 nm. The presence of the cantilever in the near-field of the optical mode changes the effective refractive index, resulting in frequency tuning, but also lowers the quality factor due to additional coupling into the membrane.

  3. Piezoresistivity and Strain-induced Band Gap Tuning in Atomically Thin MoS2.

    PubMed

    Manzeli, Sajedeh; Allain, Adrien; Ghadimi, Amirhossein; Kis, Andras

    2015-08-12

    Continuous tuning of material properties is highly desirable for a wide range of applications, with strain engineering being an interesting way of achieving it. The tuning range, however, is limited in conventional bulk materials that can suffer from plasticity and low fracture limit due to the presence of defects and dislocations. Atomically thin membranes such as MoS2 on the other hand exhibit high Young's modulus and fracture strength, which makes them viable candidates for modifying their properties via strain. The bandgap of MoS2 is highly strain-tunable, which results in the modulation of its electrical conductivity and manifests itself as the piezoresistive effect, whereas a piezoelectric effect was also observed in odd-layered MoS2 with broken inversion symmetry. This coupling between electrical and mechanical properties makes MoS2 a very promising material for nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Here, we incorporate monolayer, bilayer, and trilayer MoS2 in a nanoelectromechanical membrane configuration. We detect strain-induced band gap tuning via electrical conductivity measurements and demonstrate the emergence of the piezoresistive effect in MoS2. Finite element method (FEM) simulations are used to quantify the band gap change and to obtain a comprehensive picture of the spatially varying bandgap profile on the membrane. The piezoresistive gauge factor is calculated to be -148 ± 19, -224 ± 19, and -43.5 ± 11 for monolayer, bilayer, and trilayer MoS2, respectively, which is comparable to state-of-the-art silicon strain sensors and 2 orders of magnitude higher than in strain sensors based on suspended graphene. Controllable modulation of resistivity in 2D nanomaterials using strain-induced bandgap tuning offers a novel approach for implementing an important class of NEMS transducers, flexible and wearable electronics, tunable photovoltaics, and photodetection.

  4. An efficient automated parameter tuning framework for spiking neural networks.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Kristofor D; Nageswaran, Jayram Moorkanikara; Dutt, Nikil; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    As the desire for biologically realistic spiking neural networks (SNNs) increases, tuning the enormous number of open parameters in these models becomes a difficult challenge. SNNs have been used to successfully model complex neural circuits that explore various neural phenomena such as neural plasticity, vision systems, auditory systems, neural oscillations, and many other important topics of neural function. Additionally, SNNs are particularly well-adapted to run on neuromorphic hardware that will support biological brain-scale architectures. Although the inclusion of realistic plasticity equations, neural dynamics, and recurrent topologies has increased the descriptive power of SNNs, it has also made the task of tuning these biologically realistic SNNs difficult. To meet this challenge, we present an automated parameter tuning framework capable of tuning SNNs quickly and efficiently using evolutionary algorithms (EA) and inexpensive, readily accessible graphics processing units (GPUs). A sample SNN with 4104 neurons was tuned to give V1 simple cell-like tuning curve responses and produce self-organizing receptive fields (SORFs) when presented with a random sequence of counterphase sinusoidal grating stimuli. A performance analysis comparing the GPU-accelerated implementation to a single-threaded central processing unit (CPU) implementation was carried out and showed a speedup of 65× of the GPU implementation over the CPU implementation, or 0.35 h per generation for GPU vs. 23.5 h per generation for CPU. Additionally, the parameter value solutions found in the tuned SNN were studied and found to be stable and repeatable. The automated parameter tuning framework presented here will be of use to both the computational neuroscience and neuromorphic engineering communities, making the process of constructing and tuning large-scale SNNs much quicker and easier.

  5. An efficient automated parameter tuning framework for spiking neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Kristofor D.; Nageswaran, Jayram Moorkanikara; Dutt, Nikil; Krichmar, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    As the desire for biologically realistic spiking neural networks (SNNs) increases, tuning the enormous number of open parameters in these models becomes a difficult challenge. SNNs have been used to successfully model complex neural circuits that explore various neural phenomena such as neural plasticity, vision systems, auditory systems, neural oscillations, and many other important topics of neural function. Additionally, SNNs are particularly well-adapted to run on neuromorphic hardware that will support biological brain-scale architectures. Although the inclusion of realistic plasticity equations, neural dynamics, and recurrent topologies has increased the descriptive power of SNNs, it has also made the task of tuning these biologically realistic SNNs difficult. To meet this challenge, we present an automated parameter tuning framework capable of tuning SNNs quickly and efficiently using evolutionary algorithms (EA) and inexpensive, readily accessible graphics processing units (GPUs). A sample SNN with 4104 neurons was tuned to give V1 simple cell-like tuning curve responses and produce self-organizing receptive fields (SORFs) when presented with a random sequence of counterphase sinusoidal grating stimuli. A performance analysis comparing the GPU-accelerated implementation to a single-threaded central processing unit (CPU) implementation was carried out and showed a speedup of 65× of the GPU implementation over the CPU implementation, or 0.35 h per generation for GPU vs. 23.5 h per generation for CPU. Additionally, the parameter value solutions found in the tuned SNN were studied and found to be stable and repeatable. The automated parameter tuning framework presented here will be of use to both the computational neuroscience and neuromorphic engineering communities, making the process of constructing and tuning large-scale SNNs much quicker and easier. PMID:24550771

  6. Frequency Tuning of Hearing in the Beluga Whale.

    PubMed

    Sysueva, Evgeniya V; Nechaev, Dmitry I; Popov, Vladimir V; Supin, Alexander Y

    2016-01-01

    Data on frequency tuning in odontocetes are contradictory: different authors have reported filter qualities from 2 to almost 50. In this study, frequency tuning was measured in a beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) using a rippled-noise test stimulus in conjunction with the auditory evoked potential (AEP) technique. The response to ripple reversions was considered to indicate resolvability of the ripple pattern. The limit of ripple-pattern resolution ranged from 20 to 32 ripples per octave (rpo). A model of interaction of the ripple spectrum with frequency-tuned filters suggests that this resolution limit requires a filter quality of 29-46.

  7. Self-tuning guidance applied to aeroassisted plane change problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarsu, Srigouri; Balakrishnan, S. N.

    Nonlinear self-tuning control methods are developed for use as feedback control laws for multivariable control for the atmospheric portion of aeroassisted maneuvers. A nonlinear generalized minimum variance control method and a nonlinear pole-placement method of self-tuning control are used to track the reference trajectories during this period. Flight dynamics equations are formulated in a special form for generating the self-tuned control. Numerical examples from a plane change reentry problems to illustrate the use of these methods are presented. Detailed analysis of the effects of the design parameters is given.

  8. Frequency Tuning of Hearing in the Beluga Whale.

    PubMed

    Sysueva, Evgeniya V; Nechaev, Dmitry I; Popov, Vladimir V; Supin, Alexander Y

    2016-01-01

    Data on frequency tuning in odontocetes are contradictory: different authors have reported filter qualities from 2 to almost 50. In this study, frequency tuning was measured in a beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) using a rippled-noise test stimulus in conjunction with the auditory evoked potential (AEP) technique. The response to ripple reversions was considered to indicate resolvability of the ripple pattern. The limit of ripple-pattern resolution ranged from 20 to 32 ripples per octave (rpo). A model of interaction of the ripple spectrum with frequency-tuned filters suggests that this resolution limit requires a filter quality of 29-46. PMID:26611077

  9. First order tune shift calculations for transverse betatron dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Garavaglia, T.

    1991-09-01

    An effective Hamiltonian, with non-linear magnetic multipole terms and momentum dispersion contributions, is used to obtain the first order tune-shift results for transverse betatron motion for protons in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). This Hamiltonian is represented in terms of action angle variables, and analytical results are obtained using symbolic algebra methods. Mathematical derivations of the transverse multipole expansion and of the transverse betatron equations, using an invariant action and curvilinear coordinates, are given in the appendices. Numerical and graphical tune-space results are given that illustrate the dependence of tune-shifts on injection amplitude and momentum spread. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Musician's and physicist's view on tuning keyboard instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubenow, Martin; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2007-01-01

    The simultaneous sound of several voices or instruments requires proper tuning to achieve consonance for certain intervals and chords. Most instruments allow enough frequency variation to enable pure tuning while being played. Keyboard instruments such as organ and piano have given frequencies for individual notes and the tuning must be based on a compromise. The equal temperament is not the only solution, but a special choice. Unequal temperaments produce better results in many cases, because important major thirds and triads are improved. Equal temperament was not propagated by Johann Sebastian Bach, as is often stated in introductory literature on this topic.

  11. Electro optical tuning of Tamm-plasmon exciton-polaritons

    SciTech Connect

    Gessler, J.; Baumann, V.; Emmerling, M.; Amthor, M.; Winkler, K.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2014-11-03

    We report on electro optical tuning of the emission from GaAs quantum wells resonantly coupled to a Tamm-plasmon mode in a hybrid metal/dielectric structure. The structures were studied via momentum resolved photoluminescence and photoreflectance spectroscopy, and the surface metal layer was used as a top gate, which allowed for a precise tuning of the quantum well emission via the quantum confined Stark effect. By tuning the resonance, we were able to observe the characteristic anticrossing behavior of a polaritonic emission in the strong light-matter coupling regime, yielding a Rabi splitting of (9.2 ± 0.2) meV.

  12. A Tuned Single Parameter for Representing Conjunction Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plakaloic, D.; Hejduk, M. D.; Frigm, R. C.; Newman, L. K.

    2011-01-01

    Satellite conjunction assessment risk analysis is a subjective enterprise that can benefit from quantitative aids and, to this end, NASA/GSFC has developed a fuzzy logic construct - called the F-value - to attempt to provide a statement of conjunction risk that amalgamates multiple indices and yields a more stable intra-event assessment. This construct has now sustained an extended tuning procedure against heuristic analyst assessment of event risk. The tuning effort has resulted in modifications to the calculation procedure and the adjustment of tuning coefficients, producing a construct with both more predictive force and a better statement of its error.

  13. Adaptive Prognostics for Rolling Element Bearing Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Billington, S.; Zhang, C.; Kurfess, T.; Danyluk, S.; Liang, S.

    1999-01-01

    Rolling element bearing failure is one of the foremost causes of breakdown in rotating machinery. This paper proposes a remaining life adaptation methodology based on mechanistic modeling and parameter tuning. Vibration measurement is used to estimate defect severity by monitoring the signals generated from rotating bearings. Through a defect propagation model and defect diagnostic model, an adaptive algorithm is developed to fine tune the parameters involved in the propagation model by comparing predicted and measured defect sizes. In this manner, the instantaneous rate of defect propagation can be captured despite defect growth behavior variation. Therefore, a precise estimation of the remaining life can be determined. Simulations and experimental results are presented to illustrate the implementation principles and to verify the applicability of the adaptive prognostic methodology.

  14. Tuned, driven, and active soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Andreas M.

    2015-02-01

    One characteristic feature of soft matter systems is their strong response to external stimuli. As a consequence they are comparatively easily driven out of their ground state and out of equilibrium, which leads to many of their fascinating properties. Here, we review illustrative examples. This review is structured by an increasing distance from the equilibrium ground state. On each level, examples of increasing degree of complexity are considered. In detail, we first consider systems that are quasi-statically tuned or switched to a new state by applying external fields. These are common liquid crystals, liquid crystalline elastomers, or ferrogels and magnetic elastomers. Next, we concentrate on systems steadily driven from outside e.g. by an imposed flow field. In our case, we review the reaction of nematic liquid crystals, of bulk-filling periodically modulated structures such as block copolymers, and of localized vesicular objects to an imposed shear flow. Finally, we focus on systems that are "active" and "self-driven". Here our range spans from idealized self-propelled point particles, via sterically interacting particles like granular hoppers, via microswimmers such as self-phoretically driven artificial Janus particles or biological microorganisms, via deformable self-propelled particles like droplets, up to the collective behavior of insects, fish, and birds. As we emphasize, similarities emerge in the features and behavior of systems that at first glance may not necessarily appear related. We thus hope that our overview will further stimulate the search for basic unifying principles underlying the physics of these soft materials out of their equilibrium ground state.

  15. Photolithography and Selective Etching of an Array of Quartz Tuning Fork Resonators with Improved Impact Resistance Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungkyu

    2001-08-01

    Quartz tuning fork blanks with improved impact-resistant characteristics for use in Qualcomm mobile station modem (MSM)-3000 central processing unit (CPU) chips for code division multiple access (CDMA), personal communication system (PCS), and global system for mobile communication (GSM) systems were designed using finite element method (FEM) analysis and suitable processing conditions were determined for the reproducible precision etching of a Z-cut quartz wafer into an array of tuning forks. Negative photoresist photolithography for the additive process was used in preference to positive photoresist photolithography for the subtractive process to etch the array of quartz tuning forks. The tuning fork pattern was transferred via a conventional photolithographical chromium/quartz glass template using a standard single-sided aligner and subsequent negative photoresist development. A tightly adhering and pinhole-free 600/2000 Å chromium/gold mask was coated over the developed photoresist pattern which was subsequently stripped in acetone. This procedure was repeated on the back surface of the wafer. With the protective metallization area of the tuning fork geometry thus formed, etching through the quartz wafer was performed at 80°C in a ± 1.5°C controlled bath containing a concentrated solution of ammonium bifluoride to remove the unwanted areas of the quartz wafer. The quality of the quartz wafer surface finish after quartz etching depended primarily on the surface finish of the quartz wafer prior to etching and the quality of quartz crystals used. Selective etching of a 100 μm quartz wafer could be achieved within 90 min at 80°C. A selective etching procedure with reproducible precision has thus been established and enables the photolithographic mass production of miniature tuning fork resonators.

  16. Optimization of the alexandrite laser tuning elements for a water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Higdon, Noah S.; Browell, Edward V.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of some of the developments completed on an alexandrite laser for making water vapor DIAL measurements is presented in this paper. A computer control for active stabilization of the two intracavity etalons has been implemented and recently tested in an aircraft environment. Long-term frequency drift (i.e., 2 hours) of less than 0.7 pm has been observed in the laboratory. An alignment technique to get the optimum free spectral range ratio for the two etalons is also developed.

  17. High-precision measurements of the 87 Rb D-line tune-out wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, Adam; Leonard, Robert; Sackett, Charles

    2016-05-01

    We report a measurement of a light wavelength at which the ac electric polarizability equals zero for 87 Rb atoms in the F = 2 ground hyperfine state. The experiment uses a condensate interferometer to find this ``tune-out'' wavelength for the scalar polarizability, which lies at 790.032388(32) nm. Our result can be used to determine the ratio of matrix elements | < 5 P3 / 2 ∥ d ∥ 5 S1 / 2 > / < 5 P1 / 2 ∥ d ∥ 5 S1 / 2>|2 = 1 . 99221(3) , a 100-fold improvement over previous experimental values. We discuss techniques for accurate determination and control of light polarization as well as progress on measurements of the vector polarizability between the D 1 and D 2 spectral lines. Measurements of tune-out wavelengths and the vector polarizability between multiple lines allows separation of individual contributions to the polarizability from higher-lying states and the core up to ratios of matrix elements. Accurate knowledge of these ratios should serve useful as a theoretical benchmark and in atomic parity violation experiments.

  18. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    SciTech Connect

    Oghalai, John S.; Raphael, Patrick D.; Gao, Simon; Lee, Hee Yoon; Groves, Andrew K.; Zuo, Jian; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-12-31

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering.

  19. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oghalai, John S.; Gao, Simon; Lee, Hee Yoon; Raphael, Patrick D.; Groves, Andrew K.; Zuo, Jian; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-12-01

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering.

  20. Multiple Tune Jumps to Overcome Horizontal Depolarizing Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K. A.; Dutheil, Y.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Lin, F.; Mackay, W. W.; Meot, F.; Poblaguev, A.; Ranjbar, V.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2016-02-01

    Imperfection and vertical intrinsic depolarizing resonances have been overcome by the two partial Siberian snakes in the Alternative Gradient Synchrotron(AGS). The relatively weak but numerous horizontal resonances are the main source of polarization loss in the AGS. A pair of horizontal tune jump quads have been used to overcome these weak resonances. The locations of the two quads have to be chosen such that the disturbance to the beam optics is minimum. The emittance growth has to be mitigated for this method to work. In addition, this technique needs very accurate jump timing. Using two partial Siberian snakes, with vertical tune inside the spin tune gap and 80% polarization at AGS injection, polarized proton beam had reached 1.5 × 1011 proton per bunch with 65% polarization. With the tune jump timing optimized and emittance preserved, more than 70% polarization with 2 × 1011 protons per bunch has been achieved.

  1. On the Tuning of High-Resolution NMR Probes

    PubMed Central

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Huber, Gaspard; Nausner, Martin; Horničáková, Michaela; Desvaux, Hervé; Müller, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Three optimum conditions for the tuning of NMR probes are compared: the conventional tuning optimum, which is based on radio-frequency pulse efficiency, the spin noise tuning optimum based on the line shape of the spin noise signal, and the newly introduced frequency shift tuning optimum, which minimizes the frequency pushing effect on strong signals. The latter results if the radiation damping feedback field is not in perfect quadrature to the precessing magnetization. According to the conventional RLC (resistor–inductor–capacitor) resonant circuit model, the optima should be identical, but significant deviations are found experimentally at low temperatures, in particular on cryogenically cooled probes. The existence of different optima with respect to frequency pushing and spin noise line shape has important consequences on the nonlinearity of spin dynamics at high polarization levels and the implementation of experiments on cold probes. PMID:25210000

  2. Tuning electrode impedance for the electrical recording of biopotentials.

    PubMed

    Fontes, M A; de Beeck, M; Van Hoof, C; Neves, H P

    2010-01-01

    Tuning the electrode impedance through the DC biasing of iridium oxide is presented. Impedance reduction of up to two orders of magnitude was reproducibly observed in 20 microm diameter microelectrodes at a biasing of 1V.

  3. Little Known Facts about the Common Tuning Fork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, P. P.

    2002-01-01

    Explains the physical principles of the tuning fork which has a common use in teaching laboratories. Includes information on its vibration, frequency of vibration, elasticity, and reasons for having two prongs. (YDS)

  4. Online automatic tuning and control for fed-batch cultivation

    PubMed Central

    van Straten, Gerrit; van der Pol, Leo A.; van Boxtel, Anton J. B.

    2007-01-01

    Performance of controllers applied in biotechnological production is often below expectation. Online automatic tuning has the capability to improve control performance by adjusting control parameters. This work presents automatic tuning approaches for model reference specific growth rate control during fed-batch cultivation. The approaches are direct methods that use the error between observed specific growth rate and its set point; systematic perturbations of the cultivation are not necessary. Two automatic tuning methods proved to be efficient, in which the adaptation rate is based on a combination of the error, squared error and integral error. These methods are relatively simple and robust against disturbances, parameter uncertainties, and initialization errors. Application of the specific growth rate controller yields a stable system. The controller and automatic tuning methods are qualified by simulations and laboratory experiments with Bordetella pertussis. PMID:18157554

  5. Acousto-optic filter for electronic laser tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.

    1972-01-01

    Electronically tunable lithium niobate filter utilizes acoustic-optic diffraction for tuning laser to desired frequencies. Filter placed inside laser cavity diffracts incident optical signal of one polarization into orthogonal polarization by collinearly propagating acoustic beam to desired wavelength.

  6. OSKI: A Library of Automatically Tuned Sparse Matrix Kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Vuduc, R; Demmel, J W; Yelick, K A

    2005-07-19

    The Optimized Sparse Kernel Interface (OSKI) is a collection of low-level primitives that provide automatically tuned computational kernels on sparse matrices, for use by solver libraries and applications. These kernels include sparse matrix-vector multiply and sparse triangular solve, among others. The primary aim of this interface is to hide the complex decision-making process needed to tune the performance of a kernel implementation for a particular user's sparse matrix and machine, while also exposing the steps and potentially non-trivial costs of tuning at run-time. This paper provides an overview of OSKI, which is based on our research on automatically tuned sparse kernels for modern cache-based superscalar machines.

  7. Shape-tuned dynamic properties of magnetic nanoelements during magnetization reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guang-fu; Li, Zhi-xiong; Wang, Xi-guang; Nie, Yao-zhuang; Guo, Guang-hua

    2015-07-01

    We study the dynamic properties of magnetic nanoelements with tapered ends by using micromagnetic simulations. It is found that the spin-wave modes can be effectively manipulated by the element shape. With the increase of the end sharpness (described by tapering parameter h), the frequency of the spin-wave edge mode increases rapidly and its oscillation areas in the both ends of element gradually increase and move toward to the central area. Finally, the edge mode completely merges into the fundamental mode. During the magnetization reversal processes, the edge mode experiences one or two softening depending on h≤60 nm or 60 nm100 nm, it is the fundamental mode that goes to zero at the switching field. The evolution of the spin-wave modes reflects the change of the micromagnetic structures of the elements during the reversal. It is the softening of the edge mode that triggers the magnetization reversal in elements with h<100 nm. The quasi-uniform reversal in the elements with h>100 nm is induced by the softening of the fundamental mode, where the edge mode is completely suppressed. The results presented in this work demonstrate that the dynamic properties and the magnetization reversal can be effectively tuned by changing the shape of the nanoelements and may be useful for designing the nanoscale magnetic devices.

  8. Tuning the work-function via strong coupling.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, James A; Liscio, Andrea; Schwartz, Tal; Canaguier-Durand, Antoine; Genet, Cyriaque; Palermo, Vincenzo; Samorì, Paolo; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2013-05-01

    The tuning of the molecular material work-function via strong coupling with vacuum electromagnetic fields is demonstrated. Kelvin probe microscopy extracts the surface potential (SP) changes of a photochromic molecular film on plasmonic hole arrays and inside Fabry-Perot cavities. Modulating the optical cavity resonance or the photochromic film effectively tunes the work-function, suggesting a new tool for tailoring material properties.

  9. Tuning the work-function via strong coupling.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, James A; Liscio, Andrea; Schwartz, Tal; Canaguier-Durand, Antoine; Genet, Cyriaque; Palermo, Vincenzo; Samorì, Paolo; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2013-05-01

    The tuning of the molecular material work-function via strong coupling with vacuum electromagnetic fields is demonstrated. Kelvin probe microscopy extracts the surface potential (SP) changes of a photochromic molecular film on plasmonic hole arrays and inside Fabry-Perot cavities. Modulating the optical cavity resonance or the photochromic film effectively tunes the work-function, suggesting a new tool for tailoring material properties. PMID:23463588

  10. Genetic Algorithm Tuned Fuzzy Logic for Gliding Return Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burchett, Bradley T.

    2003-01-01

    The problem of designing and flying a trajectory for successful recovery of a reusable launch vehicle is tackled using fuzzy logic control with genetic algorithm optimization. The plant is approximated by a simplified three degree of freedom non-linear model. A baseline trajectory design and guidance algorithm consisting of several Mamdani type fuzzy controllers is tuned using a simple genetic algorithm. Preliminary results show that the performance of the overall system is shown to improve with genetic algorithm tuning.

  11. Electric-field-tuned color in photonic crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qibin; Haines, Andrew; Snoswell, David; Keplinger, Christoph; Kaltseis, Rainer; Bauer, Siegfried; Graz, Ingrid; Denk, Richard; Spahn, Peter; Hellmann, Goetz; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2012-03-01

    Electrically tuned photonic crystals are produced by applying fields across shear-assembled elastomeric polymer opal thin films. At increasing voltages, the polymer opal films stretch biaxially under Maxwell stress, deforming the nanostructure and producing marked color changes. This quadratic electro-optic tuning of the photonic bandgap is repeatable over many cycles, switches within 100 ms, and bridges the gap between electro-active materials and photonic crystals.

  12. Tuning micropillar cavity birefringence by laser induced surface defects

    SciTech Connect

    Bonato, Cristian; Ding Dapeng; Gudat, Jan; Exter, Martin P. van; Thon, Susanna; Kim, Hyochul; Petroff, Pierre M.; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2009-12-21

    We demonstrate a technique to tune the optical properties of micropillar cavities by creating small defects on the sample surface near the cavity region with an intense focused laser beam. Such defects modify strain in the structure, changing the birefringence in a controllable way. We apply the technique to make the fundamental cavity mode polarization-degenerate and to fine tune the overall mode frequencies, as needed for applications in quantum information science.

  13. Method and apparatus for tuning high power lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Vandersluis, Kenneth L.

    1977-04-19

    This invention relates to high power gas lasers that are adapted to be tuned to a desired lasing wavelength through the use of a gas cell to lower the gain at a natural lasing wavelength and "seeding" the laser with a beam from a low power laser which is lasing at the desired wavelength. This tuning is accomplished with no loss of power and produces a pulse with an altered pulse shape. It is potentially applicable to all gas lasers.

