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Sample records for 50-328 tennessee valley

  1. 32 CFR 644.403 - Transfers to Tennessee Valley Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Transfers to Tennessee Valley Authority. 644.403... Transfers to Tennessee Valley Authority. 10 U.S.C. 831f(b) authorizes the President of the United States to provide for the transfer to the Tennessee Valley Authority of the use, possession and control of such real...

  2. 32 CFR 644.403 - Transfers to Tennessee Valley Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Transfers to Tennessee Valley Authority. 644.403... Transfers to Tennessee Valley Authority. 10 U.S.C. 831f(b) authorizes the President of the United States to provide for the transfer to the Tennessee Valley Authority of the use, possession and control of such real...

  3. 32 CFR 644.403 - Transfers to Tennessee Valley Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transfers to Tennessee Valley Authority. 644.403... Transfers to Tennessee Valley Authority. 10 U.S.C. 831f(b) authorizes the President of the United States to provide for the transfer to the Tennessee Valley Authority of the use, possession and control of such real...

  4. 32 CFR 644.403 - Transfers to Tennessee Valley Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Transfers to Tennessee Valley Authority. 644.403... Transfers to Tennessee Valley Authority. 10 U.S.C. 831f(b) authorizes the President of the United States to provide for the transfer to the Tennessee Valley Authority of the use, possession and control of such real...

  5. 32 CFR 644.403 - Transfers to Tennessee Valley Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transfers to Tennessee Valley Authority. 644.403... Transfers to Tennessee Valley Authority. 10 U.S.C. 831f(b) authorizes the President of the United States to provide for the transfer to the Tennessee Valley Authority of the use, possession and control of such real...

  6. Tennessee Valley Authority 1983 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman, S.

    1983-01-01

    In the Tennessee Valley Authority's 1983 Annual Report, activities of TVA during the fiscal year (ended September 30, 1983), are covered. This report was submitted to the President, Senate and House of Representatives of the US. Contents include Energy, Economic Development, Natural Resources and Fertilizer and Farming.

  7. Little Tennessee Valley Charrette. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peccolo, Charles M.

    Purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Little Tennessee Valley Charrette, a 3-county experiment in community participation in identification of educational needs and planning new programs. An evaluation team interviewed charrette participants and group discussion leaders to obtain information on the program as the basis for…

  8. 21st Century jobs initiative - Tennessee`s Resource Valley. Progress report 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-20

    Tennessee`s Resource Valley, a regional economic development organization, was asked to facilitate a two-year, $750,000 grant from the Department of Energy. The grant`s purpose is to make the East Tennessee region less dependent on federal funds for its economic well-being and to increase regional awareness of the advantages of proximity to the Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge. Tennessee`s Resource Valley`s mission is to market the mid-East Tennessee region`s business location advantages to corporate decision makers and to facilitate regional initiatives that impact the creation of quality job opportunities. Tennessee`s Resource Valley represents the following fifteen (15) counties in East Tennessee: Anderson, Blount, Campbell, Claiborne, Cocke, Grainger, Jefferson, Knox, Loudon, Monroe, Morgan, Scott, Sevier, and Union.

  9. 21st Century jobs initiative - Tennessee`s Resource Valley. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-23

    Tennessee`s Resource Valley, a regional economic development organization, was asked to facilitate a two-year, $750,000 grant from the Department of Energy. The grant`s purpose was to make the East Tennessee region less dependent on federal funds for its economic well-being and to increase regional awareness of the advantages of proximity to the Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge. The mission of Tennessee`s Resource Valley is to market the business location advantages of mid-East Tennessee to corporate decision makers and to facilitate regional initiatives that impact the creation of quality job opportunities. Tennessee`s Resource Valley represents fifteen (15) counties in East Tennessee: Anderson, Blount, Campbell, Claiborne, Cocke, Grainger, Jefferson, Knox, Loudon, Monroe, Morgan, Roane, Scott, Sevier and Union.

  10. Tennessee Valley Authority annual report, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This 1980 Annual Report of the Tennessee Valley Authority to the US president, Senate, and House of Representatives contains information on energy supply and demand, energy conservation, load management, electric rate structures, and economic development in the TVA region, agricultural activities of the TVA, use of natural resources including land and water, and statistics on the power plants, power generation, and financial status of the TVA power system. (LCL)

  11. History of the Tennessee Valley Authority

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The history of the Tennessee Valley Authority beginning with its inception during the depression years and proceeding through the 1970's is reviewed with information on the socio-economic impact of TVA on the Southeast Region, the construction of hydro, fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants, the environmental effects of these plants, the development of waterways and flood control, recreational areas developed by TVA, and agricultural benefits. (LCL)

  12. Biomass analyses for four areas in the Tennessee Valley Authority

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    Analyses for four biomass procurement areas in the Tennessee Valley are presented. The Marlow and Perryville, Tennessee, sites can provide 38,000 dry tons of industrial residue annually. Mulberry Creek, Alabama, and Watts Bar, Tennessee, can annually provide 330,000 dry tons of industrial residue and/or forest biomass. Methanol can be produced at the Perryville and Marlow sites and ethanol at Mulberry Creek and Watts Bar. 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. Lessons from the Tennessee Valley Authority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchens, Carl Thomas

