Science.gov

Sample records for 50-100 nm diameter

  1. Fabrication of 10nm diameter carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Radenovic, Aleksandra; Trepagnier, Eliane; Csencsits, Roseann; Downing, Kenneth H; Liphardt, Jan

    2008-09-25

    The addition of carbon to samples, during imaging, presents a barrier to accurate TEM analysis, the controlled deposition of hydrocarbons by a focused electron beam can be a useful technique for local nanometer-scale sculpting of material. Here we use hydrocarbon deposition to form nanopores from larger focused ion beam (FIB) holes in silicon nitride membranes. Using this method, we close 100-200nm diameter holes to diameters of 10nm and below, with deposition rates of 0.6nm per minute. I-V characteristics of electrolytic flow through these nanopores agree quantitatively with a one dimensional model at all examined salt concentrations.

  2. Evaluation of the Diode laser (810nm,980nm) on dentin tubule diameter following internal bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Salim, Soheil; Sarraf, Pegah; Javad-Kharazifard, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diode laser irradiation and bleaching materials on the dentinal tubule diameter after laser bleaching. Material and Methods The dentin discs of 40 extracted third molar were used in this experiment. Each disc surface was divided into two halves by grooving. Half of samples were laser bleached at different wavelengths with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Other half of each disc with no laser bleaching remained as a negative control. Dentin discs were assigned randomly into four groups (n=10) with following hydrogen peroxide and diode laser wavelength specifications; Group 1 (30% - 810 nm), group 2 (30% - 980 nm), group 3 (46% - 810 nm) and group 4 (46% - 980 nm). All specimens were sent for scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis in order to measure tubular diameter in laser treated and control halves. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). Results A significant reduction in dentin tubule diameter was observed in groups 1, 2 and 4. There was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 3 and 4 after bleaching. Conclusions The SEM results showed that diode laser was able to reduce dentin tubule diameter and its effect on dentin was dependent on chemical action of bleaching material. Key words:Laser, diode, dentin, tubule, diameter. PMID:27398172

  3. Fabricating nanopores with diameters of sub-1 nm to 3 nm using multilevel pulse-voltage injection.

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Itaru; Akahori, Rena; Hatano, Toshiyuki; Takeda, Ken-ichi

    2014-05-21

    To date, solid-state nanopores have been fabricated primarily through a focused-electronic beam via TEM. For mass production, however, a TEM beam is not suitable and an alternative fabrication method is required. Recently, a simple method for fabricating solid-state nanopores was reported by Kwok, H. et al. and used to fabricate a nanopore (down to 2 nm in size) in a membrane via dielectric breakdown. In the present study, to fabricate smaller nanopores stably--specifically with a diameter of 1 to 2 nm (which is an essential size for identifying each nucleotide)--via dielectric breakdown, a technique called "multilevel pulse-voltage injection" (MPVI) is proposed and evaluated. MPVI can generate nanopores with diameters of sub-1 nm in a 10-nm-thick Si3N4 membrane with a probability of 90%. The generated nanopores can be widened to the desired size (as high as 3 nm in diameter) with sub-nanometre precision, and the mean effective thickness of the fabricated nanopores was 3.7 nm.

  4. Gold Nanoparticles of Diameter 13 nm Induce Apoptosis in Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hao; Quan, Ying-yao; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been widely used in biomedical science including antiarthritic agents, drug loading, and photothermal therapy. In this report, we studied the effects of AuNPs with diameters of 3, 13, and 45 nm, respectively, on rabbit articular chondrocytes. AuNPs were capped with citrate and their diameter and zeta potential were measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cell viability was evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay after the rabbit articular chondrocytes were pre-incubated with 3, 13, and 45 nm AuNPs, respectively, for 24 h. Flow cytometry (FCM) analysis with annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining and fluorescence imaging with Hoechst 33258 staining were used to determine the fashion of AuNPs-induced chondrocyte death. Further, 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) significantly induced chondrocyte death accompanying apoptotic characteristics including mitochondrial damage, externalization of phosphatidylserine and nuclear concentration. However, 3 nm AuNPs (2 nM) and 45 nm (0.02 nM) AuNPs did not induce cytotoxicity in chondrocytes. Although 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) increased the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, pretreatment with Nacetyl cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, did not prevent the cytotoxicity induced by 13 nm AuNPs, indicating that 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) induced ROS-independent apoptosis in chondrocytes. These results demonstrate the size-dependent cytotoxicity of AuNPs in chondrocytes, which must be seriously considered when using AuNPs for treatment of osteoarthritis (OA).

  5. Translocation of 40 nm diameter nanowires through the intestinal epithelium of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Karin; Adolfsson, Karl; Ekvall, Mikael T; Borgström, Magnus T; Linse, Sara; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Cedervall, Tommy; Prinz, Christelle N

    2016-10-01

    Nanowires (NWs) have unique electrical and optical properties of value for many applications including lighting, sensing, and energy harnessing. Consumer products containing NWs increase the risk of NWs being released in the environment, especially into aquatic ecosystems through sewage systems. Daphnia magna is a common, cosmopolitan freshwater organism sensitive to toxicity tests and represents a likely entry point for nanoparticles into food webs of aquatic ecosystems. Here we have evaluated the effect of NW diameter on the gut penetrance of NWs in Daphnia magna. The animals were exposed to NWs of two diameters (40 and 80 nm) and similar length (3.6 and 3.8 μm, respectively) suspended in water. In order to locate the NWs in Daphnia, the NWs were designed to comprise one inherently fluorescent segment of gallium indium phosphide (GaInP) flanked by a gallium phosphide (GaP) segment. Daphnia mortality was assessed directly after 24 h of exposure and 7 days after exposure. Translocation of NWs across the intestinal epithelium was investigated using confocal fluorescence microscopy directly after 24 h of exposure and was observed in 89% of Daphnia exposed to 40 nm NWs and in 11% of Daphnia exposed to 80 nm NWs. A high degree of fragmentation was observed for NWs of both diameters after ingestion by the Daphnia, although 40 nm NWs were fragmented to a greater extent, which could possibly facilitate translocation across the intestinal epithelium. Our results show that the feeding behavior of animals may enhance the ability of NWs to penetrate biological barriers and that penetrance is governed by the NW diameter.

  6. Translocation of 40 nm diameter nanowires through the intestinal epithelium of Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Karin; Adolfsson, Karl; Ekvall, Mikael T.; Borgström, Magnus T.; Linse, Sara; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Cedervall, Tommy; Prinz, Christelle N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nanowires (NWs) have unique electrical and optical properties of value for many applications including lighting, sensing, and energy harnessing. Consumer products containing NWs increase the risk of NWs being released in the environment, especially into aquatic ecosystems through sewage systems. Daphnia magna is a common, cosmopolitan freshwater organism sensitive to toxicity tests and represents a likely entry point for nanoparticles into food webs of aquatic ecosystems. Here we have evaluated the effect of NW diameter on the gut penetrance of NWs in Daphnia magna. The animals were exposed to NWs of two diameters (40 and 80 nm) and similar length (3.6 and 3.8 μm, respectively) suspended in water. In order to locate the NWs in Daphnia, the NWs were designed to comprise one inherently fluorescent segment of gallium indium phosphide (GaInP) flanked by a gallium phosphide (GaP) segment. Daphnia mortality was assessed directly after 24 h of exposure and 7 days after exposure. Translocation of NWs across the intestinal epithelium was investigated using confocal fluorescence microscopy directly after 24 h of exposure and was observed in 89% of Daphnia exposed to 40 nm NWs and in 11% of Daphnia exposed to 80 nm NWs. A high degree of fragmentation was observed for NWs of both diameters after ingestion by the Daphnia, although 40 nm NWs were fragmented to a greater extent, which could possibly facilitate translocation across the intestinal epithelium. Our results show that the feeding behavior of animals may enhance the ability of NWs to penetrate biological barriers and that penetrance is governed by the NW diameter. PMID:27181920

  7. SAXS structural study of PrPSc reveals ~11 nm diameter of basic double intertwined fibers

    PubMed Central

    Amenitsch, Heinz; Benetti, Federico; Ramos, Adriana; Legname, Giuseppe; Requena, Jesús R

    2013-01-01

    A sample of purified Syrian hamster PrP27–30 prion fibers was analyzed by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The SAXS pattern obtained was fitted to a model based on infinitely long cylinders with a log-normal intensity distribution, a hard-sphere structure factor and a general Porod term for larger aggregates. The diameter calculated for the cylinders determined from the fit was 11.0 ± 0.2 nm. This measurement offers an estimation of the diameter of PrPSc fibers in suspension, i.e., free of errors derived from estimations based on 2D projections in transmission electron microscopy images, subjected to further possible distortions from the negative stain. This diameter, which corresponds to a maximum diameter of approximately 5.5 nm for each of the two intertwined protofilaments making up the fibers, rules out the possibility that PrPSc conforms to a stack of in-register, single-rung flat PrPSc monomers; rather, PrPSc subunits must necessarily coil, most likely several times, into themselves. PMID:24247356

  8. Ultrafast proton transport in sub-1-nm diameter carbon nanotube porins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunuguntla, Ramya H.; Allen, Frances I.; Kim, Kyunghoon; Belliveau, Allison; Noy, Aleksandr

    2016-07-01

    Proton transport plays an important role in many biological processes due to the ability of protons to rapidly translocate along chains of hydrogen-bonded water molecules. Molecular dynamics simulations have predicted that confinement in hydrophobic nanochannels should enhance the rate of proton transport. Here, we show that 0.8-nm-diameter carbon nanotube porins, which promote the formation of one-dimensional water wires, can support proton transport rates exceeding those of bulk water by an order of magnitude. The transport rates in these narrow nanotube pores also exceed those of biological channels and Nafion. With larger 1.5-nm-diameter nanotube porins, proton transport rates comparable to bulk water are observed. We also show that the proton conductance of these channels can be modulated by the presence of Ca2+ ions. Our results illustrate the potential of small-diameter carbon nanotube porins as a proton conductor material and suggest that strong spatial confinement is a key factor in enabling efficient proton transport.

  9. Observation of sea-salt fraction in sub-100 nm diameter particles at Cape Grim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravigan, Luke T.; Ristovski, Zoran; Modini, Robin L.; Keywood, Melita D.; Gras, John L.

    2015-03-01

    Volatility-hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer measurements were used to infer the composition of sub-100 nm diameter Southern Ocean marine aerosols at Cape Grim in November and December 2007. This study focuses on a short-lived high sea spray aerosol (SSA) event on 7-8 December with two externally mixed modes in the Hygroscopic Growth Factor (HGF) distributions (90% relative humidity (RH)), one at HGF > 2 and another at HGF~1.5. The particles with HGF > 2 displayed a deliquescent transition at 73-75% RH and were nonvolatile up to 280°C, which identified them as SSA particles with a large inorganic sea-salt fraction. SSA HGFs were 3-13% below those for pure sea-salt particles, indicating an organic volume fraction (OVF) of up to 11-46%. Observed high inorganic fractions in sub-100 nm SSA is contrary to similar, earlier studies. HGFs increased with decreasing particle diameter over the range 16-97 nm, suggesting a decreased OVF, again contrary to earlier studies. SSA comprised up to 69% of the sub-100 nm particle number, corresponding to concentrations of 110-290 cm-3. Air mass back trajectories indicate that SSA particles were produced 1500 km, 20-40 h upwind of Cape Grim. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray spectrometry measurements of sub-100 nm aerosols collected from the same location, and at the same time, displayed a distinct lack of sea salt. Results herein highlight the potential for biases in TEM analysis of the chemical composition of marine aerosols.

  10. Influence of homogeneous interfaces on the strength of 500 nm diameter Cu nanopillars.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dongchan; Cai, Can; Greer, Julia R

    2011-04-13

    Interfaces play an important role in crystalline plasticity as they affect strength and often serve as obstacles to dislocation motion. Here we investigate effects of grain and nanotwin boundaries on uniaxial strength of 500 nm diameter Cu nanopillars fabricated by e-beam lithography and electroplating. Uniaxial compression experiments reveal that strength is lowered by introducing grain boundaries and significantly rises when twin boundaries are present. Weakening is likely due to the activation of grain-boundary-mediated processes, while impeding dislocation glide can be responsible for strengthening by twin boundaries.

  11. Super stretchable hydrogel achieved by non-aggregated spherulites with diameters <5 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guoxing; Li, Zongjin; Liang, Rui; Weng, Lu-Tao; Zhang, Lina

    2016-06-01

    The scope of hydrogel applications can be greatly expanded by the improvement of mechanical properties. However, enhancement of nanocomposite hydrogels (NC gels) has been severely limited because the size of crosslinking nanoparticles is too large, at least in one dimension. Here we report a new strategy to synthesize non-aggregated spherulite nanoparticles, with diameters <5 nm, in aqueous solution, and their enhancement to hydrogel. The stress and stretch ratio at rupture of our NC gel are 430 and 121 KPa with only 40-p.p.m. nanoparticle content. The NC gel containing 200-p.p.m. nanoparticles can revert to 90% of its original size after enduring 100-MPa compressive stress. Our results demonstrate that the suppression of nanoparticle size without aggregation helps to establish a super stretchable and high-toughness hydrogel network at very low inorganic content.

  12. Empirical Relationships Between Optical Properties and Equivalent Diameters of Fractal Soot Aggregates at 550 Nm Wavelength.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Apoorva; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Soot aggregates (SAs)-fractal clusters of small, spherical carbonaceous monomers-modulate the incoming visible solar radiation and contribute significantly to climate forcing. Experimentalists and climate modelers typically assume a spherical morphology for SAs when computing their optical properties, causing significant errors. Here, we calculate the optical properties of freshly-generated (fractal dimension Df = 1.8) and aged (Df = 2.6) SAs at 550 nm wavelength using the numericallyexact superposition T-Matrix method. These properties were expressed as functions of equivalent aerosol diameters as measured by contemporary aerosol instruments. This work improves upon previous efforts wherein SA optical properties were computed as a function of monomer number, rendering them unusable in practical applications. Future research will address the sensitivity of variation in refractive index, fractal prefactor, and monomer overlap of SAs on the reported empirical relationships.

  13. Super stretchable hydrogel achieved by non-aggregated spherulites with diameters <5 nm

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guoxing; Li, Zongjin; Liang, Rui; Weng, Lu-Tao; Zhang, Lina

    2016-01-01

    The scope of hydrogel applications can be greatly expanded by the improvement of mechanical properties. However, enhancement of nanocomposite hydrogels (NC gels) has been severely limited because the size of crosslinking nanoparticles is too large, at least in one dimension. Here we report a new strategy to synthesize non-aggregated spherulite nanoparticles, with diameters <5 nm, in aqueous solution, and their enhancement to hydrogel. The stress and stretch ratio at rupture of our NC gel are 430 and 121 KPa with only 40-p.p.m. nanoparticle content. The NC gel containing 200-p.p.m. nanoparticles can revert to 90% of its original size after enduring 100-MPa compressive stress. Our results demonstrate that the suppression of nanoparticle size without aggregation helps to establish a super stretchable and high-toughness hydrogel network at very low inorganic content. PMID:27352822

  14. Optical investigation of gold shell enhanced 25 nm diameter upconverted fluorescence emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Kory; Wirth, Janina; Lim, Shuang Fang

    2016-04-01

    We enhance the efficiency of upconverting nanoparticles by investigating the plasmonic coupling of 25 nm diameter NaYF4:Yb, Er nanoparticles with a gold-shell coating, and study the physical mechanism of enhancement by single-particle, time-resolved spectroscopy. A three-fold overall increase in emission intensity, and five-fold increase of green emission for these plasmonically enhanced particles have been achieved. Using a combination of structural and fluorescent imaging, we demonstrate that fluorescence enhancement is based on the photonic properties of single, isolated particles. Time-resolved spectroscopy shows that the increase in fluorescence is coincident with decreased rise time, which we attribute to an enhanced absorption of infrared light and energy transfer from Yb3+ to Er3+ atoms. Time-resolved spectroscopy also shows that fluorescence life-times are decreased to different extents for red and green emission. This indicates that the rate of photon emission is not suppressed, as would be expected for a metallic cavity, but rather enhanced because the metal shell acts as an optical antenna, with differing efficiency at different wavelengths.

  15. Optical investigation of gold shell enhanced 25 nm diameter upconverted fluorescence emission.

    PubMed

    Green, Kory; Wirth, Janina; Lim, Shuang Fang

    2016-04-01

    We enhance the efficiency of upconverting nanoparticles by investigating the plasmonic coupling of 25 nm diameter NaYF4:Yb, Er nanoparticles with a gold-shell coating, and study the physical mechanism of enhancement by single-particle, time-resolved spectroscopy. A three-fold overall increase in emission intensity, and five-fold increase of green emission for these plasmonically enhanced particles have been achieved. Using a combination of structural and fluorescent imaging, we demonstrate that fluorescence enhancement is based on the photonic properties of single, isolated particles. Time-resolved spectroscopy shows that the increase in fluorescence is coincident with decreased rise time, which we attribute to an enhanced absorption of infrared light and energy transfer from Yb(3+) to Er(3+) atoms. Time-resolved spectroscopy also shows that fluorescence life-times are decreased to different extents for red and green emission. This indicates that the rate of photon emission is not suppressed, as would be expected for a metallic cavity, but rather enhanced because the metal shell acts as an optical antenna, with differing efficiency at different wavelengths.

  16. Second-harmonic generation of single BaTiO3 nanoparticles down to 22 nm diameter.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eugene; Steinbrück, Andrea; Buscaglia, Maria Teresa; Buscaglia, Vincenzo; Pertsch, Thomas; Grange, Rachel

    2013-06-25

    We investigate the second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal from single BaTiO3 nanoparticles of diameters varying from 70 nm down to 22 nm with a far-field optical microscope coupled to an infrared femtosecond laser. An atomic force microscope is first used to localize the individual particles and to accurately determine their sizes. Power and polarization-dependent measurements on the individual nanoparticles reveal a diameter range between 30 and 20 nm, where deviations from bulk nonlinear optical properties occur. For 22 nm diameter particles, the tetragonal crystal structure is not applicable anymore and competing effects due to the surface to volume ratio or crystallographic modifications are taking place. The demonstration of SHG from such small nanoparticles opens up the possibilities of using them as bright coherent biomarkers. Moreover, our work shows that measuring the SHG of individual nanoparticles reveals critical material properties, opening up new possibilities to investigate ferroelectricity at the nanoscale.

  17. Direct Probes of 4 nm Diameter Gold Nanoparticles Interacting with Supported Lipid Bylayers

    SciTech Connect

    Troiano, Julianne; Olenick, Laura L.; Kuech, Thomas R.; Melby, Eric S.; Hu, Dehong; Lohse, Samuel E.; Mensch, Arielle C.; Dogangun, Merve; Vartanian, Arlane M.; Torelli, Marco; Ehimiaghe, Eseohi; Walter, Stephanie R.; Fu, Li; Anderton, Christopher R.; Zhu, Zihua; Wang, Hongfei; Orr, Galya; Murphy, Catherine; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-01-08

    Interfacial charge densities and potentials are determined for silica-supported phospholipid bilayers formed from lipids having zwitterionic, negatively charged, and positively charged headgroups. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and atomic force microscopy demonstrate the presence of well-formed supported lipid bilayers, which, as probed by vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG), undergo negligible structural changes along their alkyl chains when NaCl concentration is raised from 0.001 to 0.1 M. From second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements we estimate that each zwitterionic headgroup of the bilayer formed from pure DOPC is associated with an apparent charge of -0.028(+0.008/-0.007)×10-¹⁹C, corresponding to 1.8 ± 0.5 % of an elementary negative charge. Moreover, we show that a supported lipid bilayer carrying an apparent negative interfacial potential may interact with not just positively charged 4-nm diameter gold nanoparticles but also negatively charged gold nanoparticles. In this latter case, charge-charge repulsion does not appear to inhibit particle-bilayer interactions and is likely overcome by multivalent interactions that are estimated to involve 3-5 hydrogen-bond equivalents. FRAP, QCM-D, and SFG measurements indicate that the bilayers remain intact under the conditions of the experiments. SHG charge screening experiments are consistent with an apparent zero net charge density associated with the positively charged gold nanoparticles when they are attached to a supported lipid bilayer carrying an apparent negative potential. The results presented here serve to benchmark experimental and computational studies of the nano-bio interface.

  18. Preparation of spherical and uniform-sized ferrite nanoparticles with diameters between 50 and 150 nm for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Shimazu, Ryuichi; Nagai, Hironori; Tada, Masaru; Nakagawa, Takashi; Sandhu, Adarsh; Handa, Hiroshi; Abe, Masanori

    2009-05-01

    Spherical uniform-sized iron ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by adding a disaccharide and seed ferrite crystals into an aqueous reaction solution. The average size range 50-150 nm was controlled by choosing one out of five disaccharides and by changing the amount of the seed crystals. The particles had a saturation magnetization and a crystalline structure which are similar to those of intermediate Fe 3O 4-γ-Fe 2O 3. When coated with citrate, the particles with nearly 100 nm diameter were stably suspended in water for 2 days. These novel particles will be utilized as magnetic carriers in biomedical applications.

  19. 41 CFR 109-50.100 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of subpart. 109-50.100 Section 109-50.100 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND...

  20. 41 CFR 109-50.100 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Scope of subpart. 109-50.100 Section 109-50.100 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND...

  1. 41 CFR 109-50.100 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Scope of subpart. 109-50.100 Section 109-50.100 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND...

  2. 41 CFR 109-50.100 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Scope of subpart. 109-50.100 Section 109-50.100 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND...

  3. 41 CFR 109-50.100 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Scope of subpart. 109-50.100 Section 109-50.100 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND...

  4. Novel filaments 5 nm in diameter constitute the cytosolic ring of the plastid division apparatus.

    PubMed

    Miyagishima, S; Takahara, M; Kuroiwa, T

    2001-03-01

    The plastid division apparatus (called the plastid-dividing ring) has been detected in several plant and algal species at the constricted region of plastids by transmission electron microscopy. The apparatus is composed of two or three rings: an outer ring in the cytosol, an inner ring in the stroma, and a middle ring in the intermembrane space. The components of these rings are not clear. FtsZ, which forms the bacterial cytokinetic ring, has been proposed as a component of both the inner and outer rings. Here, we present the ultrastructure of the outer ring at high resolution. To visualize the outer ring by negative staining, we isolated dividing chloroplasts from a synchronized culture of a red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, and lysed them with nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40. Nonidet P-40 extracted primarily stroma, thylakoids, and the inner and middle rings, leaving the envelope and outer ring largely intact. Negative staining revealed that the outer ring consists of a bundle of 5-nm filaments in which globular proteins are spaced 4.8 nm apart. Immunoblotting using an FtsZ-specific antibody failed to show immunoreactivity in the fraction containing the filament. Moreover, the filament structure and properties are unlike those of known cytoskeletal filaments. The bundle of filaments forms a very rigid structure and does not disassemble in 2 M urea. We also identified a dividing phase-specific 56-kD protein of chloroplasts as a candidate component of the ring. Our results suggest that the main architecture of the outer ring did not descend from cyanobacteria during the course of endosymbiosis but was added by the host cell early in plant evolution.

  5. Multiple double cross-section transmission electron microscope sample preparation of specific sub-10 nm diameter Si nanowire devices.

    PubMed

    Gignac, Lynne M; Mittal, Surbhi; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Cohen, Guy M; Sleight, Jeffrey W

    2011-12-01

    The ability to prepare multiple cross-section transmission electron microscope (XTEM) samples from one XTEM sample of specific sub-10 nm features was demonstrated. Sub-10 nm diameter Si nanowire (NW) devices were initially cross-sectioned using a dual-beam focused ion beam system in a direction running parallel to the device channel. From this XTEM sample, both low- and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) images were obtained from six separate, specific site Si NW devices. The XTEM sample was then re-sectioned in four separate locations in a direction perpendicular to the device channel: 90° from the original XTEM sample direction. Three of the four XTEM samples were successfully sectioned in the gate region of the device. From these three samples, low- and high-resolution TEM images of the Si NW were taken and measurements of the NW diameters were obtained. This technique demonstrated the ability to obtain high-resolution TEM images in directions 90° from one another of multiple, specific sub-10 nm features that were spaced 1.1 μm apart.

  6. Preparation of PCDTBT nanofibers with a diameter of 20 nm and their application to air-processed organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehoon; Yang, Seung Jae; Kim, Sung Kyun; Choi, Hong Soo; Park, Chong Rae

    2014-03-07

    A strategy for fabricating organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices based on PCDTBT nanofibers and PC70BM is described. Electrospinning techniques are used to prepare PCDTBT nanofibers and OPV devices in ambient air. The diameters of the PCDTBT nanofibers are approximately twice the exciton diffusion length, 20 nm. The active layer exhibits 100% photoluminescence quenching due to the small nanofiber diameter, indicating that the excitons are efficiently dissociated. The electrospun PCDTBT nanofibers absorb more photons at longer wavelengths, leading to improved photon harvesting. OPV devices composed of PCDTBT nanofibers show a high short circuit current of 11.54 mA cm(-2) and a high power conversion efficiency of 5.82%. The increase in the short circuit current is attributed to enhanced photon harvesting and charge transport. This method may be applied to the fabrication, in ambient air, of large-area active layers composed of other new conjugated polymers to yield high-performance OPV devices.

  7. Growth and Physical Property Study of Single Nanowire (Diameter ~45 nm) of Half Doped Manganite

    DOE PAGES

    Datta, Subarna; Chandra, Sayan; Samanta, Sudeshna; ...

    2013-01-01

    We repormore » t here the growth and characterization of functional oxide nanowire of hole doped manganite of La 0.5 Sr 0.5 MnO 3 (LSMO). We also report four-probe electrical resistance measurement of a single nanowire of LSMO (diameter ~45 nm) using focused ion beam (FIB) fabricated electrodes. The wires are fabricated by hydrothermal method using autoclave at a temperature of 270 °C. The elemental analysis and physical property like electrical resistivity are studied at an individual nanowire level. The quantitative determination of Mn valency and elemental mapping of constituent elements are done by using Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) in the Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) mode. We address the important issue of whether as a result of size reduction the nanowires can retain the desired composition, structure, and physical properties. The nanowires used are found to have a ferromagnetic transition ( T C ) at around 325 K which is very close to the bulk value of around 330 K found in single crystal of the same composition. It is confirmed that the functional behavior is likely to be retained even after size reduction of the nanowires to a diameter of 45 nm. The electrical resistivity shows insulating behavior within the measured temperature range which is similar to the bulk system.« less

  8. Ionic transport through sub-10 nm diameter hydrophobic high-aspect ratio nanopores: experiment, theory and simulation

    PubMed Central

    Balme, Sébastien; Picaud, Fabien; Manghi, Manoel; Palmeri, John; Bechelany, Mikhael; Cabello-Aguilar, Simon; Abou-Chaaya, Adib; Miele, Philippe; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Janot, Jean Marc

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of ionic transport at the nanoscale is essential for developing biosensors based on nanopore technology and new generation high-performance nanofiltration membranes for separation and purification applications. We study here ionic transport through single putatively neutral hydrophobic nanopores with high aspect ratio (of length L = 6 μm with diameters ranging from 1 to 10 nm) and with a well controlled cylindrical geometry. We develop a detailed hybrid mesoscopic theoretical approach for the electrolyte conductivity inside nanopores, which considers explicitly ion advection by electro-osmotic flow and possible flow slip at the pore surface. By fitting the experimental conductance data we show that for nanopore diameters greater than 4 nm a constant weak surface charge density of about 10−2 C m−2 needs to be incorporated in the model to account for conductance plateaus of a few pico-siemens at low salt concentrations. For tighter nanopores, our analysis leads to a higher surface charge density, which can be attributed to a modification of ion solvation structure close to the pore surface, as observed in the molecular dynamics simulations we performed. PMID:26036687

  9. SiCN nanofibers with a diameter below 100 nm synthesized via concerted block copolymer formation, microphase separation, and crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Saravana K T; Kretschmer, Winfried P; Denner, Christine; Motz, Günter; Hund, Markus; Fery, Andreas; Trebbin, Martin; Förster, Stefan; Kempe, Rhett

    2013-04-08

    SiCN fibers with a mean diameter of 50 nm and an aspect ratio of up to 100 are produced in a two-step process by R. Kempe and co-workers. The key step to fabricate the longitudinal and cross-sectional views of the mesofibers shown here is a concerted block-copolymer synthesis, microphase separation, and cross linking at 140 °C followed by pyrolysis at 1100 °C. Inexpensive components like a commercially available silazane and polyethylene are linked. The fibers may find application in electronic devices, as components of ceramic matrix composites, as fiber beds in high-temperature nano-filtering like diesel fine dust removal, or as thermally robust and chemically inert catalyst supports. Furthermore, the SiCN nanofibers introduced on page 984 are a promising alternative to ultrathin carbon fibers, due to their oxidation resistance.

  10. Low-frequency flicker noise in a MSM device made with single Si nanowire (diameter ≈ 50 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Sudeshna; Das, Kaustuv; Raychaudhuri, Arup Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Low-frequency flicker noise has been measured in a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) device made from a single strand of a single crystalline Si nanowire (diameter approximately 50 nm). Measurement was done with an alternating current (ac) excitation for the noise measurement superimposed with direct current (dc) bias that can be controlled independently. The observed noise has a spectral power density ∝1/ f α . Application of the superimposed dc bias (retaining the ac bias unchanged) with a value more than the Schottky barrier height at the junction leads to a large suppression of the noise amplitude along with a change of α from 2 to ≈ 1. The dc bias-dependent part of the noise has been interpreted as arising from the interface region. The residual dc bias-independent flicker noise is suggested to arise from the single strand of Si nanowire, which has the conventional 1/ f spectral power density.

  11. On the elastic, elastic-plastic properties of Au nanowires in the range of diameter 1-200 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb Nath, S. K.; Kim, Sung-Gaun

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, we obtain Young's modulus and yield strength of <100> Au nanowire in the range of diameters 1-30 nm by tension and bending tests using molecular dynamics simulations. Double clamped Au nanowire is bended applying a point load at its middle span using cylindrical indenter by the atomistic approach. The superiority of the present bending technique is highlighted by analyzing the distribution of Von Misses stress of the present bending Au nanowire by 3D finite element modeling. First, Young's modulus and yield strength of Au nanowires are determined using classical theory of continuum mechanics. Then the obtained Young's modulus and yield strength of Au nanowires are corrected using 3D finite element modeling based on inverse technique [Deb Nath et al. Appl. Phys. A 103(2), 493 (2011) and Tohmyoh et al. Appl. Phys. A 103(2), 285 (2011)]. Effects of anisotropy on the tension and bending stiffness, tension and bending strength of Au nanowires are also discussed with graphs. Effects of temperature on the tension and bending stiffness, tension and bending strength of Au nanowires are discussed. Effects of vertical displacement of the indenter on the mid span of double clamped Au nanowires on the bending stiffness and strength during molecular dynamics simulation are discussed. Besides, the obtained Young's modulus and yield strength of Au nanowires by Wu et al. [Nature Mater. 4, 525 (2005)] in the range of diameters 40 to 200 nm using the theory of classical continuum mechanics are corrected using the 3D finite element modeling based on inverse technique [Deb Nath et al. Appl. Phys. A 103(2), 493 (2011) and Tohmyoh et al. Appl. Phys. A 103(2), 285 (2011)].

  12. Bulk synthesis, growth mechanism and properties of highly pure ultrafine boron nitride nanotubes with diameters of sub-10 nm.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang; Lin, Jing; Tang, Chengchun; Bando, Yoshio; Zhi, Chunyi; Zhai, Tianyou; Dierre, Benjamin; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Golberg, Dmitri

    2011-04-08

    As a structural analogue of the carbon nanotube (CNT), the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) has become one of the most intriguing non-carbon nanostructures. However, up to now the pre-existing restrictions/limitations of BNNT syntheses have made the progress in their research rather modest. This work presents a new route toward the synthesis of highly pure ultrafine BNNTs based on a modified boron oxide (BO) CVD method. A new effective precursor--a mixture of Li₂O and B--has been proposed for the growth of thin, few-layer BNNTs in bulk amounts. The Li₂O utilized as the precursor plays the crucial role for the present nanotube growth. The prepared BNNTs have average external diameters of sub-10 nm and lengths of up to tens of µm. Electron energy loss spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate the ultimate phase purity of the ultrafine BNNTs. Property studies indicate that the ultrafine nanotubes are perfect electrical insulators exhibiting superb resistance to oxidation and strong UV emission. Moreover, their reduced diameters lead to a dramatically decreased population of defects within the tube walls and result in the observation of near-band-edge (NBE) emission at room temperature.

  13. Bulk synthesis, growth mechanism and properties of highly pure ultrafine boron nitride nanotubes with diameters of sub-10 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yang; Lin, Jing; Tang, Chengchun; Bando, Yoshio; Zhi, Chunyi; Zhai, Tianyou; Dierre, Benjamin; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Golberg, Dmitri

    2011-04-01

    As a structural analogue of the carbon nanotube (CNT), the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) has become one of the most intriguing non-carbon nanostructures. However, up to now the pre-existing restrictions/limitations of BNNT syntheses have made the progress in their research rather modest. This work presents a new route toward the synthesis of highly pure ultrafine BNNTs based on a modified boron oxide (BO) CVD method. A new effective precursor—a mixture of Li2O and B—has been proposed for the growth of thin, few-layer BNNTs in bulk amounts. The Li2O utilized as the precursor plays the crucial role for the present nanotube growth. The prepared BNNTs have average external diameters of sub-10 nm and lengths of up to tens of µm. Electron energy loss spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate the ultimate phase purity of the ultrafine BNNTs. Property studies indicate that the ultrafine nanotubes are perfect electrical insulators exhibiting superb resistance to oxidation and strong UV emission. Moreover, their reduced diameters lead to a dramatically decreased population of defects within the tube walls and result in the observation of near-band-edge (NBE) emission at room temperature.

  14. Diameter control of single-walled carbon nanotube forests from 1.3–3.0 nm by arc plasma deposition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guohai; Seki, Yasuaki; Kimura, Hiroe; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji; Futaba, Don N.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to both precisely and continuously control the average diameter of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a forest ranging from 1.3 to 3.0 nm with ~1 Å resolution. The diameter control of the forest was achieved through tuning of the catalyst state (size, density, and composition) using arc plasma deposition of nanoparticles. This 1.7 nm control range and 1 Å precision exceed the highest reports to date. PMID:24448201

  15. Reading the primary structure of a protein with 0.07 nm3 resolution using a subnanometre-diameter pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Eamonn; Dong, Zhuxin; Tennant, Clare; Timp, Gregory

    2016-11-01

    The primary structure of a protein consists of a sequence of amino acids and is a key factor in determining how a protein folds and functions. However, conventional methods for sequencing proteins, such as mass spectrometry and Edman degradation, suffer from short reads and lack sensitivity, so alternative approaches are sought. Here, we show that a subnanometre-diameter pore, sputtered through a thin silicon nitride membrane, can be used to detect the primary structure of a denatured protein molecule. When a denatured protein immersed in electrolyte is driven through the pore by an electric field, measurements of a blockade in the current reveal nearly regular fluctuations, the number of which coincides with the number of residues in the protein. Furthermore, the amplitudes of the fluctuations are highly correlated with the volumes that are occluded by quadromers (four residues) in the primary structure. Each fluctuation, therefore, represents a read of a quadromer. Scrutiny of the fluctuations reveals that the subnanometre pore is sensitive enough to read the occluded volume that is related to post-translational modifications of a single residue, measuring volume differences of ∼0.07 nm3, but it is not sensitive enough to discriminate between the volumes of all twenty amino acids.

  16. Properties of magnetic tunnel junctions with a MgO/CoFeB/Ta/CoFeB/MgO recording structure down to junction diameter of 11 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Enobio, E. C. I.; Yamanouchi, M.; Ikeda, S.; Fukami, S.; Kanai, S.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate properties of perpendicular anisotropy magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a recording structure of MgO/CoFeB/Ta/CoFeB/MgO down to junction diameter (D) of 11 nm from 56 nm. Thermal stability factor (Δ) of MTJ with the structure starts to decrease at D = 30 nm. D dependence of Δ agrees well with that expected from magnetic properties of blanket film taking into account the change in demagnetizing factors of MTJs. Intrinsic critical current (IC0) reduces with decrease of D in the entire investigated D range. A ratio of Δ to IC0 shows continuous increase with decrease of D down to 11 nm.

  17. Dental caries in Rome, 50-100 AD.

    PubMed

    Fejerskov, O; Guldager Bilde, P; Bizzarro, M; Connelly, J N; Skovhus Thomsen, J; Nyvad, B

    2012-01-01

    Scarce information exists on the clinical features of dental caries in the Imperial Roman population and no structural data on caries lesions from this period have so far been published. We report on the findings of 86 teeth (50-100 AD) found during archaeological excavations of the temple of Castor and Pollux in the Forum Romanum. We found that nearly all teeth had large carious cavities extending into the pulp. The distribution and size of the caries lesions were similar to those found in contemporary adult populations in Africa and China living without access to dental care. Most lesions had a hypermineralized zone in the dentin at the advancing front of the carious cavities as revealed by micro-computed tomography. This biological dentin reaction combined with the morphology of the cavities might indicate that some temporary topical pain relief and intervention treatment slowed down the rate of lesion progression. This is indirectly supported by examination of cavities of similar size and depth from a contemporary population without access to dental health care. In contrast to the lesions in the Roman teeth, these lesions did not exhibit a hypermineralized dentin reaction. We investigated whether the Pb isotopic composition of enamel and/or dentin of a single tooth matched that of a sample of an ancient Forum water lead pipe. The Pb isotopic composition of the tooth did not match that of the tube, suggesting that the subjects were exposed to different Pb sources during their lifetime other than the lead tubes.

  18. Porcine skin damage thresholds for 0.6 to 9.5 cm beam diameters from 1070-nm continuous-wave infrared laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Vincelette, Rebecca; Noojin, Gary D; Harbert, Corey A; Schuster, Kurt J; Shingledecker, Aurora D; Stolarski, Dave; Kumru, Semih S; Oliver, Jeffrey W

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing use of high-power fiber lasers in manufacturing and telecommunications industries operating in the infrared spectrum between 1000 and 2000 nm, which are advertised to provide as much as 10 kW continuous output power at 1070 nm. Safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental and modeling investigations with scant data available for these wavelengths. A series of studies using 1070-nm infrared lasers to determine the minimum visible lesion damage thresholds in skin using the Yucatan miniature pig (Sus scrofa domestica) for a range of beam diameters (0.6, 1.1, 1.9, 2.4, 4.7, and 9.5 cm) and a range of exposure durations (10 ms to 10 s) is presented. Experimental peak temperatures associated with each damage threshold were measured using thermal imaging. Peak temperatures at damage threshold for the 10-s exposures were ∼10°C lower than those at shorter exposures. The lowest and highest experimental minimum visible lesion damage thresholds were found to have peak radiant exposures of 19 and 432  J/cm2 for the beam diameter-exposure duration pairs of 2.4 cm, 25 ms and 0.6 cm, 10 s, respectively. Thresholds for beam diameters >2.5  cm had a weak to no effect on threshold radiant exposure levels for exposure times ≤0.25  s, but may have a larger effect on thresholds for exposures ≥10  s.

  19. Simulation of phase-change random access memory with 35nm diameter of the TiN bottom electrode by finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Qiuxue; Liu, Bo; Liu, Yan; Wang, Heng; Xu, Zhen; Gao, Dan; Wang, Qing; Xia, Yangyang; Wang, Weiwei; Song, Zhitang; Feng, Songlin

    2016-10-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model for Phase-Change Random Access Memory (PCRAM) is established to simulate thermal and electrical distribution during RESET operation. The establishment of the model is highly in accordance with the manufacture of PCRAM cell in the 40nm process and the model is applied to simulate the RESET behaviors of 35 nm diameter of titanium nitride (TiN) bottom electrode in the conventional mushroom structure (MS). By the simulations of thermal and electrical distribution, the highest temperature is observed in TiN bottom electrode contactor and meanwhile the voltage of the TiN bottom electrode accounts for as high as 65 percent of the total voltage. It induces high RESET current which suggests that the thermoelectric conductivity of MS is crucial in improving the heating efficiency in RESET process. Simulation results of RESET current and high resistance distribution during RESET operation are close to the data from the actual measurement. However those two values of low resistance are slightly different, probably due to the interface resistance between Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) and other materials and the resistance caused by microstructural defects. This work reveals the importance of the thermoelectrical properties of materials in PCRAM cells and improves the quality of PCRAM simulations in industrial application.

  20. Chemical modification of contractile 3-nm-diameter filaments in Vorticella spasmoneme by diethyl-pyrocarbonate and its reversible renaturation by hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jie; Zhang, Bei; Asai, Hiroshi

    2003-10-31

    A peritrich ciliate possesses a zooid and a long stalk consisting of a bundle of 3-nm-diameter filaments. Glycerinated stalks can contract in the presence of free Ca(2+) and re-extend in the absence of free Ca(2+). In the present study, we demonstrated that histidine residue(s) played a critical role in spasmoneme contraction by using glycerinated stalk of Vorticella. Concentration-dependent inhibition of spasmoneme contraction was observed in the presence of reversible histidine-modifying reagent named diethyl-pyrocarbonate (DEPC). In addition, the contractility degree of DEPC-modified spasmoneme could be partially restored by hydroxylamine treatment. The 244nm absorption of modified spasmoneme protein(s) increased with rising DEPC concentration and decreased following the addition of hydroxylamine treatment. Adding Ca(2+) before DEPC modification could prevent the spasmoneme contraction from inhibition of DEPC. Those results suggested that histidine residues were actively involved in spasmoneme contraction. Ca(2+)-binding ability of spasmin was not inhibited by DEPC modification, which suggested that the essential histidine residues were not on the calcium-binding site of spasmin.

  1. Bacillus subtilis Bactofilins Are Essential for Flagellar Hook- and Filament Assembly and Dynamically Localize into Structures of Less than 100 nm Diameter underneath the Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    El Andari, Jihad; Altegoer, Florian; Bange, Gert; Graumann, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are a widely conserved protein family implicated in cell shape maintenance and in bacterial motility. We show that the bactofilins BacE and BacF from Bacillus subtilis are essential for motility. The proteins are required for the establishment of flagellar hook- and filament structures, but apparently not for the formation of basal bodies. Functional YFP fusions to BacE and to BacF localize as discrete assemblies at the B. subtilis cell membrane, and have a diameter of 60 to 70 nm. BacF assemblies are relatively static, and partially colocalize with flagellar basal bodies, while BacE assemblies are fewer per cell than those of BacF and are highly mobile. Tracking of BacE foci showed that the assemblies arrest at a single point for a few hundred milliseconds, showing that a putative interaction with flagellar structures would be transient and fast. When overexpressed or expressed in a heterologous cell system, bactofilins can form filamentous structures, and also form multimers as purified proteins. Our data reveal a propensity for bactofilins to form filaments, however, in B. subtilis cells, bactofilins assemble into defined size assemblies that show a dynamic localization pattern and play a role in flagellar assembly. PMID:26517549

  2. Electrospray synthesis of monodisperse polymer particles in a broad (60 nm-2 μm) diameter range: guiding principles and formulation recipes.

    PubMed

    Almería, Begoña; Gomez, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    This study reports on a methodology to control the size of polymer particles generated by the electrospray (ES) drying route, with emphasis on the generation of biodegradable polymer nanoparticles that are well suited for biomedical applications. The ability to produce spherical poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) particles with and without encapsulated active agent, with relative standard deviation not exceeding 15%, was demonstrated over a remarkably broad (60 nm-2 μm) diameter range. By judiciously choosing ES parameters and solution properties, we can control the monodispersity and the size of the obtained particles, tailoring it to a specific application. The main parameters affecting particle size include solution electrical conductivity, flow rate and initial polymer volume fraction. Quasi-monodispersity at both the micro- and the more challenging nano-scale was achieved by avoiding Coulomb fission in the spray droplets, via entanglement of the polymer chains within the droplets rather than by charge neutralization. Guiding principles in the formulation of the solutions to satisfy a multiplicity of constraints are provided along with an extensive database of "recipes".

  3. Conformal SiO2 coating of sub-100 nm diameter channels of polycarbonate etched ion-track channels by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian; Lukas, Manuela; Spende, Anne; Stühn, Bernd; Toimil-Molares, M E; Trautmann, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Polycarbonate etched ion-track membranes with about 30 µm long and 50 nm wide cylindrical channels were conformally coated with SiO2 by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The process was performed at 50 °C to avoid thermal damage to the polymer membrane. Analysis of the coated membranes by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) reveals a homogeneous, conformal layer of SiO2 in the channels at a deposition rate of 1.7-1.8 Å per ALD cycle. Characterization by infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the stoichiometric composition of the SiO2 films. Detailed XPS analysis reveals that the mechanism of SiO2 formation is based on subsurface crystal growth. By dissolving the polymer, the silica nanotubes are released from the ion-track membrane. The thickness of the tube wall is well controlled by the ALD process. Because the track-etched channels exhibited diameters in the range of nanometres and lengths in the range of micrometres, cylindrical tubes with an aspect ratio as large as 3000 have been produced.

  4. Tailoring morphology in free-standing anodic aluminium oxide: control of barrier layer opening down to the sub-10 nm diameter.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jie; Butler, William H; Zangari, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    Free-standing, highly ordered porous aluminium oxide templates were fabricated by three-step anodization in oxalic, sulfuric or phosphoric acid solutions, followed by dissolution of the aluminium substrate in HgCl(2). Opening of the pore bottoms on the barrier layer side of these templates was carried out by using chemical or ion beam etching. Chemical etching is capable of achieving full pore opening, but partial pore opening occurs inhomogeneously. On the contrary, ion beam etching enables homogeneous and reproducible partial pore opening, with the pore size controlled through the etching time. By this method, pore openings as small as 5 nm can reliably be obtained.

  5. Detection of particles of less than 5 nm in diameter formed in an argon-silane capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boufendi, L.; Gaudin, J.; Huet, S.; Viera, G.; Dudemaine, M.

    2001-12-01

    A method for the detection of dust particles occurring in silane-argon gas mixture plasmas is presented. It is based on the spectral analysis of the radio-frequency current. The amplitudes of the fundamental (13.56 MHz) and second harmonics (40.68 MHz) are very sensitive to the presence of the earlier nanoparticles when their size is in the range of 2-3 nm even if their influence on the capacitive character of the impedance is negligible. This method is nonperturbative, with a temporal resolution in the microsecond range, very easy to implement, and can thus be used for industrial reactors.

  6. Conceptual definition of a 50-100 kWe NEP system for planetary science missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedlander, Alan

    1993-01-01

    The Phase 1 objective of this project is to assess the applicability of a common Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) flight system of the 50-100 kWe power class to meet the advanced transportation requirements of a suite of planetary science (robotic) missions, accounting for differences in mission-specific payloads and delivery requirements. The candidate missions are as follows: (1) Comet Nucleus Sample Return; (2) Multiple Mainbelt Asteroid Rendezvous; (3) Jupiter Grand Tour (Galilean satellites and magnetosphere); (4) Uranus Orbiter/Probe (atmospheric entry and landers); (5) Neptune Orbiter/Probe (atmospheric entry and landers); and (6) Pluto-Charon Orbiter/Lander. The discussion is presented in vugraph form.

  7. Magic-number gold nanoclusters with diameters from 1 to 3.5 nm: relative stability and catalytic activity for CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Li, Lei; Pedersen, Andreas; Gao, Yi; Khetrapal, Navneet; Jónsson, Hannes; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2015-01-14

    Relative stability of geometric magic-number gold nanoclusters with high point-group symmetry ((Ih), D(5h), O(h)) and size up to 3.5 nm, as well as structures obtained by global optimization using an empirical potential, is investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Among high-symmetry nanoclusters, our calculations suggest that from Au(147) to Au(923), the stability follows the order Ih > D(5h) > Oh. However, at the largest size of Au(923), the computed cohesive energy differences among high-symmetry I(h), D(5h) and O(h) isomers are less than 4 meV/atom (at PBE level of theory), suggesting the larger high-symmetry clusters are similar in stability. This conclusion supports a recent experimental demonstration of controlling morphologies of high-symmetry Au(923) clusters ( Plant, S. R.; Cao, L.; Palmer, R. E. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 7559). Moreover, at and beyond the size of Au(549), the face-centered cubic-(FCC)-based structure appears to be slightly more stable than the Ih structure with comparable size, consistent with experimental observations. Also, for the Au clusters with the size below or near Au(561), reconstructed icosahedral and decahedral clusters with lower symmetry are slightly more stable than the corresponding high-symmetry isomers. Catalytic activities of both high-symmetry and reconstructed I(h)-Au(147) and both Ih-Au(309) clusters are examined. CO adsorption on Au(309) exhibits less sensitivity on the edge and vertex sites compared to Au(147), whereas the CO/O2 coadsorption is still energetically favorable on both gold nanoclusters. Computed activation barriers for CO oxidation are typically around 0.2 eV, suggesting that the gold nanoclusters of ∼ 2 nm in size are highly effective catalysts for CO oxidation.

  8. A 50-100 kWe gas-cooled reactor for use on Mars.

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Curtis D.

    2006-04-01

    In the space exploration field there is a general consensus that nuclear reactor powered systems will be extremely desirable for future missions to the outer solar system. Solar systems suffer from the decreasing intensity of solar radiation and relatively low power density. Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators are limited to generating a few kilowatts electric (kWe). Chemical systems are short-lived due to prodigious fuel use. A well designed 50-100 kWe nuclear reactor power system would provide sufficient power for a variety of long term missions. This thesis will present basic work done on a 50-100 kWe reactor power system that has a reasonable lifespan and would function in an extraterrestrial environment. The system will use a Gas-Cooled Reactor that is directly coupled to a Closed Brayton Cycle (GCR-CBC) power system. Also included will be some variations on the primary design and their effects on the characteristics of the primary design. This thesis also presents a variety of neutronics related calculations, an examination of the reactor's thermal characteristics, feasibility for use in an extraterrestrial environment, and the reactor's safety characteristics in several accident scenarios. While there has been past work for space reactors, the challenges introduced by thin atmospheres like those on Mars have rarely been considered.

  9. Growth and magnetic properties of vertically aligned epitaxial CoNi nanowires in (Sr, Ba)TiO3 with diameters in the 1.8-6 nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, V.; Milano, J.; Coati, A.; Vlad, A.; Sauvage-Simkin, M.; Garreau, Y.; Demaille, D.; Hidki, S.; Novikova, A.; Fonda, E.; Zheng, Y.; Vidal, F.

    2016-12-01

    The growth by pulsed laser deposition of fully epitaxial nanocomposites made of Co x Ni1-x nanowires (NW) vertically self-assembled in Sr0.5Ba0.5TiO3/SrTiO3(001) layers is reported. The diameter of the wires can be tuned in the 1.8-6 nm range. The composition of the wires can be controlled, with the growth sequence and the fcc crystallographic structure of the wires preserved for Co content up to 78%. The nanocomposite systems obtained display a uniaxial magnetic anisotropy with out-of-plane easy axis as shown through analysis of ferromagnetic resonance measurements. It is shown that the magnitude of the magnetic anisotropy depends sensitively on the structural quality of the nanocomposites.The energy barrier for magnetization reversal scales as the square of the diameter of the NW and reaches 60 {k}{{B}}{T}{{amb}} for 6 nm diameter, with T amb = 300 K.

  10. Conceptual Design of a 50--100 MW Electron Beam Accelerator System for the National Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Program

    SciTech Connect

    SCHNEIDER,LARRY X.

    2000-06-01

    The National Hypersonic Wind Tunnel program requires an unprecedented electron beam source capable of 1--2 MeV at a beam power level of 50--100 MW. Direct-current electron accelerator technology can readily generate high average power beams to approximately 5 MeV at output efficiencies greater than 90%. However, due to the nature of research and industrial applications, there has never been a requirement for a single module with an output power exceeding approximately 500 kW. Although a 50--100 MW module is a two-order extrapolation from demonstrated power levels, the scaling of accelerator components appears reasonable. This paper presents an evaluation of component and system issues involved in the design of a 50--100 MW electron beam accelerator system with precision beam transport into a high pressure flowing air environment.

  11. Improvement design study on steam generator of MHR-50/100 aiming higher safety level after water ingress accident

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, S.; Minatsuki, I.; Shimizu, K.

    2012-07-01

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has been studying on MHI original High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR), namely MHR-50/100, for commercialization with supported by JAEA. In the heat transfer system, steam generator (SG) is one of the most important components because it should be imposed a function of heat transfer from reactor power to steam turbine system and maintaining a nuclear grade boundary. Then we especially focused an effort of a design study on the SG having robustness against water ingress accident based on our design experience of PWR, FBR and HTGR. In this study, we carried out a sensitivity analysis from the view point of economic and plant efficiency. As a result, the SG design parameter of helium inlet/outlet temperature of 750 deg. C/300 deg. C, a side-by-side layout and one unit of SG attached to a reactor were selected. In the next, a design improvement of SG was carried out from the view point of securing the level of inherent safety without reliance on active steam dump system during water ingress accident considering the situation of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster on March 11, 2011. Finally, according to above basic design requirement to SG, we performed a conceptual design on adapting themes of SG structure improvement. (authors)

  12. REE Sorption Study of Seived -50 +100 Mesh Fraction of Media #1 in Brine #1 at Different Concentrations of REE at 70C

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Garland

    2015-06-29

    This dataset shows the sorption capacities of smaller grain size (-50 +100 mesh) of media #1 in brine #1 at different starting concentrations of REE's at elevated temperature of 70C. The experimental conditions are 2g of -50 +100 mesh media #1 to 150mL of REE solution at concentartions of .2ppm each, 2ppm each, and 20ppm each. The pH of the solution is 5.5, and the temperature was at 70C.

  13. Regression equations for estimating flood flows for the 2-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-Year recurrence intervals in Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahearn, Elizabeth A.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple linear-regression equations were developed to estimate the magnitudes of floods in Connecticut for recurrence intervals ranging from 2 to 500 years. The equations can be used for nonurban, unregulated stream sites in Connecticut with drainage areas ranging from about 2 to 715 square miles. Flood-frequency data and hydrologic characteristics from 70 streamflow-gaging stations and the upstream drainage basins were used to develop the equations. The hydrologic characteristics?drainage area, mean basin elevation, and 24-hour rainfall?are used in the equations to estimate the magnitude of floods. Average standard errors of prediction for the equations are 31.8, 32.7, 34.4, 35.9, 37.6 and 45.0 percent for the 2-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year recurrence intervals, respectively. Simplified equations using only one hydrologic characteristic?drainage area?also were developed. The regression analysis is based on generalized least-squares regression techniques. Observed flows (log-Pearson Type III analysis of the annual maximum flows) from five streamflow-gaging stations in urban basins in Connecticut were compared to flows estimated from national three-parameter and seven-parameter urban regression equations. The comparison shows that the three- and seven- parameter equations used in conjunction with the new statewide equations generally provide reasonable estimates of flood flows for urban sites in Connecticut, although a national urban flood-frequency study indicated that the three-parameter equations significantly underestimated flood flows in many regions of the country. Verification of the accuracy of the three-parameter or seven-parameter national regression equations using new data from Connecticut stations was beyond the scope of this study. A technique for calculating flood flows at streamflow-gaging stations using a weighted average also is described. Two estimates of flood flows?one estimate based on the log-Pearson Type III analyses of the annual

  14. Sub-10 nm nanopantography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Siyuan; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Economou, Demetre J.

    2015-11-01

    Nanopantography, a massively parallel nanopatterning method over large areas, was previously shown to be capable of printing 10 nm features in silicon, using an array of 1000 nm-diameter electrostatic lenses, fabricated on the substrate, to focus beamlets of a broad area ion beam on selected regions of the substrate. In the present study, using lens dimensional scaling optimized by computer simulation, and reduction in the ion beam image size and energy dispersion, the resolution of nanopantography was dramatically improved, allowing features as small as 3 nm to be etched into Si.

  15. REE Sorption Study of Sieved -50 +100 mesh Media #1 in Brine #1 with Different Starting pH's at 70C

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Garland

    2015-07-21

    This dataset described shaker table experiments ran with sieved -50 +100 mesh media #1 in brine #1 that have 2ppm each of the 7 REE metals at different starting pH's of 3.5, 4.5, and 5.5. The experimental conditions are 2g media to 150mL of REE solution, at 70C.

  16. Interpreting stem diameter changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölttä, T.; Sevanto, S.; Nikinmaa, E.

    2009-12-01

    Detecting phloem transport in stem diameter changes Teemu Hölttä1, Sanna Sevanto2, Eero Nikinmaa1 1Department of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland 2Department of Physics, P.O. Box 48, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland Introduction The volume of living cells and xylem conduits vary according to pressures they are subjected to. Our proposition is that the behavior of the inner bark diameter variation which cannot be explained by changes in xylem water status arise from changes in the osmotic concentration of the phloem and cambial growth. Materials and methods Simultaneous xylem and stem diameter measurements were conducted between June 28th to October 4th 2006 in Southern Finland on a 47-year old, 15 meter tall, Scots pine tree (DBH 15 cm) at heights of 1.5 and 10 meters. The difference between the measured inner bark diameter and the inner bark diameter predicted from xylem diameter change with a simple model (assuming there was no change in the osmotic concentration of the phloem) is hypothesized to give the changes in the osmotic concentration of the inner bark. The simple model calculates the radial water exchange between the xylem and phloem driven by the water potential changes in the xylem. Results and Discussion The major signal in the inner bark diameter was the transpiration rate as assumed, but also a signal arising from the change in the osmotic concentration (Fig 1a). The predicted osmotic concentration of the phloem typically increased during the afternoon due to the loading of photosynthesized sugars to the phloem. Inner bark osmotic concentration followed the photosynthesis rate with a 3 and 4 hour time-lag at the top and base, respectively (Fig 1b). The connection between photosynthesis and the predicted change in phloem osmotic concentration was stronger in the upper part of the tree compared to lower part. The changes in the predicted osmotic concentration were not similar every day, indicating that

  17. Solar Diameter Latitude Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilio, M.; Leister, N. V.; Laclare, F.

    The observing programs of the Sun for determining the fundamental system of reference enable, as a by-product, to measure the apparent solar diameter (Poppe, P.C.R. et al. 1996; Leister et al. 1996; Laclare et al. 1991). The diameter obtained at the Calern Observatory (φ = 43-circ 44' 55''.9; λ = -0h 27m 42s.44) and at Abrahao de Moraes Observatory (OAM) (φ = -23-circ 00'6''.0; λ = 3h 07m 52s.22) was analyzed searching for periodicity evidences. For this we utilized the temporal methods CLEAN and CLEANEST. The analysis in function of heliographic latitude shows a dependence that may be correlated to mode of pulsation non-radial gravity. A discussion is made in terms of physical parameters like temperature luminosity and magnetic field involving the solar radius (Emilio M. 1997; Laclare et al. 1996).

  18. Double diameter boring tool

    DOEpatents

    Ashbaugh, Fred N.; Murry, Kenneth R.

    1988-12-27

    A boring tool and a method of operation are provided for boring two concentric holes of precision diameters and depths in a single operation. The boring tool includes an elongated tool body, a shank for attachment to a standard adjustable boring head which is used on a manual or numerical control milling machine and first and second diametrically opposed cutting edges formed for cutting in opposite directions. The diameter of the elongated tool body is substantially equal to the distance from the first cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation plus the distance from the second cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation. The axis of rotation of the tool is spaced from the tool centerline a distance substantially equal to one-half the distance from the second cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation minus one-half the distance from the first cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation. The method includes the step of inserting the boring tool into the boring head, adjusting the distance between the tool centerline and the tool axis of rotation as described above and boring the two concentric holes.

  19. Double diameter boring tool

    DOEpatents

    Ashbaugh, F.A.; Murry, K.R.

    1986-02-10

    A boring tool and a method of operation are provided for boring two concentric holes of precision diameters and depths in a single operation. The boring tool includes an elongated tool body, a shank for attachment to a standard adjustable boring head which is used on a manual or numerical control milling machine and first and second diametrically opposed cutting flutes formed for cutting in opposite directions. The diameter of the elongated tool body is substantially equal to the distance from the first flute tip to the axis of rotation plus the distance from the second flute tip to the axis of rotation. The axis of rotation of the tool is spaced from the tool centerline a distance substantially equal to one-half the distance from the second flute tip to the axis of rotation minus one-half the distance from the first flute tip to the axis of rotation. The method includes the step of inserting the boring tool into the boring head, adjusting the distance between the tool centerline and the tool axis of rotation as described above and boring the two concentric holes.