  14. Emissivity Tuned Emitter for RTPV Power Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carl M. Stoots; Robert C. O'Brien; Troy M. Howe

    2012-03-01

    Every mission launched by NASA to the outer planets has produced unexpected results. The Voyager I and II, Galileo, and Cassini missions produced images and collected scientific data that totally revolutionized our understanding of the solar system and the formation of the planetary systems. These missions were enabled by the use of nuclear power. Because of the distances from the Sun, electrical power was produced using the radioactive decay of a plutonium isotope. Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in the past and currently used Multi-Mission RTGs (MMRTGs) provide power for space missions. Unfortunately, RTGs rely on thermocouples to convert heat to electricity and are inherently inefficient ({approx} 3-7% thermal to electric efficiency). A Radioisotope Thermal Photovoltaic (RTPV) power source has the potential to reduce the specific mass of the onboard power supply by increasing the efficiency of thermal to electric conversion. In an RTPV, a radioisotope heats an emitter, which emits light to a photovoltaic (PV) cell, which converts the light into electricity. Developing an emitter tuned to the desired wavelength of the photovoltaic is a key part in increasing overall performance. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have built a Thermal Photovoltaic (TPV) system, that utilizes a simulated General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) from a MMRTG to heat a tantalum emitter. The GPHS is a block of graphite roughly 10 cm by 10 cm by 5 cm. A fully loaded GPHS produces 250 w of thermal power and weighs 1.6 kgs. The GRC system relies on the GPHS unit radiating at 1200 K to a tantalum emitter that, in turn, radiates light to a GaInAs photo-voltaic cell. The GRC claims system efficiency of conversion of 15%. The specific mass is around 167 kg/kWe. A RTPV power source that utilized a ceramic or ceramic-metal (cermet) matrix would allow for the combination of the heat source, canister, and emitter into one compact unit, and allow variation in size

  15. Forward-masked spatial tuning curves in cochlear implant users

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David A.; Donaldson, Gail S.; Kreft, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Forward-masked psychophysical spatial tuning curves (fmSTCs) were measured in twelve cochlear-implant subjects, six using bipolar stimulation (Nucleus devices)and six using monopolar stimulation (Clarion devices). fmSTCs were measured at several probe levels on a middle electrode using a fixed-level probe stimulus and variable-level maskers. The average fmSTC slopes obtained in subjects using bipolar stimulation (3.7 dB/mm) were approximately three times steeper than average slopes obtained in subjects using monopolar stimulation (1.2 dB/mm). Average spatial bandwidths were about half as wide for subjects with bipolar stimulation (2.6 mm) than for subjects with monopolar stimulation (4.6 mm). None of the tuning curve characteristics changed significantly with probe level. fmSTCs replotted in terms of acoustic frequency, using Greenwood’s [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 33, 1344–1356 (1961)] frequency-to-place equation, were compared with forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves obtained previously from normal-hearing and hearing-impaired acoustic listeners. The average tuning characteristics of fmSTCs in electric hearing were similar to the broad tuning observed in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired acoustic listeners at high stimulus levels. This suggests that spatial tuning is not the primary factor limiting speech perception in many cochlear implant users. PMID:18345841

  16. Aircraft interior noise reduction by alternate resonance tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottwald, James A.; Bliss, Donald B.

    1990-01-01

    The focus is on a noise control method which considers aircraft fuselages lined with panels alternately tuned to frequencies above and below the frequency that must be attenuated. An interior noise reduction called alternate resonance tuning (ART) is described both theoretically and experimentally. Problems dealing with tuning single paneled wall structures for optimum noise reduction using the ART methodology are presented, and three theoretical problems are analyzed. The first analysis is a three dimensional, full acoustic solution for tuning a panel wall composed of repeating sections with four different panel tunings within that section, where the panels are modeled as idealized spring-mass-damper systems. The second analysis is a two dimensional, full acoustic solution for a panel geometry influenced by the effect of a propagating external pressure field such as that which might be associated with propeller passage by a fuselage. To reduce the analysis complexity, idealized spring-mass-damper panels are again employed. The final theoretical analysis presents the general four panel problem with real panel sections, where the effect of higher structural modes is discussed. Results from an experimental program highlight real applications of the ART concept and show the effectiveness of the tuning on real structures.

  17. A fully integrated CMOS VCXO-IC with low phase noise, wide tuning range and high tuning linearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanjun, Yang; Yun, Zeng

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a low phase noise, wide tuning range and high tuning linearity CMOS voltage controlled crystal oscillator IC (VCXO-IC) with LVCMOS and LVPECL output. A differential coupled frequency doubling Colpitts oscillator is adopted to obtain low noise 2× frequency output. Wide tuning range and high linearity are simultaneously achieved by using MOS varactor arrays. The measurement results show that the designed VCXO-IC achieves -134 dBc/Hz phase noise at 1 kHz offset frequency and ± 135 ppm output frequency tuning range within 3% linearity by using 40 MHz fundamental AT-cut crystal. The VCXO-IC is fabricated in the chartered 0.35 μm standard CMOS process and occupies a total silicon area of 2.4 mm2. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61350007).

  18. Artificial color tuning of firefly luminescence: Theoretical mutation by tuning electrostatic interactions between protein and luciferin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Naoki; Hasegawa, Jun-ya; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    Electrostatic interactions between firefly oxyluciferin and the surrounding proteins were analyzed, and the amino acids important for controlling emission energy were identified. We propose Arg223Ala, Glu344Ala, and Asp422Ala mutations in firefly oxyluciferase of Photinuspyralis, which artificially change the luminescence color by tuning the electrostatic effect from the luciferase proteins. In the theoretical mutation simulation, the emission energy of the triple mutant was estimated to be 2.05 eV (602 nm, reddish-orange), which is 0.18 eV lower than that of the wild type (2.23 eV, 557 nm, yellow-green). For calculating the emission energies, we used the symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method.

  19. Tuning Riboswitch Regulation through Conformational Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Ross C.; Smith, Angela M.; Fuchs, Ryan T.; Kleckner, Ian R.; Henkin, Tina M.; Foster, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The SMK box riboswitch, which represents one of three known classes of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-responsive riboswitches, regulates gene expression in bacteria at the level of translation initiation. In contrast to most riboswitches, which contain separate domains responsible for ligand recognition and gene regulation, the ligand-binding and regulatory domains of the SMK box riboswitch are coincident. This property was exploited to allow the first atomic-level characterization of a functionally intact riboswitch in both the ligand-bound and ligand-free states. NMR spectroscopy revealed distinct mutually exclusive RNA conformations that are differentially populated in the presence or absence of the effector metabolite. Isothermal titration calorimetry and in vivo reporter assay results revealed the thermodynamic and functional consequences of this conformational equilibrium. We present a comprehensive model of the structural, thermodynamic, and functional properties of this compact RNA regulatory element. PMID:21075119

  20. Feedback and Feedforward Control of Frequency Tuning to Naturalistic Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Chacron, Maurice J.; Maler, Leonard; Bastian, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Sensory neurons must respond to a wide variety of natural stimuli that can have very different spatiotemporal characteristics. Optimal responsiveness to subsets of these stimuli can be achieved by devoting specialized neural circuitry to different stimulus categories, or, alternatively, this circuitry can be modulated or tuned to optimize responsiveness to current stimulus conditions. This study explores the mechanisms that enable neurons within the initial processing station of the electrosensory system of weakly electric fish to shift their tuning properties based on the spatial extent of the stimulus. These neurons are tuned to low frequencies when the stimulus is restricted to a small region within the receptive field center but are tuned to higher frequencies when the stimulus impinges on large regions of the sensory epithelium. Through a combination of modeling and in vivo electrophysiology, we reveal the respective contributions of the filtering characteristics of extended dendritic structures and feedback circuitry to this shift in tuning. Our results show that low-frequency tuning can result from the cable properties of an extended dendrite that conveys receptor-afferent information to the cell body. The shift from low- to high-frequency tuning, seen in response to spatially extensive stimuli, results from increased wide-band input attributable to activation of larger populations of receptor afferents, as well as the activation of parallel fiber feedback from the cerebellum. This feedback provides a cancellation signal with low-pass characteristics that selectively attenuates low-frequency responsiveness. Thus, with spatially extensive stimuli, these cells preferentially respond to the higher-frequency components of the receptor-afferent input. PMID:15944380

  1. Neural Tuning Functions Underlie Both Generalization and Interference

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Ian S.; Franklin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    In sports, the role of backswing is considered critical for generating a good shot, even though it plays no direct role in hitting the ball. We recently demonstrated the scientific basis of this phenomenon by showing that immediate past movement affects the learning and recall of motor memories. This effect occurred regardless of whether the past contextual movement was performed actively, passively, or shown visually. In force field studies, it has been shown that motor memories generalize locally and that the level of compensation decays as a function of movement angle away from the trained movement. Here we examine if the contextual effect of past movement exhibits similar patterns of generalization and whether it can explain behavior seen in interference studies. Using a single force-field learning task, the directional tuning curves of both the prior contextual movement and the subsequent force field adaptive movements were measured. The adaptation movement direction showed strong directional tuning, decaying to zero by 90° relative to the training direction. The contextual movement direction exhibited a similar directional tuning, although the effect was always above 60%. We then investigated the directional tuning of the passive contextual movement using interference tasks, where the contextual movements that uniquely specified the force field direction were separated by ±15° or ±45°. Both groups showed a pronounced tuning effect, which could be well explained by the directional tuning functions for single force fields. Our results show that contextual effect of past movement influences predictive force compensation, even when adaptation does not require contextual information. However, when such past movement contextual information is crucial to the task, such as in an interference study, it plays a strong role in motor memory learning and recall. This work demonstrates that similar tuning responses underlie both generalization of movement direction

  2. AGS tune jump system to cross horizontal depolarization resonances overview

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, J.W.; Ahrens, L.; Fu, W.; Mi, J.L.; Rosas, P.; Schoefer, V.; Theisen, C.; Altinbas, Z.

    2011-03-28

    Two partial snakes overcome the vertical depolarizing resonances in the AGS. But a new type of depolarizing intrinsic resonance from horizontal motion appeared. We reduce these using horizontal tune jumps timed to these resonances. We gain a factor of six in crossing rate with a tune jump of 0.05 in 100 {micro}s. Two quadrapoles, we described in 2009, pulse 42 times, the current matching beam energy. The power supplies for these quads are described in detail elsewhere in this conference. The controls for the Jump Quad system is based on a BNL designed Quad Function Generator. Two modules are used; one for timing, and one to supply reference voltages. Synchronization is provided by a proprietary serial bus, the Event Link. The AgsTuneJump application predicts the times of the resonances during the AGS cycle and calculates the power supply trigger times from externally collected tune and energy versus time data and the Low and High PS voltage functions from a voltage to current model of the power supply. The system was commissioned during runs 09 & 10 and is operational. Many beam effects are described elsewhere. The TuneJump system has worked well and has caused little trouble save for the perturbations in the lattice having such a large effect due to our need to run with the vertical tune within a few thousandths of the integer tune. As these problems were mostly sorted out by correcting the 6th harmonic orbit distortions which caused a large 18 theta beta wave. Also running with minimal chromaticity reduces emittance growth. There are still small beta waves which are being addressed. The timing of the pulses is still being investigated, but as each crossing causes minimal polarization loss, this is a lengthy process.

  3. Autonomous Performance Monitoring System: Monitoring and Self-Tuning (MAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Chariya; Ziyad, Nigel A.

    2000-01-01

    Maintaining the long-term performance of software onboard a spacecraft can be a major factor in the cost of operations. In particular, the task of controlling and maintaining a future mission of distributed spacecraft will undoubtedly pose a great challenge, since the complexity of multiple spacecraft flying in formation grows rapidly as the number of spacecraft in the formation increases. Eventually, new approaches will be required in developing viable control systems that can handle the complexity of the data and that are flexible, reliable and efficient. In this paper we propose a methodology that aims to maintain the accuracy of flight software, while reducing the computational complexity of software tuning tasks. The proposed Monitoring and Self-Tuning (MAST) method consists of two parts: a flight software monitoring algorithm and a tuning algorithm. The dependency on the software being monitored is mostly contained in the monitoring process, while the tuning process is a generic algorithm independent of the detailed knowledge on the software. This architecture will enable MAST to be applicable to different onboard software controlling various dynamics of the spacecraft, such as attitude self-calibration, and formation control. An advantage of MAST over conventional techniques such as filter or batch least square is that the tuning algorithm uses machine learning approach to handle uncertainty in the problem domain, resulting in reducing over all computational complexity. The underlying concept of this technique is a reinforcement learning scheme based on cumulative probability generated by the historical performance of the system. The success of MAST will depend heavily on the reinforcement scheme used in the tuning algorithm, which guarantees the tuning solutions exist.

  4. Squeezing Alters Frequency Tuning of WGM Optical Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohageg, Makan; Maleki, Lute

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical squeezing has been found to alter the frequency tuning of a whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonator that has an elliptical shape and is made of lithium niobate. It may be possible to exploit this effect to design reconfigurable optical filters for optical communications and for scientific experiments involving quantum electrodynamics. Some background information is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the squeezing-induced alteration of frequency tuning: The spectrum of a WGM resonator is represented by a comblike plot of intensity versus frequency. Each peak of the comblike plot corresponds to an electromagnetic mode represented by an integer mode number, and the modes are grouped into sets represented by integer mode indices. Because lithium niobate is an electro-optically active material, the WGM resonator can be tuned (that is, the resonance frequencies can be shifted) by applying a suitable bias potential. The frequency shift of each mode is quantified by a tuning rate defined as the ratio between the frequency shift and the applied potential. In the absence of squeezing, all modes exhibit the same tuning rate. This concludes the background information. It has been demonstrated experimentally that when the resonator is squeezed along part of either of its two principal axes, tuning rates differ among the groups of modes represented by different indices (see figure). The differences in tuning rates could be utilized to configure the resonance spectrum to obtain a desired effect; for example, through a combination of squeezing and electrical biasing, two resonances represented by different mode indices could be set at a specified frequency difference something that could not be done through electrical biasing alone.

  5. Modification of acceleration element in ''TRANSPORT''

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, J.W.; McGill, J.

    1987-01-01

    One of the uses at LAMPF of the beam-dynamics code TRANSPORT is to model and tune the proton beams in the side-coupled linac. Significant differences are found between measured beam characteristics and those calculated by an early version of TRANSPORT. These differences are reduced to acceptable limits by modification of the original accelerator transformation matrix used in the code. The modified element and a brief description of its derivation are presented. The modified matrix reduces to the original matrix in the relativistic limit. The modified matrix is also compared to results of numerical integration to obtain some indication of its accuracy.

  6. Wide and fast dispersion tuning of a picosecond OPO based on aperiodic quasi-phase matching using an axially chirped volume Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Descloux, Delphine; Walter, Guillaume; Cadiou, Erwan; Dherbecourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gorju, Guillaume; Melkonian, Jean-Michel; Raybaut, Myriam; Drag, Cyril; Godard, Antoine

    2016-09-01

    We report on a widely tunable synchronously pumped picosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) combining an aperiodically poled MgO-doped LiNbO3 crystal as a broadband gain medium and an axially chirped volume Bragg grating as a spectral filtering dispersive element. Translation of the Bragg grating along the beam axis enables wavelength tuning over 215 nm around 3.82 μm and provides spectral narrowing. Rapid continuous tuning over 150 nm in 100 ms is demonstrated. PMID:27607972

  7. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1. UNIT VII, ENGINE TUNE-UP--DETROIT DIESEL ENGINE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 30-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF TUNE-UP PROCEDURES FOR DIESEL ENGINES. TOPICS ARE SCHEDULING TUNE-UPS, AND TUNE-UP PROCEDURES. THE MODULE CONSISTS OF A SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL BRANCH PROGRAMED TRAINING FILM "ENGINE TUNE-UP--DETROIT DIESEL ENGINE" AND OTHER MATERIALS. SEE VT 005 655 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.…

  8. A computer-aided method for postproduction tuning of HTS filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Tao; Fang, Lan; Yan, Shaolin; Zhao, Xinjie; Zhou, Tiege; You, Shitou; Ma, Weigang; Yue, Hongwei; Xie, Qinglian

    2007-12-01

    The empirical tuning of high temperature superconducting (HTS) filters is usually time-consuming and expensive. A computer-aided tuning method is presented in this paper. By means of optimization, the method diagnoses detuning of individual resonators quantitatively in the tuning process, and then by using neural network models the method is able to give the operator a decision on how much the corresponding tuning screws should be tuned. So, compared with the empirical tuning method, this method can be used to tune the HTS filters accurately with less time and cost.

  9. Extending the mode-hop-free tuning range of an external-cavity diode laser by synchronous tuning with mode matching.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hai; Liu, Zhigang; Zhou, Yangli; Zhang, Weibo

    2014-11-20

    We present an effective method to extend the mode-hop-free (MHF) tuning range of an external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) by synchronous tuning of the longitudinal modes of the external cavity and the internal cavity, with the mode also matched in the initial state. Both the principle of synchronous tuning and the condition of mode matching in a Littman-configuration ECDL are introduced. The necessary tuning parameters could simply be estimated by the output power curve of the tuning with a single photodiode. By using this tuning method, we increased the MHF tuning range of an ECDL with a nonoptimized reflector pivot position from several gigahertzes to over 78 GHz around 774.5 nm. The tuning performance of the ECDL could meet the requirement of frequency scanned interferometry. PMID:25607863

  10. A new hybrid gyroscope with electrostatic negative stiffness tuning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Guan, Yumei; Wang, Shourong; Zou, Qi; Chu, Xian; Xue, Haiyan

    2013-05-30

    A variety of gyroscopes have been extensively studied due to their capability of precision detection of rotation rates and extensive applications in navigation, guidance and motion control. In this work, a new Hybrid Gyroscope (HG) which combines the traditional Dynamically Tuned Gyroscope (DTG) with silicon micromachined technology is investigated. The HG not only has the potentiality of achieving the same high precision as the traditional DTG, but also features a small size and low cost. The theoretical mechanism of the HG with a capacitance transducer and an electrostatic torquer is derived and the influence of the installation errors from the capacitance plate and the disc rotor module is investigated. A new tuning mechanism based on negative stiffness rather than the traditional dynamic tuning is proposed. The experimental results prove that the negative stiffness tuning is practicable and a tuning voltage of as high as 63 V is demonstrated. Due to the decreased installation error, the non-linearity of the scale factor is reduced significantly from 11.78% to 0.64%, as well as the asymmetry from 93.3% to 1.56% in the open loop condition. The rebalancing close-loop control is simulated and achieved experimentally, which proves that the fundamental principle of the HG is feasible.

  11. Unsteady Aerodynamic Model Tuning for Precise Flutter Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi

    2011-01-01

    A simple method for an unsteady aerodynamic model tuning is proposed in this study. This method is based on the direct modification of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices. The aerostructures test wing 2 flight-test data is used to demonstrate the proposed model tuning method. The flutter speed margin computed using only the test validated structural dynamic model can be improved using the additional unsteady aerodynamic model tuning, and then the flutter speed margin requirement of 15 percent in military specifications can apply towards the test validated aeroelastic model. In this study, unsteady aerodynamic model tunings are performed at two time invariant flight conditions, at Mach numbers of 0.390 and 0.456. When the Mach number for the unsteady aerodynamic model tuning approaches to the measured fluttering Mach number, 0.502, at the flight altitude of 9,837 ft, the estimated flutter speed is approached to the measured flutter speed at this altitude. The minimum flutter speed difference between the estimated and measured flutter speed is -0.14 percent.

  12. Tuning the Model Predictive Control of a Crude Distillation Unit.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, André Shigueo; Zanin, Antonio Carlos; Odloak, Darci

    2016-01-01

    Tuning the parameters of the Model Predictive Control (MPC) of an industrial Crude Distillation Unit (CDU) is considered here. A realistic scenario is depicted where the inputs of the CDU system have optimizing targets, which are provided by the Real Time Optimization layer of the control structure. It is considered the nominal case, in which both the CDU model and the MPC model are the same. The process outputs are controlled inside zones instead of at fixed set points. Then, the tuning procedure has to define the weights that penalize the output error with respect to the control zone, the weights that penalize the deviation of the inputs from their targets, as well as the weights that penalize the input moves. A tuning approach based on multi-objective optimization is proposed and applied to the MPC of the CDU system. The performance of the controller tuned with the proposed approach is compared through simulation with the results of an existing approach also based on multi-objective optimization. The simulation results are similar, but the proposed approach has a computational load significantly lower than the existing method. The tuning effort is also much lower than in the conventional practical approaches that are usually based on ad-hoc procedures.

  13. The inverse problem of bimorph mirror tuning on a beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Rong

    2013-03-07

    One of the challenges of tuning bimorph mirrors with many electrodes is that the calculated focusing voltages can be different by more than the safety limit (such as 500 V for the mirrors used at 17-ID at the Advanced Photon Source) between adjacent electrodes. A study of this problem at 17-ID revealed that the inverse problem of the tuning in situ, using X-rays, became ill-conditioned when the number of electrodes was large and the calculated focusing voltages were contaminated with measurement errors. Increasing the number of beamlets during the tuning could reduce the matrix condition number in the problem, but obtaining voltages with variation below the safety limit was still not always guaranteed and multiple iterations of tuning were often required. Applying Tikhonov regularization and using the L-curve criterion for the determination of the regularization parameter made it straightforward to obtain focusing voltages with well behaved variations. Some characteristics of the tuning results obtained using Tikhonov regularization are given in this paper.

  14. The development of climate models: tuning vs. flux corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommenget, Dietmar

    2016-04-01

    Current state-of-the-art coupled general circulation models (CGCMs) have substantial errors in their main climate representations. In particular they have large uncertainties in the simulated climate sensitivity on regional and global scale to a doubling of CO2 that result from model errors. The current approach in developing CGCMs and dealing with the error in it involves substantial amount of tuning of uncertain parameters of sub-scale process that need to be parameterized. This tuning process is neither documented, nor reproducible nor is it clear if it indeed improves the model performance. Alternative methods such as flux correcting are not used nor is it clear if such methods would perform better. In the study presented here we will perform perturbed physics experiments with the simplified globally resolved energy balance (GREB) model to test the different ideas of dealing with model errors in the development of models. It will be illustrated that tuning of CGCM is very likely to fail given the complexity of the system, the limited resources and the limited observations to optimize parameters. While tuning will improve the models performance on the cost function (such as the observed past climate), it will not get closer to the 'true' physics nor will it improve future climate change projection. In turn, not tuning or flux correcting is not only much cheaper and simpler, but it will actually perform better in nearly all aspects. This, however, varies whether one is focussed on regional or global scales.

  15. Unsteady Aerodynamic Model Tuning for Precise Flutter Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2011-01-01

    A simple method for an unsteady aerodynamic model tuning is proposed in this study. This method is based on the direct modification of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices. The aerostructures test wing 2 flight-test data is used to demonstrate the proposed model tuning method. The flutter speed margin computed using only the test validated structural dynamic model can be improved using the additional unsteady aerodynamic model tuning, and then the flutter speed margin requirement of 15 % in military specifications can apply towards the test validated aeroelastic model. In this study, unsteady aerodynamic model tunings are performed at two time invariant flight conditions, at Mach numbers of 0.390 and 0.456. When the Mach number for the unsteady model tuning approaches to the measured fluttering Mach number, 0.502, at the flight altitude of 9,837 ft, the estimated flutter speed is approached to the measured flutter speed at this altitude. The minimum flutter speed difference between the estimated and measured flutter speed is -.14 %.

  16. A New Hybrid Gyroscope with Electrostatic Negative Stiffness Tuning

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Guan, Yumei; Wang, Shourong; Zou, Qi; Chu, Xian; Xue, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    A variety of gyroscopes have been extensively studied due to their capability of precision detection of rotation rates and extensive applications in navigation, guidance and motion control. In this work, a new Hybrid Gyroscope (HG) which combines the traditional Dynamically Tuned Gyroscope (DTG) with silicon micromachined technology is investigated. The HG not only has the potentiality of achieving the same high precision as the traditional DTG, but also features a small size and low cost. The theoretical mechanism of the HG with a capacitance transducer and an electrostatic torquer is derived and the influence of the installation errors from the capacitance plate and the disc rotor module is investigated. A new tuning mechanism based on negative stiffness rather than the traditional dynamic tuning is proposed. The experimental results prove that the negative stiffness tuning is practicable and a tuning voltage of as high as 63 V is demonstrated. Due to the decreased installation error, the non-linearity of the scale factor is reduced significantly from 11.78% to 0.64%, as well as the asymmetry from 93.3% to 1.56% in the open loop condition. The rebalancing close-loop control is simulated and achieved experimentally, which proves that the fundamental principle of the HG is feasible. PMID:23722826

  17. Broad electrical tuning of plasmonic nanoantennas at visible frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thang B.; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.

    2016-05-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of electrical tuning of plasmon resonances of optical nanopatch antennas over a wide wavelength range. The antennas consist of silver nanocubes separated from a gold film by a thin 8 nm polyelectrolyte spacer layer. By using ionic liquid and indium tin oxide coated glass as a top electrode, we demonstrate dynamic and reversible tuning of the plasmon resonance over 100 nm in the visible wavelength range using low applied voltages between -3.0 V and 2.8 V. The electrical potential is applied across the nanoscale gap causing changes in the gap thickness and dielectric environment which, in turn, modifies the plasmon resonance. The observed tuning range is greater than the full-width-at-half-maximum of the plasmon resonance, resulting in a tuning figure of merit of 1.05 and a tuning contrast greater than 50%. Our results provide an avenue to create active and reconfigurable integrated nanophotonic components for applications in optoelectronics and sensing.

  18. An Adaptive Kalman Filter Using a Simple Residual Tuning Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    One difficulty in using Kalman filters in real world situations is the selection of the correct process noise, measurement noise, and initial state estimate and covariance. These parameters are commonly referred to as tuning parameters. Multiple methods have been developed to estimate these parameters. Most of those methods such as maximum likelihood, subspace, and observer Kalman Identification require extensive offline processing and are not suitable for real time processing. One technique, which is suitable for real time processing, is the residual tuning method. Any mismodeling of the filter tuning parameters will result in a non-white sequence for the filter measurement residuals. The residual tuning technique uses this information to estimate corrections to those tuning parameters. The actual implementation results in a set of sequential equations that run in parallel with the Kalman filter. A. H. Jazwinski developed a specialized version of this technique for estimation of process noise. Equations for the estimation of the measurement noise have also been developed. These algorithms are used to estimate the process noise and measurement noise for the Wide Field Infrared Explorer star tracker and gyro.

  19. An Adaptive Kalman Filter using a Simple Residual Tuning Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    One difficulty in using Kalman filters in real world situations is the selection of the correct process noise, measurement noise, and initial state estimate and covariance. These parameters are commonly referred to as tuning parameters. Multiple methods have been developed to estimate these parameters. Most of those methods such as maximum likelihood, subspace, and observer Kalman Identification require extensive offline processing and are not suitable for real time processing. One technique, which is suitable for real time processing, is the residual tuning method. Any mismodeling of the filter tuning parameters will result in a non-white sequence for the filter measurement residuals. The residual tuning technique uses this information to estimate corrections to those tuning parameters. The actual implementation results in a set of sequential equations that run in parallel with the Kalman filter. Equations for the estimation of the measurement noise have also been developed. These algorithms are used to estimate the process noise and measurement noise for the Wide Field Infrared Explorer star tracker and gyro.