    This dissertation is a program evaluation of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) the largest publicly owned utility in the United States. The first essay in this dissertation examines the TVA's use of eminent domain in order to acquire property for the construction of reservoirs. It develops a new model of asymmetric information and then tests the model predictions using property level data from TVA property purchases in the 1930's. The second essay of this dissertation examines the unintended consequences of reservoir development my examining changes in the malaria rate associated with TVA reservoirs. Using panel data methods, I find that the presence of a TVA reservoir leads to large increases in the malaria mortality and morbidity rate, which cost up to 30 percent of TVA federal appropriations. The final essay in this dissertation examines the impact of TVA electrification programs on economic growth. It combines archival and panel data methods to show that contrary to the historical account, TVA electric rates did not differ substantially from the rates charged by private utilities, and secondly, shows that counties that had electricity contracts with the TVA did not have differential economic growth rates for a variety of economic outcomes. In order to control for selection into contracts, I adopt an instrumental variables strategy based on the cost of electric service.

  14. Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Katie Stokes

    2012-05-03

    In December 2009, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE), through a partnership with the Appalachian Regional Commission, EKPC, Kentucky's Department for Energy Development and Independence, SACE, Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation, and TVA, and through a contract with the Department of Energy, established the Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group (TVEKWWG). TVEKWWG consists of a strong network of people and organizations. Working together, they provide information to various organizations and stakeholders regarding the responsible development of wind power in the state. Members include representatives from utility interests, state and federal agencies, economic development organizations, non-government organizations, local decision makers, educational institutions, and wind industry representatives. The working group is facilitated by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. TVEKWWG supports the Department of Energy by helping educate and inform key stakeholders about wind energy in the state of Tennessee.

  15. 75 FR 5354 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, Units 1, 2, and 3 Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Tennessee Valley Authority; Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, Units 1, 2, and 3 Environmental Assessment...-68, issued to Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA, the licensee), for operation of the Browns Ferry...

  16. Signatures in Lightning Activity during Tennessee Valley Severe Storms of 5-6 May 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Patrick N.; Goodman, Steven J.

    2004-01-01

    During the first week of May 2003, the Tennessee Valley experienced 14 tornadoes. Those that moved across the Tennessee Valley Region of northern Alabama and southern Tennessee provided an opportunity for study us- ing the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). On 5 May a classic supercell trekked across southern Tennessee spawning several tornadoes producing FO-F3 damage; on 6 May a high precipitation supercell moved across northern Alabama producing several FO-F1 tornadoes. The life cycle of these supercells will be discussed by presenting their electrical and radar evolution.

  17. TVA and restructuring: Will more competitive markets put TVA on the ropes. [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

    SciTech Connect

    Pulsipher, A.G. )

    1991-06-01

    This article examines the financial standing of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA),its recent restructuring and the competitive pressures that may undermine its share of the power generation market. Topics reviewed are TVA's stable rate goals, competitive position, what if TVA can not compete, be the first to bail out, two arguments for optimism, contingency planning, selling power outside the Tennessee Valley Region, and the Rural Electrification Administration model.

  18. Forest resources in the Tennessee valley of north Alabama

    Treesearch

    James W. Cruikshank

    1940-01-01

    Forest survey Unit No. 6 in north Alabama embraces 10 counties that lie almost exclusively in the watershed of the Tennessee River (fig. 2). The unit, containing 4,595,900 acres, extends entirely across the northern part of the State, with its southern boundary roughly parallel to, and about 50 miles south of, the Tennessee State line. The Tennessee River, which enters...

  19. Geothermal-resource survey of the Tennessee Valley Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staub, W. P.; Treat, N. L.

    1982-08-01

    An overview appraisal of the geothermal resources in the Tennessee Valley Region revealed geothermal resources of potential usefulness in two of 13 subregions: the New Madrid Seismic Zone and the central segment of the Northern Gulf Coastal Plain. The appraisal was based on geologic features of the region (hot springs, groundwater aquifers, and structure) and temperature data for oil and gas wells and shallow water wells. Site specific exploration for economic appraisal was not carried out. The geothermal gradient for each of the subregions was established by linear regression of all of the bottom hole temperature data for the oil and gas wells. A routine statistical procedure identified all unusually warm wells within each subregion, and their locations were plotted. Hot spots in a subregion were identified by localized clustering of such wells in numbers exceeding statistical expectations based on the intensity of drilling activity. Of the two areas most likely for extraction of geothermal energy, the New Madrid Seismic Zone has a high geothermal gradient at shallow depths (less than 500 meters).