  20. Sub-70-nm pattern fabrication using an alternating phase-shifting mask in 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, Shigeo; Kanda, Noriyoshi; Watanabe, Kunio; Suganaga, Toshifumi; Itani, Toshiro

    2002-07-01

    In Selete, we have developed various resolution-enhancement technologies (RETs) such as the alternating phase shifting mask (alt-PSM), attenuated-PSM (att-PSM), and off-axis illumination (OAI). The alt-PSM, for example, reduces the k1 factor and extends the lithographic performance. A problem concerning the alt-PSM is the difference in the transmitted light intensities of the non-phase-shifting region and the phase-shifting region which can cause critical-dimension (CD) placement error. The transmitted light intensities of the two regions can be made equal by side-etching, in which the quartz (Qz) is undercut by wet-etching at the side of the transmitting region. We sought to optimize the mask structure in terms of a high numerical aperture (NA) through a simulation using two kinds of structures with a 157 nm exposure wavelength. The structures were a single-trench structure and a dual-trench structure, with each trench dug in the transmitting region. To attain a high NA (NA equals 0.85), we tried to optimize the parameters of the Cr film thickness, the amount of the undercut (side-etching), and the phase shift. The evaluated line pattern sizes were 70 nm (line/space size equals 70/70 nm, 70/140 nm, 70/210 nm, and 70/350 nm) and 50 nm (line/space size equals 50/50 nm, 50/100 nm, 50/150 nm, and 50/250 nm) at the wafer. Further, using the optimized mask, we calculated the lithographic margin of a sub 70 nm pattern through a simulation. For the 70 nm line patterns, we found that it will be difficult to fabricate precisely a 70 nm line patten using a mask with a single- trench structure. And we also found that the most suitable conditions for the dual-trench structure mask were a 90 nm undercut, a 100 nm Cr film thickness, and a 180 degree(s) phase shift. The exposure latitude at a depth of focus (DOF) of 0.3 micrometers , simulated using the optimized mask, was 5.3% for the 70/70 nm pattern, 3.6% for 70/140 nm 16.0% for 70/210 nm, and 29.3% for 70/350 nm. As the pitch

  1. A comparison of 50, 100 and 200 mg of intra-articular pethidine during knee joint surgery, a controlled study with evidence for local demethylation to norpethidine.

    PubMed

    Söderlund, A; Boreus, L O; Westman, L; Engström, B; Valentin, A; Ekblom, A

    1999-03-01

    Pethidine (meperidine) is a compound with both local anaesthetic and opioid agonist properties. We have in a recent study demonstrated that pethidine could be an interesting alternative to prilocaine in arthroscopy with local anaesthetic technique. Therefore, we investigated, in a controlled randomized double-blind study, the effect of three doses of pethidine compared with a standard local anaesthetic, in patients subjected to arthroscopic knee joint surgery. Ten patients in each group received 50 mg (P50), 100 mg (P100), 200 mg (P200) of pethidine or prilocaine (5 mg/ml) + adrenaline (4 mg/ml) (PC), injected intra-articularly (i.a.) before surgery. We measured pain intensity and discomfort during arthroscopy and pain intensity at rest and at movement, nausea and tiredness for 3 days post-operatively at regular intervals using the VAS-technique. We also measured the concentration of pethidine and its demethylated metabolite, norpethidine, in plasma by collecting blood samples at 20, 40, 60, 80, 140 and 200 min following injection, and in synovial fluid which was collected through the arthroscope at the start and the end of the surgery. It was found that significantly more patients in the P50 group (n = 6) needed general anaesthesia due to intense pain than those in the P100 group (n = 1), P200 group (n = 0) or the PC group (n = 1). The PC group required significantly more analgesics and had a significantly higher calculated total sum of pain scores at movement post-operatively, than the other three groups. The P200 group more often reported tiredness post-operatively than the other three groups. We conclude that 100 or 200 mg pethidine i.a. produces satisfactory anaesthesia for surgery. There was a rapid transfer of pethidine from synovial fluid to plasma, resulting in plasma levels earlier reported to produce centrally mediated effects, such as analgesia and tiredness. We found much higher concentrations of norpethidine in the synovial fluid than in plasma

  2. Synthesis of very small diameter silica nanofibers using sound waves.

    PubMed

    Datskos, Panos; Chen, Jihua; Sharma, Jaswinder

    2014-07-14

    Silica nanofibers of an average diameter ≈30 nm and length ≈100 μm have been synthesized using an unprecedented strategy: sound waves. A new phenomenon, spinning off the nanofibers at silica rod tips, is also observed.

  3. Submicron diameter single crystal sapphire optical fiber

    DOE PAGES

    Hill, Cary; Homa, Daniel; Liu, Bo; ...

    2014-10-02

    In this work, a submicron-diameter single crystal sapphire optical fiber was demonstrated via wet acid etching at elevated temperatures. Etch rates on the order 2.3 µm/hr were achievable with a 3:1 molar ratio sulfuric-phosphoric acid solution maintained at a temperature of 343°C. A sapphire fiber with an approximate diameter of 800 nm was successfully fabricated from a commercially available fiber with an original diameter of 50 µm. The simple and controllable etching technique provides a feasible approach to the fabrication of unique waveguide structures via traditional silica masking techniques. The ability to tailor the geometry of sapphire optical fibers ismore » the first step in achieving optical and sensing performance on par with its fused silica counterpart.« less

  4. Submicron diameter single crystal sapphire optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Cary; Homa, Daniel; Liu, Bo; Yu, Zhihao; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary

    2014-10-02

    In this work, a submicron-diameter single crystal sapphire optical fiber was demonstrated via wet acid etching at elevated temperatures. Etch rates on the order 2.3 µm/hr were achievable with a 3:1 molar ratio sulfuric-phosphoric acid solution maintained at a temperature of 343°C. A sapphire fiber with an approximate diameter of 800 nm was successfully fabricated from a commercially available fiber with an original diameter of 50 µm. The simple and controllable etching technique provides a feasible approach to the fabrication of unique waveguide structures via traditional silica masking techniques. The ability to tailor the geometry of sapphire optical fibers is the first step in achieving optical and sensing performance on par with its fused silica counterpart.

  5. The DIAMET campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, G.

    2012-04-01

    DIAMET (DIAbatic influences on Mesoscale structures in ExTratropical storms) is a joint project between the UK academic community and the Met Office. Its focus is on understanding and predicting mesoscale structures in synoptic-scale storms, and in particular on the role of diabatic processes in generating and maintaining them. Such structures include fronts, rain bands, secondary cyclones, sting jets etc, and are important because much of the extreme weather we experience (e.g. strong winds, heavy rain) comes from such regions. The project conducted two field campaigns in the autumn of 2011, from September 14 - 30 and November 24 - December 14, based around the FAAM BAe146 aircraft with support from ground-based radar and radiosonde measurements. Detailed modelling, mainly using the Met Office Unified model, supported the planning and interpretation of these campaigns. This presentation will give a brief overview of the campaigns. Both in September and November-December the weather regime was westerly, with a strong jet stream directed across the Atlantic. Three IOPs were conducted in September, to observe a convective band ahead of an upper-level trough, waves on a long trailing cold front, and a warm conveyor belt associated with a secondary cyclone. In November-December six IOPs were conducted, to observe frontal passages and high winds. This period was notable for a number of very strong windstorms passing across the north of the UK, and gave us an opportunity to examine bent-back warm fronts in the southern quadrant of these storms where the strongest winds are found. The case studies fell into two basic patterns. In the majority of cases, dropsonde legs at high level were used to obtain a cross-section of winds and thermodynamic structure (e.g. across a front), followed by in situ legs at lower levels (generally where the temperature was between 0 and -10°) to examine microphysical processes, especially ice multiplication and the extent of supercooled water

  6. Laser direct writing using submicron-diameter fibers.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng; Yang, Guoguang; Bai, Jian; Xu, Jianfeng; Hou, Changlun; Liang, Yiyong; Wang, Kaiwei

    2009-10-26

    In this paper, a novel direct writing technique using submicron-diameter fibers is presented. The submicron-diameter fiber probe serves as a tightly confined point source and it adopts micro touch mode in the process of writing. The energy distribution of direct writing model is analyzed by Three-Dimension Finite-Difference Time-Domain method. Experiments demonstrate that submicron-diameter fiber direct writing has some advantages: simple process, 350-nm-resolution (lower than 442-nm-wavelength), large writing area, and controllable width of lines. In addition, by altering writing direction of lines, complex submicron patterns can be fabricated.

  7. New Large Diameter RF Complex Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, John; Nosenko, Volodymyr; Thomas, Hubertus

    2016-10-01

    The Complex Plasma Research Group at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Oberpfaffenhofen has built a new large diameter rf plasma setup for dusty plasma experiments. The vacuum chamber is a stainless steel cylinder 0.90 m in diameter and 0.34 m in height with ports for viewing and measurement. A 0.85 m diameter plate in about the center serves as a powered electrode (13.56 MHz) with the chamber walls as the ground. It is pumped on by one of two Oerlikon turbo pumps with a pumping rate of 1100 l/s or 270 l/s. Argon gas is admitted into the chamber by an MKS mass flow meter and pumping is regulated by a butterfly valve to set pressure for experiments. A manual dropper is used to insert dust into the plasma. The dust is illuminated horizontally by a 660 nm 100 mW laser sheet and viewed from above by a Photron FASTCAM 1024 PCI camera. A vertical laser sheet of 635 nm will be used for side imaging. So far, single-layer plasma crystals of up to 15000 particles have been suspended. The particle velocity fluctuation spectra were measured and from these, the particle charge and screening length were calculated. Future experiments will explore the system-size dependence of the plasma crystal properties.

  8. Diameter Controlled of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized on Nanoporous Silicon Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asli, N. A.; Shamsudin, M. S.; Maryam, M.; Yusop, S. F. M.; Suriani, A. B.; Rusop, M.; Abdullah, S.

    2013-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been successfully synthesized on nanoporous silicon template (NPSiT) using botanical source, camphor oil. Diameter of CNTs synthesized was controlled by pore size of NPSiT prepared by photo-electrochemical anodization method. The diameter of CNTs grown on different NPSiT corresponded to the pore diameter of NPSiT. FESEM images showed self-organized bundles of fiber-like structures of CNTs with diameter of around 20nm which were successfully grown directly on nanoporous silicon while raman spectra obtained ratio of ID/IG at 0.67.

  9. Wheel Diameter and Speedometer Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Clifton

    2010-01-01

    Most introductory physics students have seen vehicles with nonstandard wheel diameters; some may themselves drive "low-rider" cars or "big-wheel" pickup trucks. But how does changing wheel diameter affect speedometer readout for a given speed? Deriving the answer can be followed readily by students who have been introduced to rotation, and it…

  10. Magnetic interactions in ferromagnetic manganite nanotubes of different diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiale, J.; Sánchez, R. D.; Troiani, H. E.; Leyva, A. G.; Levy, P.

    2007-10-01

    In this work we present a magnetic study of La 0.67Sr 0.33MnO 3 (LSMO) and La 0.67Ca 0.33MnO 3 (LCMO) nanotubes with nominal external diameters ( ϕ) of 100, 200, 600 and 800 nm. The 800 nm diameter nanotubes have walls of around 50 nm thickness in all the cases. The walls are constituted by an assembly of nanoparticles with a non-Gaussian size distribution presenting a maximum at 24 ± 6 nm (LSMO) and 25 ± 8 nm (LCMO). We carried out isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) and dc demagnetization (DCD) experiments. We determined that the crystallites are single magnetic domains with a magnetic dead layer on the surface which avoids exchange interactions among grains. We conclude that the dominating interactions are of dipolar type of the same magnitude for all the samples.

  11. Diameter Control and Photoluminescence of ZnO Nanorods from Trialkylamines

    DOE PAGES

    Andelman, Tamar; Gong, Yinyan; Neumark, Gertrude; ...

    2007-01-01

    A novel solution method to control the diameter of ZnO nanorods is reported. Small diameter (2-3 nm) nanorods were synthesized from trihexylamine, and large diameter (50–80 nm) nanorods were synthesized by increasing the alkyl chain length to tridodecylamine. The defect (green) emission of the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the nanorods varies with diameter, and can thus be controlled by the diameter control. The small ZnO nanorods have strong green emission, while the large diameter nanorods exhibit a remarkably suppressed green band. We show that this observation supports surface oxygen vacancies as the defect that gives rise to the green emission.

  12. Fiber diameter control in electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanyan, R.; Subbotin, A.; Cuperus, L.; Boonen, P.; Dorschu, M.; Oosterlinck, F.; Bulters, M.

    2014-10-01

    A simple model is proposed to predict the fiber diameter in electrospinning. We show that the terminal diameter is determined by the kinetics of the jet elongation—under the influence of the electric and viscous forces—and the solvent evaporation. Numerical and simple scaling analyses are performed, predicting the fiber diameter to scale as a power 1/3 of viscosity and 2/3 of polymer solution throughput divided by electrical current. Model predictions show a good agreement to our own electrospinning experiments on polyamide-6 solutions as well as to the data available in the literature.

  13. Sub-10 nm nanopantography

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Siyuan Donnelly, Vincent M. E-mail: economou@uh.edu; Economou, Demetre J. E-mail: economou@uh.edu; Ruchhoeft, Paul

    2015-11-09

    Nanopantography, a massively parallel nanopatterning method over large areas, was previously shown to be capable of printing 10 nm features in silicon, using an array of 1000 nm-diameter electrostatic lenses, fabricated on the substrate, to focus beamlets of a broad area ion beam on selected regions of the substrate. In the present study, using lens dimensional scaling optimized by computer simulation, and reduction in the ion beam image size and energy dispersion, the resolution of nanopantography was dramatically improved, allowing features as small as 3 nm to be etched into Si.

  14. Wheel Diameter and Speedometer Reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Clifton

    2010-09-01

    Most introductory physics students have seen vehicles with nonstandard wheel diameters; some may themselves drive "low-rider" cars or "big-wheel" pickup trucks. But how does changing wheel diameter affect speedometer readout for a given speed? Deriving the answer can be followed readily by students who have been introduced to rotation, and it makes a good illustration of how reasoning in physics can lead to a result that is useful outside the classroom.

  15. Diameter-dependent hydrophobicity in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyakuno, Haruka; Fukasawa, Mamoru; Ichimura, Ryota; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Nakai, Yusuke; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Saito, Takeshi; Maniwa, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are a good model system that provides atomically smooth nanocavities. It has been reported that water-SWCNTs exhibit hydrophobicity depending on the temperature T and the SWCNT diameter D. SWCNTs adsorb water molecules spontaneously in their cylindrical pores around room temperature, whereas they exhibit a hydrophilic-hydrophobic transition or wet-dry transition (WDT) at a critical temperature Twd ≈ 220-230 K and above a critical diameter Dc ≈ 1.4-1.6 nm. However, details of the WDT phenomenon and its mechanism remain unknown. Here, we report a systematic experimental study involving X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that water molecules inside thick SWCNTs (D > Dc) evaporate and condense into ice Ih outside the SWCNTs at Twd upon cooling, and the ice Ih evaporates and condenses inside the SWCNTs upon heating. On the other hand, residual water trapped inside the SWCNTs below Twd freezes. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that upon lowering T, the hydrophobicity of thick SWCNTs increases without any structural transition, while the water inside thin SWCNTs (D < Dc) exhibits a structural transition, forming an ordered ice. This ice has a well-developed hydrogen bonding network adapting to the cylindrical pores of the SWCNTs. Thus, the unusual diameter dependence of the WDT is attributed to the adaptability of the structure of water to the pore dimension and shape.

  16. Stellar diameters and temperatures. IV. Predicting stellar angular diameters

    SciTech Connect

    Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Van Belle, Gerard; Von Braun, Kaspar

    2014-03-01

    The number of stellar angular diameter measurements has greatly increased over the past few years due to innovations and developments in the field of long baseline optical interferometry. We use a collection of high-precision angular diameter measurements for nearby, main-sequence stars to develop empirical relations that allow the prediction of stellar angular sizes as a function of observed photometric color. These relations are presented for a combination of 48 broadband color indices. We empirically show for the first time a dependence on metallicity of these relations using Johnson (B – V) and Sloan (g – r) colors. Our relations are capable of predicting diameters with a random error of less than 5% and represent the most robust and empirical determinations of stellar angular sizes to date.

  17. Optical Fiber Geometry: Accurate Measurement of Cladding Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Young, Matt; Hale, Paul D.; Mechels, Steven E.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed three instruments for accurate measurement of optieal fiber cladding diameter: a contact micrometer, a scanning confocal microscope, and a white-light interference microscope. Each instrument has an estimated uncertainty (3 standard deviations) of 50 nm or less, but the confocal microscope may display a 20 nm systematic error as well. The micrometer is used to generate Standard Reference Materials that are commercially available. PMID:28053467

  18. Superresolution measurement of nanofiber diameter by modes beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, E. F.; Solano, P.; Hoffman, J. E.; Orozco, L. A.; Rolston, S. L.; Fatemi, F. K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanofibers are becoming an important tool in quantum information technologies for coupling photonics systems to atomic systems. Nondestructive techniques for characterizing these nanofibers prior to integration into an apparatus are desirable. In this work, we probe the light propagating in a fused silica optical nanofiber (750-nm-diameter) by coupling it evanescently to a 6- μm-diameter microfiber that is scanned along the nanofiber length. This technique is capable of observing all possible beat lengths among different propagating modes. The beat lengths are strongly dependent on the nanofiber diameter and refractive index of the fiber. The steep dependence has enabled measurements of the fiber diameter with sub-Angstrom sensitivity. The diameter extracted from the beat length measurements agrees with a measurement made using scanning electron microscopy. Work supported by NSF.

  19. Diameter-driven crossover in resistive behaviour of heavily doped self-seeded germanium nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Connaughton, Stephen; Koleśnik-Gray, Maria; Hobbs, Richard; Lotty, Olan; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-01-01

    Summary The dependence of the resistivity with changing diameter of heavily-doped self-seeded germanium nanowires was studied for the diameter range 40 to 11 nm. The experimental data reveal an initial strong reduction of the resistivity with diameter decrease. At about 20 nm a region of slowly varying resistivity emerges with a peak feature around 14 nm. For diameters above 20 nm, nanowires were found to be describable by classical means. For smaller diameters a quantum-based approach was required where we employed the 1D Kubo–Greenwood framework and also revealed the dominant charge carriers to be heavy holes. For both regimes the theoretical results and experimental data agree qualitatively well assuming a spatial spreading of the free holes towards the nanowire centre upon diameter reduction. PMID:27826502

  20. Nanofiber alignment of a small diameter elastic electrospun scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Jignesh

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in western countries with coronary heart disease making up 50% of these deaths. As a treatment option, tissue engineered grafts have great potential. Elastic scaffolds that mimic arterial extracellular matrix (ECM) may hold the key to creating viable vascular grafts. Electrospinning is a widely used scaffold fabrication technique to engineer tubular scaffolds. In this study, we investigated how the collector rotation speed altered the nanofiber alignment which may improve mechanical characteristics making the scaffold more suitable for arterial grafts. The scaffold was fabricated from a blend of PCL/Elastin. 2D Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) image processing tool and MatLab were used to quantitatively analyze nanofiber orientation at different collector speeds (13500 to 15500 rpm). Both Image J and MatLab showed graphical peaks indicating predominant fiber orientation angles. A collector speed of 15000 rpm was found to produce the best nanofiber alignment with narrow peaks at 90 and 270 degrees, and a relative amplitude of 200. This indicates a narrow distribution of circumferentially aligned nanofibers. Collector speeds below and above 15000 rpm caused a decrease in fiber alignment with a broader orientation distribution. Uniformity of fiber diameter was also measured. Of 600 measures from the 15000 rpm scaffolds, the fiber diameter range from 500 nm to 899 nm was most prevalent. This diameter range was slightly larger than native ECM which ranges from 50 nm to 500 nm. The second most prevalent diameter range had an average of 404 nm which is within the diameter range of collagen. This study concluded that with proper electrospinning technique and collector speed, it is possible to fabricate highly aligned small diameter elastic scaffolds. Image J 2D FFT results confirmed MatLab findings for the analyses of circumferentially aligned nanofibers. In addition, MatLab analyses simplified the FFT orientation data

  1. High voltage variable diameter insulator

    DOEpatents

    Vanacek, D.L.; Pike, C.D.

    1982-07-13

    A high voltage feedthrough assembly having a tubular insulator extending between the ground plane ring and the high voltage ring. The insulator is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring to the high voltage ring, producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall of the insulator to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly.

  2. Large-diameter astromast development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    The 15-m-long by 0.75-diameter deployable supermast was delivered. The performance characteristics, design parameters, and developmental work associated with this mast are described. The main differences, besides the length of these two mast sections, are a change in the longeron material (the principal structural member) to a circular cross section and the incorporation of a lanyard-bridle system which makes unaided deployment and retraction possible in zero gravity.

  3. High voltage variable diameter insulator

    DOEpatents

    Vanecek, David L.; Pike, Chester D.

    1984-01-01

    A high voltage feedthrough assembly (10) having a tubular insulator (15) extending between the ground plane ring (16) and the high voltage ring (30). The insulator (15) is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring (16) to the high voltage ring (30), producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall (27) of the insulator (15) to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly (10).

  4. 7 CFR 51.2934 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2934 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest diameter, measured through the center of the apricot, at right angles to a...

  5. 7 CFR 51.2934 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2934 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest diameter, measured through the center of the apricot, at right angles to a line running from the stem to the...

  6. 7 CFR 51.2934 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2934 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest diameter, measured through the center of the apricot, at right angles to a line running from the stem to the...

  7. 7 CFR 51.2934 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2934 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest diameter, measured through the center of the apricot, at right angles to a line running from the stem to the...

  8. 7 CFR 51.2934 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2934 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest diameter, measured through the center of the apricot, at right angles to a...

  9. Tailoring of Magnetic Easy Axis of Nickel Nanowires by Varying Diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Sidra; Sharif, Rehana; Shah, Zaheer Hussain

    2016-03-01

    Anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) templates with an average diameter of D1˜20nm and D2˜200nm are synthesized by two-step anodization. Nickel nanowires are fabricated by AC electro deposition with less microstructure defects at low voltage in AAO templates. Magnetic properties of compact nickel (Ni) nanowires show that easy axis is parallel to nanowire axis for diameter D1˜20nm while by varying diameter from D1˜20nm to D2˜200nm, easy axis shifts to perpendicular direction of nanowire axis. This shifting of magnetic easy axis from parallel to perpendicular direction is mainly due to shape anisotropy and interactive fields between the wires. The competition between shape anisotropy (due to individual wire) and interactive fields by varying diameter of nanowires could result in tailoring of the direction of magnetic easy axis of nanowires.

  10. Diameter dependent electron transfer kinetics in semiconductor-enzyme complexes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Katherine A; Song, Qing; Mulder, David W; King, Paul W

    2014-10-28

    Excited state electron transfer (ET) is a fundamental step for the catalytic conversion of solar energy into chemical energy. To understand the properties controlling ET between photoexcited nanoparticles and catalysts, the ET kinetics were measured for solution-phase complexes of CdTe quantum dots and Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase I (CaI) using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Over a 2.0-3.5 nm diameter range of CdTe nanoparticles, the observed ET rate (kET) was sensitive to CaI concentration. To account for diameter effects on CaI binding, a Langmuir isotherm and two geometric binding models were created to estimate maximal CaI affinities and coverages at saturating concentrations. Normalizing the ET kinetics to CaI surface coverage for each CdTe diameter led to k(ET) values that were insensitive to diameter, despite a decrease in the free energy for photoexcited ET (ΔGET) with increasing diameter. The turnover frequency (TOF) of CaI in CdTe-CaI complexes was measured at several molar ratios. Normalization for diameter-dependent changes in CaI coverage showed an increase in TOF with diameter. These results suggest that k(ET) and H2 production for CdTe-CaI complexes are not strictly controlled by ΔG(ET) and that other factors must be considered.

  11. Albuquerque, NM, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Albuquerque, NM (35.0N, 106.5W) is situated on the edge of the Rio Grande River and flood plain which cuts across the image. The reddish brown surface of the Albuquerque Basin is a fault depression filled with ancient alluvial fan and lake bed sediments. On the slopes of the Manzano Mountains to the east of Albuquerque, juniper and other timber of the Cibola National Forest can be seen as contrasting dark tones of vegetation.

  12. Theory and applications of surface energy transfer for 2-20 nm diameter metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riskowski, Ryan A.

    The development and experimental validation of a mathematical model for nanoparticle-based surface energy transfer (SET) between gold nanoparticles and fluorescent dye labels, has enabled biophysical studies of nucleic acid structure and function previously inaccessible by other methods. The main advantages of SET for optical distance measurements are that it can operate over longer distances than other similar methods, such as Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), thus enabling measurements across biological structures much larger than otherwise possible. This work discusses the fundamental theory for the SET interaction and expansion of SET theory to account for multiple interacting dye labels and demonstrated on DNA and RNA in order to allow 3D triangulation of labeled structures. SET theory has also been expanded to core shell structures which represent a new class of designer SET platforms with dramatically increased spectral windows; allowing for a multitude of dye labels to be used simultaneously over a broad range of wavelengths. Additionally, these designer nanostructures can incorporate the material properties of the core. So that , for example Ni Au, can provide a SET measurement platform coupled with a magnetic moment for sample purification and manipulation. These efforts to develop and establish optical SET methods lays a foundation of a powerful methodology for biophysical characterization, and allows researchers to study biological structures previously too large or complex to be easily studied, such as the unknown tertiary structures of large RNA elements.

  13. Promotion of Water Channels for Enhanced Ion Transport in 14 nm Diameter Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jiadong; Zhu, Qi; Zeng, Xian; Yang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2017-03-29

    Ion transport plays an important role in solar-to-electricity conversion, drug delivery, and a variety of biological processes. Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a promising material as an ion transporter in the applications of the mimicking of natural ion channels, desalination, and energy harvesting. Here, we demonstrate a unique, enhanced ion transport through a vertically aligned multiwall CNT membrane after the application of an electric potential across CNT membranes. Interestingly, electrowetting arising from the application of an electric potential is critical for the enhancement of overall ion transport rate through CNT membranes. The wettability of a liquid with high surface tension on the interior channel walls of CNTs increases during an electric potential treatment and promotes the formation of water channels in CNTs. The formation of water channels in CNTs induces an increase in overall ion diffusion through CNT membranes. This phenomenon is also related to a decrease in the charge transfer resistance of CNTs (Rct) after an electric potential is applied. Correspondingly, the enhanced ion flow rate gives rise to an enhancement in the capacitive performance of CNT based membranes. Our observations might have profound impact on the development of CNT based energy storage devices as well as artificial ion channels.

  14. Thin boron nitride nanotubes with unusual large inner diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Renzhi; Bando, Yoshio; Sato, Tadao; Kurashima, Keiji

    2001-12-01

    BN nanotubes, displaying the characteristics of few concentric layers (2-6 layers) but unusual large inner diameters (ranging from 8 to more than 10 nm), are synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method on α-Al 2O 3 micrometer-range particles. The inner diameters are at least 5 nm larger than the previously reported BN nanotubes of similar layers. Some BN nanotubes are observed to be filled with B-N-O-based amorphous materials. Crystalline core fillings (in the form of boron carbide nanorods) were also discovered. The discussions suggested that the CVD growth behavior of BN nanotubes may be closely dependent on the underlying substrates, which may be helpful to the possible rational synthesis of BN nanotubes.

  15. Interferometric Measurement of the Diameters of Fused Quartz Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Shoichi

    1981-12-01

    This paper describes a method for the interferometric measurement of the diameter of a fused quartz sphere with Fabry-Perot etalon. Interference fringes are produced by laser radiation reflected from each surface of the etalon and the adjacent surface of the sphere and then their gaps are measured. The diameter of the sphere is derived by subtracting the two gaps from the plate separation of the etalon. Several lines from a free-running He-Se laser are used as the light sources for the exact fraction method together with the 633 nm line of a Lamb-dip stabilized He-Ne laser. The effects of fringe distortion, caused by laser radiation reflected from the other surface of the transparent sphere, are eliminated by placing a small circular stop at the image point of the light source. Experiments have shown that the precision of measurement of the diameter is about ± 0.16 ppm at 95% confidence interval.

  16. Diameter dependent thermoelectric properties of individual SnTe nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, E. Z.; Li, Z.; Martinez, J. A.; ...

    2015-01-15

    The lead-free compound tin telluride (SnTe) has recently been suggested to be a promising thermoelectric material. In this work, we report on the first thermoelectric study of individual single-crystalline SnTe nanowires with different diameters ranging from ~ 218 to ~ 913 nm. Measurements of thermopower S, electrical conductivity σ and thermal conductivity κ were carried out on the same nanowires over a temperature range of 25 - 300 K. While the electrical conductivity does not show a strong diameter dependence, the thermopower increases by a factor of two when the nanowire diameter is decreased from ~ 913 nm to ~more » 218 nm. The thermal conductivity of the measured NWs is lower than that of the bulk SnTe, which may arise from the enhanced phonon - surface boundary scattering and phonon-defect scattering. Lastly, temperature dependent figure of merit ZT was determined for individual nanowires and the achieved maximum value at room temperature is about three times higher than that in bulk samples of comparable carrier density.« less

  17. Diameter dependent thermoelectric properties of individual SnTe nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, E. Z.; Li, Z.; Martinez, J. A.; Sinitsyn, N.; Htoon, H.; Li, Nan; Swartzentruber, B.; Hollingsworth, J. A.; Wang, Jian; Zhang, S. X.

    2015-01-15

    The lead-free compound tin telluride (SnTe) has recently been suggested to be a promising thermoelectric material. In this work, we report on the first thermoelectric study of individual single-crystalline SnTe nanowires with different diameters ranging from ~ 218 to ~ 913 nm. Measurements of thermopower S, electrical conductivity σ and thermal conductivity κ were carried out on the same nanowires over a temperature range of 25 - 300 K. While the electrical conductivity does not show a strong diameter dependence, the thermopower increases by a factor of two when the nanowire diameter is decreased from ~ 913 nm to ~ 218 nm. The thermal conductivity of the measured NWs is lower than that of the bulk SnTe, which may arise from the enhanced phonon - surface boundary scattering and phonon-defect scattering. Lastly, temperature dependent figure of merit ZT was determined for individual nanowires and the achieved maximum value at room temperature is about three times higher than that in bulk samples of comparable carrier density.

  18. Diameter dependent thermoelectric properties of individual SnTe nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, E. Z.; Li, Z.; Martinez, J. A.; ...

    2015-01-15

    The lead-free compound tin telluride (SnTe) has recently been suggested to be a potentially promising thermoelectric material because of its similar electronic band structure as the well-known lead telluride. Here we report on the first thermoelectric study of individual single crystalline SnTe nanowires (NWs) with different diameters ranging from ~200 to ~1000 nm. Measurements of thermopower S, electrical conductivity σ, and thermal conductivity κ were carried out on the same nanowires over a temperature range of 25 - 300 K. While σ does not show a strong diameter dependence, the thermopower increases by a factor of 2 when the nanowiremore » diameter is decreased from 1000 nm to 200 nm. The thermal conductivities of the measured NWs are only about half of that of the bulk SnTe, which may arise from the enhanced phonon-grain boundary and phonon-defect scatterings. Temperature dependent figure-of-merit ZT was determined and the maximum value at room temperature is ~3 times higher than what was obtained in bulk samples of comparable carrier density.« less

  19. Multi-watt 589nm fiber laser source

    SciTech Connect

    DAWSON, J W; DROBSHOFF, A D; BEACH, R J; MESSERLY, M J; PAYNE, S A; BROWN, A; PENNINGTON, D M; BAMFORD, D J; SHARPE, S J; COOK, D J

    2006-01-19

    We have demonstrated 3.5W of 589nm light from a fiber laser using periodically poled stoichiometric Lithium Tantalate (PPSLT) as the frequency conversion crystal. The system employs 938nm and 1583nm fiber lasers, which were sum-frequency mixed in PPSLT to generate 589nm light. The 938nm fiber laser consists of a single frequency diode laser master oscillator (200mW), which was amplified in two stages to >15W using cladding pumped Nd{sup 3+} fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifiers operate at 938nm and minimize amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing a specialty fiber design, which maximizes the core size relative to the cladding diameter. This design allows the 3-level laser system to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the competing 1088nm 4-level laser transition. At 15W, the 938nm laser has an M{sup 2} of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >15:1). The 1583nm fiber laser consists of a Koheras 1583nm fiber DFB laser that is pre-amplified to 100mW, phase modulated and then amplified to 14W in a commercial IPG fiber amplifier. As a part of our research efforts we are also investigating pulsed laser formats and power scaling of the 589nm system. We will discuss the fiber laser design and operation as well as our results in power scaling at 589nm.

  20. Multi-watt 589nm fiber laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Jay W.; Drobshoff, Alex D.; Beach, Raymond J.; Messerly, Michael J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Brown, Aaron; Pennington, Deanna M.; Bamford, Douglas J.; Sharpe, Scott J.; Cook, David J.

    2006-02-01

    We have demonstrated 3.5W of 589nm light from a fiber laser using periodically poled stoichio-metric Lithium Tantalate (PPSLT) as the frequency conversion crystal. The system employs 938nm and 1583nm fiber lasers, which were sum-frequency mixed in PPSLT to generate 589nm light. The 938nm fiber laser consists of a single frequency diode laser master oscillator (200mW), which was amplified in two stages to >15W using cladding pumped Nd 3+ fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifiers operate at 938nm and minimize amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing a specialty fiber design, which maximizes the core size relative to the cladding diameter. This design allows the 3-level laser system to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the 1088nm 4-level laser transition. At 15W, the 938nm laser has an M2 of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >15:1). The 1583nm fiber laser consists of a Koheras 1583nm fiber DFB laser that is pre-amplified to 100mW, phase modulated and then amplified to 14W in a commercial IPG fiber amplifier. As a part of our research efforts we are also investigating pulsed laser formats and power scaling of the 589nm system. We will discuss the fiber laser design and operation as well as our results in power scaling at 589nm.

  1. Vertically aligned crystalline silicon nanowires with controlled diameters for energy conversion applications: Experimental and theoretical insights

    SciTech Connect

    Razek, Sara Abdel; Swillam, Mohamed A.; Allam, Nageh K.

    2014-05-21

    Vertically orientated single crystalline silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays with controlled diameters are fabricated via a metal-assisted chemical etching method. The diameter of the fabricated nanowires is controlled by simply varying the etching time in HF/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} electrolytes. The fabricated SiNWs have diameters ranging from 117 to 650 nm and lengths from 8 to 18 μm. The optical measurements showed a significant difference in the reflectance/absorption of the SiNWs with different diameters, where the reflectance increases with increasing the diameter of the SiNWs. The SiNWs showed significant photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra with peaks lying between 380 and 670 nm. The PL intensity increases as the diameter increases and shows red shift for peaks at ∼670 nm. The increase or decrease of reflectivity is coincident with PL intensity at wavelength ∼660 nm. The x-ray diffraction patterns confirm the high crystallinity of the fabricated SiNWs. In addition, the Raman spectra showed a shift in the first order transverse band toward lower frequencies compared to that usually seen for c-Si. Finite difference time domain simulations have been performed to confirm the effect of change of diameter on the optical properties of the nanowires. The simulation results showed good agreement with the experimental results for the SiNWs of different diameters.

  2. Biosensing using plasmonic nanohole arrays with small, homogenous and tunable aperture diameters.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Kunli; Emilsson, Gustav; Dahlin, Andreas B

    2016-06-21

    Plasmonic nanohole arrays are widely used for optical label-free molecular detection. An important factor for many applications is the diameter of the apertures. So far nanohole arrays with controllable diameters below 100 nm have not been demonstrated and it has not been systematically investigated how the diameter influences the optical properties. In this work we fine-tune the diameter in short range ordered nanohole arrays down to 50 nm. The experimental far field spectra show how the wavelength of maximum extinction remains unaffected while the transmission maximum blue shifts with smaller diameters. The near field is visualized by numerical simulations, showing a homogenous enhancement throughout the cylindrical void at the transmission maximum for diameters between 50 and 100 nm. For diameters below 50 nm plasmon excitation is no longer possible experimentally or by simulations. Further, we investigate the refractive index sensing capabilities of the smaller holes. As the diameter was reduced, the sensitivity in terms of resonance shift with bulk liquid refractive index was found to be unaltered. However, for the transmission maximum the sensitivity becomes more strongly localized to the hole interior. By directing molecular binding to the bottom of the holes we demonstrate how smaller holes enhance the sensitivity in terms of signal per molecule. A real-time detection limit well below one protein per nanohole is demonstrated. The smaller plasmonic nanoholes should be suitable for studies of molecules confined in small volumes and as mimics of biological nanopores.

  3. Photoelectrochemical water splitting properties of hydrothermally-grown ZnO nanorods with controlled diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Eadi Sunil; Hong, Soon-Ku; Vo, Thanh Son; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Cho, Hyung Koun

    2015-01-01

    The effect of diameter change on photoelectrochemical water splitting was investigated in depth for ZnO nanorods. ZnO nanorods were grown on SiO2/Si and indium tin-oxide substrates by the hydrothermal growth method. By controlling the concentration ratio between zinc nitrate hexahydrate (ZNT) and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) nanorod diameters were changed from 45 to 275 nm, in which the diameter decreased with decreasing the ratio. Photoelectrochemical properties of ZnO nanorods with diameters from 45 to 255 nm were investigated under ultraviolet (UV) and visible light illumination. The maximum photoconversion efficiency of 45.3% was obtained from ZnO nanorods with 45 nm diameter under 365 nm UV light illumination. The photoconversion efficiency of 0.42% was obtained under Air Mass 1.5 Global simulated solar light illumination. Higher photoconversion efficiency for smaller diameter nanorods is attributed to the increase in the light absorption with decreasing the diameter that is confirmed by our simulation using finite-difference time domain. The length change of nanorods showed relatively negligible effects compared to the diameter change in our system.

  4. 7 CFR 51.2656 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2656 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest dimension measured at right angles to a line from the stem to the blossom end of the cherry....

  5. 7 CFR 51.587 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Diameter. 51.587 Section 51.587 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.587 Diameter. Diameter means... lowest outer branch to the base....

  6. 7 CFR 51.587 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Diameter. 51.587 Section 51.587 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.587 Diameter. Diameter means... lowest outer branch to the base....

  7. 7 CFR 51.587 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Diameter. 51.587 Section 51.587 Agriculture... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.587 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest dimension of the stalk measured at a point 2 inches above the point of attachment of the lowest outer branch to the base....

  8. 7 CFR 51.587 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Diameter. 51.587 Section 51.587 Agriculture... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.587 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest dimension of the stalk measured at a point 2 inches above the point of attachment of the lowest outer branch to the base....

  9. Diameter Dependent Thermoelectric Properties of Individual SnTe Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, E. Z.; Li, Z.; Martinez, J.; Sinitsyn, N.; Htoon, H.; Li, N.; Swartzentruber, B.; Hollingsworth, J.; Wang, J.; Zhang, S. X.

    2015-03-01

    Tin telluride (SnTe), a newly discovered topological crystalline insulator, has recently been suggested to be a promising thermoelectric material. In this work, we report on a systematic study of the thermoelectric properties of individual single-crystalline SnTe nanowires with different diameters. Measurements of thermopower, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity were carried out on the same nanowires over a temperature range of 25 - 300 K. While the electrical conductivity does not show a strong diameter dependence, we found that the thermopower increases by a factor of two when the nanowire diameter is decreased from 913 nm to 218 nm. The thermal conductivity of the measured NWs is lower than that of the bulk SnTe, which may be attributed to the enhanced phonon - surface boundary scattering and phonon-defect scattering. We further calculated the temperature dependent figure of merit ZT for each individual nanowire. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science by Los Alamos National Laboratory (Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396) and Sandia National Laboratories (Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000). We acknowledge support by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  10. Pupil Diameter Tracks Lapses of Attention

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Peter R.; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Our ability to sustain attention for prolonged periods of time is limited. Studies on the relationship between lapses of attention and psychophysiological markers of attentional state, such as pupil diameter, have yielded contradicting results. Here, we investigated the relationship between tonic fluctuations in pupil diameter and performance on a demanding sustained attention task. We found robust linear relationships between baseline pupil diameter and several measures of task performance, suggesting that attentional lapses tended to occur when pupil diameter was small. However, these observations were primarily driven by the joint effects of time-on-task on baseline pupil diameter and task performance. The linear relationships disappeared when we statistically controlled for time-on-task effects and were replaced by consistent inverted U-shaped relationships between baseline pupil diameter and each of the task performance measures, such that most false alarms and the longest and most variable response times occurred when pupil diameter was both relatively small and large. Finally, we observed strong linear relationships between the temporal derivative of pupil diameter and task performance measures, which were largely independent of time-on-task. Our results help to reconcile contradicting findings in the literature on pupil-linked changes in attentional state, and are consistent with the adaptive gain theory of locus coeruleus-norepinephrine function. Moreover, they suggest that the derivative of baseline pupil diameter is a potentially useful psychophysiological marker that could be used in the on-line prediction and prevention of attentional lapses. PMID:27768778

  11. Diameter Effect In Initiating Explosives, Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; Benterou, J.; Roeske, F.; Roos, E.

    2006-02-10

    The ability to safely machine small pieces of HE with the femtosecond laser allows diameter effect experiments to be performed in initiating explosives in order to study the failure diameter, the reduction of the detonation velocity and curvature versus the diameter. The reduced diameter configuration needs to be optimized, so that the detonation products of the first cylinder will not affect the measurement of the detonation velocity of the second cylinder with a streak camera. Different 2D axi-symmetrical configurations have been calculated to identify the best solution using the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for LX16 Pellet with Ls-Dyna.

  12. Large Diameter Shuttle Launched-AEM (LDSL-AEM) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A technical description of a Large Diameter Shuttle Launched-AEM (LDSL-AEM), an AEM base module adapted to carry 5 ft diameter payloads in the shuttle with propulsion for carrying payloads to higher altitude orbits from a 150 NM shuttle orbit, is described. The AEM is designed for launch on the scout launch vehicle. Onboard equipment provides capability to despin, acquire the earth, and control the vehicle in an earth pointing mode using reaction wheels for torque with magnets for all attitude acquisition, wheel desaturation, and nutation damping. Earth sensors in the wheels provide pitch and roll attitude. This system provides autonomous control capability to 1 degree in pitch and roll and 2 degrees in yaw. The attitude can be determined to .5 degrees in pitch and roll and 2 degrees in yaw.

  13. Aharonov—Bohm Oscillations in Small Diameter Bi Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopko, L.

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect (AB) exists in cylindrical wires as the magnetoresistance (MR) oscillations with a period ΔB that is proportional to Φ0 / S, where Φ0 = h / e is the flux quantum and S is the wire cross section. The AB-type longitudinal MR oscillations with period ΔB = Φ0 / S caused by electrons undergoing continuous grazing incidence at the wire wall have been observed previously at 4.2 K in single bismuth nanowires with a diameter 0. 2 < d < 0. 8 μm grown by the Ulitovsky technique. We present here our results of the observation of AB oscillations with period ΔB = h / e and ΔB = h / 2e on single Bi nanowires with a diameter d = 45-73 nm. The single nanowire samples were prepared by improved Ulitovsky technique and represented cylindrical single crystals with (1011) orientation along the wire axis. Due to very low effective masses of electrons and holes, electronic quantum confinement effects induce a semimetal-to-semiconductor transformation (SMSC) for wires with diameters below 50 nm. Our estimation of thermal energy gap from R(T) dependence for 50 nm Bi wire gives the value of 14 meV. The surface of Bi nanowire supports surface states, with carrier densities of around 5 ×1012 cm- 2 with strong spin-orbit interactions. From B ˜ 8 T down to B = 0, the extremums of h/2e oscillations are shifted up to 3π at B = 0, which is the manifestation of Berry phase shift. We connect the existence of h / 2e oscillations with weak localizations on surface states of Bi nanowires according to the Altshuller-Aronov-Spivak theory.

  14. Developing high coercivity in large diameter cobalt nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazer, A. H.; Ramazani, A.; Almasi Kashi, M.; Zavašnik, J.

    2016-11-01

    Regardless of the synthetic method, developing high magnetic coercivity in ferromagnetic nanowires (NWs) with large diameters has been a challenge over the past two decades. Here, we report on the synthesis of highly coercive cobalt NW arrays with diameters of 65 and 80 nm, which are embedded in porous anodic alumina templates with high-aspect-ratio pores. Using a modified electrochemical deposition method enabled us to reach room temperature coercivity and remanent ratio up to 3000 Oe and 0.70, respectively, for highly crystalline as-synthesized hcp cobalt NW arrays with a length of 8 μm. The first-order reversal curve (FORC) analysis showed the presence of both soft and hard magnetic phases along the length of the resulting NWs. To develop higher coercive fields, the length of the NWs was then gradually reduced in order from bottom to top, thereby reaching NW sections governed by the hard phase. Consequently, this resulted in record high coercivities of 4200 and 3850 Oe at NW diameters of 65 and 80 nm, respectively. In this case, the FORC diagrams confirmed a significant reduction in interactions between the magnetic phases of the remaining sections of NWs. At this stage, x-ray diffraction (XRD) and dark-field transmission electron microscopy analyses indicated the formation of highly crystalline bamboo-like sections along the [0 0 2] direction during a progressive pulse-controlled electrochemical growth of NW arrays under optimized parameters. Our results both provide new insights into the growth process, crystalline characteristics and magnetic phases along the length of large diameter NW arrays and, furthermore, develop the performance of pure 3d transition magnetic NWs.

  15. Stellar angular diameters from occultation observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, B.-C.

    This paper reviews the history of measuring stellar angular diameters from lunar occultation observations and the techniques of data analysis. Several effects which can affect the results of measurement are discussed. The author finds that there may be systematic errors in angular diameters measured by various observatories for Aldebaran.

  16. Comparison of 980-nm and 1070-nm in endovenous laser treatment (EVLT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaloglu, Nermin; Tabakoglu, Ozgur; Ergenoglu, Mehmet U.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2009-07-01

    The use of endovenous laser treatment for varicose veins has been increasing in recent years. It is a safer technique than surgical vein stripping. Its complications (e.g. bruising, pain) are less than the complications of surgical vein stripping. But best parameters such as optimum wavelength, power, and application duration are still under investigation to clarify uncertainties about this technique. To prevent its complications and improve its clinical outcomes, the exact mechanism of it has to be known. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of different laser wavelengths on endovenous laser therapy. In this study 980-nm diode laser and 1070-nm fiber laser were used. Human veins were irradiated with 980-nm and 1070-nm lasers at 8 W and 10 W to find the optimal power and wavelength. After laser application, remarkable shrinkage was observed. Inner and outer diameters of the veins also narrowed for both of the laser types. 10 W of 980-nm laser application led to better shrinkage results.

  17. Measurement of wire diameter by optical diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodier, Soraya A.

    2004-02-01

    A combined interference and diffraction pattern, in the form of equidistant interference fringes, resulting from illuminating a vertical metallic wire by a laser beam is analyzed to measure the diameter of four standard wires. The diameters range from 170 to 450 μm. It is found that the error in the diameter measurements increases for small metallic wires and for small distances between the wire and the screen due to scattering effects. The intensity of the incident laser beam was controlled by a pair of sheet polaroids to minimize the scattered radiation. The used technique is highly sensitive, but requires controlled environmental conditions and absence of vibration effects. The expanded uncertainty for k=2 is calculated and found to decrease from U(D)=±1.45 μm for the wire of nominal diameter 170 μm to ±0.57 μm for the diameter 450 μm.

  18. Narrowing SWNT diameter distribution using size-separated ferritin-based Fe catalysts.

    PubMed

    Durrer, Lukas; Greenwald, Jason; Helbling, Thomas; Muoth, Matthias; Riek, Roland; Hierold, Christofer

    2009-09-02

    Sensors and devices made from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are most often electrically probed through metal leads contacting the semiconducting SWNTs (s-SWNTs). Contact barriers in general and Schottky barriers (SBs) in particular are usually obtained at a metal-semiconductor interface. The unique one-dimensional structure (1D) of SWNTs allows tailoring of the SB heights through the contact metal type and the size of the s-SWNT bandgap. A large workfunction reduces the SB height (e.g. using Pd as the metal contact material). The bandgap of an SWNT is inversely proportional to its diameter. Ohmic contacts--the preferable choice--are achieved for s-SWNTs with diameters greater than 2 nm on Pd metal leads. SWNT device reproducibility, on the other hand, requires a narrow distribution of the SWNT diameters. Here, we present a method to fabricate SWNTs with a large and adjustable mean diameter (1.9-2.4 nm) and very narrow diameter distribution (+/- 0.27 nm at mean diameter 1.9 nm). The results are achieved through a size separation of the ferritin catalyst particles by sedimentation velocity centrifugation prior to their use in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) formation of SWNTs.

  19. Impact of doping and diameter on the electrical properties of GaSb nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadi, Aein S.; Svensson, Johannes; Lind, Erik; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2017-01-01

    The effect of doping and diameter on the electrical properties of vapor-liquid-solid grown GaSb nanowires was characterized using long channel back-gated lateral transistors and top-gated devices. The measurements showed that increasing the doping concentration significantly increases the conductivity while reducing the control over the channel potential and shifting the threshold voltage, as expected. The highest average mobility was 85 cm2/V.s measured for an unintentionally doped GaSb nanowire with a diameter of 45 nm, whereas medium doped nanowires with large diameters (81 nm) showed a value of 153 cm2/V.s. The mobility is found to be independent of nanowire diameter in the range of 36 nm-68 nm, while the resistivity is strongly reduced with increasing diameter attributed to the surface depletion of charge carriers. The data are in good agreement with an analytical calculation of the depletion depth. A high transconductance was achieved by scaling down the channel length to 200 nm, reaching a maximum value of 80 μS/μm for a top-gated GaSb nanowires transistor with an ON-resistance of 26 kΩ corresponding to 3.9 Ω.mm. The lowest contact resistance obtained was 0.35 Ω.mm for transistors with the highest doping concentration.

  20. Atomic layer deposition as pore diameter adjustment tool for nanoporous aluminum oxide injection molding masks.

    PubMed

    Miikkulainen, Ville; Rasilainen, Tiina; Puukilainen, Esa; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tapani A

    2008-05-06

    The wetting properties of polypropylene (PP) surfaces were modified by adjusting the dimensions of the surface nanostructure. The nanostructures were generated by injection molding with nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) as the mold insert. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of molybdenum nitride film was used to control the pore diameters of the AAO inserts. The original 50-nm pore diameter of AAO was adjusted by depositing films of thickness 5, 10, and 15 nm on AAO. Bis(tert-butylimido)-bis(dimethylamido)molybdenum and ammonia were used as precursors in deposition. The resulting pore diameters in the nitride-coated AAO inserts were 40, 30, and 20 nm, respectively. Injection molding of PP was conducted with the coated inserts, as well as with the non-coated insert. Besides the pore diameter, the injection mold temperature was varied with temperatures of 50, 70, and 90 degrees C tested. Water contact angles of PP casts were measured and compared with theoretical contact angles calculated from Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter theories. The highest contact angle, 140 degrees , was observed for PP molded with the AAO mold insert with 30-nm pore diameter. The Cassie-Baxter theory showed better fit than the Wenzel theory to the experimental values. With the optimal AAO mask, the nanofeatures in the molded PP pieces were 100 nm high. In explanation of this finding, it is suggested that some sticking and stretching of the nanofeatures occurs during the molding. Increase in the mold temperature increased the contact angle.

  1. Biofilm formation on a TiO2 nanotube with controlled pore diameter and surface wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitha, V. C.; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jintae; Narayan Banerjee, Arghya; Joo, Sang Woo; Min, Bong Ki

    2015-02-01

    Titania (TiO2) nanotube arrays (TNAs) with different pore diameters (140 - 20 nm) are fabricated via anodization using hydrofluoric acid (HF) containing ethylene glycol (EG) by changing the HF-to-EG volume ratio and the anodization voltage. To evaluate the effects of different pore diameters of TiO2 nanotubes on bacterial biofilm formation, Shewanella oneidensis (S. oneidensis) MR-1 cells and a crystal-violet biofilm assay are used. The surface roughness and wettability of the TNA surfaces as a function of pore diameter, measured via the contact angle and AFM techniques, are correlated with the controlled biofilm formation. Biofilm formation increases with the decreasing nanotube pore diameter, and a 20 nm TiO2 nanotube shows the maximum biofilm formation. The measurements revealed that 20 nm surfaces have the least hydrophilicity with the highest surface roughness of ˜17 nm and that they show almost a 90% increase in the effective surface area relative to the 140 nm TNAs, which stimulate the cells more effectively to produce the pili to attach to the surface for more biofilm formation. The results demonstrate that bacterial cell adhesion (and hence, biofilm formation) can effectively be controlled by tuning the roughness and wettability of TNAs via controlling the pore diameters of TNA surfaces. This biofilm formation as a function of the surface properties of TNAs can be a potential candidate for both medical applications and as electrodes in microbial fuel cells.

  2. Microbes make average 2 nanometer diameter crystalline UO2 particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Banfield, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    It is well known that phylogenetically diverse groups of microorganisms are capable of catalyzing the reduction of highly soluble U(VI) to highly insoluble U(IV), which rapidly precipitates as uraninite (UO2). Because biological uraninite is highly insoluble, microbial uranyl reduction is being intensively studied as the basis for a cost-effective in-situ bioremediation strategy. Previous studies have described UO2 biomineralization products as amorphous or poorly crystalline. The objective of this study is to characterize the nanocrystalline uraninite in detail in order to determine the particle size, crystallinity, and size-related structural characteristics, and to examine the implications of these for reoxidation and transport. In this study, we obtained U-contaminated sediment and water from an inactive U mine and incubated them anaerobically with nutrients to stimulate reductive precipitation of UO2 by indigenous anaerobic bacteria, mainly Gram-positive spore-forming Desulfosporosinus and Clostridium spp. as revealed by RNA-based phylogenetic analysis. Desulfosporosinus sp. was isolated from the sediment and UO2 was precipitated by this isolate from a simple solution that contains only U and electron donors. We characterized UO2 formed in both of the experiments by high resolution-TEM (HRTEM) and X-ray absorption fine structure analysis (XAFS). The results from HRTEM showed that both the pure and the mixed cultures of microorganisms precipitated around 1.5 - 3 nm crystalline UO2 particles. Some particles as small as around 1 nm could be imaged. Rare particles around 10 nm in diameter were also present. Particles adhere to cells and form colloidal aggregates with low fractal dimension. In some cases, coarsening by oriented attachment on \\{111\\} is evident. Our preliminary results from XAFS for the incubated U-contaminated sample also indicated an average diameter of UO2 of 2 nm. In nanoparticles, the U-U distance obtained by XAFS was 0.373 nm, 0.012 nm

  3. Measurement of 100 nm and 60 nm Particle Standards by Differential Mobility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mulholland, George W.; Donnelly, Michelle K.; Hagwood, Charles R.; Kukuck, Scott R.; Hackley, Vincent A.; Pui, David Y. H.

    2006-01-01

    The peak particle size and expanded uncertainties (95 % confidence interval) for two new particle calibration standards are measured as 101.8 nm ± 1.1 nm and 60.39 nm ± 0.63 nm. The particle samples are polystyrene spheres suspended in filtered, deionized water at a mass fraction of about 0.5 %. The size distribution measurements of aerosolized particles are made using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) system calibrated using SRM® 1963 (100.7 nm polystyrene spheres). An electrospray aerosol generator was used for generating the 60 nm aerosol to almost eliminate the generation of multiply charged dimers and trimers and to minimize the effect of non-volatile contaminants increasing the particle size. The testing for the homogeneity of the samples and for the presence of multimers using dynamic light scattering is described. The use of the transfer function integral in the calibration of the DMA is shown to reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of the peak particle size compared to the approach based on the peak in the concentration vs. voltage distribution. A modified aerosol/sheath inlet, recirculating sheath flow, a high ratio of sheath flow to the aerosol flow, and accurate pressure, temperature, and voltage measurements have increased the resolution and accuracy of the measurements. A significant consideration in the uncertainty analysis was the correlation between the slip correction of the calibration particle and the measured particle. Including the correlation reduced the expanded uncertainty from approximately 1.8 % of the particle size to about 1.0 %. The effect of non-volatile contaminants in the polystyrene suspensions on the peak particle size and the uncertainty in the size is determined. The full size distributions for both the 60 nm and 100 nm spheres are tabulated and selected mean sizes including the number mean diameter and the dynamic light scattering mean diameter are computed. The use of these particles for calibrating DMAs and for

  4. Fiber diameters control osteoblastic cell migration and differentiation in electrospun gelatin.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Kristin; Zhang, Chu; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Chase, D Bruce; Rabolt, John F

    2010-09-15

    Defined electrospinning conditions were used to create scaffolds with different fiber diameters to investigate their interactions with osteoblastic MG63 cells. Nonwoven gelatin scaffolds were electrospun with varied fiber diameters to investigate the effect of fiber size and resultant porosity on cell proliferation, viability, migration, and differentiation. The low toxicity solvent acetic acid:ethyl acetate:water ratio and gelatin concentrations were optimized to create small and large diameter fibers. The fiber diameters obtained by this procedure were 110 +/- 40 nm for the small and 600 +/- 110 nm for the large fibers. Cell viability assays showed that MG63 cells grew similarly on both fibers at the early time point (day 3) but preferred the scaffold with large diameter fibers by the later time points (day 5 and day 7). Confocal microscopic imaging showed that MG63 cells migrated poorly (maximum depth of 18 microm) into the scaffold of small diameter fibers, but readily penetrated (maximum depth of 50 microm) into the scaffold of large diameter fibers. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assays showed that MG63 cells differentiated on scaffolds made from both diameter fibers. In longer term experiments, MG63 cells differentiated to a greater extent on scaffolds made from small diameter fibers compared to large diameter fibers at days 3 and 7, but the ALP levels were the same for both diameter fibers by day 14. These results indicate that cells can perceive differences in the diameter and resultant pore size of electrospun gelatin fibers and that they process this information to alter their behavior.

  5. [Influence of direct electric current on hydrodynamic diameter of human serum albumin].

    PubMed

    Korpan, M I; Gorchev, V F; Chekman, I S; Gun'ko, V M; Fialko-Moser, V

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the weak electric current (2 mA/cm2) on structural characteristics (hydrodynamic diameter and molecular weight) of the human serum albumin (HSA) was studied using photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS). The average diameter of initial HSA globule is approximately 7 nm (66.8 kDa). After electric current treatment during 2-5 min the diameter of HSA monomer increases to 7.5 nm. The duration of electric current treatment being increased to 20 min the size of HSA monomers decreases to 6.4 nm. The behaviour of HSA oligomers is close to that of monomers. Consequently, changes in the sizes of monomers and oligomers of HSA under the electric current treatment are caused by the change in the charge density stimulating change of tertiary structure of molecules and possible addition of ions from the buffer solution to them.

  6. Impact Structures: What Does Crater Diameter Mean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turtle, E. P.; Pierazzo, E.; Collins, G. S.; Osinski, G. R.; Melosh, H. J.; Morgan, J. V.; Reimold, W. U.; Spray, J. G.

    2004-03-01

    Crater diameter is an important parameter in energy scaling and impact simulations. However, disparate types of data make the use of consistent metrics difficult. We suggest a consistent terminology and discuss it in the context of several examples.

  7. Growth of nanostructures with controlled diameter

    DOEpatents

    Pfefferle, Lisa; Haller, Gary; Ciuparu, Dragos

    2009-02-03

    Transition metal-substituted MCM-41 framework structures with a high degree of structural order and a narrow pore diameter distribution were reproducibly synthesized by a hydrothermal method using a surfactant and an anti-foaming agent. The pore size and the mesoporous volume depend linearly on the surfactant chain length. The transition metals, such as cobalt, are incorporated substitutionally and highly dispersed in the silica framework. Single wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow diameter distribution that correlates with the pore diameter of the catalytic framework structure were prepared by a Boudouard reaction. Nanostructures with a specified diameter or cross-sectional area can therefore be predictably prepared by selecting a suitable pore size of the framework structure.

  8. The Effect of PVAc Solution Viscosity on Diameter of PVAc Nanofibres Prepared by Technology of Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petras, David; Slobodian, Petr; Pavlínek, Vladimír; Sáha, Petr; Kimmer, Dušan

    2011-07-01

    Polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) nanofibers were prepared by technology of electrospinning with help of multi-jets electrospinning machine from acetic acid/water solvent system. The stability of the process was tested in a broad concentration region from 5 to 40 wt. % of PVAc. The main attention was carried out to study the effect of polyvinyl acetate solution concentration/viscosity onto mean diameter of prepared nanofibers. It was found that increased solution viscosity leads to increase of fibers diameters from appox. 60 nm at viscosity ˜0.04 Pa.s to appox. 1000 nm at viscosity ˜6-7 Pa.s. The PVAc nanofibres can be considered as a potential precursor for preparation of inorganic fibrous nanoparticles. Their dimensions can be effectively controlled by PVAc nanofibers diameter by easy diameter-concentration/viscosity optimalization.

  9. Variation of the diameter of the Sun as measured by the Solar Disk Sextant (SDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, S.; Girard, T. M.; Sofia, U. J.; Twigg, L.; Heaps, W.; Thuillier, G.

    2013-12-01

    The balloon-borne Solar Disk Sextant (SDS) experiment has measured the angular size of the Sun on seven occasions spanning the years 1992 to 2011. The solar half-diameter - observed in a 100 nm wide passband centred at 615 nm - is found to vary over that period by up to 200 mas, while the typical estimated uncertainty of each measure is 20 mas. The diameter variation is not in phase with the solar activity cycle; thus, the measured diameter variation cannot be explained as an observational artefact of surface activity. Other possible instrument-related explanations for the observed variation are considered but found unlikely, leading us to conclude that the variation is real. The SDS is described here in detail, as is the complete analysis procedure necessary to calibrate the instrument and allow comparison of diameter measures across decades.

  10. Variation of the Diameter of the Sun as Measured by the Solar Disk Sextant (SDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Terrence; Sofia, S.; Sofia, U. J.; Twigg, L. W.; Heaps, W.; Thuillier, G.

    2014-01-01

    The balloon-borne Solar Disk Sextant (SDS) experiment has measured the angular size of the Sun on seven occasions spanning the years 1992 to 2011. The solar half-diameter -- observed in a 100-nm wide passband centered at 615 nm -- is found to vary over that period by up to 200 mas, while the typical estimated uncertainty of each measure is 20 mas. The diameter variation is not in phase with the solar activity cycle; thus, the measured diameter variation cannot be explained as an observational artifact of surface activity. Other possible instrument-related explanations for the observed variation are considered and found unlikely, leading us to conclude that the variation is real. The SDS and its results are presented here, including the analysis procedure necessary to calibrate the instrument and allow comparison of diameter measures across decades.