  20. Dynamic tuning of lymphocytes: physiological basis, mechanisms, and function.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Zvi; Paul, William E

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic tuning of cellular responsiveness as a result of repeated stimuli improves the ability of cells to distinguish physiologically meaningful signals from each other and from noise. In particular, lymphocyte activation thresholds are subject to tuning, which contributes to maintaining tolerance to self-antigens and persisting foreign antigens, averting autoimmunity and immune pathogenesis, but allowing responses to strong, structured perturbations that are typically associated with acute infection. Such tuning is also implicated in conferring flexibility to positive selection in the thymus, in controlling the magnitude of the immune response, and in generating memory cells. Additional functional properties are dynamically and differentially tuned in parallel via subthreshold contact interactions between developing or mature lymphocytes and self-antigen-presenting cells. These interactions facilitate and regulate lymphocyte viability, maintain their functional integrity, and influence their responses to foreign antigens and accessory signals, qualitatively and quantitatively. Bidirectional tuning of T cells and antigen-presenting cells leads to the definition of homeostatic set points, thus maximizing clonal diversity. PMID:25665077

  1. Tuning Parameters in Heuristics by Using Design of Experiments Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arin, Arif; Rabadi, Ghaith; Unal, Resit

    2010-01-01

    With the growing complexity of today's large scale problems, it has become more difficult to find optimal solutions by using exact mathematical methods. The need to find near-optimal solutions in an acceptable time frame requires heuristic approaches. In many cases, however, most heuristics have several parameters that need to be "tuned" before they can reach good results. The problem then turns into "finding best parameter setting" for the heuristics to solve the problems efficiently and timely. One-Factor-At-a-Time (OFAT) approach for parameter tuning neglects the interactions between parameters. Design of Experiments (DOE) tools can be instead employed to tune the parameters more effectively. In this paper, we seek the best parameter setting for a Genetic Algorithm (GA) to solve the single machine total weighted tardiness problem in which n jobs must be scheduled on a single machine without preemption, and the objective is to minimize the total weighted tardiness. Benchmark instances for the problem are available in the literature. To fine tune the GA parameters in the most efficient way, we compare multiple DOE models including 2-level (2k ) full factorial design, orthogonal array design, central composite design, D-optimal design and signal-to-noise (SIN) ratios. In each DOE method, a mathematical model is created using regression analysis, and solved to obtain the best parameter setting. After verification runs using the tuned parameter setting, the preliminary results for optimal solutions of multiple instances were found efficiently.

  2. Overcoming horizontal depolarizing resonances with multiple tune jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K. A.; Dutheil, Y.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Lin, F.; MacKay, W. W.; Meot, F.; Poblaguev, A.; Ranjbar, V.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2014-08-01

    In a medium energy proton synchrotron, strong enough partial Siberian snakes can be used to avoid both imperfection and vertical intrinsic depolarizing resonances. However, partial snakes tilt the stable spin direction away from vertical, which generates depolarizing resonances associated with horizontal tune. The relatively weak but numerous horizontal intrinsic resonances are the main source of the residual polarization losses. A pair of horizontal tune jump quads have been used in the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron to overcome these weak resonances. The locations of the two quads have to be chosen such that the disturbance to the beam optics is minimum. The emittance growth has to be mitigated for this method to work. In addition, this technique needs very accurate jump timing. Using two partial Siberian snakes, with vertical tune inside the spin tune gap and 80% polarization at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron injection, polarized proton beam had reached 1.5×1011 proton per bunch with 65% polarization. With the tune jump timing optimized and emittance preserved, more than 70% polarization with 2×1011 protons per bunch has been achieved. The polarization transport efficiency is close to 90%.

  3. A New Approach to Identify Optimal Properties of Shunting Elements for Maximum Damping of Structural Vibration Using Piezoelectric Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Junhong; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2004-01-01

    The use of shunted piezoelectric patches in reducing vibration and sound radiation of structures has several advantages over passive viscoelastic elements, e.g., lower weight with increased controllability. The performance of the piezoelectric patches depends on the shunting electronics that are designed to dissipate vibration energy through a resistive element. In past efforts most of the proposed tuning methods were based on modal properties of the structure. In these cases, the tuning applies only to one mode of interest and maximum tuning is limited to invariant points when based on den Hartog's invariant points concept. In this study, a design method based on the wave propagation approach is proposed. Optimal tuning is investigated depending on the dynamic and geometric properties that include effects from boundary conditions and position of the shunted piezoelectric patch relative to the structure. Active filters are proposed as shunting electronics to implement the tuning criteria. The developed tuning methods resulted in superior capabilities in minimizing structural vibration and noise radiation compared to other tuning methods. The tuned circuits are relatively insensitive to changes in modal properties and boundary conditions, and can applied to frequency ranges in which multiple modes have effects.

  4. DPSS Laser Beam Quality Optimization Through Pump Current Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, Rob; Callen, Alice; Sukuta, Sydney; /San Jose City Coll.

    2012-03-30

    The goal of this study is to demonstrate how a DPSS laser beam's quality parameters can be simultaneously optimized through pump current tuning. Two DPSS lasers of the same make and model were used where the laser diode pump current was first varied to ascertain the lowest RMS noise region. The lowest noise was found to be 0.13% in this region and the best M{sup 2} value of 1.0 and highest laser output power were simultaneously attained at the same current point. The laser manufacturer reported a M{sup 2} value of 1.3 and RMS noise value of .14% for these lasers. This study therefore demonstrates that pump current tuning a DPSS laser can simultaneously optimize RMS Noise, Power and M{sup 2} values. Future studies will strive to broaden the scope of the beam quality parameters impacted by current tuning.

  5. AGS tune jump power supply design and test

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, J.; Glenn, J.W.; Huang, H.; Marneris, I.; Rosas, P.; Sandberg, J.; Tan, Y.; Zhang, W.

    2011-03-28

    A horizontal tune jump system has been installed to overcome the horizontal intrinsic spin resonances, which requires jumping the horizontal tune 0.04 units 82 times, 41 up and 41 down. Two quadruple magnets have been installed in AGS ring to perform this. The pulsed magnet current ranges from about 140A near injection to about 1400A later. The current pulse rise and fall time are around 100uS and flat tops time is around 4mS. These quadruples have separated supplies. This tune jump pulse power supply employees all semiconductor parts as well as the main switches. During dummy load and magnet testing, the test results showed that the power supply could meet the specification. This article will describe some details of power supply simulation, design and testing. Some test waveforms and pictures are presented in this paper.

  6. The Tevatron tune tracker pll - theory, implementation and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The Tevatron tune tracker is based on the idea that the transverse phase response of the beam can be measured quickly and accurately enough to allow us to track the betatron tune with a phase locked loop (PLL). The goal of this paper is to show the progress of the PLL project at Fermilab. We will divide this paper into three parts: theory, implementation and measurements. In the theory section, we will use a simple linear model to show that our design will track the betatron tune under conditions that occur in the Tevatron. In the implementation section we will break down and examine each part of the PLL and in some cases calculate the actual PLL parameters used in our system from beam measurements. And finally in the measurements section we will show the results of the PLL performance.

  7. Multimodal tuned dynamic absorber for split Stirling linear cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veprik, Alexander; Tuito, Avi

    2016-05-01

    Low size, weight, power and price split Stirling linear cryocooler usually comprises electro-dynamically driven compressor and pneumatically driven expander which are side-by-side fixedly mounted upon the common frame and interconnected by the configurable transfer line. Vibration export produced by such a cryocooler comprises of a pair of tonal forces, the frequency of which essentially equals fixed driving frequency. In vibration sensitive applications, this may result in excessive angular line of sight jitter and translational defocusing affecting the image quality. The authors present Multimodal Tuned Dynamic Absorber, having one translational and two tilting modes essentially tuned to the driving frequency. Dynamic analysis shows that the dynamic reactions (force and moment) produced by such a dynamic absorber are capable of simultaneous attenuation of translational and tilting components of cryocooler induced vibration. The authors reveal the preferable design, the method of fine tuning and outcomes of numerical simulation on attainable performance.

  8. Fabrication and tuning of the SNS CCL hot model

    SciTech Connect

    Bultman, N. K.; Billen, J. H.; Chen, Z.; Richards, D. R.; Young, L. M.; Hopkins, S. M.

    2003-01-01

    A full-scale powered model of the SNS CCL was completed in August 2001. The manufacturing processes and tuning procedures used in the CCL Hot Model formed the basis of the main manufacturing contract for the SNS CCL system later placed in private industry. In this paper we summarize the design basis for the CCL and the manufacturing and process steps required to fabricate and of the various tooling and lifting and handling fixtures utilized in the process at the various machining, brazing, welding, and tuning steps. The tooling utilized in the fabrication and tuning process is discussed in detail. The ultimate successful testing of the CCL hot model has key to development of a manufacturing plan for the CCL system.

  9. The general RF tuning for IH-DTL linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. R.; Ratzinger, U.; Schlitt, B.; Tiede, R.

    2007-11-01

    The RF tuning is the most important research for achieving the resonant frequency and the flatness of electric field distributions along the axis of RF accelerating structures. The six different tuning concepts and that impacts on the longitudinal field distributions have been discussed in detail combining the RF tuning process of a 1:2 modeled 20.85 MV compact IH-DTL cavity, which was designed to accelerate proton, helium, oxygen or C 4+ from 400 keV/ u to 7 MeV/u and used as the linear injector of 430 MeV/ u synchrotron [Y.R. Lu, S. Minaev, U. Ratzinger, B. Schlitt, R.Tiede, The Compact 20MV IH-DTL for the Heidelberg Therapy Facility, in: Proceedings of the LINAC Conference, Luebeck, Germany, 2004 [1]; Y.R. Lu, Frankfurt University Dissertation, 2005. [2

  10. Tuning and Robustness Analysis for the Orion Absolute Navigation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; Zanetti, Renato; D'Souza, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is currently under development as NASA's next-generation spacecraft for exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit. The MPCV is set to perform an orbital test flight, termed Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT-1), some time in late 2014. The navigation system for the Orion spacecraft is being designed in a Multi-Organizational Design Environment (MODE) team including contractor and NASA personnel. The system uses an Extended Kalman Filter to process measurements and determine the state. The design of the navigation system has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to show the efforts made to-date in tuning the filter for the EFT-1 mission and instilling appropriate robustness into the system to meet the requirements of manned space ight. Filter performance is affected by many factors: data rates, sensor measurement errors, tuning, and others. This paper focuses mainly on the error characterization and tuning portion. Traditional efforts at tuning a navigation filter have centered around the observation/measurement noise and Gaussian process noise of the Extended Kalman Filter. While the Orion MODE team must certainly address those factors, the team is also looking at residual edit thresholds and measurement underweighting as tuning tools. Tuning analysis is presented with open loop Monte-Carlo simulation results showing statistical errors bounded by the 3-sigma filter uncertainty covariance. The Orion filter design uses 24 Exponentially Correlated Random Variable (ECRV) parameters to estimate the accel/gyro misalignment and nonorthogonality. By design, the time constant and noise terms of these ECRV parameters were set to manufacturer specifications and not used as tuning parameters. They are included in the filter as a more analytically correct method of modeling uncertainties than ad-hoc tuning of the process noise. Tuning is explored for the

  11. A PIN diode controlled dual-tuned MRI RF coil and phased array for multi nuclear imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Seunghoon; Hamamura, Mark J.; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Tugan Muftuler, L.

    2010-05-01

    MR imaging of nuclei other than hydrogen has been used to investigate metabolism in humans and animals. However, MRI observable nuclei other than hydrogen are not as abundant and as a result the image SNR is lower. Dual-tuned radio frequency (RF) coils are developed for these studies in which high-resolution structural images are acquired using hydrogen and metabolic information is acquired by exciting the other nucleus. Using a dual-tuned coil, the experimenter avoids the inconvenience of moving the patient out and replacing the RF coil for imaging different nuclei. This also eliminates image registration problems. However, the common scheme of using trap circuits for dual-tuned operation results in increased coil losses as well as problems in obtaining optimal tuning and matching at both frequencies. Here, a new approach is presented using PIN diodes to switch the coil between two resonance frequencies. This design eliminates the need for the trap circuit and associated losses from the self-resistance of the trap circuit inductors. At the operating frequencies we used, the equivalent series resistance of an inductor is higher than that of the PIN diodes. In order to test the efficacy of this new approach, we first built two surface coils of identical geometry, one with the conventional trap circuits and one with the PIN diode switches. We also studied the performances of both coils when the coils are divided into shorter conductors segments by adding more tuning elements. It is known that dividing the coil into shorter conductor segments helps reduce radiation and electric field losses. We explored this effect for both coils at both operating frequencies. Finally, a dual-tuned receive-only phased array was designed and built with the PIN diode circuit to switch between two resonance frequencies. A conventional dual-tuned birdcage coil was designed and built to transmit RF power. A unique feature of this coil is that the RF power is fed through two separate sets

  12. A PIN diode controlled dual-tuned MRI RF coil and phased array for multi nuclear imaging.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seunghoon; Hamamura, Mark J; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Muftuler, L Tugan

    2010-05-01

    MR imaging of nuclei other than hydrogen has been used to investigate metabolism in humans and animals. However, MRI observable nuclei other than hydrogen are not as abundant and as a result the image SNR is lower. Dual-tuned radio frequency (RF) coils are developed for these studies in which high-resolution structural images are acquired using hydrogen and metabolic information is acquired by exciting the other nucleus. Using a dual-tuned coil, the experimenter avoids the inconvenience of moving the patient out and replacing the RF coil for imaging different nuclei. This also eliminates image registration problems. However, the common scheme of using trap circuits for dual-tuned operation results in increased coil losses as well as problems in obtaining optimal tuning and matching at both frequencies. Here, a new approach is presented using PIN diodes to switch the coil between two resonance frequencies. This design eliminates the need for the trap circuit and associated losses from the self-resistance of the trap circuit inductors. At the operating frequencies we used, the equivalent series resistance of an inductor is higher than that of the PIN diodes. In order to test the efficacy of this new approach, we first built two surface coils of identical geometry, one with the conventional trap circuits and one with the PIN diode switches. We also studied the performances of both coils when the coils are divided into shorter conductors segments by adding more tuning elements. It is known that dividing the coil into shorter conductor segments helps reduce radiation and electric field losses. We explored this effect for both coils at both operating frequencies. Finally, a dual-tuned receive-only phased array was designed and built with the PIN diode circuit to switch between two resonance frequencies. A conventional dual-tuned birdcage coil was designed and built to transmit RF power. A unique feature of this coil is that the RF power is fed through two separate sets

  13. On the MSSM Higgsino mass and fine tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Graham G.; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Staub, Florian

    2016-08-01

    It is often argued that low fine tuning in the MSSM necessarily requires a rather light Higgsino. In this note we show that this need not be the case when a more complete set of soft SUSY breaking mass terms are included. In particular an Higgsino mass term, that correlates the μ-term contribution with the soft SUSY-breaking Higgsino masses, significantly reduces the fine tuning even for Higgsinos in the TeV mass range where its relic abundance means it can make up all the dark matter.

  14. Tuning Yu-Shiba-Rusinov states in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jellinggaard, Anders; Grove-Rasmussen, Kasper; Madsen, Morten Hannibal; Nygârd, Jesper

    2016-08-01

    We present transport spectroscopy of subgap states in a bottom gated InAs nanowire coupled to a normal lead and a superconducting aluminium lead. The device shows clearly resolved subgap states which we can track as the coupling parameters of the system are tuned and as the gap is closed by means of a magnetic field. We systematically extract system parameters by using numerical renormalization-group theory fits as a level of the quantum dot is tuned through a quantum phase transition electrostatically and magnetically. We also give an intuitive description of subgap excitations.

  15. Parameter Tuning Patterns for Random Graph Coloring with Quantum Annealing

    PubMed Central

    Titiloye, Olawale; Crispin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Quantum annealing is a combinatorial optimization technique inspired by quantum mechanics. Here we show that a spin model for the k-coloring of large dense random graphs can be field tuned so that its acceptance ratio diverges during Monte Carlo quantum annealing, until a ground state is reached. We also find that simulations exhibiting such a diverging acceptance ratio are generally more effective than those tuned to the more conventional pattern of a declining and/or stagnating acceptance ratio. This observation facilitates the discovery of solutions to several well-known benchmark k-coloring instances, some of which have been open for almost two decades. PMID:23166818

  16. Tune Evaluation From Phased BPM Turn-By-Turn Data

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Marsh, W.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-18

    In fast ramping synchrotrons like the Fermilab Booster the conventional methods of betatron tune evaluation from the turn-by-turn data may not work due to rapid changes of the tunes (sometimes in a course of a few dozens of turns) and a high level of noise. We propose a technique based on phasing of signals from a large number of BPMs which significantly increases the signal to noise ratio. Implementation of the method in the Fermilab Booster control system is described and some measurement results are presented.

  17. Piezoelectric-tuned microwave cavity for absorption spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Leskovar, Branko; Buscher, Harold T.; Kolbe, William F.

    1978-01-01

    Gas samples are analyzed for pollutants in a microwave cavity that is provided with two highly polished walls. One wall of the cavity is mechanically driven with a piezoelectric transducer at a low frequency to tune the cavity over a band of microwave frequencies in synchronism with frequency modulated microwave energy applied to the cavity. Absorption of microwave energy over the tuned frequencies is detected, and energy absorption at a particular microwave frequency is an indication of a particular pollutant in the gas sample.

  18. Tune-out wavelengths for helium atom in plasma environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Sabyasachi; Wang, Yu-Shu; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Zishi

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the effect of plasma screening on the tune-out wavelengths for helium atom using correlated exponential wave function within the framework of Debye shielding approach. The pseudostate summation technique has been used to calculate the dynamic dipole polarizability for the states (2 1S, 3 1S, 2 3S, 3 3S) of helium embedded in plasma environments. In a free-atomic system, our calculated results are in agreement with available theoretical and experimental predictions. The tune-out wavelengths show interesting behavior as functions of screening parameter.

  19. Collecting EUV mask images through focus by wavelength tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Huh, Sungmin

    2009-02-23

    Using an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) microscope to produce high-quality images of EUV reticles, we have developed a new wavelength tuning method to acquire through-focus data series with a higher level of stability and repeatability than was previously possible. We utilize the chromatic focal-length dependence of a diffractive Fresnel zoneplate objective lens, and while holding the mask sample mechanically still, we tune the wavelength through a narrow range, in small steps. In this paper, we demonstrate the method and discuss the relative advantages that this data collection technique affords.

  20. Control System Design for Automatic Cavity Tuning Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Khabiboulline, T.; Kotelnikov, S.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Nogiec, J.; Ross, M.; Schappert, W.; Goessel, A.; Iversen, J.; Klinke, D.; /DESY

    2009-05-01

    A series of four automatic tuning machines for 9-cell TESLA-type cavities are being developed and fabricated in a collaborative effort among DESY, FNAL, and KEK. These machines are intended to support high-throughput cavity fabrication for construction of large SRF-based accelerator projects. Two of these machines will be delivered to cavity vendors for the tuning of XFEL cavities. The control system for these machines must support a high level of automation adequate for industrial use by non-experts operators. This paper describes the control system hardware and software design for these machines.

  1. Dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipole implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, W.C.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Pai, C.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.

    2010-05-02

    AC-dipole magnets are typically implemented as a parallel LC resonant circuit. To maximize efficiency, it's beneficial to operate at a high Q. This, however, limits the magnet to a narrow frequency range. Current designs therefore operate at a low Q to provide a wider bandwidth at the cost of efficiency. Dynamically tuning a high Q resonant circuit tries to maintain a high efficiency while providing a wide frequency range. The results of ongoing efforts at BNL to implement dynamically tuned high-Q AC dipoles will be presented.

  2. Theory of Energy Level Tuning in Quantum Dots by Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Wang, Lin-Wang; Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Team

    2015-03-01

    Besides quantum confinement that provides control of the quantum dot (QD) band gap, surface ligands allow control of the absolute energy levels. We theoretically investigate energy level tuning in PbS QD by surfactant exchange. We perform direct calculations of real-size QD with various surfactants within the frame of the density functional theory and explicitly analyze the influence of the surfactants on the electronic properties of the QD. This work provides a hint for predictable control of the absolute energy levels and their fine tuning within 3 eV range by modification of big and small surfactants that simultaneously passivate the QD surface.

  3. Tm:germanate Fiber Laser: Tuning And Q-switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Walsh, Brian M.; Reichle, Donald J.; DeYoung, R. J.; Jiang, Shibin

    2007-01-01

    A Tm:germanate fiber laser produced >0.25 mJ/pulse in a 45 ns pulse. It is capable of producing multiple Q-switched pulses from a single p ump pulse. With the addition of a diffraction grating, Tm:germanate f iber lasers produced a wide, but length dependent, tuning range. By s electing the fiber length, the tuning range extends from 1.88 to 2.04 ?m. These traits make Tm:germanate lasers suitable for remote sensin g of water vapor.

  4. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through variable ring loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of noise radiating structure is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating structure is tuned by a plurality of drivers arranged to contact the noise radiating structure. Excitation of the drivers causes expansion or contraction of the drivers, thereby varying the edge loading applied to the noise radiating structure. The drivers are actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the drivers, causing them to expand or contract. The noise radiating structure may be either the outer shroud of the engine or a ring mounted flush with an inner wall of the shroud or disposed in the interior of the shroud.

  5. Enhancing long-term memory with stimulation tunes visual attention in one trial.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Robert M G; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2015-01-13

    Scientists have long proposed that memory representations control the mechanisms of attention that focus processing on the task-relevant objects in our visual field. Modern theories specifically propose that we rely on working memory to store the object representations that provide top-down control over attentional selection. Here, we show that the tuning of perceptual attention can be sharply accelerated after 20 min of noninvasive brain stimulation over medial-frontal cortex. Contrary to prevailing theories of attention, these improvements did not appear to be caused by changes in the nature of the working memory representations of the search targets. Instead, improvements in attentional tuning were accompanied by changes in an electrophysiological signal hypothesized to index long-term memory. We found that this pattern of effects was reliably observed when we stimulated medial-frontal cortex, but when we stimulated posterior parietal cortex, we found that stimulation directly affected the perceptual processing of the search array elements, not the memory representations providing top-down control. Our findings appear to challenge dominant theories of attention by demonstrating that changes in the storage of target representations in long-term memory may underlie rapid changes in the efficiency with which humans can find targets in arrays of objects.

  6. Optimal placement of tuning masses for vibration reduction in helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Described are methods for reducing vibration in helicopter rotor blades by determining optimum sizes and locations of tuning masses through formal mathematical optimization techniques. An optimization procedure is developed which employs the tuning masses and corresponding locations as design variables which are systematically changed to achieve low values of shear without a large mass penalty. The finite-element structural analysis of the blade and the optimization formulation require development of discretized expressions for two performance parameters: modal shaping parameter and modal shear amplitude. Matrix expressions for both quantities and their sensitivity derivatives are developed. Three optimization strategies are developed and tested. The first is based on minimizing the modal shaping parameter which indirectly reduces the modal shear amplitudes corresponding to each harmonic of airload. The second strategy reduces these amplitudes directly, and the third strategy reduces the shear as a function of time during a revolution of the blade. The first strategy works well for reducing the shear for one mode responding to a single harmonic of the airload, but has been found in some cases to be ineffective for more than one mode. The second and third strategies give similar results and show excellent reduction of the shear with a low mass penalty.

  7. Dual-Functional Energy-Harvesting and Vibration Control: Electromagnetic Resonant Shunt Series Tuned Mass Dampers.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lei; Cui, Wen

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel retrofittable approach for dual-functional energy-harvesting and robust vibration control by integrating the tuned mass damper (TMD) and electromagnetic shunted resonant damping. The viscous dissipative element between the TMD and primary system is replaced by an electromagnetic transducer shunted with a resonant RLC circuit. An efficient gradient based numeric method is presented for the parameter optimization in the control framework for vibration suppression and energy harvesting. A case study is performed based on the Taipei 101 TMD. It is found that by tuning the TMD resonance and circuit resonance close to that of the primary structure, the electromagnetic resonant-shunt TMD achieves the enhanced effectiveness and robustness of double-mass series TMDs, without suffering from the significantly amplified motion stroke. It is also observed that the parameters and performances optimized for vibration suppression are close to those optimized for energy harvesting, and the performance is not sensitive to the resistance of the charging circuit or electrical load.

  8. Dual-Functional Energy-Harvesting and Vibration Control: Electromagnetic Resonant Shunt Series Tuned Mass Dampers.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lei; Cui, Wen

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel retrofittable approach for dual-functional energy-harvesting and robust vibration control by integrating the tuned mass damper (TMD) and electromagnetic shunted resonant damping. The viscous dissipative element between the TMD and primary system is replaced by an electromagnetic transducer shunted with a resonant RLC circuit. An efficient gradient based numeric method is presented for the parameter optimization in the control framework for vibration suppression and energy harvesting. A case study is performed based on the Taipei 101 TMD. It is found that by tuning the TMD resonance and circuit resonance close to that of the primary structure, the electromagnetic resonant-shunt TMD achieves the enhanced effectiveness and robustness of double-mass series TMDs, without suffering from the significantly amplified motion stroke. It is also observed that the parameters and performances optimized for vibration suppression are close to those optimized for energy harvesting, and the performance is not sensitive to the resistance of the charging circuit or electrical load. PMID:23918165

  9. Composition tuning the upconversion emission in NaYF4:Yb/Tm hexaplate nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Li, Yujing; Lin, Yungchen; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-03-01

    Single crystal hexagonal NaYF4:Yb/Tm nanocrystals have been synthesized with uniform size, morphology and controlled chemical composition. Spectroscopic studies show that these nanocrystals exhibit strong energy upconversion emission when excited with a 980 nm diode laser, with two primary emission peaks centered around 452 nm and 476 nm. Importantly, the overall and relative emission intensity at these wavelengths can be readily tuned by controlling the concentration of the trivalent rare earth element dopants at the beginning of the synthesis which has been confirmed by EDX for the first time. Through systematic studies, the optimum rare earth ion doping concentration can be determined for the strongest emission intensity at the selected peak(s). Confocal microscopy studies show that the upconversion emission from individual NCs can be readily visualized. These studies demonstrate a rational approach for fine tuning the upconversion properties in rare-earth doped nanostructures and can broadly impact areas ranging from energy harvesting, energy conversion to biomedical imaging and therapeutics. PMID:21264435

  10. Enhancing long-term memory with stimulation tunes visual attention in one trial

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, Robert M. G.; Woodman, Geoffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Scientists have long proposed that memory representations control the mechanisms of attention that focus processing on the task-relevant objects in our visual field. Modern theories specifically propose that we rely on working memory to store the object representations that provide top-down control over attentional selection. Here, we show that the tuning of perceptual attention can be sharply accelerated after 20 min of noninvasive brain stimulation over medial-frontal cortex. Contrary to prevailing theories of attention, these improvements did not appear to be caused by changes in the nature of the working memory representations of the search targets. Instead, improvements in attentional tuning were accompanied by changes in an electrophysiological signal hypothesized to index long-term memory. We found that this pattern of effects was reliably observed when we stimulated medial-frontal cortex, but when we stimulated posterior parietal cortex, we found that stimulation directly affected the perceptual processing of the search array elements, not the memory representations providing top-down control. Our findings appear to challenge dominant theories of attention by demonstrating that changes in the storage of target representations in long-term memory may underlie rapid changes in the efficiency with which humans can find targets in arrays of objects. PMID:25548192

  11. Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are a precision, yet simple, machine element of great utility. A brief history of rolling element bearings is reviewed and the type of rolling element bearings, their geometry and kinematics, as well as the materials they are made from and the manufacturing processes they involve are described. Unloaded and unlubricated rolling element bearings, loaded but unlubricated rolling element bearings and loaded and lubricated rolling element bearings are considered. The recognition and understanding of elastohydrodynamic lubrication covered, represents one of the major development in rolling element bearings.