  20. Directory of forest industries in the Tennessee Valley Region, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    The forest industries play an important role in supporting the Tennessee Valley region economy. In 1984, 2297 active primary and secondary wood-using industries provided employment for 92,203 persons. Gross product value totaled $2386 million for primary mills and $4160 million for secondary plants. Primary mills consumed 717 million cubic feet of wood while secondary plants used 291 million cubic feet. Fifty-two plants were under construction or began operations in 1985 and 293 mills were inactive during 1984. Sawmills are the most numerous industry, with 994 active mills employing 9775 workers. The pulp and paper industry is the next largest employer with eleven mills supporting 8406 workers. These two groups account for 92% of the workforce in the primary forest industry sector. Lumber production reached 2.1 billion board feet in 1984. The 56 mills in the 5000-9999 MBF/year size class produced the most lumber (384,809 MBF). The mid-range size classes (1000-9999 MBF/year) employed 5337 workers of 55% of the sawmill workforce. Hardwood lumber production was greatest in the 3000-4999 MBF/year and 5000-9999 MBF/year size classes with 281,224 and 315,808 MBF respectively. Softwood lumber production increased by size with the 50,000 + MBF/year size class producing the most softwood lumber (354,781 MBF).

  1. Reservoir monitoring---1990: Bacteriological conditions in the Tennessee Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Fehring, J.P.

    1991-05-01

    Twenty-three designated swimming beaches, two informal swimming areas, and four canoe launching sites were sampled at least ten times during a 30-day period in 1990. All 29 met the regulatory limits of a geometric mean of less than 200 colonies of fecal coliform bacteria per l00 milliliters (ml). However, four sites had one sample each with at least 1000 colonies per 100 ml, which is a violation of recreation criteria in two of the seven Tennessee Valley states. Forty-four nonrecreation sites were also sampled to provide generic bacteriological water quality data on several reservoirs and streams and to determine if the Georgia Mountain Fair was having an adverse impact on the bacteriological water quality of Chatuge Reservoir. No impact was observed. Thirty-three sites on 15 reservoirs were sampled, and all but three met recreation criteria. Eleven locations were sampled on three streams: Cotaco Creek near Huntsville, and Beaver and Bullrun Creeks near Knoxville. A comparison of 1990 sampling results at 16 sites with results from a 1974 survey was made.

  2. 77 FR 32981 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Tennessee Valley Authority and the University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... University of Tennessee McClung Museum, Knoxville, TN AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the University of Tennessee McClung Museum (McClung... itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural items may contact the TVA and McClung Museum....

  3. 77 FR 32980 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Tennessee Valley Authority and the University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... University of Tennessee McClung Museum, Knoxville, TN AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the University of Tennessee McClung Museum (McClung... believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural items may contact the TVA and McClung...

  4. Geothermal-resource survey of the Tennessee Valley Region

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, W.P.; Treat, N.L.

    1982-08-01

    An overview appraisal of the geothermal resources in the Tennessee Valley Region revealed geothermal resources of potential usefulness in two of 13 subregions: the New Madrid Seismic Zone and the central segment of the Northern Gulf Coastal Plain. The appraisal was based on geologic features of the region (hot springs, groundwater aquifers, and structure) and temperature data for oil and gas wells and shallow water wells. Site-specific exploration for economic appraisal was not carried out. The geothermal gradient for each of the subregions was established by linear regression of all of the bottom-hole temperature data for the oil and gas wells. A routine statistical procedure identified all unusually warm wells within each subregion, and their locations were plotted. Hot spots in a subregion were identified by localized clustering of such wells in numbers exceeding statistical expectations based on the intensity of drilling activity. Of the two areas most likely for extraction of geothermal energy, the New Madrid Seismic Zone has a high geothermal gradient at shallow depths (less than 500 meters). However, the higher gradient does not continue at greater depth since convective circulation is the probable cause of the higher-than-normal groundwater temperatures. Although a high geothermal gradient does persist at depth in the central segment of the Northern Gulf Coastal Plain, engineering problems are likely to hinder the current economic use of geothermal energy in this subregion. The extraction of geothermal resources in the 11 other subregions is not considered to be feasible at present because (1) the heat source is too deep, or (2) there are no suitable aquifers.

  5. 77 FR 32982 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority and the University of Tennessee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... analysis can be found in Hiwassee Island: An Archaeological Account of Four Tennessee Indian Peoples, by... shells, 1 shell gorget, 1 shell hairpin, 1 ceramic pot, iron wire, 1 lead shot, approximately...

  6. The Emergency Jobs Program of 1983: Its Implementation by the Tennessee Valley Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Vernon M., Jr.

    In March 1983, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) received $4 million in Federal funds to establish an emergency jobs program as authorized under the Emergency Jobs Act of 1983. Within 90 days, TVA found employment for 493 persons, and, by the end of June 1984, 1,183 persons had been employed by TVA. Of those employed, 14.9 percent were…

  7. 78 FR 79506 - Tennessee Valley Authority: Exemption From Requirements To Revise Combined License Application To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing an exemption in response to an October 28, 2013, request from Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). On September 29, 2010, TVA requested that the NRC suspend review of its combined license application until further notice. On October 28, 2013 TVA requested an exemption from certain regulatory requirements which, if granted, would allow them......

  8. 78 FR 79503 - Tennessee Valley Authority, Combined License Application for Bellefonte Units 3 and 4 Exemption...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing an exemption in response to an October 28, 2013, request from Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). On September 29, 2010, TVA requested that the NRC suspend review of its combined license (COL) application until further notice. On October 28, 2013, TVA requested an exemption from certain regulatory requirements that require them to submit a......