  11. Diameter of titanium nanotubes influences anti-bacterial efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercan, Batur; Taylor, Erik; Alpaslan, Ece; Webster, Thomas J.

    2011-07-01

    Bacterial infection of in-dwelling medical devices is a growing problem that cannot be treated by traditional antibiotics due to the increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation. Here, due to changes in surface parameters, it is proposed that bacterial adhesion can be prevented through nanosurface modifications of the medical device alone. Toward this goal, titanium was created to possess nanotubular surface topographies of highly controlled diameters of 20, 40, 60, or 80 nm, sometimes followed by heat treatment to control chemistry and crystallinity, through a novel anodization process. For the first time it was found that through the control of Ti surface parameters including chemistry, crystallinity, nanotube size, and hydrophilicity, significantly changed responses of both Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus (pathogens relevant for orthopaedic and other medical device related infections) were measured. Specifically, heat treatment of 80 nm diameter titanium tubes produced the most robust antimicrobial effect of all surface treatment parameters tested. This study provides the first step toward understanding the surface properties of nano-structured titanium that improve tissue growth (as has been previously observed with nanotubular titanium), while simultaneously reducing infection without the use of pharmaceutical drugs.

  12. Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, E.D.; Hooper, F.M.; Reichenbach, M.L.

    1992-08-11

    A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut. 1 figure.

  13. Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, Eldon D.; Hooper, Frederick M.; Reichenbach, Marvin L.

    1992-01-01

    A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut.

  14. Controlling the Fiber Diameter during Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridrikh, Sergey V.; Yu, Jian H.; Brenner, Michael P.; Rutledge, Gregory C.

    2003-04-01

    We present a simple analytical model for the forces that determine jet diameter during electrospinning as a function of surface tension, flow rate, and electric current in the jet. The model predicts the existence of a terminal jet diameter, beyond which further thinning of the jet due to growth of the whipping instability does not occur. Experimental data for various electrospun fibers attest to the accuracy of the model.

  15. Making Jointless Dual-Diameter Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Kathleen E.

    1989-01-01

    Welds between sections having different diameters eliminated. Single tube made with integral tapered transition section between straight sections of different diameters and wall thicknesses. Made from single piece; contains no joints, welded or otherwise. Not prone to such weld defects as voids and need not be inspected for them. Tube fabricated by either of two methods: drawing or reduction. Both methods used to fabricate tubes of 316L corrosion-resistant stainless steel for use as heat-exchanger coil.

  16. Large diameter carbon-boron fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veltri, R. D.; Jacob, B. A.; Galasso, F. S.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations concerned with a development of large-diameter carbon fibers are considered, taking into account the employment of vapor deposition techniques. In the experiments a carbon monofilament substrate is used together with reacting gases which consist of combinations of hydrogen, methane, and boron trichloride. It is found that the described approach can be used to obtain a large-diameter carbon filament containing boron. The filament has reasonable strength and modulus properties.

  17. Ultra-efficient Engine Diameter Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daggett, David L.; Brown, Stephen T.; Kawai, Ron T.

    2003-01-01

    Engine fan diameter and Bypass Ratio (BPR) optimization studies have been conducted since the beginning of the turbofan age with the recognition that reducing the engine core jet velocity and increasing fan mass flow rate generally increases propulsive efficiency. However, performance tradeoffs limit the amount of fan flow achievable without reducing airplane efficiency. This study identifies the optimum engine fan diameter and BPR, given the advanced Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) powerplant efficiencies, for use on an advanced subsonic airframe. Engine diameter studies have historically focused on specific engine size options, and were limited by existing technology and transportation infrastructure (e.g., ability to fit bare engines through aircraft doors and into cargo holds). This study is unique in defining the optimum fan diameter and drivers for future 2015 (UEET) powerplants while not limiting engine fan diameter by external constraints. This report follows on to a study identifying the system integration issues of UEET engines. This Engine Diameter study was managed by Boeing Phantom Works, Seattle, Washington through the NASA Glenn Revolutionary Aero Space Engine Research (RASER) contract under task order 10. Boeing Phantom Works, Huntington Beach, completed the engine/airplane sizing optimization, while the Boeing Commercial Airplane group (BCA) provided design oversight. A separate subcontract to support the overall project was issued to Tuskegee University.

  18. A Novel Method for Characterizing the Diameter of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Optical Absorption Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Takeshi; Ohmori, Shigekazu; Shukla, Bikau; Yumura, Motoo; Iijima, Sumio

    2009-09-01

    The potentiality of optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS) for the estimation of mean diameter of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from electronic transition energies has been explored. The observed dependence of electronic transition energies of both metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs on their mean diameters clearly showed that transition energies scale inversely with the tube diameter. In the present study, the applicability of this estimation method has been experimentally confirmed for the diameter range of 1-2 nm and is expected to be useful for the characterization of wide range of diameters of SWNCTs.

  19. DiameterJ: A validated open source nanofiber diameter measurement tool.

    PubMed

    Hotaling, Nathan A; Bharti, Kapil; Kriel, Haydn; Simon, Carl G

    2015-08-01

    Despite the growing use of nanofiber scaffolds for tissue engineering applications, there is not a validated, readily available, free solution for rapid, automated analysis of nanofiber diameter from scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs. Thus, the goal of this study was to create a user friendly ImageJ/FIJI plugin that would analyze SEM micrographs of nanofibers to determine nanofiber diameter on a desktop computer within 60 s. Additional design goals included 1) compatibility with a variety of existing segmentation algorithms, and 2) an open source code to enable further improvement of the plugin. Using existing algorithms for centerline determination, Euclidean distance transforms and a novel pixel transformation technique, a plugin called "DiameterJ" was created for ImageJ/FIJI. The plugin was validated using 1) digital synthetic images of white lines on a black background and 2) SEM images of nominally monodispersed steel wires of known diameters. DiameterJ analyzed SEM micrographs in 20 s, produced diameters not statistically different from known values, was over 10-times closer to known diameter values than other open source software, provided hundreds of times the sampling of manual measurement, and was hundreds of times faster than manual assessment of nanofiber diameter. DiameterJ enables users to rapidly and thoroughly determine the structural features of nanofiber scaffolds and could potentially allow new insights to be formed into fiber diameter distribution and cell response.

  20. Collagen fibril diameter and alignment promote the quiescent keratocyte phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Muthusubramaniam, Lalitha; Peng, Lily; Zaitseva, Tatiana; Paukshto, Michael; Martin, George R.; Desai, Tejal

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how matrix nanotopography affects corneal fibroblast phenotype and matrix synthesis. To this end, corneal fibroblasts isolated from bovine corneas were grown on collagen nanofiber scaffolds of different diameters and alignment – 30 nm aligned fibrils (30A), 300 nm or larger aligned fibrils (300A), and 30 nm nonaligned fibrils (30NA) in comparison to collagen coated flat glass substrates (FC). Cell morphology was visualized using confocal microscopy. Quantitative PCR was used to measure expression levels of six target genes: the corneal crystallin - transketolase (TKT), the myofibroblast marker - α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), and four matrix proteins - collagen 1 (COL1), collagen 3 (COL3), fibronectin (FN) and biglycan. It was found that SMA expression was down-regulated and TKT expression was increased on all three collagen nanofiber substrates, compared to the FC control substrates. However, COL3 and biglycan expression was also significantly increased on 300A, compared to the FC substrates. Thus matrix nanotopography down-regulates the fibrotic phenotype, promotes formation of the quiescent keratocyte phenotype and influences matrix synthesis. These results have significant implications for the engineering of corneal replacements and for promoting regenerative healing of the cornea after disease and/or injury. PMID:22213336

  1. Large diameter astromast development, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preiswerk, P. R.; Finley, L. A.; Knapp, K.

    1983-01-01

    Coilable-longeron lattice columns called Astromasts (trademark) were manufactured for a variety of spacecraft missions. These flight structures varied in diameter from 0.2 to 0.5 meter (9 to 19 in.), and the longest Astromast of this type deploys to a length of 30 meters (100 feet). A double-laced diagonal Astromast design referred to as the Supermast (trademark) which, because it has shorter baylengths than an Astromast, is approximately four times as strong. The longeron cross section and composite material selection for these structures are limited by the maximum strain associated with stowage and deployment. As a result, future requirements for deployable columns with high stiffness and strength require the development of both structures in larger diameters. The design, development, and manufacture of a 6.1-m-long (20-ft), 0.75-m-diameter (30-in.), double-laced diagonal version of the Astromast is described.

  2. The influence of fiber diameter of electrospun substrates on neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Christopherson, Gregory T; Song, Hongjun; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2009-02-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all types of neural lineage under different biochemical and topographical cues. In this study, we cultured rat hippocampus-derived adult NSCs (rNSCs) on laminin-coated electrospun Polyethersulfone (PES) fiber meshes with average fiber diameters of 283+/-45 nm, 749+/-153 nm and 1452+/-312 nm; and demonstrated that fiber diameter of PES mesh significantly influences rNSC differentiation and proliferation. Under the differentiation condition (in the presence of 1 microM retinoic acid and 1% fetal bovine serum), rNSCs showed a 40% increase in oligodendrocyte differentiation on 283-nm fibers and 20% increase in neuronal differentiation on 749-nm fibers, in comparison to tissue culture polystyrene surface. SEM imaging revealed that cells stretched multi-directionally to follow underlying 283-nm fibers, but extended along a single fiber axis on larger fibers. When cultured on fiber meshes in serum free medium in the presence of 20 ng/mL of FGF-2, rNSCs showed lower proliferation and more rounded morphology compared to that cultured on laminin-coated 2D surface. As the fiber diameter decreased, higher degree of proliferation and cell spreading and lower degree of cell aggregation were observed. This collective evidence indicates fiber topography can play a vital role in regulating differentiation and proliferation of rNSCs in culture.

  3. Systematic biases in radiometric diameter determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, John R.; Lebofsky, Larry A.; Sykes, Mark V.

    1989-01-01

    Radiometric diameter determinations are presently shown to often be significantly affected by the effect of rotation. This thermal effect of rotation depends not only on the object's thermal inertia, rotation rate, and pole orientation, but also on its temperature, since colder objects having constant rotation rate and thermal inertia will radiate less of their heat on the diurnal than on the nocturnal hemisphere. A disk-integrated beaming parameter of 0.72 is determined for the moon, and used to correct empirically for the roughness effects in thermophysical models; the standard thermal model is found to systematically underestimate cold object diameters, while overstating their albedos.

  4. Shaft Diameter Measurement Using Structured Light Vision.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siyuan; Tan, Qingchang; Zhang, Yachao

    2015-08-12

    A method for measuring shaft diameters is presented using structured light vision measurement. After calibrating a model of the structured light measurement, a virtual plane is established perpendicular to the measured shaft axis and the image of the light stripe on the shaft is projected to the virtual plane. On the virtual plane, the center of the measured shaft is determined by fitting the projected image under the geometrical constraints of the light stripe, and the shaft diameter is measured by the determined center and the projected image. Experiments evaluated the measuring accuracy of the method and the effects of some factors on the measurement are analyzed.

  5. THERMAL EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT DRIFT DIAMETER SIZES

    SciTech Connect

    H.M. Wade

    1999-01-04

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate the thermal response of a repository-emplaced waste package and its corresponding drift wall surface temperature with different drift diameters. The case examined is that of a 21 pressurized water reactor (PWR) uncanistered fuel (UCF) waste package loaded with design basis spent nuclear fuel assemblies. This calculation evaluates a 3.5 meter to 6.5 meter drift diameter range in increments of 1.0 meters. The time-dependent temperatures of interest, as determined by this calculation, are the spent nuclear fuel cladding temperature, the waste package surface temperature, and the drift wall surface temperature.

  6. The truth about small-diameter implants.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Gordon J; Child, Paul L

    2010-05-01

    SDIs that are treatment planned correctly, placed and loaded properly, and are within a well-adjusted occlusion, are working in an excellent manner for the patients described in this article. It is time for those practitioners unfamiliar with SDIs and their uses to discontinue their discouragement of this technique. SDIs are easily placed, minimally invasive, and a true service to those patients described. They do not replace conventional diameter implants; however, they are a significant and important augmentation to the original root-form implant concept. There is obvious evidence of the growing acceptance of small-diameter implants by both general practitioners and specialists.

  7. 7 CFR 51.320 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.320 Diameter. When measuring for minimum size, “diameter” means the greatest dimension of the apple measured at right angles to a line from stem to blossom end. When measuring for maximum size, “diameter” means the smallest dimension of the apple determined...

  8. 7 CFR 51.320 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.320 Diameter. When measuring for minimum size, “diameter” means the greatest dimension of the apple measured at right angles to... dimension of the apple determined by passing the apple through a round opening in any position....

  9. 7 CFR 51.320 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.320 Diameter. When measuring for minimum size, “diameter” means the greatest dimension of the apple measured at right angles to a line from stem to blossom end. When measuring for maximum size, “diameter” means the smallest dimension of the apple determined...

  10. 7 CFR 51.320 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.320 Diameter. When measuring for minimum size, “diameter” means the greatest dimension of the apple measured at right angles to a line from stem to blossom end. When measuring for maximum size, “diameter” means the smallest dimension of the apple determined...

  11. 7 CFR 51.320 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.320 Diameter. When measuring for minimum size, “diameter” means the greatest dimension of the apple measured at right angles to... dimension of the apple determined by passing the apple through a round opening in any position....

  12. Reducing the diameters of computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S. H.; Raza, A. D.

    1986-01-01

    Three methods of reducing the diameters of computer networks by adding additional processor to processor links under the constraint that no more than one I/O port be added to each processor are discussed. This is equivalent to adding edges to a given graph under the constraint that the degree of any node be increased, at most, by one.

  13. Small diameter symmetric networks from linear groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Lowell; Carlsson, Gunnar E.; Dinneen, Michael J.; Faber, Vance; Fellows, Michael R.; Langston, Michael A.; Moore, James W.; Multihaupt, Andrew P.; Sexton, Harlan B.

    1992-01-01

    In this note is reported a collection of constructions of symmetric networks that provide the largest known values for the number of nodes that can be placed in a network of a given degree and diameter. Some of the constructions are in the range of current potential engineering significance. The constructions are Cayley graphs of linear groups obtained by experimental computation.

  14. Reduced artery diameters in Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Foresta, C; Caretta, N; Palego, P; Ferlin, A; Zuccarello, D; Lenzi, A; Selice, R

    2012-10-01

    Various epidemiological studies in relatively large cohorts of patients with Klinefelter syndrome (KS) described the increased morbidity and mortality in these subjects. Our aim was to study the structure and function of arteries in different districts to investigate in these subjects possible alterations. A total of 92 patients having non-mosaic KS, diagnosed in Centre for Human Reproduction Pathology at the University of Padova, and 50 age-matched healthy male controls were studied. Klinefelter syndrome subjects and controls evaluation included complete medical history, physical examination, measurement of concentrations of the reproductive hormones, lipidic and glycidic metabolism, AR function and sensitivity, ultrasound examinations (diameters, carotid intima-media thickness and brachial flow-mediated dilation) of brachial, common carotid and common femoral artery and abdominal aorta. Klinefelter syndrome patients showed significantly reduced artery diameters in all districts evaluated. On the contrary no statistically significant difference was found in cIMT and brachial FMD values between KS patients and controls. Furthermore, we found no statistically significant correlation of artery diameters with reproductive hormones, metabolic parameters, anthropometric measures and weighted CAG repeats. To our knowledge, this is the first study finding a reduced artery diameter in several districts in KS patients compared with that of normal male subjects and overlapping to that of female subjects. We have not an explanation for this phenomenon, even if a possible involvement of genes controlling the development of vascular system might be hypothesized, and further research is required to verify this hypothesis.

  15. Precision distances with spiral galaxy apparent diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Spiral galaxy diameters offer the oldest extragalactic distance indicator known. Although outdated and hitherto imprecise, two spiral diameter-based distance indicators applied in the 1980s can be tested, calibrated, and re-established for precision era use, based on abundant redshift-independent distances data available in NED-D. Indicator one employs the largest Giant Spiral Galaxies, which have an absolute isophotal major diameter of ~70 +/- 10 kpc, offering standard ruler-based distances with <10% precision. Indicator two employs the diameter-magnitude relation for spirals in general, as a secondary indicator, offering ~20% precision. The ruler-based indicator is the only indicator with <10% precision able to independently calibrate type Ia supernovae-based distances at cosmological distances. The secondary-based indicator is the only indicator with 20% precision applicable to more galaxies than in current Tully-Fisher surveys. The primary indicator gives researchers a new tool to confirm or refute if, as currently believed, universal expansion is accelerating. The secondary indicator gives researchers a new path toward acquiring a more complete 3D picture of the local universe and potentially, because the majority of galaxies in the universe are spirals, the distant universe.

  16. Solar diameter with 2012 Venus Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, C.

    2012-06-01

    The role of Venus and Mercury transits is crucial to know the past history of the solar diameter. Through the W parameter, the logarithmic derivative of the radius with respect to the luminosity, the past values of the solar luminosity can be recovered. The black drop phenomenon affects the evaluation of the instants of internal and external contacts between the planetary disk and the solar limb. With these observed instants compared with the ephemerides the value of the solar diameter is recovered. The black drop and seeing effects are overcome with two fitting circles, to Venus and to the Sun, drawn in the undistorted part of the image. The corrections of ephemerides due to the atmospheric refraction will also be taken into account. The forthcoming transit of Venus will allow an accuracy on the diameter of the Sun better than 0.01 arcsec, with good images of the ingress and of the egress taken each second. Chinese solar observatories are in the optimal conditions to obtain valuable data for the measurement of the solar diameter with the Venus transit of 5/6 June 2012 with an unprecedented accuracy, and with absolute calibration given by the ephemerides.

  17. Measuring Solar Diameter with 2012 Venus Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    The role of Venus and Mercury transits is crucial to know the past history of the solar diameter. Through the W parameter, the logarithmic derivative of the radius with respect to the luminosity, the past values of the solar luminosity can be recovered. The black drop phenomenon affects the evaluation of the instants of internal and external contacts between the planetary disk and the solar limb. With these observed instants compared with the ephemerides the value of the solar diameter is recovered. The black drop and seeing effects are overcome with two fitting circles, to Venus and to the Sun, drawn in the undistorted part of the image. The corrections of ephemerides due to the atmospheric refraction will also be taken into account. The forthcoming transit of Venus will allow an accuracy on the diameter of the Sun better than 0.01 arcsec, with good images of the ingress and of the egress taken each second. Chinese solar observatories are in the optimal conditions to obtain valuable data for the measurement of the solar diameter with the Venus transit of 5/6 June 2012 with an unprecedented accuracy, and with absolute calibration given by the ephemerides.

  18. Characterization of very-low density lipoprotein particle diameter dynamics in relation to egg production in a passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Salvante, Katrina G; Lin, Gina; Walzem, Rosemary L; Williams, Tony D

    2007-03-01

    During avian egg production, oestrogen mediates marked increases in hepatic lipid production and changes in the diameter of assembled very-low density lipoprotein (VLDL). A nearly complete shift from generic VLDL ( approximately 70 nm in diameter), which transports lipids to peripheral tissues, to yolk-targeted VLDL (VLDLy) ( approximately 30 nm), which supplies the yolk with energy-rich lipid, has been observed in the plasma of laying domestic fowl. We validated an established dynamic laser scattering technique for a passerine songbird Taeniopygia guttata, the zebra finch, to characterize the dynamics of VLDL particle diameter distribution in relation to egg production. We predicted that non-gallinaceous avian species that have not been selected for maximum egg production would exhibit less dramatic shifts in lipid metabolism during egg production. As predicted, there was considerable overlap between the VLDL particle diameter distributions of laying and non-laying zebra finches. But unexpectedly, non-laying zebra finches had VLDL diameter distributions that peaked at small particles and had relatively few large VLDL particles. As a result, laying zebra finches, in comparison, had diameter distributions that were shifted towards larger VLDL particles. Nevertheless, laying zebra finches, like laying chickens, had larger proportions of particles within proposed VLDLy particle diameter ranges than non-laying zebra finches (e.g. sVLDLy: 50% vs 37%). Furthermore, zebra finches and chickens had similar modal (29.7 nm in both species) and median (32.7 nm vs 29.6 nm) VLDL particle diameters during egg production. Therefore, although zebra finches and chickens exhibited opposing directional shifts in VLDL particle diameter distribution during egg production, the modifications to VLDL particle structure in both species resulted in the realization of a common goal, i.e. to produce and maintain a large proportion of small VLDL particles of specific diameters that are capable

  19. Molecular transport through large-diameter DNA nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Swati; Ziegler, Daniela; Arnaut, Vera; Martin, Thomas G.; Kapsner, Korbinian; Henneberg, Katharina; Bausch, Andreas R.; Dietz, Hendrik; Simmel, Friedrich C.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based nanopores are synthetic biomolecular membrane pores, whose geometry and chemical functionality can be tuned using the tools of DNA nanotechnology, making them promising molecular devices for applications in single-molecule biosensing and synthetic biology. Here we introduce a large DNA membrane channel with an ≈4 nm diameter pore, which has stable electrical properties and spontaneously inserts into flat lipid bilayer membranes. Membrane incorporation is facilitated by a large number of hydrophobic functionalizations or, alternatively, streptavidin linkages between biotinylated channels and lipids. The channel displays an Ohmic conductance of ≈3 nS, consistent with its size, and allows electrically driven translocation of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA analytes. Using confocal microscopy and a dye influx assay, we demonstrate the spontaneous formation of membrane pores in giant unilamellar vesicles. Pores can be created both in an outside-in and an inside-out configuration. PMID:27658960

  20. Molecular transport through large-diameter DNA nanopores.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Swati; Ziegler, Daniela; Arnaut, Vera; Martin, Thomas G; Kapsner, Korbinian; Henneberg, Katharina; Bausch, Andreas R; Dietz, Hendrik; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2016-09-23

    DNA-based nanopores are synthetic biomolecular membrane pores, whose geometry and chemical functionality can be tuned using the tools of DNA nanotechnology, making them promising molecular devices for applications in single-molecule biosensing and synthetic biology. Here we introduce a large DNA membrane channel with an ≈4 nm diameter pore, which has stable electrical properties and spontaneously inserts into flat lipid bilayer membranes. Membrane incorporation is facilitated by a large number of hydrophobic functionalizations or, alternatively, streptavidin linkages between biotinylated channels and lipids. The channel displays an Ohmic conductance of ≈3 nS, consistent with its size, and allows electrically driven translocation of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA analytes. Using confocal microscopy and a dye influx assay, we demonstrate the spontaneous formation of membrane pores in giant unilamellar vesicles. Pores can be created both in an outside-in and an inside-out configuration.

  1. Molecular transport through large-diameter DNA nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Swati; Ziegler, Daniela; Arnaut, Vera; Martin, Thomas G.; Kapsner, Korbinian; Henneberg, Katharina; Bausch, Andreas R.; Dietz, Hendrik; Simmel, Friedrich C.

    2016-09-01

    DNA-based nanopores are synthetic biomolecular membrane pores, whose geometry and chemical functionality can be tuned using the tools of DNA nanotechnology, making them promising molecular devices for applications in single-molecule biosensing and synthetic biology. Here we introduce a large DNA membrane channel with an ~4 nm diameter pore, which has stable electrical properties and spontaneously inserts into flat lipid bilayer membranes. Membrane incorporation is facilitated by a large number of hydrophobic functionalizations or, alternatively, streptavidin linkages between biotinylated channels and lipids. The channel displays an Ohmic conductance of ~3 nS, consistent with its size, and allows electrically driven translocation of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA analytes. Using confocal microscopy and a dye influx assay, we demonstrate the spontaneous formation of membrane pores in giant unilamellar vesicles. Pores can be created both in an outside-in and an inside-out configuration.

  2. Influence of diesel engine combustion parameters on primary soot particle diameter.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Urs; Mohr, Martin; Kaegi, Ralf; Bertola, Andrea; Boulouchos, Konstantinos

    2005-03-15

    Effects of engine operating parameters and fuel composition on both primary soot particle diameter and particle number size distribution in the exhaust of a direct-injected heavy-duty diesel engine were studied in detail. An electrostatic sampler was developed to deposit particles directly on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. Using TEM, the projected area equivalent diameter of primary soot particles was determined. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used for the measurement of the particle number size distribution. Variations in the main engine operating parameters (fuel injection system, air management, and fuel properties) were made to investigate soot formation and oxidation processes. Primary soot particle diameters determined by TEM measurements ranged from 17.5 to 32.5 nm for the diesel fuel and from 24.1 to 27.2 nm for the water-diesel emulsion fuel depending on the engine settings. For constant fuel energy flow rate, the primary particle size from the water-diesel emulsion fuel was slightly larger than that from the diesel fuel. A reduction in primary soot particle diameter was registered when increasing the fuel injection pressure (IP) or advancing the start of injection (SOI). Larger primary soot particle diameters were measured while the engine was operating with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Heat release rate analysis of the combustion process revealed that the primary soot particle diameter decreased when the maximum flame temperature increased for the diesel fuel.

  3. Diameter Dependence of Planar Defects in InP Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fengyun; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yiqian; Zhang, Minghuan; Han, Zhenlian; Yip, SenPo; Shen, Lifan; Han, Ning; Pun, Edwin Y. B.; Ho, Johnny C.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, extensive characterization and complementary theoretical analysis have been carried out on Au-catalyzed InP nanowires in order to understand the planar defect formation as a function of nanowire diameter. From the detailed transmission electron microscopic measurements, the density of stacking faults and twin defects are found to monotonically decrease as the nanowire diameter is decreased to 10 nm, and the chemical analysis clearly indicates the drastic impact of In catalytic supersaturation in Au nanoparticles on the minimized planar defect formation in miniaturized nanowires. Specifically, during the chemical vapor deposition of InP nanowires, a significant amount of planar defects is created when the catalyst seed sizes are increased with the lower degree of In supersaturation as dictated by the Gibbs-Thomson effect, and an insufficient In diffusion (or Au-rich enhancement) would lead to a reduced and non-uniform In precipitation at the NW growing interface. The results presented here provide an insight into the fabrication of “bottom-up” InP NWs with minimized defect concentration which are suitable for various device applications. PMID:27616584

  4. Diameter Dependence of Planar Defects in InP Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengyun; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yiqian; Zhang, Minghuan; Han, Zhenlian; Yip, Senpo; Shen, Lifan; Han, Ning; Pun, Edwin Y. B.; Ho, Johnny C.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, extensive characterization and complementary theoretical analysis have been carried out on Au-catalyzed InP nanowires in order to understand the planar defect formation as a function of nanowire diameter. From the detailed transmission electron microscopic measurements, the density of stacking faults and twin defects are found to monotonically decrease as the nanowire diameter is decreased to 10 nm, and the chemical analysis clearly indicates the drastic impact of In catalytic supersaturation in Au nanoparticles on the minimized planar defect formation in miniaturized nanowires. Specifically, during the chemical vapor deposition of InP nanowires, a significant amount of planar defects is created when the catalyst seed sizes are increased with the lower degree of In supersaturation as dictated by the Gibbs-Thomson effect, and an insufficient In diffusion (or Au-rich enhancement) would lead to a reduced and non-uniform In precipitation at the NW growing interface. The results presented here provide an insight into the fabrication of “bottom-up” InP NWs with minimized defect concentration which are suitable for various device applications.

  5. Diameters and albedos of satellites of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Morrison, D.

    1982-01-01

    Products of the masses of the five known satellites of Uranus, and estimates of their bulk densities and surface albedos, are used to infer their probable dimensions. Spectrophotometry has established the presence of water ice on the surfaces of all save Rhea, and the brightnesses of the satellites have been measured photoelectrically. The diameter measurements presented were made using a photometric/radiometric technique, whose recent recalibration, using independent solar system object measurements, has yielded absolute accuracies better than 5 per cent. The new albedo measurements show that Umbriel, Titania and Oberon are similar to the Jupiter moon Callisto, while Ariel resembles the Saturn moon Hyperion. The diameters of all four are similar to those of the large, icy Saturn satellites Rhea and Iapetus.

  6. Small diameter, deep bore optical inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, David E.; Petrini, Richard R.; Carter, Gary W.

    1981-01-01

    An improved rod optic system for inspecting small diameter, deep bores. The system consists of a rod optic system utilizing a curved mirror at the end of the rod lens such that the optical path through the system is bent 90.degree. to minimize optical distortion in examining the sides of a curved bore. The system is particularly useful in the examination of small bores for corrosion, and is capable of examining 1/16 inch diameter and up to 4 inch deep drill holes, for example. The positioning of the curved mirror allows simultaneous viewing from shallow and right angle points of observation of the same artifact (such as corrosion) in the bore hole. The improved rod optic system may be used for direct eye sighting, or in combination with a still camera or a low-light television monitor; particularly low-light color television.

  7. Small diameter, deep bore optical inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.; Petrini, R.R.; Carter, G.W.

    An improved rod optic system for inspecting small diameter, deep bores is described. The system consists of a rod optic system utilizing a curved mirror at the end of the rod lens such that the optical path through the system is bent 90/sup 0/ to minimize optical distortion in examing the sides of a curved bore. The system is particularly useful in the examination of small bores for corrosion, and is capable if examing 1/16 inch diameter and up to 4-inch deep drill holes, for example. The positioning of the curved mirror allows simultaneous viewing from shallow and righ angle points of observation of the same artifact (such as corrosion) in the bore hole. The improved rod optic system may be used for direct eye sighting, or in combination with a still camera or a low-light television monitor; particularly low-light color television.

  8. European Projects of Solar Diameter Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino; Bianda, Michele; Arnaud, Jean

    2008-10-01

    Three projects dealing with solar diameter evolution are presently in development. Historical and contemporary eclipses and planetary transits data collection and analysis, to cover potentially the last 5 centuries with an accuracy of few hundreds of arcsecond on diameter's measurements. The French space mission PICARD with a few milliarcseconds accuray. With PICARD-SOL instruments located at the plateau of Calern the role of the atmosphere in ground-based measurements will be clarified. CLAVIUS is a Swiss-Italian project based on drift-scan method, free from optical distortions, where hourly circles transits will be monitored with fast CMOS sensors in different wavebands. The will run at IRSOL Gregory-Coudé telescope.

  9. On finding minimum-diameter clique trees

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, J.R.S. . Dept. of Computer Science); Peyton, B.W. )

    1991-08-01

    It is well-known that any chordal graph can be represented as a clique tree (acyclic hypergraph, join tree). Since some chordal graphs have many distinct clique tree representations, it is interesting to consider which one is most desirable under various circumstances. A clique tree of minimum diameter (or height) is sometimes a natural candidate when choosing clique trees to be processed in a parallel computing environment. This paper introduces a linear time algorithm for computing a minimum-diameter clique tree. The new algorithm is an analogue of the natural greedy algorithm for rooting an ordinary tree in order to minimize its height. It has potential application in the development of parallel algorithms for both knowledge-based systems and the solution of sparse linear systems of equations. 31 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Fabricated nano-fiber diameter as liquid concentration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyad, Radhi M.; Mat Jafri, Mohd Zubir; Ibrahim, Kamarulazizi

    Nanofiber is characterized by thin, long, and very soft silica. Taper fibers are made using an easy and low cost chemical method. Etching is conducted with a HF solution to remove cladding and then a low molarity HF solution to reduce the fiber core diameter. One approach to on-line monitoring of the etching process uses spectrophotometer with a white light source. In the aforementioned technique, this method aims to determine the diameter of the reduced core and show the evolution of the two different processes from the nanofiber regime to the fixed regime in which the mode was remote from the surrounding evanescent field, intensity can propagate outside the segment fiber when the core diameter is less than 500 nm. Manufacturing technologies of nano-fiber sensors offer a number of approved properties of optical fiber sensors utilized in various sensory applications. The nano-fiber sensor is utilized to sense the difference in the concentration of D-glucose in double-distilled deionized water and to measure the refractive index (RI) of a sugar solution. Our proposed method exhibited satisfactory capability based on bimolecular interactions in the biological system. The response of the nano-fiber sensors indicates a different kind of interaction among various groups of AAs. These results can be interpreted in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions and the structure making or breaking ability of solutes in the given solution. This study utilized spectra photonics to measure the transmission of light through different concentrations of sugar solution, employing cell cumber and nano-optical fibers as sensors.

  11. 20 W continuous-wave cladding-pumped Nd-doped fiber laser at 910 nm.

    PubMed

    Laroche, M; Cadier, B; Gilles, H; Girard, S; Lablonde, L; Robin, T

    2013-08-15

    We demonstrate a double-clad fiber laser operating at 910 nm with a record power of 20 W. Laser emission on the three-level scheme is enabled by the combination of a small inner cladding-to-core diameter ratio and a high brightness pump source at 808 nm. A laser conversion efficiency as high as 44% was achieved in CW operating regime by using resonant fiber Bragg reflectors at 910 nm that prevent the lasing at the 1060 nm competing wavelength. Furthermore, in a master oscillator power-amplifier scheme, an amplified power of 14.8 W was achieved at 914 nm in the same fiber.

  12. 29 mm Diameter Test Target Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, Keith Albert; Dale, Gregory E.; Olivas, Eric Richard; Naranjo, Angela Carol; Romero, Frank Patrick

    2016-08-15

    The Northstar target for Mo99 production is made up of Mo100 disks in a stack separated by coolant gaps for helium flow. A number of targets have been tested at ANL for both production of Mo99 and for thermal-hydraulic performance. These have all been with a 12 mm diameter target, even while the production goals have increased the diameter to now 29 mm. A 29 mm diameter target has been designed that is consistent with the ANL beam capabilities and the capabilities of the helium circulation system currently in use at ANL. This target is designed for 500 μA at 35 MeV electrons. While the plant design calls for 42 MeV, the chosen design point is more favorable and higher power given the limits of the ANL accelerator. The intended beam spot size is 12 mm FWHM, but the thermal analysis presented herein conservatively assumed a 10 mm FWHM beam, which results in a 44% higher beam current density at beam center.

  13. The holin of bacteriophage lambda forms rings with large diameter.

    PubMed

    Savva, Christos G; Dewey, Jill S; Deaton, John; White, Rebecca L; Struck, Douglas K; Holzenburg, Andreas; Young, Rye

    2008-08-01

    Holins control the length of the infection cycle of tailed phages (the Caudovirales) by oligomerizing to form lethal holes in the cytoplasmic membrane at a time dictated by their primary structure. Nothing is currently known about the physical basis of their oligomerization or the structure of the oligomers formed by any known holin. Here we use electron microscopy and single-particle analysis to characterize structures formed by the bacteriophage lambda holin (S105) in vitro. In non-ionic or mild zwitterionic detergents, purified S105, but not the lysis-defective variant S105A52V, forms rings of at least two size classes, the most common having inner and outer diameters of 8.5 and 23 nm respectively, and containing approximately 72 S105 monomers. The height of these rings, 4 nm, closely matches the thickness of the lipid bilayer. The central channel is of unprecedented size for channels formed by integral membrane proteins, consistent with the non-specific nature of holin-mediated membrane permeabilization. S105 present in detergent-solubilized rings and in inverted membrane vesicles showed similar sensitivities to proteolysis and cysteine-specific modification, suggesting that the rings are representative of the lethal holes formed by S105 to terminate the infection cycle and initiate lysis.

  14. Size and voltage dependence of effective anisotropy in sub-100-nm perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Stephan K.; Bapna, Mukund; Oberdick, Samuel D.; Majetich, Sara A.; Li, Mingen; Chien, C. L.; Ahmed, Rizvi; Victora, R. H.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are investigated using a conductive atomic force microscope. The 1.23 -nm Co40Fe40B20 recording layer coercivity exhibits a size dependence which suggests single-domain behavior for diameters ≤100 nm. Focusing on devices with diameters smaller than 100 nm, we determine the effect of voltage and size on the effective device anisotropy Keff using two different techniques. Keff is extracted both from distributions of the switching fields of the recording and reference layers and from measurement of thermal fluctuations of the recording layer magnetization when a field close to the switching field is applied. The results from both sets of measurements reveal that Keff increases monotonically with decreasing junction diameter, consistent with the size dependence of the demagnetization energy density. We demonstrate that Keff can be controlled with a voltage down to the smallest size measured, 64 nm.

  15. Chirality and Diameter Influence on Thermal Conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ya; Zhu, Jie; Tang, Da-Wei

    2015-04-01

    Influence of chirality and diameter on thermal conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWNT) with different tube lengths have been investigated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) method. The tube lengths of the SWNTs studied here are 20, 50 and 100 nm, respectively, and at each length the relationship between chiral angle and thermal conductivity of SWNT has been revealed; the dependence of thermal conductivity on diameter has also been studied. We find that chirality impact on thermal conductivity of SWNT is more obvious when tube length is relatively shorter, while diameter effect is more noticeable when tube gets longer. With larger chiral angle, thermal conductivity of chiral SWNTs is greater than that with smaller chiral angle and thermal conductivity increases with diameter.

  16. Incoherent magnetization reversal in 30-nm Ni particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, C. A.; Chantrell, R.; Hwang, M.; Farhoud, M.; Savas, T. A.; Hao, Y.; Smith, Henry I.; Ross, F. M.; Redjdal, M.; Humphrey, F. B.

    2000-12-01

    The magnetic properties of a 100-nm-period large-area array of regular, 30-nm polycrystalline nickel particles have been studied. The particles are found to reverse incoherently, and their hysteresis behavior has been compared with a computational model over a range of temperatures. Excellent agreement with the model is obtained, indicating that switching of the particles is dominated by the reversal of approximately 10-nm-diameter volumes within each particle. These switching volumes are identified with the columnar grains in the polycrystalline nickel, showing that the microstructure determines the magnetic behavior of the particles. This explains the anisotropy distribution and the onset of superparamagnetism in the sample. Incoherent reversal occurs even though the particles are only 1.5 times the exchange length in nickel, a size at which nearly uniform rotation is expected to occur if the particles were homogeneous.

  17. Variable diameter wind turbine rotor blades

    DOEpatents

    Jamieson, Peter McKeich; Hornzee-Jones, Chris; Moroz, Emilian M.; Blakemore, Ralph W.

    2005-12-06

    A system and method for changing wind turbine rotor diameters to meet changing wind speeds and control system loads is disclosed. The rotor blades on the wind turbine are able to adjust length by extensions nested within or containing the base blade. The blades can have more than one extension in a variety of configurations. A cable winching system, a hydraulic system, a pneumatic system, inflatable or elastic extensions, and a spring-loaded jack knife deployment are some of the methods of adjustment. The extension is also protected from lightning by a grounding system.

  18. The diameter and albedo of 1943 Anteros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Tedesco, E. F.; Tholen, D. J.; Tokunaga, A.; Matthews, K.; Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.; Kowal, C.

    1981-01-01

    The results of broadband visual and infrared photometry of the Apollo-Amor asteroid 1943 Anteros during its 1980 apparition are reported. By means of a radiometric model, a diameter of 2.3 + or - 0.2 km and a visual geometric albedo of 0.13 + or - 0.03 is calculated. The albedo and reflectance spectrum of Anteros imply that it is a type S asteroid. Thus, Anteros may have a silicate surface similar to other Apollo-Amor asteroids as well as some stony-iron meteorites.

  19. A Variable Diameter Short Haul Civil Tiltrotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, James M.; Jones, Christopher T.; Nixon, Mark W.

    1999-01-01

    The Short-Haul-Civil-tiltrotor (SHCT) component of the NASA Aviation System Capacity Program is an effort to develop the technologies needed for a potential 40-passenger civil tiltrotor. The variable diameter tiltrotor (VDTR) is a Sikorsky concept aimed at improving tiltrotor hover and cruise performance currently limited by disk loading that is much higher in hover than conventional helicopter, and much lower in cruise than turbo-prop systems. This paper describes the technical merits of using a VDTR on a SHCT aircraft. The focus will be the rotor design.

  20. A 30-cm diameter argon ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    A 30 cm diameter argon ion source was evaluated. Ion source beam currents up to 4a were extracted with ion energies ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 KeV. An ion optics scaling relation was developed for predicting ion beam extraction capability as a function of total extraction voltage, gas type, and screen grid open area. Ignition and emission characteristics of several hollow cathode geometries were assessed for purposes of defining discharge chamber and neutralizer cathodes. Also presented are ion beam profile characteristics which exhibit broad beam capability well suited for ion beam sputtering applications.

  1. Thread gauge for measuring thread pitch diameters

    DOEpatents

    Brewster, A.L.

    1985-11-19

    A thread gauge which attaches to a vernier caliper to measure the thread pitch diameter of both externally threaded and internally threaded parts is disclosed. A pair of anvils are externally threaded with threads having the same pitch as those of the threaded part. Each anvil is mounted on a stem having a ball on which the anvil can rotate to properly mate with the parts to which the anvils are applied. The stems are detachably secured to the caliper blades by attachment collars having keyhole openings for receiving the stems and caliper blades. A set screw is used to secure each collar on its caliper blade. 2 figs.

  2. Thread gauge for measuring thread pitch diameters

    DOEpatents

    Brewster, Albert L.

    1985-01-01

    A thread gauge which attaches to a vernier caliper to measure the thread pitch diameter of both externally threaded and internally threaded parts. A pair of anvils are externally threaded with threads having the same pitch as those of the threaded part. Each anvil is mounted on a stem having a ball on which the anvil can rotate to properly mate with the parts to which the anvils are applied. The stems are detachably secured to the caliper blades by attachment collars having keyhole openings for receiving the stems and caliper blades. A set screw is used to secure each collar on its caliper blade.

  3. Control of diameter and morphology of poly(vinylidene fluoride) nanofibers fabricated by electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Hongjun; Du, Xiaosong; Jiang, Yadong

    2009-11-01

    This paper described a procedure based on electrospinning for generating nanofibers with controllable diameters and morphology. When an acetone and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) mixture solvent containing poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) was injected through a needle under a strong electric field, nanofibers made of PVDF formed as a result of electrostatic jetting. To control the diameter and morphology of PVDF nanofibers, the solution properties and process parameters were investigated, such as polymer concentration, the ratio of the mixture solvent, feeding rate, applied electric field, and needle-to-collector distance. The fabricated fibers were 30-8000 nm in diameter. The increase in the polymer concentration caused an increase in the fiber diameter. However, the increase in the feeding rate and applied electric field decreased the fiber diameter. Variation in the needle-to-collector distance did not result in significant changes in the fiber diameter. The ratio of the solvent also had a very significant impact on electrospinning. The diameter and morphology of the PVDF nanofibers were characterized by optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  4. The effect of nanowire length and diameter on the properties of transparent, conducting nanowire films.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Stephen M; Chen, Yu-Hui; Rathmell, Aaron R; Charbonneau, Patrick; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Wiley, Benjamin J

    2012-03-21

    This article describes how the dimensions of nanowires affect the transmittance and sheet resistance of a random nanowire network. Silver nanowires with independently controlled lengths and diameters were synthesized with a gram-scale polyol synthesis by controlling the reaction temperature and time. Characterization of films composed of nanowires of different lengths but the same diameter enabled the quantification of the effect of length on the conductance and transmittance of silver nanowire films. Finite-difference time-domain calculations were used to determine the effect of nanowire diameter, overlap, and hole size on the transmittance of a nanowire network. For individual nanowires with diameters greater than 50 nm, increasing diameter increases the electrical conductance to optical extinction ratio, but the opposite is true for nanowires with diameters less than this size. Calculations and experimental data show that for a random network of nanowires, decreasing nanowire diameter increases the number density of nanowires at a given transmittance, leading to improved connectivity and conductivity at high transmittance (>90%). This information will facilitate the design of transparent, conducting nanowire films for flexible displays, organic light emitting diodes and thin-film solar cells.

  5. Measurement of Diameter Changes during Irradiation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, K. L.; Knudson, D. L.; Crepeau, J. C.; Solstad, S.

    2015-03-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in advanced and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can experience significant dimensional and physical changes during irradiation. Currently in the US, such changes are measured by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a specified period of time and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The time and labor to remove, examine, and return irradiated samples for each measurement makes this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data and handling may disturb the phenomena of interest. In-pile detection of changes in geometry is sorely needed to understand real-time behavior during irradiation testing of fuels and materials in high flux US Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). This paper presents development results of an advanced Linear Variable Differential Transformer-based test rig capable of detecting real-time changes in diameter of fuel rods or material samples during irradiation in US MTRs. This test rig is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory and will provide experimenters with a unique capability to measure diameter changes associated with fuel and cladding swelling, pellet-clad interaction, and crud buildup.

  6. Selective dispersion of large-diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes with pyridine-containing copolymers.

    PubMed

    Berton, Nicolas; Lemasson, Fabien; Poschlad, Angela; Meded, Velimir; Tristram, Frank; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Hennrich, Frank; Kappes, Manfred M; Mayor, Marcel

    2014-01-29

    The purity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is a key parameter for their integration in electronic, optoelectronic and photonic devices. Samples of pristine SWNTs are inhomogeneous in terms of electric behavior and diameter and contain a variety of amorphous carbon and catalyst residues. To obtain high performance devices, purification of SWNTs is required. Conjugated polymers have emerged as efficient solubilizing and sorting agents for small diameter SWNTs (HiPco tubes, 0.7 nm<Ø<1.1 nm). Nevertheless, reports on polymers able to efficiently sort large diameter SWNTs with Ø>1.1 nm are lacking. Several pyridine-containing copolymers were synthesized for this purpose and showed efficient and selective extraction of semiconducting large diameter SWNTs (PLV tubes, Ø>1.1 nm). High concentration and high purity suspensions are obtained without the use of ultracentrifugation, which gives an up-scaling potential of the method. The emission wavelength is in near infrared region around 1550 nm and fits with broadly used telecommunication wavelength window. The processes taking place at the interface were simulated by a newly designed hybrid coarse-grain model combining density functional theory and geometrical calculation to yield insights into the wrapping processes with an unprecedented level of details for such large diameter SWNTs.

  7. Effect of nanowire number, diameter, and doping density on nano-FET biosensor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jason; Zhang, Yanliang; To, Steve; You, Lidan; Sun, Yu

    2011-08-23

    Semiconductive nanowire-based biosensors are capable of label-free detection of biological molecules. Nano-FET (field-effect transistor) biosensors exhibiting high sensitivities toward proteins, nucleic acids, and viruses have been demonstrated. Rational device design methodologies, particularly those based on theoretical predictions, were reported. However, few experimental studies have investigated the effect of nanowire diameter, doping density, and number on nano-FET sensitivity. In this study, we devised a fabrication process based on parallel approaches and nanomanipulation-based post-processing for constructing nano-FET biosensor devices with carefully controlled nanowire parameters (diameter, doping density, and number). We experimentally reveal the effect of these nanowire parameters on nano-FET biosensor sensitivity. The experimental findings quantitatively demonstrate that device sensitivity decreases with increasing number of nanowires (4 and 7 nanowire devices exhibited a ∼38 and ∼82% decrease in sensitivity as compared to a single-nanowire device), larger nanowire diameters (sensors with 81-100 and 101-120 nm nanowire diameters exhibited a ∼16 and ∼37% decrease in sensitivity compared to devices with nanowire diameters of 60-80 nm), and higher nanowire doping densities (∼69% decrease in sensitivity due to an increase in nanowire doping density from 10(17) to 10(19) atoms·cm(-3)). These results provide insight into the importance of controlling nanowire properties for maximizing sensitivity and minimizing performance variation across devices when designing and manufacturing nano-FET biosensors.

  8. Reduced haze of transparent conductive films by smaller diameter silver nanowires.

    PubMed

    Menamparambath, Mini Mol; Yang, Kihyuk; Kim, Hyeong Hoon; Bae, Oh Seung; Jeong, Mun Seok; Choi, Jae-Young; Baik, Seunghyun

    2016-11-18

    Silver nanowires (Ag NWs) have received considerable attention for flexible transparent conductive films (TCFs) since they provide a relatively low sheet resistance at a high transmittance. However, the diffuse light scattering, haze, has been regarded as a hurdle to achieve clarity of films. Here we revisit the Mie scattering theory to calculate the extinction and scattering coefficients of Ag NWs which were employed to estimate haze of TCFs. The theory predicted a decrease in haze with a decrease in Ag NW diameter which was supported by experimental investigations carried out using Ag NWs with 5 different diameters (17.6, 19.9, 22.5, 24.3, and 29.6 nm). Overall, excellent properties of TCFs (haze = 0.21%-1.8%, transmittance = 95.33%-98.45%, sheet resistance = 20.87-81.76 Ω sq(-1)) were obtained. Ag NWs with a diameter of 17.6 nm provided minimum haze values at equivalent sheet resistances (e.g., haze = 0.21%, transmittance = 98.45%, sheet resistance = 77.36 Ω sq(-1)) compared with ones with lager diameters and the controls in literatures. This work investigated the interdependence between haze and NW diameter and might provide a design guide for flexible Ag NW TCFs.

  9. Reduced haze of transparent conductive films by smaller diameter silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mol Menamparambath, Mini; Yang, Kihyuk; Kim, Hyeong Hoon; Bae, Oh Seung; Jeong, Mun Seok; Choi, Jae-Young; Baik, Seunghyun

    2016-11-01

    Silver nanowires (Ag NWs) have received considerable attention for flexible transparent conductive films (TCFs) since they provide a relatively low sheet resistance at a high transmittance. However, the diffuse light scattering, haze, has been regarded as a hurdle to achieve clarity of films. Here we revisit the Mie scattering theory to calculate the extinction and scattering coefficients of Ag NWs which were employed to estimate haze of TCFs. The theory predicted a decrease in haze with a decrease in Ag NW diameter which was supported by experimental investigations carried out using Ag NWs with 5 different diameters (17.6, 19.9, 22.5, 24.3, and 29.6 nm). Overall, excellent properties of TCFs (haze = 0.21%-1.8%, transmittance = 95.33%-98.45%, sheet resistance = 20.87-81.76 Ω sq-1) were obtained. Ag NWs with a diameter of 17.6 nm provided minimum haze values at equivalent sheet resistances (e.g., haze = 0.21%, transmittance = 98.45%, sheet resistance = 77.36 Ω sq-1) compared with ones with lager diameters and the controls in literatures. This work investigated the interdependence between haze and NW diameter and might provide a design guide for flexible Ag NW TCFs.

  10. Carbon : nickel nanocomposite templates - predefined stable catalysts for diameter-controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Melkhanova, Svetlana; Haluska, Miro; Hübner, René; Kunze, Tim; Keller, Adrian; Abrasonis, Gintautas; Gemming, Sibylle; Krause, Matthias

    2016-08-21

    Carbon : nickel (C : Ni) nanocomposite templates (NCTs) were used as catalyst precursors for diameter-controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Two NCT types of 2 nm thickness were prepared by ion beam co-sputtering without (type I) or with assisting Ar(+) ion irradiation (type II). NCT type I comprised Ni-rich nanoparticles (NPs) with defined diameter in an amorphous carbon matrix, while NCT type II was a homogenous C : Ni film. Based on the Raman spectra of more than 600 individual SWCNTs, the diameter distribution obtained from both types of NCT was determined. SWCNTs with a selective, monomodal diameter distribution are obtained from NCT type I. About 50% of the SWCNTs have a diameter of (1.36 ± 0.10) nm. In contrast to NCT type I, SWCNTs with a non-selective, relatively homogeneous diameter distribution from 0.80 to 1.40 nm covering 88% of all SWCNTs are obtained from NCT type II. From both catalyst templates predominantly separated as-grown SWCNTs are obtained. They are free of solvents or surfactants, exhibit a low degree of bundling and contain negligible amounts of MWCNTs. The study demonstrates the advantage of predefined catalysts for diameter-controlled SWCNT synthesis in comparison to in situ formed catalysts.

  11. Inhibited bacterial biofilm formation and improved osteogenic activity on gentamicin-loaded titania nanotubes with various diameters

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen-tao; Tan, Hong-lue; Duan, Zhao-ling; Yue, Bing; Ma, Rui; He, Guo; Tang, Ting-ting

    2014-01-01

    Titania nanotubes loaded with antibiotics can deliver a high concentration of antibiotics locally at a specific site, thereby providing a promising strategy to prevent implant-associated infections. In this study we have fabricated titania nanotubes with various diameters (80, 120, 160, and 200 nm) and 200 nm length via electrochemical anodization. These nanotubes were loaded with 2 mg of gentamicin using a lyophilization method and vacuum drying. A standard strain, Staphylococcus epidermidis (American Type Culture Collection 35984), and two clinical isolates, S. aureus 376 and S. epidermidis 389, were selected to investigate the anti-infective ability of the gentamicin-loaded nanotubes (NT-G). Flat titanium (FlatTi) and nanotubes with no drug loading (NT) were also investigated and compared. We found that NT-G could significantly inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation compared to FlatTi or NT, and the NT-G with 160 nm and 200 nm diameters had stronger antibacterial activity because of the extended drug release time of NT-G with larger diameters. The NT also exhibited greater antibacterial ability than the FlatTi, while nanotubes with 80 nm or 120 nm diameters had better effects. Furthermore, human marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells were used to evaluate the effect of nanotubular topographies on the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Our results showed that NT-G and NT, especially those with 80 nm diameters, significantly promoted cell attachment, proliferation, spreading, and osteogenic differentiation when compared to FlatTi, and there was no significant difference between NT-G and NT with the same diameter. Therefore, nanotube modification and gentamicin loading can significantly improve the antibacterial ability and osteogenic activity of orthopedic implants. PMID:24634583

  12. Inhibited bacterial biofilm formation and improved osteogenic activity on gentamicin-loaded titania nanotubes with various diameters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-tao; Tan, Hong-lue; Duan, Zhao-ling; Yue, Bing; Ma, Rui; He, Guo; Tang, Ting-ting

    2014-01-01

    Titania nanotubes loaded with antibiotics can deliver a high concentration of antibiotics locally at a specific site, thereby providing a promising strategy to prevent implant-associated infections. In this study we have fabricated titania nanotubes with various diameters (80, 120, 160, and 200 nm) and 200 nm length via electrochemical anodization. These nanotubes were loaded with 2 mg of gentamicin using a lyophilization method and vacuum drying. A standard strain, Staphylococcus epidermidis (American Type Culture Collection 35984), and two clinical isolates, S. aureus 376 and S. epidermidis 389, were selected to investigate the anti-infective ability of the gentamicin-loaded nanotubes (NT-G). Flat titanium (FlatTi) and nanotubes with no drug loading (NT) were also investigated and compared. We found that NT-G could significantly inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation compared to FlatTi or NT, and the NT-G with 160 nm and 200 nm diameters had stronger antibacterial activity because of the extended drug release time of NT-G with larger diameters. The NT also exhibited greater antibacterial ability than the FlatTi, while nanotubes with 80 nm or 120 nm diameters had better effects. Furthermore, human marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells were used to evaluate the effect of nanotubular topographies on the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Our results showed that NT-G and NT, especially those with 80 nm diameters, significantly promoted cell attachment, proliferation, spreading, and osteogenic differentiation when compared to FlatTi, and there was no significant difference between NT-G and NT with the same diameter. Therefore, nanotube modification and gentamicin loading can significantly improve the antibacterial ability and osteogenic activity of orthopedic implants.

  13. 41 CFR 128-50.100 - Storage and care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... bureau preparing a seized vehicle for storage should be at a minimum; (1) Protect the cooling system from freezing; (2) Protect the battery by assuring it is properly watered; (3) Protect the tires by inflating...

  14. 41 CFR 128-50.100 - Storage and care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... bureau preparing a seized vehicle for storage should be at a minimum; (1) Protect the cooling system from freezing; (2) Protect the battery by assuring it is properly watered; (3) Protect the tires by inflating...

  15. 41 CFR 128-50.100 - Storage and care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... bureau preparing a seized vehicle for storage should be at a minimum; (1) Protect the cooling system from freezing; (2) Protect the battery by assuring it is properly watered; (3) Protect the tires by inflating...

  16. 41 CFR 128-50.100 - Storage and care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... bureau preparing a seized vehicle for storage should be at a minimum; (1) Protect the cooling system from freezing; (2) Protect the battery by assuring it is properly watered; (3) Protect the tires by inflating...

  17. 41 CFR 128-50.100 - Storage and care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... bureau preparing a seized vehicle for storage should be at a minimum; (1) Protect the cooling system from freezing; (2) Protect the battery by assuring it is properly watered; (3) Protect the tires by inflating...

  18. Large-diameter glory-hole drilling: Evolution from 12- to 20-ft diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, R.

    1994-06-01

    To drill for oil and gas in shallow, ice-infested waters, a hole needs to be excavated in the seafloor to protect subsea blowout preventers (BOP's) from ice-scour damage. Canadian Marine Drilling pioneered the use of large-diameter glory-hole drilling systems by designing, building, and patenting a 12-ft (3.7-m)-diameter prototype bit system, a 17-ft (5.2-m)-diameter upgrade, a 20-ft (6.1-m)-diameter standard system, and a 20-ft (6.1-m)-diameter enhanced system. The enhanced bit design incorporates high-pressure jetting, boulder storage, pilot-hole centering, and other features that allow a 36-in (0.91-m) hole to be drilled through the body of the bit. An optional feature is the ability to drill and case the glory hole simultaneously. To date, penetration rates up to 4.5 ft/hr (1.37 m/h) in soils with a shear strength 5,000 lbf/ft[sup 2] (239 kPa) have been obtained. Glory-hole drilling times have been reduced from more than 20 days in 1978 to approximately 1[1/2] days since 1986.

  19. Development of fine diameter mullite fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of a program to develop and evaluate mullite fiber with a mean diameter under two microns. The two micron fiber is produced by a blowing process at room temperature from a low viscosity (10-25 poise) solution. The blown fiber was evaluated for dimensional stability in thermal cycling to 1371 C, and was equivalent to the 5 micron spun B and W mullite fiber. An additive study was conducted to evaluate substitutes for the boron. Three levels of chromium, lithium fluoride, and magnesium were added to the standard composition in place of boron and the fiber produced was evaluated for chemical and dimensional stability in thermal cycling to 1371 C. The magnesium was the most chemically stable, but the chrome additive imparted the best dimensional stability.

  20. Five meter diameter conical furlable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenberry, J. W.; Freeland, R. E.; Moore, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was made to demonstrate that a 5-meter-diameter, furlable, conical reflector antenna utilizing a line source feed can be fabricated utilizing composite materials and to prove that the antenna can function mechanically and electrically as prototype flight hardware. The design, analysis, and testing of the antenna are described. An RF efficiency of 55% at 8.5 GHz and a surface error of 0.64 mm rms were chosen as basic design requirements. Actual test measurements yielded an efficiency of 53% (49.77 dB gain) and a surface error of 0.61 mm rms. Atmospherically induced corrosion of the reflector mesh resulted in the RF performance degradation. An assessment of the antenna as compared to the current state of the art technology was made. This assessment included cost, surface accuracy and RF performance, structural and mechanical characteristics, and possible applications.

  1. Thirty-centimeter-diameter ion milling source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    A 30-cm beam diameter ion source has been designed and fabricated for micromachining and sputtering applications. An argon ion current density of 1 mA/cu cm at 500 eV ion energy was selected as a design operating condition. The completed ion source met the design criteria at this operating condition with a uniform and well-collimated beam having an average variation in current density of + or - 5% over the center of 20 cm of the beam. This ion source has a multipole magnetic field that employs permanent magnets between permeable pole pieces. Langmuir probe surveys of the source plasma support the design concepts of a multipole field and a circumferential cathode to enhance plasma uniformity.

  2. Stemming selection for large-diameter blastholes

    SciTech Connect

    Eloranta, J.

    1994-12-31

    Proper selection of stemming has a profound effect on blast performance. This paper describes several methods of evaluating stemming performance in 16-inch blastholes. Tests are done on stemming ranging in size from nominal 1/4 inch crushed rock up to railroad ballast size rock (2 1/2 inch > diameter < 3/4 inch). Concrete plugs (both pre-cast and poured) are evaluated as well as air decking. A Red lake Lo-cam and a velocity of detonation recorder (VODR) are used to estimate stemming retention time and stemming ejection velocities. Downstream productivity rates including: shovel digging rates, crusher speed and crusher hangup counts are used to estimate fragmentation results. Digital image analysis is used to estimate size distributions.

  3. Fire protection covering for small diameter missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Sawko, P. M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Flexible intumescent protection sheeting of unusually uniform thickness were prepared from epoxy-polysulfide compositions, containing microfibers and the ammonium salt of 1,4-nitroaniline-2-sulfonic acid, as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,663,464, except that an ammonium salt particle size in the order of 5 to 8 microns and a fiber size of about 1/128th inch in length and 3 to 5 microns in diameter were found critical to obtain the required density of 1.46 to 1.50 g/cc. The insulation sheeting was prepared by a continuous process involving vacuum mixing, calendering, and curing under very strict conditions which depend to some extent upon the thickness of the sheet produced.

  4. Fabrication of sub-15 nm aluminum wires by controlled etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan-Wall, T.; Hughes, H. J.; Hartman, N.; McQueen, T. M.; Marković, N.

    2014-04-01

    We describe a method for the fabrication of uniform aluminum nanowires with diameters below 15 nm. Electron beam lithography is used to define narrow wires, which are then etched using a sodium bicarbonate solution, while their resistance is simultaneously measured in-situ. The etching process can be stopped when the desired resistance is reached, and can be restarted at a later time. The resulting nanowires show a superconducting transition as a function of temperature and magnetic field that is consistent with their smaller diameter. The width of the transition is similar to that of the lithographically defined wires, indicating that the etching process is uniform and that the wires are undamaged. This technique allows for precise control over the normal state resistance and can be used to create a variety of aluminum nanodevices.