  12. Resolving and Tuning Mechanical Anisotropy in Black Phosphorus via Nanomechanical Multimode Resonance Spectromicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zenghui; Jia, Hao; Zheng, Xu-Qian; Yang, Rui; Ye, G J; Chen, X H; Feng, Philip X-L

    2016-09-14

    Black phosphorus (P) has emerged as a layered semiconductor with a unique crystal structure featuring corrugated atomic layers and strong in-plane anisotropy in its physical properties. Here, we demonstrate that the crystal orientation and mechanical anisotropy in free-standing black P thin layers can be precisely determined by spatially resolved multimode nanomechanical resonances. This offers a new means for resolving important crystal orientation and anisotropy in black P device platforms in situ beyond conventional optical and electrical calibration techniques. Furthermore, we show that electrostatic-gating-induced straining can continuously tune the mechanical anisotropic effects on multimode resonances in black P electromechanical devices. Combined with finite element modeling (FEM), we also determine the Young's moduli of multilayer black P to be 116.1 and 46.5 GPa in the zigzag and armchair directions, respectively. PMID:27505636

  13. Tuning the Electronic Absorption of Protein-Embedded All-trans-Retinal

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenjing; Nossoni, Zahra; Berbasova, Tetyana; Watson, Camille T.; Yapici, Ipek; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Geiger, James H.; Borhan, Babak

    2014-10-02

    Protein-chromophore interactions are a central component of a wide variety of critical biological processes such as color vision and photosynthesis. To understand the fundamental elements that contribute to spectral tuning of a chromophore inside the protein cavity, we redesigned human cellular retinol binding protein II (hCRBPII) to fully encapsulate all-trans-retinal and form a covalent bond as a protonated Schiff base. The system, using rational mutagenesis designed to alter the electrostatic environment within the binding pocket of the host protein, enabled regulation of the absorption maximum of the pigment in the range of 425 to 644 nanometers. Moreover, with only nine point mutations, the hCRBPII mutants induced a systematic shift in the absorption profile of all-trans-retinal of more than 200 nanometers across the visible spectrum.

  14. Frequency tuning, nonlinearities and mode coupling in circular mechanical graphene resonators.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, A M; Midtvedt, D; Croy, A; Isacsson, A

    2013-10-01

    We study circular nanomechanical graphene resonators by means of continuum elasticity theory, treating them as membranes. We derive dynamic equations for the flexural mode amplitudes. Due to the geometrical nonlinearity the mode dynamics can be modeled by coupled Duffing equations. By solving the Airy stress problem we obtain analytic expressions for the eigenfrequencies and nonlinear coefficients as functions of the radius, suspension height, initial tension, back-gate voltage and elastic constants, which we compare with finite element simulations. Using perturbation theory, we show that it is necessary to include the effects of the non-uniform stress distribution for finite deflections. This correctly reproduces the spectrum and frequency tuning of the resonator, including frequency crossings. PMID:24008430

  15. TUNING SILICON NANORODS FOR ANODES OF LI-ION RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES

    SciTech Connect

    Au, M.

    2010-11-23

    Silicon is a promising anode material for Li-ion batteries in regarding of high capacity, low cost and safety, but it suffers poor cycling stability due to the pulverization induced by severe volume expansion/shrinkage (297%) during lithium insertion/extraction. In our previous investigation on aluminum nanorods anodes, it is found the selection of substrates in which Al nanorods grown plays the role in prevention of pulverization resulting in the increase of cycling life. Adapting this knowledge, we investigated the Si based nanorods anodes by tuning its composition and element distribution. Our results show that although the Si nanorods demonstrated higher initial anodic capacity of 1500 mAh/g, it diminished after 50 cycles due to morphology change and pulverization. By codepositing Cu, the Si-Cu composite nanorods demonstrated sustainable capacity of 500 mAh/g in 100 cycles attributing to its flexible and less brittle nature.

  16. Resolving and Tuning Mechanical Anisotropy in Black Phosphorus via Nanomechanical Multimode Resonance Spectromicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zenghui; Jia, Hao; Zheng, Xu-Qian; Yang, Rui; Ye, G J; Chen, X H; Feng, Philip X-L

    2016-09-14

    Black phosphorus (P) has emerged as a layered semiconductor with a unique crystal structure featuring corrugated atomic layers and strong in-plane anisotropy in its physical properties. Here, we demonstrate that the crystal orientation and mechanical anisotropy in free-standing black P thin layers can be precisely determined by spatially resolved multimode nanomechanical resonances. This offers a new means for resolving important crystal orientation and anisotropy in black P device platforms in situ beyond conventional optical and electrical calibration techniques. Furthermore, we show that electrostatic-gating-induced straining can continuously tune the mechanical anisotropic effects on multimode resonances in black P electromechanical devices. Combined with finite element modeling (FEM), we also determine the Young's moduli of multilayer black P to be 116.1 and 46.5 GPa in the zigzag and armchair directions, respectively.

  17. Resolving and Tuning Mechanical Anisotropy in Black Phosphorus via Nanomechanical Multimode Resonance Spectromicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zenghui; Jia, Hao; Zheng, Xu-Qian; Yang, Rui; Ye, G. J.; Chen, X. H.; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2016-09-01

    Black phosphorus (P) has emerged as a layered semiconductor with a unique crystal structure featuring corrugated atomic layers and strong in-plane anisotropy in its physical properties. Here, we demonstrate that the crystal orientation and mechanical anisotropy in free-standing black P thin layers can be precisely determined by spatially resolved multimode nanomechanical resonances. This offers a new means for resolving important crystal orientation and anisotropy in black P device platforms in situ beyond conventional optical and electrical calibration techniques. Furthermore, we show that electrostatic-gating-induced straining can continuously tune the mechanical anisotropic effects on multimode resonances in black P electromechanical devices. Combined with finite element modeling (FEM), we also determine the Young's moduli of multilayer black P to be 116.1 and 46.5 GPa in the zigzag and armchair directions, respectively.

  18. Tuning the local temperature during feedback controlled electromigration in gold nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, An; Hou, Shimin Liao, Jianhui

    2014-06-02

    Feedback controlled electromigration (FCE) in metallic nanowires has been widely used for various purposes. However, the control of the local temperature during FCE remains a challenge. Here, we report that the environment temperature can be used as a knob to tune the local temperature during FCE in gold nanowires. FCE was performed in gold nanowires at various environment temperatures ranging from 4.2 K to 300 K. We find that the dissipated power normalized by the cross section area of the nano constriction is linearly proportional to the environment temperature. Interestingly, the estimated local maximum temperature parabolically depends on the environment temperature. A minimum in the local temperature can be reached if an appropriate environment temperature is chosen. Our findings are well supported by the finite element simulation. Moreover, the data indicates the coupling between FCE triggering current density and local temperature.

  19. Tuning a fuzzy controller using quadratic response surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schott, Brian; Whalen, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Response surface methodology, an alternative method to traditional tuning of a fuzzy controller, is described. An example based on a simulated inverted pendulum 'plant' shows that with (only) 15 trial runs, the controller can be calibrated using a quadratic form to approximate the response surface.

  20. Taming parallel I/O complexity with auto-tuning

    DOE PAGES

    Behzad, Babak; Luu, Huong Vu Thanh; Huchette, Joseph; Byna, Surendra; Prabhat, -; Aydt, Ruth; Koziol, Quincey; Snir, Marc

    2013-11-17

    We present an auto-tuning system for optimizing I/O performance of HDF5 applications and demonstrate its value across platforms, applications, and at scale. The system uses a genetic algorithm to search a large space of tunable parameters and to identify effective settings at all layers of the parallel I/O stack. The parameter settings are applied transparently by the auto-tuning system via dynamically intercepted HDF5 calls. To validate our auto-tuning system, we applied it to three I/O benchmarks (VPIC, VORPAL, and GCRM) that replicate the I/O activity of their respective applications. We tested the system with different weak-scaling configurations (128, 2048, andmore » 4096 CPU cores) that generate 30 GB to 1 TB of data, and executed these configurations on diverse HPC platforms (Cray XE6, IBM BG/P, and Dell Cluster). In all cases, the auto-tuning framework identified tunable parameters that substantially improved write performance over default system settings. In conclusion, we consistently demonstrate I/O write speedups between 2x and 100x for test configurations.« less

  1. Tuning ground states and excitations in complex electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, A.R.

    1996-09-01

    Modern electronic materials are characterized by a great variety of broken-symmetry ground states and excitations. Their control requires understanding and tuning underlying driving forces of spin-charge-lattice coupling, critical to macroscopic properties and applications. We report representative model calculations which demonstrate some of the richness of the phenomena and the challenges for successful microscopic modeling.

  2. Ten Things You Should Do with a Tuning Fork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, James

    2013-01-01

    Tuning forks are wonderful tools for teaching physics. Every physics classroom should have several and every physics student should be taught how to use them. In this article, I highlight 10 enriching demonstrations that most teachers might not know, as well as provide tips to enhance the demonstrations teachers might already be doing. Some of…

  3. Photo-tuning of highly selective wetting in inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Thomas A; Burgess, Ian B; Nerger, Bryan A; Goulet-Hanssens, Alexis; Koay, Natalie; Barrett, Christopher J; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-03-01

    Crack-free inverse opals exhibit a sharply defined threshold wettability for infiltration that has enabled their use as colourimetric indicators for liquid identification. Here we demonstrate direct and continuous photo-tuning of this wetting threshold in inverse opals whose surfaces are functionalized with a polymer doped with azobenzene chromophores. PMID:24651846

  4. Controller parameter tuning of delta robot based on servo identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing; Wang, Panfeng; Mei, Jiangping

    2015-03-01

    High-speed pick-and-place parallel robot is a system where the inertia imposed on the motor shafts is real-time changing with the system configurations. High quality of computer control with proper controller parameters is conducive to overcoming this problem and has a significant effect on reducing the robot's tracking error. By taking Delta robot as an example, a method for parameter tuning of the fixed gain motion controller is presented. Having identifying the parameters of the servo system in the frequency domain by the sinusoidal excitation, the PD+feedforward control strategy is proposed to adapt to the varying inertia loads, allowing the controller parameters to be tuned by minimizing the mean square tracking error along a typical trajectory. A set of optimum parameters is obtained through computer simulations and the effectiveness of the proposed approach is validated by experiments on a real prototype machine. Let the traveling plate undergoes a specific trajectory and the results show that the tracking error can be reduced by at least 50% in comparison with the conventional auto-tuning and Z-N methods. The proposed approach is a whole workspace optimization and can be applied to the parameter tuning of fixed gain motion controllers.

  5. Tune Up to Literacy: Original Songs and Activities for Kids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkin, Al

    2009-01-01

    Encourage literacy with twenty original songs by musician and educator Al Balkin! Children's and school librarians will welcome "Tune Up to Literacy", a handy package of music and activities that musically introduces and reinforces crucial literacy concepts such as the alphabet, vowels, consonants, nouns, verbs, adjectives, sentence construction,…

  6. Taming parallel I/O complexity with auto-tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Behzad, Babak; Luu, Huong Vu Thanh; Huchette, Joseph; Byna, Surendra; Prabhat, -; Aydt, Ruth; Koziol, Quincey; Snir, Marc

    2013-11-17

    We present an auto-tuning system for optimizing I/O performance of HDF5 applications and demonstrate its value across platforms, applications, and at scale. The system uses a genetic algorithm to search a large space of tunable parameters and to identify effective settings at all layers of the parallel I/O stack. The parameter settings are applied transparently by the auto-tuning system via dynamically intercepted HDF5 calls. To validate our auto-tuning system, we applied it to three I/O benchmarks (VPIC, VORPAL, and GCRM) that replicate the I/O activity of their respective applications. We tested the system with different weak-scaling configurations (128, 2048, and 4096 CPU cores) that generate 30 GB to 1 TB of data, and executed these configurations on diverse HPC platforms (Cray XE6, IBM BG/P, and Dell Cluster). In all cases, the auto-tuning framework identified tunable parameters that substantially improved write performance over default system settings. In conclusion, we consistently demonstrate I/O write speedups between 2x and 100x for test configurations.

  7. Farm Tractor Tune-Up and Service Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, J. G.; And Others

    Tune-up and service specifications for 10 major tractor manufacturers are presented in the handbook. In addition, the following tables are included: (1) spark plug heat-range comparisons, (2) freezing protection, (3) pressures for farm tractor tires, (4) use of calcium chloride for liquid weighting, (5) comparisons of American Petroleum Institute…

  8. Tune modulation due to gradient ripple and the dynamic aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Parzen, G.

    1993-10-01

    A tracking study was done of the effects of a tune modulation, due to a gradient ripple in the quadrupoles, on the dynamic aperture in RHIC lattices. Using tracking runs of about 1 {times} 10{sup 6} turns, the dynamic aperture was found to decrease roughly linearly with the amplitude of the tune modulation, and may be represented by A = A{sub 0}(1 {minus} 42 {Delta}{nu}) where A{sub 0} is the dynamic aperture for {Delta}{nu} = 0, and {Delta}{nu} is the tune modulation amplitude. Two RHIC lattices were studied. One with 6 insertions having {beta}* = 6m, and one with 6 insertions having {beta}* = 2m. Roughly the same results was found for both lattices. The dependence of the dynamic aperture on the frequency of the gradient ripple was also studied. No appreciable dependence on the ripple frequency was found for the range covered in the ripple frequency and in the tune modulation amplitude.

  9. Adaptive tuning functions arise from visual observation of past movement

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Ian S.; Franklin, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Visual observation of movement plays a key role in action. For example, tennis players have little time to react to the ball, but still need to prepare the appropriate stroke. Therefore, it might be useful to use visual information about the ball trajectory to recall a specific motor memory. Past visual observation of movement (as well as passive and active arm movement) affects the learning and recall of motor memories. Moreover, when passive or active, these past contextual movements exhibit generalization (or tuning) across movement directions. Here we extend this work, examining whether visual motion also exhibits similar generalization across movement directions and whether such generalization functions can explain patterns of interference. Both the adaptation movement and contextual movement exhibited generalization beyond the training direction, with the visual contextual motion exhibiting much broader tuning. A second experiment demonstrated that this pattern was consistent with the results of an interference experiment where opposing force fields were associated with two separate visual movements. Overall, our study shows that visual contextual motion exhibits much broader (and shallower) tuning functions than previously seen for either passive or active movements, demonstrating that the tuning characteristics of past motion are highly dependent on their sensory modality. PMID:27341163

  10. Tuning Up Your Class: Using Assessment for Optimal Student Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Donna Killian; Duffy, John J.; Jones, Janet Wright

    1997-01-01

    Describes a schedule for college classroom "preventive maintenance" that focuses on four classroom components: classroom community; students; course content; and faculty. A checklist allows assessment of these components during specific time periods in the semester, and a tune-up kit that includes diagnostic questions, sources of relevant…

  11. Parameter tuning of PVD process based on artificial intelligence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norlina, M. S.; Diyana, M. S. Nor; Mazidah, P.; Rusop, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, an artificial intelligence technique is proposed to be implemented in the parameter tuning of a PVD process. Due to its previous adaptation in similar optimization problems, genetic algorithm (GA) is selected to optimize the parameter tuning of the RF magnetron sputtering process. The most optimized parameter combination obtained from GA's optimization result is expected to produce the desirable zinc oxide (ZnO) thin film from the sputtering process. The parameters involved in this study were RF power, deposition time and substrate temperature. The algorithm was tested to optimize the 25 datasets of parameter combinations. The results from the computational experiment were then compared with the actual result from the laboratory experiment. Based on the comparison, GA had shown that the algorithm was reliable to optimize the parameter combination before the parameter tuning could be done to the RF magnetron sputtering machine. In order to verify the result of GA, the algorithm was also been compared to other well known optimization algorithms, which were, particle swarm optimization (PSO) and gravitational search algorithm (GSA). The results had shown that GA was reliable in solving this RF magnetron sputtering process parameter tuning problem. GA had shown better accuracy in the optimization based on the fitness evaluation.

  12. Educational Tool for Optimal Controller Tuning Using Evolutionary Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmona Morales, D.; Jimenez-Hornero, J. E.; Vazquez, F.; Morilla, F.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an optimal tuning tool is presented for control structures based on multivariable proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control, using genetic algorithms as an alternative to traditional optimization algorithms. From an educational point of view, this tool provides students with the necessary means to consolidate their knowledge on…

  13. Methodologies and Tools for Tuning Parallel Programs: Facts and Fantasies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jerry C.; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The need for computing power has forced a migration from serial computation on a single processor to parallel processing on multiprocessors. However, without effective means to monitor (and analyze) program execution, tuning the performance of parallel programs becomes exponentially difficult as program complexity and machine size increase. The recent introduction of performance tuning tools from various supercomputer vendors (Intel's ParAide, TMC's PRISM, CRI's Apprentice, and Convex's CXtrace) seems to indicate the maturity of performance tool technologies and vendors'/customers' recognition of their importance. However, a few important questions remain: What kind of performance bottlenecks can these tools detect (or correct)? How time consuming is the performance tuning process? What are some important technical issues that remain to be tackled in this area? This workshop reviews the fundamental concepts involved in analyzing and improving the performance of parallel and heterogeneous message-passing programs. Several alternative strategies will be contrasted, and for each we will describe how currently available tuning tools (e.g. AIMS, ParAide, PRISM, Apprentice, CXtrace, ATExpert, Pablo, IPS-2) can be used to facilitate the process. We will characterize the effectiveness of the tools and methodologies based on actual user experiences at NASA Ames Research Center. Finally, we will discuss their limitations and outline recent approaches taken by vendors and the research community to address them.

  14. Water tuned the helical nanostructures and supramolecular chirality in organogels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changxia; Jin, Qingxian; Lv, Kai; Zhang, Li; Liu, Minghua

    2014-04-11

    Water was found to tune the self-assembled nanostructures of a cationic amphiphile in organic solvents from nanofibers to helical tapes, helical tubes and chiral nanotwists with various pitch lengths depending on water content. Inversion of CD spectra was observed in the water-triggered polar and non-polar solvent gels.

  15. Perfect harmony: A mathematical analysis of four historical tunings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Michael F.

    2004-10-01

    In Western music, a musical interval defined by the frequency ratio of two notes is generally considered consonant when the ratio is composed of small integers. Perfect harmony or an ``ideal just scale,'' which has no exact solution, would require the division of an octave into 12 notes, each of which would be used to create six other consonant intervals. The purpose of this study is to analyze four well-known historical tunings to evaluate how well each one approximates perfect harmony. The analysis consists of a general evaluation in which all consonant intervals are given equal weighting and a specific evaluation for three preludes from Bach's ``Well-Tempered Clavier,'' for which intervals are weighted in proportion to the duration of their occurrence. The four tunings, 5-limit just intonation, quarter-comma meantone temperament, well temperament (Werckmeister III), and equal temperament, are evaluated by measures of centrality, dispersion, distance, and dissonance. When all keys and consonant intervals are equally weighted, equal temperament demonstrates the strongest performance across a variety of measures, although it is not always the best tuning. Given C as the starting note for each tuning, equal temperament and well temperament perform strongly for the three ``Well-Tempered Clavier'' preludes examined. .

  16. High bandwidth on-chip capacitive tuning of microtoroid resonators.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher G; Bekker, Christiaan; McAuslan, David L; Sheridan, Eoin; Bowen, Warwick P

    2016-09-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and characterization of silica microtoroid based cavity opto-electromechanical systems (COEMS). Electrodes patterned onto the microtoroid resonators allow for rapid capacitive tuning of the optical whispering gallery mode resonances while maintaining their ultrahigh quality factor, enabling applications such as efficient radio to optical frequency conversion, optical routing and switching applications. PMID:27607646

  17. Integrating Cache Performance Modeling and Tuning Support in Parallelization Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    With the resurgence of distributed shared memory (DSM) systems based on cache-coherent Non Uniform Memory Access (ccNUMA) architectures and increasing disparity between memory and processors speeds, data locality overheads are becoming the greatest bottlenecks in the way of realizing potential high performance of these systems. While parallelization tools and compilers facilitate the users in porting their sequential applications to a DSM system, a lot of time and effort is needed to tune the memory performance of these applications to achieve reasonable speedup. In this paper, we show that integrating cache performance modeling and tuning support within a parallelization environment can alleviate this problem. The Cache Performance Modeling and Prediction Tool (CPMP), employs trace-driven simulation techniques without the overhead of generating and managing detailed address traces. CPMP predicts the cache performance impact of source code level "what-if" modifications in a program to assist a user in the tuning process. CPMP is built on top of a customized version of the Computer Aided Parallelization Tools (CAPTools) environment. Finally, we demonstrate how CPMP can be applied to tune a real Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) application.

  18. Tuning Complex Computer Codes to Data and Optimal Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong Soo

    Modern scientific researchers often use complex computer simulation codes for theoretical investigations. We model the response of computer simulation code as the realization of a stochastic process. This approach, design and analysis of computer experiments (DACE), provides a statistical basis for analysing computer data, for designing experiments for efficient prediction and for comparing computer-encoded theory to experiments. An objective of research in a large class of dynamic systems is to determine any unknown coefficients in a theory. The coefficients can be determined by "tuning" the computer model to the real data so that the tuned code gives a good match to the real experimental data. Three design strategies for computer experiments are considered: data-adaptive sequential A-optimal design, maximum entropy design and optimal Latin-hypercube design. The following "code tuning" methodologies are proposed: nonlinear least squares, joint MLE, "separated" joint MLE and Bayesian method. The performance of these methods have been studied in several toy models. In the application to nuclear fusion devices, a cheaper emulator of the simulation code (BALDUR) has been constructed, and the transport coefficients were estimated from data of two tokamaks (ASDEX and PDX). Tuning complex computer codes to data using some statistical estimation methods and a cheap emulator of the code along with careful designs of computer experiments, with applications to nuclear fusion devices, is the topic of this thesis.

  19. Human face processing is tuned to sexual age preferences

    PubMed Central

    Ponseti, J.; Granert, O.; van Eimeren, T.; Jansen, O.; Wolff, S.; Beier, K.; Deuschl, G.; Bosinski, H.; Siebner, H.

    2014-01-01

    Human faces can motivate nurturing behaviour or sexual behaviour when adults see a child or an adult face, respectively. This suggests that face processing is tuned to detecting age cues of sexual maturity to stimulate the appropriate reproductive behaviour: either caretaking or mating. In paedophilia, sexual attraction is directed to sexually immature children. Therefore, we hypothesized that brain networks that normally are tuned to mature faces of the preferred gender show an abnormal tuning to sexual immature faces in paedophilia. Here, we use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test directly for the existence of a network which is tuned to face cues of sexual maturity. During fMRI, participants sexually attracted to either adults or children were exposed to various face images. In individuals attracted to adults, adult faces activated several brain regions significantly more than child faces. These brain regions comprised areas known to be implicated in face processing, and sexual processing, including occipital areas, the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and, subcortically, the putamen and nucleus caudatus. The same regions were activated in paedophiles, but with a reversed preferential response pattern. PMID:24850896

  20. HEURISTIC OPTIMIZATION AND ALGORITHM TUNING APPLIED TO SORPTIVE BARRIER DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    While heuristic optimization is applied in environmental applications, ad-hoc algorithm configuration is typical. We use a multi-layer sorptive barrier design problem as a benchmark for an algorithm-tuning procedure, as applied to three heuristics (genetic algorithms, simulated ...

  1. Dynamics of spatial frequency tuning in mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Vreysen, Samme; Zhang, Bin; Chino, Yuzo M.; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal spatial frequency tuning in primary visual cortex (V1) substantially changes over time. In both primates and cats, a shift of the neuron's preferred spatial frequency has been observed from low frequencies early in the response to higher frequencies later in the response. In most cases, this shift is accompanied by a decreased tuning bandwidth. Recently, the mouse has gained attention as a suitable animal model to study the basic mechanisms of visual information processing, demonstrating similarities in basic neuronal response properties between rodents and highly visual mammals. Here we report the results of extracellular single-unit recordings in the anesthetized mouse where we analyzed the dynamics of spatial frequency tuning in V1 and the lateromedial area LM within the lateral extrastriate area V2L. We used a reverse-correlation technique to demonstrate that, as in monkeys and cats, the preferred spatial frequency of mouse V1 neurons shifted from low to higher frequencies later in the response. However, this was not correlated with a clear selectivity increase or enhanced suppression of responses to low spatial frequencies. These results suggest that the neuronal connections responsible for the temporal shift in spatial frequency tuning may considerably differ between mice and monkeys. PMID:22402662

  2. Adaptive tuning functions arise from visual observation of past movement.

    PubMed

    Howard, Ian S; Franklin, David W

    2016-01-01

    Visual observation of movement plays a key role in action. For example, tennis players have little time to react to the ball, but still need to prepare the appropriate stroke. Therefore, it might be useful to use visual information about the ball trajectory to recall a specific motor memory. Past visual observation of movement (as well as passive and active arm movement) affects the learning and recall of motor memories. Moreover, when passive or active, these past contextual movements exhibit generalization (or tuning) across movement directions. Here we extend this work, examining whether visual motion also exhibits similar generalization across movement directions and whether such generalization functions can explain patterns of interference. Both the adaptation movement and contextual movement exhibited generalization beyond the training direction, with the visual contextual motion exhibiting much broader tuning. A second experiment demonstrated that this pattern was consistent with the results of an interference experiment where opposing force fields were associated with two separate visual movements. Overall, our study shows that visual contextual motion exhibits much broader (and shallower) tuning functions than previously seen for either passive or active movements, demonstrating that the tuning characteristics of past motion are highly dependent on their sensory modality. PMID:27341163

  3. How communication goals determine when audience tuning biases memory.

    PubMed

    Echterhoff, Gerald; Higgins, E Tory; Kopietz, René; Groll, Stephan

    2008-02-01

    After tuning their message to suit their audience's attitude, communicators' own memories for the original information (e.g., a target person's behaviors) often reflect the biased view expressed in their message--producing an audience-congruent memory bias. Exploring the motivational circumstances of message production, the authors investigated whether this bias depends on the goals driving audience tuning. In 4 experiments, the memory bias was found to a greater extent when audience tuning served the creation of a shared reality than when it served alternative, nonshared reality goals (being polite toward a stigmatized-group audience; obtaining incentives; being entertaining; complying with a blatant demand). In addition, the authors found that these effects were mediated by the epistemic trust in the audience-congruent view but not by the rehearsal or accurate retrieval of the original input information, the ability to discriminate between the original and the message information, or a contrast away from extremely tuned messages. The central role of epistemic trust, a measure of the communicators' experience of shared reality, was supported in meta-analyses across the experiments.