  9. 75 FR 12314 - Tennessee Valley Authority: Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... the rule's compliance date for all operating nuclear power plants, but noted that the Commission's... COMMISSION Tennessee Valley Authority: Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 Exemption 1.0 Background..., which authorizes operation of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN), Unit 1. TVA obtained construction...

  10. 77 FR 71454 - Notice of Atomic Safety And Licensing Board Reconstitution, Tennessee Valley Authority (Watts Bar...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... COMMISSION Notice of Atomic Safety And Licensing Board Reconstitution, Tennessee Valley Authority (Watts Bar, Unit 2) Pursuant to 10 CFR 2.313(c) and 2.321(b), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (Board) in the... 16th day of November 2012. E. Roy Hawkens, Chief Administrative Judge, Atomic Safety and...

  11. 78 FR 28897 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... COMMISSION Tennessee Valley Authority; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Pursuant to... that an Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (Board) is being established to preside over the following... Radiation. The Board is comprised of the following administrative judges: Alex S. Karlin, Chairman,...

  12. 75 FR 3946 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Bellefonte Efficiency and Sustainability Team, and the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy in response to a... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY... following proceeding: Tennessee Valley Authority (Bellefonte Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2) This proceeding...

  13. 75 FR 13327 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, Units 1, 2, and 3; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... COMMISSION Tennessee Valley Authority; Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, Units 1, 2, and 3; Exemption 1.0... DPR-33, DPR-52 and DPR-68, which authorize operation of the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, Units 1, 2... Ferry Schedule Exemption Request The licensee provided detailed information in its November 6, 2009...

  14. Inventory of karst subsidence in the Valley and Ridge Province of East Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelle, R.H.; Newton, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The first regional inventory of karst activity in the Valley and Ridge Province of East Tennessee was performed as a part of ongoing studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory pertaining to environmental impact assessment of waste disposal in karst settings. More than half the land area in the Valley and Ridge Province of East Tennessee is underlain by karst-prone carbonate bedrock. The regional karst inventory was initiated to obtain current information on the extent of active karst subsidence in the region for use in decision making by the Department of Energy in planning future waste disposal facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The inventory was performed by contacting personnel of federal, state, and county agencies to obtain reports of known active karst subsidence within the region. Data from these interviews were tabulated resulting in identificaton of more than 250 karst subsidence incidents in East Tennessee, most of which have occurred since 1980. Although the infomation obtained was largely anecdotal, approximate location, date, size, and circumstances under which the collapses occurred were recorded for as many cases as could be documented. The study also included detailed reconnaissance of selected areas similar in geology and hydrology to a study area at Oak Ridge, Tennessee to identify causative factors which contribute to karst subsidence in the region and for comparison of the occurrence of visible karst features at different sites. Human activities affecting site hydrology such as large scale land clearing and earthmoving projects were related to most of the subsidence incidents inventoried.

  15. Holocene ethnobotanical and paleoecological record of human impact on vegetation in the Little Tennessee River Valley, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcourt, Paul A.; Delcourt, Hazel R.; Cridlebaugh, Patricia A.; Chapman, Jefferson

    1986-05-01

    Human occupation and utilization of plant resources have affected vegetation in the lower Little Tennessee River Valley of East Tennessee for 10,000 yr. Changes in Indian cultures and land use are documented by radiocarbon chronologies, lithic artifacts, ceramics, settlement patterns, and ethnobotanical remains from 25 stratified archaeological sites within the Holocene alluvial terrace. The ethnobotanical record consists of 31,500 fragments (13.7 kg) of wood charcoal identified to species and 7.7 kg of carbonized fruits, seeds, nutshells, and cultigens from 956 features. Pollen and plant macrofossils from small ponds both in the uplands and on lower stream terraces record local vegetational changes through the last 1500 to 3000 yr. Human impact increased after cultigens, including squash and gourd, were introduced ca. 4000 yr B.P. during the Archaic cultural period. Forest clearance and cultivation disturbed vegetation on both the floodplain and lower terraces after 2800 yr B.P., during the Woodland period. Permanent Indian settlements and maize and bean agriculture extended to higher terraces 1.5 km from the floodplain by the Mississippian period (1000 to 300 yr B.P.). After 300 yr B.P., extensive land clearance and cultivation by Historic Overhill Cherokee and Euro-Americans spread into the uplands beyond the river valley.

  16. ERTS-B imagery interpretation techniques in the Tennessee Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, R. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. The proposed investigation is a continuation of an ERTS-1 project. The principal missions are to serve as the principal supporter on computer and image processing problems for the multidisciplinary ERTS effort of the University of Tennessee, and to carry out research in improved methods for the computer processing, enhancement, and recognition of ERTS imagery.

  17. Annual report of the Tennessee Valley Authority for the fiscal year ended September 30, 1980. Volume II. Appendixes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The appendixes to the 1980 Annual Report of the Tennessee Valley Authority contain the annual financial statements, statistics on power sales, procurement sources, and educational programs, data on power contracts, a summary of litigation, and an allocation report. (LCL)

  18. Case studies in technology choice. Volume 4. Tennessee Valley Authority. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney, R.L.; Sicherman, A.