  5. Synthesis of subnanometer-diameter vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with copper-anchored cobalt catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Kehang; Kumamoto, Akihito; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Wang, Benjamin; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high-quality SWNTs are expected to pave the way to replace silicon for next-generation optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high

  6. Variation of nanopore diameter along porous anodic alumina channels by multi-step anodization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Hong; Lim, Xin Yuan; Wai, Kah Wing; Romanato, Filippo; Wong, Chee Cheong

    2011-02-01

    In order to form tapered nanocapillaries, we investigated a method to vary the nanopore diameter along the porous anodic alumina (PAA) channels using multi-step anodization. By anodizing the aluminum in either single acid (H3PO4) or multi-acid (H2SO4, oxalic acid and H3PO4) with increasing or decreasing voltage, the diameter of the nanopore along the PAA channel can be varied systematically corresponding to the applied voltages. The pore size along the channel can be enlarged or shrunken in the range of 20 nm to 200 nm. Structural engineering of the template along the film growth direction can be achieved by deliberately designing a suitable voltage and electrolyte together with anodization time.

  7. Development of large diameter carbon monofilament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, B.; Neltri, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    A process for preparing large diameter carbon-boron monofilament was developed. The process involves chemical vapor depositing a carbon-boron alloy monofilament from a BCl3, CH4, and H2 gas mixture onto a carbon substrate. Amorphous alloys were formed when gaseous mixtures containing greater than 20 percent methane (80 percent BCl3) were used. The longest uninterrupted lengths of carbon-boron monofilament were produced using a CH4/BCl3 gas ratio of 2.34. It was found that the properties of the carbon-boron alloy monofilament improved when the carbon substrate was precleaned in chlorine. The highest strength monofilament was attained when a CH4/BCl3 gas volume ratio of 0.44 was 28 million N/sq cm (40 million psi). While the highest strengths were attained in this run, the 0.44 gas ratio and other CH4/BCl3 ratios less than 2.34 would not yield long runs. Runs using these ratios were usually terminated because of a break in the monofilament within the reactor. It is felt better process control could probably be achieved by varying the amount of hydrogen; the BCl3/H2 ratio was kept constant in these studies.

  8. The 15 cm diameter ion thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    The startup reliability of a 15 cm diameter mercury bombardment ion thruster which employs a pulsed high voltage tickler electrode on the main and neutralizer cathodes is examined. Startup of the thruster is achieved 100% of the time on the main cathode and 98.7% of the time on the neutralizer cathode over a 3640 cycle test. The thruster was started from a 20 C initial condition and operated for an hour at a 600 mA beam current. An energy efficiency of 75% and a propellant utilization efficiency of 77% was achieved over the complete cycle. The effect of a single cusp magnetic field thruster length on its performance is discussed. Guidelines are formulated for the shaping of magnetic field lines in thrusters. A model describing double ion production in mercury discharges is presented. The production route is shown to occur through the single ionic ground state. Photographs of the interior of an operating-hollow cathode are presented. A cathode spot is shown to be present if the cathode is free of low work-function surfaces. The spot is observed if a low work-function oxide coating is applied to the cathode insert. Results show that low work-function oxide coatings tend to migrate during thruster operation.

  9. Sub-180 nm generation with borate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Chen; Yoshimura, Masashi; Tsunoda, Jun; Kaneda, Yushi; Imade, Mamoru; Sasaki, Takatomo; Mori, Yusuke

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrated a new scheme for the generation of 179 nm vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) light with an all-solid-state laser system. It was achieved by mixing the deep-ultraviolet (DUV) of 198.8 nm and the infrared (IR) of 1799.9 nm. While CsB3O5 (CBO) did not satisfy the phase-matching at around 180 nm, 179 nm output was generated with LiB3O5 (LBO) for the first time. The phase-matching property of LBO at around 180 nm was also investigated. There was small deviation from theoretical curve in the measurement, which is still considered reasonable.

  10. Ultra long SiC nanowires with fluctuating diameters synthesized in a polymer pyrolysis CVD route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gong-Yi; Li, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Hao; Liu, Lin

    2009-12-01

    Large areas of millimeters long β-SiC nanowires with fluctuating diameters were synthesized in a polymer pyrolysis CVD (PPCVD) route. Polycarbosilane was used as the raw material. The morphology and structure of the nanowires were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the nanowires had non-periodically fluctuating diameters in the range of 100-250 nm along the axial direction, and were composed of well crystalline β-SiC along the <111> direction. The vapor-solid (VS) mechanism was employed to interpret the nanowires growth procedure, and the diameter fluctuation was resulted from the varying concentration of the local silane fragments.

  11. Interferometric diameter determination of a silicon sphere using a traceable single laser frequency synthesizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuejian; Li, Yan; Wei, Haoyun; Yang, Honglei; Yang, Guoce; Zhang, Jitao

    2013-11-01

    To determine the absolute diameter of a silicon sphere for the Avogadro constant project, we present a phase-shifting interferometer based on a flat etalon and a traceable single laser frequency synthesizer. By using an optical frequency comb to calibrate a frequency-tunable diode laser, the single laser frequency synthesizer can produce an arbitrary laser frequency with a relative uncertainty of 9.2 × 10-12 in the range of 4 THz. According to the laser frequency tuning system, the Carré algorithm with arbitrary but equal phase steps is employed to calculate the fractional interference phases. The absolute diameter is obtained by measuring the fractional and integral parts based on the principles of phase-shifting interferometry and frequency-sweeping interferometry, respectively. The uncertainty of a single diameter measurement in air is estimated to be 5 nm, whose uncertainty sources from the laser frequency and the phase-shifting algorithm are negligible.

  12. Puffing and inhalation behaviour in cigarette smoking: Implications for particle diameter and dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickens, Colin; McGrath, Conor; Warren, Nigel; Biggs, Philip; McAughey, John

    2009-02-01

    Inhalation of tobacco smoke aerosol is a two-step process involving puffing followed by inhalation. Measured smoke deposition efficiencies in the lung (20-70%) are greater than expected for smoke particles of diameter 150 -- 250 nm CMD. Various mechanisms have been put forward to explain this enhanced deposition pattern, including coagulation, hygroscopic growth, condensation and evaporation, changes in composition, or changes in inhalation behaviour. This paper represents one of a series of studies seeking to better quantify smoke chemistry, inhalation behaviour and cumulative particle growth. The studies have been conducted to better understand smoke dosimetry and links to disease as part of a wider programme defining risk and potential harm reduction. In this study, it was noted that particle deposition increased with increasing inhalation depth, and that smoke inhalation volumes were generally greater than normal tidal breathing volumes. A weak association was observed between particle diameter and puff flow, but no strong association between particle diameter and retention efficiency.

  13. Do Shale Pore Throats Have a Threshold Diameter for Oil Storage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Caineng; Jin, Xu; Zhu, Rukai; Gong, Guangming; Sun, Liang; Dai, Jinxing; Meng, Depeng; Wang, Xiaoqi; Li, Jianming; Wu, Songtao; Liu, Xiaodan; Wu, Juntao; Jiang, Lei

    2015-08-01

    In this work, a nanoporous template with a controllable channel diameter was used to simulate the oil storage ability of shale pore throats. On the basis of the wetting behaviours at the nanoscale solid-liquid interfaces, the seepage of oil in nano-channels of different diameters was examined to accurately and systematically determine the effect of the pore diameter on the oil storage capacity. The results indicated that the lower threshold for oil storage was a pore throat of 20 nm, under certain conditions. This proposed pore size threshold provides novel, evidence-based criteria for estimating the geological reserves, recoverable reserves and economically recoverable reserves of shale oil. This new understanding of shale oil processes could revolutionize the related industries.

  14. Do Shale Pore Throats Have a Threshold Diameter for Oil Storage?

    PubMed

    Zou, Caineng; Jin, Xu; Zhu, Rukai; Gong, Guangming; Sun, Liang; Dai, Jinxing; Meng, Depeng; Wang, Xiaoqi; Li, Jianming; Wu, Songtao; Liu, Xiaodan; Wu, Juntao; Jiang, Lei

    2015-08-28

    In this work, a nanoporous template with a controllable channel diameter was used to simulate the oil storage ability of shale pore throats. On the basis of the wetting behaviours at the nanoscale solid-liquid interfaces, the seepage of oil in nano-channels of different diameters was examined to accurately and systematically determine the effect of the pore diameter on the oil storage capacity. The results indicated that the lower threshold for oil storage was a pore throat of 20 nm, under certain conditions. This proposed pore size threshold provides novel, evidence-based criteria for estimating the geological reserves, recoverable reserves and economically recoverable reserves of shale oil. This new understanding of shale oil processes could revolutionize the related industries.

  15. Facile synthesis of silicon nitride nanowires with flexible mechanical properties and with diameters controlled by flow rate

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shun; Hu, Ping; Zhang, Xinghong; Cheng, Yuan; Fang, Cheng; Xu, Jianguo; Chen, Guiqing

    2017-01-01

    Ultralong Si3N4 nanowires (NWs) were successfully synthesized with size controlled in N2 gas by using an efficient method. The diameters of the Si3N4 NWs increased when the flow rate of N2 gas increased, with average diameters of 290 nm from flow rates of 100 ml/min, 343 nm from flow rates of 200 ml/min and 425 nm from flow rates of 400 ml/min. Young’s modulus was found to rely strongly on the diameters of the Si3N4 NWs, decreasing from approximately 526.0 GPa to 321.9 GPa; as the diameters increased from 360 nm to 960 nm. These findings provide a promising method for tailoring these mechanical properties of the NWs in a controlled manner over a wide range of Young’s modulus values. Vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanisms were used to model the growth of Si3N4 NWs on the inner wall of an alumina crucible and on the surface of the powder mixture. Alumina may be an effective mediator of NW growth that plays an important role in controlling the concentrations of Si-containing reactants to support the growth of NWs on the inner wall of the alumina crucible. This approach offers a valuable means for preparing ultralong Si3N4 NWs doped with Al with unique properties. PMID:28349956

  16. Facile synthesis of silicon nitride nanowires with flexible mechanical properties and with diameters controlled by flow rate.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shun; Hu, Ping; Zhang, Xinghong; Cheng, Yuan; Fang, Cheng; Xu, Jianguo; Chen, Guiqing

    2017-03-28

    Ultralong Si3N4 nanowires (NWs) were successfully synthesized with size controlled in N2 gas by using an efficient method. The diameters of the Si3N4 NWs increased when the flow rate of N2 gas increased, with average diameters of 290 nm from flow rates of 100 ml/min, 343 nm from flow rates of 200 ml/min and 425 nm from flow rates of 400 ml/min. Young's modulus was found to rely strongly on the diameters of the Si3N4 NWs, decreasing from approximately 526.0 GPa to 321.9 GPa; as the diameters increased from 360 nm to 960 nm. These findings provide a promising method for tailoring these mechanical properties of the NWs in a controlled manner over a wide range of Young's modulus values. Vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanisms were used to model the growth of Si3N4 NWs on the inner wall of an alumina crucible and on the surface of the powder mixture. Alumina may be an effective mediator of NW growth that plays an important role in controlling the concentrations of Si-containing reactants to support the growth of NWs on the inner wall of the alumina crucible. This approach offers a valuable means for preparing ultralong Si3N4 NWs doped with Al with unique properties.

  17. Method of synthesizing small-diameter carbon nanotubes with electron field emission properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jie (Inventor); Du, Chunsheng (Inventor); Qian, Cheng (Inventor); Gao, Bo (Inventor); Qiu, Qi (Inventor); Zhou, Otto Z. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube material having an outer diameter less than 10 nm and a number of walls less than ten are disclosed. Also disclosed are an electron field emission device including a substrate, an optionally layer of adhesion-promoting layer, and a layer of electron field emission material. The electron field emission material includes a carbon nanotube having a number of concentric graphene shells per tube of from two to ten, an outer diameter from 2 to 8 nm, and a nanotube length greater than 0.1 microns. One method to fabricate carbon nanotubes includes the steps of (a) producing a catalyst containing Fe and Mo supported on MgO powder, (b) using a mixture of hydrogen and carbon containing gas as precursors, and (c) heating the catalyst to a temperature above 950.degree. C. to produce a carbon nanotube. Another method of fabricating an electron field emission cathode includes the steps of (a) synthesizing electron field emission materials containing carbon nanotubes with a number of concentric graphene shells per tube from two to ten, an outer diameter of from 2 to 8 nm, and a length greater than 0.1 microns, (b) dispersing the electron field emission material in a suitable solvent, (c) depositing the electron field emission materials onto a substrate, and (d) annealing the substrate.

  18. Effect of fiber diameter on the spreading, proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes on electrospun chitosan matrices.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Sandra E; Hasanova, Gulnara I; Schneider, Min Jeong; Larsen, Gustavo F; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2012-01-01

    Tissue-engineered neocartilage with appropriate biomechanical properties holds promise not only for graft applications but also as a model system for controlled studies of chondrogenesis. Our objective in the present research study is to better understand the impact of fiber diameter on the cellular activity of chondrocytes cultured on nanofibrous matrices. By using the electrospinning process, fibrous scaffolds with fiber diameters ranging from 300 nm to 1 μm were prepared and the physicomechanical properties of the scaffolds were characterized. Bovine articular chondrocytes were then seeded and maintained on the scaffolds for 7 and 14 days in culture. An upregulation in the gene expression of collagen II was noted with decreasing fiber diameters. For cells that were cultured on scaffolds with a mean fiber diameter of 300 nm, a 2-fold higher ratio of collagen II/collagen I was noted when compared to cells cultured on sponge-like scaffolds prepared by freeze drying and lyophilization. Integrin (α(5), αv, β(1)) gene expression was also observed to be influenced by matrix morphology. Our combined results suggest that matrix geometry can regulate and promote the retention of the chondrocyte genotype.

  19. Behavior of large diameter wire ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Raoof, M.; Kraincanic, I.

    1995-12-31

    The paper reviews the recent theoretical work of the present authors as regards the prediction of the 2 {times} 2 stiffness matrix describing axial/torsional coupling of large diameter wire ropes. The theoretical analysis is based on results from a previously reported orthotropic sheet model which enables one to obtain estimates of the coefficients in the 2 {times} 2 stiffness matrix describing the axial/torsional coupling of the constituent spiral strands. The proposed model can (unlike previously available theories for wire ropes) cater for the presence of interwire friction and the various wire rope stiffness coefficients corresponding to both no-slip and full-slip regimes can be calculated. The no-slip regime corresponds to cases when an axially preloaded wire rope experiences cyclic variations of external load which are small enough not to induce initiation of gross interwire slippage within the constituent spiral strands. For sufficiently large values of range/mean axial load ratios, on the other hand, gross interwire slippage takes place and the effects of interwire friction on wire rope stiffness coefficients will be negligibly small compared with the effects due to the force changes in the wires themselves. Theoretical models have been developed for two types of wire ropes, i.e., those with an independent wire rope core (IWRC) or the types with a fiber core: the salient features for both approaches are reviewed with an emphasis on the characteristics of various wire rope constructions. In addition, experimental results from other sources are found to provide encouraging support for the theoretical predictions in a number of areas.

  20. Mockup Small-Diameter Air Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    A. Poerschke and A. Rudd

    2016-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using a home-run manifold small-diameter duct system to provide space conditioning air to individual thermal zones in a low-load home. This compact layout allows duct systems to be brought easily within conditioned space via interior partition walls. Centrally locating the air hander unit in the house significantly reduces duct lengths. The plenum box is designed so that each connected duct receives an equal amount of airflow, regardless of the duct position on the box. Furthermore, within a reasonable set of length restrictions, each duct continues to receive similar airflow. The design method uses an additive approach to reach the total needed zonal airflow. Once the cubic feet per minute needed to satisfy the thermal load of a zone has been determined, the total number of duct runs to a zone can be calculated by dividing the required airflow by the standard airflow from each duct. The additive approach greatly simplifies the design effort and reduces the potential for duct design mistakes to be made. Measured results indicate that this plenum design can satisfy the heating load. However, the total airflow falls short of satisfying the cooling load in a hypothetical building. Static pressure inside the plenum box of 51.5 Pa limited the total airflow of the attached mini-split heat pump blower, thus limiting the total thermal capacity. Fan energy consumption is kept to 0.16 to 0.22 watt/CFM by using short duct runs and smooth duct material.

  1. High-power vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with an optimized p-contact diameter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Ning, Yongqiang; Qin, Li; Wang, Ye; Cui, Jinjiang; Liu, Guangyu; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Zhenfu; Sun, Yanfang; Liu, Yun; Wang, Lijun

    2010-07-01

    A 980 nm bottom-emitting vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a p-contact diameter is reported to achieve high power and good beam quality. A numerical simulation is conducted on the current spreading in a VCSEL with oxidation between the active region and the p-type distributed Bragg reflector. It is found that, for a particular oxide aperture diameter, somewhat homogeneous current distribution can be achieved for a VCSEL with an optimized p-contact diameter. The far-field divergence angle from a 600 microm diameter VCSEL is suppressed from 30 degrees to 15 degrees, and no strong sidelobe is observed in the far-field pattern by using the optimized p-contact diameter. There is a slight rise in threshold and optical output power that is due to the p-contact optimization. By improving the device packaging method, the maximum optical output power of the device is 2.01 W.

  2. Instability of Reference Diameter in the Evaluation of Stenosis After Coronary Angioplasty: Percent Diameter Stenosis Overestimates Dilative Effects Due to Reference Diameter Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hirami, Ryouichi; Iwasaki, Kohichiro; Kusachi, Shozo; Murakami, Takashi; Hina, Kazuyoshi; Matano, Shigeru; Murakami, Masaaki; Kita, Toshimasa; Sakakibara, Noburu; Tsuji, Takao

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To examine changes in the reference segment luminal diameter after coronary angioplasty.Methods: Sixty-one patients with stable angina pectoris or old myocardial infarction were examined. Coronary angiograms were recorded before coronary angioplasty (pre-angioplasty) and immediately after (post-angioplasty), as well as 3 months after. Artery diameters were measured on cine-film using quantitative coronary angiographic analysis.Results: The diameters of the proximal segment not involved in the balloon inflation and segments in the other artery did not change significantly after angioplasty, but the reference segment diameter significantly decreased (4.7%). More than 10% luminal reduction was observed in seven patients (11%) and more than 5% reduction was observed in 25 patients (41%). More than 5% underestimation of the stenosis was observed in 22 patients (36%) when the post-angioplasty reference diameter was used as the reference diameter, compared with when the pre-angioplasty measurement was used and more than 10% underestimation was observed in five patients (8%).Conclusion: This study indicated that evaluation by percent diameter stenosis, with the reference diameter from immediately after angioplasty, overestimates the dilative effects of coronary angioplasty, and that it is thus better to evaluate the efficacy of angioplasty using the absolute diameter in addition to percent luminal stenosis.

  3. Extrusion of small-diameter, thin-wall tungsten tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, C. P.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Small-diameter, thin-wall seamless tubing of tungsten has been fabricated in lengths of up to 10 feet by hot extrusion over a floating mandrel. Extrusion of 0.50-inch-diameter tubing over 0.4-inch-diameter mandrels was accomplished at temperatures ranging from 3000 degrees to 4000 degrees F.

  4. Magnetic domain structure in small diameter magnetic nanowire arrays [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dong-Huan; Zhang, Hao-Li; Xu, Cai-Ling; Xu, Tao; Li, Hu-Lin

    2005-01-01

    Fe 0.3Co 0.7 alloy nanowire arrays were prepared by ac electrodepositing Fe 2+ and Co 2+ into a porous anodic aluminum oxide (PAO) template with diameter about 50 nm. The surface of the samples were polished by 100 nm diamond particle then chemical polishing to give a very smooth surface (below ±10 nm/μm 2). The morphology properties were characterized by SEM and AFM. The bulk magnetic properties and domain structure of nanowire arrays were investigated by VSM and MFM respectively. We found that such alloy arrays showed strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with easy axis parallel to nanowire arrays. Each nanowire was in single domain structure with several opposite single domains surrounding it. Additionally, we investigated the domain structure with a variable external magnetic field applied parallel to the nanowire arrays. The MFM results showed a good agreement with our magnetic hysteresis loop.

  5. Diameter and chiral angle distribution dependencies on the carbon precursors in surface-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Maoshuai; Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Lehtonen, Juha

    2012-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes grown from discrete Fe-containing nanoparticles dispersed on a silicon nitride transmission electron microscope grid were systematically studied. The (n,m) indices of produced single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were deduced from their electron diffraction patterns. Relatively small diameter SWNTs with a narrow diameter distribution (0.7-1.6 nm) were produced using CO as the carbon source at 800 °C, while large diameter SWNTs ranging from 1.0 nm to 4.7 nm were synthesized when using CH4 as the carbon source. The chiral angle distributions of the SWNTs produced from different carbon sources are also different, which are attributed to the preferred cap nucleation associated with the carbon feed rate on the catalyst instead of carbon nanotube growth kinetics. Furthermore, growth of carbon laminar nanoclusters inside carbon nanotubes was achieved at a higher growth temperature, suggesting that dissociated carbon diffuses across the nanoparticle during the nanotube growth process.Carbon nanotubes grown from discrete Fe-containing nanoparticles dispersed on a silicon nitride transmission electron microscope grid were systematically studied. The (n,m) indices of produced single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were deduced from their electron diffraction patterns. Relatively small diameter SWNTs with a narrow diameter distribution (0.7-1.6 nm) were produced using CO as the carbon source at 800 °C, while large diameter SWNTs ranging from 1.0 nm to 4.7 nm were synthesized when using CH4 as the carbon source. The chiral angle distributions of the SWNTs produced from different carbon sources are also different, which are attributed to the preferred cap nucleation associated with the carbon feed rate on the catalyst instead of carbon nanotube growth kinetics. Furthermore, growth of carbon laminar nanoclusters inside carbon nanotubes was achieved at a higher growth temperature, suggesting that dissociated carbon diffuses across the nanoparticle during the

  6. Simultaneous three-wavelength continuous wave laser at 946 nm, 1319 nm and 1064 nm in Nd:YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Yanfei; Zhao, Lianshui; Zhai, Pei; Xia, Jing; Fu, Xihong; Li, Shutao

    2013-01-01

    A continuous-wave (cw) diode-end-pumped Nd:YAG laser that generates simultaneous laser at the wavelengths 946 nm, 1319 nm and 1064 nm is demonstrated. The optimum oscillation condition for the simultaneous three-wavelength operation has been derived. Using the separation of the three output couplers, we obtained the maximum output powers of 0.24 W at 946 nm, 1.07 W at 1319 nm and 1.88 W at 1064 nm at the absorbed pump power of 11.2 W. A total output power of 3.19 W for the three-wavelength was achieved at the absorbed pump power of 11.2 W with optical conversion efficiency of 28.5%.

  7. Control of the Diameter and Chiral Angle Distributions during Production of Single-wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolaev, Pavel; Holmes, William; Sosa, Edward; Boul, Peter; Arepalli, Sivaram; Yowell, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Many applications of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), especially in microelectronics, will benefit from use of certain (n,m) nanotube types (metallic, small gap semiconductor, etc.). However, as produced SWCNT samples are polydispersed, with many (n,m) types present and typical approximate 1:2 metal/semiconductor ratio. It has been recognized that production of SWCNTs with narrow 'tube type populations' is beneficial for their use in applications, as well as for the subsequent sorting efforts. In the present work, SWCNTs were produced by a pulsed laser vaporization (PLV) technique. The nanotube type populations were studied with respect to the production temperature with two catalyst compositions: Co/Ni and Rh/Pd. The nanotube type populations were measured via photoluminescence, UV-Vis-NIR absorption and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that in the case of Co/Ni catalyst, decreased production temperature leads to smaller average diameter, exceptionally narrow diameter distribution, and strong preference toward (8,7) nanotubes. The other nanotubes present are distributed evenly in the 7-30 deg chiral angle range. In the case of Rh/Pd catalyst, a decrease in the temperature leads to a small decrease in the average diameter, with the chiral angle distribution skewed towards 30 o and a preference toward (7,6), (8,6) and (8,7) nanotubes. However, the diameter distribution remains rather broad. These results demonstrate that PLV production technique can provide at least partial control over the nanotube (n,m) populations. In addition, these results have implications for the understanding the nanotube nucleation mechanism in the laser oven.

  8. Estimation of genetic parameters for wool fiber diameter measures.

    PubMed

    Iman, N Y; Johnson, C L; Russell, W C; Stobart, R H

    1992-04-01

    Genetic and phenotypic correlations and heritability estimates of side, britch, and core diameters; side and britch CV; side and britch diameter difference; and clean fleece weight were investigated using 385 western white-faced ewes produced by 50 sires and maintained at two locations on a selection study. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance procedures, and effects in the final model included breed of sire-selection line combination, sire within breed-selection line, and location. Heritabilities were estimated by paternal half-sib analysis. Sires within breed-selection line represented a significant source of variation for all traits studied. Location had a significant effect on side diameter, side and britch diameter difference, and clean fleece weight. Age of ewe only affected clean fleece weight. Phenotypic and genetic correlations among side, britch, and core diameter measures were high and positive. Phenotypic correlations ranged from .68 to .75 and genetic correlations ranged from .74 to .89. The genetic correlations between side and britch diameter difference and side diameter or core diameter were small (-.16 and .28, respectively). However, there was a stronger genetic correlation between side and britch diameter difference and britch diameter (.55). Heritability of the difference between side and britch diameter was high (.46 +/- .16) and similar to heritability estimates reported for other wool traits. Results of this study indicate that relatively rapid genetic progress through selection for fiber diameter should be possible. In addition, increased uniformity in fiber diameter should be possible through selection for either side and britch diameter difference or side or britch CV.

  9. Crown diameters of the deciduous teeth of Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Dung, S Z; Yang, Y H

    2000-06-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to characterize the crown diameters of the deciduous teeth of Taiwanese; (2) to compare the differences in the deciduous crown diameters between different populations. The results might provide odontometric information in making preformed stainless steel crowns of the Chinese population. Study casts of 90 children (51 boys and 39 girls) of aged 3 to 6 years were used in this study. The maximum mesiodistal crown diameter (the greatest distance between the contact points of the approximal surfaces) and the buccolingual crown diameter (the greatest distance at a right angle to the mesiodistal measurement) were obtained by using an electronic digital caliper. Significant differences between antimeres were found in the mesiodistal diameters of maxillary canine and maxillary molars (p < 0.001) as well as in the buccolingual diameters of mandibular molars (p < 0.05). Excellent correlations between the antimeres of the corresponding teeth were found (r = 0.70 to 0.96). Boys generally had larger crown diameters than girls with the exception of mesiodistal diameters of maxillary and mandibular canines, and mandibular lateral incisor, whereas the statistically significant gender difference was only found in the buccolingual diameter of mandibular second molar (p < 0.05). The higher the percentage of sexual dimorphism, the larger the gender differences. The percentage of sexual dimorphism ranged from 0.09 to 1.94 for mesiodistal diameters and 0.04 to 2.86 for buccolingual diameters. The mandibular second molar was the most dimorphic tooth. Variations in the crown diameters of the deciduous teeth existed among and within different populations. Deciduous mesiodistal crown diameters of Taiwanese were, in general, smaller than those of Australian aborigines, Taiwan Chinese aborigines, and Hong Kong Chinese, but larger than those of American whites. When considering the buccolingual crown diameters, our data were significantly smaller than those

  10. Ultrabreathable and protective membranes with sub-5 nm carbon nanotube pores

    DOE PAGES

    Bui, Ngoc; Meshot, Eric R.; Kim, Sangil; ...

    2016-05-09

    Here, small-diameter carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are shown to enable exceptionally fast transport of water vapor under a concentration gradient driving force. Thanks to this property, membranes having sub-5 nm CNTs as conductive pores feature outstanding breathability while maintaining a high degree of protection from biothreats by size exclusion.

  11. Fabricating vertically aligned sub-20 nm Si nanowire arrays by chemical etching and thermal oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Luping; Fang, Yin; Xu, Cheng; Zhao, Yang; Zang, Nanzhi; Jiang, Peng; Ziegler, Kirk J

    2016-04-22

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are appealing building blocks in various applications, including photovoltaics, photonics, and sensors. Fabricating SiNW arrays with diameters <100 nm remains challenging through conventional top-down approaches. In this work, chemical etching and thermal oxidation are combined to fabricate vertically aligned, sub-20 nm SiNW arrays. Defect-free SiNWs with diameters between 95 and 200 nm are first fabricated by nanosphere (NS) lithography and chemical etching. The key aspects for defect-free SiNW fabrication are identified as: (1) achieving a high etching selectivity during NS size reduction; (2) retaining the circular NS shape with smooth sidewalls; and (3) using a directional metal deposition technique. SiNWs with identical spacing but variable diameters are demonstrated by changing the reactive ion etching power. The diameter of the SiNWs is reduced by thermal oxidation, where self-limiting oxidation is encountered after oxidizing the SiNWs at 950 °C for 1 h. A second oxidation is performed to achieve vertically aligned, sub-20 nm SiNW arrays. Si/SiO2 core/shell NWs are obtained before removing the oxidized shell. HRTEM imaging shows that the SiNWs have excellent crystallinity.

  12. New antireflective coatings for 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gu; Guerrero, Douglas J.; Dobson, Norman

    1998-06-01

    New bottom antireflective coatings (BARCs) for 193 nm lithography have been recently developed by Brewer Science Inc. Copolymers of benzyl methacrylate (or benzyl acrylate) and hydroxypropyl methacrylate have been synthesized and used as a main component in 193 nm BARCs. The acrylic copolymers have strong absorbance at 193 nm UV light wavelength. The 193 nm BARCs were formulated in safe solvents such as ethyl lactate and formed by spin-on coating process. Thermosetting of the 193 nm BARCs limited their intermixing with photoresists. These 193 nm BARCs had optical density of about 10 micrometers -1, k equals 0.35, and n equals 1.81. Preliminary oxygen plasma etch rates were > 1.5 times DUV resists. Good profiles at small feature sizes (< 0.20 micrometers ) were achieved with tested photoresists.

  13. Synthesis of subnanometer-diameter vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with copper-anchored cobalt catalysts.

    PubMed

    Cui, Kehang; Kumamoto, Akihito; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Wang, Benjamin; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2016-01-21

    We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high-quality SWNTs are expected to pave the way to replace silicon for next-generation optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.

  14. Diameter-sensitive biocompatibility of anodic TiO2 nanotubes treated with supercritical CO2 fluid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This work reports on the diameter-sensitive biocompatibility of anodic TiO2 nanotubes with different nanotube diameters grown by a self-ordering process and subsequently treated with supercritical CO2 (ScCO2) fluid. We find that highly hydrophilic as-grown TiO2 nanotubes become hydrophobic after the ScCO2 treatment but can effectively recover their surface wettability under UV light irradiation as a result of photo-oxidation of C-H functional groups formed on the nanotube surface. It is demonstrated that human fibroblast cells show more obvious diameter-specific behavior on the ScCO2-treated TiO2 nanotubes than on the as-grown ones in the range of diameters of 15 to 100 nm. This result can be attributed to the removal of disordered Ti(OH)4 precipitates from the nanotube surface by the ScCO2 fluid, thus resulting in purer nanotube topography and stronger diameter dependence of cell activity. Furthermore, for the smallest diameter of 15 nm, ScCO2-treated TiO2 nanotubes reveal higher biocompatibility than the as-grown sample. PMID:23547743

  15. Fiber diameter distributions in the chinchilla's ampullary nerves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Larry F.; Honrubia, Vicente

    2002-01-01

    A morphometric study of the chinchilla's ampullary nerves was conducted to produce an unbiased accounting of the diameter distribution of their constituent fibers. Diameter analyses were determined from 1 microm plastic-embedded nerve sections taken at a plane immediately proximal to the sensory epithelium. We found these nerves to be composed of 2094+/-573 fibers, having diameters that ranged from 0.5 to 8 microm. The distributions of diameters were positively skewed, where approximately 75% of the fibers were found to have diameters less than 3.5 microm. An analysis of the spatial distribution of diameters within the nerve section revealed that the lateralmost areas of the nerve contained larger fractions of fibers within the smallest diameter quintiles, and the central area harbored greater proportions of the larger diameter quintiles. However, significant fractions of all quintiles were found in all areas. These data were integrated with available data of Fernandez et al. (1998) to produce diameter estimates of calyx, dimorphic, and bouton morphology subpopulations. In view of a general relationship between diameter, innervation locus, and an afferent's physiologic characteristics, these data provide the basis for developing a perspective for the in situ distribution of afferent response dynamics.

  16. Carbon : nickel nanocomposite templates - predefined stable catalysts for diameter-controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkhanova, Svetlana; Haluska, Miro; Hübner, René; Kunze, Tim; Keller, Adrian; Abrasonis, Gintautas; Gemming, Sibylle; Krause, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Carbon : nickel (C : Ni) nanocomposite templates (NCTs) were used as catalyst precursors for diameter-controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Two NCT types of 2 nm thickness were prepared by ion beam co-sputtering without (type I) or with assisting Ar+ ion irradiation (type II). NCT type I comprised Ni-rich nanoparticles (NPs) with defined diameter in an amorphous carbon matrix, while NCT type II was a homogenous C : Ni film. Based on the Raman spectra of more than 600 individual SWCNTs, the diameter distribution obtained from both types of NCT was determined. SWCNTs with a selective, monomodal diameter distribution are obtained from NCT type I. About 50% of the SWCNTs have a diameter of (1.36 +/- 0.10) nm. In contrast to NCT type I, SWCNTs with a non-selective, relatively homogeneous diameter distribution from 0.80 to 1.40 nm covering 88% of all SWCNTs are obtained from NCT type II. From both catalyst templates predominantly separated as-grown SWCNTs are obtained. They are free of solvents or surfactants, exhibit a low degree of bundling and contain negligible amounts of MWCNTs. The study demonstrates the advantage of predefined catalysts for diameter-controlled SWCNT synthesis in comparison to in situ formed catalysts.Carbon : nickel (C : Ni) nanocomposite templates (NCTs) were used as catalyst precursors for diameter-controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Two NCT types of 2 nm thickness were prepared by ion beam co-sputtering without (type I) or with assisting Ar+ ion irradiation (type II). NCT type I comprised Ni-rich nanoparticles (NPs) with defined diameter in an amorphous carbon matrix, while NCT type II was a homogenous C : Ni film. Based on the Raman spectra of more than 600 individual SWCNTs, the diameter distribution obtained from both types of NCT was determined. SWCNTs with a selective, monomodal diameter distribution are obtained from NCT

  17. Pattern transfer processes for 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Seiro; Furukawa, Takamitsu; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Irie, Shigeo; Itani, Toshiro

    2002-07-01

    We describe and evaluate three kinds of pattern transfer processes that are suitable for 157-nm lithography. These transfer processes are 1) a hard mask (HM) process using SiO as a HM material, 2) a HM process using an organic bottom anti-reflecting coating (BARC)/SiN structure, and 3) a bi- layer process using a silicon-containing resist and an organic film as the bottom layer. In all of these processes, the underlayer fo the resist acts as an anti-reflecting layer. For the HM processes, we patterned a newly developed fluorine-containing resist using a 157-nm microstepper, and transferred the resist patterns to the hard mask by reactive ion etching (RIE) with minimal critical dimension shift. Using the HM pattern, we then fabricated a 65nm Wsi/poly-Si gate pattern using a high-NA microstepper (NA=0.85). With the bi-layer process, we transferred a 60nm 1:1 lines and spaces pattern of a newly developed silicon-containing resist to a 300nm-thick organic film by RIE. The fabrication of a 65nm 1:1 gate pattern and 60nm 1:1 organic film patten clearly demonstrated that 157-nm lithography is the best candidate for fabricating sub-70nm node devices.

  18. Can DUV take us below 100 nm?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finders, Jo; Jorritsma, Louis; Eurlings, Mark; Moerman, Richard; van Greevenbroek, Henk; van Schoot, Jan B.; Flagello, Donis G.; Socha, Robert J.; Stammler, Thomas

    2001-09-01

    Currently, the 130 nm SIA node is being implemented at leading edge semiconductor manufacturing facilities. Previously, this node appeared to be the insertion point for 193 nm lithography. However, it is evident that for the majority of applications 248 nm will be the wavelength of choice. This once again raises the question how far DUV lithography (248 nm) will take us. To investigate this, overlay, imaging and productivity related issues have to be considered. Although these items become more and more linked at low k1-factors (e.g. overlay and imaging), this paper will focus on some of the imaging related topics.

  19. Lithography strategy for 65-nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodovsky, Yan A.; Schenker, Richard E.; Allen, Gary A.; Tejnil, Edita; Hwang, David H.; Lo, Fu-Chang; Singh, Vivek K.; Gleason, Robert E.; Brandenburg, Joseph E.; Bigwood, Robert M.

    2002-07-01

    Intel will start high volume manufacturing (HVM) of the 65nm node in 2005. Microprocessor density and performance trends will continue to follow Moore's law and cost-effective patterning solutions capable of supporting it have to be found, demonstrated and developed during 2002-2004. Given the uncertainty regarding the readiness and respective capabilities of 157nm and 193nm lithography to support 65nm technology requirements, Intel is developing both lithographic options and corresponding infrastructure with the intent to use both options in manufacturing. Development and use of dual lithographic options for a given technology node in manufacturing is not a new paradigm for Intel: whenever introduction of a new exposure wavelength presented excessive risk to the manufacturing schedule, Intel developed parallel patterning approaches in time for the manufacturing ramp. Both I-line and 248nm patterning solutions were developed and successfully used in manufacturing of the 350nm node at Intel. Similarly, 248nm and 193nm patterning solutions were fully developed for 130nm node high volume manufacturing.

  20. Gradient fiber electrospinning of layered scaffolds using controlled transitions in fiber diameter.

    PubMed

    Grey, Casey P; Newton, Scott T; Bowlin, Gary L; Haas, Thomas W; Simpson, David G

    2013-07-01

    We characterize layered, delamination resistant, tissue engineering scaffolds produced by gradient electrospinning using computational fluid dynamics, measurements of fiber diameter with respect to dynamic changes in polymer concentration, SEM analysis, and materials testing. Gradient electrospinning delivers a continuously variable concentration of polymer to the electrospinning jet, resulting in scaffolds that exhibit controlled transitions in fiber diameter across the Z-axis. This makes it possible to produce scaffolds that exhibit very different fiber sizes and material properties on opposing surfaces while eliminating the boundary layers that lead to delamination failures. In materials testing bi-layered laminated electrospun scaffolds (layer 1 = <250 nm, layer 2 = 1000 nm diameter polycaprolactone fibers) exhibit ductile properties and undergo multiphasic failure. In contrast, scaffolds, produced by gradient electrospinning fabricated with fibers of this type on opposing surfaces fracture and fail as unified, and mechanically integrated, structures. Gradient electrospinning also eliminates the anisotropic strain properties observed in scaffolds composed of highly aligned fibers. In burst testing, scaffolds composed of aligned fibers produced using gradient electrospinning exhibit superior material properties with respect to scaffolds composed of random or aligned fibers produced from a single polymer concentration or as bi-layered, laminated structures.

  1. Interferometric determination of the silicon sphere diameter using a laser frequency tuning system calibrated by a Fabry-Perot cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuejian; Zhang, Jitao; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2012-11-01

    In order to obtain an accurate Avogadro constant with a relative uncertainty of 1×10-8 to redefine the kilogram, the diameter of a perfect single crystal silicon sphere is required with the measurement uncertainty of 0.3 nm using the X-ray crystal density method. To achieve this, phase-shifting interferometers have been developed. A laser frequency tuning system calibrated by a Fabry-Perot cavity is proposed to improve the laser wavelength and the phase-shift accuracy. The laser frequency standard deviation of the beat frequency is 85 kHz with a gate time of 0.1 s. The gap distances in the diameter determination interferometer are measured based on the laser tuning system, which are 275.3 nm and 110.5 nm, respectively.

  2. Glial Cell Contribution to Basal Vessel Diameter and Pressure-Initiated Vascular Responses in Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Bui, Bang V.; Cull, Grant; Wang, Fang; Wang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that retinal glial cells modify basal vessel diameter and pressure-initiated vascular regulation in rat retina. Methods In rats, L-2-aminoadipic acid (LAA, 10 nM) was intravitreally injected to inhibit glial cell activity. Twenty-four hours following injection, retinal glial intracellular calcium (Ca2+) was labeled with the fluorescent calcium indicator Fluo-4/AM (F4, 1 mM). At 110 minutes after injection, intraocular pressure (IOP) was elevated from 20 to 50 mm Hg. Prior to and during IOP elevation, Ca2+ and retinal vessel diameter were assessed using a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography/confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Dynamic changes in Ca2+ and diameter from IOP elevation were quantified. The response in LAA-treated eyes was compared with vehicle treated control eyes. Results L-2-Aminoadipic acid treatment significantly reduced F4-positive cells in the retina (LAA, 16 ± 20 vs. control, 55 ± 37 cells/mm2; P = 0.02). Twenty-four hours following LAA treatment, basal venous diameter was increased from 38.9 ± 3.9 to 51.8 ± 6.4 μm (P < 0.0001, n = 20), whereas arterial diameter was unchanged (from 30.3 ± 3.5 to 30.7 ± 2.8 μm; P = 0.64). In response to IOP elevation, LAA-treated eyes showed a smaller increase in glial cell Ca2+ around both arteries and veins in comparison with control (P < 0.001 for both). There was also significantly greater IOP-induced vasoconstriction in both vessel types (P = 0.05 and P = 0.02, respectively; n = 6 each). Conclusions The results suggest that glial cells can modulate basal retinal venous diameter and contribute to pressure-initiated vascular responses. PMID:28055098

  3. Supercontinuum generation from 437 to 2850 nm in a tapered fluorotellurite microstructured fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Jia, Z. X.; Yao, C. F.; Wang, S. B.; Hu, M. L.; Wu, C. F.; Ohishi, Y.; Qin, W. P.; Qin, G. S.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrated supercontinuum (SC) generation in a tapered fluorotellurite microstructured fiber (MF) with a sub-micrometer core diameter. Fluorotellurite MFs based on TeO2-BaF2-Y2O3 glasses were fabricated by using a rod-in-tube method and a tapered fluorotellurite MF with a minimum core diameter of ~0.65 µm was prepared by employing a tapering system. A 1560 nm femtosecond fiber laser was used as the pumping source. With increasing the peak power of the launched pump laser to ~11 kW, SC light expanding from 437 to 2850 nm was generated in the tapered fluorotellurite MF. In addition, relatively strong blue-shifted dispersive wave at ~489 nm was also observed from the tapered fluorotellurite MF.

  4. Size dependent compressibility of nano-ceria: Minimum near 33 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Song, Junhua; Walker, David; Clark, Simon M.; Kalkan, Bora; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-04-01

    We report the crystallite-size-dependency of the compressibility of nanoceria under hydrostatic pressure for a wide variety of crystallite diameters and comment on the size-based trends indicating an extremum near 33 nm. Uniform nano-crystals of ceria were synthesized by basic precipitation from cerium (III) nitrate. Size-control was achieved by adjusting mixing time and, for larger particles, a subsequent annealing temperature. The nano-crystals were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and standard ambient x-ray diffraction (XRD). Compressibility, or its reciprocal, bulk modulus, was measured with high-pressure XRD at LBL-ALS, using helium, neon, or argon as the pressure-transmitting medium for all samples. As crystallite size decreased below 100 nm, the bulk modulus first increased, and then decreased, achieving a maximum near a crystallite diameter of 33 nm. We review earlier work and examine several possible explanations for the peaking of bulk modulus at an intermediate crystallite size.

  5. Controlled placement of colloidal quantum dots in sub-15 nm clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfrinato, Vitor R.; Wanger, Darcy D.; Strasfeld, David B.; Han, Hee-Sun; Marsili, Francesco; Arrieta, Jose P.; Mentzel, Tamar S.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Berggren, Karl K.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrated a technique to control the placement of 6 nm-diameter CdSe and 5 nm-diameter CdSe/CdZnS colloidal quantum dots (QDs) through electron-beam lithography. This QD-placement technique resulted in an average of three QDs in each cluster, and 87% of the templated sites were occupied by at least one QD. These QD clusters could be in close proximity to one another, with a minimum separation of 12 nm. Photoluminescence measurements of the fabricated QD clusters showed intermittent photoluminescence, which indicates that the QDs were optically active after the fabrication process. This optimized top-down lithographic process is a step towards the integration of individual QDs in optoelectronic and nano-optical systems.

  6. Controlled placement of colloidal quantum dots in sub-15 nm clusters.

    PubMed

    Manfrinato, Vitor R; Wanger, Darcy D; Strasfeld, David B; Han, Hee-Sun; Marsili, Francesco; Arrieta, Jose P; Mentzel, Tamar S; Bawendi, Moungi G; Berggren, Karl K

    2013-03-29

    We demonstrated a technique to control the placement of 6 nm-diameter CdSe and 5 nm-diameter CdSe/CdZnS colloidal quantum dots (QDs) through electron-beam lithography. This QD-placement technique resulted in an average of three QDs in each cluster, and 87% of the templated sites were occupied by at least one QD. These QD clusters could be in close proximity to one another, with a minimum separation of 12 nm. Photoluminescence measurements of the fabricated QD clusters showed intermittent photoluminescence, which indicates that the QDs were optically active after the fabrication process. This optimized top-down lithographic process is a step towards the integration of individual QDs in optoelectronic and nano-optical systems.

  7. Arterial diameter measurement using high resolution ultrasonography: in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Brum, Javier; Bia, Daniel; Benech, Nicolas; Balay, Guillermo; Armentano, Ricardo L; Negreira, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of pressure and diameter in blood vessels or vascular prosthesis is of great importance in cardiovascular research. Knowledge of diameter changes as response to intravascular pressure is the basis to estimate the biomechanical properties of blood vessel. In this work a new method to quantify arterial diameter based in high resolution ultrasonography is proposed. Measurements on an arterial phantom placed on a cardiovascular simulator were performed. The results were compared to sonomicrometry measurements considered as gold standard technique. The obtained results indicate that the new method ensure an optimal diameter quantification. This method presents two main advantages respect to sonomicrometry: is noninvasive and the vessel wall strain can be measured directly.

  8. Research on fiber diameter automatic measurement based on image detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaogang; Jiang, Yu; Shen, Wen; Han, Guangjie

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we present a method of Fiber Diameter Automatic Measurement(FDAM). This design is based on image detection technology in order to provide a rapid and accurate measurement of average fiber diameter. Firstly, a preprocessing mechanism is proposed to the sample fiber image by using improved median filtering algorithm, then we introduce edge detection with Sobel operator to detect target fiber, finally diameter of random point and average diameter of the fiber can be measured precisely with searching shortest path algorithm. Experiments are conducted to prove the accuracy of the measurement, and simulations show that measurement errors caused by human factors could be eliminated to a desirable level.

  9. Diameter-Controlled and Surface-Modified Sb2Se3 Nanowires and Their Photodetector Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Donghyeuk; Jang, Yamujin; Lee, Jeehee; Jeong, Gyoung Hwa; Whang, Dongmok; Hwang, Sung Woo; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Kim, Sang-Wook

    2014-10-01

    Due to its direct and narrow band gap, high chemical stability, and high Seebeck coefficient (1800 μVK-1), antimony selenide (Sb2Se3) has many potential applications, such as in photovoltaic devices, thermoelectric devices, and solar cells. However, research on the Sb2Se3 materials has been limited by its low electrical conductivity in bulk state. To overcome this challenge, we suggest two kinds of nano-structured materials, namely, the diameter-controlled Sb2Se3 nanowires and Ag2Se-decorated Sb2Se3 nanowires. The photocurrent response of diameter-controlled Sb2Se3, which depends on electrical conductivity of the material, increases non-linearly with the diameter of the nanowire. The photosensitivity factor (K = Ilight/Idark) of the intrinsic Sb2Se3 nanowire with diameter of 80-100 nm is highly improved (K = 75). Additionally, the measurement was conducted using a single nanowire under low source-drain voltage. The dark- and photocurrent of the Ag2Se-decorated Sb2Se3 nanowire further increased, as compared to that of the intrinsic Sb2Se3 nanowire, to approximately 50 and 7 times, respectively.

  10. Orientation of C{sub 70} molecules in peapods as a function of the nanotube diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Chorro, Matthieu; Delhey, Axel; Launois, Pascale; Noe, Laure; Monthioux, Marc

    2007-01-15

    Encapsulated C{sub 70} molecules packed in single-walled carbon nanotubes display different orientations depending on the nanotube radius. We present x-ray scattering data obtained on a powder of nanotubes filled with C{sub 70} molecules. Analytical expressions for calculating the diffraction diagram taking into account fullerene orientations are developed. The comparison between calculations and experiments allows us to conclude that the change from the lying to standing orientation--corresponding to the molecule long axis parallel and perpendicular to the tube axis, respectively--takes place when nanotubes reach a diameter of about 1.42 nm. Energy calculations are performed using a Lennard-Jones (6-12) potential, leading to a calculated reorientation diameter in good agreement with that determined experimentally.

  11. Mean particle diameters. From statistical definition to physical understanding.

    PubMed

    Alderliesten, Maarten

    2005-01-01

    Mean particle diameters may be used to describe and to model physical, chemical, or physiological properties of products or materials containing dispersed phases. There are different notation systems for these mean diameters, which may cause much confusion. This equally applies to their nomenclature. This article introduces the Moment-Ratio definition system and evaluates briefly the ISO definition system. The ISO system appears to have serious drawbacks. Mean particle diameters can be estimated from histograms of size distributions by Summation (M-R system) and by Integration (ISO system) over the histogram intervals. Summation tends to be more accurate than Integration and is less sensitive to low values of the lower limit of size distributions. The Summation method equations are straightforward and generally applicable. The mathematical formulas of the Integration method are difficult to apply in daily practice, and their complexity may easily hide the physical background of a mean particle diameter. A coherent nomenclature system for denoting mean particle diameters is recommended. This nomenclature system does not contain any ambiguities and clearly conveys the physical meanings of mean particle diameters. This article deals also with an empirical method to select the proper type of mean diameter to describe a physical, chemical, or physiological property of a product or material containing dispersed phases. After calculation of the mean diameters from experimental data, the relationships between the product property and these mean diameters are investigated statistically. The selection method has been illustrated by two examples. The dataset of each example consists of a set of particle size distributions and the corresponding physical product properties that are influenced by the particle sizes. Hypotheses are formulated to explain the types of selected mean diameters. Sharing results from all over the world of applications of the developed selection method

  12. Size and time-resolved growth rate measurements of 1 to 5 nm freshly formed atmospheric nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang C.; Chen, M.; Zhao, J.; Smith, J.; McMurry, P. H.; Wang, J.

    2012-04-12

    This study presents measurements of size and time-resolved particle diameter growth rates for freshly nucleated particles down to 1 nm geometric diameter. Novel data analysis methods were developed, de-coupling for the first time the size and time-dependence of particle growth rates by fitting the aerosol general dynamic equation to size distributions obtained at an instant in time. Size distributions of freshly nucleated total aerosol (neutral and charged) were measured during two intensive measurement campaigns in different environments (Atlanta, GA and Boulder, CO) using a recently developed electrical mobility spectrometer with a diethylene glycol-based ultrafine condensation particle counter as the particle detector. One new particle formation (NPF) event from each campaign was analyzed in detail. At a given instant in time during the NPF event, size-resolved growth rates were obtained directly from measured size distributions and were found to increase approximately linearly with particle size from {approx}1 to 3 nm geometric diameter, increasing from 5.5 {+-} 0.8 to 7.6 {+-} 0.6 nm h{sup -1} in Atlanta (13:00) and from 5.6 {+-} 2 to 27 {+-} 5 nm h{sup -1} in Boulder (13:00). The resulting growth rate enhancement {Lambda}, defined as the ratio of the observed growth rate to the growth rate due to the condensation of sulfuric acid only, was found to increase approximately linearly with size from {approx}1 to 3 nm geometric diameter. For the presented NPF events, values for {Lambda} had lower limits that approached {approx}1 at 1.2 nm geometric diameter in Atlanta and {approx}3 at 0.8 nm geometric diameter in Boulder, and had upper limits that reached 8.3 at 4.1 nm geometric diameter in Atlanta and 25 at 2.7 nm geometric diameter in Boulder. Nucleated particle survival probability calculations comparing the effects of constant and size-dependent growth indicate that neglecting the strong dependence of growth rate on size from 1 to 3 nm observed in this study

  13. Dataset for the validation and use of DiameterJ an open source nanofiber diameter measurement tool

    PubMed Central

    Hotaling, Nathan A.; Bharti, Kapil; Kriel, Haydn; Simon, Carl G.

    2015-01-01

    DiameterJ is an open source image analysis plugin for ImageJ. DiameterJ produces ten files for every image that it analyzes. These files include the images that were analyzed, the data to create histograms of fiber radius, pore size, fiber orientation, and summary statistics, as well as images to check the output of DiameterJ. DiameterJ was validated with 130 in silico-derived, digital, synthetic images and 24 scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of steel wire samples with a known diameter distribution. Once validated, DiameterJ was used to analyze SEM images of electrospun polymeric nanofibers, including a comparison of different segmentation algorithms. In this article, all digital synthetic images, SEM images, and their segmentations are included. Additionally, DiameterJ’s raw output files, and processed data is included for the reader. The data provided herein was used to generate the figures in DiameterJ: A Validated Open Source Nanofiber Diameter Measurement Tool[1], where more discussion can be found. PMID:26380840

  14. Simultaneous triple 914 nm, 1084 nm, and 1086 nm operation of a diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Yanfei; Xia, Jing; Liu, Huilong; Pu, Xiaoyun

    2014-10-01

    We report a diode-pumped continuous-wave (cw) triple-wavelength Nd:YVO4 laser operating at 914, 1084, and 1086 nm. A theoretical analysis has been introduced to determine the threshold conditions for simultaneous triple-wavelength laser. Using a T-shaped cavity, we realized an efficient triple-wavelength operation at 4F3/2→4I9/2 and 4F3/2→4I11/2 transitions for Nd:YVO4 crystal, simultaneously. At an absorbed pump power of 16 W (or 25 W of incident pump power), the maximum output power was 2.3 W, which included 914 nm, 1084 nm, and 1086 nm three wavelengths, and the optical conversion efficiency with respect to the absorbed pump power was 14.4%.

  15. Final report on the torque comparison EURAMET.M.T-S2, measurand torque: 10 N.m, 20 N.m, 40 N.m, 60 N.m, 80 N.m, and 100 N.m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röske, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the EURAMET comparison EURAMET.M.T-S2 was to compare the measuring capabilities up to 100 N.m of a reference-type torque calibration machine of ZAG, Slovenia, with the torque standard machine of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) acting as pilot laboratory. A very stable TT1 torque transducer with well-known properties and two torque measuring bridges was used as travelling standard. According to the technical protocol, torque steps of at least 10 N.m, 20 N.m, 40 N.m, 60 N.m, 80 N.m, and 100 N.m had to be measured both in clockwise and anticlockwise directions. For each of the torque steps and both senses of direction of the torque vector, En values were calculated. The results are in general in good agreement with the claimed measurement uncertainties except for the very first measurement at ZAG with additional support and four plate couplings. It seems to be sufficient in a vertical set-up (vertical torque axis) to use only two flexible couplings and there is no need for a further support between the transducers. The measurements with two couplings fulfill the requirement to the En value and support ZAG's claimed uncertainties of measurement. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  16. The Measurements of the Solar Diameter at the Kepler's Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino; Fraschetti, Federico

    2002-12-01

    We examine five measurements of the solar disk diameter made with a pinhole instrument by Tycho in 1591 and Kepler in 1600-1602 [1]. Those are the first accurate measurements of the solar disk diameter available in literature, even if Ptolemy and Copernicus already did such measurements [2].

  17. Method accurately measures mean particle diameters of monodisperse polystyrene latexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubitschek, H. E.

    1967-01-01

    Photomicrographic method determines mean particle diameters of monodisperse polystyrene latexes. Many diameters are measured simultaneously by measuring row lengths of particles in a triangular array at a glass-oil interface. The method provides size standards for electronic particle counters and prevents distortions, softening, and flattening.

  18. Crystallization and fusion behaviors, observed by adiabatic calorimetry, of benzene confined in silica mesopores with uniform diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagoe, Atsushi; Oguni, Masaharu; Fujimori, Hiroki

    2015-03-01

    Heat capacities and spontaneous enthalpy-relaxation effects of the benzene confined in silica MCM-41 and SBA-15 pores with uniform diameters were measured by high-precision adiabatic calorimetry. The fusion temperatures and fusion enthalpies determined were compared with the literature results of benzene confined within pores of CPG glasses. It was confirmed, from the observed spontaneous heat-release or -absorption effects, that there exists a non-crystallizing amorphous component of confined benzene, as reported previously. The pore-diameter dependence of fusion enthalpy observed was inconsistent with the previously proposed model which suggested that the non-crystallizing amorphous component is located on the pore wall in the form of a shell-like structure of a few nm in thickness. A very slow relaxation process corresponding to a translational-diffusion motion of molecule was observed, indicating that the benzene fills the pores incompletely along the pore channel. In addition, we found that the fusion enthalpy as a function of inverse pore-diameter dependence decreases steeply in the range of 60-10 nm in diameter while gradually in the range around 5 nm.

  19. The uncertainty of the phase-correction in sphere-diameter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, B.; Fujii, K.; Kuramoto, N.; Mana, G.

    2012-08-01

    The calculation of the phase correction and the associated uncertainty in the measurement of sphere diameters carried out by optical interferometers is of particular interest. With this view, a Gaussian-beam tracing method was utilized for application to the sphere-interferometer at the National Metrology Institute of Japan as it was used to measure the volume of the 28Si spheres in the determination of the Avogadro constant. Monte Carlo simulations taking account also of possible interferometer misalignments reveal a correction and its uncertainty of 0.609(139) nm.

  20. Uniform circular disks with synthetically tailorable diameters: two-dimensional nanoparticles for plasmonics.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Matthew N; Jones, Matthew R; Kohlstedt, Kevin L; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-02-11

    Herein, we report the synthesis of structurally uniform gold circular disks as two-dimensional plasmonic nanostructures that complement the well-established one-dimensional rod and three-dimensional shell structures. We show that a Au conproportionation reaction can be used to etch a collection of nonuniform triangular prisms into a uniform circular disk product with thickness and diameter varying <10%. These new particles have broadly tunable plasmon resonances (650-1000 nm) with narrow bandwidths (0.23-0.28 eV) and can be described as "effectively two-dimensional" plasmonic structures, as they do not support a significant transverse mode.

  1. Reliable Diameter Control of Carbon Nanotube Nanobundles Using Withdrawal Velocity.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung Hwal; Kim, Kanghyun; An, Taechang; Choi, WooSeok; Lim, Geunbae

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) nanobundles are widely used in nanoscale imaging, fabrication, and electrochemical and biological sensing. The diameter of CNT nanobundles should be controlled precisely, because it is an important factor in determining electrode performance. Here, we fabricated CNT nanobundles on tungsten tips using dielectrophoresis (DEP) force and controlled their diameters by varying the withdrawal velocity of the tungsten tips. Withdrawal velocity pulling away from the liquid-air interface could be an important, reliable parameter to control the diameter of CNT nanobundles. The withdrawal velocity was controlled automatically and precisely with a one-dimensional motorized stage. The effect of the withdrawal velocity on the diameter of CNT nanobundles was analyzed theoretically and compared with the experimental results. Based on the attachment efficiency, the withdrawal velocity is inversely proportional to the diameter of the CNT nanobundles; this has been demonstrated experimentally. Control of the withdrawal velocity will play an important role in fabricating CNT nanobundles using DEP phenomena.

  2. Binding of human coronary artery endothelial cells to plasma-treated titanium dioxide nanotubes of different diameters.

    PubMed

    Flašker, Ajda; Kulkarni, Mukta; Mrak-Poljšak, Katjuša; Junkar, Ita; Čučnik, Saša; Žigon, Polona; Mazare, Anca; Schmuki, Patrik; Iglič, Aleš; Sodin-Semrl, Snezna

    2016-05-01

    Nanoscale topography in improving vascular response in vitro was established previously on various titanium surfaces. In the present study different surface nanotopographies that is different diameters of titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) nanotubes (NTs) were fabricated by electrochemical anodization and conditioned with highly reactive gaseous oxygen plasma. The morphology of different diameter NTs was studied by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, while changes in chemical composition on the surface before and after plasma treatment were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Performance of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) on those conditioned surfaces was studied in regard to cell proliferation, released IL-6 protein and immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM). We show that HCAEC function is dependent on the diameter of the TiO2 NTs, functioning far less optimally when bound to 100 nm TiO2 NTs as compared to Ti foil, 15 nm NTs or 50 nm NTs. There were improved, morphological cell shape changes, observed with IFM, between HCAEC growing on oxygen-rich plasma-treated versus nontreated 100 nm NTs. These endothelialized conditioned Ti nanosurfaces could elucidate optimization conditions necessary for vascular implants in coronary arteries.

  3. Pore diameter effects on phase behavior of a gas condensate in graphitic one-and two-dimensional nanopores.

    PubMed

    Welch, William R W; Piri, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on a hydrocarbon mixture representing a typical gas condensate composed mostly of methane and other small molecules with small fractions of heavier hydrocarbons, representative of mixtures found in tight shale reservoirs. The fluid was examined both in bulk and confined to graphitic nano-scale slits and pores. Numerous widths and diameters of slits and pores respectively were examined under variable pressures at 300 K in order to find conditions in which the fluid at the center of the apertures would not be affected by capillary condensation due to the oil-wet walls. For the bulk fluid, retrograde phase behavior was verified by liquid volumes obtained from Voronoi tessellations. In cases of both one and two-dimensional confinement, for the smallest apertures, heavy molecules aggregated inside the pore space and compression of the gas outside the solid structure lead to decreases in density of the confined fluid. Normal density/pressure relationships were observed for slits having gaps of above 3 nm and pores having diameters above 6 nm. At 70 bar, the minimum gap width at which the fluid could pass through the center of slits without condensation effects was predicted to be 6 nm and the corresponding diameter in pores was predicted to be 8 nm. The models suggest that in nanoscale networks involving pores smaller than these limiting dimensions, capillary condensation should significantly impede transmission of natural gases with similar composition.