  4. How Communication Goals Determine when Audience Tuning Biases Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Echterhoff, Gerald; Higgins, E. Tory; Kopietz, Rene; Groll, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    After tuning their message to suit their audience's attitude, communicators' own memories for the original information (e.g., a target person's behaviors) often reflect the biased view expressed in their message--producing an audience-congruent memory bias. Exploring the motivational circumstances of message production, the authors investigated…

  5. Recognizing and naming tunes: memory impairment in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Maylor, E A

    1991-09-01

    Subjects over the age of 50 listened to theme tunes of remote, recent, and frequent television programs. If they recognized the tune, they were asked for the name of the program and for as much information about the program as possible. From the responses to a subsequent questionnaire, it was possible to divide the data according to whether or not the subjects watched the programs. There was no effect of age on the recognition and naming of programs subjects never watched. For programs they watched (a true test of memory), older subjects recognized fewer tunes as familiar and were less able than younger subjects to name the programs with familiar tunes. Neither the amount of exposure nor the delay since exposure had a significant influence on the recognition and naming impairments with age. Older subjects reported less information about programs they watched than younger subjects. In multiple regression analyses, age was a better predictor of performance than measures of current cognitive ability. The results are compared with the effects of age on the recognition and naming of famous faces (Maylor, 1990a). It is argued that the studies together support the view that the information processing rate decreases with age; therefore the elderly are poor at speeded tasks, the most dramatic effects appearing for later components of sequential processes.

  6. Photo-tuning of highly selective wetting in inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Thomas A; Burgess, Ian B; Nerger, Bryan A; Goulet-Hanssens, Alexis; Koay, Natalie; Barrett, Christopher J; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-03-01

    Crack-free inverse opals exhibit a sharply defined threshold wettability for infiltration that has enabled their use as colourimetric indicators for liquid identification. Here we demonstrate direct and continuous photo-tuning of this wetting threshold in inverse opals whose surfaces are functionalized with a polymer doped with azobenzene chromophores.

  7. Hair Cells: Bundles, Tuning, Transduction—A Moderated Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavitaki, K. Domenica; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2011-11-01

    A discussion moderated by the authors on the topic "Hair Cells: Bundles, Tuning, Transduction" was held on 17 July 2011 at the 11th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop in Williamstown, Massachusetts. The paper provides an edited transcript of the session.

  8. Discrete Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  9. Microglia and synapse interactions: fine tuning neural circuits and candidate molecules

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Akiko; Wake, Hiroaki; Moorhouse, Andrew J.; Nabekura, Junichi

    2013-01-01

    Brain function depends critically on the interactions among the underlying components that comprise neural circuits. This includes coordinated activity in pre-synaptic and postsynaptic neuronal elements, but also in the non-neuronal elements such as glial cells. Microglia are glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS) that have well-known roles in neuronal immune function, responding to infections and brain injury and influencing the progress of neurodegenerative disorders. However, microglia are also surveyors of the healthy brain, continuously extending and retracting their processes and making contacts with pre- and postsynaptic elements of neural circuits, a process that clearly consumes considerable energy. Pruning of synapses during development and in response to injury has also been documented, and we propose that this extensive surveillance of the brain parenchyma in adult healthy brain results in similar “fine-tuning” of neural circuits. A reasonable extension is that a dysfunction of such a homeostatic role of microglia could be a primary cause of neuronal disease. Indeed, neuronal functions including cognition, personality, and information processing are affected by immune status. In this review we focus on the interactions between microglia and synapses, the possible cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate such contacts, and the possible implications these interactions may have in the fine tuning of neural circuits that is so important for physiological brain function. PMID:23720611

  10. Element by Element Abundances in Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthey, Guy; Serven, Jedidiah

    2006-02-01

    Element-by-element abundances will be derived from high quality long slit KPNO 4m spectra of nearby elliptical galaxies that span the range of velocity dispersion. Analysis of these spectra will give the abundances of 18 individual elements to bring to extragalactic astronomy the same luxurious situation now enjoyed only by stellar spectroscopists. These spectra will reveal the basic element ratio behavior as a function of galaxy velocity dispersion. For example, [Mg/Fe] is seen to be enhanced in large galaxies, but not small ones. We propose to expand our purview from 2 elements (Mg and Fe) to 18 elements. This, in turn, will tie directly to chemical evolution and chemical enrichment mechanisms. As a byproduct, we also decrease the stellar population age uncertainty by about a factor of ten from today's Balmer-metal index diagram techniques.

  11. Development of Tuning Fork Based Probes for Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalilian, Romaneh; Yazdanpanah, Mehdi M.; Torrez, Neil; Alizadeh, Amirali; Askari, Davood

    2014-03-01

    This article reports on the development of tuning fork-based AFM/STM probes in NaugaNeedles LLC for use in atomic force microscopy. These probes can be mounted on different carriers per customers' request. (e.g., RHK carrier, Omicron carrier, and tuning fork on a Sapphire disk). We are able to design and engineer tuning forks on any type of carrier used in the market. We can attach three types of tips on the edge of a tuning fork prong (i.e., growing Ag2Ga nanoneedles at any arbitrary angle, cantilever of AFM tip, and tungsten wire) with lengths from 100-500 μm. The nanoneedle is located vertical to the fork. Using a suitable insulation and metallic coating, we can make QPlus sensors that can detect tunneling current during the AFM scan. To make Qplus sensors, the entire quartz fork will be coated with an insulating material, before attaching the nanoneedle. Then, the top edge of one prong is coated with a thin layer of conductive metal and the nanoneedle is attached to the fork end of the metal coated prong. The metal coating provides electrical connection to the tip for tunneling current readout and to the electrodes and used to read the QPlus current. Since the amount of mass added to the fork is minimal, the resonance frequency spectrum does not change and still remains around 32.6 KHz and the Q factor is around 1,200 in ambient condition. These probes can enhance the performance of tuning fork based atomic microscopy.

  12. The Fine-Tuning of the Universe for Intelligent Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, L. A.

    2012-06-01

    The fine-tuning of the universe for intelligent life has received a great deal of attention in recent years, both in the philosophical and scientific literature. The claim is that in the space of possible physical laws, parameters and initial conditions, the set that permits the evolution of intelligent life is very small. I present here a review of the scientific literature, outlining cases of fine-tuning in the classic works of Carter, Carr and Rees, and Barrow and Tipler, as well as more recent work. To sharpen the discussion, the role of the antagonist will be played by Victor Stenger's recent book The Fallacy of Fine-Tuning: Why the Universe is Not Designed for Us. Stenger claims that all known fine-tuning cases can be explained without the need for a multiverse. Many of Stenger's claims will be found to be highly problematic. We will touch on such issues as the logical necessity of the laws of nature; objectivity, invariance and symmetry; theoretical physics and possible universes; entropy in cosmology; cosmic inflation and initial conditions; galaxy formation; the cosmological constant; stars and their formation; the properties of elementary particles and their effect on chemistry and the macroscopic world; the origin of mass; grand unified theories; and the dimensionality of space and time. I also provide an assessment of the multiverse, noting the significant challenges that it must face. I do not attempt to defend any conclusion based on the fine-tuning of the universe for intelligent life. This paper can be viewed as a critique of Stenger's book, or read independently.

  13. Why Cosmic Fine-Tuning Needs to BE Explained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manson, Neil Alan

    Discoveries in modern physics and Big Bang cosmology indicate that if either the initial conditions of the universe or the physical laws governing its development had differed even slightly, life could never have developed. It is for this reason that the universe is said to be ``fine-tuned'' for life. I argue that cosmic fine-tuning, which some want to dismiss as the way things just happen to be, in fact needs to be explained. In Chapter One I provide an overview of the evidence that the universe is fine-tuned for life. In Chapter Two I present a set of sufficient conditions for a fact's needing to be explained. The conditions are that the fact is improbable and that a ``tidy'' explanation of it is available. A tidy explanation of a fact is considerably less improbable than that fact and makes the obtaining of that fact considerably less improbable. Chapters Three, Four, and Five are devoted to showing that cosmic Chapter Three I argue that the universe's being finely tuned for life can meaningfully be considered improbable. In Chapter Four I claim that there is at least one tidy explanation of cosmic fine-tuning: that the universe was created by some sort of extramundane designer. In Chapters Four and Five I respond to three objections. The first is that the design hypothesis is ad hoc. The second is that we have no reason to believe a supernatural designer would prefer life-permitting cosmoi to other possible cosmoi and that our tendency to believe otherwise is the result of anthropocentrism. The third is that the design hypothesis never buys us an explanatory advantage.

  14. Elements of Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobker, Lee R.

    A film is the successful combination of two distinct groups of elements: (1) the technical elements by which the film is made (camera, lighting, sound and editing) and (2) the esthetic elements that transform the craft into an art. This book attempts to combine the study of these elements by providing technical information about the process of…

  15. Organic Elemental Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, T. S.; Wang, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a literature review on methods used to analyze organic elements. Topic areas include methods for: (1) analyzing carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen; (2) analyzing oxygen, sulfur, and halogens; (3) analyzing other elements; (4) simultaneously determining several elements; and (5) determing trace elements. (JN)

  16. Exact H2 optimal tuning and experimental verification of energy-harvesting series electromagnetic tuned mass dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yilun; Zuo, Lei; Lin, Chi-Chang; Parker, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Energy-harvesting series electromagnetic tuned mass dampers (EMTMDs) have been recently proposed for dual-functional energy harvesting and robust vibration control by integrating the tuned mass damper (TMD) and electromagnetic shunted resonant damping. In this paper, we derive ready-to-use analytical tuning laws for the energy-harvesting series EMTMD system when the primary structure is subjected to force or ground excitations, like wind loads or earthquakes. Both vibration mitigation and energy harvesting performances are optimized using H2 criteria to minimize root-mean-square values of the deformation of the primary structure, or maximize the average harvestable power. These analytical tuning laws can easily guide the design of series EMTMDs under various ambient loadings. Later, extensive numerical analysis is presented to show the effectiveness of the series EMTMDs. The numerical analysis shows that the series EMTMD is superior to mitigate the vibration of the primary structure nearly across the whole frequency spectrum, as compared to that of classic TMDs. Simultaneously, the series EMTMD can better harvest the energy due to broader bandwidth effect. Beyond simulations, this paper also experimentally verifies the effectiveness of the energy-harvesting series electromagnetic TMDs in both vibration mitigation and energy harvesting.

  17. Tuning photoluminescence and surface properties of carbon nanodots for chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaomin; Pan, Yi; Fang, Yaning; Zhang, Lulu; Chen, Junying; Yi, Changqing

    2015-12-01

    Obtaining tunable photoluminescence (PL) with improved emission properties is crucial for successfully implementing fluorescent carbon nanodots (fCDs) in all practical applications such as multicolour imaging and multiplexed detection by a single excitation wavelength. In this study, we report a facile hydrothermal approach to adjust the PL peaks of fCDs from blue, green to orange by controlling the surface passivation reaction during the synthesis. This is achieved by tuning the passivating reagents in a step-by-step manner. The as-prepared fCDs with narrow size distribution show improved PL properties with different emission wavelengths. Detailed characterization of fCDs using elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggested that the surface chemical composition results in this tunable PL emission. Surface passivation significantly alters the surface status, resulting in fCDs with either stronger surface oxidation or N element doping that ultimately determine their PL properties. Further experiments suggested that the as-prepared orange luminescent fCDs (O-fCDs) were sensitive and specific nanosensing platforms towards Fe3+ determination in a complex biological environment, emphasizing their potential practical applications in clinical and biological fields.Obtaining tunable photoluminescence (PL) with improved emission properties is crucial for successfully implementing fluorescent carbon nanodots (fCDs) in all practical applications such as multicolour imaging and multiplexed detection by a single excitation wavelength. In this study, we report a facile hydrothermal approach to adjust the PL peaks of fCDs from blue, green to orange by controlling the surface passivation reaction during the synthesis. This is achieved by tuning the passivating reagents in a step-by-step manner. The as-prepared fCDs with narrow size distribution show improved PL properties with different emission wavelengths. Detailed

  18. 40 CFR 63.10006 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests or tune-ups?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... performance tune-up according to § 63.10021(e). (1) For EGUs not employing neural network combustion... 36 calendar months after the previous performance tune-up. (2) For EGUs employing neural...

  19. Stopping the growth of particles to silica-supported mono-nuclear Ru hydride surface species by tuning silica with surface silanes

    SciTech Connect

    Berthoud, Romain; Fenet, Bernard; Lukens, Wayne; Pelzer, Katrin; Basset, Jean-Marie; Candy, Jean-Pierre; Coperet, Christophe

    2007-07-11

    Tuning silica by replacing surface silanols with silanes allows chemical grafting of Ru(COD)(COT) through a covalent Ru-Si bond, as evidenced by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy and EXAFS. Treatment of these surface species under H2 at 300 oC yields a mononuclear Ru hydride species, without any sintering of the metal according to TEM and EXAFS analyses. This supported system displays catalytic properties different from those of supported Ru particles (2 nm), selectively hydrogenating olefins over aromatics.

  20. A Pinger Magnet System For Tune Measurements in the IPNS Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dooling, J. C.; Donley, L.; Brumwell, F. R.; McMichael, G. E.; Wang, S.

    2006-11-20

    Pinger magnets for measuring horizontal and vertical tunes in the IPNS RCS have been constructed and installed. Reference horizontal tune data was collected using the extraction kicker magnets in December 2005. More recent data collected at the end of February 2006 with the dedicated pinger magnets confirms December measurements and provided simultaneous vertical tune information. Chromaticity variation with sextupole field strength is examined in an effort to optimize tune profiles.

  1. A pinger magnet system for tune measurements in the IPNS Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS).

    SciTech Connect

    Dooling, J. C.; Donley, L. I.; Brumwell, F. R.; McMichael, G. E.; Wang, S.; Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    2006-01-01

    Pinger magnets for measuring horizontal and vertical tunes in the IPNS RCS have been constructed and installed. Reference horizontal tune data was collected using the extraction kicker magnets in December 2005. More recent data collected at the end of February 2006 with the dedicated pinger magnets confirms December measurements and provided simultaneous vertical tune information. Chromaticity variation with sextupole field strength is examined in an effort to optimize tune profiles.

  2. A Pinger Magnet System For Tune Measurements in the IPNS Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooling, J. C.; Donley, L.; Brumwell, F. R.; McMichael, G. E.; Wang, S.

    2006-11-01

    Pinger magnets for measuring horizontal and vertical tunes in the IPNS RCS have been constructed and installed. Reference horizontal tune data was collected using the extraction kicker magnets in December 2005. More recent data collected at the end of February 2006 with the dedicated pinger magnets confirms December measurements and provided simultaneous vertical tune information. Chromaticity variation with sextupole field strength is examined in an effort to optimize tune profiles.

  3. Tuning of MEMS Devices using Evolutionary Computation and Open-loop Frequency Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Fink, Wolfgang; Ferguson, Michael I.; Peay, Chris; Oks, Boris; Terrile, Richard; Yee, Karl

    2005-01-01

    We propose a tuning method for MEMS gyroscopes based on evolutionary computation that has the capacity to efficiently increase the sensitivity of MEMS gyroscopes through tuning and, furthermore, to find the optimally tuned configuration for this state of increased sensitivity. The tuning method was tested for the second generation JPL/Boeing Post-resonator MEMS gyroscope using the measurement of the frequency response of the MEMS device in open-loop operation.

  4. Plasmonic nanoparticles tuned thermal sensitive photonic polymer for biomimetic chameleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yang; Liu, Lin; Cai, Zihe; Xu, Jiwen; Xu, Zhou; Zhang, Di; Hu, Xiaobin

    2016-08-01

    Among many thermo-photochromic materials, the color-changing behavior caused by temperature and light is usually lack of a full color response. And the study on visible light-stimuli chromic response is rarely reported. Here, we proposed a strategy to design a thermo-photochromic chameleon biomimetic material consisting of photonic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) copolymer and plasmonic nanoparticles which has a vivid color change triggered by temperature and light like chameleons. We make use of the plasmonic nanoparticles like gold nanoparticles and silver nanoparticles to increase the sensitivity of the responsive behavior and control the lower critical solution temperature of the thermosensitive films by tuning the polymer chain conformation transition. Finally, it is possible that this film would have colorimetric responses to the entire VIS spectrum by the addition of different plasmonic nanoparticles to tune the plasmonic excitation wavelength. As a result, this method provides a potential use in new biosensors, military and many other aspects.

  5. Betatron tune measurement at the Argonne Rapid-Cycling Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Rauchas, A.V.; Brumwell, F.R.; Cho, Y.; Czyz, W.S.; Gunderson, G.R.; Knott, M.J.; Suddeth, D.E.; Volk, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    In the past, betatron tune measurements at the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) were made using a spectrum analyzer for betatron frequency analysis and one of the extraction kicker magnets to induce the coherent betatron motion. This method had several severe limitations: poor signal-to-noise ratio, inability to extract the beam after the measurement and dependence on the horizontal kick coupling into the vertical plane for vertical tune measurements. A new system is presently being constructed which will eliminate these problems. The beam will be kicked by independent horizontal and vertical ferrite pinger magnets. The beam positron data will be digitized and then analyzed by an array-processing computer using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). The control system will allow for additional improvements.

  6. Molecular Design for Tuning Work Functions of Transparent Conducting Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Koldemir, Unsal; Braid, Jennifer L; Morgenstern, Amanda; Eberhart, Mark; Collins, Reuben T; Olson, Dana C; Sellinger, Alan

    2015-06-18

    In this Perspective, we provide a brief background on the use of aromatic phosphonic acid modifiers for tuning work functions of transparent conducting oxides, for example, zinc oxide (ZnO) and indium tin oxide (ITO). We then introduce our preliminary results in this area using conjugated phosphonic acid molecules, having a substantially larger range of dipole moments than their unconjugated analogues, leading to the tuning of ZnO and ITO electrodes over a 2 eV range as derived from Kelvin probe measurements. We have found that these work function changes are directly correlated to the magnitude and the direction of the computationally derived molecular dipole of the conjugated phosphonic acids, leading to the predictive power of computation to drive the synthesis of new and improved phosphonic acid ligands. PMID:26266603

  7. Spatial clustering of tuning in mouse primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Ringach, Dario L; Mineault, Patrick J; Tring, Elaine; Olivas, Nicholas D; Garcia-Junco-Clemente, Pablo; Trachtenberg, Joshua T

    2016-01-01

    The primary visual cortex of higher mammals is organized into two-dimensional maps, where the preference of cells for stimulus parameters is arranged regularly on the cortical surface. In contrast, the preference of neurons in the rodent appears to be arranged randomly, in what is termed a salt-and-pepper map. Here we revisited the spatial organization of receptive fields in mouse primary visual cortex by measuring the tuning of pyramidal neurons in the joint orientation and spatial frequency domain. We found that the similarity of tuning decreases as a function of cortical distance, revealing a weak but statistically significant spatial clustering. Clustering was also observed across different cortical depths, consistent with a columnar organization. Thus, the mouse visual cortex is not strictly a salt-and-pepper map. At least on a local scale, it resembles a degraded version of the organization seen in higher mammals, hinting at a possible common origin. PMID:27481398

  8. Nanoionic devices: Interface nanoarchitechtonics for physical property tuning and enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Takashi; Terabe, Kazuya; Yang, Rui; Aono, Masakazu

    2016-11-01

    Nanoionic devices have been developed to generate novel functions overcoming limitations of conventional materials synthesis and semiconductor technology. Various physical properties can be tuned and enhanced by local ion transport near the solid/solid interface. Two electronic carrier doping methods can be used to achieve extremely high-density electronic carriers: one is electrostatic carrier doping using an electric double layer (EDL); the other is electrochemical carrier doping using a redox reaction. Atomistic restructuring near the solid/solid interface driven by a DC voltage, namely, interface nanoarchitechtonics, has huge potential. For instance, the use of EDL enables high-density carrier doping in potential superconductors, which can hardly accept chemical doping, in order to achieve room-temperature superconductivity. Optical bandgap and photoluminescence can be controlled for various applications including smart windows and biosensors. In situ tuning of magnetic properties is promising for low-power-consumption spintronics. Synaptic plasticity in the human brain is achieved in neuromorphic devices.

  9. The Magnetically-Tuned Transition-Edge Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadleir, John E.; Lee, Sang-Jun; Smith, Stephen J.; Busch, Sarah E.; Bandler, Simon R.; Adams, Joseph S.; Eckart, Megan E.; Chervenak, James A.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Porst, Jan-Patrick

    2014-08-01

    We present the first measurements on the proposed magnetically-tuned superconducting transition-edge sensor and compare the modified resistive transition with the theoretical prediction (Sadleir et al., IEEE Trans App Supercond 23:2101405, 2013). A TES's resistive transition is customarily characterized in terms of the unitless device parameters and corresponding to the resistive response to changes in temperature and current respectively. We present a new relationship between measured IV quantities (sensor current and voltage ) and the parameters and and use these relations to confirm we have stably biased a TES with negative parameter with magnetic tuning. Motivated by access to this new unexplored parameter space, we investigate the conditions for bias stability of a TES taking into account both self and externally applied magnetic fields.

  10. Angular tuning of the magnetic birefringence in rippled cobalt films

    SciTech Connect

    Arranz, Miguel A.; Colino, José M.

    2015-06-22

    We report the measurement of magnetically induced birefringence in rippled Co films. For this purpose, the magneto-optical properties of ion beam eroded ferromagnetic films were studied using Kerr magnetometry and magnetic birefringence in the transmitted light intensity. Upon sufficient ion sculpting, these ripple surface nanostructures developed a defined uniaxial anisotropy in the in-plane magnetization, finely tuning the magnetic birefringence effect. We have studied its dependence on the relative orientation between the ripple direction and the magnetic field, and found this effect to be dramatically correlated with the capability to neatly distinguish the mechanisms for the in-plane magnetization reversal, i.e., rotation and nucleation. This double refraction corresponds univocally to the two magnetization axes, parallel and perpendicular to the ripples direction. We have also observed that tuned birefringence in stack assemblies of rippled Co films, which enables us to technically manipulate the number and direction of refraction axes.

  11. Cosmologically Safe QCD Axion without Fine-Tuning.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masaki; Yanagida, Tsutomu T; Yonekura, Kazuya

    2016-02-01

    Although QCD axion models are widely studied as solutions to the strong CP problem, they generically confront severe fine-tuning problems to guarantee the anomalous Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry. In this Letter, we propose a simple QCD axion model without any fine-tunings. We introduce an extra dimension and a pair of extra quarks living on two branes separately, which is also charged under a bulk Abelian gauge symmetry. We assume a monopole condensation on our brane at an intermediate scale, which implies that the extra quarks develop chiral symmetry breaking and the PQ symmetry is broken. In contrast to Kim's original model, our model explains the origin of the PQ symmetry thanks to the extra dimension and avoids the cosmological domain wall problem because of chiral symmetry breaking in Abelian gauge theory.

  12. Tuning the Engine Skoda 781 for Sport Competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragan, Branislav; Polóni, Marián; Chríbik, Andrej

    2014-12-01

    This article deals with the tuning of a mass-produced engine Skoda 781.136B and its rebuilding into a racing engine. The introduction briefly describes the basic parameters of the massproduced engine. The information is then followed by a detailed description of adjustments to the pipe system, valve timing, cylinder head and crank mechanism. The article presents the benefits in terms of increasing power parameters and there is also a comparison of speed characteristics. The aim of the tuning was to increase the engine power parameters, in particular the torque in the range of 4 000-6 000 min-1, at which the engine most often operates during competitions. The adjustments and optimization of the engine have increased the power parameters in the required range of revolutions by 38-47%.

  13. Spatial steadiness of individual disorder modes upon controlled spectral tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, Niccolò; Riboli, Francesco; Intonti, Francesca; La China, Federico; Biccari, Francesco; Gerardino, Annamaria; Gurioli, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Recent innovative applications in disordered photonics would strongly benefit from the possibility to achieve spectral tuning of the individual disorder localized photonic modes without affecting their spatial distributions. Here, we design and fabricate a two-dimensional disordered photonic system, made of a GaAs slab patterned with randomly distributed circular air scattering centers, supporting localized light modes with very small modal volume. The photoluminescence of InAs quantum dots embedded in the slab is used as a probe for near field experiments and gives direct access to the electric field intensity distribution of the localized random modes. We demonstrate that laser assisted oxidation of the GaAs slab performed by near field illumination can be used for a gentle tuning of the individual random modes without modifying the subtle balance leading to light localization given by multiple scattering.