    1985-07-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has been considering different technological alternatives for managing their spent nuclear fuel. This report illustrates the use of the Technology Choice Model (TCM) to assist decision makers with this decision. A preliminary TCM application which addresses two spent fuel storage alternatives is presented and discussed. The report includes a procedure to elicit ''values'' from members of the public to evaluate alternatives. Use of the procedure was demonstrated through an illustrative example.

  19. Computerized marketing of fruits and vegetables in the Tennessee Valley region: perceptions of growers and buyers

    SciTech Connect

    Brooker, J.R.; Adrian, J.; Free, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Computer applications of fruit and vegetable growers in the Tennessee Valley region are limited. Nearly three-fourths of the buyers had never used a computer. The buyers' responses regarding obtaining a computer during the next year were more negative than that of the growers, indicating that these growers are more concerned about their selling problems than the buyers are about their procurement problems. Buyers expressed greater satisfaction with the present marketing system than did the growers, 97 to 63%. (DLC)

  20. The Use of Radar to Improve Rainfall Estimation over the Tennessee and San Joaquin River Valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Felix, Mariana; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation provides an overview of the collaborative radar rainfall project between the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Von Braun Center for Science & Innovation (VCSI), NASA MSFC and UAHuntsville. Two systems were used in this project, Advanced Radar for Meteorological & Operational Research (ARMOR) Rainfall Estimation Processing System (AREPS), a demonstration project of real-time radar rainfall using a research radar and NEXRAD Rainfall Estimation Processing System (NREPS). The objectives, methodology, some results and validation, operational experience and lessons learned are reviewed. The presentation. Another project that is using radar to improve rainfall estimations is in California, specifically the San Joaquin River Valley. This is part of a overall project to develop a integrated tool to assist water management within the San Joaquin River Valley. This involves integrating several components: (1) Radar precipitation estimates, (2) Distributed hydro model, (3) Snowfall measurements and Surface temperature / moisture measurements. NREPS was selected to provide precipitation component.

  1. Preliminary direct heat geothermal resource assessment of the Tennessee Valley region

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, W.P.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary appraisal of the direct heat geothermal energy resources of the Tennessee Valley region has been completed. This region includes Kentucky, Tennessee and parts of adjacent states. Intermediate and deep aquifers were selected for study. Basement and Top-of-Knox structure and temperature maps were compiled from oil and gas well data on file at various state geological survey offices. Results of this study indicate that the New Madrid seismic zone is the only area within the region that possesses potential for direct heat utilization. In other areas geothermal energy is either too deep for economical extraction or it will not be able to compete with other local energy resources. The only anomalously high temperature well outside the New Madrid seismic zone was located in the Rome Trough and near the central part of the eastern Kentucky coal basin. Geothermal energy in that region would face strong competition from coal, oil and natural gas.

  2. Base flow and ground water in upper Sweetwater Valley, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evaldi, R.D.; Lewis, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Base flow measurements showed interbasin transfer of water among sub-basins of upper Sweetwater Valley. In general, topographically higher sub-basins have deficient surface outflow unless significant spring flow occurs in the basin. Topographically lower areas adjacent to the main channel of Sweetwater Creek generally have surplus flow. Major flow surpluses were associated with areas in which the majority of flow originated at a spring. Unusual outflow was related to geology to hypothesize a ground-water flow network. Areas of ground-water flow up-gradient of large springs were hypothesized as likely areas for significant ground-water reservoirs. A water budget study indicated that during dry years approximately three-fourths of the annual flow to Sweetwater Creek may be derived from ground-water sources. Streamflow records were analyzed to estimate the frequency of low-flow of Sweetwater Creek. (USGS)

  3. Population trends and environmental contaminants in herons in the Tennessee Valley, 1980-81

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Pullin, B.P.; Swineford, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) eggs (N = 40) collected in 1980 from four of the largest colonies in the Tennessee Valley contained organochlorine pesticide, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), and chromium concentrations below those associated with reduced productivity. Low concentrations of organochlorine pesticide and PCB residues also were found in eggs (N = 31) from three of the larger Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) colonies in the Tennessee Valley. However, DDE concentrations in two of the Black-crowned Night-Heron eggs exceeded levels associated with reduced nesting success. Mercury was found in all eggs of both species with residues ranging to a high of 2.0 ppm; residues of this magnitude have not been identified as reducing nesting success of either of these two species. Green-backed Heron (Butorides striatus) eggs collected in 1981 near a former DDT manufacturing site in the Tennessee Valley had the highest DDE concentrations ever reported for this species; the effect of these high concentrations on productivity is not known. Eggshell thickness of Great Blue Heron, Green-backed Heron, and Black- crowned Night-Heron eggs averaged 7.5%, 7.6%, and 3% thinner, respectively, than shell thickness of eggs collected before 1947. This amount of thinning is not deleterious; intraclutch variation in shell thickness is often this high. Shell thickness in all three species was correlated (P lt 0.1) with DDE concentrations. The number of nesting pairs of Great Blue Herons and Black-crowned Night-Herons at each of the colonies studied has been stable or increasing during the previous decade. These population data, combined with the residue data, suggest that organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, mercury, and chromium are not adversely affecting these populations. However, we did not assess nesting success which would be a requisite for confirming this.