  4. Effects of TiO2 nanotubes with different diameters on gene expression and osseointegration of implants in minipigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Li, Hongyi; Lü, Wulong; Li, Jinghui; Wang, Jinshu; Zhang, Zhenting; Liu, Yiran

    2011-10-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanotubes can accelerate the adhesion and differentiation of osteoblasts, yet little is known how this nano-modified implant surface affects osseointegration at molecular level in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of TiO(2) nanotubes with different diameters (30 nm, 70 nm and 100 nm) on biological attachment mechanism of implants to bone in vivo by studying the gene expression and bone formation around the implants. The histological features and fluorochrome labeling changes of bone around implants on the non-decalcified sections (at 3, 5 and 8 weeks after implantation) were investigated by using traditional light- and fluorescent microscopy, and the gene expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osterix (Osx), collagen-I (Col-I) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) was examined by using real-time PCR at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 weeks after implantation. Comparing with machined titanium implants, a significant increase in bone-implant contact (BIC) and gene expression levels was found in the bone attached to implants with TiO(2) nanotubes, especially with 70 nm diameter nanotubes. At the same time, the sequential fluorescent labeling images illustrated dynamic bone deposition. In conclusion, TiO(2) nanotubes can modulate bone formation events at the bone-implant interface as to reach favorable molecular response and osseointegration; in addition, the diameters of nanotubes can be precisely controlled in order to obtain better bone formation.

  5. Effect of diameter of nanoparticles and capture cross-section library on macroscopic dose enhancement in boron neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farhood, Bagher

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is evaluation of the effect of diameter of 10B nanoparticles and various neutron capture cross-section libraries on macroscopic dose enhancement in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Material and methods MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used for simulation of a 252Cf source, a soft tissue phantom and a tumor containing 10B nanoparticles. Using 252Cf as a neutron source, macroscopic dose enhancement factor (MDEF) and total dose rate in tumor in the presence of 100, 200, and 500 ppm of 10B nanoparticles with 25 nm, 50 nm, and 100 nm diameters were calculated. Additionally, the effect of ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, and CENDL neutron capture cross-section libraries on MDEF was evaluated. Results There is not a linear relationship between the average MDEF value and nanoparticles’ diameter but the average MDEF grows with increased concentration of 10B nanoparticles. There is an increasing trend for average MDEF with the tumor distance. The average MDEF values were obtained the same for various neutron capture cross-section libraries. The maximum and minimum doses that effect on the total dose in tumor were neutron and secondary photon doses, respectively. Furthermore, the boron capture related dose component reduced in some extent with increase of diameter of 10B nanoparticles. Conclusions Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that from physical point of view, various nanoparticle diameters have no dominant effect on average MDEF value in tumor. Furthermore, it is concluded that various neutron capture cross-section libraries are resulted to the same macroscopic dose enhancements. However, it is predicted that taking into account the biological effects for various nanoparticle diameters will result in different dose enhancements. PMID:25834582

  6. 10{times} reduction imaging at 13.4nm

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, D.A.; Kubiak, G.D.; Malinowski, M.E.

    1994-08-01

    A Schwarzschild imaging system has been designed to achieve 0.1 {mu}m resolution in a 0.4 mm diameter field of view when operated at a center wavelength of 13.4 nm. A decentered aperture is located on the convex primary resulting in an unobstructed numerical aperture of 0.08 and a corresponding depth of field of {plus_minus} 1 {mu}m. The Schwarzschild imaging objective is part of a five-reflection system containing the laser plasma source (LPS), condensing optics, turning mirror and reflection mask as shown in Figure 1. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is generated by impinging a laser beam onto a copper target. The plasma source is driven by a Lambda Physik PLX 250 KrF excimer laser emitting 0.6 Joule, 20 ns pulses at a 200 Hz maximum repetition rate. Measurements of the source indicate that the full-width-half-maximum diameter is less than 100 {mu}m.

  7. Gallup, NM, CARE Grant Success Story

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A CARE Grant, Level II award, was made to Gallup, NM to focus on cleaning up the waste stream, reuse and recycling of materials, and reclaiming land for these purposes through outreach, education and organization.

  8. Recent progress in 193-nm antireflective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meador, James D.; Guerrero, Douglas J.; Xu, Gu; Shao, Xie; Dobson, Norman; Claypool, James B.; Nowak, Kelly A.

    1999-06-01

    This paper presents the chemistries and properties of organic, spin-on, bottom antireflective coatings (BARCs) that are designed for 193 nm lithography. All of the BARCs are thermosetting and use dye-attached/incorporated polymers. A first generation product, NEXT, will soon be commercialized. NEXT is built form i-line and deep-UV chemistries with the polymeric constituent being a substitute novolac. This product provide outstanding resolution of 0.16 micrometers L/S with several 193 nm photoresists. Second generation chemical platforms under study include acrylics, polyesters, and polyethers with the 193 nm absorbing chromophore being an aromatic function. The performance of selected BARCs from the four platforms is described, including: optical properties, 193 nm litho, plasma etch rates, Prolith modeling data, spin-bowl and waste line compatibility, and ambient stability.

  9. Measuring helium bubble diameter distributions in tungsten with grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M.; Kluth, P.; Doerner, R. P.; Kirby, N.; Riley, D.; Corr, C. S.

    2016-02-01

    Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering was performed on tungsten samples exposed to helium plasma in the MAGPIE and Pisces-A linear plasma devices to measure the size distributions of resulting helium nano-bubbles. Nano-bubbles were fitted assuming spheroidal particles and an exponential diameter distribution. These particles had mean diameters between 0.36 and 0.62 nm. Pisces-A exposed samples showed more complex patterns, which may suggest the formation of faceted nano-bubbles or nano-scale surface structures.

  10. Anomalous n-type electrical behaviour of Pd-contacted CNTFET fabricated on small-diameter nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jejurikar, S.; Casterman, D.; Pillai, P. B.; Petrenko, O.; De Souza, M. M.; Tahraoui, A.; Durkan, C.; Milne, W. I.

    2010-05-01

    A Pd-contacted dopant-free CNTFET with small-diameter (0.57 nm) carbon nanotube showing an anomalous n-type electrical characteristic is reported for the first time. This observed behaviour is attributed to a carbon nanotube work function higher than (or close to) palladium as well as a large hole-to-electron effective mass ratio of ~ 2.5 predicted by hybridization in small-diameter nanotubes. A variation of the conduction type with temperature is also observed and is attributed to an increase of the palladium work function and decrease of the CNT work function with increasing temperature.

  11. Anomalous n-type electrical behaviour of Pd-contacted CNTFET fabricated on small-diameter nanotube.

    PubMed

    Jejurikar, S; Casterman, D; Pillai, P B; Petrenko, O; De Souza, M M; Tahraoui, A; Durkan, C; Milne, W I

    2010-05-28

    A Pd-contacted dopant-free CNTFET with small-diameter (0.57 nm) carbon nanotube showing an anomalous n-type electrical characteristic is reported for the first time. This observed behaviour is attributed to a carbon nanotube work function higher than (or close to) palladium as well as a large hole-to-electron effective mass ratio of approximately 2.5 predicted by hybridization in small-diameter nanotubes. A variation of the conduction type with temperature is also observed and is attributed to an increase of the palladium work function and decrease of the CNT work function with increasing temperature.

  12. Regulation of electrospun scaffold stiffness via coaxial core diameter.

    PubMed

    Drexler, J W; Powell, H M

    2011-03-01

    Scaffold mechanics influence cellular behavior, including migration, phenotype and viability. Scaffold stiffness is commonly modulated through cross-linking, polymer density, or bioactive coatings on stiff substrates. These approaches provide useful information about cellular response to substrate stiffness; however, they are not ideal as the processing can change substrate morphology, density or chemistry. Coaxial electrospinning was investigated as a fabrication method to produce scaffolds with tunable stiffness and strength without changing architecture or surface chemistry. Core solution concentration, solvent and feed rate were utilized to control core diameter with higher solution concentration and feed rate positively correlating with increased fiber diameter and stiffness. Coaxial scaffolds electrospun with an 8 wt./vol.% polycaprolactone (PCL)-HFP solution at 1 ml h(-1) formed scaffolds with an average core diameter of 1.1±0.2 μm and stiffness of 0.027±3.3×10(-3) N mm(-1). In contrast, fibers which were 2.6±0.1 μm in core diameter yielded scaffolds with a stiffness of 0.065±4.7×10(-3) N mm(-1). Strength and stiffness positively correlated with core diameter with no significant difference in total fiber diameter and interfiber distance observed in as-spun scaffolds. These data indicate that coaxial core diameter can be utilized to tailor mechanical properties of three-dimensional scaffolds and would provide an ideal scaffold for assessing the effect of scaffold mechanics on cell behavior.

  13. Fabrication of sub-10 nm metal nanowire arrays with sub-1 nm critical dimension control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Shuang; Lin, Peng; Xia, Qiangfei

    2016-11-01

    Sub-10 nm metal nanowire arrays are important electrodes for building high density emerging ‘beyond CMOS’ devices. We made Pt nanowire arrays with sub-10 nm feature size using nanoimprint lithography on silicon substrates with 100 nm thick thermal oxide. We further studied the critical dimension (CD) evolution in the fabrication procedure and achieved 0.4 nm CD control, providing a viable solution to the imprint lithography CD challenge as specified by the international technology roadmap for semiconductors. Finally, we fabricated Pt/TiO2/Pt memristor crossbar arrays with the 8 nm electrodes, demonstrating great potential in dimension scaling of this emerging device.

  14. Comparison of Epidermal/Dermal Damage Between the Long-Pulsed 1064 nm Nd:YAG and 755 nm Alexandrite Lasers Under Relatively High Fluence Conditions: Quantitative and Histological Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hwan; Park, So Ra; Jo, Jeong Ho; Park, Sung Yun; Seo, Young Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare degrees of epidermal/dermal tissue damage quantitatively and histologically after laser irradiation, to find ideal treatment conditions with relatively high fluence for skin rejuvenation. Background data: A number of recent studies have evaluated the clinical efficacy and safety of therapeutic lasers under relatively low fluence conditions. Methods: We transmitted the long-pulsed 1064 nm Nd:YAG and 755 nm Alexandrite lasers into pig skin according to different fluences and spot diameters, and estimated epidermal/dermal temperatures. Pig skin specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological assessments. The fluence conditions comprised 26, 30, and 36 J/cm2, and the spot diameter conditions were 5, 8, and 10 mm. Pulse duration was 30 ms for all experiments. Results: Both lasers produced reliable thermal damage on the dermis without any serious epidermal injuries, under relatively high fluence conditions. The 1064 nm laser provided more active fibrous formations than the 755 nm laser, while higher risks for tissue damages simultaneously occurred. Conclusions: The ideal treatment conditions for skin rejuvenation were 8 mm diameter with 30 J/cm2 and 10 mm diameter with 26 J/cm2 for the 1064 nm laser, and 8 mm diameter with 36 J/cm2 and 10 mm diameter with 26 J/cm2 for the 755 nm laser. PMID:24992273

  15. Measurement of fetal biparietal diameter in owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae).

    PubMed

    Schuler, A Michele; Brady, Alan G; Tustin, George W; Parks, Virginia L; Morris, Chris G; Abee, Christian R

    2010-09-01

    Owl monkeys are New World primates frequently used in biomedical research. Despite the historical difficulty of breeding owl monkeys in captivity, several productive owl monkey breeding colonies exist currently. The animals in the colony we describe here are not timed-pregnant, and determination of gestational age is an important factor in prenatal care. Gestational age of human fetuses is often determined by using transabdominal measurements of fetal biparietal diameter. The purpose of this study was to correlate biparietal diameter measurements with gestational age in owl monkeys. We found that biparietal diameter can be used to accurately predict gestational age in owl monkeys.

  16. 946 nm Diode Pumped Laser Produces 100mJ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axenson, Theresa J.; Barnes, Norman P.; Reichle, Donald J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An innovative approach to obtaining high energy at 946 nm has yielded 101 mJ of laser energy with an optical-to-optical slope efficiency of 24.5%. A single gain module resonator was evaluated, yielding a maximum output energy of 50 mJ. In order to obtain higher energy a second gain module was incorporated into the resonator. This innovative approach produced un-surprised output energy of 101 mJ. This is of utmost importance since it demonstrates that the laser output energy scales directly with the number of gain modules. Therefore, higher energies can be realized by simply increasing the number of gain modules within the laser oscillator. The laser resonator incorporates two gain modules into a folded "M-shaped" resonator, allowing a quadruple pass gain within each rod. Each of these modules consists of a diode (stack of 30 microlensed 100 Watt diode array bars, each with its own fiber lens) end-pumping a Nd:YAG laser rod. The diode output is collected by a lens duct, which focuses the energy into a 2 mm diameter flat to flat octagonal pump area of the laser crystal. Special coatings have been developed to mitigate energy storage problems, including parasitic lasing and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), and encourage the resonator to operate at the lower gain transition at 946 nm.

  17. High index fluoride materials for 193nm immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawata, T.; Inui, Y.; Masada, I.; Nishijima, E.; Satoh, H.; Fukuda, T.

    2006-03-01

    We tried to investigate various kinds of metal fluoride materials which have higher gravity than CaF II and cubic crystal system, and we found out barium lithium fluoride (BaLiF 3) and potassium yttrium fluoride (KY 3F 10) as candidates for the last lens material. We have developed unique Czochralski (CZ) machines and techniques for the growth of large calcium fluoride single crystals. And we applied these technologies to the growth of fluoride high index materials. We have succeeded to grow the large BaLiF 3 single crystal with 120mm in diameter and a KY 3F 10 single crystal, and measured their basic properties such as refractive index, VUV transmittance, birefringence, and so on. As a result of our basic research, we found out that BaLiF 3 single crystal is transparent at VUV region, and the refractive index at 193nm is 1.64, and KY 3F 10 single crystal has the index of 1.59 at the wavelength of 193nm which is slightly higher than fused silica. We expect that these fluoride high index materials are useful for the last lens material of the next generation immersion lithography.

  18. Low-noise low-jitter 32-pixels CMOS single-photon avalanche diodes array for single-photon counting from 300 nm to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto Villa, Federica; Tisa, Simone; Zappa, Franco

    2013-12-15

    We developed a single-photon counting multichannel detection system, based on a monolithic linear array of 32 CMOS SPADs (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes). All channels achieve a timing resolution of 100 ps (full-width at half maximum) and a photon detection efficiency of 50% at 400 nm. Dark count rate is very low even at room temperature, being about 125 counts/s for 50 μm active area diameter SPADs. Detection performance and microelectronic compactness of this CMOS SPAD array make it the best candidate for ultra-compact time-resolved spectrometers with single-photon sensitivity from 300 nm to 900 nm.

  19. Fabrication of 250-nm-hole arrays in glass and fused silica by UV laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karstens, R.; Gödecke, A.; Prießner, A.; Ihlemann, J.

    2016-09-01

    Parallel nanohole drilling in glass using an ArF excimer laser (193 nm) is demonstrated. For the first time, hole arrays with 500 nm pitch and individual holes with 250 nm diameter and more than 100 nm depth are fabricated by phase mask imaging using a Schwarzschild objective. Holes in soda lime glass are drilled by direct ablation; fused silica is processed by depositing a SiOx-film on SiO2, patterning the SiOx by ablation, and finally oxidizing the remaining SiOx to SiO2. Thermally induced ordered dewetting of noble metal films deposited on such templates may be used for the fabrication of plasmonic devices.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Scanning Probe for Surface Profiling of DUV and 193 nm Photoresist Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Stevens, Ramsey M. D.; Barber, Jabulani; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.; Sanchez, Martha I.; Larson, Carl; Hinsberg, William D.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The continual scaling down of semiconductors to 100 nm and below necessitates a characterization technique to resolve high aspect ratio features in the nanoscale regime. This paper reports the use of atomic force microscope coupled with high aspect ratio multi-walled carbon nanotube scanning probe tip for the purpose of imaging surface profile of photoresists. Multi-walled carbon nanotube tips used in this work are 5-10 nm in diameter and about a micron long. Their exceptional mechanical strength and ability to reversibly buckle enable to resolve steep, deep nanometer-scale features. Images of photoresist patterns generated by 257 nm interference lithography as well as 193 nm lithography are presented to demonstrate multi-walled carbon nanotube scanning probe tip for applications in metrology.

  1. The experimental study of a CW 1080 nm multi-point pump fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuexia; Ge, Tingwu; Ding, Xing; Tan, Qirui; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report on a CW 1080 nm fiber laser cascaded-pumped by a CW 975 nm diode laser. The fiber used in the experiment has a core diameter of 20 μm (NA  =  0.06), inner clad of 400 μm (NA  =  0.46), and an absorption coefficient of about 1.26 dB m-1 at 975 nm. An output power of 780 W with an optical conversion efficiency of 71% has been achieved at a pump light of 1.1 kW. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a 1080 nm CW fiber laser has used a cascaded-pump coupler.

  2. 635nm diode laser biostimulation on cutaneous wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solmaz, Hakan; Gülsoy, Murat; Ülgen, Yekta

    2014-05-01

    Biostimulation is still a controversial subject in wound healing studies. The effect of laser depends of not only laser parameters applied but also the physiological state of the target tissue. The aim of this project is to investigate the biostimulation effects of 635nm laser irradiation on the healing processes of cutaneous wounds by means of morphological and histological examinations. 3-4 months old male Wistar Albino rats weighing 330 to 350 gr were used throughout this study. Low-level laser therapy was applied through local irradiation of red light on open skin excision wounds of 5mm in diameter prepared via punch biopsy. Each animal had three identical wounds on their right dorsal part, at which two of them were irradiated with continuous diode laser of 635nm in wavelength, 30mW of power output and two different energy densities of 1 J/cm2 and 3 J/cm2. The third wound was kept as control group and had no irradiation. In order to find out the biostimulation consequences during each step of wound healing, which are inflammation, proliferation and remodeling, wound tissues removed at days 3, 7, 10 and 14 following the laser irradiation are morphologically examined and than prepared for histological examination. Fragments of skin including the margin and neighboring healthy tissue were embedded in paraffin and 6 to 9 um thick sections cut are stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Histological examinations show that 635nm laser irradiation accelerated the healing process of cutaneous wounds while considering the changes of tissue morphology, inflammatory reaction, proliferation of newly formed fibroblasts and formation and deposition of collagen fibers. The data obtained gives rise to examine the effects of two distinct power densities of low-level laser irradiation and compare both with the non-treatment groups at different stages of healing process.

  3. Wavelength dependence of the apparent diameter of retinal blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Robert; Twietmeyer, Karen; Chipman, Russell; Beaudry, Neil; Salyer, David

    2005-04-01

    Imaging of retinal blood vessels may assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and hypertension. However, close examination reveals that the contrast and apparent diameter of vessels are dependent on the wavelength of the illuminating light. In this study multispectral images of large arteries and veins within enucleated swine eyes are obtained with a modified fundus camera by use of intravitreal illumination. The diameters of selected vessels are measured as a function of wavelength by cross-sectional analysis. A fixed scale with spectrally independent dimension is placed above the retina to isolate the chromatic effects of the imaging system and eye. Significant apparent differences between arterial and venous diameters are found, with larger diameters observed at shorter wavelengths. These differences are due primarily to spectral absorption in the cylindrical blood column.

  4. The philosophies of dowel diameter preparation: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, P M; Palik, J F

    1993-01-01

    This article reviewed the literature regarding the diameter of dowels and identified three distinct philosophies of dowel space preparation. One group advocated the narrowest diameter for fabrication of a dowel to a desired length. Another recommended a dowel space with an apical diameter equal to one third of the narrowest dimension of the root at the terminus of the dowel. A third group advised that at least 1 mm of sound dentin should surround the entire surface of the dowel. A combination of the one third and 1 mm minimal philosophies yielded a practical guideline for dowel space preparation, particularly in aged teeth. Requiring a definite amount of tooth structure surrounding the dowel, while adhering to the one third proportion, indicated upper limits on both the diameter and length of the dowel. These calculated limits served as convenient starting points in selecting a specific style of dowel and assisted in determining whether additional measures are warranted to enhance dowel retention.

  5. SMALL DIAMETER PRECEMENT LINING FROM CATWALK ABOVE. United States ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SMALL DIAMETER PRE-CEMENT LINING FROM CATWALK ABOVE. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Coating, Painting, Lining & Packaging Building, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  6. SMALL DIAMETER CEMENT LINING FROM STAIRWAY. United States Pipe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SMALL DIAMETER CEMENT LINING FROM STAIRWAY. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Coating, Painting, Lining & Packaging Building, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  7. Reconstruction of small diameter arteries using decellularized vascular scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Yuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Kishida, Akio; Fujisato, Toshia; Takakuda, Kazuo

    2014-03-19

    Although artificial vessels are available for large diameter arteries, there are no artificial vessels for small diameter arteries of < 4 mm. We created a decellularized vascular scaffold (length, 10 mm; outer diameter, 1.5 mm; inner diameter, 1.3 mm) from rat abdominal arteries. We measured the biomechanical characteristics of the scaffolds, implanted them to defects made in rat carotid arteries, and evaluated their patency and the endothelial cell linings. Silastic grafts were implanted as controls. The decellularized scaffolds demonstrated similar mechanical characteristics to normal arteries. All of the control grafts were occluded. Fibroblast-like cells were discovered in the thrombus, and fibrous organization was apparent. In contrast, patency of the grafts in 10 of 12 animals was observed 4 weeks after implantation. The internal cavity of the patent scaffold was completely lined by endotheliallike cells. Thus, the possibility of small artery reconstruction using decellularized scaffolds was demonstrated.

  8. SMALL DIAMETER STENCILING, ROLLING OVER STAMP. United States Pipe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SMALL DIAMETER STENCILING, ROLLING OVER STAMP. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Coating, Painting, Lining & Packaging Building, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  9. LARGE DIAMETER WATER TEST MACHINE, TEST FINISHED, PIPE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LARGE DIAMETER - WATER TEST MACHINE, TEST FINISHED, PIPE ON CAR. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Pipe Casting & Testing Area, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  10. Diameter estimation of cylinders by the rigorous diffraction model.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel

    2005-07-01

    The Fraunhofer diffraction formula is commonly used for estimating the diameter of thin cylinders by far field diffractometry. However, an experimental systematic overestimation of the value of the cylinder diameter by this diffraction model and other three-dimensional models has been reported when this estimation is compared with those obtained from interferometric techniques. In this work, a rigorous electromagnetic diffraction model is analyzed to determine the cylinder diameter by using the envelope minima of the far field diffraction pattern. The results of this rigorous model are compared with those from the Fraunhofer diffraction formula. The overestimation by the Fraunhofer model is predicted theoretically, presenting a dependence on the wavelength, the polarization state of the incident wave, and the cylinder diameter. The discrepancies are shown to be due to the three-dimensional geometry.

  11. Northern view of inside diameter welding station of the saw ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Northern view of inside diameter welding station of the saw line in bay9 of the main pipe mill building. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Main Pipe Mill Building, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  12. Eddy sensors for small diameter stainless steel tubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Jack L.; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Grant, J. Brian; Korellis, Henry James; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth; Van Blarigan, Benjamin; Andersen, Lisa E.

    2011-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop non-destructive, minimally disruptive eddy sensors to inspect small diameter stainless steel metal tubes. Modifications to Sandia's Emphasis/EIGER code allowed for the modeling of eddy current bobbin sensors near or around 1/8-inch outer diameter stainless steel tubing. Modeling results indicated that an eddy sensor based on a single axial coil could effectively detect changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tubing. Based on the modeling results, sensor coils capable of detecting small changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tube were designed, built and tested. The observed sensor response agreed with the results of the modeling and with eddy sensor theory. A separate limited distribution SAND report is being issued demonstrating the application of this sensor.

  13. Development of welded metal bellows having minimum effective diameter change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henschel, J. K.; Stevens, J. B.; Harvey, A. C.; Howland, J. S.; Rhee, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    A program of analysis, design, and fabrication was conducted to develop welded metal bellows having a minimum change in effective diameter for cryogenic turbomachinery face seal applications. Linear analysis of the principle types of bellows provided identification of concepts capable of meeting basic operation requirements. For the 6-inch (.152 m) mean diameter, 1.5-inch free length bellows studied, nonlinear analysis showed that opposed and nested toroidal bellows plates stiffened by means of alternating stiffener rings were capable of maintaining constant effective diameter within 0.3% and 0.1% respectively under the operating conditions of interest. Changes in effective diameter were due principally to bellows axial deflection with pressure differential having a lesser influence. Fabrication problems associated with joining the thin bellows plates to the relatively heavy stiffener rings were encountered and precluded assembly and testing of a bellows core. Fabrication problems are summarized and recommended fabrication methods for future effort are presented.

  14. 810nm, 980nm, 1470nm and 1950nm diode laser comparison: a preliminary "ex vivo" study on oral soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Sozzi, Michele; Selleri, Stefano; Vescovi, Paolo; Cucinotta, Annamaria

    2015-02-01

    The introduction of diode lasers in dentistry has several advantages, mainly consisting on the reduced size, reduced cost and possibility to beam delivering by optical fibers. At the moment the two diode wavelengths normally utilized in the dental field are 810 and 980 nm for soft tissues treatments. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of four different diode wavelengths: 810, 980, 1470 and 1950 nm diode laser for the ablation of soft tissues. Several samples of veal tongue were exposed to the four different wavelengths, at different fluences. The internal temperature of the soft tissues, in the area close to the beam, was monitored with thermocouple during the experiment. The excision quality of the exposed samples have been characterized by means of an optical microscope. Tissue damages and the cut regularity have been evaluated on the base of established criteria. The lowest thermal increase was recorded for 1950 nm laser. Best quality and speed of incision were obtained by the same wavelength. By evaluating epithelial, stromal and vascular damages for all the used wavelengths, the best result, in terms of "tissue respect", have been obtained for 1470 and 1950 nm exposures. From the obtained results 1470 and 1950 nm diode laser showed to be the best performer wavelengths among these used in this "ex vivo" study, probably due to their greatest affinity to water.

  15. Radiation Failures in Intel 14nm Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossev, Dobrin P.; Duncan, Adam R.; Gadlage, Matthew J.; Roach, Austin H.; Kay, Matthew J.; Szabo, Carl; Berger, Tammy J.; York, Darin A.; Williams, Aaron; LaBel, K.; Ingalls, James D.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the 14 nm Intel Broadwell 5th generation core series 5005U-i3 and 5200U-i5 was mounted on Dell Inspiron laptops, MSI Cubi and Gigabyte Brix barebones and tested with Windows 8 and CentOS7 at idle. Heavy-ion-induced hard- and catastrophic failures do not appear to be related to the Intel 14nm Tri-Gate FinFET process. They originate from a small (9 m 140 m) area on the 32nm planar PCH die (not the CPU) as initially speculated. The hard failures seem to be due to a SEE but the exact physical mechanism has yet to be identified. Some possibilities include latch-ups, charge ion trapping or implantation, ion channels, or a combination of those (in biased conditions). The mechanism of the catastrophic failures seems related to the presence of electric power (1.05V core voltage). The 1064 nm laser mimics ionization radiation and induces soft- and hard failures as a direct result of electron-hole pair production, not heat. The 14nm FinFET processes continue to look promising for space radiation environments.

  16. Acoustic fill factors for a 120 inch diameter fairing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. Albert

    1992-01-01

    Data from the acoustic test of a 120-inch diameter payload fairing were collected and an analysis of acoustic fill factors were performed. Correction factors for obtaining a weighted spatial average of the interior sound pressure level (SPL) were derived based on this database and a normalized 200-inch diameter fairing database. The weighted fill factors were determined and compared with statistical energy analysis (VAPEPS code) derived fill factors. The comparison is found to be reasonable.

  17. Thermal resistance of ultra-small-diameter disk microlasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, A. E. Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Maximov, M. V.; Lipovskii, A. A.; Savelyev, A. V.; Shostak, I. I.; Moiseev, E. I.; Kudashova, Yu. V.; Kulagina, M. M.; Troshkov, S. I.

    2015-05-15

    The thermal resistance of AlGaAs/GaAs microlasers of the suspended-disk type with a diameter of 1.7–4 μm and InAs/InGaAs quantum dots in the active region is inversely proportional to the squared diameter of the microdisk. The proportionality factor is 3.2 × 10{sup −3} (K cm{sup 2})/W, and the thermal resistance is 120–20°C/mW.

  18. Aldebaran's angular diameter: How well do we know it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richichi, A.; Roccatagliata, V.

    2005-04-01

    The bright, well-known K5 giant Aldebaran, α Tau, is probably the star with the largest number of direct angular diameter determinations, achieved over a long time by several authors using various techniques. In spite of this wealth of data, or perhaps as a direct result of it, there is not a very good agreement on a single angular diameter value. This is particularly unsettling if one considers that Aldebaran is also used as a primary calibrator for some angular resolution methods, notably for optical and infrared long baseline interferometry. Directly connected to Aldebaran's angular diameter and its uncertainties is its effective temperature, which also has been used for several empirical calibrations. Among the proposed explanations for the elusiveness of an accurate determination of the angular diameter of Aldebaran are the possibility of temporal variations as well as a possible dependence of the angular diameter on the wavelength. We present here a few, very accurate new determinations obtained by means of lunar occultations and long baseline interferometry. We derive an average value of 19.96±0.03 milliarcsec for the uniform disk diameter. The corresponding limb-darkened value is 20.58±0.03 milliarcsec, or 44.2±0.9 R⊙. We discuss this result, in connection with previous determinations and with possible problems that may affect such measurements. Based on observations collected at TIRGO (Gornergrat, Switzerland). TIRGO is operated by CNR - CAISMI Arcetri, Italy.

  19. Understanding the effect of carbon status on stem diameter variations

    PubMed Central

    De Swaef, Tom; Driever, Steven M.; Van Meulebroek, Lieven; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Marcelis, Leo F. M.; Steppe, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbon assimilation and leaf-to-fruit sugar transport are, along with plant water status, the driving mechanisms for fruit growth. An integrated comprehension of the plant water and carbon relationships is therefore essential to better understand water and dry matter accumulation. Variations in stem diameter result from an integrated response to plant water and carbon status and are as such a valuable source of information. Methods A mechanistic water flow and storage model was used to relate variations in stem diameter to phloem sugar loading and sugar concentration dynamics in tomato. The simulation results were compared with an independent model, simulating phloem sucrose loading at the leaf level based on photosynthesis and sugar metabolism kinetics and enabled a mechanistic interpretation of the ‘one common assimilate pool’ concept for tomato. Key Results Combining stem diameter variation measurements and mechanistic modelling allowed us to distinguish instantaneous dynamics in the plant water relations and gradual variations in plant carbon status. Additionally, the model combined with stem diameter measurements enabled prediction of dynamic variables which are difficult to measure in a continuous and non-destructive way, such as xylem water potential and phloem hydrostatic potential. Finally, dynamics in phloem sugar loading and sugar concentration were distilled from stem diameter variations. Conclusions Stem diameter variations, when used in mechanistic models, have great potential to continuously monitor and interpret plant water and carbon relations under natural growing conditions. PMID:23186836

  20. Streamer velocity and diameter observed in sprites and laboratory discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.; Kammae, T.; McHarg, M. G.; Haaland, R. K.

    2012-12-01

    Analysis of the relation between the reduced diameter (scaled with atmospheric density) and velocity of sprite streamers has found a roughly linear dependence (Kanmae et al., J. Phys. D, 45, 275203, 2012). This linear dependence agrees with modeling by Naidis (Phys. Rev. E, 79,057401, 2009). Comparing observations of diameters in sprites with those of laboratory streamers (Briels et al., J. Phys. D, 39, 5201, 2006) show that the laboratory streamers, while following the linear diameter-velocity relation, have smaller diameters (and velocities) than what we observe in sprite streamers. We suggest that this may be an artifact of the smaller reduced scale sizes of the laboratory experimental setup where the streamers are observed much earlier relative to streamer onset. Another systematic difference between laboratory and sprite streamers is that while sprite streamers often split into many sub-streamers, laboratory streamers only rarely split into more than two. There have been several studies of streamer stability against splitting. Lui & Pasko (J. Geophys. Res. 109, A04301, 2004) found that the streamer radius limit of 97 m at 70 km altitude for stability. Sprite streamers are often significantly larger, suggesting that the relatively larger streamer diameter in sprites compared to laboratory streamers is responsible for the larger number of sub streamers. However, we note that the distance sprite streamers travel between splitting is highly varying between events and seemingly not related to the sprite diameter.

  1. Diode laser (980nm) cartilage reshaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kharbotly, A.; El Tayeb, T.; Mostafa, Y.; Hesham, I.

    2011-03-01

    Loss of facial or ear cartilage due to trauma or surgery is a major challenge to the otolaryngologists and plastic surgeons as the complicated geometric contours are difficult to be animated. Diode laser (980 nm) has been proven effective in reshaping and maintaining the new geometric shape achieved by laser. This study focused on determining the optimum laser parameters needed for cartilage reshaping with a controlled water cooling system. Harvested animal cartilages were angulated with different degrees and irradiated with different diode laser powers (980nm, 4x8mm spot size). The cartilage specimens were maintained in a deformation angle for two hours after irradiation then released for another two hours. They were serially measured and photographed. High-power Diode laser irradiation with water cooling is a cheep and effective method for reshaping the cartilage needed for reconstruction of difficult situations in otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Key words: cartilage,diode laser (980nm), reshaping.

  2. CoPt/CeO2 catalysts for the growth of narrow diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei; Li, Taotao; Li, Chaowei; Ling, Lin; Zhang, Kai; Yao, Yagang

    2015-11-01

    For the application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in nanoelectronic devices, effective techniques for the growth of semiconducting SWNTs (s-SWNTs) with a specific diameter are still a great challenge. Herein, we report a facile strategy for the selective growth of narrow diameter distributed s-SWNTs using CoPt/CeO2 catalysts. The addition of Pt into a Co catalyst dramatically reduces the diameter distributions and even the chirality distributions of the as-grown SWNTs. Oxygen vacancies that are provided by mesoporous CeO2 are responsible for creating an oxidative environment to in situ etch metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs). Atomic force microscope (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy characterizations indicate a narrow diameter distribution of 1.32 +/- 0.03 nm and the selective growth of s-SWNTs to 93%, respectively. In addition, electronic transport measurements also confirm that the Ion/Ioff ratio is mainly in the order of ~103. This work provides an effective strategy for the facile fabrication of narrow diameter distributed s-SWNTs, which will be beneficial to fundamental research and the broad application of SWNTs for future nanoelectronics.For the application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in nanoelectronic devices, effective techniques for the growth of semiconducting SWNTs (s-SWNTs) with a specific diameter are still a great challenge. Herein, we report a facile strategy for the selective growth of narrow diameter distributed s-SWNTs using CoPt/CeO2 catalysts. The addition of Pt into a Co catalyst dramatically reduces the diameter distributions and even the chirality distributions of the as-grown SWNTs. Oxygen vacancies that are provided by mesoporous CeO2 are responsible for creating an oxidative environment to in situ etch metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs). Atomic force microscope (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy characterizations indicate a narrow diameter distribution of 1.32 +/- 0.03 nm and the selective growth of s-SWNTs to 93%, respectively. In addition

  3. 200-mm-diameter neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma etcher and silicon etching

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Tomohiro; Nukaga, Osamu; Ueki, Shinji; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Inamoto, Yoshimasa; Ohtake, Hiroto; Samukawa, Seiji

    2010-09-15

    The authors developed a neutral beam source consisting of a 200-mm-diameter inductively coupled plasma etcher and a graphite neutralization aperture plate based on the design of a neutral beam source that Samukawa et al. [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Part 2 40, L779 (2001)] developed. They measured flux and energy of neutral particles, ions, and photons using a silicon wafer with a thermocouple and a Faraday cup and calculated the neutralization efficiency. An Ar neutral beam flux of more than 1 mA/cm{sup 2} in equivalent current density and a neutralization efficiency of more than 99% were obtained. The spatial uniformity of the neutral beam flux was within {+-}6% within a 100 mm diameter. Silicon etching using a F{sub 2}-based neutral beam was done at an etch rate of about 47 nm/min, while Cl{sub 2}-based neutral beam realized completely no undercut. The uniformity of etch rate was less than {+-}5% within the area. The etch rate increased by applying bias power to the neutralization aperture plate, which shows that accelerated neutral beam was successfully obtained. These results indicate that the neutral beam source is scalable, making it possible to obtain a large-diameter and uniform neutral beam, which is inevitable for application to mass production.

  4. Ultra-Compact Multitip Scanning Probe Microscope with an Outer Diameter of 50 mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, Vasily; Zubkov, Evgeny; Junker, Hubertus; Korte, Stefan; Blab, Marcus; Coenen, Peter; Voigtländer, Bert

    We present a multitip scanning tunneling microscope (STM) where four independent STM units are integrated on a diameter of 50 mm. The coarse positioning of the tips is done under the control of an optical microscope or an SEM in vacuum. The heart of this STM is a new type of piezoelectric coarse approach called Koala Drive which can have a diameter greater than 2.5 mm and a length smaller than 10 mm. Alternating movements of springs move a central tube which holds the STM tip or AFM sensor. This new operating principle provides a smooth travel sequence and avoids shaking which is intrinsically present for nanopositioners based on inertial motion with saw tooth driving signals. Inserting the Koala Drive in a piezo tube for xyz-scanning integrates a complete STM inside a 4 mm outer diameter piezo tube of <10 mm length. The use of the Koala Drive makes the scanning probe microscopy design ultra-compact and accordingly leads to a high mechanical stability. The drive is UHV, low temperature, and magnetic field compatible. The compactness of the Koala Drive allows building a four-tip STM as small as a single-tip STM with a drift of <0.2 nm/min and lowest resonance frequencies of 2.5 (xy) and 5.5 kHz (z). We present examples of the performance of the multitip STM designed using the Koala Drive.

  5. Construction and manufacturing of a microgearhead with 1.9-mm outer diameter for universal application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuerigen, Christian; Beckord, Ulrich; Bessey, Reiner

    1999-03-01

    Many new applications in medicine, telecommunication, automation systems etc. require powerful microdrives. Speeds up to 100.000 rpm and output torques in the (mu) Nm-range are typical characteristics of electromagnetic micromotors with diameters of a few millimeters. To accomplish a powerful microdrive, these micromotors have to be combined with micro gearheads of the same outer diameter. For such a micro gearhead with toothed wheels manufactured by use of the LIGA process a multi-stage planetary gear has many advantages. Many stages with different gear ratios can be combined to achieve a great number of different transmission, but manufacturing tolerances and a clearance for assembly must be respected. Therefore besides the selection of a reliable gearhead type and a suitable manufacturing process the optimization of the tooth profile is the key to the implementation of powerful micro gear systems with high output torques and efficiencies. The involute profile is the most suitable toothing, but many calculations and simulations are required to find the right modulus, total depth of teeth, profile offset etc. In a joint project Dr. Fritz Faulhaber GmbH and Co. KG and the Institut fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz GmbH developed a powerful microdevice with an outer diameter of only 1.9 mm.

  6. Sub-100 nm silicon nanowires by laser interference lithography and metal-assisted etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boor, Johannes; Geyer, Nadine; Wittemann, Jörg V.; Gösele, Ulrich; Schmidt, Volker

    2010-03-01

    By combining laser interference lithography and metal-assisted etching we were able to produce arrays of silicon nanowires with uniform diameters as small as 65 nm and densities exceeding 2 × 107 mm - 2. The wires are single crystalline, vertically aligned, arranged in a square pattern and obey strict periodicity over several cm2. The applied technique allows for a tailoring of nanowire size and density. Using a controlled and scalable process to fabricate sub-100 nm silicon nanowires is an important step towards the realization of cost-effective electronic and thermoelectric devices.

  7. 14nm M1 triple patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiao; Ghosh, Pradiptya; Abercrombie, David; LaCour, Pat; Kanodia, Suniti

    2012-03-01

    With 20nm production becoming a reality, research has started to focus on the technology needs for 14nm. The LELE double patterning used in 20nm production will not be able to resolve M1 for 14nm. Main competing enabling technologies for the 14nm M1 are SADP, EUV, and LELELE (referred as LE3 thereafter) triple patterning. SADP has a number of concerns of 1. density, as a layout geometry needs to stay complete as a whole, and can not be broken; 2. the complexity in SADP mask generation and debug feedback to designers; 3. the subtraction nature of the trim mask further complicates OPC and yield. While EUV does not share those concerns, it faces significant challenges on the manufacturing equipment side. Of the SADP concerns, LE3 only shares that of complexity involved in mask generation and intuitive debug feedback mechanism. It does not require a layout geometry to stay as a whole, and it benefits from the affinity to LELE which is being deployed for 20nm production. From a process point of view, this benefit from affinity to LELE is tremendous due to the data and knowledge that have been collected and will be coming from the LELE deployment. In this paper, we first recount the computational complexity of the 3-colorability problem which is an integral part of a LE3 solution. We then describe graph characteristics that can be exploited such that 3-colorability is equivalent under divide-and-conquer. Also outlined are heuristics, which are generally applied in solving computationally intractable problems, for the 3-colorability problem, and the importance in choosing appropriate worst-case exponential runtime algorithms. This paper concludes with a discussion on the new hierarchical problem that faces 3-colorability but not 2-colorability and proposals for non-3-colorability feedback mechanism.

  8. Comparative study of Nd:KGW lasers pumped at 808 nm and 877 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ke; Ge, Wen-Qi; Zhao, Tian-Zhuo; He, Jian-Guo; Feng, Chen-Yong; Fan, Zhong-Wei

    2015-10-01

    The laser performance and thermal analysis of Nd:KGW laser continuously pumped by 808 nm and 877 nm are comparatively investigated. Output power of 670 mW and 1587 mW, with nearly TEM00 mode, are achieved respectively at 808 nm pump and 877 nm pump. Meanwhile, a high-power passively Q-switched Nd:KGW/Cr4+:YAG laser pumped at 877 nm is demonstrated. An average output power of 1495 mW is obtained at pump power of 5.22 W while the laser is operating at repetition of 53.17 kHz. We demonstrate that 877 nm diode laser is a more potential pump source for Nd:KGW lasers.

  9. Preparation of large-pore mesoporous nanocrystalline TiO2 thin films with tailored pore diameters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kesong; Fu, Honggang; Shi, Keying; Xiao, Fengshou; Jing, Liqiang; Xin, Baifu

    2005-10-13

    A novel and facile synthesis route to large-pore mesoporous nanocrystalline anatase thin films with tunable pore diameters in narrow distribution of sizes ranging from 8.3 to 14 nm is reported, using triblock copolymer as the template and Ti(OBu(n))4 as the inorganic precursor. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption. A reasonable formation mechanism is also presented in this work.

  10. 193 nm Excimer laser processing of Si/Ge/Si(100) micropatterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontad, F.; Conde, J. C.; Chiussi, S.; Serra, C.; González, P.

    2016-01-01

    193 nm Excimer laser assisted growth and crystallization of amorphous Si/Ge bilayer patterns with circular structures of 3 μm diameter and around 25 nm total thickness, is presented. Amorphous patterns were grown by Laser induced Chemical Vapor Deposition, using nanostencils as shadow masks and then irradiated with the same laser to induce structural and compositional modifications for producing crystalline SiGe alloys through fast melting/solidification cycles. Compositional and structural analyses demonstrated that pulses of 240 mJ/cm2 lead to graded SiGe alloys with Si rich discs of 2 μm diameter on top, a buried Ge layer, and Ge rich SiGe rings surrounding each feature, as predicted by previous numerical simulation.

  11. Large Diameter, Radiative Extinction Experiments with Decane Droplets in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, John; Tien, James; Dietrich, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The extinction of a diffusion flame is of fundamental interest in combustion science. Linan, Law, and Chung and Law analytically and experimentally determined an extinction boundary in terms of droplet diameter and pressure for a single droplet due to Damkohler, or blowoff, extinction. More recently, other researchers demonstrated extinction due to finite rate kinetics in reduced gravity for free droplets of heptane. Chao modeled the effect of radiative heat loss on a quasi-steady spherically symmetric single droplet burning in the absence of buoyancy. They determined that for increasing droplet diameter, a second limit can be reached such that combustion is no longer possible. This second, larger droplet diameter limit arises due to radiative heat loss, which increases with increasing droplet and flame diameter. This increase in radiative heat loss arises due to an increase in the surface area of the flame. Recently, Marchese modeled fuel droplets with detailed chemistry and radiative effects, and compared the results to other work. The modeling also showed the importance of radiative loss and radiative extinction Experiments examined the behavior of a large droplet of decane burning in reduced gravity onboard the NASA Lewis DC-9 aircraft, but did not show a radiative extinction boundary due to g-jitter (Variations in gravitational level and direction) effects. Dietrich conducted experiments in the reduced gravity environment of the Space Shuttle. This work showed that the extinction diameter of methanol droplets increased when the initial diameter of the droplets was large (in this case, approximately 5 mm). Theoretical results agreed with these experimental results only when the theory included radiative effects . Radiative extinction was experimentally verified by Nayagam in a later Shuttle mission. The following work focuses on the combustion and extinction of a single fuel droplet. The goal is to experimentally determine a large droplet diameter limit that

  12. Synthesis of fluorinated materials for 193-nm immersion lithography and 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Yoshida, T.; Hayamai, T.; Araki, Takayuki; Aoyama, H.; Hagiwara, T.; Itani, Toshiro; Fujii, Kiyoshi

    2005-05-01

    Various fluorinated polymers were synthesized for application in 193-nm immersion lithography with the goal of improving 157-nm photoresist performance. Their fundamental properties were characterized, such as transparency at 193-nm and 157-nm (wavelength) and solubility in water and a standard alkaline developer. High transparency, i.e., absorbance better than 0.3 μm-1 at 193-nm wavelength, was achieved. The dissolution behaviors of them were studied by using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) method. We find that the dissolution rate of Poly(norbornene-2-fluoro-2-hexafluoroalchol) (PNB1FVIP) in 0.065N tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) was >200 times (nm/s) faster than that of the copolymer of tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) and norbornene-2-fluoro-2-hexafluoroalchol (TFE/NB1FVIP). A resist based on TFE/NB1FVIP was able to delineate 75 nm dense lines by exposure at 193-nm (wavelength) with an alternating phase shift mask using a 0.75 NA ArF scanner. The dissolution rates of the fluoropolymers in water and a 0.262N and 0.065 TMAH can be controlled by optimizing counter monomers containing hexafluoroisopropanol (HFA) unit, carboxylic acid unit and so on. In addition, we have collect water contact angle data. This data shows that fluoropolymers can be used as resist cover materials for 193-nm immersion lithography.

  13. Control of the Diameter and Chiral Angle Distributions during Production of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolaev, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Many applications of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), especially in microelectronics, will benefit from use of certain (n,m) nanotube types (metallic, small gap semiconductor, etc.) Especially fascinating is the possibility of quantum conductors that require metallic armchair nanotubes. However, as produced SWCNT samples are polydisperse, with many (n,m) types present and typical approx.1:2 metal/semiconductor ratio. Nanotube nucleation models predict that armchair nuclei are energetically preferential due to formation of partial triple bonds along the armchair edge. However, nuclei can not reach any meaningful thermal equilibrium in a rapidly expanding and cooling plume of carbon clusters, leading to polydispersity. In the present work, SWCNTs were produced by a pulsed laser vaporization (PLV) technique. The carbon vapor plume cooling rate was either increased by change in the oven temperature (expansion into colder gas), or decreased via "warm-up" with a laser pulse at the moment of nucleation. The effect of oven temperature and "warm-up" on nanotube type population was studied via photoluminescence, UV-Vis-NIR absorption and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that reduced temperatures leads to smaller average diameters, progressively narrower diameter distributions, and some preference toward armchair structures. "Warm-up" shifts nanotube population towards arm-chair structures as well, but the effect is small. Possible improvement of the "warm-up" approach to produce armchair SWCNTs will be discussed. These results demonstrate that PLV production technique can provide at least partial control over the nanotube (n,m) population. In addition, these results have implications for the understanding the nanotube nucleation mechanism in the laser oven.

  14. Fabrication and electrical characterization of sub-micron diameter through-silicon via for heterogeneous three-dimensional integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaspour, R.; Brown, D. K.; Bakir, M. S.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and electrical characterization of high aspect-ratio (AR) sub-micron diameter through silicon vias (TSVs) for densely interconnected three-dimensional (3D) stacked integrated circuits (ICs). The fabricated TSV technology features an AR of 16:1 with 680 nm diameter copper (Cu) core and 920 nm overall diameter. To address the challenges in scaling TSVs, scallop-free low roughness nano-Bosch silicon etching and direct Cu electroplating on a titanium-nitride (TiN) diffusion barrier layer have been developed as key enabling modules. The electrical resistance of the sub-micron TSVs is measured to be on average 1.2 Ω, and the Cu resistivity is extracted to be approximately 2.95 µΩ cm. Furthermore, the maximum achievable current-carrying capacity (CCC) of the scaled TSVs is characterized to be approximately 360 µA for the 680 nm Cu core.

  15. White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast NM (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground.

  16. Radiation Tolerance of 65nm CMOS Transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Krohn, M.; Bentele, B.; Christian, D. C.; ...

    2015-12-11

    We report on the effects of ionizing radiation on 65 nm CMOS transistors held at approximately -20°C during irradiation. The pattern of damage observed after a total dose of 1 Grad is similar to damage reported in room temperature exposures, but we observe less damage than was observed at room temperature.

  17. The 503nm pigment of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kamitakahara, Joyce R.; Polglase, W. J.

    1970-01-01

    The yield of cell protein was one-third less for streptomycin-dependent Escherichia coli B than for the wild-type parent strain when both were grown aerobically on a medium with limiting glucose, but anaerobically the yield of protein was similar for both strains. The transient pigment absorbing at 503nm that is known to be present in E. coli and other organisms was not detectable in streptomycin-dependent mutants nor in a non-dependent (energy-deficient) revertant. When wild-type E. coli B was grown on limiting glucose–salts medium containing 2,4 dinitrophenol, the yield of cell protein was decreased and formation of the 503nm pigment was inhibited. Fumarase, aconitase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were de-repressed in E. coli B cells grown with excess of glucose in a medium containing 2,4-dinitrophenol. In air-oxidized, wild-type E. coli B cells, the 503nm pigment appeared before reduced cytochromes when gluconate was the substrate but failed to appear when succinate was the substrate. The results provide evidence for a role of the 503nm pigment in aerobic energy metabolism, possibly as an electron acceptor from NADPH. PMID:4395501

  18. Electrical transport properties of small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes aligned on ST-cut quartz substrates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A method is introduced to isolate and measure the electrical transport properties of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) aligned on an ST-cut quartz, from room temperature down to 2 K. The diameter and chirality of the measured SWNTs are accurately defined from Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A significant up-shift in the G-band of the resonance Raman spectra of the SWNTs is observed, which increases with increasing SWNTs diameter, and indicates a strong interaction with the quartz substrate. A semiconducting SWNT, with diameter 0.84 nm, shows Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid and Coulomb blockade behaviors at low temperatures. Another semiconducting SWNT, with a thinner diameter of 0.68 nm, exhibits a transition from the semiconducting state to an insulating state at low temperatures. These results elucidate some of the electrical properties of SWNTs in this unique configuration and help pave the way towards prospective device applications. PMID:25170326

  19. Ferromagnetism in fcc twinned 2.4 nm size Pd nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, B; Crespo, P; Hernando, A; Litrán, R; Sánchez López, J C; López Cartes, C; Fernandez, A; Ramírez, J; González Calbet, J; Vallet, M

    2003-12-05

    The onset of ferromagnetism has been experimentally observed in small Pd particles of average diameter 2.4 nm. High-resolution studies reveal that a high percentage of the fcc particle exhibits single and multiple twinning boundaries. The spontaneous magnetization close to 0.02 emu/g seems to indicate that only a small fraction of atoms holds a permanent magnetic moment and contributes to ferromagnetism. The possible origin of ferromagnetism is briefly discussed according to different models recently reported.

  20. Compositional Variation in Large-Diameter Low-Albedo asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, F.; Jarvis, K. S.; Thibault, C. A.; Sawyer, S. R.

    2000-12-01

    Age dating of meteorites indicates that the Solar System was subjected to a major heating event 4.5 Gyr ago. Models of the effects of heating by electromagnetic induction or decay of short-lived radionuclides combined with models of the early collisional history of the Solar System after Jupiter's formation indicate that asteroids observed today can be divided into two groups by diameter. Those asteroids having diameters greater than 100 km were mixed by multiple collisions but remain as gravitationally bound rubble piles. Asteroids with diameters less than 100 km should show more compositional diversity. Vilas and Sykes (1996, Icarus, 124) have shown using ECAS photometry that this compositional difference exists. The larger diameter group should be individually homogenous, with spectral differences showing the combined effects of a primordial compositional gradient in the asteroid belt with thermal metamorphism. We address the significance of 36 rotationally-resolved spectra of larger-diameter low-albedo asteroids of the C class (and subclasses B, F, G) and P class in the visible and Near-IR spectral regions. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy program.

  1. Memory, emotion, and pupil diameter: Repetition of natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Margaret M; Lang, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that pupil diameter, like the "old-new" ERP, may be a measure of memory. Because the amplitude of the old-new ERP is enhanced for items encoded in the context of repetitions that are distributed (spaced), compared to massed (contiguous), we investigated whether pupil diameter is similarly sensitive to repetition. Emotional and neutral pictures of natural scenes were viewed once or repeated with massed (contiguous) or distributed (spaced) repetition during incidental free viewing and then tested on an explicit recognition test. Although an old-new difference in pupil diameter was found during successful recognition, pupil diameter was not enhanced for distributed, compared to massed, repetitions during either recognition or initial free viewing. Moreover, whereas a significant old-new difference was found for erotic scenes that had been seen only once during encoding, this difference was absent when erotic scenes were repeated. Taken together, the data suggest that pupil diameter is not a straightforward index of prior occurrence for natural scenes.

  2. Parametric Probability Distribution Functions for Axon Diameters of Corpus Callosum.

    PubMed

    Sepehrband, Farshid; Alexander, Daniel C; Clark, Kristi A; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Yang, Zhengyi; Reutens, David C

    2016-01-01

    Axon diameter is an important neuroanatomical characteristic of the nervous system that alters in the course of neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Axon diameters vary, even within a fiber bundle, and are not normally distributed. An accurate distribution function is therefore beneficial, either to describe axon diameters that are obtained from a direct measurement technique (e.g., microscopy), or to infer them indirectly (e.g., using diffusion-weighted MRI). The gamma distribution is a common choice for this purpose (particularly for the inferential approach) because it resembles the distribution profile of measured axon diameters which has been consistently shown to be non-negative and right-skewed. In this study we compared a wide range of parametric probability distribution functions against empirical data obtained from electron microscopy images. We observed that the gamma distribution fails to accurately describe the main characteristics of the axon diameter distribution, such as location and scale of the mode and the profile of distribution tails. We also found that the generalized extreme value distribution consistently fitted the measured distribution better than other distribution functions. This suggests that there may be distinct subpopulations of axons in the corpus callosum, each with their own distribution profiles. In addition, we observed that several other distributions outperformed the gamma distribution, yet had the same number of unknown parameters; these were the inverse Gaussian, log normal, log logistic and Birnbaum-Saunders distributions.

  3. Two-dimensional wakes of a variable diameter cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchao; Stremler, Mark

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that periodic variations in the position of a circular cylinder can produce a variety of complex vortex wake patterns. We will discuss what we believe is the first investigation of the wake patterns produced by a stationary circular cylinder undergoing periodic variations in the cylinder diameter. In our experiments, cylinder variations are produced by oscillating a cone perpendicularly through a flowing soap film. The wake flow generates thickness variations in the thin soap film, allowing direct observation of wake patterns through visualization of interference fringes. We consider diameter variations ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 times the mean diameter, with the Reynolds number varying from 50 to 150. The frequency of the diameter's variation influences the wake patterns. When the variation frequency is negligible compared to the vortex shedding frequency, the wake is a quasi-steady representation of fixed cylinder shedding. We will discuss wake pattern bifurcations that occur as the variation frequency becomes comparable to the vortex shedding frequency. Comparisons will be made with the wake patterns generated by a constant-diameter circular cylinder forced to oscillate transverse to the free stream.

  4. Parametric Probability Distribution Functions for Axon Diameters of Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Sepehrband, Farshid; Alexander, Daniel C.; Clark, Kristi A.; Kurniawan, Nyoman D.; Yang, Zhengyi; Reutens, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Axon diameter is an important neuroanatomical characteristic of the nervous system that alters in the course of neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Axon diameters vary, even within a fiber bundle, and are not normally distributed. An accurate distribution function is therefore beneficial, either to describe axon diameters that are obtained from a direct measurement technique (e.g., microscopy), or to infer them indirectly (e.g., using diffusion-weighted MRI). The gamma distribution is a common choice for this purpose (particularly for the inferential approach) because it resembles the distribution profile of measured axon diameters which has been consistently shown to be non-negative and right-skewed. In this study we compared a wide range of parametric probability distribution functions against empirical data obtained from electron microscopy images. We observed that the gamma distribution fails to accurately describe the main characteristics of the axon diameter distribution, such as location and scale of the mode and the profile of distribution tails. We also found that the generalized extreme value distribution consistently fitted the measured distribution better than other distribution functions. This suggests that there may be distinct subpopulations of axons in the corpus callosum, each with their own distribution profiles. In addition, we observed that several other distributions outperformed the gamma distribution, yet had the same number of unknown parameters; these were the inverse Gaussian, log normal, log logistic and Birnbaum-Saunders distributions. PMID:27303273

  5. Ultralong, small-diameter TiOTiO₂ nanotubes achieved by an optimized two-step anodization for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Sun, Lidong; Zhang, Sam; Wang, Xiu

    2014-02-12

    An optimized two-step anodization is developed to fabricate ultralong, small-diameter TiO2 nanotubes, that is, with tube length of up to 31 μm and pore diameter of about 35 nm in this work. This overcomes the length limitation of small diameter tubes that usually presents in conventional one-step anodization. The small tubes with lengths of 23 μm yield a conversion efficiency of 5.02% in dye-sensitized solar cells under nonoptimized conditions.

  6. Diameter and density control of single-walled carbon nanotube forests by modulating Ostwald ripening through decoupling the catalyst formation and growth processes.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Shunsuke; Inaguma, Masayasu; Futaba, Don N; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2013-11-11

    A continuous and wide range control of the diameter (1.9-3.2 nm) and density (0.03-0.11 g cm(-3) ) of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) forests is demonstrated by decoupling the catalyst formation and SWNT growth processes. Specifically, by managing the catalyst formation temperature and H2 exposure, the redistribution of the Fe catalyst thin film into nanoparticles is controlled while a fixed growth condition preserved the growth yield. The diameter and density are inversely correlated, where low/high density forests would consist of large/small diameter SWNTs, which is proposed as a general rule for the structural control of SWNT forests. The catalyst formation process is modeled by considering the competing processes, Ostwald ripening, and subsurface diffusion, where the dominant mechanism is found to be Ostwald ripening. Specifically, H2 exposure increases catalyst surface energy and decreases diameter, while increased temperature leads to increased diffusion on the surface and an increase in diameter.

  7. Facile Synthesis of Sub-20 nm Silver Nanowires through a Bromide-Mediated Polyol Method.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Robson Rosa; Yang, Miaoxin; Choi, Sang-Il; Chi, Miaofang; Luo, Ming; Zhang, Chao; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Camargo, Pedro H C; Ribeiro, Sidney José Lima; Xia, Younan

    2016-08-23

    Essentially all of the Ag nanowires reported in the literature have sizes larger than 30 nm in diameter. In this article, we report a simple and robust approach to the synthesis of Ag nanowires with diameters below 20 nm and aspect ratios over 1000 using a one-pot polyol method. The Ag nanowires took a penta-twinned structure, and they could be obtained rapidly (<35 min) and in high morphology purity (>85% of the as-obtained solid product) under atmospheric pressure. The key to the success of this synthesis is to restrain the nanowires from lateral growth by employing both Br(-) ions and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) with a high molecular weight of 1 300 000 g/mol to cap the {100} side faces, together with the use of a syringe pump to slowly introduce AgNO3 into the reaction solution. By optimizing the ratios between the capping agents and AgNO3, we were able to slow down the reduction kinetics and effectively direct the Ag nanowires to grow along the longitudinal direction only. The nanowires showed great mechanical flexibility and could be bent with acute angles without breaking. Because of their small diameters, the transverse localized surface plasmon resonance peak of the Ag nanowires could be pushed down to the ultraviolet region, below 400 nm, making them ideal conductive elements for the fabrication of touch screens, solar cells, and smart windows.

  8. The study of 700mm-diameter primary mirror based on topology optimization and sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; He, Xiaoying; Jing, Juanjuan; Feng, Lei; Zhou, Jinsong; Wang, Wei; Li, Yacan; Wei, Lidong

    2016-10-01

    The primary mirror is an important optical component of space camera. Its performance related to the optical image quality, and the weight directly affects the whole camera weight. The traditional design of primary mirror relies on much experience, lacking of precise theory, and many design parameters obtained by empirical formulas, thus the performance of the result is unstable. For this study, a primary mirror made of SiC with the diameter of 700mm was conceptual designed to get the optimized structure. Then sensitivity analysis was carried out to determine the optimum thickness of the back muscles. Finally, the optimum primary mirror fully satisfied the required was completed, with outstanding mechanical performance and light weight. A comparison between the optimum primary and traditional primary was performed and the results showed that the optimum primary has higher lightweight ratio increased by 5%, higher modal frequency increased by 81Hz.The maximum deformation under gravity reduced by 48nm, PV of the mirror surface reduced by 8.1nm and RMS reduced by 3.1nm. All the results indicated that the optimization method in the paper is reasonable and effective, which gives a reference to the primary mirror design in the future.