  14. A molecular tuning fork in single-molecule mechanochemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Shankar; Koirala, Deepak; Selvam, Sangeetha; Ghimire, Chiran; Mao, Hanbin

    2015-06-22

    The separate arrangement of target recognition and signal transduction in conventional biosensors often compromises the real-time response and can introduce additional noise. To address these issues, we combined analyte recognition and signal reporting by mechanochemical coupling in a single-molecule DNA template. We incorporated a DNA hairpin as a mechanophore in the template, which, under a specific force, undergoes stochastic transitions between folded and unfolded hairpin structures (mechanoescence). Reminiscent of a tuning fork that vibrates at a fixed frequency, the device was classified as a molecular tuning fork (MTF). By monitoring the lifetime of the folded and unfolded hairpins with equal populations, we were able to differentiate between the mono- and bivalent binding modes during individual antibody-antigen binding events. We anticipate these mechanospectroscopic concepts and methods will be instrumental for the development of novel bioanalyses.

  15. The Magnetically-Tuned Transition-Edge Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadleir, John E.; Lee, Sang-Jun; Smith, Stephen J.; Busch, Sarah E.; Bandler, Simon R.; Adams, Joseph S.; Eckart, Megan E.; Chevenak, James A.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Porst, Jan-Patrick

    2014-01-01

    We present the first measurements on the proposed magnetically-tuned superconducting transition-edge sensor (MTES) and compare the modified resistive transition with the theoretical prediction. A TES's resistive transition is customarily characterized in terms of the unit less device parameters alpha and beta corresponding to the resistive response to changes in temperature and current respectively. We present a new relationship between measured IV quantities and the parameters alpha and beta and use these relations to confirm we have stably biased a TES with negative beta parameter with magnetic tuning. Motivated by access to this new unexplored parameter space, we investigate the conditions for bias stability of a TES taking into account both self and externally applied magnetic fields.

  16. MAESTRO -- A Model and Expert System Tuning Resource for Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, D.L.; Brand, H.R.; Maurer, W.J.; Coffield, F.E.; Chambers, F.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed MAESTRO, a Model And Expert System Tuning Resource for Operators. It provides a unified software environment for optimizing the performance of large, complex machines, in particular the Advanced Test Accelerator and Experimental Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The system incorporates three approaches to tuning: a mouse-based manual interface to select and control magnets and to view displays of machine performance; an automation based on cloning the operator'' by implementing the strategies and reasoning used by the operator; an automation based on a simulator model which, when accurately matched to the machine, allows downloading of optimal sets of parameters and permits diagnosing errors in the beamline. The latter two approaches are based on the Artificial Intelligence technique known as Expert Systems. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Preliminary study on the RF tuning of CSNS DTL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xue-Jun; Li, A.-Hong; Xiao, Yong-Chuang; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Hua-Chang; Gong, Ke-Yun; Fu, Shi-Nian

    2014-02-01

    In the R&D of the CSNS Drift Tube Linac (DTL), the first unit tank with 28 drift tubes has been developed. The axial accelerating field is ramped from 2.2 MV/m to 3.1 MV/m in this tank. The required field flatness is less than ±2% with the standard deviation of 1% for the beam dynamics; the field stability should be less than 1% for machine stable operation. After successful alignment, RF tuning was carried out focusing on the field profile measurement. Four slug tuners and eleven post couplers were applied in this procedure. The ramped field and required stability had been achieved by fine adjustment of the slug tuners and post couplers. In this paper, the preliminary tuning results are presented and discussed.

  18. Modal selective tuning in a photonic crystal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisanello, F.; De Vittorio, M.; Cingolani, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present a way to selectively tune the properties of the degenerated modes confined in a single point defect two-dimensional photonic crystal cavity based on a triangular lattice of air holes. We investigate the dependence of the modal properties of the resonator on the position of the first neighbor holes, showing that it is possible to finely tune the resonant frequency of only one of these two modes and to increase the quality factor of the mode that has no frequency shift. This is achieved by controlling the wavevector components inside the cavity. This approach is a viable strategy for the development and the optimization of several innovative devices based on bi-modal cavity arrays, such as arrays of integrated optical filters and optical read-out sections for biosensing applications.

  19. Spatial clustering of tuning in mouse primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ringach, Dario L.; Mineault, Patrick J.; Tring, Elaine; Olivas, Nicholas D.; Garcia-Junco-Clemente, Pablo; Trachtenberg, Joshua T.

    2016-01-01

    The primary visual cortex of higher mammals is organized into two-dimensional maps, where the preference of cells for stimulus parameters is arranged regularly on the cortical surface. In contrast, the preference of neurons in the rodent appears to be arranged randomly, in what is termed a salt-and-pepper map. Here we revisited the spatial organization of receptive fields in mouse primary visual cortex by measuring the tuning of pyramidal neurons in the joint orientation and spatial frequency domain. We found that the similarity of tuning decreases as a function of cortical distance, revealing a weak but statistically significant spatial clustering. Clustering was also observed across different cortical depths, consistent with a columnar organization. Thus, the mouse visual cortex is not strictly a salt-and-pepper map. At least on a local scale, it resembles a degraded version of the organization seen in higher mammals, hinting at a possible common origin. PMID:27481398

  20. High-speed spectral tuning CARS microscopy using AOTF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Mamoru; Iwatsuka, Junichi; Niioka, Hirohiko; Araki, Tsutomu

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a high speed spectral tuning CARS microscopy system using a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser with an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) in the cavity. Since the wavelength of the laser is tunable with the applied radio frequency to the AOTF, the wavelength is electrically tunable.The pulse duration of the laser is about 10 ps, tunable range is 800 nm to 930 nm, and the tuning speed is ms order. The laser is synchronized with another mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser laser our own method using a balance cross-correlator and phase lock loop technique. The synchronized lasers are used for light source of multi-focus CARS microscopy system using a microlens array scanner, and the hyperspectral imaging of adipocyte cells is demonstrated.

  1. Tuning the plasmon resonance of a nano-mouth array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yang; Chen, Xia; Dou, Zhijie; Johnson, Nigel P.; Zhou, Zhang-Kai; Wang, Xuehua; Jin, Chongjun

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a method to fabricate a silver nano-mouth array via a cost-effective inverted hemispherical colloidal lithography method. It shows that the nano-mouth supports a strong localized surface plasmon resonance, which results in an extraordinary optical transmission peak. When the nano-mouth array is transferred onto a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate, we show that the localized surface plasmon resonance can be tuned via the swelling and recovery of the PDMS in ethyl acetate solvent. The resonant peak can be tuned with a relative bandwidth of over 10%. We also demonstrate the refractive index sensitivity of the nano-mouth array at a wavelength of 1300 nm. This structure might be useful for optical microfluidic devices and sensors.

  2. Cascaded, stagger-tuned, broadband, low-ripple optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Saleh, A A; Jopson, R M

    1988-11-01

    We show theoretically that the gain spectrum obtained by cascading two or more semiconductor optical amplifiers can have a ripple amplitude that is significantly smaller than that currently attainable with a single stage of optical amplification. For example, by cascading two stagger-tuned amplifiers, each having 10 dB of coupling loss and facet reflectivities of 10(-3), one can achieve a net (fiber-to-fiber) gain of 30 dB with less than 2 dB of ripple amplitude. We also show that, under some conditions, simple cascading of optical amplifiers, without the stagger tuning and associated control, can lead to low-ripple, high-gain optical amplification.

  3. Tuning positive feedback for signal detection in noisy dynamic environments.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anders; Ramsch, Kai; Middendorf, Martin; Sumpter, David J T

    2012-09-21

    Learning from previous actions is a key feature of decision-making. Diverse biological systems, from neuronal assemblies to insect societies, use a combination of positive feedback and forgetting of stored memories to process and respond to input signals. Here we look how these systems deal with a dynamic two-armed bandit problem of detecting a very weak signal in the presence of a high degree of noise. We show that by tuning the form of positive feedback and the decay rate to appropriate values, a single tracking variable can effectively detect dynamic inputs even in the presence of a large degree of noise. In particular, we show that when tuned appropriately a simple positive feedback algorithm is Fisher efficient, in that it can track changes in a signal on a time of order L(h)=(|h|/σ)(-2), where |h| is the magnitude of the signal and σ the magnitude of the noise.

  4. Automated Tuning of the Advanced Photon Source Booster Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedron, S. G.; Carwardine, J. A.; Milton, S. V.

    1997-05-01

    The acceleration cycle of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) booster synchrotron is completed within 250 ms and is repeated at 2 Hz. Unless properly corrected, transverse and longitudinal injection errors can lead to inefficient booster performance. Ramped-magnet tracking errors can also lead to losses during the acceleration cycle. In order to simplify daily operation, automated tuning methods have been developed. Through the use of empirically determined response functions, transfer line corrector magnets, and beam position monitor readings, the injection process is optimized by correcting the first turn trajectory to the measured closed orbit. An automated version of this correction technique has been implemented using the feedback-based program sddscontrollaw. Further automation is used to adjust and minimize tracking errors between the five main ramped power supplies. These tuning algorithms and their implementation are described here along with an evaluation of their! performance.

  5. Low Emittance Tuning Studies for SuperB

    SciTech Connect

    Liuzzo, Simone; Biagini, Maria; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Donald, Martin; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    SuperB[1] is an international project for an asymmetric 2 rings collider at the B mesons cm energy to be built in the Rome area in Italy. The two rings will have very small beam sizes at the Interaction Point and very small emittances, similar to the Linear Collider Damping Rings ones. In particular, the ultra low vertical emittances, 7 pm in the LER and 4 pm in the HER, need a careful study of the misalignment errors effects on the machine performances. Studies on the closed orbit, vertical dispersion and coupling corrections have been carried out in order to specify the maximum allowed errors and to provide a procedure for emittance tuning. A new tool which combines MADX and Matlab routines has been developed, allowing for both corrections and tuning. Results of these studies are presented.

  6. Grating-tuned semiconductor MOPA lasers for precision spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marquardt, J.H.; Cruz, F.C.; Stephens, M.; Oates, C.W.; Hollberg, L.W.; Bergquist, J.C.; Welch, D.F.; Mehuys, D.; Sanders, S.

    1996-12-31

    A standard grating-tuned extended-cavity diode laser is used for injection seeding of a tapered semiconductor laser/amplifier. With sufficient injection power the output of the amplifier takes on the spectral characteristics of the master laser. The authors have constructed master-oscillator power-amplifier (MOPA) systems that operate near 657 nm, 675 nm, 795 nm, and 850 nm. Although the characteristics vary from system to system, the authors have demonstrated output powers of greater than 700 mW in a single spatial mode, linewidths less than 1 kHz, coarse tuning greater than 20 nm, and continuous single-frequency scanning greater than 150 GHz. The authors discuss the spectroscopic applications of these high power, highly coherent, tunable diode lasers as applied to Ca, Hg{sup +}, I{sub 2}, and two-photon transitions in Cs.

  7. Mechanical and electrical tuning in a tonotopically organized insect ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Jennifer; Schöneich, Stefan; Hedwig, Berthold; Kössl, Manfred; Nowotny, Manuela

    2015-12-01

    The high-frequency hearing organ of bushcrickets - the crista acustica (CA) - is tonotopically organized. Details about the mechano-electrical transduction mechanisms within the sensory-cell complex, however, remain unknown. In the recent study, we investigated and compared the anatomical, mechanical and electrophysiological properties of the CA and reveal a strong correlation of the mechanical and neuronal frequency tuning, which is supported by an anatomical gradient along the CA. Only in the distal high-frequency region of the CA a discrepancy between a strong mechanical response to low frequencies <30 kHz and a neuronal response that was restricted to frequencies >30 kHz was found. Therefore, we suggest that there might be additional intrinsic tuning mechanisms in the sensory cells of the distal region to distinguish the frequency content of sound.

  8. Artifical intelligence techniques for tuning linear induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, D.; Brand, H.; Chambers, F.; Coffield, F.; Maurer, W.; Turner, W.

    1991-05-01

    We developed an expert system that acts as an intelligent assistant for tuning particle beam generators called MAESTRO, Model and Expert System Resource for Operators. MAESTRO maintains a knowledge base of the accelerator containing not only the interconnections of the beamline components, but also their physical attributes such as measured magnetic tilts, offsets, and field profiles. MAESTRO incorporates particle trajectory and beam envelope models which are coupled to the knowledge base permitting large numbers of real-time orbit and envelope calculations in the control-room environment. To date we have used this capability in three ways: First, to implement a tuning algorithm for minimizing transverse beam motion. Second, to produce a beam waist with arbitrary radius at the entrance to a brightness diagnostic. And finally, to measure beam energy along the accelerator by fitting orbits to focusing and steering sweeps.

  9. Electrically tuned magnetic order and magnetoresistance in a topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zuocheng; Feng, Xiao; Guo, Minghua; Li, Kang; Zhang, Jinsong; Ou, Yunbo; Feng, Yang; Wang, Lili; Chen, Xi; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qikun; Wang, Yayu

    2014-09-15

    The interplay between topological protection and broken time reversal symmetry in topological insulators may lead to highly unconventional magnetoresistance behaviour that can find unique applications in magnetic sensing and data storage. However, the magnetoresistance of topological insulators with spontaneously broken time reversal symmetry is still poorly understood. In this work, we investigate the transport properties of a ferromagnetic topological insulator thin film fabricated into a field effect transistor device. We observe a complex evolution of gate-tuned magnetoresistance, which is positive when the Fermi level lies close to the Dirac point but becomes negative at higher energies. This trend is opposite to that expected from the Berry phase picture, but is intimately correlated with the gate-tuned magnetic order. The underlying physics is the competition between the topology-induced weak antilocalization and magnetism-induced negative magnetoresistance. The simultaneous electrical control of magnetic order and magnetoresistance facilitates future topological insulator based spintronic devices.

  10. Stabilization of betatron tune in Indus-2 storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saroj, Jena; Yadav, S.; K. Agrawal, R.; D. Ghodke, A.; Pravin, Fatnani; A. Puntambekar, T.

    2014-06-01

    Indus-2 is a synchrotron radiation source that is operational at RRCAT, Indore, India. It is essentially pertinent in any synchrotron radiation facility to store the electron beam without beam loss. During the day to day operation of Indus-2 storage ring, difficulty was being faced in accumulating higher beam current. After examination, it was found that the working point was shifting from its desired value during accumulation. For smooth beam accumulation, a fixed desired tune in both horizontal and vertical plane plays a significant role in avoiding beam loss via the resonance process. This required a betatron tune feedback system to be put in the storage ring. After putting ON this feedback, the beam accumulation was smooth. The details of this feedback and its working principle are described in this paper.

  11. Effects of Stimulus Octave and Timbre on the Tuning Accuracy of Secondary School Instrumentalists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byo, James L.; Schlegel, Amanda L.; Clark, N. Alan

    2011-01-01

    To test the effects of octave and timbre on tuning accuracy, four stimuli--B-flat 4 sounded by flute, oboe, and clarinet and B-flat 2 sounded by tuba--functioned as reference pitches for high school wind players (N = 72). The two stimulus octaves combined with participants' assigned tuning notes created soprano, tenor, and bass tuning groups. All…

  12. Tuned vibration absorbers with nonlinear viscous damping for damped structures under random load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    The classical problem for the application of a tuned vibration absorber is to minimize the response of a structural system, such as displacement, velocity, acceleration or to maximize the energy dissipated by tuned vibration absorber. The development of explicit optimal absorber parameters is challenging for a damped structural system since the fixed points no longer exist in the frequency response curve. This paper aims at deriving a set of simple design formula of tuned vibration absorber with nonlinear viscous damping based on the frequency tuning for harmonic load for a damped structural system under white noise excitation. The vibration absorbers being considered include tuned mass damper (TMD) and liquid column vibration absorber (LCVA). Simple approximate expression for the standard deviation velocity response of tuned vibration absorber for damped primary structure is also derived in this study to facilitate the estimation of the damping coefficient of TMD with nonlinear viscous damping and the head loss coefficient of LCVA. The derived results indicate that the higher the structural inherent damping the smaller the supplementary damping provided by a tuned vibration absorber. Furthermore, the optimal damping of tuned vibration absorber is shown to be independent of structural damping when it is tuned using the frequency tuning for harmonic load. Finally, the derived closed-form expressions are demonstrated to be capable of predicting the optimal parameters of tuned vibration absorbers with sufficient accuracy for preliminary design of tuned vibration absorbers with nonlinear viscous damping for a damped primary structure.

  13. Teachers' Practices and Beliefs Regarding Teaching Tuning in Elementary and Middle School Group String Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine teachers' practices and beliefs related to the teaching of stringed instrument tuning in elementary and middle school group classes. The aspects examined included the following: (a) teachers' beliefs about teaching tuning in their string classes, (b) activities teachers used when teaching tuning in string…

  14. Choice of Tevatron tune with matched low-. beta. insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M.

    1984-06-20

    The Tevatron lattice, following closely the Main Ring lattice, is made up of approximately 90 FODO cells with six straight sections equally spaced. The straight sections are identical (neglecting the special high-..beta.. straight section used for resonant extraction) providing six-fold symmetry. Each straight section is comprised mainly of a pair of doublets, one at each end, in an antisymmetric configuration. The ..beta..-functions are matched to the building block cells but the dispersion function is not. The ..beta..-function matching implies that the structure is not sensitive to the tune of the sextant (i.e., structure resonances); however, the dispersion mismatch excites off-momentum dipole resonances and the dispersion structure of the ring is therefore sensitive to sextant tunes near an integer. The introduction of low-..beta.. insertions can be accomplished by replacing a standard insertion (expanded somewhat from the doublet pair straight section) with a low-..beta.. insertion. By matching the ends of the replacement units with respect to ..beta..-functions and dispersion function, the full lattice is made insensitive to linear structure resonances. Procedures are described here for introducing into the idealized Tevatron lattice considered here a single matched low-..beta.. insertion at BO, and two matched low-..beta.. insertions at BO and DO. The main consequence is the need for a significant number of independently powered quadrupoles. Another conclusion is related to the choice of tune, where it is found that the arbitrary rule of maintaining a fixed tune for all configurations should be modified.

  15. Betatron tune measurement at the Argonne rapid cycling synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Rauchas, A.V.; Brumwell, F.R.; Cho, Y.; Czyz, W.S.; Gunderson, G.R.; Knott, M.J.; Suddeth, D.E.; Volk, G.J.

    1981-06-01

    Preliminary tests of the new system have been completed using the extraction kicker as a ''pinger'' magnet. Data has been gathered, digitized, and the FFT calculated. The results are within expectations. The new system expands the tune measurement capabilities tremendously. The computer allows for data processing which improves signal-to-noise ratio and further increases resolution. The system will also lend itself to study beam motion other than betatron. 8 refs.

  16. UV-mediated tuning of surface biorepulsivity in aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Weber, Theresa; Meyerbröker, Nikolaus; Hira, Nuruzzaman Khan; Zharnikov, Michael; Terfort, Andreas

    2014-04-28

    While it is well-known that oligoethylene glycol (OEG) terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) can be deteriorated by UV irradiation in air, we now report that the analogous modification can also be performed in water, opening the opportunity for in situ tuning of biorepulsive properties. Surprisingly, this deterioration also takes place even in the absence of molecular oxygen, resulting in a very selective process.

  17. Electromechanical tuning of vertically-coupled photonic crystal nanobeams.

    PubMed

    Midolo, L; Yoon, S N; Pagliano, F; Xia, T; van Otten, F W M; Lermer, M; Höfling, S; Fiore, A

    2012-08-13

    We present the design, the fabrication and the characterization of a tunable one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal cavity (PCC) etched on two vertically-coupled GaAs nanobeams. A novel fabrication method which prevents their adhesion under capillary forces is introduced. We discuss a design to increase the flexibility of the structure and we demonstrate a large reversible and controllable electromechanical wavelength tuning (> 15 nm) of the cavity modes. PMID:23038566

  18. Linewidth and tuning characteristics of terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Barkan, A; Tittel, F K; Mittleman, D M; Dengler, R; Siegel, P H; Scalari, G; Ajili, L; Faist, J; Beere, H E; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G; Ritchie, D A

    2004-03-15

    We have measured the spectral linewidths of three continuous-wave quantum cascade lasers operating at terahertz frequencies by heterodyning the free-running quantum cascade laser with two far-infrared gas lasers. Beat notes are detected with a GaAs diode mixer and a microwave spectrum analyzer, permitting very precise frequency measurements and giving instantaneous linewidths of less than -30 kHz. Characteristics are also reported for frequency tuning as the injection current is varied.

  19. Ion production and tune shift in the recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Krish Gounder; John Marriner; Shekhar Mishra

    2003-05-27

    We calculate the ion production rate for a beam of 2 x 10{sup 12} antiprotons in the Recycler Ring using the known vacuum residual gas composition. We study the effect of ion buildup around the antiproton beam on beam lifetime and stability. We compare the ion production rate with the actual measurement using the beam tune shifts when the RF gap in the circulating beam is removed.

  20. TDG - Uncertainty in a design of tuned dry gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Yoshiaki; Nibe, Hitoshi

    Measurements were made of the day-to-day stability and temperature coefficient of G-insensitive drift for tuned dry gyros (TDG), in-phase spring rate, quadrature spring rate, and the offset angle consisting of G-insensitive drift. It was found that the governing parameter for instabiity or uncertainty of TDG G-insensitive drift was mainly dependent on the offset angle variation. This conclusion will help to introduce more accuracy in TDG design and fabrication.

  1. ATCOM: Automatically Tuned Collective Communication System for SMP Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meng-Shiou

    2005-01-01

    Conventional implementations of collective communications are based on point-to-point communications, and their optimizations have been focused on efficiency of those communication algorithms. However, point-to-point communications are not the optimal choice for modern computing clusters of SMPs due to their two-level communication structure. In recent years, a few research efforts have investigated efficient collective communications for SMP clusters. This dissertation is focused on platform-independent algorithms and implementations in this area. There are two main approaches to implementing efficient collective communications for clusters of SMPs: using shared memory operations for intra-node communications, and overlapping inter-node/intra-node communications. The former fully utilizes the hardware based shared memory of an SMP, and the latter takes advantage of the inherent hierarchy of the communications within a cluster of SMPs. Previous studies focused on clusters of SMP from certain vendors. However, the previously proposed methods are not portable to other systems. Because the performance optimization issue is very complicated and the developing process is very time consuming, it is highly desired to have self-tuning, platform-independent implementations. As proven in this dissertation, such an implementation can significantly out-perform the other point-to-point based portable implementations and some platform-specific implementations. The dissertation describes in detail the architecture of the platform-independent implementation. There are four system components: shared memory-based collective communications, overlapping mechanisms for inter-node and intra-node communications, a prediction-based tuning module and a micro-benchmark based tuning module. Each component is carefully designed with the goal of automatic tuning in mind.

  2. ORMOSIL thin films: tuning mechanical properties via a nanochemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Giovanni; Le Bourhis, Eric; Ciriminna, Rosaria; Tranchida, Davide; Pagliaro, Mario

    2006-12-19

    The mechanical properties (hardness and elastic modulus) of organically modified silicate thin films can be finely tuned by varying the degree of alkylation and thus the fraction of six- and four-membered siloxane rings in the organosilica matrix. This opens the way to large tunability of parameters that are of crucial practical importance for films that are finding increasing application in numerous fields ranging from microelectronics to chemical sensing.

  3. Tuning and synthesis of semiconductor nanostructures by mechanical compression

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou; Li, Binsong

    2015-11-17

    A mechanical compression method can be used to tune semiconductor nanoparticle lattice structure and synthesize new semiconductor nanostructures including nanorods, nanowires, nanosheets, and other three-dimensional interconnected structures. II-VI or IV-VI compound semiconductor nanoparticle assemblies can be used as starting materials, including CdSe, CdTe, ZnSe, ZnS, PbSe, and PbS.

  4. Fab 5: noncanonical kinetic gravity, self tuning, and cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Appleby, Stephen A.; Linder, Eric V.; Felice, Antonio De E-mail: adefelic@gmail.com

    2012-10-01

    We investigate circumstances under which one can generalize Horndeski's most general scalar-tensor theory of gravity. Specifically we demonstrate that a nonlinear combination of purely kinetic gravity terms can give rise to an accelerating universe without the addition of extra propagating degrees of freedom on cosmological backgrounds, and exhibit self tuning to bring a large cosmological constant under control. This nonlinear approach leads to new properties that may be instructive for exploring the behaviors of gravity.

  5. The position of hydrophobic residues tunes peptide self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Bortolini, Christian; Liu, Lei; Gronewold, Thomas M A; Wang, Chen; Besenbacher, Flemming; Dong, Mingdong

    2014-08-21

    The final structure and properties of synthetic peptides mainly depend on their sequence composition and experimental conditions. This work demonstrates that a variation in the positions of hydrophobic residues within a peptide sequence can tune the self-assembly. Techniques employed are atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and an innovative method based on surface acoustic waves. In addition, a systematic investigation on pH dependence was carried out by utilizing constant experimental parameters. PMID:24995505

  6. Tuning of PID controllers for boiler-turbine units.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen; Liu, Jizhen; Fang, Fang; Chen, Yanqiao

    2004-10-01

    A simple two-by-two model for a boiler-turbine unit is demonstrated in this paper. The model can capture the essential dynamics of a unit. The design of a coordinated controller is discussed based on this model. A PID control structure is derived, and a tuning procedure is proposed. The examples show that the method is easy to apply and can achieve acceptable performance.