  4. 40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.72 Section 81.72 Protection of... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Scottsboro (Alabama... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region and revised to consist of...

  5. 40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.72 Section 81.72 Protection of... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Scottsboro (Alabama... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region and revised to consist of...

  6. 40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.72 Section 81.72 Protection of... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Scottsboro (Alabama... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region and revised to consist of...

  7. 40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.72 Section 81.72 Protection of... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Scottsboro (Alabama... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region and revised to consist of...

  8. 40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.72 Section 81.72 Protection of... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Scottsboro (Alabama... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region and revised to consist of...

  9. Remote sensing for water quality monitoring in the Tennessee valley: Field tests of two systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dierberg, F.

    1992-08-25

    Two airborne renote sensing systems, the Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) and the Airborne Multispectral Measurement System (AMMS) were field tested over reservoirs in the Tennessee River valley during the summmer of 1991 and winter (AMMS only) of 1992. Univariate, linear regression analyses using single or ratioed wavelength bands and line height algorithms for spectral energy in the 625-725 nm wavelength range provided the best correlations to ground-truthed uncorrected chlorophyll A, turbidity, suspended solids, and Secchi disk transparency. Details of these monitoring studies are included in this report.

  10. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of Resilience Investments: Tennessee Valley Authority Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Melissa R.; Wilbanks, Thomas J.; Preston, Benjamin L.; Kao, Shih-Chieh; Bradbury, James

    2017-01-01

    This report describes a general approach for assessing climate change vulnerabilities of an electricity system and evaluating the costs and benefits of certain investments that would increase system resilience. It uses Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) as a case study, concentrating on the Cumberland River basin area on the northern side of the TVA region. The study focuses in particular on evaluating risks associated with extreme heat wave and drought conditions that could be expected to affect the region by mid-century. Extreme climate event scenarios were developed using a combination of dynamically downscaled output from the Community Earth System Model and historical heat wave and drought conditions in 1993 and 2007, respectively.

  11. Trophic classification of Tennessee Valley area reservoirs derived from LANDSAT multispectral scanner data. [Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and North Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinert, D. L.; Malone, D. L.; Voss, A. W. (Principal Investigator); Scarpace, F. L.

    1980-01-01

    LANDSAT MSS data from four different dates were extracted from computer tapes using a semiautomated digital data handling and analysis system. Reservoirs were extracted from the surrounding land matrix by using a Band 7 density level slice of 3; and descriptive statistics to include mean, variance, and ratio between bands for each of the four bands were calculated. Significant correlations ( 0.80) were identified between the MSS statistics and many trophic indicators from ground truth water quality data collected at 35 reservoirs in the greater Tennessee Valley region. Regression models were developed which gave significant estimates of each reservoir's trophic state as defined by its trophic state index and explained in all four LANDSAT frames at least 85 percent of the variability in the data. To illustrate the spatial variations within reservoirs as well as the relative variations between reservoirs, a table look up elliptical classification was used in conjunction with each reservoir's trophic state index to classify each reservoir on a pixel by pixel basis and produce color coded thematic representations.

  12. Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell, Kevin R.

    2011-05-01

    This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds

  13. Treponemal disease in the middle Archaic to early Woodland periods of the western Tennessee River Valley.

    PubMed

    Smith, Maria Ostendorf

    2006-10-01

    The high frequency of late prehistoric New World treponemal disease is attributable to the demographic changes concomitant with the adoption of agriculture. However, these demographic changes in group mobility and site density episodically preceded intensive plant domestication, suggesting possible staggered temporal change in observed treponemal disease case frequency. Thirteen convincing and an additional two probable (N = 581) cases of treponemal disease were identified in an eight-site skeletal sample spanning the Middle (6,000-3,000 BCE) to Late (2,500-ca. 1,000 to 500 BCE) Archaic and Early Woodland (500 BCE-0 CE) periods from the western Tennessee River Valley. Treponemal disease cases are infrequent in both the Middle (3/115, 2.6%) and Late (2 to 4 cases, Tennessee River Valley remained, as elsewhere, based on intensive hunting and collecting, the demographic corollaries of treponemal disease would apparently not be met. However, the traditional horizon marker of the Woodland period is the adoption of pottery, an activity associated with sedentism.

  14. Cost of electric-power interruptions to residences in the Tennessee Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmer, R W; Mack, R S

    1982-03-01

    This report assesses the cost of electric power outages to residential customers of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The assessment focuses primarily on costs associated with rationing electric power by means of rotating blackouts of 1 to 3 h, exercised several times per year and perhaps as often as once each month. The cost of these blackouts is assessed in terms of several measures of lost consumer's surplus and lost production within the home. Estimates are developed by season for the typical home, for homes in different parts of the Tennessee Valley, and for homes with different mixes of appliances. Estimates for a typical home in the TVA region vary from 20 cents to 50 cents per kilowatthour depending upon the season and the method of measurement used. These valuations for the TVA region are compared to cost estimates for the US as a whole. The implications of outages lasting longer than 3 h are considered, and costs sustained in such outages are outlined.