  9. Directional Solidification and Convection in Small Diameter Crucibles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Sung, P. K.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.; DeGroh, H. C., III

    2003-01-01

    Pb-2.2 wt% Sb alloy was directionally solidified in 1, 2, 3 and 7 mm diameter crucibles. Pb-Sb alloy presents a solutally unstable case. Under plane-front conditions, the resulting macrosegregation along the solidified length indicates that convection persists even in the 1 mm diameter crucible. Al-2 wt% Cu alloy was directionally solidified because this alloy was expected to be stable with respect to convection. Nevertheless, the resulting macrosegregation pattern and the microstructure in solidified examples indicated the presence of convection. Simulations performed for both alloys show that convection persists for crucibles as small as 0.6 mm of diameter. For the solutally stable alloy, Al-2 wt% Cu, the simulations indicate that the convection arises from a lateral temperature gradient.

  10. NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year One: Preliminary Asteroid Diameters and Albedos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, Carolyn; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J. R.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Grav, T.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S.; Stevenson, R.; Wright, E.

    2015-11-01

    The infrared NEOWISE project (Mainzer et al. 2011a) has measured diameters and albedos for ˜20% of the known asteroid population, the majority of these measurements to date (Mainzer et al. 2011b, 2012, 2015; Masiero et al. 2011, 2012; Grav et al. 2011, 2012a; Bauer et al. 2013). Here, we expand the number of asteroids characterized by NEOWISE, deriving diameters and albedos for 7,959 asteroids detected between December 13, 2013, and December 13, 2014 during the first year of the Reactivation mission. 7,758 are Main Belt or Mars-crossing asteroids. 17% of these objects have not been previously characterized using WISE or NEOWISE thermal measurements. Diameters are determined to an accuracy of ~20% or better. If good-quality H magnitudes are available, albedos can be determined to within ~40% or better.

  11. Diameter of basalt columns derived from fracture mechanics bifurcation analysis.

    PubMed

    Bahr, H-A; Hofmann, M; Weiss, H-J; Bahr, U; Fischer, G; Balke, H

    2009-05-01

    The diameter of columnar joints forming in cooling basalt and drying starch increases with decreasing growth rate. This observation can be reproduced with a linear-elastic three-dimensional fracture mechanics bifurcation analysis, which has been done for a periodic array of hexagonal columnar joints by considering a bifurcation mode compatible with observations on drying starch. In order to be applicable to basalt columns, the analysis has been carried out with simplified stationary temperature fields. The critical diameter differs from the one derived with a two-dimensional model by a mere factor of 1/2. By taking into account the latent heat released at the solidification front, the results agree fairly well with observed column diameters.

  12. Ultrasonographic measurement of thoracic diameters of the early gestating fetus.

    PubMed

    Hata, T; Hata, K; Yamane, Y; Osamu, T; Kitao, M

    1989-08-01

    Eighty-two ultrasonographic examinations were performed on 60 of our pregnant patients with regular menstrual cycles and no complications. The pregnancies ranged from 7 to 13 weeks of gestation. Thoracic anteroposterior diameter (ETAPD), transverse diameter (ETTD), cross-sectional area (ETA) and crown-rump length (CRL) were measured on each ultrasonogram. A high correlation between CRL and gestational age was firstly confirmed in this study. ETAPD, ETTD and ETA correlated well with the gestational age and CRL, respectively. Correlations between ETAPD/CRL and ETTD/CRL ratios with the gestational age were negative. A positive correlation of ETA/CRL ratio with the gestational age was evident. Ultrasonographic measurement of the thoracic diameters of the fetus in utero should be a useful parameter to evaluate the gestational age and for early detection of growth retardation in utero.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Thorium spectrum from 250nm to 5500nm (Redman+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, S. L.; Nave, G.; Sansonetti, C. J.

    2014-04-01

    We observed the spectrum of a commercial sealed Th/Ar HCL running at 25mA for almost 15hr starting on 2011 November 2. The region of observation was limited to between 8500/cm and 28000/cm (360nm and 1200nm) by the sensitivity of the silicon photodiode detector. (5 data files).

  14. Ion Exclusion by Sub 2-nm Carbon Nanotube Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-04-09

    Carbon nanotubes offer an outstanding platform for studying molecular transport at nanoscale, and have become promising materials for nanofluidics and membrane technology due to their unique combination of physical, chemical, mechanical, and electronic properties. In particular, both simulations and experiments have proved that fluid flow through carbon nanotubes of nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast compared to what continuum hydrodynamic theories would predict when applied on this length scale, and also, compared to conventional membranes with pores of similar size, such as zeolites. For a variety of applications such as separation technology, molecular sensing, drug delivery, and biomimetics, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In particular, for water desalination, coupling the enhancement of the water flux with selective ion transport could drastically reduce the cost of brackish and seawater desalting. In this work, we study the ion selectivity of membranes made of aligned double-walled carbon nanotubes with sub-2 nm diameter. Negatively charged groups are introduced at the opening of the carbon nanotubes by oxygen plasma treatment. Reverse osmosis experiments coupled with capillary electrophoresis analysis of permeate and feed show significant anion and cation rejection. Ion exclusion declines by increasing ionic strength (concentration) of the feed and by lowering solution pH; also, the highest rejection is observed for the A{sub m}{sup Z{sub A}} C{sub n}{sup Z{sub C}} salts (A=anion, C=cation, z= valence) with the greatest Z{sub A}/Z{sub C} ratio. Our results strongly support a Donnan-type rejection mechanism, dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion

  15. Solar diameter measurements from eclipses as a solar variability proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, David W.; Sofia, Sabatino; Guhl, Konrad; Herald, David

    The widths of total solar eclipse paths depends on the diameter of the Sun, so if observations are obtained near both the northern and southern limits of the eclipse path, in principle, the angular diameter of the Sun can be measured. Concerted efforts have been made to obtain contact timings from locations near total solar eclipse path edges since the mid 19th century, and Edmund Halley organized a rather successful first effort in 1715. Members of IOTA have been making increasingly sophisticated observations of the Baily's bead phenomena near central solar eclipse path edges since 1970.

  16. NEOWISE REACTIVATION MISSION YEAR ONE: PRELIMINARY ASTEROID DIAMETERS AND ALBEDOS

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, C. R.; Cutri, R. M.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S.; Stevenson, R.; Grav, T.; Wright, E. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present preliminary diameters and albedos for 7956 asteroids detected in the first year of the NEOWISE Reactivation mission. Of those, 201 are near-Earth asteroids and 7755 are Main Belt or Mars-crossing asteroids. 17% of these objects have not been previously characterized using the Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or “NEOWISE” thermal measurements. Diameters are determined to an accuracy of ∼20% or better. If good-quality H magnitudes are available, albedos can be determined to within ∼40% or better.

  17. Hardfacing takes the inside track in coating small diameter pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    A Canadian company has adapted a standard hardfacing method to solve the problem of coating smaller pipe sizes. Small diameter piping and valves are hardfaced using a custom-designed plasma transferred arc (PTA) system. With an arrangement of automatically controlled mechanical arms, the firm is able to operate a PTA torch inside piping 6 to 12 inches in diameter and as long as 13 feet. Recently, the company improved the system so it can automatically hardface elbows up to 24 in. as well as straight runs of pipe.

  18. Nanopore Diameters Tune Strain in Extruded Fibronectin Fibers.

    PubMed

    Raoufi, Mohammad; Das, Tamal; Schoen, Ingmar; Vogel, Viola; Brüggemann, Dorothea; Spatz, Joachim P

    2015-10-14

    Fibronectin is present in the extracellular matrix and can be assembled into nanofibers in vivo by undergoing conformational changes. Here, we present a novel approach to prepare fibronectin nanofibers under physiological conditions using an extrusion approach through nanoporous aluminum oxide membranes. This one-step process can prepare nanofiber bundles up to a millimeter in length and with uniform fiber diameters in the nanometer range. Most importantly, by using different pore diameters and protein concentrations in the extrusion process, we could induce varying lasting structural changes in the fibers, which were monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer and should impose different physiological functions.

  19. Enhancement in Sustained Release of Antimicrobial Peptide from Dual-Diameter-Structured TiO2 Nanotubes for Long-Lasting Antibacterial Activity and Cytocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanni; Zhang, Lan; Li, Bo; Han, Yong

    2017-03-22

    Novel films on Ti-based orthopedic implants for localized antimicrobial delivery, which comprises dual-diameter TiO2 nanotubes with the inner layers of compact and fluorine-free oxide tightly bonding to Ti, were formed by voltage-increased anodization with F(-) sedimentation procedure. The nanotubes were closely aligned and structured with upper 35 and 70 nm diametric tubes as nanocaps, respectively, and the underlying 140 nm diametric tubes as nanoreservoirs. Followed by loading ponericin G1 (a kind of antimicrobial peptide (AMP)) into the dual-diameter nanotubes with vacuum-assisted physisorption, the resultant films were investigated for loading efficiency and release kinetics of AMP, antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, and osteoblastic compatibility, together with the AMP-loaded single-diameter (140 nm) nanotube film. The loaded films had no statistical difference in the loading efficiency of AMP and revealed burst release within 6 h followed by steady release of AMP in phosphate-buffered solution. At day 42, almost all of AMP was released from the single-diameter nanotube film. However, the dual-diameter nanotube films loaded with AMP still showed sustained release at least up to 60 days, and the sustained efficacy was enhanced with decreasing diameter of nanocaps. In the case of nominal AMP loading amount of 125 μg, the resultant 35 nm capped dual-diameter nanotube film exhibited significant short- and long-term (even for 49 days) antibacterial activity not only against planktonic bacteria, which is ascribed to the release-killing efficacy of AMP, but also against adhered bacteria, which is ascribed to the AMP-derived killing efficacy and the nanocaps-derived adhesion resistance. Moreover, this loaded film presented cytocompatibility comparative to that of Ti but higher than that of the other AMP-loaded films. Increasing the nominal loading amount of AMP to 200 μg improved antibacterial activity but gave rise to obvious cytotoxicity of the

  20. Efficient 1645-nm Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, York E.; Setzler, Scott D.; Snell, Kevin J.; Budni, Peter A.; Pollak, Thomas M.; Chicklis, E. P.

    2004-05-01

    We report a resonantly fiber-laser-pumped Er:YAG laser operating at the eye-safe wavelength of 1645 nm, exhibiting 43% optical efficiency and 54% incident slope efficiency and emitting 7-W average power when repetitively Q switched at 10 kHz. To our knowledge, this is the best performance (conversion efficiency and average power) obtained from a bulk solid-state Q-switched erbium laser. At a 1.1-kHz pulse repetition frequency the laser produces 3.4-mJ pulses with a corresponding peak power of 162 kW. Frequency doubling to produce 822.5-nm, 4.7-kW pulses at 10 kHz was performed to demonstrate the laser's utility.

  1. DNA Charge Transport over 34 nm

    PubMed Central

    Slinker, Jason D.; Muren, Natalie B.; Renfrew, Sara E.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular wires show promise in nanoscale electronics but the synthesis of uniform, long conductive molecules is a significant challenge. DNA of precise length, by contrast, is easily synthesized, but its conductivity has not been explored over the distances required for nanoscale devices. Here we demonstrate DNA charge transport (CT) over 34 nm in 100-mer monolayers on gold. Multiplexed gold electrodes modified with 100-mer DNA yield sizable electrochemical signals from a distal, covalent Nile Blue redox probe. Significant signal attenuation upon incorporation of a single base pair mismatch demonstrates that CT is DNA-mediated. Efficient cleavage of these 100-mers by a restriction enzyme indicates that the DNA adopts a native conformation that is accessible to protein binding. Similar electron transfer rates are measured through 100-mer and 17-mer monolayers, consistent with rate-limiting electron tunneling through the saturated carbon linker. This DNA-mediated CT distance of 34 nm surpasses most reports of molecular wires. PMID:21336329

  2. Radiation Status of Sub-65 nm Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Ultra-scaled complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) includes commercial foundry capabilities at and below the 65 nm technology node Radiation evaluations take place using standard products and test characterization vehicles (memories, logic/latch chains, etc.) NEPP focus is two-fold: (1) Conduct early radiation evaluations to ascertain viability for future NASA missions (i.e. leverage commercial technology development). (2) Uncover gaps in current testing methodologies and mechanism comprehension -- early risk mitigation.

  3. Binary 193nm photomasks aging phenomenon study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufaye, Félix; Sartelli, Luca; Pogliani, Carlo; Gough, Stuart; Sundermann, Frank; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Hidenori, Yoshioka; Charras, Nathalie; Brochard, Christophe; Thivolle, Nicolas

    2011-05-01

    193nm binary photomasks are still used in the semiconductor industry for the lithography of some critical layers for the nodes 90nm and 65nm, with high volumes and over long period. These 193nm binary masks seem to be well-known but recent studies have shown surprising degrading effects, like Electric Field induced chromium Migration (EFM) [1] or chromium migration [2] [3] . Phase shift Masks (PSM) or Opaque MoSi On Glass (OMOG) might not be concerned by these effects [4] [6] under certain conditions. In this paper, we will focus our study on two layers gate and metal lines. We will detail the effects of mask aging, with SEM top view pictures revealing a degraded chromium edge profile and TEM chemical analyses demonstrating the growth of a chromium oxide on the sidewall. SEMCD measurements after volume production indicated a modified CD with respect to initial CD data after manufacture. A regression analysis of these CD measurements shows a radial effect, a die effect and an isolated-dense effect. Mask cleaning effectiveness has also been investigated, with sulphate or ozone cleans, to recover the mask quality in terms of CD. In complement, wafer intrafield CD measurements have been performed on the most sensitive structure to monitor the evolution of the aging effect on mask CD uniformity. Mask CD drift have been correlated with exposure dose drift and isolated-dense bias CD drift on wafers. In the end, we will try to propose a physical explanation of this aging phenomenon and a solution to prevent from it occurring.

  4. Laser damage database at 1064 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer, F.; Gonzales, R.P.; Morgan, A.J.

    1990-03-01

    In conjunction with our diversification of laser damage testing capabilities, we have expanded upon a database of threshold measurements and parameter variations at 1064 nm. This includes all tests at low pulse-repetition frequencies (PRF) ranging from single shots to 120 Hz. These tests were conducted on the Reptile laser facility since 1987 and the Variable Pulse Laser (VPL) facility since 1988. Pulse durations ranged from 1 to 16 ns. 10 refs., 14 figs.

  5. 3 Watt CW OPO tunable 604nm to 616nm for quantum optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Angus; Halfmann, Thomas; Mieth, Simon

    2012-06-01

    A continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (CW OPO) pumped by a fiber laser has been developed which emits up to 3 Watts of single longitudinal mode radiation tunable in the wavelength range 604nm to 616nm. The device is a modified version of the ``Argos'' Model 2400 commercial product by Lockheed Martin Aculight. A 15 Watt 1064nm fiber laser pumps a CW OPO based upon periodically-poled Lithium Niobate (PPLN). A short section of the nonlinear crystal is poled to allow efficient intracavity sum frequency generation (SFG) between the OPO pump and signal wavelengths to generate orange radiation. The device can be coarsely tuned by matching the poling periods and temperature within the nonlinear crystal to phase-match both OPO and SFG processes simultaneously. Fine mode-hop-free tuning of the orange wavelength of up to 100GHz range can be achieved by applying a voltage to a PZT which tunes the pump laser. By similar intracavity conversion schemes, the system offers the potential of providing high power at wavelengths from 600nm to 1400nm in addition to the direct signal and idler wavelength ranges from 1400nm to 4630nm. Such capability comes without the complexity and reliability issues which are inherent in dye and Ti:Sapphire systems. Details of the OPO system performance and its use in quantum optics applications will be provided.

  6. Downhole pumps for water sampling in small diameter wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koopman, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    The relatively high cost and difficulty in locating a source of pumps for use in obtaining ground-water samples from small-diameter wells has demonstrated a need for this report. Criteria for selection of a pump and pumping equipment to meet specific requirements has been tabulated to assist field personnel in making a selection from commercial sources. (Kosco-USGS)

  7. Calibration of Laser Beam Direction for Inner Diameter Measuring Device

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tongyu; Wang, Zhong; Wu, Zhengang; Li, Xingqiang; Wang, Lei; Liu, Changjie

    2017-01-01

    The laser triangulation method is one of the most advanced methods for large inner diameter measurement. Our research group proposed a kind of inner diameter measuring device that is principally composed of three laser displacement sensors known to be fixed in the same plane measurement position. It is necessary to calibrate the direction of the laser beams that are emitted by laser displacement sensors because they do not meet the theoretical model accurately. For the purpose of calibrating the direction of laser beams, a calibration method and mathematical model were proposed. The inner diameter measuring device is equipped with the spindle of the machine tool. The laser beams rotate and translate in the plane and constitute the rotary rays which are driven to scan the inner surface of the ring gauge. The direction calibration of the laser beams can be completed by the sensors’ distance information and corresponding data processing method. The corresponding error sources are analyzed and the validity of the method is verified. After the calibration, the measurement error of the inner diameter measuring device reduced from ±25 μm to ±15 μm and the relative error was not more than 0.011%. PMID:28165432

  8. Experimental study on strain sensing by small-diameter FBG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong-mei; Li, Qiufeng; Zhu, Lujia; Liang, Dakai

    2016-11-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors were attractive in various fields for structural health monitoring. Because of their accurate performance and real time response, embedded FBG sensors are promising for strain monitoring in composite materials. As an optical fiber sensor was embedded inside a composite, interface would form around the embedded optical fiber and the host polymer composite. In order to study the influence of the embedded optical fiber to the mechanical character, finite elemental analysis was applied to study the stress distribution inside the composite. Keeping the resin rich area the same size, laminates with optical fibers in different diameters, which were 250 and 125 micrometers, were analyzed. The simulation results represent that stress singularity would occur around the embedded optical fiber. The singularity value for the laminate with optical fiber at 250 micrometer was higher than that with optical fiber at 125 micrometer. Micro- cracks would arise at the stress singularity point. Therefore, the optical fiber in smaller diameter was preferred since the mechanical strength could be higher. Four points bending test was carried out on a steel beam with a small-diameter FBG on the bottom surface. Besides, a strain gauge was stuck on bottom to validate the monitoring results by FBG sensor. The tested results indicated that the strain monitoring results by the small-diameter FBG sensor almost identical with the theoretical ones and what recorded by strain gauge. The maximum testing error for the designed FBG is less than 2% compared with the theoretical one.

  9. Measuring the Diameter of a Hair with a Steel Rule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, John; O'Leary, Sean V.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a technique that uses a helium neon laser, a steel rule, a wooden rule, and a piece of paper to measure the diameter of a hair using the diffraction of light. Details on technique, mathematics, and sources of error are provided. (DDR)

  10. Compositional Variegation of Large-Diameter Low-Albedo Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, F.; Jarvis, K. S.; Anz-Meador, T. D.; Thibault, C. A.; Sawyer, S. R.; Fitzsimmons, A.

    1997-07-01

    Asteroids showing signs of aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism in visible/near IR spectroscopy and photometry (C, G, F, B, and P classes) ranging from 0.37 - 0.90mu m dominate the asteroid population at heliocentric distances of 2.6 - 3.5 AU. Age dating of meteorites indicates that the Solar System was subjected to a major heating event 4.5 Gyr ago. Recent meteoritic research has produced evidence of a carbonaceous chondrite subjected to two separate aqueous alteration events with a metamorphic heating inbetween (Krot et al., 1997, submitted). Models of the effects of heating by electromagnetic induction or decay of short-lived radionuclides combined with models of the early collisional history of the Solar System after Jupiter's formation indicate that asteroids observed today can be divided into two groups by diameter. Those asteroids having diameters greater than 100 km were mixed by multiple collisions but remain as gravitationally bound rubble piles. Asteroids with diameters less than 100 km should show more compositional diversity. Vilas and Sykes (1996, Icarus, v. 124, 483) have shown using ECAS photometry that this compositional difference exists. Those asteroids having diameters greater than 100 km should be individually homogeneous, with spectral differences showing the combined effects of a primordial compositional gradient in the asteroid belt with thermal metamorphism. We address the significance of spatially-resolved spectra of 42 asteroids to the collective origin of these asteroids.

  11. 5. 30 DIAMETER ACCESS MANHOLE IN THE CENTER OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. 30 DIAMETER ACCESS MANHOLE IN THE CENTER OF THE GATE HOUSE, LOOKING SOUTH. - Washington Water Power Spokane River Upper Falls Hydroelectric Development, Gates & Gate-Lifting Mechanisms, Spokane River, approximately 0.5 mile northeast of intersection of Spokane Falls Boulevard & Post Street, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  12. Pupil diameter covaries with BOLD activity in human locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Peter R; O'Connell, Redmond G; O'Sullivan, Michael; Robertson, Ian H; Balsters, Joshua H

    2014-08-01

    The locus coeruleus-noradrenergic (LC-NA) neuromodulatory system has been implicated in a broad array of cognitive processes, yet scope for investigating this system's function in humans is currently limited by an absence of reliable non-invasive measures of LC activity. Although pupil diameter has been employed as a proxy measure of LC activity in numerous studies, empirical evidence for a relationship between the two is lacking. In the present study, we sought to rigorously probe the relationship between pupil diameter and BOLD activity localized to the human LC. Simultaneous pupillometry and fMRI revealed a relationship between continuous pupil diameter and BOLD activity in a dorsal pontine cluster overlapping with the LC, as localized via neuromelanin-sensitive structural imaging and an LC atlas. This relationship was present both at rest and during performance of a two-stimulus oddball task, with and without spatial smoothing of the fMRI data, and survived retrospective image correction for physiological noise. Furthermore, the spatial extent of this pupil/LC relationship guided a volume-of-interest analysis in which we provide the first demonstration in humans of a fundamental characteristic of animal LC activity: phasic modulation by oddball stimulus relevance. Taken together, these findings highlight the potential for utilizing pupil diameter to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the role of the LC-NA system in human cognition.

  13. Asteroid magnitudes, UBV colors, and IRAS albedos and diameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper lists absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for known asteroids numbered through 3318. The values presented are those used in reducing asteroid IR flux data obtained with the IRAS. U-B colors are given for 938 asteroids, and B-V colors are given for 945 asteroids. The IRAS albedos and diameters are tabulated for 1790 asteroids.

  14. Definition of Beam Diameter for Electron Beam Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Burgardt, Paul; Pierce, Stanley W.; Dvornak, Matthew John

    2016-03-11

    It is useful to characterize the dimensions of the electron beam during process development for electron beam welding applications. Analysis of the behavior of electron beam welds is simplest when a single number can be assigned to the beam properties that describes the size of the beam spot; this value we generically call the “beam diameter”. This approach has worked well for most applications and electron beam welding machines with the weld dimensions (width and depth) correlating well with the beam diameter. However, in recent weld development for a refractory alloy, Ta-10W, welded with a low voltage electron beam machine (LVEB), it was found that the weld dimensions (weld penetration and weld width) did not correlate well with the beam diameter and especially with the experimentally determined sharp focus point. These data suggest that the presently used definition of beam diameter may not be optimal for all applications. The possible reasons for this discrepancy and a suggested possible alternative diameter definition is the subject of this paper.

  15. Solar diameter measurements for study of Sun climate coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    Changes in solar shape and diameter were detected as a possible probe of variability in solar luminosity, an important climatic driving function. A technique was designed which will allow the calibration of the telescope field, providing a scale for long-term comparison of these and future measurements.

  16. Non-Contact EDDY Current Hole Eccentricity and Diameter Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James

    1998-01-01

    Precision holes are among the most critical features of a mechanical component. Deviations from permissible tolerances can impede operation and result in unexpected failure. We have developed an automated non-contact eddy current hole diameter and eccentricity measuring system. The operating principle is based on the eddy current lift-off effect, which is the coil impedance as a function of the distance between the coil and the test object. An absolute eddy current probe rotates in the hole. The impedance of each angular position is acquired and input to the computer for integration and analysis. The eccentricity of the hole is the profile of the impedance as a function of angular position as compared to a straight line, an ideal hole. The diameter of the hole is the sum of the diameter of the probe and twice the distance-calibrated impedance. An eddy current image is generated by integrating angular scans for a plurality of depths between the top and bottom to display the eccentricity profile. This system can also detect and image defects in the hole. The method for non-contact eddy current hole diameter and eccentricity measurement has been granted a patent by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

  17. Calibration of Laser Beam Direction for Inner Diameter Measuring Device.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tongyu; Wang, Zhong; Wu, Zhengang; Li, Xingqiang; Wang, Lei; Liu, Changjie

    2017-02-05

    The laser triangulation method is one of the most advanced methods for large inner diameter measurement. Our research group proposed a kind of inner diameter measuring device that is principally composed of three laser displacement sensors known to be fixed in the same plane measurement position. It is necessary to calibrate the direction of the laser beams that are emitted by laser displacement sensors because they do not meet the theoretical model accurately. For the purpose of calibrating the direction of laser beams, a calibration method and mathematical model were proposed. The inner diameter measuring device is equipped with the spindle of the machine tool. The laser beams rotate and translate in the plane and constitute the rotary rays which are driven to scan the inner surface of the ring gauge. The direction calibration of the laser beams can be completed by the sensors' distance information and corresponding data processing method. The corresponding error sources are analyzed and the validity of the method is verified. After the calibration, the measurement error of the inner diameter measuring device reduced from ± 25 μ m to ± 15 μ m and the relative error was not more than 0.011%.

  18. Sex discrimination potential of permanent maxillary molar cusp diameters.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, P J

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to assess the potential usefulness of permanent maxillary molar cusp diameters for sex discrimination of poorly preserved skeletal remains. Cusp diameters were measured from standardized occlusal view photographs in a sample of black South Africans consisting of 130 males and 105 females. Results demonstrated that all cusp dimensions for both first and second maxillary molars exhibited significant sexual dimorphism (p < 0.001). Univariate and multivariate discriminant function equations permitted low to moderate classification accuracy in discriminating sex (58.3%-73.6%). The allocation accuracies for cusp diameter measurements were as high as, and even surpassed, those observed for conventional crown length and breadth dimensions of the same teeth. The most accurate result (73.6%, with a sex bias of only 0.5%) was obtained when all cusp diameters from both maxillary molars were used concurrently. However, only slightly less accurate results (~70.0%) were achieved when selected dimensions from only one of the molars, or even a single cusp, were utilized. Although not as reliable at predicting sex as other skeletal elements in black South Africans, the derived odontometric standards can be used with highly fragmentary skeletal material, as well as immature remains in which crown formation of the maxillary molars is complete.

  19. General view of outside diameter welding stations of the saw ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of outside diameter welding stations of the saw line in bay 8 of the main pipe mill building looking northwest. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Main Pipe Mill Building, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  20. No. 2 outside diameter submerged arc welder of the saw ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    No. 2 outside diameter submerged arc welder of the saw line in bay 8 of the main pipe mill building looking south. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Main Pipe Mill Building, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  1. Southeast view of the no. 1 outside diameter submerged arch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southeast view of the no. 1 outside diameter submerged arch welder of the saw line in bay 8 of the main pipe mill building. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Main Pipe Mill Building, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  2. Pupil Diameter May Reflect Motor Control and Learning.

    PubMed

    White, Olivier; French, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Non-luminance-mediated changes in pupil diameter have been used since the first studies by Darwin in 1872 as indicators of clinical, cognitive, and arousal states. However, the relation between processes involved in motor control and changes in pupil diameter remains largely unknown. Twenty participants attempted to compensate random walks of a cursor with a computer mouse to restrain its trajectory within a target circle while the authors recorded their pupil diameters. Two conditions allowed the authors to experimentally manipulate the motor and cognitive components of the task. First, the step size of the cursor's random walk was either large or small leading to 2 task difficulties (difficult or easy). Second, they instructed participants to imagine controlling the cursor by moving the mouse, but without actually moving it (task modality: imagined movement or real movement condition). Task difficulty and modality allowed the authors to show that pupil diameters reflect processes involved in motor control and in the processing of feedback, respectively. Furthermore, the authors also demonstrate that motor learning can be quantified by pupil size. This noninvasive approach provides a promising method for investigating not only motor control, but also motor imagery, a research field of growing importance in sports and rehabilitation.

  3. Combined position and diameter measures for lunar craters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, D.W.G.

    1977-01-01

    The note addresses the problem of simultaneously measuring positions and diameters of circular impact craters on wide-angle photographs of approximately spherical planets such as the Moon and Mercury. The method allows for situations in which the camera is not aligned on the planet's center. ?? 1977.

  4. Assessment of vessel diameters for MR brain angiography processed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, Luminita; Obreja, Cristian-Dragos; Moldovanu, Simona

    2015-12-01

    The motivation was to develop an assessment method to measure (in)visible differences between the original and the processed images in MR brain angiography as a method of evaluation of the status of the vessel segments (i.e. the existence of the occlusion or intracerebral vessels damaged as aneurysms). Generally, the image quality is limited, so we improve the performance of the evaluation through digital image processing. The goal is to determine the best processing method that allows an accurate assessment of patients with cerebrovascular diseases. A total of 10 MR brain angiography images were processed by the following techniques: histogram equalization, Wiener filter, linear contrast adjustment, contrastlimited adaptive histogram equalization, bias correction and Marr-Hildreth filter. Each original image and their processed images were analyzed into the stacking procedure so that the same vessel and its corresponding diameter have been measured. Original and processed images were evaluated by measuring the vessel diameter (in pixels) on an established direction and for the precise anatomic location. The vessel diameter is calculated using the plugin ImageJ. Mean diameter measurements differ significantly across the same segment and for different processing techniques. The best results are provided by the Wiener filter and linear contrast adjustment methods and the worst by Marr-Hildreth filter.

  5. Rowlinson’s concept of an effective hard sphere diameter

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Attention is drawn to John Rowlinson’s idea that the repulsive portion of the intermolecular interaction may be replaced by a temperature-dependent hard sphere diameter. It is this approximation that made the development of perturbation theory possible for realistic fluids whose intermolecular interactions have a steep, but finite, repulsion at short separations. PMID:20953320

  6. View of wood stave penstocks (four feet in diameter) with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of wood stave penstocks (four feet in diameter) with steel bands, wood and steel frames; standing on top of penstocks is Doug Hamilton (right), Nooksack Falls hydro-plant operator for puget power, and Ken Rose (left) HAER Historian. - Nooksack Falls Hydroelectric Plant, Route 542, Glacier, Whatcom County, WA

  7. Salt-dependent DNA superhelix diameter studied by small angle neutron scattering measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed Central

    Hammermann, M; Brun, N; Klenin, K V; May, R; Tóth, K; Langowski, J

    1998-01-01

    Using small angle neutron scattering we have measured the static form factor of two different superhelical DNAs, p1868 (1868 bp) and pUC18 (2686 bp), in dilute aqueous solution at salt concentrations between 0 and 1.5 M Na+ in 10 mM Tris at 0% and 100% D2O. For both DNA molecules, the theoretical static form factor was also calculated from an ensemble of Monte Carlo configurations generated by a previously described model. Simulated and measured form factors of both DNAs showed the same behavior between 10 and 100 mM salt concentration: An undulation in the scattering curve at a momentum transfer q = 0.5 nm-1 present at lower concentration disappears above 100 mM. The position of the undulation corresponds to a distance of approximately 10-20 nm. This indicated a change in the DNA superhelix diameter, as the undulation is not present in the scattering curve of the relaxed DNA. From the measured scattering curves of superhelical DNA we estimated the superhelix diameter as a function of Na+ concentration by a quantitative comparison with the scattering curve of relaxed DNA. The ratio of the scattering curves of superhelical and relaxed DNA is very similar to the form factor of a pair of point scatterers. We concluded that the distance of this pair corresponds to the interstrand separation in the superhelix. The computed superhelix diameter of 16.0 +/- 0.9 nm at 10 mM decreased to 9.0 +/- 0.7 nm at 100 mM salt concentration. Measured and simulated scattering curves agreed almost quantitatively, therefore we also calculated the superhelix diameter from the simulated conformations. It decreased from 18.0 +/- 1.5 nm at 10 mM to 9.4 +/- 1.5 nm at 100 mM salt concentration. This value did not significantly change to lower values at higher Na+ concentration, in agreement with results obtained by electron microscopy, scanning force microscopy imaging in aqueous solution, and recent MC simulations, but in contrast to the observation of a lateral collapse of the DNA superhelix

  8. Tunable Solid-Etalon Filter for the ICESat/GLAS 532 nm Channel Lidar Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Stephen, Mark A.; Martino, Anthony J.; Lunt, David L.

    2003-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) was launched into Earth orbit on board the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) on January 12, 2003. GLAS is a laser altimeter designed to measure ice-sheet topography and associated temporal changes, as well as cloud and atmospheric properties. Each (of the three identical) GLAS lasers is a diode pumped, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with energy levels of 75 mJ (1064 nm) and 35 mJ (532 nm). The infrared pulse is used for both surface altimetry and atmospheric measurements while the green pulse is used primarily for atmospheric measurements. The receiver uses a 1 meter diameter telescope. We report on the tunable solid-etalon filter used in the ICESat/GLAS 532 nm channel lidar receiver.

  9. Formation of 300 nm period pore arrays by laser interference lithography and electrochemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Kleimann, P.; Laffite, G.; Jamois, C.; Orobtchouk, R.

    2015-02-01

    This paper highlights that combining laser interference lithography and electrochemical etching is a cost-effective, efficient method to realize periodic nanopore arrays in silicon with lattice pitch as small as 300 nm on centimeter-scale substrates. The fabrication of wide-area and high aspect ratio 2D pore arrays with 250 nm diameter and 5 μm depth is demonstrated. All the steps of the process have been optimized to achieve vertical sidewalls with 50 nm thickness, providing pore arrays with aspect ratio of 100 on n-type silicon substrates over an area of 2 × 2 cm2. These results constitute a technological advance in the realization of ordered pore arrays in silicon with very small lattice parameters, with impact in biotechnology, energy harvesting, or sensors.

  10. Wettability control of a polymer surface through 126 nm vacuum ultraviolet light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hozumi, Atsushi; Shirahata, Naoto; Nakanishi, Youichiro; Asakura, Shuuichi; Fuwa, Akio

    2004-07-01

    The control of the surface wettability of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrates has been successfully demonstrated using an Ar2* excimer lamp radiating 126 nm vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light. Each of the samples was exposed to 126 nm VUV light in air over the pressure range of 2×10-4-105 Pa. Although at the process pressures of 10, 103, and 105 Pa, the PMMA surfaces became relatively hydrophilic, the degree of hydrophilicity depended markedly on the pressure. The minimum water contact angles of the samples treated at 10, 103, and 105 Pa were about 50°, 33°, and 64°, respectively. These values were larger than those of PMMA substrates hydrophilized through 172 nm VUV irradiation conducted under the same conditions. On the other hand, after 126 nm VUV irradiation conducted under the high vacuum condition of 2×10-4 Pa, the PMMA substrate surface became carbon-rich, probably due to preferential cross-linking reactions, as evidenced by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This surface was hydrophobic, showing a water contact angle of about 101°. Although the 126 nm VUV-irradiated surfaces appeared relatively smooth when observed by atomic force microscope, very small particles with diameters of 30-60 nm, which probably originated from the readhesion of photodecomposed products, existed on all of the sample surfaces. .

  11. A Sounding Rocket Mission Concept to Acquire High-Resolution Radiometric Spectra Spanning the 9 nm - 31 nm Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. Habash; Cirtain, Jonathan; McGuirck, Michael; Pavelitz, Steven; Weber, Ed.; Winebarger, Amy

    2012-01-01

    When studying Solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) emissions, both single-wavelength, two- dimensional (2D) spectroheliograms and multi-wavelength, one-dimensional (1D) line spectra are important, especially for a thorough understanding of the complex processes in the solar magnetized plasma from the base of the chromosphere through the corona. 2D image data are required for a detailed study of spatial structures, whereas radiometric (i.e., spectral) data provide information on relevant atomic excitation/ionization state densities (and thus temperature). Using both imaging and radiometric techniques, several satellite missions presently study solar dynamics in the EUV, including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Hinode, and the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The EUV wavelengths of interest typically span 9 nm to 31 nm, with the shorter wavelengths being associated with the hottest features (e.g., intense flares and bright points) and the longer wavelengths associated with cooler features (e.g., coronal holes and filaments). Because the optical components of satellite instruments degrade over time, it is not uncommon to conduct sounding rocket underflights for calibration purposes. The authors have designed a radiometric sounding rocket payload that could serve as both a calibration underflight for and a complementary scientific mission to the upcoming Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) mission aboard the GOES-R satellite (scheduled for a 2015 launch). The challenge to provide quality radiometric line spectra over the 9-31 nm range covered by SUVI was driven by the multilayer coatings required to make the optical components, including mirrors and gratings, reflective over the entire range. Typically, these multilayers provide useful EUV reflectances over bandwidths of a few nm. Our solution to this problem was to employ a three-telescope system in which the optical components were coated with multilayers that spanned three wavelength ranges to cover

  12. Nuclear criticality safety calculational analysis for small-diameter containers

    SciTech Connect

    LeTellier, M.S.; Smallwood, D.J.; Henkel, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents calculations performed to establish a technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of favorable geometry containers, sometimes referred to as 5-inch containers, in use at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A list of containers currently used in the plant is shown in Table 1.0-1. These containers are currently used throughout the plant with no mass limits. The use of containers with geometries or material types other than those addressed in this evaluation must be bounded by this analysis or have an additional analysis performed. The following five basic container geometries were modeled and bound all container geometries in Table 1.0-1: (1) 4.32-inch-diameter by 50-inch-high polyethylene bottle; (2) 5.0-inch-diameter by 24-inch-high polyethylene bottle; (3) 5.25-inch-diameter by 24-inch-high steel can ({open_quotes}F-can{close_quotes}); (4) 5.25-inch-diameter by 15-inch-high steel can ({open_quotes}Z-can{close_quotes}); and (5) 5.0-inch-diameter by 9-inch-high polybottle ({open_quotes}CO-4{close_quotes}). Each container type is evaluated using five basic reflection and interaction models that include single containers and multiple containers in normal and in credible abnormal conditions. The uranium materials evaluated are UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O and UF{sub 4}+oil materials at 100% and 10% enrichments and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, and H{sub 2}O at 100% enrichment. The design basis safe criticality limit for the Portsmouth facility is k{sub eff} + 2{sigma} < 0.95. The KENO study results may be used as the basis for evaluating general use of these containers in the plant.

  13. Changes in retinal microvascular diameter in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Andréa Vasconcellos Batista; Gouvea, Sonia Alves; da Silva, Aurélio Paulo Batista; Bortolon, Saulo; Rodrigues, Anabel Nunes; Abreu, Glaucia Rodrigues; Herkenhoff, Fernando Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Diabetic retinopathy is the main microvascular complication in diabetes mellitus and needs to be diagnosed early to prevent severe sight-threatening retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to quantify the retinal microvasculature pattern and analyze the influence of blood glucose level and the duration of diabetes mellitus on the retinal microvasculature. Methods Two groups were analyzed: patients with diabetes (N=26) and patients without diabetes, ie, controls (N=26). A quantitative semiautomated method analyzed retinal microvasculature. The diameters of arterioles and venules were measured. The total numbers of arterioles and venules were counted. The ratio of arteriole diameter to venule diameter was calculated. The retinal microvasculature pattern was related to clinical and biochemical parameters. Results Patients with diabetes exhibited larger venule diameters in the upper temporal quadrant of the retina compared to the lower temporal quadrant (124.85±38.03 µm vs 102.92±15.69 µm; P<0.01). Patients with diabetes for 5 or more years had larger venule diameters in the upper temporal quadrant than patients without diabetes (141.62±44.44 vs 112.58±32.11 µm; P<0.05). The degree of venodilation in the upper temporal quadrant was positively correlated with blood glucose level and the estimated duration of diabetes mellitus. Interpretation and conclusion The employed quantitative method demonstrated that patients with diabetes exhibited venule dilation in the upper temporal quadrant, and the duration of diabetes mellitus was positively correlated with blood glucose level. Therefore, the early assessment of retinal microvascular changes is possible prior to the onset of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26345217

  14. Prediction of moderate or severe pulmonary hypertension by main pulmonary artery diameter and main pulmonary artery diameter/ascending aorta diameter in pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Shirin; Aronow, Wilbert S; Ravipati, Gautham; Maguire, George P; Belkin, Robert N; Lehrman, Stuart G

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the accuracy of computed tomographic measurements of main pulmonary artery diameter (MPAD) and of MPAD/ascending aorta diameter (AAD) in predicting moderate or severe pulmonary hypertension in 190 patients with acute pulmonary embolism. A pulmonary artery systolic pressure of > or = 50 mm Hg measured by Doppler echocardiography was considered moderate or severe pulmonary hypertension. A MPAD of > 28.6 mm and a MPAD/AAD ratio of > or = 1.00 measured by computed tomography were considered abnormal. A MPAD of > 28.6 mm had a 75% sensitivity and specificity, a 52% positive predictive value, a 89% negative predictive value, a 3.0 likelihood ratio for a positive test, and a 0.33 likelihood ratio for a negative test in predicting moderate or severe pulmonary hypertension. A MPAD/AAD ratio of > or = 1.00 had a 59% sensitivity, a 82% specificity, a 55% positive predictive value, a 84% negative predictive value, a 3.3 likelihood ratio for a positive test, and a 0.50 likelihood ratio for a negative test.

  15. Fabrication of sub-20 nm nanopore arrays in membranes with embedded metal electrodes at wafer scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jingwei; Wang, Deqiang; Nam, Sung-Wook; Peng, Hongbo; Bruce, Robert; Gignac, Lynn; Brink, Markus; Kratschmer, Ernst; Rossnagel, Stephen; Waggoner, Phil; Reuter, Kathleen; Wang, Chao; Astier, Yann; Balagurusamy, Venkat; Luan, Binquan; Kwark, Young; Joseph, Eric; Guillorn, Mike; Polonsky, Stanislav; Royyuru, Ajay; Papa Rao, S.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2014-07-01

    We introduce a method to fabricate solid-state nanopores with sub-20 nm diameter in membranes with embedded metal electrodes across a 200 mm wafer using CMOS compatible semiconductor processes. Multi-layer (metal-dielectric) structures embedded in membranes were demonstrated to have high uniformity (+/-0.5 nm) across the wafer. Arrays of nanopores were fabricated with an average size of 18 +/- 2 nm in diameter using a Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) method in lieu of TEM drilling. Shorts between the membrane-embedded metals were occasionally created after pore formation, but the RIE based pores had a much better yield (99%) of unshorted electrodes compared to TEM drilled pores (<10%). A double-stranded DNA of length 1 kbp was translocated through the multi-layer structure RIE-based nanopore demonstrating that the pores were open. The ionic current through the pore can be modulated with a gain of 3 using embedded electrodes functioning as a gate in 0.1 mM KCl aqueous solution. This fabrication approach can potentially pave the way to manufacturable nanopore arrays with the ability to electrically control the movement of single or double-stranded DNA inside the pore with embedded electrodes.We introduce a method to fabricate solid-state nanopores with sub-20 nm diameter in membranes with embedded metal electrodes across a 200 mm wafer using CMOS compatible semiconductor processes. Multi-layer (metal-dielectric) structures embedded in membranes were demonstrated to have high uniformity (+/-0.5 nm) across the wafer. Arrays of nanopores were fabricated with an average size of 18 +/- 2 nm in diameter using a Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) method in lieu of TEM drilling. Shorts between the membrane-embedded metals were occasionally created after pore formation, but the RIE based pores had a much better yield (99%) of unshorted electrodes compared to TEM drilled pores (<10%). A double-stranded DNA of length 1 kbp was translocated through the multi-layer structure RIE-based nanopore

  16. 63W output tandem-pumped thulium-doped silica fiber laser at 1980 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Ying-bin; Bu, Fan; Wang, Yi-bo; Li, Hai-qing; Peng, Jing-gang; Yang, Lv-yun; Dai, Neng-li; Li, Jin-yan

    2016-11-01

    We have demonstrated a high power and high efficiency thulium-doped silica fiber laser using a cascade tandem pumping method. A 1915nm Tm-doped fiber laser was used as a pump source for another Tm-doped fiber laser with the output power of 63W at 1980nm, corresponding to the slope efficiency of 80%, which is the highest power to our best knowledge. And the 3dB bandwidth was 0.24nm. The 1915nm Tm-doped fiber laser was pumped by 793nm diode laser and the slope efficiency was 51%. The preform of double cladding Tm-doped fiber for the tandem pumped fiber laser was manufactured by MCVD with using the vapor-solution hybrid doping method. The fiber has a 25μm diameter, 0.098 NA(numerical aperture) core and 400μm diameter, 0.46 NA inner cladding. In the tandem pumped fiber laser, the resonant cavity consist of a high reflection FBG at 1980nm, flat fiber end and the homemade Tm-doped silica fiber. The optimal active fiber length was presented and it is found that when the length of homemade Tm-doped silica fiber was 7m, the efficiency was the highest. The influence of Tm concentration and ratio of Tm ion and Al ion on the efficiency was also explored. And it is found that the thulium-doped silica fiber with lower Tm concentration and higher Tm:Al ratio had lower optical efficiency. Meanwhile, the optimal fiber length became shorter.

  17. Domain wall motion in sub-100 nm magnetic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Saima; Dutta, Sumit; Currivan, Jean Anne; Ross, Caroline; Baldo, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Nonvolatile memory devices such as racetrack memory rely on the manipulation of domain wall (DW) in magnetic nanowires, and scaling of these devices requires an understanding of domain wall behavior as a function of the wire width. Due to the increased importance of edge roughness and magnetostatic interaction, DW pinning increases dramatically as the wire dimensions decrease and stochastic behavior is expected depending on the distribution of pinning sites. We report on the field driven DW statistics in sub-100 nm wide nanowires made from Co films with very small edge roughness. The nanowires were patterned in the form of a set of concentric rings of 10 μm diameter. Two different width nanowires with two different spacings have been studied. The rings were first saturated in plane to produce onion states and then the DWs were translated in the wires using an orthogonal in-plane field. The position of the DWs in the nanowires was determined with magnetic force microscopy. From the positions of the DWs in the nanowires, the strength of the extrinsic pinning sites was identified and they follow two different distributions in two different types of nanowire rings. For the closely spaced wires, magnetostatic interactions led to correlated movement of DWs in neighboring wires. The implications of DW pinning and interaction in nanoscale DW devices will be discussed.

  18. Solution voltammetry of 4 nm magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Joseph J P; Westgard, John A; Cooper, Laura M; Murray, Royce W

    2014-07-30

    The voltammetry of solution-dispersed magnetite iron oxide Fe3O4 nanoparticles is described. Their currents are controlled by nanoparticle transport rates, as shown with potential step chronoamperometry and rotated disk voltammetry. In pH 2 citrate buffer with added NaClO4 electrolyte, solution cyclic voltammetry of these nanoparticles (average diameter 4.4 ± 0.9 nm, each containing ca. 30 Fe sites) displays an electrochemically irreversible oxidation with E(PEAK) at ca. +0.52 V and an irreversible reduction with E(PEAK) at ca. +0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl reference electrode. These processes are presumed to correspond to the formal potentials for one-electron oxidation of Fe(II) and reduction of Fe(III) at their different sites in the magnetite nanoparticle structure. The heterogeneous electrode reaction rates of the nanoparticles are very slow, in the 10(-5) cm/s range. The nanoparticles are additionally characterized by a variety of tools, e.g., TEM, UV/vis, and XPS spectroscopies.

  19. Technique for cellular microsurgery using the 193-nm excimer laser.

    PubMed

    Palanker, D; Ohad, S; Lewis, A; Simon, A; Shenkar, J; Penchas, S; Laufer, N

    1991-01-01

    A new cell surgery technique has been developed to produce well-defined alterations in cells and tissue without detectable heating and/or other structural damage in the surroundings. The technique involves the use of an argon fluoride excimer laser, in the deep ultraviolet (UV) region of the spectrum at 193 nm, which is guided through a glass pipette filled with a positive air pressure. To demonstrate the method, holes were drilled in the zona pellucida of mouse oocytes. The diameter of the drilled hole was determined by the pipette tip size, and its depth by an energy emitted per pulse and number of pulses. Scanning electron microscopy of the drilled mouse oocytes showed uniform, round, well-circumscribed holes with sharp edges. Oocytes that had their zona pellucida drilled with this new method fertilized in vitro and developed to the blastocyst stage in a rate similar to that of control group. These results demonstrate the nonperturbing nature of this cold laser microsurgical procedure. In addition to the extension of our results for clinical in vitro fertilization purposes, such as enhancement of fertilization and embryo biopsy, there are wide-ranging possible uses of our method in fundamental and applied investigations that require submicron accuracy in cellular alteration.

  20. Gas phase synthesis of non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes with near-armchair chiralities

    SciTech Connect

    Mustonen, K.; Laiho, P.; Kaskela, A.; Zhu, Z.; Reynaud, O.; Houbenov, N.; Tian, Y.; Jiang, H.; Kauppinen, E. I.; Susi, T.; Nasibulin, A. G.

    2015-07-06

    We present a floating catalyst synthesis route for individual, i.e., non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a narrow chiral angle distribution peaking at high chiralities near the armchair species. An ex situ spark discharge generator was used to form iron particles with geometric number mean diameters of 3–4 nm and fed into a laminar flow chemical vapour deposition reactor for the continuous synthesis of long and high-quality SWCNTs from ambient pressure carbon monoxide. The intensity ratio of G/D peaks in Raman spectra up to 48 and mean tube lengths up to 4 μm were observed. The chiral distributions, as directly determined by electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope, clustered around the (n,m) indices (7,6), (8,6), (8,7), and (9,6), with up to 70% of tubes having chiral angles over 20°. The mean diameter of SWCNTs was reduced from 1.10 to 1.04 nm by decreasing the growth temperature from 880 to 750 °C, which simultaneously increased the fraction of semiconducting tubes from 67% to 80%. Limiting the nanotube gas phase number concentration to ∼10{sup 5 }cm{sup −3} prevented nanotube bundle formation that is due to collisions induced by Brownian diffusion. Up to 80% of 500 as-deposited tubes observed by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy were individual. Transparent conducting films deposited from these SWCNTs exhibited record low sheet resistances of 63 Ω/□ at 90% transparency for 550 nm light.

  1. Cylinder-shaped ultrasonic motors 4.8 mm in diameter using electroactive piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Laihui; Zhu, Hua; Zhao, Chunsheng; Wang, Haixia; Luo, Haosu

    2007-01-01

    Two cylinder-shaped ultrasonic motors 4.8mm in diameter were developed. This kind of motor was driven by four pieces of piezoelectric materials, which were used to excite the two first-bending vibrations. Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMNT) crystal and Pb(Zr ,Ti)O3 (PZT) ceramic piezoelectric materials were used as drive elements. The motor based on PMNT crystals could operate at a voltage of 25Vp-p (peak to peak). When driven by a 100Vp-p voltage, the motor could run at frequency ranging from 26to68kHz and the revolution speed reached 450rpm. Its maximum output torque was 0.6mNm. The motor based on the PZT ceramic did not exhibit high performance as the PMNT crystal motor. The piezoelectric materials affect the performance of the motors greatly.

  2. 75 FR 81437 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Taos, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... Taos, NM. Decommissioning of the Ski non-directional beacon (NDB) at Taos Regional Airport, Taos, NM... Taos, NM area. Decommissioning of the Ski NDB and cancellation of the NDB approach at Taos...

  3. Deep ultraviolet (254 nm) focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicek, Erdem; Vashaei, Zahra; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2011-10-01

    We report the synthesis, fabrication and testing of a 320 × 256 focal plane array (FPA) of back-illuminated, solarblind, p-i-n, AlxGa1-xN-based detectors, fully realized within our research laboratory. We implemented a novel pulsed atomic layer deposition technique for the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of crackfree, thick, and high Al composition AlxGa1-xN layers. Following the growth, the wafer was processed into a 320 × 256 array of 25 μm × 25 μm pixels on a 30 μm pixel-pitch and surrounding mini-arrays. A diagnostic mini-array was hybridized to a silicon fan-out chip to allow the study of electrical and optical characteristics of discrete pixels of the FPA. At a reverse bias of 1 V, an average photodetector exhibited a low dark current density of 1.12×10-8 A/cm2. Solar-blind operation is observed throughout the array with peak detection occurring at wavelengths of 256 nm and lower and falling off three orders of magnitude by 285 nm. After indium bump deposition and dicing, the FPA is hybridized to a matching ISC 9809 readout integrated circuit (ROIC). By developing a novel masking technology, we significantly reduced the visible response of the ROIC and thus the need for external filtering to achieve solar- and visible-blind operation is eliminated. This allowed the FPA to achieve high external quantum efficiency (EQE): at 254 nm, average pixels showed unbiased peak responsivity of 75 mA/W, which corresponds to an EQE of ~37%. Finally, the uniformity of the FPA and imaging properties are investigated.

  4. Laser-induced bulk damage of silica glass at 355nm and 266nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwagi, R.; Aramomi, S.

    2016-12-01

    Laser processing machines using Nd:YAG 3rd harmonic wave (355 nm) and 4th harmonic wave (266 nm) have been developed and put into practical use lately. Due to this, optical elements with high laser durability to 355 nm and 266 nm are required. Silica glass is the optical element which has high UV transmission and high laser durability. Laser-induced surface damage of the silica glass has been studied in detail, but we hardly have the significant knowledge of laserinduced bulk damage. This knowledge is required in order to evaluate the silica glass itself. That is because cracks and scratches on the surface give rise to a higher possibility of damage. Therefore, we studied the laser durability of a variety of the silica glass samples by 1-on-1 and S-on-1 laser-induced bulk damage threshold (LIDT) at 355 nm and 266 nm. In this study, we gained knowledge in three areas about bulk damage to the silica glass. First, the LIDT became lower as shot counts increased. Second, the LIDT decreased as the hydroxyl content in the silica glass increased. Last, the LIDT became higher as the hydrogen concentration in the silica glass increased. Under the UV irradiation, impurities are generated and the silica glass absorbs more light. Therefore, the LIDT decreased as shot counts increased. Also, the hydroxyl in particular generates more impurities, so damage easily occurs. On the other hand, the hydrogen reacts with impurities and absorption is suppressed. Based on these results, we can improve laser durability at 355 nm and 266 nm by reducing the hydroxyl content and increasing the hydrogen concentration in the silica glass.

  5. Yb fiber amplifier at 972.5 nm with frequency quadrupling to 243.1 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkley, Z.; Rasor, C.; Cooper, S. F.; Brandt, A. D.; Yost, D. C.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a continuous-wave ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier which produces 6.3 W at a wavelength of 972.5 nm. We frequency-quadruple this source in two resonant doubling stages to generate 530 mW at 243.1 nm. Radiation at this wavelength is required to excite the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen and could therefore find application in experimental studies of hydrogen and anti-hydrogen.

  6. 248nm silicon photoablation: Microstructuring basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poopalan, P.; Najamudin, S. H.; Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.

    2015-05-01

    248nm pulses from a KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a Si wafer in order to ascertain the laser pulse and energy effects for use as a microstructuring tool for MEMS fabrication. The laser pulses were varied between two different energy levels of 8mJ and 4mJ while the number of pulses for ablation was varied. The corresponding ablated depths were found to range between 11 µm and 49 µm, depending on the demagnified beam fluence.

  7. Photolysis of formic acid at 355 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Denhi; Bautista, Teonanacatl; Guerrero, Alfonso; Alvarez, Ignacio; Cisneros, Carmen

    2015-05-01

    Formic acid is well known as a food additive and recently an application on fuel cell technology has emerged. In this work we have studied the dissociative ionization process by multiphoton absorption of formic acid molecules at 355nm wavelength photons, using TOF spectrometry in reflectron mode (R-TOF). Some of the most abundant ionic fragments produced are studied at different settings of the laser harmonic generator. The dependence of the products on these conditions is reported. This work was supported by CONACYT Project 165410 and PAPIIT IN102613 and IN101215.

  8. 248nm silicon photoablation: Microstructuring basics

    SciTech Connect

    Poopalan, P.; Najamudin, S. H.; Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.

    2015-05-15

    248nm pulses from a KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a Si wafer in order to ascertain the laser pulse and energy effects for use as a microstructuring tool for MEMS fabrication. The laser pulses were varied between two different energy levels of 8mJ and 4mJ while the number of pulses for ablation was varied. The corresponding ablated depths were found to range between 11 µm and 49 µm, depending on the demagnified beam fluence.

  9. Nonlinear absorption properties of DKDP crystal at 263 nm and 351 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiangxu; Zhu, Qihua; Feng, Bin; Li, Fuquan; Feng, Xi; Wang, Fang; Han, Wei; Wang, Liquan

    2017-02-01

    At the wavelength of 263 nm and 351 nm, the nonlinear absorption curves of 66% deuterated DKDP crystal were measured in the geometries of beam polarizing along the optics axis (E∥Z) and perpendicular to it (E⊥Z). The results indicate that the nonlinear absorption in the E⊥Z geometry is stronger than that in the E∥Z geometry. The nonlinear absorptions at 263 nm and 351 nm are identified to two- and three-photon absorption, respectively. The theoretical fits to the experimental data yields the two-photon absorption coefficients of 0.32 ± 0.03 cm/GW (E⊥Z geometry) and 0.17 ± 0.02 cm/GW (E∥Z geometry) at 263 nm, and the three-photon absorption coefficients of (8.1 ± 1.1) × 10-4 cm3/GW2 (E⊥Z geometry) and (2.2 ± 0.5) × 10-4 cm3/GW2 (E∥Z geometry) at 351 nm.

  10. Monte-Carlo simulation studies of the effect of temperature and diameter variation on spin transport in II-VI semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishti, Sabiq; Ghosh, Bahniman; Bishnoi, Bhupesh

    2015-02-01

    We have analyzed the spin transport behaviour of four II-VI semiconductor nanowires by simulating spin polarized transport using a semi-classical Monte-Carlo approach. The different scattering mechanisms considered are acoustic phonon scattering, surface roughness scattering, polar optical phonon scattering, and spin flip scattering. The II-VI materials used in our study are CdS, CdSe, ZnO and ZnS. The spin transport behaviour is first studied by varying the temperature (4-500 K) at a fixed diameter of 10 nm and also by varying the diameter (8-12 nm) at a fixed temperature of 300 K. For II-VI compounds, the dominant mechanism is for spin relaxation; D'yakonovPerel and Elliot Yafet have been actively employed in the first order model to simulate the spin transport. The dependence of the spin relaxation length (SRL) on the diameter and temperature has been analyzed.

  11. Determination of critical diameters for intrinsic carrier diffusion-length of GaN nanorods with cryo-scanning near-field optical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y. T.; Karlsson, K. F.; Birch, J.; Holtz, P. O.

    2016-01-01

    Direct measurements of carrier diffusion in GaN nanorods with a designed InGaN/GaN layer-in-a-wire structure by scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) were performed at liquid-helium temperatures of 10 K. Without an applied voltage, intrinsic diffusion lengths of photo-excited carriers were measured as the diameters of the nanorods differ from 50 to 800 nm. The critical diameter of nanorods for carrier diffusion is concluded as 170 nm with a statistical approach. Photoluminescence spectra were acquired for different positions of the SNOM tip on the nanorod, corresponding to the origins of the well-defined luminescence peaks, each being related to recombination-centers. The phenomenon originated from surface oxide by direct comparison of two nanorods with similar diameters in a single map has been observed and investigated. PMID:26876009

  12. DNA charge transport over 34 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Jason D.; Muren, Natalie B.; Renfrew, Sara E.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-03-01

    Molecular wires show promise in nanoscale electronics, but the synthesis of uniform, long conductive molecules is a significant challenge. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of precise length, by contrast, is synthesized easily, but its conductivity over the distances required for nanoscale devices has not been explored. Here we demonstrate DNA charge transport (CT) over 34 nm in 100-mer monolayers on gold. Multiplexed gold electrodes modified with 100-mer DNA yield sizable electrochemical signals from a distal, covalent Nile Blue redox probe. Significant signal attenuation upon incorporation of a single base-pair mismatch demonstrates that CT is DNA-mediated. Efficient cleavage of these 100-mers by a restriction enzyme indicates that the DNA adopts a native conformation accessible to protein binding. Similar electron-transfer rates measured through 100-mer and 17-mer monolayers are consistent with rate-limiting electron tunnelling through the saturated carbon linker. This DNA-mediated CT distance of 34 nm surpasses that of most reports of molecular wires.

  13. Stress shielding of patellar tendon: effect on small-diameter collagen fibrils in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Majima, Tokifumi; Yasuda, Kazunori; Tsuchida, Takamasa; Tanaka, Kunio; Miyakawa, Kiyoshi; Minami, Akio; Hayashi, Kozaburo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of stress shielding on the microstructure and ultrastructure of the patellar tendon using 40 mature female Japanese white rabbits. The patellar tendon was completely released from stress by drawing the patella toward the tibial tubercle with a stainless steel wire installed between them. Microstructurally, stress shielding for 3 and 6 weeks increased the number of cells approximately fivefold, to that of the control tendon. Collagen bundles were less well oriented in the stress-shielded tendon than in the control. Ultrastructurally, small collagen fibrils with a diameter of less than 90 nm increased in the stress-shielded tendon. The median collagen fibril diameter in 6-week stress-shielded tendon was significantly smaller ( P < 0.05) than in the control tendon (58.8% of control). The ratio of the total area of collagen fibrils to the whole visualized area in the stress-shielded patellar tendon was significantly smaller at 3 and 6 weeks than that in the control. This study demonstrated that complete stress shielding significantly affects the microstructure and ultrastructure of the patellar tendon

  14. Constraints on the diameter and albedo of 2060 Chiron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, Mark V.; Walker, Russell G.