  7. Neuronal correlates of perception, imagery, and memory for familiar tunes.

    PubMed

    Herholz, Sibylle C; Halpern, Andrea R; Zatorre, Robert J

    2012-06-01

    We used fMRI to investigate the neuronal correlates of encoding and recognizing heard and imagined melodies. Ten participants were shown lyrics of familiar verbal tunes; they either heard the tune along with the lyrics, or they had to imagine it. In a subsequent surprise recognition test, they had to identify the titles of tunes that they had heard or imagined earlier. The functional data showed substantial overlap during melody perception and imagery, including secondary auditory areas. During imagery compared with perception, an extended network including pFC, SMA, intraparietal sulcus, and cerebellum showed increased activity, in line with the increased processing demands of imagery. Functional connectivity of anterior right temporal cortex with frontal areas was increased during imagery compared with perception, indicating that these areas form an imagery-related network. Activity in right superior temporal gyrus and pFC was correlated with the subjective rating of imagery vividness. Similar to the encoding phase, the recognition task recruited overlapping areas, including inferior frontal cortex associated with memory retrieval, as well as left middle temporal gyrus. The results present new evidence for the cortical network underlying goal-directed auditory imagery, with a prominent role of the right pFC both for the subjective impression of imagery vividness and for on-line mental monitoring of imagery-related activity in auditory areas. PMID:22360595

  8. The Effects of Auditory Contrast Tuning upon Speech Intelligibility

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Nathan J.; Watkins, Paul V.; Davidson, Lisa S.; Barbour, Dennis L.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously identified neurons tuned to spectral contrast of wideband sounds in auditory cortex of awake marmoset monkeys. Because additive noise alters the spectral contrast of speech, contrast-tuned neurons, if present in human auditory cortex, may aid in extracting speech from noise. Given that this cortical function may be underdeveloped in individuals with sensorineural hearing loss, incorporating biologically-inspired algorithms into external signal processing devices could provide speech enhancement benefits to cochlear implantees. In this study we first constructed a computational signal processing algorithm to mimic auditory cortex contrast tuning. We then manipulated the shape of contrast channels and evaluated the intelligibility of reconstructed noisy speech using a metric to predict cochlear implant user perception. Candidate speech enhancement strategies were then tested in cochlear implantees with a hearing-in-noise test. Accentuation of intermediate contrast values or all contrast values improved computed intelligibility. Cochlear implant subjects showed significant improvement in noisy speech intelligibility with a contrast shaping procedure. PMID:27555826

  9. Dynamically tuned magnetostrictive spring with electrically controlled stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the design and testing of an electrically controllable magnetostrictive spring that has a dynamically tunable stiffness (i.e., a magnetostrictive Varispring). The device enables in situ stiffness tuning or stiffness switching for vibration control applications. Using a nonlinear electromechanical transducer model and an analytical solution of linear, mechanically induced magnetic diffusion, Terfenol-D is shown to have a faster rise time to stepped voltage inputs and a significantly higher magnetic diffusion cut-off frequency relative to Galfenol. A Varispring is manufactured using a laminated Terfenol-D rod. Further rise time reductions are achieved by minimizing the rod’s diameter and winding the electromagnet with larger wire. Dynamic tuning of the Varispring’s stiffness is investigated by measuring the Terfenol-D rod’s strain response to dynamic, compressive, axial forces in the presence of sinusoidal or square wave control currents. The Varispring’s rise time is \\lt 1 ms for 1 A current switches. Continuous modulus changes up to 21.9 GPa and 500 Hz and square wave modulus changes (dynamic {{Δ }}E effect) up to 12.3 GPa and 100 Hz are observed. Stiffness tunability and tuning bandwidth can be considerably increased by operating about a more optimal bias stress and improving the control of the electrical input.

  10. PERI - Auto-tuning Memory Intensive Kernels for Multicore

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H; Williams, Samuel; Datta, Kaushik; Carter, Jonathan; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Yelick, Katherine; Bailey, David H

    2008-06-24

    We present an auto-tuning approach to optimize application performance on emerging multicore architectures. The methodology extends the idea of search-based performance optimizations, popular in linear algebra and FFT libraries, to application-specific computational kernels. Our work applies this strategy to Sparse Matrix Vector Multiplication (SpMV), the explicit heat equation PDE on a regular grid (Stencil), and a lattice Boltzmann application (LBMHD). We explore one of the broadest sets of multicore architectures in the HPC literature, including the Intel Xeon Clovertown, AMD Opteron Barcelona, Sun Victoria Falls, and the Sony-Toshiba-IBM (STI) Cell. Rather than hand-tuning each kernel for each system, we develop a code generator for each kernel that allows us to identify a highly optimized version for each platform, while amortizing the human programming effort. Results show that our auto-tuned kernel applications often achieve a better than 4X improvement compared with the original code. Additionally, we analyze a Roofline performance model for each platform to reveal hardware bottlenecks and software challenges for future multicore systems and applications.

  11. Keeping up with bats: dynamic auditory tuning in a moth.

    PubMed

    Windmill, James Frederick Charles; Jackson, Joseph Curt; Tuck, Elizabeth Jane; Robert, Daniel

    2006-12-19

    Many night-flying insects evolved ultrasound sensitive ears in response to acoustic predation by echolocating bats . Noctuid moths are most sensitive to frequencies at 20-40 kHz , the lower range of bat ultrasound . This may disadvantage the moth because noctuid-hunting bats in particular echolocate at higher frequencies shortly before prey capture and thus improve their echolocation and reduce their acoustic conspicuousness . Yet, moth hearing is not simple; the ear's nonlinear dynamic response shifts its mechanical sensitivity up to high frequencies. Dependent on incident sound intensity, the moth's ear mechanically tunes up and anticipates the high frequencies used by hunting bats. Surprisingly, this tuning is hysteretic, keeping the ear tuned up for the bat's possible return. A mathematical model is constructed for predicting a linear relationship between the ear's mechanical stiffness and sound intensity. This nonlinear mechanical response is a parametric amplitude dependence that may constitute a feature common to other sensory systems. Adding another twist to the coevolutionary arms race between moths and bats, these results reveal unexpected sophistication in one of the simplest ears known and a novel perspective for interpreting bat echolocation calls.

  12. Broad electrical tuning of graphene-loaded plasmonic antennas.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yu; Kats, Mikhail A; Genevet, Patrice; Yu, Nanfang; Song, Yi; Kong, Jing; Capasso, Federico

    2013-03-13

    Plasmonic antennas enable the conversion of light from free space into subwavelength volumes and vice versa, which facilitates the manipulation of light at the nanoscale. Dynamic control of the properties of antennas is desirable for many applications, including biochemical sensors, reconfigurable meta-surfaces and compact optoelectronic devices. The combination of metallic structures and graphene, which has gate-voltage dependent optical properties, is emerging as a possible platform for electrically controlled plasmonic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate in situ control of antennas using graphene as an electrically tunable load in the nanoscale antenna gap. In our experiments, we demonstrate electrical tuning of graphene-loaded antennas over a broad wavelength range of 650 nm (∼140 cm(-1), ∼10% of the resonance frequency) in the mid-infrared (MIR) region. We propose an equivalent circuit model to quantitatively analyze the tuning behavior of graphene-loaded antenna pairs and derive an analytical expression for the tuning range of resonant wavelength. In a separate experiment, we used doubly resonant antenna arrays to achieve MIR optical intensity modulation with maximum modulation depth of more than 30% and bandwidth of 600 nm (∼100 cm(-1), 8% of the resonance frequency). This study shows that combining graphene with metallic nanostructures provides a route to electrically tunable optical and optoelectronic devices.

  13. Lightweight linear alternators with and without capacitive tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    1993-01-01

    Permanent magnet excited linear alternators rated tens of kW and coupled to free-piston Stirling engines are presently viewed as promising candidates for long term generation of electric power in both space and terrestrial applications. Series capacitive cancellation of the internal inductive reactance of such alternators was considered a viable way to both increase power extraction and to suppress unstable modes of the thermodynamic oscillation. Idealized toroidal and cylindrical alternator geometries are used for a comparative study of the issues of specific mass and capacitive tuning, subject to stability criteria. The analysis shows that the stator mass of an alternator designed to be capacitively tuned is always greater than the minimum achievable stator mass of an alternator designed with no capacitors, assuming equal utilization of materials ratings and the same frequency and power to a resistive load. This conclusion is not substantially altered when the usually lesser masses of the magnets and of any capacitors are added. Within the reported stability requirements and under circumstances of normal materials ratings, this study finds no clear advantage to capacitive tuning. Comparative plots of the various constituent masses are presented versus the internal power factor taken as a design degree of freedom. The explicit formulas developed for stator core, coil, capacitor, and magnet masses and for the degree of magnet utilization provide useful estimates of scaling effects.

  14. The Effects of Auditory Contrast Tuning upon Speech Intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Killian, Nathan J; Watkins, Paul V; Davidson, Lisa S; Barbour, Dennis L

    2016-01-01

    We have previously identified neurons tuned to spectral contrast of wideband sounds in auditory cortex of awake marmoset monkeys. Because additive noise alters the spectral contrast of speech, contrast-tuned neurons, if present in human auditory cortex, may aid in extracting speech from noise. Given that this cortical function may be underdeveloped in individuals with sensorineural hearing loss, incorporating biologically-inspired algorithms into external signal processing devices could provide speech enhancement benefits to cochlear implantees. In this study we first constructed a computational signal processing algorithm to mimic auditory cortex contrast tuning. We then manipulated the shape of contrast channels and evaluated the intelligibility of reconstructed noisy speech using a metric to predict cochlear implant user perception. Candidate speech enhancement strategies were then tested in cochlear implantees with a hearing-in-noise test. Accentuation of intermediate contrast values or all contrast values improved computed intelligibility. Cochlear implant subjects showed significant improvement in noisy speech intelligibility with a contrast shaping procedure. PMID:27555826

  15. PERI - auto-tuning memory-intensive kernels for multicore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S.; Datta, K.; Carter, J.; Oliker, L.; Shalf, J.; Yelick, K.; Bailey, D.

    2008-07-01

    We present an auto-tuning approach to optimize application performance on emerging multicore architectures. The methodology extends the idea of search-based performance optimizations, popular in linear algebra and FFT libraries, to application-specific computational kernels. Our work applies this strategy to sparse matrix vector multiplication (SpMV), the explicit heat equation PDE on a regular grid (Stencil), and a lattice Boltzmann application (LBMHD). We explore one of the broadest sets of multicore architectures in the high-performance computing literature, including the Intel Xeon Clovertown, AMD Opteron Barcelona, Sun Victoria Falls, and the Sony-Toshiba-IBM (STI) Cell. Rather than hand-tuning each kernel for each system, we develop a code generator for each kernel that allows us identify a highly optimized version for each platform, while amortizing the human programming effort. Results show that our auto-tuned kernel applications often achieve a better than 4× improvement compared with the original code. Additionally, we analyze a Roofline performance model for each platform to reveal hardware bottlenecks and software challenges for future multicore systems and applications.

  16. Self tuning scalar fields in spherically symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    We search for self tuning solutions to the Einstein-scalar field equations for the simplest class of `Fab-Four' models with constant potentials. We first review the conditions under which self tuning occurs in a cosmological spacetime, and by introducing a small modification to the original theory—introducing the second and third Galileon terms—show how one can obtain de Sitter states where the expansion rate is independent of the vacuum energy. We then consider whether the same self tuning mechanism can persist in a spherically symmetric inhomogeneous spacetime. We show that there are no asymptotically flat solutions to the field equations in which the vacuum energy is screened, other than the trivial one (Minkowski space). We then consider the possibility of constructing Schwarzschild de Sitter spacetimes for the modified Fab Four plus Galileon theory. We argue that the only model that can successfully screen the vacuum energy in both an FLRW and Schwarzschild de Sitter spacetime is one containing `John' ~ Gμν ∂μphi∂νphi and a canonical kinetic term ~ ∂αphi ∂αphi. This behaviour was first observed in [1]. The screening mechanism, which requires redundancy of the scalar field equation in the `vacuum', fails for the `Paul' term in an inhomogeneous spacetime.

  17. Timing and Tuning for Familiarity of Cortical Responses to Faces

    PubMed Central

    Bobes, Maria A.; Lage Castellanos, Agustin; Quiñones, Ileana; García, Lorna; Valdes-Sosa, Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    Different kinds of known faces activate brain areas to dissimilar degrees. However, the tuning to type of knowledge, and the temporal course of activation, of each area have not been well characterized. Here we measured, with functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activity elicited by unfamiliar, visually familiar, and personally-familiar faces. We assessed response amplitude and duration using flexible hemodynamic response functions, as well as the tuning to face type, of regions within the face processing system. Core face processing areas (occipital and fusiform face areas) responded to all types of faces with only small differences in amplitude and duration. In contrast, most areas of the extended face processing system (medial orbito-frontal, anterior and posterior cingulate) had weak responses to unfamiliar and visually-familiar faces, but were highly tuned and exhibited prolonged responses to personally-familiar faces. This indicates that the neural processing of different types of familiar faces not only differs in degree, but is probably mediated by qualitatively distinct mechanisms. PMID:24130761

  18. Timing and tuning for familiarity of cortical responses to faces.

    PubMed

    Bobes, Maria A; Lage Castellanos, Agustin; Quiñones, Ileana; García, Lorna; Valdes-Sosa, Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    Different kinds of known faces activate brain areas to dissimilar degrees. However, the tuning to type of knowledge, and the temporal course of activation, of each area have not been well characterized. Here we measured, with functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activity elicited by unfamiliar, visually familiar, and personally-familiar faces. We assessed response amplitude and duration using flexible hemodynamic response functions, as well as the tuning to face type, of regions within the face processing system. Core face processing areas (occipital and fusiform face areas) responded to all types of faces with only small differences in amplitude and duration. In contrast, most areas of the extended face processing system (medial orbito-frontal, anterior and posterior cingulate) had weak responses to unfamiliar and visually-familiar faces, but were highly tuned and exhibited prolonged responses to personally-familiar faces. This indicates that the neural processing of different types of familiar faces not only differs in degree, but is probably mediated by qualitatively distinct mechanisms.

  19. A-Priori Tuning of Modified Magnussen Combustion Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, A. T.

    2016-01-01

    In the application of CFD to turbulent reacting flows, one of the main limitations to predictive accuracy is the chemistry model. Using a full or skeletal kinetics model may provide good predictive ability, however, at considerable computational cost. Adding the ability to account for the interaction between turbulence and chemistry improves the overall fidelity of a simulation but adds to this cost. An alternative is the use of simple models, such as the Magnussen model, which has negligible computational overhead, but lacks general predictive ability except for cases that can be tuned to the flow being solved. In this paper, a technique will be described that allows the tuning of the Magnussen model for an arbitrary fuel and flow geometry without the need to have experimental data for that particular case. The tuning is based on comparing the results of the Magnussen model and full finite-rate chemistry when applied to perfectly and partially stirred reactor simulations. In addition, a modification to the Magnussen model is proposed that allows the upper kinetic limit for the reaction rate to be set, giving better physical agreement with full kinetic mechanisms. This procedure allows a simple reacting model to be used in a predictive manner, and affords significant savings in computational costs for simulations.

  20. Simulation and Big Data Challenges in Tuning Building Energy Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyal, Jibonananda; New, Joshua Ryan

    2013-01-01

    EnergyPlus is the flagship building energy simulation software used to model whole building energy consumption for residential and commercial establishments. A typical input to the program often has hundreds, sometimes thousands of parameters which are typically tweaked by a buildings expert to get it right . This process can sometimes take months. Autotune is an ongoing research effort employing machine learning techniques to automate the tuning of the input parameters for an EnergyPlus input description of a building. Even with automation, the computational challenge faced to run the tuning simulation ensemble is daunting and requires the use of supercomputers to make it tractable in time. In this proposal, we describe the scope of the problem, the technical challenges faced and overcome, the machine learning techniques developed and employed, and the software infrastructure developed/in development when taking the EnergyPlus engine, which was primarily designed to run on desktops, and scaling it to run on shared memory supercomputers (Nautilus) and distributed memory supercomputers (Frost and Titan). The parametric simulations produce data in the order of tens to a couple of hundred terabytes.We describe the approaches employed to streamline and reduce bottlenecks in the workflow for this data, which is subsequently being made available for the tuning effort as well as made available publicly for open-science.

  1. Alternate Tunings for the Linac Coherent Light Source Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C.; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2006-03-17

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) project based on the SLAC linac. The LCLS Photoinjector beamline has been designed to deliver 10-ps long electron bunches of 1 nC with a normalized projected transverse emittance smaller than 1.2 mm-mrad at 135 MeV. Tolerances and regulation requirements are tight for this tuning. Half of the total emittance at the end of the injector comes from the ''cathode emittance'' which is 0.7 mm-mrad for our nominal 1nC tuning. As the ''cathode emittance'' scales linearly with laser spot radius, the emittance will be dramatically reduced for smaller radius, but this is only possible at lower charge. In particular, for a 0.2 nC charge, we believe we can achieve an emittance closer to 0.4 mm-mrad. This working point will be easier to tune and the beam quality should be much easier to maintain than for the 1 nC case. In the second half of this paper, we discuss optimum laser pulse shapes. We demonstrate that the benefits of the ellipsoidal shapes seem to be important enough so that serious investigations should be carried out in the production of such pulses.

  2. Element-ary Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schamp, Homer W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historic development of the periodic table from the four-element theory to the Lavoisier's table. Presents a table listing the old and new names of chemicals and the Lavoisier's table of elements. Lists two references. (YP)

  3. Trace Elements and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettyjohn, Wayne A.

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes the effects of arsenic, lead, zinc, mercury, and cadmium on human health, indicates the sources of the elements in water, and considers the possibility of students in high schools analyzing water for trace amounts of the elements. (AL)

  4. Measuring the tuning accuracy of thousands singing in unison: an English Premier Football League table of fans' singing tunefulness.

    PubMed

    Howard, David M

    2004-01-01

    Tunefulness in singing is well understood in the context of solo stage performance, singing in small groups and singing in choirs, with or without accompaniment, and it can be readily measured under laboratory conditions. When thousands of people are singing outside in support of their football team, however, the singing is impromptu; there is no conductor, no starting note, and generally no accompaniment. This paper describes the measurement of the tunefulness of the singing of fans of the twenty clubs in the 2001-2002 English Premier League. The technique adopted is unusual in that it makes direct reference to the formal definition of pitch as a subjective phenomenon. The results are presented in the form of a 2001-2002 English Premier League football fans singing league table. PMID:15260183

  5. Orthotropic hole element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, J. W.; Smith, C. V.

    1983-01-01

    A finite element was developed to adequately represent the state of stress in the region around a circular hole in orthotropic material experiencing reasonably general loading. This has been achieved through a complementary virtual work formulation of the stiffness and stress matrices for a square element with a center circular hole. The element has been incorporated into COSMIC/NASTRAN as a dummy element. Sample problems have been solved and these results are presented.

  6. Elemental Chemical Puzzlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Nicholas C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides nine short chemically based puzzles or problems extensible for use with students from middle school to college. Some of these will strengthen students' recognition of individual elements and element names. Others require students to focus on the salient properties of given chemical elements.

  7. Organic Elemental Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, T. S.; Gutterson, Milton

    1980-01-01

    Reviews general developments in computerization and data processing of organic elemental analyses; carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen analyzers; procedures for determining oxygen, sulfur, and halogens, as well as other nometallic elements and organometallics. Selected papers on trace analysis of nonmetals and determination of metallic elements are…

  8. Tuning efficiency and linewidth of electrostatically actuated multiple air-gap filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, F.; Prott, C.; Irmer, S.; Daleiden, J.; Tarraf, A.; Hillmer, H.; Strassner, M.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the tuning efficiency of electrostatically actuated multiple air-gap filters fabricated in InP for dense wavelength division multiplex applications by comparing measured tuning curves with the results of optical and mechanical simulations. These filters exhibit a record tuning range of 127 nm at 7.3 V tuning voltage. The filters were measured in reflection using standard single mode fiber. The subsequent analysis is based on a one-dimensional electromechanical and optical model providing a reasonable estimation for the pull-in voltage. Optical simulations show that the filter linewidth does not affect the tuning efficiency.

  9. A Solution to the Supersymmetric Fine-Tuning Problem within the MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Kitano, Ryuichiro; Nomura, Yasunori; /UC, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley

    2005-09-08

    Weak scale supersymmetry has a generic problem of fine-tuning in reproducing the correct scale for electroweak symmetry breaking. The problem is particularly severe in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM). We present a solution to this problem that does not require an extension of the MSSM at the weak scale. Superparticle masses are generated by a comparable mixture of moduli and anomaly mediated contributions, and the messenger scale of supersymmetry breaking is effectively lowered to the TeV region. Crucial elements for the solution are a large A term for the top squarks and a small B term for the Higgs doublets. Requiring no fine-tuning worse than 20%, we obtain rather sharp predictions on the spectrum. The gaugino masses are almost universal at the weak scale with the mass between 450 and 900 GeV. The squark and slepton masses are also nearly universal at the weak scale with the mass a factor of {radical}2 smaller than that of the gauginos. The only exception is the top squarks whose masses split from the other squark masses by about m{sub t}/{radical}2. The lightest Higgs boson mass is smaller than 120 GeV, while the ratio of the vacuum expectation values for the two Higgs doublets, tan {beta}, is larger than about 5. The lightest superparticle is the neutral Higgsino of the mass below 190 GeV, which can be dark matter of the universe. The mass of the lighter top squark can be smaller than 300 GeV, which may be relevant for Run II at the Tevatron.

  10. A Cyber Expert System for Auto-Tuning Powered Prosthesis Impedance Control Parameters.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Crouch, Dustin L; Liu, Ming; Sawicki, Gregory S; Wang, Ding

    2016-05-01

    Typically impedance control parameters (e.g., stiffness and damping) in powered lower limb prostheses are fine-tuned by human experts (HMEs), which is time and resource intensive. Automated tuning procedures would make powered prostheses more practical for clinical use. In this study, we developed a novel cyber expert system (CES) that encoded HME tuning decisions as computer rules to auto-tune control parameters for a powered knee (passive ankle) prosthesis. The tuning performance of CES was preliminarily quantified on two able-bodied subjects and two transfemoral amputees. After CES and HME tuning, we observed normative prosthetic knee kinematics and improved or slightly improved gait symmetry and step width within each subject. Compared to HME, the CES tuning procedure required less time and no human intervention. Hence, using CES for auto-tuning prosthesis control was a sound concept, promising to enhance the practical value of powered prosthetic legs. However, the tuning goals of CES might not fully capture those of the HME. This was because we observed that HME tuning reduced trunk sway, while CES sometimes led to slightly increased trunk motion. Additional research is still needed to identify more appropriate tuning objectives for powered prosthetic legs to improve amputees' walking function. PMID:26407703

  11. Coarse-fine adaptive tuned vibration absorber with high frequency resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Yang, Bintang; You, Jiaxin; Gao, Zhe

    2016-11-01

    The speed fluctuation of satellite-rotary-mechanisms causes vibration of slightly different frequencies. The critical requirements of satellites need a vibration control device with high frequency resolution to suppress the vibration. This paper presents a coarse-fine adaptive tuned vibration absorber (ATVA) with high frequency resolution. The coarse-fine ATVA which simultaneously satisfies the requirements of high resolution and relatively wide effective bandwidth is capable of tracking the variable exciting frequency adaptively to suppress the vibration of the primary system. The coarse-fine ATVA is divided into a coarse tuning segment and a fine tuning segment. The coarse tuning segment is used to tune the required natural frequency in a relatively wide effective bandwidth and the fine tuning segment can achieve precise tune in a tiny-scale bandwidth. The mathematical model of the coarse tuning and the fine tuning is proposed to design the parameters of the coarse-fine ATVA. The experimental test results indicate the coarse tuning bandwidth of the coarse-fine ATVA is 8.7 Hz to 29 Hz and the minimum resolution of the fine tuning is 0.05 Hz. Moreover, a significant vibration attenuation of 15dB is verified in the effective bandwidth.

  12. A Cyber Expert System for Auto-Tuning Powered Prosthesis Impedance Control Parameters.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Crouch, Dustin L; Liu, Ming; Sawicki, Gregory S; Wang, Ding

    2016-05-01

    Typically impedance control parameters (e.g., stiffness and damping) in powered lower limb prostheses are fine-tuned by human experts (HMEs), which is time and resource intensive. Automated tuning procedures would make powered prostheses more practical for clinical use. In this study, we developed a novel cyber expert system (CES) that encoded HME tuning decisions as computer rules to auto-tune control parameters for a powered knee (passive ankle) prosthesis. The tuning performance of CES was preliminarily quantified on two able-bodied subjects and two transfemoral amputees. After CES and HME tuning, we observed normative prosthetic knee kinematics and improved or slightly improved gait symmetry and step width within each subject. Compared to HME, the CES tuning procedure required less time and no human intervention. Hence, using CES for auto-tuning prosthesis control was a sound concept, promising to enhance the practical value of powered prosthetic legs. However, the tuning goals of CES might not fully capture those of the HME. This was because we observed that HME tuning reduced trunk sway, while CES sometimes led to slightly increased trunk motion. Additional research is still needed to identify more appropriate tuning objectives for powered prosthetic legs to improve amputees' walking function.

  13. Noise reduction in a launch vehicle fairing using actively tuned loudspeakers.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Jonathan D; Clark, Robert L

    2003-04-01

    Loudspeakers tuned as optimal acoustic absorbers can significantly reduce damaging, low frequency, reverberant noise in a full-scale launch vehicle fairing. Irregular geometry, changing payloads, and the compliant nature of the fairing hinder effective implementation of a passively tuned loudspeaker. A method of tuning the loudspeaker dynamics in real time is required to meet the application requirements. Through system identification, the dynamics of the enclosure can be identified and used to tune the dynamics of the loudspeaker for reduction of targeted, high intensity, low-frequency modes that dominate the acoustic response in the fairing. A loudspeaker model with desired dynamics serves as the reference model in a control law designed to tune the dynamics of a non-ideal loudspeaker to act as an optimal tuned absorber. Experimental results indicate that a tuned loudspeaker placed in the nose cone of the fairing significantly reduces acoustic energy and verifies results calculated from the simulation.

  14. Design and Field Implementation of Auto Tuned Virtual Instrumentation Corrosion Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, J.; Agnihotri, Ganga; Deshpande, D. M.

    2016-06-01

    Corrosion in underground metallic pipeline leads to leakage which is hazardous when oil/natural gas is transported. Rate of corrosion in metal pipeline can be controlled by impressing dc current to the gas pipeline and thereby making metal pipeline to act as cathode of corrosion cell. Proportional integral controllers are used in impressed current cathodic protection application; tuning of proportional and integral constants of these controllers requires expertise. Step open, step close and relay tuning methods are compared; relay tuning provided better results for cathodic protection application. Ziegler-Nichols tuning formulas are used to select tuning parameters based on loop response. Virtual instrumentation is used for design, development, testing and field implementation of auto tuned PI controller. Proposed auto tuned proportional integral impressed current cathodic protection controller precisely controls corrosion in pipeline by selecting optimum proportional and integral constants. Controller effectiveness is cross verified using electrical resistance probe.

  15. The structural elements of the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    In 1970 Zel'dovich published a far-reaching paper presenting a simple equation describing the nonlinear growth of primordial density inhomogeneities. The equation was remarkably successful in explaining the large scale structure in the Universe that we observe: a Universe in which the structure appears to be delineated by filaments and clusters of galaxies surrounding huge void regions. In order to concretise this impression it is necessary to define these structural elements through formal techniques with which we can compare the Zel'dovich model and N-body simulations with the observational data. We present an overview of recent efforts to identify voids, filaments and clusters in both the observed galaxy distribution and in numerical simulations of structure formation. We focus, in particular, on methods that involve no fine-tuning of parameters and that handle scale dependence automatically. It is important that these techniques should result in finding structures that relate directly to the dynamical mechanism of structure formation.