  15. Evaluation of the water quality in the releases from thirty dams in the Tennessee River Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Butkus, S.R.

    1990-09-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has routinely monitored dissolved oxygen (DO) and temperature from the tailwater releases of its dams since the 1950s. The original objective of this monitoring was to collect baseline information to support reaeration research and determine the relative impact of impoundments on the assimilative capacity of the river system. This monitoring has continued even though the original objective was satisfied. New purposes for this monitoring data have arisen in support of several programs, without new consideration of the monitoring strategy and sampling design. The primary purpose of this report is to compare the historical release data for 30 dams in the Tennessee Valley based on four different objectives: (1) comparison of seasonal patterns, (2) comparison of baseline conditions using descriptive statistics, (3) evaluation of monotonic trends, and (4) discussion of monitoring strategies that might be required to determine compliance with existing and proposed criteria. A secondary purpose of the report is to compile the existing database into tables and figures that would be useful for other investigators. 51 refs., 210 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Annual report of the Tennessee Valley Authority for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1983. Volume II. Appendixes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This is the Tennessee Valley Authority's 1983 annual report (Volume II). Contained within this report are appendixes including the financial statements, power contracts and a summary of litigation. Also contained within an appendix are statistical tables on fertilizer distribution, material distribution, power sales and TVA procurement sources.

  17. Integrated Regional Resources Management. A Syllabus for an International Training Course Based on the Experience of the Tennessee Valley Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville.

    This syllabus outlines a course of study in integrated regional resources management based on the experience of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The course has been developed for resource practitioners, in developing countries, who have responsibilities related to topics addressed in the course's 14 instructional modules. These topics are:…

  18. 75 FR 3945 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... different types of radiological impacts are expected as a result of the proposed exemption. The proposed... socioeconomic resources. Therefore, no changes to or different types of non-radiological environmental impacts... COMMISSION Tennessee Valley Authority; Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment and...

  19. Preliminary evaluation of ground-water flow in Bear Creek Valley, the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Z.C.

    1988-01-01

    Bear Creek Valley, Tennessee contains hazardous waste disposal sites where contaminants leach into ground and surface water. Groundwater flow and the potential migration of contaminants is poorly understood. The Valley is underlain by calcareous shale that contains limestone units. Ridges to the north and south are underlain by interbedded sandstones, siltstone and shale, and by massive, siliceous dolomite, respectively. The bedrock, which dips about 45 degrees southeast, is overlain by regolith to a maximum thickness of 80 ft. Observed hydraulic conductivities for the regolith range from 0.01 to 13 ft/day, and for the bedrock, from 0.001 to 11 ft/day. Groundwater flow is probably toward streams and is preferential along strike because of an areal anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity. A cross sectional groundwater flow model was used to test the conceptualized flow system and to help identify areas where additional data are needed. The preliminary model shows a pattern of recharge at both ridges, flow toward the valley, and upward flow that discharges into Bear Creek. Final model values of hydraulic conductivity in the bedrock range from 0.01 to 0.1 ft/day and reflect an areal anisotropy ratio of 1:5. Simulated recharge was 10 inches/year. (USGS)

  20. Final review of the Campbell Creek demonstrations showcased by Tennessee Valley Authority

    SciTech Connect

    Gehl, Anthony C.; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Boudreaux, Philip R.; Miller, William A.; New, Joshua Ryan; Khowailed, Giannate

    2015-06-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery and Utilization Office funded and managed a showcase demonstration located in the suburbs of west Knox county, Tennessee. Work started March 2008 with the goal of documenting best practices for retrofitting existing homes and for building new high-efficiency homes. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided technical support. An analytical base was developed for helping homeowners, homebuyers, builders, practitioners and the TVA make informed economic decisions for the materials and incentives necessary to build a new high-efficiency home or retrofit an existing home. New approaches to more efficiently control active energy subsystems and information for selecting or upgrading to Energy Star appliances, changing all lights to 100% CFL s and upgrading windows to low-E gas filled glazing yields a 40% energy savings with neutral cash flow for the homeowner. Passive designs were reviewed and recommendations made for envelope construction that is durable and energy efficient. The Campbell Creek project complements the DOE Building Technologies Program strategic goal. Results of the project created technologies and design approaches that will yield affordable energy efficient homes. The 2010 DOE retrofit goals are to find retrofit packages that attain 30% whole house energy savings as documented by pre and post Home Energy rating scores (HERS). Campbell Creek met these goals.