    1991-01-01

    Asteroid 2060 Chiron is the largest known object exhibiting cometary activity. Radiometric observations made in 1983 from a ground-based telescope and the IRAS are used to examine the limits on Chiron's diameter and albedo. It is argued that Chiron's surface temperature distribution at that time is best described by an 'isothermal latitude' or 'rapid-rotator' model. Consequently, Chiron has a maximum diameter of 372 kilometers and a minimum geometric albedo of 2.7 percent. This is much bigger and darker than previous estimates, and suggests that gravity may play a significant role in the evolution of gas and dust emissions. It is also found that for large obliquities, surface temperatures can vary dramatically on time scales of a decade, and that such geometry may play a critical role in explaining Chiron's observed photometric behavior since its discovery in 1977.

  15. Twist Neutrality and the Diameter of the Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2012-03-01

    The diameter of the nucleosome core particle is the same for all the eukaryotes. Here we discuss the possibility that this selectiveness is consistent with a propensity for twist neutrality, in particular, for the double helical DNA to stay rotationally neutral when strained. Reorganization of DNA cannot be done without some level of temporal tensile stress, and as a consequence chiral molecules, such as helices, will twist under strain. The requirement that the nucleosome, constituting the nucleosome core particle and linker DNA, has a vanishing strain-twist coupling leads to a requirement for the amount of bending. For the diameter of the coiled DNA we obtain the relatively accurate numerical estimate of 2R=82Å.

  16. Angular diameter distances reconsidered in the Newman and Penrose formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Thomas P.; Aly, Aly

    2016-02-01

    Using the Newman and Penrose spin coefficient (NP) formalism, we provide a derivation of the Dyer-Roeder equation for the angular diameter distance in cosmological space-times. We show that the geodesic deviation equation written in NP formalism is precisely the Dyer-Roeder equation for a general Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time, and then we examine the angular diameter distance to redshift relation in the case that a flat FRW metric is perturbed by a gravitational potential. We examine the perturbation in the case that the gravitational potential exhibits the properties of a thin gravitational lens, demonstrating how the weak lensing shear and convergence act as source terms for the perturbed Dyer-Roeder equation.

  17. Antioxidant properties of cerium oxide nanocrystals as a function of nanocrystal diameter and surface coating.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Soo; Song, Wensi; Cho, Minjung; Puppala, Hema L; Nguyen, Phuc; Zhu, Huiguang; Segatori, Laura; Colvin, Vicki L

    2013-11-26

    This work examines the effect of nanocrystal diameter and surface coating on the reactivity of cerium oxide nanocrystals with H2O2 both in chemical solutions and in cells. Monodisperse nanocrystals were formed in organic solvents from the decomposition of cerium precursors, and subsequently phase transferred into water using amphiphiles as nanoparticle coatings. Quantitative analysis of the antioxidant capacity of CeO2-x using gas chromatography and a luminol test revealed that 2 mol of H2O2 reacted with every mole of cerium(III), suggesting that the reaction proceeds via a Fenton-type mechanism. Smaller diameter nanocrystals containing more cerium(III) were found to be more reactive toward H2O2. Additionally, the presence of a surface coating did not preclude the reaction between the nanocrystal surface cerium(III) and hydrogen peroxide. Taken together, the most reactive nanoparticles were the smallest (e.g., 3.8 nm diameter) with the thinnest surface coating (e.g., oleic acid). Moreover, a benchmark test of their antioxidant capacity revealed these materials were 9 times more reactive than commercial antioxidants such as Trolox. A unique feature of these antioxidant nanocrystals is that they can be applied multiple times: over weeks, cerium(IV) rich particles slowly return to their starting cerium(III) content. In nearly all cases, the particles remain colloidally stable (e.g., nonaggregated) and could be applied multiple times as antioxidants. These chemical properties were also observed in cell culture, where the materials were able to reduce oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblasts exposed to H2O2 with efficiency comparable to their solution phase reactivity. These data suggest that organic coatings on cerium oxide nanocrystals do not limit the antioxidant behavior of the nanocrystals, and that their redox cycling behavior can be preserved even when stabilized.

  18. Diameter-Specific Growth of Semiconducting SWNT Arrays Using Uniform Mo2C Solid Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuchen; Tong, Lianming; Hu, Yue; Kang, Lixing; Zhang, Jin

    2015-07-22

    Semiconducting single-walled nanotube (s-SWNT) arrays with specific diameters are urgently demanded in the applications in nanoelectronic devices. Herein, we reported that by using uniform Mo2C solid catalyst, aligned s-SWNT (∼90%) arrays with narrow-diameter distribution (∼85% between 1.0 and 1.3 nm) on quartz substrate can be obtained. Mo2C nanoparticles with monodisperse sizes were prepared by using molybdenum oxide-based giant clusters, (NH4)42[Mo132O372(H3CCOO)30(H2O)72]·10H3CCOONH4·300H2O(Mo132), as the precursor that was carburized by a gas mixture of C2H5OH/H2 during a temperature-programmed reduction. In this approach, the formation of volatile MoO3 was inhibited due to the annealing and reduction at a low temperature. As a result, uniform Mo2C nanoparticles are formed, and their narrow size-dispersion strictly determines the diameter distribution of SWNTs. During the growth process, Mo2C selectively catalyzes the scission of C-O bonds of ethanol molecules, and the resultant absorbed oxygen (Oads) preferentially etches metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs), leading to the high-yield of s-SWNTs. Raman spectroscopic analysis showed that most of the s-SWNTs can be identified as (14, 4), (13, 6), or (10, 9) tubes. Our findings open up the possibility of the chirality-controlled growth of aligned-SWNTs using uniform carbide nanoparticles as solid catalysts for practical nanoelectronics applications.

  19. From Agglomerates of Spheres to Irregularly Shaped Particles: Determination of Dynamic Shape Factors from Measurements of Mobility and Vacuum Aerodynamic Diameters

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Cai, Yong; Imre, Dan G.

    2006-03-01

    With the advert of aerosol instrumentation it has become possible to simultaneously measure individual particle mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameters. For spherical particles these two diameters yield individual particle density. In contrast, assigning a physical meaning to the mobility or aerodynamic diameter of aspherical particles is not straightforward. This paper presents an experimental exploration of the effect of particle shape on the relationship between mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameters. We make measurements on systems of three types: 1) Agglomerates of spheres, for which the density and the volume are known; 2) Ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, succinic acid and lauric acid irregularly shaped particles of known density; and 3) Internally mixed particles, containing organics and ammonium sulfate, of unknown density and shape. For agglomerates of spheres we observed alignment effects in the DMA and report the first measurements of the dynamic shape factors (DSFs) in free molecular regime. We present here the first experimental determination of the DSF of ammonium sulfate particles. We find for ammonium sulfate particles a DSF that increases from 1.03 to 1.07 as particle mobility diameter increases from 160 nm to 500 nm. Three types of NaC1 particles were generated and characterized: nearly spherical particles with DSF of ~1.02; cubic with DSF that increases from 1.065 to 1.17 as particle mobility diameter increases from 200 nm to 900 nm; and compact agglomerates with DSF 1.3-1.4. Organic particles were found very nearly spherical. The data suggest that particles composed of binary mixtures of ammonium sulfate and succinic acid have lower dynamic shape factors than pure ammonium sulfate particles. However, for internally mixed ammonium sulfate and lauric acid particles we cannot distinguish between nearly spherical particles with low density and particles with DSF of 1.17.

  20. Low-intensity LED (625 and 405 nm) and laser (805 nm) killing of Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchina, Elena S.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2009-02-01

    In the present work we have investigated in vitro sensitivity of microorganisms P. acnes and S. epidermidis to action of red (625 nm and 405 nm) and infrared (805 nm) radiations in combination with photosensitizes Methylene Blue and Indocyanine Green.

  1. Behavior of large-diameter pipelines at fault crossings

    SciTech Connect

    Desmond, T.P.; Power, M.S.; Taylor, C.L.; Lau, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    An evaluation of large diameter pipes which cross earthquake faults in the San Francisco Bay Area is summarized. Pipe response due to fault movement is evaluated by estimating the likely fault offset and then determining pipe strain induced by soil-pipe interaction. Probabilistic models are used to predict fault offsets associated with a Maximum Credible Earthquake. These ground movements are related to pipe strains; then, pipe damage is characterized in probabilistic terms. These analyses form the basis for recommending pipeline modifications.

  2. Measuring angular diameter distances of strong gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, I.; Komatsu, E.; Suyu, S. H.

    2015-11-01

    The distance-redshift relation plays a fundamental role in constraining cosmological models. In this paper, we show that measurements of positions and time delays of strongly lensed images of a background galaxy, as well as those of the velocity dispersion and mass profile of a lens galaxy, can be combined to extract the angular diameter distance of the lens galaxy. Physically, as the velocity dispersion and the time delay give a gravitational potential (GM/r) and a mass (GM) of the lens, respectively, dividing them gives a physical size (r) of the lens. Comparing the physical size with the image positions of a lensed galaxy gives the angular diameter distance to the lens. A mismatch between the exact locations at which these measurements are made can be corrected by measuring a local slope of the mass profile. We expand on the original idea put forward by Paraficz and Hjorth, who analyzed singular isothermal lenses, by allowing for an arbitrary slope of a power-law spherical mass density profile, an external convergence, and an anisotropic velocity dispersion. We find that the effect of external convergence cancels out when dividing the time delays and velocity dispersion measurements. We derive a formula for the uncertainty in the angular diameter distance in terms of the uncertainties in the observables. As an application, we use two existing strong lens systems, B1608+656 (zL=0.6304) and RXJ1131-1231 (zL=0.295), to show that the uncertainty in the inferred angular diameter distances is dominated by that in the velocity dispersion, σ2, and its anisotropy. We find that the current data on these systems should yield about 16% uncertainty in DA per object. This improves to 13% when we measure σ2 at the so-called sweet-spot radius. Achieving 7% is possible if we can determine σ2 with 5% precision.

  3. NEOWISE Diameters and Albedos V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Grav, T.; Kramer, E. A.; Masiero, J. R.; Nugent, C. R.; Sonnett, S. M.; Stevenson, R. A.; Wright, E. L.

    2016-06-01

    This PDS data set represents a compilation of published diameters, optical albedos, near-infrared albedos, and beaming parameters for minor planets detected by NEOWISE during the fully cryogenic, 3-band cryo, post-cryo and NEOWISE-Reactivation Year 1 operations. It contains data covering near-Earth asteroids, Main Belt asteroids, active Main Belt objects, Hildas, Jupiter Trojans, Centaurs, and Jovian and Saturnian irregular satellites. Methodology for physical property determination is described in the referenced articles.

  4. No link between the solar activity cycle and the diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dame, L.; Cugnet, D.

    We do not understand the physical mechanisms responsible for the solar irradiance cycle. Measurements of small variations in the solar diameter could have been a critical probe of the Sun 's interior stratification, telling us how and where the solar luminosity is gated or stored. We have reanalyzed the 7 years of filtregrams data (150 000 photograms and magnetograms) of the SOHO/MDI experiment. We used the maximum possible sampling compatible with full frame recording, carefully avoiding any suspicious filtregram. Going further than the previous analysis of 2 years of data by Emilio et al. (Ap. J. 543,1007, 2000), we better corrected for changes in optical aberrations and, along Turmon et al. (Ap. J., 568, 396, 2002), we reduced radius measurement errors by identifying active regions and avoiding radius measurements herein. We found that, within the limit of our noise level uncertainties (2 mas), the solar diameter could be constant over the half cycle investigated. Our results confirm the recent reanalysis of the 7 years of MDI data made by Antia (Ap. J. 590, 567, 2003), with a completely different method since using the ultra-precise frequency variation of the f-modes (fundamental modes linked to the diameter). He found (carefully removing the yearly Earth induced variations and avoiding the SOHO data gap of 1999) that the diameter is constant over the half solar cycle (radius variation are less than 0.6 km, 0.8 mas - nothing over noise level). Along Antia, we can conclude that: "If a careful analysis is performed, then it turns out that there is no evidence for any variation in the solar radius." There were no theoretical reasons for large solar radius variations and there is no observational evidence for them with consistent space observations. If changes exit, they are to be very small.

  5. Measuring angular diameter distances of strong gravitational lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Jee, I.; Komatsu, E.; Suyu, S.H. E-mail: komatsu@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2015-11-01

    The distance-redshift relation plays a fundamental role in constraining cosmological models. In this paper, we show that measurements of positions and time delays of strongly lensed images of a background galaxy, as well as those of the velocity dispersion and mass profile of a lens galaxy, can be combined to extract the angular diameter distance of the lens galaxy. Physically, as the velocity dispersion and the time delay give a gravitational potential (GM/r) and a mass (GM) of the lens, respectively, dividing them gives a physical size (r) of the lens. Comparing the physical size with the image positions of a lensed galaxy gives the angular diameter distance to the lens. A mismatch between the exact locations at which these measurements are made can be corrected by measuring a local slope of the mass profile. We expand on the original idea put forward by Paraficz and Hjorth, who analyzed singular isothermal lenses, by allowing for an arbitrary slope of a power-law spherical mass density profile, an external convergence, and an anisotropic velocity dispersion. We find that the effect of external convergence cancels out when dividing the time delays and velocity dispersion measurements. We derive a formula for the uncertainty in the angular diameter distance in terms of the uncertainties in the observables. As an application, we use two existing strong lens systems, B1608+656 (z{sub L}=0.6304) and RXJ1131−1231 (z{sub L}=0.295), to show that the uncertainty in the inferred angular diameter distances is dominated by that in the velocity dispersion, σ{sup 2}, and its anisotropy. We find that the current data on these systems should yield about 16% uncertainty in D{sub A} per object. This improves to 13% when we measure σ{sup 2} at the so-called sweet-spot radius. Achieving 7% is possible if we can determine σ{sup 2} with 5% precision.

  6. Modification of laminar flow ultrafine condensation particle counters for the enhanced detection of 1 nm condensation nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, C.; Chen, M.; McMurry, P. H.; Wang, J.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes simple modifications to thermally diffusive laminar flow ultrafine condensation particle counters (UCPCs) that allow detection of {approx}1 nm condensation nuclei with much higher efficiencies than have been previously reported. These nondestructive modifications were applied to a commercial butanol based UCPC (TSI 3025A) and to a diethylene glycol-based UCPC (UMN DEG-UCPC). Size and charge dependent detection efficiencies using the modified UCPCs (BNL 3025A and BNL DEGUCPC) were measured with high resolution mobility classified aerosols composed of NaCl, W, molecular ion standards of tetraalkyl ammonium bromide, and neutralizer-generated ions. With negatively charged NaCl aerosol, the BNL 3025A and BNL DEGUCPC achieved detection efficiencies of 37% (90x increase over TSI 3025A) at 1.68 nm mobility diameter (1.39 nm geometric diameter) and 23% (8x increase over UMN DEG-UCPC) at 1.19 nm mobility diameter (0.89 nm geometric diameter), respectively. Operating conditions for both UCPCs were identified that allowed negatively charged NaCl and W particles, but not negative ions of exactly the same mobility size, to be efficiently detected. This serendipitous material dependence, which is not fundamentally understood, suggests that vapor condensation might sometimes allow for the discrimination between air 'ions' and charged 'particles.' As a detector in a scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS), a UCPC with this strong material dependence would allow for more accurate measurements of sub-2 nm aerosol size distributions due to the reduced interference from neutralizer-generated ions and atmospheric ions, and provide increased sensitivity for the determination of nucleation rates and initial particle growth rates.

  7. The method for detecting diffusion ring diameter in Hemagglutinin measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Wenbo; Liu, Xue; Duan, Jin; Wang, Xiao-man

    2014-11-01

    The diffuser ring diameter measurement is the most critical in hemagglutinin Measuring. The traditional methods, such as a vernier caliper or high-definition scanned images are subjective and low for the measurement data reliability. Propose high-resolution diffusion ring image for drop-resolution processing, adaptive Canny operator and local detection method to extract complete and clear diffusion ring boundaries, and finally make use of polynomial interpolation algorithm to make diffusion ring outer boundary pixel coordinates achieve sub-pixel accuracy and the least-squares fitting circle algorithm to calculate the precise center of the circle and the diameter of the diffuser ring. Experimental results show that the method detection time is only 63.61ms, which is a faster speed; diffuser ring diameter estimation error can achieve 0.55 pixel, high stability in experimental data. This method is adapted to the various types of influenza vaccine hemagglutinin content measurements, and has important value in the influenza vaccine quality detection.

  8. Stellar Diameters in the Beta Pic Moving Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M.; Schaefer, G. H.

    2014-09-01

    Members of the Beta Pic Moving Group (BPMG) are young enough (10-20 MY) and near enough (< 50 pc) that some are resolvable with the CHARA Interferometric Array in the H and K bands. The capability to measure the radius of a star as it contracts is important because it provides a new way to measure the stars age by reference to models of its evolution. We measured the angular diameters of the BPMG members HIP 560 (F3V) and HIP 21547 (F0V) using the interferometer with the CLASSIC beam combiner. Our observing assignment was in the time the CHARA administration made publicly available through the NOAO application process. The limb-darkened angular diameters of HIP 560 and 21547 are 0.492±0.032 and 0.518±0.009 mas, respectively. The corresponding stellar radii are 2.1 (HIP 560) and 1.6 Rsun (HIP 21547). These values indicate that HIP 560 and 21547 are truly young. Comparison to theoretical evolutionary models indicates their age is 13±2 MY. We describe our observations and results briefly here and discuss the studies that will become possible in the near future. A more detailed account is given in our paper “Measured Diameters of 2 F-stars in the Beta Pic Moving Group,” submitted to the Astrophysical Journal.

  9. Tree height–diameter allometry across the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hulshof, Catherine M; Swenson, Nathan G; Weiser, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between tree height and diameter is fundamental in determining community and ecosystem structure as well as estimates of biomass and carbon storage. Yet our understanding of how tree allometry relates to climate and whole organismal function is limited. We used the Forest Inventory and Analysis National Program database to determine height–diameter allometries of 2,976,937 individuals of 293 tree species across the United States. The shape of the allometric relationship was determined by comparing linear and nonlinear functional forms. Mixed-effects models were used to test for allometric differences due to climate and floristic (between angiosperms and gymnosperms) and functional groups (leaf habit and shade tolerance). Tree allometry significantly differed across the United States largely because of climate. Temperature, and to some extent precipitation, in part explained tree allometric variation. The magnitude of allometric variation due to climate, however, had a phylogenetic signal. Specifically, angiosperm allometry was more sensitive to differences in temperature compared to gymnosperms. Most notably, angiosperm height was more negatively influenced by increasing temperature variability, whereas gymnosperm height was negatively influenced by decreasing precipitation and increasing altitude. There was little evidence to suggest that shade tolerance influenced tree allometry except for very shade-intolerant trees which were taller for any given diameter. Tree allometry is plastic rather than fixed and scaling parameters vary around predicted central tendencies. This allometric variation provides insight into life-history strategies, phylogenetic history, and environmental limitations at biogeographical scales. PMID:25859325

  10. J-integral of circumferential crack in large diameter pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Chao, Yuh J.; Sutton, M. A.; Lam, P. S.; Mertz, G. E.

    Large diameter thin-walled pipes are encountered in a low pressure nuclear power piping system. Fracture parameters such as K and J, associated with postulated cracks, are needed to assess the safety of the structure, for example, prediction of the onset of tile crack growth and the stability of the crack. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has completed a comprehensive study of cracks in pipes and handbook-type data is available. However, for some large diameter, thin-walled pipes the needed information is not included in the handbook. This paper reports our study of circumferential cracks in large diameter, thin-walled pipes (R/t=30 to 40) under remote bending or tension loads. Elastic-Plastic analyses using the finite element method were performed to determine the elastic and fully plastic J values for various pipe/crack geometries. A non-linear Ramberg-Osgood material model is used with strain hardening exponents (n) that range from 3 to 10. A number of circumferential, through thickness cracks were studied with half crack angles ranging from 0.063(pi) to 0.5(pi). Results are tabulated for use with the EPRI estimation scheme.

  11. Effect of Periradial Administration of Papaverine on Radial Artery Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, P. S.; Singh, Naveen G.; Manjunatha, N.; Desai, Rushikesh Chintamanrao

    2017-01-01

    Background: Radial artery cannulation is a skillful procedure. An experienced anesthesiologist might also face difficulty in cannulating a feeble radial pulse. Aim: The purpose of the study was to determine whether periradial subcutaneous administration of papaverine results in effective vasodilation and improvement in the palpability score of radial artery. Settings and Design: Prospective, double-blinded trial. Methodology: Thirty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery were enrolled in the study. 30 mg of papaverine with 1 ml of 2% lignocaine and 3 ml of normal saline were injected subcutaneously 1–2 cm proximal to styloid process of the radius. Radial artery diameter before and after 20 min of injection papaverine was measured using ultrasonography. The palpability of the radial pulse was also determined before the injection of papaverine and 20 min later. Patients were monitored for hemodynamics and any complications were noted. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test for paired data. Results: Radial artery diameter increased significantly (P < 0.0001), and the pulse palpability score also showed statistically significant improvement (P < 0.0001) after periradial subcutaneous administration of papaverine. There was no statistically significant difference in heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure before and after papaverine injection. No complications were noted in 24 h of follow-up. Conclusion: Periradial subcutaneous administration of papaverine significantly increased the radial artery diameter and pulse palpability score, which had an impact on ease of radial artery cannulation essential for hemodynamic monitoring in cardiac surgical patients. PMID:28298790

  12. Real-time diameter measurement using diffuse light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaohe; Hui, Mei; Zhu, Qiudong; Wang, Shanshan

    2016-09-01

    A method for on-line rapid determination of the diameter of metallic cylinder is introduced in this paper. Under the radiation of diffuse light, there is a bright area close to the margin of metallic cylinder, and the method of this paper is based on the intensity distribution of the bright area. In this paper, with the radiation by a diffuse plane light with special shape, we present the relation expression of the distance between the peak point and the real edge of the cylinder and the distance between the diffuse light and the pinhole aperture of the camera. With the expression, the diameter of the cylinder to be measured can be calculated. In the experiments, monochromatic LED uniting with ground glass forms the diffuse light source, then the light irradiates the tested cylinder. After the cylinder, we use a lens with a front pinhole stop to choose the light into CMOS, then a computer is used to analyze images and export the measurement results. The measuring system using this method is very easily implemented, so it can realize the on-line rapid measurement. Experimental results are presented for six metallic cylinders with the diameter in 5 18mm range and roughness in Ra- 0.02um, and the precision reaches 3um.

  13. Electrospun polystyrene fiber diameter influencing bacterial attachment, proliferation, and growth.

    PubMed

    Abrigo, Martina; Kingshott, Peter; McArthur, Sally L

    2015-04-15

    Electrospun materials have been widely investigated in the past few decades as candidates for tissue engineering applications. However, there is little available data on the mechanisms of interaction of bacteria with electrospun wound dressings of different morphology and surface chemistry. This knowledge could allow the development of effective devices against bacterial infections in chronic wounds. In this paper, the interactions of three bacterial species (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus) with electrospun polystyrene meshes were investigated. Bacterial response to meshes with different fiber diameters was assessed through a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy. Experiments included attachment studies in liquid medium but also directly onto agar plates; the latter was aimed at mimicking a chronic wound environment. Fiber diameter was shown to affect the ability of bacteria to proliferate within the fibrous networks, depending on cell size and shape. The highest proliferation rates occurred when fiber diameter was close to the bacterial size. Nanofibers were found to induce conformational changes of rod shaped bacteria, limiting the colonization process and inducing cell death. The data suggest that simply tuning the morphological properties of electrospun fibers may be one strategy used to control biofilm formation within wound dressings.

  14. Large diameter propellers of reduced weight. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hadler, J.B.; Neilson, R.; Rowen, A.; Sedat, R.; Zubaly, R.

    1982-04-01

    A study of the design and economic analysis of large diameter, slow-turning marine propellers to improve the fuel economy of merchant ships. Detailed designs of several lightweight propellers were made. It was determined that the best combination for weight reduction is a cast hollow blade with 1 1/4 inch wall thickness and a hollow hub. Other investigations made were: fabrication techniques, resonant frequency effects, hydrodynamic characteristics, cascading effects and tip emersion effects. Costs and benefits as applied to a 120,000 DWT Tanker are discussed allowing for both strict adherence to IMCO Rules of tip submersion and with a relaxing of IMCO Rules. Strict adherence shows a maximum propeller diameter of about 30.2 feet with a resulting annual fuel savings of 1/4 million dollars over the 27.5' propeller. Relaxing these rules allows for a 42.5 diameter propeller turning at 30.8 RPM which would result in an annual fuel savings of one million dollars per year over the 27.5 propeller.

  15. Ultrasound guided percutaneous EVAR success is predicted by vessel diameter

    PubMed Central

    Bensley, Rodney P.; Hurks, Rob; Huang, Zhen; Pomposelli, Frank; Hamdan, Allen; Wyers, Mark; Chaikof, Elliot; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound guided access allows for direct visualization of the access artery during percutaneous endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. We hypothesize that the use of ultrasound guidance allowed us to safely increase the utilization of percutaneous endovascular aortic aneurysm repair to almost all patients and decrease access complications. Methods A retrospective chart review of all elective endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs, both abdominal and descending thoracic, from 2005-2010 was performed. Patients were identified using ICD9 codes and stratified based on access type: percutaneous vs. cutdown. We examined the success rate of percutaneous access and the cause of failure. Sheath size was large (18-24 Fr) or small (12-16 Fr). Minimum access vessel diameter was also measured. Outcomes were wound complications (infections or clinically significant hematomas that delayed discharge or required transfusion), operative and incision time, length of stay, and discharge disposition. Predictors of percutaneous failure were identified. Results 168 patients (296 arteries) had percutaneous access (P-EVAR) while 131 patients (226 arteries) had femoral cutdown access (C-EVAR). Ultrasound guided access was introduced in 2007. P-EVAR increased from zero cases in 2005 to 92.3% of all elective cases in 2010. The success rate with percutaneous access was 96%. Failures requiring open surgical repair of the artery included 7 for hemorrhage and 6 for flow limiting stenosis or occlusion of the femoral artery. P-EVAR had fewer wound complications (0.7% vs. 7.4%, P = .001) shorter operative time (153.3 vs. 201.5 minutes, P < .001) and larger minimal access vessel diameter (6.7 mm vs. 6.1 mm, P < .01). Patients with failed percutaneous access had smaller minimal access vessel diameters when compared to successful P-EVAR (4.9 mm vs. 6.8 mm, P < .001). More failures occurred in small sheaths than large ones (7.4% vs. 1.9%, P = .02). Access vessel diameter < 5 mm is predictive

  16. The action of NIR (808nm) laser radiation and gold nanorods labeled with IgA and IgG human antibodies on methicillin-resistant and methicillin sensitive strains of Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchina, Elena S.; Petrov, Pavel O.; Ratto, Fulvio; Centi, Sonia; Pini, Roberto; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of NIR laser radiation (808 nm) on methicillin-sensitive and methicillin resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus incubated with gold nanorods is studied. Nanorods having length of 44 (± 4) nm and diameter of 10 (± 3) nm with the absorption maximum in the NIR (800 nm), functionalized with human immunoglobulins IgA and IgG, were synthesized and used in the studies. The killing ability up to 97% of the microorganism populations by using this nanotechnology was shown.

  17. TCSPC FLIM in the wavelength range from 800 nm to 1700 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Shcheslavsky, Vladislav

    2016-03-01

    Excitation and detection in the wavelength range above 800nm is a convenient and relatively inexpensive way to increase the penetration depth in optical microscopy. Moreover, detection at long wavelength avoids the problem that tissue autofluorescence contaminates the signals from endogenous fluorescence probes. FLIM at NIR wavelength may therefore be complementary to multiphoton microscopy, especially if the lifetimes of NIR fluorophores report biological parameters of the tissue structures they are bound to. Unfortunately, neither the excitation sources nor the detectors of standard confocal and multiphoton laser scanning systems are directly suitable for excitation and detection of NIR fluorescence. Most of these problems can be solved, however, by using ps diode lasers or Ti:Sapphire lasers at their fundamental wavelength, and NIR-sensitive detectors. With NIR-sensitive PMTs the detection wavelength range can be extended up to 900 nm, with InGaAs SPAD detectors up to 1700 nm. Here, we demonstrate the use of a combination of laser scanning, multi-dimensional TCSPC, and advanced excitation sources and detectors for FLIM at up to 1700 nm. The performance was tested at tissue samples incubated with NIR dyes. The fluorescence lifetimes generally get shorter with increasing absorption and emission wavelengths of the dyes. For the cyanine dye IR1061, absorbing around 1060 nm, the lifetime was found to be as short as 70 ps. Nevertheless the fluorescence decay could still be clearly detected. Almost all dyes showed clear lifetime changes depending on the binding to different tissue constituents.

  18. Dual illumination OCT at 1050nm and 840nm for whole eye segment imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shanhui; Qin, Lin; Dai, Cuixia; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2014-11-01

    We presented an improved dual channel dual focus spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with two illuminations at 840 nm and 1050 nm for whole eye segment imaging and biometry in vivo. The two light beams were coupled and optically optimized to scan the anterior and posterior segment of the eye simultaneously. This configuration with dichroic mirrors integrated in the sample arm enables us to acquire images from the anterior segment and retina effectively with minimum loss of sample signal. In addition, the full resolved complex (FRC) method was applied to double the imaging depth for the whole anterior segment imaging by eliminating the mirror image. The axial resolution for 1050 nm and 840 nm OCT was 14 μm and 8 μm in air, respectively. Finally, the system was successfully tested in imaging the unaccommodated and accommodated eyes. The preliminary results demonstrated the significant improvements comparing with our previous dual channel SD-OCT configuration in which the two probing beams had the same central wavelength of 840 nm.

  19. 808-nm diode lasers with and without exogenous chromophore in the treatment of benign facial pigmented and vascular lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangoni, Ovidio; Magaton Rizzi, G.; Trevisan, G.

    2001-10-01

    Aim: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of an 808 nm diode laser for the treatment of benign facial pigmented and vascular lesions, with and without the use of an exogenous chromophore. Method: Thirty-eight patients were treated with an 808 nm diode laser (Eufoton, Italy), in some cases using a chromophore (1% methylene blue, SALF, Bergamo). Pigmented lesions: 21 patients, (15 pigmented keratoses, 6 melanoses). All the lesions were evaluated by dermatoscopy (Videocap 200, DS Medica, Italy) before the treatment. Fluence levels were 10 - 30 J/cmq; pulse lengths were 10 - 50 ms; spot size was 2 mm. Five hypopigmented keratoses were artificially pigmented using exogenous chromophore. Two melanoses required an additional laser session. Vascular lesions: 17 patients, (12 small angiomas, 5 teleangectasias). Fluences were 50 - 100 J/cmq; pulse lengths were 10 - 50 ms; spot size was 2 mm. Eight angiomas were pigmented with exogenous chromophore prior to the treatment. In all cases the areas surrounding the lesions were cooled. The patients were followed at 1, 4 and 8 weeks after the procedure. Results: The keratoses healed completely within two weeks. Four melanoses healed after four weeks. In the two melanoses that were re-treated after eight weeks there remained slight hypopigmentation of the area. All the vascular lesions healed after 15 days without any residual scarring. Considerations: The use of the 808 nm diode laser in the treatment of benign facial pigmented and vascular lesions appears to be justified on the grounds of efficacy and safety of the device, and good degree of acceptance by the patients. By increasing absorption of the 808 nm beam and reducing its penetration, the pigmentation of superficial lesions with exogenous chromophore allowed us to decrease fluences and reduce irradiation times.

  20. 308-nm excimer laser in endodontics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liesenhoff, Tim

    1992-06-01

    Root canal preparation was performed on 20 extracted human teeth. After opening the coronal pulp, the root canals were prepared by 308 nm excimer laser only. All root canals were investigated under SEM after separation in the axial direction. By sagittal separation of the mandibles of freshly slaughtered cows, it was possible to get access to the tissues and irradiate under optical control. Under irradiation of excimer laser light, tissue starts to fluoresce. It was possible to demonstrate that each tissue (dentin, enamel, bone, pulpal, and connective tissue) has a characteristic spectral pattern. The SEM analyses showed that it is well possible to prepare root canals safely. All organic soft tissue has been removed by excimer laser irradiation. There was no case of via falsa. The simultaneous spectroscopic identification of the irradiated tissue provides a safe protection from overinstrumentation. First clinical trials on 20 patients suffering of chronical apical parodontitis have been carried out successfully.

  1. Microscope illumination systems for 157 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesch, Alexander; Uhlendorf, Kristina; Deparnay, Arnaud; Erdmann, Lars; Kuschnerus, Peter; Engel, Thomas; Brunner, Robert

    2003-05-01

    The image quality of an inspection microscope depends strongly on the performance of the illumination system. Especially in the case of laser-based illumination it is necessary to transform the original beam profile into a homogeneous light spot with a flat top field distribution. Simultaneously, speckles caused by the coherence of the laser have to be reduced. Here we discuss different ways to homogenize the multi mode beam profile of a pulsed compact 157 nm excimer laser. A variety of setups, combining dynamic acting diffusers, microlens arrays and primary lenses were realized and characterized in several geometrical arrangements. The homogenizers were evaluated and characterized especially with respect to the statistical behavior on the integrated pulse number.

  2. Geometric interpretation of the ratio of overall diameter to rim crest diameter for lunar and terrestrial craters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegal, B. S.; Wickman, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    An empirical linear relationship has been established by Pike (1967) between the overall diameter and the rim crest diameter for rimmed, flat-floored as well as bowl-shaped, lunar and terrestrial craters formed by impact and explosion. A similar relationship for experimentally formed fluidization craters has been established by Siegal (1971). This relationship is examined in terms of the geometry of the crater and the slope angles of loose materials. The parameter varies from 1.40 to 1.65 and is found to be dependent on mean interior flat floor radius, exterior and interior rim slope angles, angle of aperture of the crater cone, and the volume fraction of crater void accounted for in the rim. The range of the observed parameter can be understood in terms of simple crater geometry by realistic values of the five parameters.

  3. Sub-5 nm nanostructures fabricated by atomic layer deposition using a carbon nanotube template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Ju Yeon; Han, Hyo; Kim, Ji Weon; Lee, Seung-Mo; Ha, Jeong Sook; Shim, Joon Hyung; Han, Chang-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The fabrication of nanostructures having diameters of sub-5 nm is very a important issue for bottom-up nanofabrication of nanoscale devices. In this work, we report a highly controllable method to create sub-5 nm nano-trenches and nanowires by combining area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as templates. Alumina nano-trenches having a depth of 2.6 ∼ 3.0 nm and SiO2 nano-trenches having a depth of 1.9 ∼ 2.2 nm fully guided by the SWNTs have been formed on SiO2/Si substrate. Through infilling ZnO material by ALD in alumina nano-trenches, well-defined ZnO nanowires having a thickness of 3.1 ∼ 3.3 nm have been fabricated. In order to improve the electrical properties of ZnO nanowires, as-fabricated ZnO nanowires by ALD were annealed at 350 °C in air for 60 min. As a result, we successfully demonstrated that as-synthesized ZnO nanowire using a specific template can be made for various high-density resistive components in the nanoelectronics industry.

  4. Non-variation of the solar diameter with the cycle: the end of a possible link between activity and diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dame, L.; Cugnet, D.

    We have reanalyzed the 7 years of filtregrams data (150 000 photograms and magnetograms) of the SOHO/MDI experiment. We used the maximum possible sampling compatible with full frame recording, carefully avoiding any suspicious filtregram. Going further than the previous analysis of 2 years of data by Emilio et al. (Ap. J. 543,1007, 2000), we better corrected for changes in optical aberrations and, along Turmon et al. (Ap. J., 568, 396, 2002), we reduced radius measurement errors by identifying active regions and avoiding radius measurements herein. We found that, within the limit of our noise level uncertainties (2 mas), the solar diameter could be constant over the half cycle investigated. Our results confirm the recent reanalysis of the 7 years of MDI data made by Antia (Ap. J. 590, 567, 2003), with a completely different method since using the ultra-precise frequency variation of the f-modes (fundamental modes linked to the diameter). He found (carefully removing the yearly Earth induced variations and avoiding the SOHO data gap of 1999) that the diameter is constant over the half solar cycle (radius variation are less than 0.6 km, 0.8 mas - nothing over noise level). Along Antia, we can conclude that: "If a careful analysis is performed, then it turns out that there is no evidence for any variation in the solar radius." There were no theoretical reasons for large solar radius variations and there is no observational evidence for them with consistent space observations.

  5. Size dependent compressibility of nano-ceria: Minimum near 33 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Song, Junhua; Chan, Siu-Wai; Walker, David; Clark, Simon M.; Kalkan, Bora

    2015-04-20

    We report the crystallite-size-dependency of the compressibility of nanoceria under hydrostatic pressure for a wide variety of crystallite diameters and comment on the size-based trends indicating an extremum near 33 nm. Uniform nano-crystals of ceria were synthesized by basic precipitation from cerium (III) nitrate. Size-control was achieved by adjusting mixing time and, for larger particles, a subsequent annealing temperature. The nano-crystals were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and standard ambient x-ray diffraction (XRD). Compressibility, or its reciprocal, bulk modulus, was measured with high-pressure XRD at LBL-ALS, using helium, neon, or argon as the pressure-transmitting medium for all samples. As crystallite size decreased below 100 nm, the bulk modulus first increased, and then decreased, achieving a maximum near a crystallite diameter of 33 nm. We review earlier work and examine several possible explanations for the peaking of bulk modulus at an intermediate crystallite size.

  6. Fabrication of sub-20 nm nanopore arrays in membranes with embedded metal electrodes at wafer scales.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jingwei; Wang, Deqiang; Nam, Sung-Wook; Peng, Hongbo; Bruce, Robert; Gignac, Lynn; Brink, Markus; Kratschmer, Ernst; Rossnagel, Stephen; Waggoner, Phil; Reuter, Kathleen; Wang, Chao; Astier, Yann; Balagurusamy, Venkat; Luan, Binquan; Kwark, Young; Joseph, Eric; Guillorn, Mike; Polonsky, Stanislav; Royyuru, Ajay; Papa Rao, S; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2014-08-07

    We introduce a method to fabricate solid-state nanopores with sub-20 nm diameter in membranes with embedded metal electrodes across a 200 mm wafer using CMOS compatible semiconductor processes. Multi-layer (metal-dielectric) structures embedded in membranes were demonstrated to have high uniformity (± 0.5 nm) across the wafer. Arrays of nanopores were fabricated with an average size of 18 ± 2 nm in diameter using a Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) method in lieu of TEM drilling. Shorts between the membrane-embedded metals were occasionally created after pore formation, but the RIE based pores had a much better yield (99%) of unshorted electrodes compared to TEM drilled pores (<10%). A double-stranded DNA of length 1 kbp was translocated through the multi-layer structure RIE-based nanopore demonstrating that the pores were open. The ionic current through the pore can be modulated with a gain of 3 using embedded electrodes functioning as a gate in 0.1 mM KCl aqueous solution. This fabrication approach can potentially pave the way to manufacturable nanopore arrays with the ability to electrically control the movement of single or double-stranded DNA inside the pore with embedded electrodes.

  7. Size engineering of metal nanoparticles to diameter-specified growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes with horizontal alignment on quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Ju; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Jeong, Goo-Hwan

    2012-03-01

    The electronic, physical and optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are governed by their diameter and chirality, and thus much research has been focused on controlling the diameter and chirality of SWNTs. To date, control of the catalyst particle size has been thought to be one of the most promising approaches to control the diameter or chirality of SWNTs owing to the correlation between catalyst particle size and tube diameter. In this study, we demonstrate the size engineering of catalytic nanoparticles for the controlled growth of diameter-specified and horizontally aligned SWNTs on quartz substrates. Uniformly sized iron nanoparticles derived from ferritin molecules were used as a catalyst, and their size was intentionally decreased via thermal heat treatment at 900 °C under atmospheric Ar ambient. ST-cut quartz wafers were used as growth substrates in order to elucidate the effect of the size of the nanoparticles on the tube diameter and the effect of catalyst size on the degree of parallel alignment on the quartz substrates. SWNTs grown by chemical vapor deposition using methane as feedstock exhibited a high degree of horizontal alignment when the particle density was low enough to produce individual SWNTs without bundling. Annealing for 60 min at 900 °C produced a reduction of nanoparticle diameter from 2.6 to 1.8 nm and a decrease in the mean tube diameter from 1.2 to 0.8 nm, respectively. Raman spectroscopy results corroborated the observation that prolonged heat treatment of nanoparticles yields thinner tubes with narrower size distributions. The results of this work suggest that straightforward thermal annealing can be a facile way to obtain uniform-sized SWNTs as well as catalytic nanoparticles.

  8. Ultra-small diameter coils for treatment of intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Timothy; Beaty, Narlin; Puri, Ajit; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2015-01-01

    This study reports our initial clinical experience treating very small intracranial aneurysms using only Target® Nano™ coils. Retrospective angiographic and clinical analysis was performed on a non-randomized single arm registry of all intracranial aneurysms treated with only Target® Nano™ coils (1 mm and 1.5 mm diameter only) during a 12 month period at two academic hospitals. Fourteen patients with 14 intracranial aneurysms were treated. The maximum diameter of saccular aneurysms treated ranged from 1.5 to 3.5 mm; minimum aneurysm diameter was 1.1 to 2 mm. The immediate complete aneurysm occlusion rate was 86% (12/14), and a small residual within the aneurysm was seen in 14% (2/14) of cases. Packing density from coils ranged between 24% and 83% (mean 51%). The immediate complication rate was 0% (0/14). The angiographic/MR angiography follow-up period was 22 to 70 weeks (mean 37 weeks) with an overall complete occlusion rate of 9/11 (81%), recurrence in 18% (2/11), and lack of follow-up in three cases, two due to death during hospitalization and one procedure not yet due for imaging follow-up. Both patients who died presented with brain aneurysm ruptures prior to treatment. Both recurrences were retreated with repeat coiling procedures. Our initial results using only Target® Nano™ coils for the endovascular treatment of very small intracranial aneurysms have demonstrated initial good safety and efficacy profiles. PMID:25934775

  9. Trace of totally positive algebraic integers and integer transfinite diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flammang, V.

    2009-06-01

    Explicit auxiliary functions can be used in the ``Schur-Siegel- Smyth trace problem''. In the previous works, these functions were constructed only with polynomials having all their roots positive. Here, we use several polynomials with complex roots, which are found with Wu's algorithm, and we improve the known lower bounds for the absolute trace of totally positive algebraic integers. This improvement has a consequence for the search of Salem numbers that have a negative trace. The same method also gives a small improvement of the upper bound for the integer transfinite diameter of [0,1].

  10. Structure Optimization and Evaluation of Small Adjustable Diameter Grinding Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yiyong; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Liping; Zhao, Hu

    Focus on the uneven deformation of conventional adjustable diameter grinding wheel (ADGW), a structure optimization and evaluation method of ADGW was proposed in this paper. Firstly, the evaluation index system and structure optimization framework of ADGW was established to obtain the optimization objective of ADGW. Then a simulated experiment was provided. The flexible units of ADGW with different structures and geometries were selected to analyze the unevenness of deformation. The comparison results showed that the proposed method can improve the ADGW structures effectively and provide a technical approach for evaluating the structure design of ADGW.

  11. Note: Computer controlled rotation mount for large diameter optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakonjac, Ana; Roberts, Kris O.; Deb, Amita B.; Kjærgaard, Niels

    2013-02-01

    We describe the construction of a motorized optical rotation mount with a 40 mm clear aperture. The device is used to remotely control the power of large diameter laser beams for a magneto-optical trap. A piezo-electric ultrasonic motor on a printed circuit board provides rotation with a precision better than 0.03° and allows for a very compact design. The rotation unit is controlled from a computer via serial communication, making integration into most software control platforms straightforward.

  12. Base metal thermocouples drift rate dependence from thermoelement diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlasek, P.; Duris, S.; Palencar, R.

    2015-02-01

    Temperature measurements are one of the key factors in many industrial applications that directly affect the quality, effectiveness and safety of manufacturing processes. In many industrial applications these temperature measurements are realized by thermocouples. Accuracy of thermocouples directly affects the quality of the final product of manufacturing and their durability determines the safety margins required. One of the significant effects that affect the precision of the thermocouples is short and long term stability of their voltage output. This stability issue occurs in every type of thermocouples and is caused by multiple factors. In general these factors affect the Seebeck coefficient which is a material constant, which determines the level of generated voltage when exposed to a temperature gradient. Changes of this constant result in the change of the thermocouples voltage output thus indicated temperature which can result in production quality issues, safety and health hazards. These alternations can be caused by physical and chemical changes within the thermocouple lead material. Modification of this material constant can be of temporary nature or permanent. This paper concentrates on the permanent, or irreversible changes of the Seebeck coefficient that occur in commonly used swaged MIMS Type N thermocouples. These permanent changes can be seen as systematic change of the EMF of the thermocouple when it is exposed to a high temperature over a period of time. This change of EMF by time is commonly known as the drift of the thermocouple. This work deals with the time instability of thermocouples EMF at temperatures above 1200 °C. Instability of the output voltage was taken into relation with the lead diameter of the tested thermocouples. This paper concentrates in detail on the change of voltage output of thermocouples of different diameters which were tested at high temperatures for the overall period of more than 210 hours. The gather data from this

  13. SERS Raman Sensor Based on Diameter-Modulated Sapphire Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoji, Yutaka

    2010-08-09

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been observed using a sapphire fiber coated with gold nano-islands for the first time. The effect was found to be much weaker than what was observed with a similar fiber coated with silver nanoparticles. Diameter-modulated sapphire fibers have been successfully fabricated on a laser heated pedestal growth system. Such fibers have been found to give a modest increase in the collection efficiency of induced emission. However, the slow response of the SERS effect makes it unsuitable for process control applications.

  14. Detachable shoe plates for large diameter drill bits

    SciTech Connect

    Bardwell, A.E.

    1984-08-21

    Shoe members and drill shank members for large diameter cable drilling bits are provided with a tongue on one of the members that projects axially relative to the drill shank member and with an arcuate lip and projecting stop on the other of the members to trap the tongue and prevent radial movement of the shoe member in response to radially directed forces caused by the spinning of the bit in drilling operations. Such forces would impose shear stresses on the fastening members that extend through the shoe member and axially into the drill shank. Four embodiments are disclosed: a spudding bit, two star bits and a scow bit.

  15. Measurements of Soot Mass Absorption Coefficients from 300 to 660 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Fisher, Al; Helgestad, Taylor; Lambe, Andrew; Sedlacek, Arthur; Smith, Geoffrey; Cappa, Christopher; Davidovits, Paul; Onasch, Timothy; Freedman, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Soot, a product of incomplete combustion, plays an important role in the earth's climate system through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. In particular, the assumed mass absorption coefficient (MAC) of soot and its variation with wavelength presents a significant uncertainty in the calculation of radiative forcing in global climate change models. As part of the fourth Boston College/Aerodyne soot properties measurement campaign, we have measured the mass absorption coefficient of soot produced by an inverted methane diffusion flame over a spectral range of 300-660 nm using a variety of optical absorption techniques. Extinction and absorption were measured using a dual cavity ringdown photoacoustic spectrometer (CRD-PAS, UC Davis) at 405 nm and 532 nm. Scattering and extinction were measured using a CAPS PMssa single scattering albedo monitor (Aerodyne) at 630 nm; the absorption coefficient was determined by subtraction. In addition, the absorption coefficients in 8 wavelength bands from 300 to 660 nm were measured using a new broadband photoacoustic absorption monitor (UGA). Soot particle mass was quantified using a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA, Cambustion), mobility size with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI) and soot concentration with a CPC (Brechtel). The contribution of doubly charged particles to the sample mass was determined using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (DMT). Over a mass range of 1-8 fg, corresponding to differential mobility diameters of ~150 nm to 550 nm, the value of the soot MAC proved to be independent of mass for all wavelengths. The wavelength dependence of the MAC was best fit to a power law with an Absorption Ångstrom Coefficient slightly greater than 1.

  16. Photodissociation of the Propargyl (C3D3) Radicals at 248 nm and 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Neumark., D.M.; Crider, P.E.; Castiglioni, L.; Kautzman, K.K.

    2009-01-21

    The photodissociation of perdeuterated propargyl (D{sub 2}CCCD) and propynyl (D{sub 3}CCC) radicals was investigated using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Radicals were produced from their respective anions by photodetachment at 540 nm and 450 nm (below and above the electron affinity of propynyl). The radicals were then photodissociated by 248 nm or 193 nm light. The recoiling photofragments were detected in coincidence with a time- and position-sensitive detector. Three channels were observed: D{sub 2} loss, CD + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} + C{sub 2}. Obervation of the D loss channel was incompatible with this experiment and was not attempted. Our translational energy distributions for D{sub 2} loss peaked at nonzero translational energy, consistent with ground state dissociation over small (< 1 eV) exit barriers with respect to separated products. Translational energy distributions for the two heavy channels peaked near zero kinetic energy, indicating dissociation on the ground state in the absence of exit barriers.

  17. THE SPECTRUM OF THORIUM FROM 250 nm TO 5500 nm: RITZ WAVELENGTHS AND OPTIMIZED ENERGY LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Redman, Stephen L.; Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.

    2014-03-01

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly, and doubly ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19, 874 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40, 000 cm{sup –1} to 1800 cm{sup –1}). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer and Engleman and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. We also found a large scatter with respect to the thorium line list of Lovis and Pepe. We anticipate that our Ritz wavelengths will lead to improved measurement accuracy for current and future spectrographs that make use of thorium-argon or thorium-neon lamps as calibration standards.

  18. The Spectrum of Thorium from 250 nm to 5500 nm: Ritz Wavelengths and Optimized Energy Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.

    2014-03-01

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly, and doubly ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19, 874 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40, 000 cm-1 to 1800 cm-1). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer & Engleman and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. We also found a large scatter with respect to the thorium line list of Lovis & Pepe. We anticipate that our Ritz wavelengths will lead to improved measurement accuracy for current and future spectrographs that make use of thorium-argon or thorium-neon lamps as calibration standards.

  19. Optical constants determination of neodymium and gadolinium in the 3-nm to 100-nm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjornrattanawanich, B.; Windt, D. L.; Uspenskii, Y. A.; Seely, J. F.

    2006-08-01

    The optical constants (n, k) of the wavelength-dependent index of refraction N = n+ik = 1-δ+ik of Nd (Neodymium) and Gd (Gadolinium) are determined in the wavelength range of 3 nm to 100 nm by the transmittance method using synchrotron radiation. Nd and Gd films with thicknesses ranging from 5 nm to 180 nm were fabricated on Si photodiodes (which served as the coating substrates as well as the detectors) and capped with Si layers to protect these reactive rare earth elements from oxidation. The imaginary part (k) obtained directly from the transmittance measurement is used in the derivation of the real part (δ) of the complex index of refraction N through the Kramers- Kronig integral. The measured optical constants are used in the design of currently developed Nd- and Gd-based multilayers for solar imaging applications. Our results on Nd and Gd optical constants and the reflectance of some Nd- and Gd-based multilayers are presented.

  20. NXT:1980Di immersion scanner for 7nm and 5nm production nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Roelof; Weichselbaum, Stefan; Droste, Richard; McLaren, Matthew; Koek, Bert; de Boeij, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Immersion scanners remain the critical lithography workhorses in semiconductor device manufacturing. When progressing towards the 7nm device node for logic and D18 device node for DRAM production, pattern-placement and layer-to-layer overlay requirements keep progressively scaling down and consequently require system improvements in immersion scanners. The on-product-overlay requirements are approaching levels of only a few nanometers, imposing stringent requirements on the scanner tool design in terms of reproducibility, accuracy and stability. In this paper we report on the performance of the NXT:1980Di immersion scanner. The NXT:1980Di builds upon the NXT:1970Ci, that is widely used for 16nm, 14nm and 10nm high-volume manufacturing. We will discuss the NXT:1980Di system- and sub-system/module enhancements that drive the scanner overlay, focus and productivity performance. Overlay, imaging, focus, productivity and defectivity data will be presented for multiple tools. To further reduce the on-product overlay system performance, alignment sensor contrast improvements as well as active reticle temperature conditioning are implemented on the NXT:1980Di. Reticle temperature conditioning will reduce reticle heating overlay and the higher contrast alignment sensor will improve alignment robustness for processed alignment targets. Due to an increased usage of multiple patterning techniques, an increased number of immersion exposures is required. NXT:1980Di scanner design modifications raised productivity levels from 250wph to 275wph. This productivity enhancement provides lower cost of ownership (CoO) for customers using immersion technology.

  1. Characterization of LANDSAT Panels Using the NIST BRDF Scale from 1100 nm to 2500 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian; Tsai, Benjamin K.; Allen, David W.; Cooksey, Catherine; Yoon, Howard; Hanssen, Leonard; Zeng, Jinan; Fulton, Linda; Biggar, Stuart; Markham, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Many earth observing sensors depend on white diffuse reflectance standards to derive scales of radiance traceable to the St Despite the large number of Earth observing sensors that operate in the reflective solar region of the spectrum, there has been no direct method to provide NIST traceable BRDF measurements out to 2500 rim. Recent developments in detector technology have allowed the NIST reflectance measurement facility to expand the operating range to cover the 250 nm to 2500 nm range. The facility has been modified with and additional detector using a cooled extended range indium gallium arsenide (Extended InGaAs) detector. Measurements were made for two PTFE white diffuse reflectance standards over the 1100 nm to 2500 nm region at a 0' incident and 45' observation angle. These two panels will be used to support the OLI calibration activities. An independent means of verification was established using a NIST radiance transfer facility based on spectral irradiance, radiance standards and a diffuse reflectance plaque. An analysis on the results and associated uncertainties will be discussed.

  2. Skin damage thresholds with continuous-wave laser exposures at the infrared wavelength of 1319 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Harbert, Corey A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Noojin, Isaac D.; Schuster, Kurt J.; Shingledecker, Aurora D.; Stolarski, David J.; Kumru, Semih S.

    2011-03-01

    ABSTRACT Damage thresholds (ED50) for skin using Yucatan mini-pig (Sus scrofa domestica) have been determined at the operational wavelength of 1319 nm with beam diameters of 0.61 cm and 0.96 cm. Exposure durations of 0.25, 1.0, 2.5 and 10 seconds were used to determine trends in damage threshold with respect to exposure time and beam diameter at this moderately-high penetrating wavelength. A relatively narrow range of total radiant exposure from 37.4 J/cm2 to 62.3 J/cm2 average was observed for threshold damage with laser parameters encompassing a factor of two in beam area and a factor of forty in exposure duration.

  3. Fabrication of sub-15 nm aluminum wires by controlled etching

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan-Wall, T.; Hughes, H. J.; Hartman, N.; Marković, N.; McQueen, T. M.

    2014-04-28

    We describe a method for the fabrication of uniform aluminum nanowires with diameters below 15 nm. Electron beam lithography is used to define narrow wires, which are then etched using a sodium bicarbonate solution, while their resistance is simultaneously measured in-situ. The etching process can be stopped when the desired resistance is reached, and can be restarted at a later time. The resulting nanowires show a superconducting transition as a function of temperature and magnetic field that is consistent with their smaller diameter. The width of the transition is similar to that of the lithographically defined wires, indicating that the etching process is uniform and that the wires are undamaged. This technique allows for precise control over the normal state resistance and can be used to create a variety of aluminum nanodevices.

  4. Maskless plasmonic lithography at 22 nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liang; Park, Yongshik; Xiong, Yi; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wang, Yuan; Zeng, Li; Xiong, Shaomin; Rho, Junsuk; Sun, Cheng; Bogy, David B; Zhang, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Optical imaging and photolithography promise broad applications in nano-electronics, metrologies, and single-molecule biology. Light diffraction however sets a fundamental limit on optical resolution, and it poses a critical challenge to the down-scaling of nano-scale manufacturing. Surface plasmons have been used to circumvent the diffraction limit as they have shorter wavelengths. However, this approach has a trade-off between resolution and energy efficiency that arises from the substantial momentum mismatch. Here we report a novel multi-stage scheme that is capable of efficiently compressing the optical energy at deep sub-wavelength scales through the progressive coupling of propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) and localized surface plasmons (LSPs). Combining this with airbearing surface technology, we demonstrate a plasmonic lithography with 22 nm half-pitch resolution at scanning speeds up to 10 m/s. This low-cost scheme has the potential of higher throughput than current photolithography, and it opens a new approach towards the next generation semiconductor manufacturing.

  5. Catalytic Properties of AgPt Nanoshells as a Function of Size: Larger Outer Diameters Lead to Improved Performances.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Thenner S; da Silva, Anderson G M; Gonçalves, Mariana C; Fajardo, Humberto V; Balzer, Rosana; Probst, Luiz F D; da Silva, Alisson H M; Assaf, Jose M; Camargo, Pedro H C

    2016-09-13

    We report herein a systematic investigation on the effect of the size of silver (Ag) nanoparticles employed as starting materials over the morphological features and catalytic performances of AgPt nanoshells produced by a combination of galvanic replacement between Ag and PtCl6(2-) and PtCl6(2-) reduction by hydroquinone. More specifically, we focused on Ag nanoparticles of four different sizes as starting materials, and found that the outer diameter, shell thickness, and the number of Pt surface atoms of the produced nanoshells increased with the size of the starting Ag nanoparticles. The produced AgPt nanoshells were supported into SiO2, and the catalytic performances of the AgPt/SiO2 nanocatalysts toward the gas-phase oxidation of benzene, toluene, and o-xylene (BTX oxidation) followed the order: AgPt 163 nm/SiO2 > AgPt 133 nm/SiO2 > AgPt 105 nm/SiO2 > AgPt 95 nm/SiO2. Interestingly, bigger AgPt nanoshell sizes lead to better catalytic performances in contrast to the intuitive prediction that particles having larger outer diameters tend to present poorer catalytic activities due to their lower surface to volume ratios as compared to smaller particles. This is in agreement with the H2 chemisorption results, and can be assigned to the increase in the Pt surface area with size due to the presence of smaller NPs islands at the surface of the nanoshells having larger outer diameters. This result indicates that, in addition to the overall diameters, the optimization of the surface morphology may play an important role over the optimization of catalytic activities in metal-based nanocatalysts, which can be even more pronounced that the size effect. Our data demonstrate that the control over surface morphology play a very important role relative to the effect of size to the optimization of catalytic performances in catalysts based on noble-metal nanostructures.

  6. Faster qualification of 193-nm resists for 100-nm development using photo cell monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Chris M.; Kallingal, Chidam; Zawadzki, Mary T.; Jeewakhan, Nazneen N.; Kaviani, Nazila N.; Krishnan, Prakash; Klaum, Arthur D.; Van Ess, Joel

    2003-05-01

    The development of 100-nm design rule technologies is currently taking place in many R&D facilities across the world. For some critical alyers, the transition to 193-nm resist technology has been required to meet this leading edge design rule. As with previous technology node transitions, the materials and processes available are undergoing changes and improvements as vendors encounter and solve problems. The initial implementation of the 193-nm resits process did not meet the photolithography requirements of some IC manufacturers due to very high Post Exposure Bake temperature sensitivity and consequently high wafer to wafer CD variation. The photoresist vendors have been working to improve the performance of the 193-nm resists to meet their customer's requirements. Characterization of these new resists needs to be carried out prior to implementation in the R&D line. Initial results on the second-generation resists evaluated at Cypress Semicondcutor showed better CD control compared to the aelrier resist with comparable Depth of Focus (DOF), Exposure Latitute, Etch Resistance, etc. In addition to the standard lithography parameters, resist characterization needs to include defect density studies. It was found that the new resists process with the best CD control, resulted in the introduction of orders of magnitude higher yield limiting defects at Gate, Contact adn Local Interconnect. The defect data were shared with the resists vendor and within days of the discovery the resist vendor was able to pinpoint the source of the problem. The fix was confirmed and the new resists were successfully released to production. By including defect monitoring into the resist qualification process, Cypress Semiconductor was able to 1) drive correction actions earlier resulting in faster ramp and 2) eliminate potential yield loss. We will discuss in this paper how to apply the Micro Photo Cell Monitoring methodology for defect monitoring in the photolithogprhay module and the

  7. Large diameter femoral heads: is bigger always better?

    PubMed

    Cooper, H J; Della Valle, C J

    2014-11-01

    Dislocation remains among the most common complications of, and reasons for, revision of both primary and revision total hip replacements (THR). Hence, there is great interest in maximising stability to prevent this complication. Head size has been recognised to have a strong influence on the risk of dislocation post-operatively. As femoral head size increases, stability is augmented, secondary to an increase in impingement-free range of movement. Larger head sizes also greatly increase the 'jump distance' required for the head to dislocate in an appropriately positioned cup. Level-one studies support the use of larger diameter heads as they decrease the risk of dislocation following primary and revision THR. Highly cross-linked polyethylene has allowed us to increase femoral head size, without a marked increase in wear. However, the thin polyethylene liners necessary to accommodate larger heads may increase the risk of liner fracture and larger heads have also been implicated in causing soft-tissue impingement resulting in groin pain. Larger diameter heads also impart larger forces on the femoral trunnion, which may contribute to corrosion, metal release, and adverse local tissue reactions. Alternative large bearings including large ceramic heads and dual mobility bearings may mitigate some of these risks, and several of these devices have been used with clinical success.