  16. Micro optical spatial and spectral elements (MOSSE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Pradeep; Yilmaz, Yigit O.; Johnson, Eric G.

    2009-08-01

    Interference transmission filters that have a defect layer incorporated photonic crystal structure provide a narrow transmission notch within a wide stop band. The location and width of transmission notch can be tuned by changing the thickness of the defect layer. In this paper, we propose and implement interference filters with defect layers patterned with diffractive optical elements. The spectral transmission is a function of the local defect layer thickness while the spatial transmission follows contours of equal optical thickness. The novel devices have multiplexed spectral and spatial transmission characteristics. Alternating layers of silicon oxide (SiOx) and silicon nitride (SixNy) were grown onto a clean silicon substrate using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). A thick defect layer of SiOx was grown and the wafer was removed from the growth chamber. The wafer was then patterned with charge 2, 8-level vortex structures on a GCA 6300 g-line stepper tool. The devices were interrogated with a collimated beam from a tunable laser source that operates from 1520 nm to 1630 nm. The spectral transmission was measured by separately illuminating each level of diffractive element and the spatial transmission was imaged on to a CCD camera. Spectral transmission peaks whose location varies as a function of level height were obtained. The spatial transmission profiles consist of triangular zones with wavelength dependent orientation. The elements have potential applications in hyper spectral imaging, pupil filtering, and engineered illumination systems.

  17. End-loaded crossed-slot radiating elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manshadi, F.

    1991-01-01

    Three cavity-backed crossed-slot antenna configurations are described that offer simple design, easy frequency tuning, light weight, low loss, and low cost. These antennas are designed for mobile satellite (MSAT) vehicle phased-array applications. The slots in these antennas are end-loaded. The end loading makes the slots effectively longer, and hence reduces their resonant frequency. Therefore, relatively small radiating elements can be achieved for large-angle-scanning phased-array antennas. These antennas have good RF characteristics and provide a relatively wide bandwidth without needing external tuning circuits for impedance matching. Measurements for the return loss and the far-field pattern of these antennas are presented.

  18. Systematic tuning of silicon Schottky barrier height by atomic interlayers with low electronegativities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Wei

    The Schottky barrier height (SBH) is of great importance to the functionality of semiconductor devices, as it governs the carrier transport across the metal-semiconductor (MS) interface. The presence of the Fermi level (FL) pinning phenomena makes tuning the SBH a difficult goal to achieve. The technique of "partisan interlayer" (PI) was proposed recently to modify the SBH, where stable adsorbate-terminated semiconductor (ATS) surfaces were used to form SBs with subsequently applied metal. When elements with large electronegativities were used to form the ATS, the PI technique was effective in reducing the n-type SBH and increasing the p-type SBH, driven by the expected transfer of charge from the semiconductor to the adsorbates. In this thesis work, elements with electronegativities smaller than that of the semiconductor are used as surface termination. SBHs for Ag, Au and In on Si surfaces are found to increase for the n-type and decrease for the p-type interfaces, by as much as 0.25eV, when Ga, Mg and K are used to terminate the Si surfaces. The present results are thus in agreement with the expected charge transfers from elements with smaller electronegativities to silicon and illustrate the general validity of the PI technique. The chemical stability of these surfaces likely weakens the MS interaction and leads to the (partial) preservation of the surface dipole at the MS interface. However, large degrees of SBH inhomogeneity are observed for diodes on these surfaces, likely due to insufficient stability of these surfaces to completely withstand metal interaction. These results are discussed within the basic models of SBH formation and the implications of these results for SBH control of MS systems are also addressed.

  19. Mechanochemical tuning of myosin-I by the N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael J; Lin, Tianming; Shuman, Henry; Ostap, E Michael

    2015-06-30

    Myosins are molecular motors that generate force to power a wide array of motile cellular functions. Myosins have the inherent ability to change their ATPase kinetics and force-generating properties when they encounter mechanical loads; however, little is known about the structural elements in myosin responsible for force sensing. Recent structural and biophysical studies have shown that myosin-I isoforms, Myosin-Ib (Myo1b) and Myosin-Ic (Myo1c), have similar unloaded kinetics and sequences but substantially different responses to forces that resist their working strokes. Myo1b has the properties of a tension-sensing anchor, slowing its actin-detachment kinetics by two orders of magnitude with just 1 pN of resisting force, whereas Myo1c has the properties of a slow transporter, generating power without slowing under 1-pN loads that would stall Myo1b. To examine the structural elements that lead to differences in force sensing, we used single-molecule and ensemble kinetic techniques to show that the myosin-I N-terminal region (NTR) plays a critical role in tuning myosin-I mechanochemistry. We found that replacing the Myo1c NTR with the Myo1b NTR changes the identity of the primary force-sensitive transition of Myo1c, resulting in sensitivity to forces of <2 pN. Additionally, we found that the NTR plays an important role in stabilizing the post-power-stroke conformation. These results identify the NTR as an important structural element in myosin force sensing and suggest a mechanism for generating diversity of function among myosin isoforms. PMID:26056287

  20. Tuned range separated hybrid functionals for solvated low bandgap oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Queiroz, Thiago B. de Kümmel, Stephan

    2015-07-21

    The description of charge transfer excitations has long been a challenge to time dependent density functional theory. The recently developed concept of “optimally tuned range separated hybrid (OT-RSH) functionals” has proven to describe charge transfer excitations accurately in many cases. However, describing solvated or embedded systems is yet a challenge. This challenge is not only computational but also conceptual, because the tuning requires identifying a specific orbital, typically the highest occupied one of the molecule under study. For solvated molecules, this orbital may be delocalized over the solvent. We here demonstrate that one way of overcoming this problem is to use a locally projected self-consistent field diagonalization on an absolutely localized molecular orbital expansion. We employ this approach to determine ionization energies and the optical gap of solvated oligothiophenes, i.e., paradigm low gap systems that are of relevance in organic electronics. Dioxane solvent molecules are explicitly represented in our calculations, and the ambiguities of straightforward parameter tuning in solution are elucidated. We show that a consistent estimate of the optimal range separated parameter (ω) at the limit of bulk solvation can be obtained by gradually extending the solvated system. In particular, ω is influenced by the solvent beyond the first coordination sphere. For determining ionization energies, a considerable number of solvent molecules on the first solvation shell must be taken into account. We demonstrate that accurately calculating optical gaps of solvated systems using OT-RSH can be done in three steps: (i) including the chemical environment when determining the range-separation parameter, (ii) taking into account the screening due to the solvent, and (iii) using realistic molecular geometries.

  1. Tuning magnetism by biaxial strain in native ZnO.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chengxiao; Wang, Yuanxu; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Zhang, Guangbiao; Wang, Chao; Yang, Gui

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic ZnO, one of the most important diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS), has attracted great scientific interest because of its possible technological applications in optomagnetic devices. Magnetism in this material is usually delicately tuned by the doping level, dislocations, and local structures. The rational control of magnetism in ZnO is a highly attractive approach for practical applications. Here, the tuning effect of biaxial strain on the d(0) magnetism of native imperfect ZnO is demonstrated through first-principles calculations. Our calculation results show that strain conditions have little effect on the defect formation energy of Zn and O vacancies in ZnO, but they do affect the magnetism significantly. For a cation vacancy, increasing the compressive strain will obviously decrease its magnetic moment, while tensile strain cannot change the moment, which remains constant at 2 μB. For a singly charged anion vacancy, however, the dependence of the magnetic moment on strain is opposite to that of the Zn vacancy. Furthermore, the ferromagnetic state is always present, irrespective of the strain type, for ZnO with two zinc vacancies, 2VZns. A large tensile strain is favorable for improving the Curie temperature and realizing room temperature ferromagnetism for ZnO-based native semiconductors. For ZnO with two singly charged oxygen vacancies, 2Vs, no ferromagnetic ordering can be observed. Our work points the way to the rational design of materials beyond ZnO with novel non-intrinsic functionality by simply tuning the strain in a thin film form.

  2. Orientation-tuned surround suppression in mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Self, Matthew W; Lorteije, Jeannette A M; Vangeneugden, Joris; van Beest, Enny H; Grigore, Mihaela E; Levelt, Christiaan N; Heimel, J Alexander; Roelfsema, Pieter R

    2014-07-01

    The firing rates of neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) are suppressed by large stimuli, an effect known as surround suppression. In cats and monkeys, the strength of suppression is sensitive to orientation; responses to regions containing uniform orientations are more suppressed than those containing orientation contrast. This effect is thought to be important for scene segmentation, but the underlying neural mechanisms are poorly understood. We asked whether it is possible to study these mechanisms in the visual cortex of mice, because of recent advances in technology for studying the cortical circuitry in mice. It is unknown whether neurons in mouse V1 are sensitive to orientation contrast. We measured the orientation selectivity of surround suppression in the different layers of mouse V1. We found strong surround suppression in layer 4 and the superficial layers, part of which was orientation tuned: iso-oriented surrounds caused more suppression than cross-oriented surrounds. Surround suppression was delayed relative to the visual response and orientation-tuned suppression was delayed further, suggesting two separate suppressive mechanisms. Previous studies proposed that surround suppression depends on the activity of inhibitory somatostatin-positive interneurons in the superficial layers. To test the involvement of the superficial layers we topically applied lidocaine. Silencing of the superficial layers did not prevent orientation-tuned suppression in layer 4. These results show that neurons in mouse V1, which lacks orientation columns, show orientation-dependent surround suppression in layer 4 and the superficial layers and that surround suppression in layer 4 does not require contributions from neurons in the superficial layers.

  3. Tuned range separated hybrid functionals for solvated low bandgap oligomers.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, Thiago B; Kümmel, Stephan

    2015-07-21

    The description of charge transfer excitations has long been a challenge to time dependent density functional theory. The recently developed concept of "optimally tuned range separated hybrid (OT-RSH) functionals" has proven to describe charge transfer excitations accurately in many cases. However, describing solvated or embedded systems is yet a challenge. This challenge is not only computational but also conceptual, because the tuning requires identifying a specific orbital, typically the highest occupied one of the molecule under study. For solvated molecules, this orbital may be delocalized over the solvent. We here demonstrate that one way of overcoming this problem is to use a locally projected self-consistent field diagonalization on an absolutely localized molecular orbital expansion. We employ this approach to determine ionization energies and the optical gap of solvated oligothiophenes, i.e., paradigm low gap systems that are of relevance in organic electronics. Dioxane solvent molecules are explicitly represented in our calculations, and the ambiguities of straightforward parameter tuning in solution are elucidated. We show that a consistent estimate of the optimal range separated parameter (ω) at the limit of bulk solvation can be obtained by gradually extending the solvated system. In particular, ω is influenced by the solvent beyond the first coordination sphere. For determining ionization energies, a considerable number of solvent molecules on the first solvation shell must be taken into account. We demonstrate that accurately calculating optical gaps of solvated systems using OT-RSH can be done in three steps: (i) including the chemical environment when determining the range-separation parameter, (ii) taking into account the screening due to the solvent, and (iii) using realistic molecular geometries.

  4. Numerical weather prediction model tuning via ensemble prediction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvinen, H.; Laine, M.; Ollinaho, P.; Solonen, A.; Haario, H.

    2011-12-01

    This paper discusses a novel approach to tune predictive skill of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. NWP models contain tunable parameters which appear in parameterizations schemes of sub-grid scale physical processes. Currently, numerical values of these parameters are specified manually. In a recent dual manuscript (QJRMS, revised) we developed a new concept and method for on-line estimation of the NWP model parameters. The EPPES ("Ensemble prediction and parameter estimation system") method requires only minimal changes to the existing operational ensemble prediction infra-structure and it seems very cost-effective because practically no new computations are introduced. The approach provides an algorithmic decision making tool for model parameter optimization in operational NWP. In EPPES, statistical inference about the NWP model tunable parameters is made by (i) generating each member of the ensemble of predictions using different model parameter values, drawn from a proposal distribution, and (ii) feeding-back the relative merits of the parameter values to the proposal distribution, based on evaluation of a suitable likelihood function against verifying observations. In the presentation, the method is first illustrated in low-order numerical tests using a stochastic version of the Lorenz-95 model which effectively emulates the principal features of ensemble prediction systems. The EPPES method correctly detects the unknown and wrongly specified parameters values, and leads to an improved forecast skill. Second, results with an atmospheric general circulation model based ensemble prediction system show that the NWP model tuning capacity of EPPES scales up to realistic models and ensemble prediction systems. Finally, a global top-end NWP model tuning exercise with preliminary results is published.

  5. The spiral staircase: Tonotopic microstructure and cochlear tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher A.

    2015-12-01

    Cochlear frequency-position maps are predicted to manifest a staircase-like structure comprising plateaus of nearly constant characteristic frequency separated by abrupt discontinuities. The height and width of the stair steps are determined by parameters of cochlear frequency tuning and vary with location in the cochlea. The step height is approximately equal to the critical band, and the step width matches that of the spatial excitation pattern produced by a low-level pure tone. Stepwise tonotopy is an emergent property arising from wave reflection and interference within the cochlea. Possible relationships between the microstructure of the cochlear map and the tiered tonotopy observed in the inferior colliculus are explored.

  6. On Realizing a Framework for Self-tuning Mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, Manuel; Seidl, Martina; Brosch, Petra; Kargl, Horst; Kappel, Gerti

    Realizing information exchange is a frequently recurring challenge in nearly every domain of computer science. Although languages, formalisms, and storage formats may differ in various engineering areas, the common task is bridging schema heterogeneities in order to transform their instances. Hence, a generic solution for realizing information exchange is needed. Conventional techniques often fail, because alignments found by matching tools cannot be executed automatically by transformation tools. In this paper we present the Smart Matching approach, a successful combination of matching techniques and transformation techniques, extended with self-tuning capabilities. With the Smart Matching approach, complete and correct executable mappings are found in a test-driven manner.

  7. Analysis of the tuning characteristics of microwave plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotk, Robert; Jasiński, Mariusz; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of the tuning characteristics of waveguide-supplied metal-cylinder-based nozzleless microwave plasma source. This analysis has enabled to estimate the electron concentration ne and electron frequency collisions ν in the plasma generated in nitrogen and in a mixture of nitrogen and ethanol vapour. The parameters ne and ν are the basic quantities that characterize the plasma. The presented new plasma diagnostic method is particularly useful, when spectroscopic methods are useless. The presented plasma source is currently used in research of a hydrogen production from liquids.

  8. Anytime query-tuned kernel machine classifiers via Cholesky factorization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCoste, D.

    2002-01-01

    We recently demonstrated 2 to 64-fold query-time speedups of Support Vector Machine and Kernel Fisher classifiers via a new computational geometry method for anytime output bounds (DeCoste,2002). This new paper refines our approach in two key ways. First, we introduce a simple linear algebra formulation based on Cholesky factorization, yielding simpler equations and lower computational overhead. Second, this new formulation suggests new methods for achieving additional speedups, including tuning on query samples. We demonstrate effectiveness on benchmark datasets.

  9. Antenna matching device tuning for type ZhRU radiostations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iof, M. I.

    1984-09-01

    The antennas employed with the ZhR series radiostations are lengths of wire 11 to 14 meters long suspended 0.4 to 0.6 meters above the locomotive cab, with their end grounded through the locomotive cab. The antenna matching device must be tuned properly, because it is this device which finally determines the effective transmitter power and the condition of the antenna feed devices. Adjustment of the antenna matching device by means of front-panel controls is described, and the meanings of various ammeter readings are interpreted.

  10. Acoustic Resonances in Helium Fluids Excited by Quartz Tuning Forks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmela, A.; Tuoriniemi, J.; Rysti, J.

    2011-03-01

    Ordinary quartz tuning fork resonators, operated at about 30 or 200 kHz frequency, couple to acoustic first and second sound resonances in helium fluids under certain conditions. We have studied acoustic resonances in supercritical 4He, normal and superfluid 4He, and in isotopic mixtures of helium. Suggestive temperature, pressure, and concentration dependences are given. Furthermore, we propose a thermometric reference point device based on second sound resonances in helium mixtures, and indicate possible differences in the nature of second sound resonances in superfluid 4He and helium mixtures.

  11. Theory of the tune shift due to linear coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Parzen, G.

    1991-07-01

    The presence of skew quadrupole fields will linearly couple the x and y motions. The x and y motion can then be written as the sum of two normal modes which have the tunes {nu}{sub 1},{nu}{sub 2}, in the absence of the skew quadrupole fields. New beta functions, {Beta}{sub 1} and {Beta}{sub 2}, can be defined which are the beta functions of the normal modes and which are different from {Beta}{sub x} and {Beta}{sub y}, the beta functions of the unperturbed accelerator. This paper presents analytical perturbation theory results for {nu}{sub 1},{nu}{sub 2}. The results for {nu}{sub 1},{nu}{sub 2} are first found correct to lowest order in the skew quadrupole fields. The results for {nu}{sub 1},{nu}{sub 2} are then carried one step further to include the next higher order terms in the skew quadrupole fields. Results for {Beta}{sub 1},{Beta}{sub 2} will be given in a future paper. These analytical results show that for the higher order shift in tune the important harmonics of the skew quadrupole field are the harmonics near {nu}{sub x} + {nu}{sub y}. However the harmonics closest to {nu}{sub x} + {nu}{sub y} do not contribute to the higher order tune splitting, {vert bar}{nu}{sub 1}{minus}{nu}{sub 2}{vert bar}, as they shift {nu}{sub 1} and {nu}{sub 2} about equally. This results in lack of a dominant harmonic for the higher order contribution of {vert bar}{nu}{sub 1}{minus}{nu}{sub 2}{vert bar}, which complicates the understanding and correction of the higher order contribution to {vert bar}{nu}{sub 1}{minus}{nu}{sub 1}{vert bar}. Analytical results are found for the residual tune splitting which is the {vert bar}{nu}{sub 1}{minus}{nu}{sub 2}{vert bar} that remains after the driving term of the nearby difference resonance has been corrected. 4 refs.

  12. Microwave absorption by nanoresonator vibrations tuned with surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivosudský, Ondrej; Cifra, Michal

    2016-08-01

    Elucidating the physical and chemical parameters that govern viscous damping of nanoresonator vibrations and their coupling to electromagnetic radiation is important for understanding the behavior of matter at the nanoscale. Here we develop an analytical model of microwave absorption of a longitudinally oscillating and electrically polar rod-like nanoresonator embedded in a viscoelastic fluid. We show that the slip length, which can be tuned via surface modifications, controls the quality factor and coupling of nanoresonator vibration modes to microwave radiation. We demonstrate that the larger slip length brings the sharper frequency response of the nanoresonator vibration and electromagnetic absorption. Our findings contribute to design guidelines of fluid embedded nanoresonator devices.

  13. Towards understanding fine-tuning in fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Grant Edward

    The standard models of particle physics and cosmology are enjoying wild success, but are beset by surprising features. Chief among these are the mysterious smallness of general relativity's cosmological constant (known as the cosmological constant "problem"), and the mysteriously tremendous strength of all other forces relative to gravity (known as the hierarchy "problem"). Both are instances of a physically relevant quantity that (due to quantum effects) is a sum of many (unknown) quantities; in both cases, these summands seem to cancel out to remarkable precision to give a much smaller sum, a phenomenon called fine-tuning. The size of the cosmological constant has proved robust against explanation on the grounds of physical principles like symmetry. Such explanations of the electroweak/gravity hierarchy abound, but recent experimental efforts have ruled many of them out, or forced them to introduce new fine-tuning. In both cases, arguments about selection effects and priors have emerged. Here, a dialectic approach is taken to understanding this apparent fine-tuning in nature: First, symmetry is employed. Supersymmetry famously resolves the hierarchy problem, but is under siege by increasing experimental constraints ruling out much of its natural parameter space. A class of supersymmetry models with supersymmetry broken at a low scale is proposed which evade experimental constraints without needing fine-tuning. The key ingredient is some anti-correlation between supersymmetry-breaking effects and electroweak-breaking effects on a field, e.g. if the symmetry-breaking fields are localized at different points along an extra dimension. Then, a careful argument employing selection effects and Bayesian reasoning is undertaken to show that the size of the cosmological constant is not surprising. Previous such arguments have suggested many different probability measures on the space of different possibilities, but a careful review of quantum mechanics shows a unique

  14. Photoluminescence excitation measurements using pressure-tuned laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bercha, Artem; Ivonyak, Yurii; Mędryk, Radosław; Trzeciakowski, Witold A. Dybała, Filip; Piechal, Bernard

    2015-06-15

    Pressure-tuned laser diodes in external cavity were used as tunable sources for photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The method was demonstrated in the 720 nm-1070 nm spectral range using a few commercial laser diodes. The samples for PLE measurements were quantum-well structures grown on GaAs and on InP. The method is superior to standard PLE measurements using titanium sapphire laser because it can be extended to any spectral range where anti-reflection coated laser diodes are available.

  15. Energy Scaling of Spin Tune due to RHIC Snakes

    SciTech Connect

    MacKay,W.W.

    2009-01-02

    For a ring like RHIC with two full Siberian snakes on opposite sides of the ring, the spin tune for a flat orbit will be 1/2 if the snake rotation axes are perpendicular, {Delta}{phi} = {phi}{sub 9}-{phi}{sub 3} = {pi}/2. Here {phi}{sup 9} and {phi}{sub 3} are respectively the direction of the rotation axes of the 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock snakes relative to the design trajectory as shown in Figure 1. If the two snakes are slightly detuned by the same amount such that the rotation axes are no longer perpendicular, then the deviation of the closed-orbit spin tune {nu}{sub 0} from 1/2 is given by {Delta}{nu}{sub 0} {approx_equal} ({Delta}{mu}){sup 2}/4{pi} cosG{gamma}{pi} - 2{Delta}{phi}/{pi} {approx_equal} 2{Delta}{phi}/180{sup o} with G{gamma} at a half integer, and where {Delta}{mu} is the deviation of snake rotation angle from 180{sup o}. It should be noted that there is a sign ambiguity in {Delta}{mu}{sub 0} since a spin tune of 0.495 is also a spin tune of 0.505, depending on the direction taken along the stable spin axis. In order to understand the effect of energy scaling on the snake axis direction, I have integrated the trajectory and spin rotation through a model of a RHIC snake (bi9-snk7) and found the energy (U) dependence of the snake axis angle {phi}{sub 9} and rotation angle {mu} as shown. A {approx_equal} p{sup -2} scaling of errors is typical in helical snakes. To first order, the orbit excursion drops as p{sup -1} and the spin precessions about transverse fields increase as {gamma} giving an approximate cancellation with energy, so we do not expect much change during the field ramp. The next order term which comes in is primarily proportional to p{sup -2}; although naively one might expect a slight effect inversely proportional to the velocity since {gamma}/p {proportional_to} c/{nu} {approx_equal} 1 + 1/2{gamma}{sup 2}.

  16. On-chip microfluidic tuning of an optical microring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Uriel; Campbell, Kyle; Groisman, Alex; Mookherjea, Shayan; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2006-03-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and operation of a tunable optical filter based on a bus waveguide coupled to a microring waveguide resonator located inside a microchannel in a microfluidic chip. Liquid flowing in the microchannel constitutes the upper cladding of the waveguides. The refractive index of the liquid controls the resonance wavelengths and strength of coupling between the bus waveguide and the resonator. The refractive index is varied by on-chip mixing of two source liquids with different refractive indices. We demonstrate adjustment of the resonance by 2nm and tuning the filter to an extinction ratio of 37dB.

  17. General self-tuning solutions and no-go theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Förste, Stefan; Kim, Jihn E.; Lee, Hyun Min E-mail: jihnekim@gmail.com

    2013-03-01

    We consider brane world models with one extra dimension. In the bulk there is in addition to gravity a three form gauge potential or equivalently a scalar (by generalisation of electric magnetic duality). We find classical solutions for which the 4d effective cosmological constant is adjusted by choice of integration constants. No go theorems for such self-tuning mechanism are circumvented by unorthodox Lagrangians for the three form respectively the scalar. It is argued that the corresponding effective 4d theory always includes tachyonic Kaluza-Klein excitations or ghosts. Known no go theorems are extended to a general class of models with unorthodox Lagrangians.

  18. A Micromechanical Contribution to Cochlear Tuning and Tonotopic Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holton, Thomas; Hudspeth, A. J.

    1983-11-01

    The response properties of hair cells and nerve fibers in the alligator lizard cochlea are frequency selective and tonotopically organized with longitudinal position in the organ. The lengths of the hair-cell hair bundles also vary monotonically with longitudinal position. In this study, quantitative measurements were made of the motion of individual hair bundles in an excised preparation of the cochlea stimulated at auditory frequencies. The angular displacement of hair bundles is frequency selective and tonotopically organized, demonstrating the existence of a micromechanical tuning mechanism.

  19. Electric field engineering using quantum-size-effect-tuned heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinolfi, V.; Ning, Z.; Xu, J.; Masala, S.; Zhitomirsky, D.; Thon, S. M.; Sargent, E. H.

    2013-07-01

    A quantum junction solar cell architecture was recently reported that employs colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) on each side of the p-n junction. This architecture extends the range of design opportunities for CQD photovoltaics, since the bandgap can be tuned across the light-absorbing semiconductor layer via control over CQD size, employing solution-processed, room-temperature fabricated materials. We exploit this feature by designing and demonstrating a field-enhanced heterojunction architecture. We optimize the electric field profile within the solar cell through bandgap engineering, thereby improving carrier collection and achieving an increased open circuit voltage, resulting in a 12% improvement in power conversion efficiency.

  20. An expert system for tuning particle-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, D.L.; Brand, H.R.; Maurer, W.J.; Searfus, R.M.; Hernandez, J.E.

    1989-01-12

    We have developed a proof-of-concept prototype of an expert system for tuning particle beam accelerators. It is designed to function as an intelligent assistant for an operator. In its present form it implements the strategies and reasoning followed by the operator for steering through the beam transport section of the Advanced Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Site 300. The system is implemented in the language LISP using the Artificial Intelligence concepts of frames, daemons, and a representation we developed called a Monitored Decision Script. 4 refs., 5 figs.