  8. Ultrasonic wave based pressure measurement in small diameter pipeline.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Song, Zhengxiang; Wu, Yuan; Jiang, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    An effective non-intrusive method of ultrasound-based technique that allows monitoring liquid pressure in small diameter pipeline (less than 10mm) is presented in this paper. Ultrasonic wave could penetrate medium, through the acquisition of representative information from the echoes, properties of medium can be reflected. This pressure measurement is difficult due to that echoes' information is not easy to obtain in small diameter pipeline. The proposed method is a study on pipeline with Kneser liquid and is based on the principle that the transmission speed of ultrasonic wave in pipeline liquid correlates with liquid pressure and transmission speed of ultrasonic wave in pipeline liquid is reflected through ultrasonic propagation time providing that acoustic distance is fixed. Therefore, variation of ultrasonic propagation time can reflect variation of pressure in pipeline. Ultrasonic propagation time is obtained by electric processing approach and is accurately measured to nanosecond through high resolution time measurement module. We used ultrasonic propagation time difference to reflect actual pressure in this paper to reduce the environmental influences. The corresponding pressure values are finally obtained by acquiring the relationship between variation of ultrasonic propagation time difference and pressure with the use of neural network analysis method, the results show that this method is accurate and can be used in practice.

  9. [Small-diameter portosystemic shunts: indications and limitations].

    PubMed

    Angel Mercado, M; Granados-García, J; Barradas, F; Chan, C; Contreras, J L; Orozco, H; Angel-Mercado, M

    1998-01-01

    Low diameter porto-systemic shunts for the treatment of portal hypertension bleeding have emerged as a consequence of the technical development of vascular grafts (PTFE) that allow the use of a narrow lumen. The experience with this kind of operation at the Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City during a 6-year period is reported. There were twenty-seven patients with good liver function (Child-Pugh A-B) were operated or electively, average Age 47.5 years (range 17-71), twenty three patients with liver cirrhosis, one with portal fibrosis and three with idiopathic portal hypertension. Operative mortality: 4%. Rebleeding: 14%. Postoperative encephalopathy was observed in 14 of 27, three of them being grade III-IV (11%). In the remaining 11 cases, it was mild and easily controlled. Postoperative angiography showed shunt patency in 81% of the cases; in 33% of the cases, portal vein diameter reduction was shown, as well as two cases with portal vein thrombosis. In 77% of the cases, adequate postoperative quality of life was observed. Survival (Kaplan-Meier): 86% at 12 months and 56% at 60 months. These kinds of shunts are a good alternate choice for patients considered for surgery, in which other portal blood flow preserving procedures (selective shunts, devascularization with transection) are not feasible.

  10. Laser microwelding of small diameter wire to a contact

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcicki, M.A.; Pryputniewicz, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    This work is an attempt to evaluate feasibility of the laser welding process of small diameter wire to a contact. In particular, the paper addresses characterization of laser spot welded 32 AWG solid copper/silver plated wires to contacts on 0.050 in. centers. The copper alloy contacts were provided on strips in two lots, one unplated, and the other with 75 {mu}in. of plated Nickel. An industrial type IR, Nd:YAG, pulsed laser was used to produce welds, in order to simulate manufacturing environment. Metallurgical analysis, SEM, and nanoindentation characterization have been used in setting up the welding process and in final evaluation. Quality of welds was also evaluated by a tensile test and the results are presented in a statistical format. The test results indicate that the tensile strength of the laser welded wire, relative to the bare (unwelded) wire, yielded 95.47% for joints on unplated contacts, and 98.25% for Nickel plated contacts. Microscope examination of samples, after pull test, shows that all wires broke behind the weld area. These results significantly exceed the required minimum tensile of a welded joint, which is 60% of the tensile strength of a bare wire. They also indicate that laser welding of small diameter wires to high density contacts can be considered as a valuable process alternative.

  11. Research on high accuracy diameter measurement system with CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Bo; Duan, Guoteng

    2011-08-01

    Non-touch measurement is an important technology in many domains such as the monitoring of tool breakage and tool wear, et al. Based on the method of curve fitting and demanding inflection point, we present a high accuracy non-touch diameter measurement system. The measurement system comprise linear array CCD, CCD driving circuit, power supply, workseat, light source, data acquisition card and so on. The picture element of the linear array CCD is 2048, and the size of every pixel and the spacing of adjacent pixels have the same size of 14μmx14μm. The stabilized voltage supply has a constant voltage output of 3V. The light is generated by a halogen tungsten lamp, which does not represent any risk to the health of the whole system. The data acquisition card converts the analog signal to digital signal with the accuracy of 12 bit. The error of non-uniform of the CCD pixels in sensitivity and the electrical noise error are indicated in detail. The measurement system has a simple structure, high measuring precision, and can be carried out automatically. Experiment proves that the diameter measurement of the system is within the range of Φ0.5~Φ10mm, and the total measuring unstability of the system is within the range of +/- 1.4μm.

  12. Allowable pillar to diameter ratio for strategic petroleum reserve caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2011-05-01

    This report compiles 3-D finite element analyses performed to evaluate the stability of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns over multiple leach cycles. When oil is withdrawn from a cavern in salt using freshwater, the cavern enlarges. As a result, the pillar separating caverns in the SPR fields is reduced over time due to usage of the reserve. The enlarged cavern diameters and smaller pillars reduce underground stability. Advances in geomechanics modeling enable the allowable pillar to diameter ratio (P/D) to be defined. Prior to such modeling capabilities, the allowable P/D was established as 1.78 based on some very limited experience in other cavern fields. While appropriate for 1980, the ratio conservatively limits the allowable number of oil drawdowns and hence limits the overall utility and life of the SPR cavern field. Analyses from all four cavern fields are evaluated along with operating experience gained over the past 30 years to define a new P/D for the reserve. A new ratio of 1.0 is recommended. This ratio is applicable only to existing SPR caverns.

  13. The Use of Narrow Diameter Implants in the Molar Area

    PubMed Central

    Saad, M.; Assaf, A.; Gerges, E.

    2016-01-01

    Implant rehabilitations in the posterior jaw are influenced by many factors such as the condition of the remaining teeth, the force factors related to the patient, the quality of the bone, the maintenance of the hygiene, the limited bone height, the type and extent of edentulism, and the nature of the opposing arch. The gold standard is to place a regular diameter implant (>3.7 mm) or a wide one to replace every missing molar. Unfortunately, due to horizontal bone resorption, this option is not possible without lateral bone augmentation. In this situation, narrow diameter implant (NDI < 3.5 mm) could be the alternative to lateral bone augmentation procedures. This paper presents a clinical study where NDIs were used for the replacement of missing molars. They were followed up to 11 years. Special considerations were observed and many parameters were evaluated. NDI could be used to replace missing molar in case of moderate horizontal bone resorption if strict guidelines are respected. Yet, future controlled prospective clinical trials are required to admit their use as scientific evidence. PMID:27293436

  14. Tunable Engineered Skin Mechanics via Coaxial Electrospun Fiber Core Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Blackstone, Britani Nicole; Drexler, Jason William

    2014-01-01

    Autologous engineered skin (ES) offers promise as a treatment for massive full thickness burns. Unfortunately, ES is orders of magnitude weaker than normal human skin causing it to be difficult to apply surgically and subject to damage by mechanical shear in the early phases of engraftment. In addition, no manufacturing strategy has been developed to tune ES biomechanics to approximate the native biomechanics at different anatomic locations. To enhance and tune ES biomechanics, a coaxial (CoA) electrospun scaffold platform was developed from polycaprolactone (PCL, core) and gelatin (shell). The ability of the coaxial fiber core diameter to control both scaffold and tissue mechanics was investigated along with the ability of the gelatin shell to facilitate cell adhesion and skin development compared to pure gelatin, pure PCL, and a gelatin-PCL blended fiber scaffold. CoA ES exhibited increased cellular adhesion and metabolism versus PCL alone or gelatin-PCL blend and promoted the development of well stratified skin with a dense dermal layer and a differentiated epidermal layer. Biomechanics of the scaffold and ES scaled linearly with core diameter suggesting that this scaffold platform could be utilized to tailor ES mechanics for their intended grafting site and reduce graft damage in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24712409

  15. The effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser-induced damage sites at 351 nm on fused silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Negres, R A; Norton, M A; Liao, Z M; Cross, D A; Bude, J D; Carr, C W

    2009-10-29

    Past work in the area of laser-induced damage growth has shown growth rates to be primarily dependent on the laser fluence and wavelength. More recent studies suggest that growth rate, similar to the damage initiation process, is affected by a number of additional parameters including pulse duration, pulse shape, site size, and internal structure. In this study, we focus on the effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser damage sites located on the exit surface of fused silica optics. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, a significant dependence of growth rate at 351 nm on pulse duration from 1 ns to 15 ns as {tau}{sup 0.3} for sites in the 50-100 {micro}m size range.

  16. Fast profile measurement of micrometer-sized tapered fibers with better than 50-nm accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warken, Florian; Giessen, Harald

    2004-08-01

    The forward scattering of light illuminating a transparent dielectric cylinder, such as a tapered fiber, from the side can be understood as interference of the diffracted, reflected, and transmitted light. Additionally, light can be resonantly coupled into the fiber if a multiple of the wavelength matches the circumference. Using a suitable laser setup with a novel evaluation algorithm allows us to quickly extract the fiber radius from the complex diffraction pattern, obtaining an accuracy of better than 50 nm. We demonstrate experimentally our method, which is noncontact and allows one to simultaneously measure the profile of a several-centimeter-long fiber waist with a diameter near the diffraction limit.

  17. Direct Patterning of CdSe Quantum Dots into Sub-100 nm Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, Meredith J.; Templeton, Joseph L.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2010-03-02

    Ordered, two-dimensional cadmium selenide (CdSe) arrays have been fabricated on indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) electrodes using the pattern replication in nonwetting templates (PRINT) process. CdSe quantum dots (QDs) with an average diameter of 2.7 nm and a pyridine surface ligand were used for patterning. The PRINT technique utilizes a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) elastomeric mold that is tolerant of most organic solvents, thus allowing solutions of CdSe QDs in 4-picoline to be used for patterning without significant deformation of the mold. Nanometer-scale diffraction gratings have been successfully replicated with CdSe QDs.

  18. Fiber Bragg grating inscriptions in multimode fiber using 800 nm femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Qiangzhou; Qiao, Xueguang

    2015-09-01

    A short fiber Bragg grating (FBG) was successfully written in a multimode fiber (MMF) tube with core and cladding diameters of 105 μm and 125 μm using 800 nm femtosecond laser. A side-illumination technique was utilized to ensure the grating inscriptions regain over the core of MMF. Both fundamental mode and high-order modes of MMF are coupled at the core-mismatch junction and appear as two well-defined resonances in transmission. Femtosecond laserwritten three FBG-types present good thermostability up to 900 °C.

  19. Threshold and efficiency for perforation of 1 nm thick carbon nanomembranes with slow highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Gruber, Elisabeth; Ritter, Robert; Heller, René; Beyer, André; Turchanin, Andrey; Klingner, Nico; Hübner, René; Stöger-Pollach, Michael; Vieker, Henning; Hlawacek, Gregor; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Facsko, Stefan; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2015-09-01

    Cross-linking of a self-assembled monolayer of 1,1‧-biphenyl-4-thiol by low energy electron irradiation leads to the formation of a carbon nanomembrane, that is only 1 nm thick. Here we study the perforation of these freestanding membranes by slow highly charged ion irradiation with respect to the pore formation yield. It is found that a threshold in potential energy of the highly charged ions of about 10 keV must be exceeded in order to form round pores with tunable diameters in the range of 5-15 nm. Above this energy threshold, the efficiency for a single ion to form a pore increases from 70% to nearly 100% with increasing charge. These findings are verified by two independent methods, namely the analysis of individual membranes stacked together during irradiation and the detailed analysis of exit charge state spectra utilizing an electrostatic analyzer.

  20. Superconducting nanowire single photon detector at 532 nm and demonstration in satellite laser ranging.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Chen, Sijing; You, Lixing; Meng, Wengdong; Wu, Zhibo; Zhang, Zhongping; Tang, Kai; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Weijun; Yang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2016-02-22

    Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) at a wavelength of 532 nm were designed and fabricated aiming to satellite laser ranging (SLR) applications. The NbN SNSPDs were fabricated on one-dimensional photonic crystals with a sensitive-area diameter of 42 μm. The devices were coupled with multimode fiber (ϕ = 50 μm) and exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency of 75% at an extremely low dark count rate of <0.1 Hz. An SLR experiment using an SNSPD at a wavelength of 532 nm was successfully demonstrated. The results showed a depth ranging with a precision of ~8.0 mm for the target satellite LARES, which is ~3,000 km away from the ground ranging station at the Sheshan Observatory.

  1. Core level photoionization on free sub-10-nm nanoparticles using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Meinen, Jan; Leisner, Thomas; Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Eritt, Markus; Antonsson, Egill; Langer, Burkhard; Ruehl, Eckart

    2010-08-15

    A novel instrument is presented, which permits studies on singly charged free nanoparticles in the diameter range from 1 to 30 nm using synchrotron radiation in the soft x-ray regime. It consists of a high pressure nanoparticle source, a high efficiency nanoparticle beam inlet, and an electron time-of-flight spectrometer suitable for probing surface and bulk properties of free, levitated nanoparticles. We show results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study near the Si L{sub 3,2}-edge on 8.2 nm SiO{sub 2} particles prepared in a nanoparticle beam. The possible use of this apparatus regarding chemical reactions on the surface of nanometer-sized particles is highlighted. This approach has the potential to be exploited for process studies on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry.

  2. Toward efficient optical trapping of sub-10-nm particles with coaxial plasmonic apertures.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Amr A E; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2012-11-14

    Optical trapping using focused laser beams has emerged as a powerful tool in the biological and physical sciences. However, scaling this technique to nanosized objects remains challenging due to the diffraction limit of light and the high power levels required for nanoscale trapping. In this paper, we propose plasmonic coaxial apertures as low-power optical traps for nanosized specimens. The illumination of a coaxial aperture with a linearly polarized plane wave generates a dual optical trapping potential well. We theoretically show that this potential can stably trap dielectric particles smaller than 10 nm in diameter while keeping the trapping power level below 20 mW. By tapering the thickness of the coaxial dielectric channel, trapping can be extended to sub-2-nm particles. The proposed structures may enable optical trapping and manipulation of dielectric particles ranging from single proteins to small molecules with sizes previously inaccessible.

  3. Control of optical bandgap energy and optical absorption coefficient by geometric parameters in sub-10 nm silicon-nanodisc array structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairuz Budiman, Mohd; Hu, Weiguo; Igarashi, Makoto; Tsukamoto, Rikako; Isoda, Taiga; Itoh, Kohei M.; Yamashita, Ichiro; Murayama, Akihiro; Okada, Yoshitaka; Samukawa, Seiji

    2012-02-01

    A sub-10 nm, high-density, periodic silicon-nanodisc (Si-ND) array has been fabricated using a new top-down process, which involves a 2D array bio-template etching mask made of Listeria-Dps with a 4.5 nm diameter iron oxide core and damage-free neutral-beam etching (Si-ND diameter: 6.4 nm). An Si-ND array with an SiO2 matrix demonstrated more controllable optical bandgap energy due to the fine tunability of the Si-ND thickness and diameter. Unlike the case of shrinking Si-ND thickness, the case of shrinking Si-ND diameter simultaneously increased the optical absorption coefficient and the optical bandgap energy. The optical absorption coefficient became higher due to the decrease in the center-to-center distance of NDs to enhance wavefunction coupling. This means that our 6 nm diameter Si-ND structure can satisfy the strict requirements of optical bandgap energy control and high absorption coefficient for achieving realistic Si quantum dot solar cells.

  4. Distributed Humidity Sensing in PMMA Optical Fibers at 500 nm and 650 nm Wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Liehr, Sascha; Breithaupt, Mathias; Krebber, Katerina

    2017-03-31

    Distributed measurement of humidity is a sought-after capability for various fields of application, especially in the civil engineering and structural health monitoring sectors. This article presents a method for distributed humidity sensing along polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) polymer optical fibers (POFs) by analyzing wavelength-dependent Rayleigh backscattering and attenuation characteristics at 500 nm and 650 nm wavelengths. Spatially resolved humidity sensing is obtained from backscatter traces of a dual-wavelength optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR). Backscatter dependence, attenuation dependence as well as the fiber length change are characterized as functions of relative humidity. Cross-sensitivity effects are discussed and quantified. The evaluation of the humidity-dependent backscatter effects at the two wavelength measurements allows for distributed and unambiguous measurement of relative humidity. The technique can be readily employed with low-cost standard polymer optical fibers and commercial OTDR devices.

  5. Polarization properties of lidar scattering from clouds at 347 nm and 694 nm.

    PubMed

    Pal, S R; Carswell, A I

    1978-08-01

    The polarization characteristics of lidar scattering from cumulus and low-lying shower clouds have been measured with a system operating at 694 nm (red) and 347 nm (blue). The backscatter profiles of the polarization components as well as of the total intensity of the return are presented and discussed for the two wavelengths. The linear depolarization ratio delta, which can be used as a measure of the unpolarized multiple scattering, has been obtained at both wavelengths. This quantity has a very low value at cloud base for both wavelengths and increases with pulse penetration. The blue registers generally higher values of a within the cloud. The measured total intensity backscatter functions for both wavelengths are presented and discussed in relation to theoretical calculations of cloud models.

  6. Novel 980-nm and 490-nm light sources using vertical cavity lasers with extended coupled cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, John G.; Mooradian, Aram; Lewis, Alan; Shchegrov, Andrei V.; Strzelecka, Eva M.; Lee, Dicky; Watson, Jason P.; Liebman, Michael K.; Carey, Glen P.; Umbrasas, Arvydas; Amsden, Charles A.; Cantos, Brad D.; Hitchens, William R.; Heald, David L.; Doan, Vincent V.; Cannon, J. L.

    2003-04-01

    We have developed novel electrically pumped, surface-emitting lasers emitting at 980 nm with an extended coupled cavity. The concept is scalable from monolithic low power devices all the way to high power extended cavity lasers. The latter have demonstrated 1W cw multi-mode and 0.5 W cw in a TEM00 mode and a single frequency, with 90% coupling efficiency into a single-mode fiber. By inserting a nonlinear optical medium in the external cavity, efficient and compact frequency doubling has been achieved with CW output powers 5-40 mW demonstrated at 490 nm. The latter devices are especially noteworthy due to their very low noise, sub 10 μrad beam pointing stability combined with small size, low power consumption and high efficiency.

  7. A 15 W 1152 nm Raman fiber laser with 6 nm spectral width for Ho3+-doped crystal's pumping source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiuyan; Jiang, Huawei

    2016-12-01

    A 11.5 W 1152 nm Raman fiber laser with 6 nm spectral width was demonstrated based on the resonator constructed with one fiber loop mirror and one fiber Bragg grating. By mans of experimental measurement and theoretical calculation, the reflectivity of the fiber loop mirror was confirmed as 0.93. The Yb3+-doped 1090 nm fiber length was about 5 m. When the maximum pumping power of 976 nm laser was 54.8 W, 32.2 W 1090 nm laser was obtained and the optical to optical conversion efficiency from 1090 nm to 1152 nm light was 48%. Finally, the 1152 nm Raman fiber laser was used for pumping Ho3+:LLF crystal, and the 1194 nm fluorescence emission peak was detected for the first time.

  8. Investigations of a dual seeded 1178nm Raman laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Matthew; Henry, Leanne J.; Klopfer, Michael; Jain, Ravinder

    2016-03-01

    The leakage of 1121 nm power from a resonator cavity because of spectral broadening seriously degrades the performance of a Raman resonator by reducing the 1121 nm circulating power and the 1178 nm output power. Therefore, it is important to understand the conditions which minimize 1121 nm power leakage, maximize 1121 intracavity and 1178 nm output power while enabling a manageable Stimulated Brillouin Scattering gain for narrow linewidth systems. It was found that cavity lengths longer than approximately 40 m didn't result in significantly more 1121 nm linewidth broadening. Relative to the high reflectivity bandwidth of the fiber Bragg gratings, it was found that 4 nm FBGs seemed to optimize 1178 nm amplification while minimizing the amount of 1121 nm power leakage. A two stage high power 1178 nm Raman system was built and 20 W of 1178 nm output power was achieved with a polarization extinction ratio of 21 and nearly diffraction limited beam quality. Linewidth broadening was found to increase as the 1178 nm output increased and was approximately 8 GHz when the 1178 nm output power was 20 W. Because of the linewidth broadening, a co-pumped second Stokes Raman laser system is not useful for the sodium guidestar laser application which requires narrow linewidth.

  9. Numerical investigations of small diameter two-phase closed thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naresh, Y.; Balaji, C.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a CFD model is developed to simulate the working of a 6mm diameter two-phase closed thermosyphon using water as the working fluid. At each section (evaporator, condenser, adiabatic) of the thermosyphon, lumped equations have been developed to calculate the temperatures at corresponding sections. In order to process two phase flow inside the system, a user-defined function (UDF) has been developed and integrated with the CFD model. The volume of fluid (VOF) method is used to carry out the simulations in Ansys FLUENT 15 and the lumped equations are solved in MATLAB 2013a. Volume fractions and temperature profiles obtained from CFD simulations and the lumped parametric estimations are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results available in literature.

  10. Density profile control in a large diameter, helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cluggish, B.P.; Anderegg, F.A.; Freeman, R.L.; Gilleland, J.; Hilsabeck, T.J.; Isler, R.C.; Lee, W.D.; Litvak, A.A.; Miller, R.L.; Ohkawa, T.; Putvinski, S.; Umstadter, K.R.; Winslow, D.L.

    2005-05-15

    Plasmas with peaked radial density profiles have been generated in the world's largest helicon device, with plasma diameters of over 70 cm. The density profiles can be manipulated by controlling the phase of the current in each strap of two multistrap antenna arrays. Phase settings that excite long axial wavelengths create hollow density profiles, whereas settings that excite short axial wavelengths create peaked density profiles. This change in density profile is consistent with the cold-plasma dispersion relation for helicon modes, which predicts a strong increase in the effective skin depth of the rf fields as the wavelength decreases. Scaling of the density with magnetic field, gas pressure, and rf power is also presented.

  11. Experiments with large diameter gravity driven impacting liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storr, G. J.; Behnia, M.

    The phenomenon of a liquid jet released under gravity and falling through or impacting onto another liquid before colliding with an obstructing solid surface has been studied experimentally under isothermal conditions. Usually the jet diameter was sufficiently large to ensure jet coherency until collision. Direct flow visualization was used to study jets released into water pools with no air head space and jets impacting onto water pools after falling through an air head space. It is shown that distances predicting the onset of buoyancy and the entrainment of air using derivations from continuous plunging jets, are not applicable for impacting jets. The morphology of jet debris after collision with the solid surfaces correlates with the wetting properties of the jet liquid on the surface.

  12. NEOWISE diameters and albedos: now available on PDS!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, Amy K.; Bauer, James M.; Cutri, Roc M.; Grav, Tommy; Kramer, Emily A.; Nugent, Carolyn; Sonnett, Sarah M.; Stevenson, Rachel; Wright, Edward L.

    2016-10-01

    We present the recent PDS release of minor planet physical property data from the WISE/NEOWISE fully cryogenic, 3-band cryo, and post-cryo surveys as well as the first year of the NEOWISE-Reactivation survey. This release includes 165,865 diameters, visible albedos, near-infrared albedos, and/or beaming parameters for 140,493 unique minor planets. The published data include near-Earth asteroids, Main Belt asteroids, Hildas, Jupiter Trojans, Centaurs, active Main Belt objects and irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. We provide an overview of the available data and discuss the key features of the PDS data set. The data are available online at: http://sbn.psi.edu/pds/resource/neowisediam.html.

  13. The rotation, color, phase coefficient, and diameter of 1915 Quetzalcoatl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Tholen, D. J.

    1983-09-01

    Photoelectric observations of 1915 Quetzalcoatl on March 2, 1981 show that this asteroid has a rotational period of 4.9 + or - 0.3 hr and a lightcurve amplitude of 0.26 magnitudes. B-V and U-B colors are found to be 0.83 + or - 0.04 and 0.43 + or - 0.03, respectively, consistent with Quetzalcoatl being an S-type asteroid. Additional observations from March 31, 1981, give a linear phase coefficient of 0.033 mag/deg and a mean B(1,0) magnitude of 20.10. The resulting estimated mean diameter for Quetzalcoatl is only 0.37 km, making it one of the smallest asteroids for which physical observations have yet been made.

  14. The rotation, color, phase coefficient, and diameter of 1915 Quetzalcoatl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Tholen, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Photoelectric observations of 1915 Quetzalcoatl on March 2, 1981 show that this asteroid has a rotational period of 4.9 + or - 0.3 hr and a lightcurve amplitude of 0.26 magnitudes. B-V and U-B colors are found to be 0.83 + or - 0.04 and 0.43 + or - 0.03, respectively, consistent with Quetzalcoatl being an S-type asteroid. Additional observations from March 31, 1981, give a linear phase coefficient of 0.033 mag/deg and a mean B(1,0) magnitude of 20.10. The resulting estimated mean diameter for Quetzalcoatl is only 0.37 km, making it one of the smallest asteroids for which physical observations have yet been made.

  15. Size-controlled large-diameter and few-walled carbon nanotube catalysts for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianliang; Li, Qing; Pan, Hengyu; Lin, Ye; Ke, Yujie; Sheng, Haiyang; Swihart, Mark T.; Wu, Gang

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a new strategy for tuning the size of large-diameter and few-walled nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) from 50 to 150 nm by varying the transition metal (TM = Fe, Co, Ni or Mn) used to catalyze graphitization of dicyandiamide. Fe yielded the largest tubes, followed by Co and Ni, while Mn produced a clot-like carbon morphology. We show that morphology is correlated with electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). A clear trend of Fe > Co > Ni > Mn for the ORR catalytic activity was observed, in both alkaline media and more demanding acidic media. The Fe-derived N-CNTs exhibited the highest BET (~870 m2 g-1) and electrochemically accessible (~450 m2 g-1) surface areas and, more importantly, the highest concentration of nitrogen incorporated into the carbon planes. Thus, in addition to the intrinsic high activity of Fe-derived catalysts, the high surface area and nitrogen doping contribute to high ORR activity. This work, for the first time, demonstrates size-controlled synthesis of large-diameter N-doped carbon tube electrocatalysts by varying the metal used in N-CNT generation. Electrocatalytic activity of the Fe-derived catalyst is already the best among studied metals, due to the high intrinsic activity of possible Fe-N coordination. This work further provides a promising route to advanced Fe-N-C nonprecious metal catalysts by generating favorable morphology with more active sites and improved mass transfer.We demonstrate a new strategy for tuning the size of large-diameter and few-walled nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) from 50 to 150 nm by varying the transition metal (TM = Fe, Co, Ni or Mn) used to catalyze graphitization of dicyandiamide. Fe yielded the largest tubes, followed by Co and Ni, while Mn produced a clot-like carbon morphology. We show that morphology is correlated with electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). A clear trend of Fe > Co > Ni > Mn for the ORR catalytic

  16. TUNABLE DIODE LASER MEASUREMENTS OF NO2 NEAR 670 NM AND 395 NM. (R823933)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two single-mode diode lasers were used to record high-resolution absorption spectra of NO2 (dilute in Ar) near 670.2 and 394.5 nm over a range of temperatures (296 to 774 K) and total pressures (2.4 x 10(-2) to 1 atm). A commercial InGaAsP laser was tuned 1.3 cm(-1) at a repetiti...

  17. Effects of 20-100 nm particles on liquid clouds in the clean summertime Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leaitch, W. Richard; Korolev, Alexei; Aliabadi, Amir A.; Burkart, Julia; Willis, Megan D.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Bozem, Heiko; Hoor, Peter; Köllner, Franziska; Schneider, Johannes; Herber, Andreas; Konrad, Christian; Brauner, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    Observations addressing effects of aerosol particles on summertime Arctic clouds are limited. An airborne study, carried out during July 2014 from Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Canada, as part of the Canadian NETCARE project, provides a comprehensive in situ look into some effects of aerosol particles on liquid clouds in the clean environment of the Arctic summer. Median cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC) from 62 cloud samples are 10 cm-3 for low-altitude cloud (clouds topped below 200 m) and 101 cm-3 for higher-altitude cloud (clouds based above 200 m). The lower activation size of aerosol particles is ≤ 50 nm diameter in about 40 % of the cases. Particles as small as 20 nm activated in the higher-altitude clouds consistent with higher supersaturations (S) for those clouds inferred from comparison of the CDNC with cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) measurements. Over 60 % of the low-altitude cloud samples fall into the CCN-limited regime of Mauritsen et al. (2011), within which increases in CDNC may increase liquid water and warm the surface. These first observations of that CCN-limited regime indicate a positive association of the liquid water content (LWC) and CDNC, but no association of either the CDNC or LWC with aerosol variations. Above the Mauritsen limit, where aerosol indirect cooling may result, changes in particles with diameters from 20 to 100 nm exert a relatively strong influence on the CDNC. Within this exceedingly clean environment, as defined by low carbon monoxide and low concentrations of larger particles, the background CDNC are estimated to range between 16 and 160 cm-3, where higher values are due to activation of particles ≤ 50 nm that likely derive from natural sources. These observations offer the first wide-ranging reference for the aerosol cloud albedo effect in the summertime Arctic.

  18. Endovenous laser therapy for occlusion of incompetent saphenous veins using 1940nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Pongratz, Thomas; Esipova, Anna; Dikic, Slobodan; Demhasaj, Sahit; Comsa, Florin; Schmedt, Claus-Georg

    2015-07-01

    Objective: Several studies indicate that ELT using wavelengths of high water absorption showed advantages compared to conventional ELT. Thulium-Lasers emit nearby the local absorption maximum of water at 1940nm. In this clinical study the effectiveness, safety and the feasibility of 1940nm-ELT is proven. Materials and Method: A single centric, prospective observational study was performed. 1940nm-laserenergy was applied using radial emitting fibres with continuous pullback (1mm/s). Treatment was performed under anesthesia (general, spinal, tumescent) thus simultaneous miniphlebectomy and ligation of perforators could be applied. Patient and technical details were systematically collected. Evaluation included: standardized questionnaire, clinical examination, color-duplex ultrasonography preoperatively, 3d, 4w, 6m postoperatively, statistic. Results: The 1940nm-ELT study include 55 patients (female/men=34/21, mean age 55y, range 23-90y) treating n=72 vessels. The mean maximum diameter of great saphenous veins (GSV, n=59) was 7.5mm (range 3.7-11.3mm) and of small saphenous veins (SSV, n=13) was 5.3mm (3.0-10.0mm). The mean applied longitudinal endovenous energy density (LEED) was 64.3J/cm (40.3-98.2J/cm) in GSVs and 51.0J/cm (37.6-72.7J/cm) in SSVs. Complete occlusion of the vein without sign of reflux was achieved in 100%. The mean length of non-occluded stump at the sapheno-femoral junction was 6.0mm (1.0-20.0mm). Postoperative reduction of the diameter of GSV was 1.6mm (21.3%) and 2.0mm (37.7%) in SSV. One (1.4%) endovenous heat induced thrombus (EHIT) was observed. Further adverse events were: paresthesia 10/72 (13.9%), ecchymosis 1/72 (1.4%), lymphocele 1/72 (1.4%), hyperpigmentation 1/72 (1.4%). The mean postoperative pain intensity was 1.3 and 1.8 single doses of analgesics were administered. Normal physical activity was reached after 3d (1-21d). Conclusion: 1940nm-ELT using radial light application effectively eliminates the reflux in insufficient saphenous

  19. Novel Genetic Loci Associated with Retinal Microvascular Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Richard A.; Sim, Xueling; Smith, Albert Vernon; Li, Xiaohui; Jakobsdóttir, Jóhanna; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Brody, Jennifer A.; Cotch, Mary Frances; Mcknight, Barbara; Klein, Ronald; Wang, Jie Jin; Kifley, Annette; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Taylor, Kent D.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Li, Xiang; Ikram, M. Arfan; Klaver, Caroline C.; van der Lee, Sven J.; Mutlu, Unal; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T.; Mitchell, Paul; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I.; Boerwinkle, Eric; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Wong, Tien Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that retinal microvascular diameters are associated with cardio- and cerebrovascular conditions. The shared genetic effects of these associations are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to increase our understanding of the genetic factors that mediate retinal vessel size. Methods and Results This study extends previous genome-wide association study results using 24,000+ multi-ethnic participants from 7 discovery and 5,000+ subjects of European ancestry from 2 replication cohorts. Using the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip, we investigate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and variants collectively across genes with summary measures of retinal vessel diameters, referred to as the central retinal venule equivalent (CRVE) and the central retinal arteriole equivalent (CRAE). We report 4 new loci associated with CRVE, one of which is also associated with CRAE. The 4 SNPs are rs7926971 in TEAD1 (p=3.1×10−11, minor allele frequency (MAF)=0.43), rs201259422 in TSPAN10 (p=4.4×10−9, MAF=0.27), rs5442 in GNB3 (p=7.0×10−10, MAF=0.05) and rs1800407 in OCA2 (p=3.4×10−8, MAF=0.05). The latter SNP, rs1800407, was also associated with CRAE (p=6.5×10−12). Results from the gene-based burden tests were null. In phenotype look-ups, SNP rs201255422 was associated with both systolic (p=0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (p=8.3×10−04). Conclusions Our study expands the understanding of genetic factors influencing the size of the retinal microvasculature. These findings may also provide insight into the relationship between retinal and systemic microvascular disease. PMID:26567291

  20. Evaluation of small diameter coreholes for reservoir information

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, Susan; Adair, Richard G.; Livesay, Bill

    1992-01-01

    Geothermal exploration has been highly successful to date in locating targets for drilling. However, the requirements for an economically successful geothermal well are both high flow rate and high temperature. Most geophysical and geochemical exploration methods have not been highly accurate in predicting the depth and actual temperature of a reservoir, nor have they been able to locate high permeability zones. The result is that most geothermal exploration is conducted by drilling core holes to better understand the heat flow in an area followed by drilling of production diameter exploration wells which can be flow tested to ascertain the permeability. The goal of any exploration program is to determine reservoir economics. The cost of wells makes up between one quarter and one half the total cost of producing geothermal power. The number, design, depth of wells and placement of injectors are important to the optimal exploitation of the reservoir. Although early efforts at development have focused on rapid plant construction to begin cash flow, the history of producing fields emphasizes that understanding reservoirs can reduce the risk of rapid temperature or pressure declines and increase the success of step out drilling following initial exploitation. The high cost of large diameter production wells makes the collecting of exploration data on the reservoir through some less expensive method desirable. Geothermal developers are still drilling resources with surface expression, hot springs and surface mappable fractures and faults. As these obvious resources are developed and as the obvious targets in productive fields are exhausted, new exploration tools are needed. One possibility is the use of deep core holes drilled for temperature gradient data to provide more reservoir information. Two methods not previously applied to geothermal reservoir assessment are suggested to augment other data obtained from coreholes.

  1. Validation of EUCAST zone diameter breakpoints against reference broth microdilution.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, S; Bjelkenbrant, C; Kahlmeter, G

    2014-06-01

    The European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) began harmonizing clinical breakpoints in Europe 2002. In 2009, work to develop a disc diffusion method began and the first disc diffusion breakpoints calibrated to EUCAST clinical MIC breakpoints were published in December 2009. In this study we validated EUCAST clinical zone diameter breakpoints against the International Standard Organization (ISO) reference broth microdilution. A collection of 544 isolates (238 Gram-negative and 306 Gram-positive) were tested against a panel of antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed with broth microdilution as described by ISO and disc diffusion in accordance with EUCAST methodology. Inhibition zone diameters and MIC values were interpreted and categorized (S, I and R) according to EUCAST clinical breakpoint table version 2.0. Categorical agreement (CA) as well as minor (mD), major (MD) and very major (VMD) discrepancies were determined. There was in general good correlation between susceptibility test results obtained with disc diffusion and broth microdilution. Overall CA was 97.3% for all combinations of organisms and antimicrobial agents (n = 5231) and the overall discrepancy rates were 110 (2.1%) mD, 24 (0.5%) MD and 7 (0.1%) VMD. The overall CA for Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms were 98.7% (2346 tests) and 96.2% (2942 tests), respectively. Seven VMD were observed, five for Gram-positive organisms (coagulase negative staphylococci (n = 2) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 3)) and two for Gram-negative organisms (Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Minor discrepancies were mainly observed in Gram-negatives and were related to different antimicrobial agents and species.

  2. Automatic detection and estimation of biparietal diameter from fetal ultrasonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annangi, Pavan; Banerjee Krishnan, Kajoli; Banerjee, Jyotirmoy; Gupta, Madhumita; Patil, Uday

    2011-03-01

    Fetal bi-parietal diameter (BPD) is known to provide a reliable estimate of gestational age (GA) of a fetus in the first half of pregnancy. In this paper, we present an automated method to identify and measure BPD from B-mode ultrasound images of fetal head. The method (a) automatically detects and places a region-of-interest on the head based on a prior work in our group (b) utilizes the concept of phase congruency for edge detection and (c) employs a cost function to identify the third ventricle inside the head (d) measures the BPD along the perpendicular bisector of occipital frontal diameter (OFD) from the outer rim of the cranium closer to the transducer to the inner rim of the cranium away from the transducer. The cost function is premised on the distribution of anatomical shape, size and presentation of the third ventricle in images that adhere to clinical guidelines describing the scan plane for BPD measurement. The OFD is assumed to lie along the third ventricle. The algorithm has been tested on 137 images acquired from four different scanners. Based on GA estimates and their bounds specified in Standard Obstetric Tables, the GA predictions from automated measurements are found to be within +/-2SD of GA estimates from manual measurements by the operator and a second expert radiologist in 98% of the cases. The method described in this paper can also be adapted to assess the accuracy of the scan plane based on the presence/absence of the third ventricle.

  3. Electron-induced single event upsets in 28 nm and 45 nm bulk SRAMs

    DOE PAGES

    Trippe, J. M.; Reed, R. A.; Austin, R. A.; ...

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence of single electron-induced upsets in commercial 28 nm and 45 nm CMOS SRAMs from a monoenergetic electron beam. Upsets were observed in both technology nodes when the SRAM was operated in a low power state. The experimental cross section depends strongly on both bias and technology node feature size, consistent with previous work in which SRAMs were irradiated with low energy muons and protons. Accompanying simulations demonstrate that δ-rays produced by the primary electrons are responsible for the observed upsets. Additional simulations predict the on-orbit event rates for various Earth and Jovian environmentsmore » for a set of sensitive volumes representative of current technology nodes. The electron contribution to the total upset rate for Earth environments is significant for critical charges as high as 0.2 fC. This value is comparable to that of sub-22 nm bulk SRAMs. Similarly, for the Jovian environment, the electron-induced upset rate is larger than the proton-induced upset rate for critical charges as high as 0.3 fC.« less

  4. A robust 45 nm gate-length CMOSFET for 90 nm Hi-speed technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, K. Y.; Chan, V.; Rengarajan, R.; Lee, H. K.; Rovedo, N.; Lim, E. H.; Yang, S.; Jamin, F.; Nguyen, P.; Lin, W.; Lai, C. W.; Teh, Y. W.; Lee, J.; Kim, L.; Luo, Z.; Ng, H.; Sudijono, J.; Wann, C.; Yang, I.

    2006-04-01

    We have developed a robust 45 nm gate-length CMOSFET for 90 nm node high performance application. Aggressive gate length and gate dielectric scaling along with optimized strain engineering enable high performance device similar to 65 nm node CMOSFET [Nakahara Y, et al. IEDM Tech Dig 2003;281] We have utilized oxy-nitride gate with post-nitridation anneal, high ramp rate spike anneal, low temperature spacer scheme and stress controlled SiN contact etch stop liner process in order to improve drive current as well as transistor short-channel roll-off. In particular, we will focus on the study of middle-of-line (MOL) process parameters, (i.e. MOL thermal expense and mechanical stress from contact etch stop liner) on transistor performance and reliability. Based on the study, we have obtained device exhibit drive-current of 900/485 μA/μm for NMOSFET and PMOSFET, respectively, at standard supply voltage of 1 V.

  5. Electron-induced single event upsets in 28 nm and 45 nm bulk SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Trippe, J. M.; Reed, R. A.; Austin, R. A.; Sierawski, B. D.; Weller, R. A.; Funkhouser, E. D.; King, M. P.; Narasimham, B.; Bartz, B.; Baumann, R.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Labello, R.; Nichols, J.; Weeden-Wright, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence of single electron-induced upsets in commercial 28 nm and 45 nm CMOS SRAMs from a monoenergetic electron beam. Upsets were observed in both technology nodes when the SRAM was operated in a low power state. The experimental cross section depends strongly on both bias and technology node feature size, consistent with previous work in which SRAMs were irradiated with low energy muons and protons. Accompanying simulations demonstrate that δ-rays produced by the primary electrons are responsible for the observed upsets. Additional simulations predict the on-orbit event rates for various Earth and Jovian environments for a set of sensitive volumes representative of current technology nodes. The electron contribution to the total upset rate for Earth environments is significant for critical charges as high as 0.2 fC. This value is comparable to that of sub-22 nm bulk SRAMs. Similarly, for the Jovian environment, the electron-induced upset rate is larger than the proton-induced upset rate for critical charges as high as 0.3 fC.

  6. Large-sensitive-area superconducting nanowire single-photon detector at 850 nm with high detection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Lu; You, Lixing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Weijun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Sijing; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-06-29

    Satellite-ground quantum communication requires single-photon detectors of 850-nm wavelength with both high detection efficiency and large sensitive area. We developed superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on one-dimensional photonic crystals, which acted as optical cavities to enhance the optical absorption, with a sensitive-area diameter of 50 μm. The fabricated multimode fiber coupled NbN SNSPDs exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency (DE) of up to 82% and a DE of 78% at a dark count rate of 100 Hz at 850-nm wavelength as well as a system jitter of 105 ps.

  7. Large area metal nanowire arrays with tunable sub-20 nm nanogaps.

    PubMed

    Le Thi Ngoc, Loan; Jin, Mingliang; Wiedemair, Justyna; van den Berg, Albert; Carlen, Edwin T

    2013-06-25

    We report a new top-down nanofabrication technology to realize large area metal nanowire (m-NW) arrays with tunable sub-20 nm separation nanogaps without the use of chemical etching or milling of the metal layer. The m-NW array nanofabrication technology is based on a self-regulating metal deposition process that is facilitated by closely spaced and isolated heterogeneous template surfaces that confine the metal deposition into two dimensions, and therefore, electrically isolated parallel arrays of m-NW can be realized with uniform and controllable nanogaps. Au-NW and Ag-NW arrays are presented with high-density ~10(5) NWs cm(-1), variable NW diameters down to ~50 nm, variable nanogaps down to ~5 nm, and very large nanogap length density ~1 km cm(-2). The m-NW arrays are designed and implemented as interdigitated nanoelectrodes for electrochemical applications and as plasmonic substrates where the coupled-mode localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength in the nanogaps between adjacent m-NW dimers can be precisely tuned to match any excitation source in the range from 500 to 1000 nm, thus providing optimal local electromagnetic field enhancement. A spatially averaged (n = 2500) surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) analytical enhancement factor of (1.2 ± 0.1) × 10(7) is demonstrated from a benzenethiol monolayer chemisorbed on a Au-NW array substrate with LSPR wavelength matched to a He-Ne laser source.

  8. Sub-10-nm Pd nanosheets with renal clearance for efficient near-infrared photothermal cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaoheng; Chen, Mei; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2014-08-13

    Efficient renal clearance is of fundamentally important property of nanoparticles for their in vivo biomedical applications. In this work, we report the successful synthesis of ultra-small Pd nanosheets (SPNS) with an average diameter of 4.4 nm and their application in photothermal cancer therapy using a near infrared laser. The ultra-small Pd nanosheets have strong optical absorption in the NIR region and high photothermal conversion efficiency (52.0%) at 808 nm. After being surface-functionalized with reduced glutathione (GSH), the SPNS-GSH was administered to mice to investigate the biodistribution, photothermal efficacy and tumor ablation in vivo. The in vivo photothermal therapy studies clearly demonstrate that surface modification with GSH allows the nanosheets to exhibit prolonged blood circulation and thus high accumulation in tumors. Upon 808 nm NIR irradiation, the tumors can be completely ablated. More importantly, with the size below the renal filtration limit (<10 nm), the GSHylated Pd nanosheets can be nicely cleared from body through the renal excretion route and into urine. Together with the high efficacy of NIR photothermal therapy, the unique renal clearance properties make the ultra-small Pd nanosheets promising for practical use in photothermal cancer therapy.

  9. Light-emitting diodes at 940nm attenuate colitis-induced inflammatory process in mice.

    PubMed

    Belém, Mônica O; de Andrade, Giovana M M; Carlos, Thalita M; Guazelli, Carla F S; Fattori, Victor; Toginho Filho, Dari O; Dias, Ivan F L; Verri, Waldiceu A; Araújo, Eduardo J A

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) presents intense inflammatory infiltrate, crypt abscesses, ulceration and even loss of function. Despite the clinical relevance of IBD, its current therapy remains poorly effective. Infrared wavelength phototherapy shows therapeutic potential on inflammation. Our goal was to evaluate whether light-emitting diodes (LED) at 940nm are capable of mitigating the colitis-induced inflammatory process in mice. Forty male Swiss mice were assigned into five groups: control; control treated with LED therapy; colitis without treatment; colitis treated with LED therapy; colitis treated with Prednisolone. Experimental colitis was induced by acetic acid 7.5% (pH2.5) rectal administration. LED therapy was performed with light characterized by wavelength of 940nm, 45nm bandwidth, intensity of 4.05J/cm(2), total power of 270mW and total dose of 64.8J for 4min in a single application. Colitis-induced intestinal transit delay was inhibited by LED therapy. Colitis caused an increase of colon dimensions (length, diameter, total area) and colon weight (edema), which were inhibited by LED therapy. LED therapy also decreased colitis-induced tissue gross lesion, myeloperoxidase activity, microscopic tissue damage score and the presence of inflammatory infiltrate in all intestinal layers. Furthermore, LED therapy inhibited colitis-induced IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 production. We conclude LED therapy at 940nm inhibited experimental colitis-induced colon inflammation in mice, therefore, rendering it a promising therapeutic approach that deserves further investigation.

  10. Surface effects in the magnetic properties of crystalline 3 nm ferrite nanoparticles chemically synthesized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, E.; De Biasi, E.; Mansilla, M. Vasquez; Saleta, M. E.; Effenberg, F.; Rossi, L. M.; Cohen, R.; Rechenberg, H. R.; Zysler, R. D.

    2010-11-01

    We have systematically studied the magnetic properties of ferrite nanoparticles with 3, 7, and 11 nm of diameter with very narrow grain size distributions. Samples were prepared by the thermal decomposition of Fe(acac)3 in the presence of surfactants giving nanoparticles covered by oleic acid. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images and XRD diffraction patterns confirms that all samples are composed by crystalline nanoparticles with the spinel structure expected for the iron ferrite. ac and dc magnetization measurements, as well in-field Mössbauer spectroscopy, indicate that the magnetic properties of nanoparticles with 11 and 7 nm are close to those expected for a monodomain, presenting large MS (close to the magnetite bulk). Despite the crystalline structure observed in HRTEM images, the nanoparticles with 3 nm are composed by a magnetically ordered region (core) and a surface region that presents a different magnetic order and it contains about 66% of Fe atoms. The high saturation and irreversibility fields in the M(H ) loops of the particles with 3 nm together with the misalignment at 120 kOe in the in-field Mössbauer spectrum of surface component indicate a high surface anisotropy for the surface atoms, which is not observed for the core. For T <10 K, we observe an increase in the susceptibility and of the magnetization for former sample, indicating that surface moments tend to align with applied field increasing the magnetic core size.

  11. Size-dependent photoconductivity and dark conductivity of m-axial GaN nanowires with small critical diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Reui-San; Chang, Fu-Chieh; Chen, Li-Chyong; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Yang, Ying-Jay

    2009-10-01

    The size effects on both the photoconductivity and dark conductivity have been observed in m-axial GaN nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). For these nanowires with diameters at 50-130 nm, the products of carrier lifetime (τ) and mobility (μ) derived from the photocurrent measurements are typically at (2-8)×10-1 cm2/V, which are over two orders of magnitude higher than the maximal reported values [τμ=(1-5)×10-4 cm2/V] for their thin film counterparts. A significant decrease of τμ value at diameter below the critical values (dcrt) at 30-40 nm is observed. Similar size dependence is also found from the dark conductivity study. The temperature-dependent measurements further indicate two different thermal activation mechanisms in GaN nanowires with sizes above and below the dcrt. These results suggest a surface-dominant transport property in GaN nanowires both in dark and under light illumination due to the presence of surface depletion and band bending. Probable reasons leading to the smaller dcrt of the CVD-grown m-axial GaN nanowires, compared to the c-axial ones grown by molecular beam epitaxy are discussed as well.

  12. Application of the laser diode with central wavelength 975 nm for the therapy of neurofibroma and hemangiomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymańczyk, Jacek; Sawczak, Mirosław; Cenian, Witold; Karpienko, Katarzyna; Jędrzejewska-Szczerska, Małgorzata; Cenian, Adam

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a newly developed dermatological laser (with a central wavelength 975 nm) for application in therapies requiring deep penetration of tissue, e.g., cutaneous (dermal) neurofibroma (von Recklinghausen disease) and hemangiomas. This laser can work either in pulses or continues wave mode. Laser radiation is transmitted toward the application region by optical fiber with a diameter of 0.6 mm. The compact design of the laser facilitates its transport and increases the comfort of use.

  13. Attached cavitation at a small diameter ultrasonic horn tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žnidarčič, Anton; Mettin, Robert; Cairós, Carlos; Dular, Matevž

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasonic horn transducers are frequently used in applications of acoustic cavitation in liquids, for instance, for cell disruption or sonochemical reactions. They are operated typically in the frequency range up to about 50 kHz and have tip diameters from some mm to several cm. It has been observed that if the horn tip is sufficiently small and driven at high amplitude, cavitation is very strong, and the tip can be covered entirely by the gas/vapor phase for longer time intervals. A peculiar dynamics of the attached cavity can emerge with expansion and collapse at a self-generated frequency in the subharmonic range, i.e., below the acoustic driving frequency. Here, we present a systematic study of the cavitation dynamics in water at a 20 kHz horn tip of 3 mm diameter. The system was investigated by high-speed imaging with simultaneous recording of the acoustic emissions. Measurements were performed under variation of acoustic power, air saturation, viscosity, surface tension, and temperature of the liquid. Our findings show that the liquid properties play no significant role in the dynamics of the attached cavitation at the small ultrasonic horn. Also the variation of the experimental geometry, within a certain range, did not change the dynamics. We believe that the main two reasons for the peculiar dynamics of cavitation on a small ultrasonic horn are the higher energy density on a small tip and the inability of the big tip to "wash" away the gaseous bubbles. Calculation of the somewhat adapted Strouhal number revealed that, similar to the hydrodynamic cavitation, values which are relatively low characterize slow cavitation structure dynamics. In cases where the cavitation follows the driving frequency this value lies much higher - probably at Str > 20. In the spirit to distinguish the observed phenomenon with other cavitation dynamics at ultrasonic transducer surfaces, we suggest to term the observed phenomenon of attached cavities partly covering the full horn

  14. Modular Small Diameter Vascular Grafts with Bioactive Functionalities

    PubMed Central

    Neufurth, Meik; Wang, Xiaohong; Tolba, Emad; Dorweiler, Bernhard; Schröder, Heinz C.; Link, Thorben; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of a novel type of artificial small diameter blood vessels, termed biomimetic tissue-engineered blood vessels (bTEBV), with a modular composition. They are composed of a hydrogel scaffold consisting of two negatively charged natural polymers, alginate and a modified chitosan, N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan (N,O-CMC). Into this biologically inert scaffold two biofunctionally active biopolymers are embedded, inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) and silica, as well as gelatin which exposes the cell recognition signal, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD). These materials can be hardened by exposure to Ca2+ through formation of Ca2+ bridges between the polyanions, alginate, N,O-CMC, and polyP (alginate-Ca2+-N,O-CMC-polyP). The bTEBV are formed by pressing the hydrogel through an extruder into a hardening solution, containing Ca2+. In this universal scaffold of the bTEBV biomaterial, polycations such as poly(l-Lys), poly(d-Lys) or a His/Gly-tagged RGD peptide (three RGD units) were incorporated, which promote the adhesion of endothelial cells to the vessel surface. The mechanical properties of the biopolymer material (alginate-Ca2+-N,O-CMC-polyP-silica) revealed a hardness (elastic modulus) of 475 kPa even after a short incubation period in CaCl2 solution. The material of the artificial vascular grafts (bTEBVs with an outer size 6 mm and 1.8 mm, and an inner diameter 4 mm and 0.8 mm, respectively) turned out to be durable in 4-week pulsatile flow experiments at an alternating pressure between 25 and 100 mbar (18.7 and 75.0 mm Hg). The burst pressure of the larger (smaller) vessels was 850 mbar (145 mbar). Incorporation of polycationic poly(l-Lys), poly(d-Lys), and especially the His/Gly-tagged RGD peptide, markedly increased the adhesion of human, umbilical vein/vascular endothelial cells, EA.HY926 cells, to the surface of the hydrogel. No significant effect of the polyP samples on the clotting of human plasma is measured. We propose that the metabolically degradable

  15. Cell projection use in maskless lithography for 45nm and 32nm logic nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manakli, S.; Komami, H.; Takizawa, M.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Pain, L.

    2009-03-01

    Due to the ever-increasing cost of equipment and mask complexity, the use of optical lithography for integrated circuit manufacturing is increasingly more complex and expensive. Recent workshops and conferences in semiconductor lithography underlined that one alternative to support sub-32nm technologies is mask-less lithography option using electron beam technology. However, this direct write approach based on variable shaped beam principle (VSB) is not sufficient in terms of throughput, i.e. of productivity. New direct write techniques like multibeam systems are under development, but these solutions will not be mature before 2012. The use of character/cell projection (CP) on industrial VSB tools is the first step to deal with the throughput concerns. This paper presents the status of the CP technology and evaluates its possible use for the 45nm and 32nm logic nodes. It will present standard cell and SRAM structures that are printed as single characters using the CP technique. All experiments are done using the Advantest tool (F3000) which can project up to 100 different cells per layer. Cell extractions and design have been performed with the design and software solution developed by D2S. In this paper, we first evaluate the performance gain that can be obtained with the CP approach compared to the standard VSB approach. This paper also details the patterning capability obtained by using the CP concept. An evaluation of the CD uniformity and process stability is also presented. Finally this paper discusses about the improvements of this technique to address high resolution and to improve the throughput concerns.

  16. Nonmonotonic Diameter Dependence of Thermal Conductivity of Extremely Thin Si Nanowires: Competition between Hydrodynamic Phonon Flow and Boundary Scattering.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanguang; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming

    2017-02-08

    By carefully and systematically performing Green-Kubo equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we report that the thermal conductivity (κ) of Si nanowires (NWs) does not diverge but converges and increases steeply when NW diameter (D) becomes extremely small (dκ/dD < 0), a long debate of one-dimensional heat conduction in history. The κ of the thinnest possible Si NWs reaches a superhigh level that is as large as more than 1 order of magnitude higher than its bulk counterpart. The abnormality is explained in terms of the dominant normal (N) process (energy and momentum conservation) of low frequency acoustic phonons that induces hydrodynamic phonon flow in the Si NWs without being scattered. With D increasing, the downward shift of optical phonons triggers strong Umklapp (U) scattering with acoustic phonons and attenuates the N process, leading to the regime of phonon boundary scattering (dκ/dD < 0). The two competing mechanisms result in nonmonotonic diameter dependence of κ with minima at critical diameter of 2-3 nm. Our results unambiguously demonstrate the converged κ and the clear trend of κ ∼ D for extremely thin Si NWs by fully elucidating the competition between the hydrodynamic phonon flow and phonon boundary scattering.

  17. Protein Adsorption From Biofluids on Silica Nanoparticles: Corona Analysis as a Function of Particle Diameter and Porosity

    PubMed Central

    Clemments, Alden M.; Botella, Pablo; Landry, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    A study on the adsorption of proteins from fetal bovine serum (FBS) on spherical dense and mesoporous silica nanoparticles with a wide range of diameters, from 70 to 900 nm, is presented. Monodisperse populations of particles with a range of diameters were obtained through modifications of the Stöber method. Extensive characterization of the particles was then performed using N2 physisorption, TEM, DLS, and ζ-potential. Following serum exposure, proteomic evaluation in concert with thermogravimetric analysis revealed the associated concentrations of each protein identified in the hard corona. Small particles adsorbed the largest amount of protein, due to their larger external surface area. Proteins with low molecular weights (<50 kDa) composed the majority of the protein corona, totaling between 60 and 80 % of the total mass of adsorbed protein. Here, the higher surface curvature of small particles favors the enrichment of smaller proteins. Porosity does not promote protein adsorption, but improves deposition of the low molecular weight protein fraction due to the size exclusion effect related to pore diameter. These results have important implications for the use of dense and porous silica nanoparticles in biomedical applications. PMID:26371804

  18. On the scaling behavior of hardness with ligament diameter of nanoporous-Au: Constrained motion of dislocations along the ligaments

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanath, R. N.; Polaki, S. R.; Rajaraman, R.; Abhaya, S.; Chirayath, V. A.; Amarendra, G.; Sundar, C. S.

    2014-06-09

    The scaling behavior of hardness with ligament diameter and vacancy defect concentration in nanoporous Au (np-Au) has been investigated using a combination of Vickers Hardness, Scanning electron microscopy, and positron lifetime measurements. It is shown that for np-Au, the hardness scales with the ligament diameter with an exponent of −0.3, that is, at variance with the conventional Hall-Petch exponent of −0.5 for bulk systems, as seen in the controlled experiments on cold worked Au with varying grain size. The hardness of np-Au correlates with the vacancy concentration C{sub V} within the ligaments, as estimated from positron lifetime experiments, and scales as C{sub V}{sup 1/2}, pointing to the interaction of dislocations with vacancies. The distinctive Hall-Petch exponent of −0.3 seen for np-Au, with ligament diameters in the range of 5–150 nm, is rationalized by invoking the constrained motion of dislocations along the ligaments.

  19. Electrical Mobility Spectrometer Using a Diethylene Glycol Condensation Particle Counter for Measurement of Aerosol Size Distributions Down to 1 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Kuang, C.; Chen, M.; Attoui, M.; McMurry, P. H.

    2011-02-01

    We report a new scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS) for measuring number size distributions of particles down to {approx}1 nm mobility diameter. This SMPS includes an aerosol charger, a TSI 3085 nano differential mobility analyzer (nanoDMA), an ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC) using diethylene glycol (DEG) as the working fluid, and a conventional butanol CPC (the 'booster') to detect the small droplets leaving the DEG UCPC. The response of the DEG UCPC to negatively charged sodium chloride particles with mobility diameters ranging from 1-6 nm was measured. The sensitivity of the DEG UCPC to particle composition was also studied by comparing its response to positively charged 1.47 and 1.70 nm tetra-alkyl ammonium ions, sodium chloride, and silver particles. A high resolution differential mobility analyzer was used to generate the test particles. These results show that the response of this UCPC to sub-2 nm particles is sensitive to particle composition. The applicability of the new SMPS for atmospheric measurement was demonstrated during the Nucleation and Cloud Condensation Nuclei (NCCN) field campaign (Atlanta, Georgia, summer 2009). We operated the instrument at saturator and condenser temperatures that allowed the efficient detection of sodium chloride particles but not of air ions having the same mobility. We found that particles as small as 1 nm were detected during nucleation events but not at other times. Factors affecting size distribution measurements, including aerosol charging in the 1-10 nm size range, are discussed. For the charger used in this study, bipolar charging was found to be more effective for sub-2 nm particles than unipolar charging. No ion induced nucleation inside the charger was observed during the NCCN campaign.

  20. Electrospun silk fibroin fiber diameter influences in vitro dermal fibroblast behavior and promotes healing of ex vivo wound models

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Tom; Yuan, Xue-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Replicating the nanostructured components of extracellular matrix is a target for dermal tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Electrospinning Bombyx mori silk fibroin (BMSF) allows the production of nano- to microscale fibrous scaffolds. For BMSF electrospun scaffolds to be successful, understanding and optimizing the cellular response to material morphology is essential. Primary human dermal fibroblast response to nine variants of BMSF scaffolds composed of nano- to microscale fibers ranging from ~250 to ~1200 nm was assessed in vitro with regard to cell proliferation, viability, cellular morphology, and gene expression. BMSF support of epithelial migration was then assessed through utilization of a novel ex vivo human skin wound healing model. Scaffolds composed of the smallest diameter fibers, ~250 -300 nm, supported cell proliferation significantly more than fibers with diameters approximately 1 μm (p < 0.001). Cell morphology was observed to depart from a stellate morphology with numerous cell -fiber interactions to an elongated, fiber-aligned morphology with interaction predominately with single fibers. The expressions of extracellular matrix genes, collagen types I and III (p < 0.001), and proliferation markers, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (p < 0.001), increased with decreasing fiber diameter. The re-epithelialization of ex vivo wound models was significantly improved with the addition of BMSF electrospun scaffolds, with migratory keratinocytes incorporated into scaffolds. BMSF scaffolds with nanofibrous architectures enhanced proliferation in comparison to microfibrous scaffolds and provided an effective template for migratory keratinocytes during re-epithelialization. The results may aid in the development of effective BMSF electrospun scaffolds for wound healing applications PMID:25383171