  1. Selenium speciation in coal ash spilled at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston site.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Chen, Tsan-Yao; Mackebee, William Greer; Ruhl, Laura; Vengosh, Avner; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2013-12-17

    Selenium (Se) in coal ash spills poses a threat to adjacent ecosystems because of its potential to mobilize and bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms. Given that the mobility and bioavailability of Se is controlled by its valence states, we aimed to define Se speciation in coal ash solids and examine the relationships between Se speciation and the magnitude of its mobilization from coal ash. We used coal ash samples from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)-Kingston fossil plant and the site of a coal ash spill that occurred in 2008 in Tennessee. Results of X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses showed that Se in coal ash samples was a mixture of elemental Se(0) and Se oxyanions. The amount of leachable Se increased with an increase of pH from 3 to 13. At the natural pH of coal ash samples (from pH 7.6 to 9.5), the leachable Se was comprised of Se oxyanions, mainly selenite. This was observed by both direct quantification of Se oxyanions in the leachate and the corresponding loss of Se oxyanions in the solid phase. At pH 12, however, the Se release appeared to derive from both desorption of Se oxyanions and oxidative dissolution of elemental Se(0). Our results indicate that Se oxyanions are the most labile species; however, the magnitude of Se mobilization will increase if the waste material is subjected to alkaline conditions.

  2. Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and maintain additional storage capacity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW). New capacity would be provided by a facility partitioned into six individual tank vaults containing one 100,000 gallon LLLW storage tank each. The storage tanks would be located within the existing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) facility. This action would require the extension of a potable water line approximately one mile from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) area to the proposed site to provide the necessary potable water for the facility including fire protection. Alternatives considered include no-action, cease generation, storage at other ORR storage facilities, source treatment, pretreatment, and storage at other DOE facilities.

  3. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the Tennessee Valley Authority (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-06-01

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the Tennessee Valley Authority provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  4. Evaluation of sinkhole occurrence in the Valley and Ridge Province, East Tennessee: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, J.G.; Tanner, J.M.

    1987-11-01

    Data from a reconnaissance-type inventory of sinkhole occurrence and from more detailed inventories in selected areas were used to determine regional density and frequency of sinkhole occurrence in the Valley and Ridge Province, Tennessee. The overall database consisted of 333 sinkholes of which 211, or 63 percent of the total, were classified as induced. Almost all induced sinkholes resulted from construction activities, such as grading, ditching, and impoundment of water. Extrapolation of data to provide estimates of regional sinkhole density necessitated adjustment of the reconnaissance inventory. Adjustment factors were calculated by comparing reconnaissance inventories from selected areas with those obtained from detailed inventories in the same areas. The number of sinkholes in the detailed inventories was 5 and 8.5 times greater than the number in the reconnaissance inventories.

  5. Results of a seepage investigation at Bear Creek Valley, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, January through September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.A.; Johnson, G.C.

    1996-12-31

    A seepage investigation was conducted of 4,600 acres of Bear Creek Valley southwest of the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for the period of January through September 1994. The data was collected to help the Y-12 Environmental Restoration Program develop a better understanding of ground-water and surface-water interactions, recharge and discharge relations, and ground-water flow patterns. The project was divided into three phases: a reconnaissance and mapping of seeps, springs, and stream-measurement sites; a high base flow seepage investigation; and a low base flow seepage investigation. This report describes the results of the investigation. It includes a map showing measurement site locations and tables that list the coordinates for each site and measurements of discharge, pH, specific conductance, temperature, and dissolved oxygen.

  6. Surface-geophysical investigations in Melton Valley, Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucci, Patrick

    1987-01-01

    Surface geophysical methods were found to be valuable for refining knowledge of the geohydrology of Melton Valley, an area used for burial of low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. The valley is characterized by locally complex geologic structures in lithologies of interbedded shale and limestone. Radionuclides have been transported away from the burial areas by groundwater along paths that are, in part, controlled by geologic structures and rock type. Direct current resistivity soundings were used to determine the depth to bedrock and to aid in the delineation of subsurface stratigraphy. Depth to bedrock, as indicated by an increase in resistivity in the interpreted geoelectric layering, was compared to auger-hole data at five sites, where bedrock depths ranged from 1 to 14 ft and were within 3 ft at four sites. The subsurface contact between shale and limestone was indicated by an increase in model calculated resistivity from < 100 to > 150 ohm-meters at four different sites. Terrain conductivity profiles were used to aid in mapping surficial geologic contacts between shale and limestone units. Terrain conductivity for shale at 33-ft coil separation was generally greater than 15 millimhos/m and ranged from about 10 to 40 millimhos/m. Conductivity for limestone was generally < 15 millimhos/m and ranged from 5 to 25 millimhos/m. Azimuthal conductivity surveys indicated that conductivity was generally greatest when the transmitter and receiver coils were oriented parallel to strike. This anisotropy in terrain conductivity shows the need to keep the coil orientation consistent throughout the length of a profile. (Author 's abstract)

  7. Down on the farm. An analysis of energy inputs in Tennessee Valley farms

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    There are 150,159 farms in the 170 power counties of TVA; the largest percentage are in the Central District (26.4%). The majority of the farm operators reside on the farm they operate (101,592 operators or 67.7%). Individual or family-owned farms represent the largest type of farm organization (134,111 farms or 89.3%). Over 71,000 farms use electricity in actual farm production; farm expenses for electricity totaled $37,040,000 in 1982. Approximately 18% of the energy requirements in the American food system is used for actual farm production, while 82% goes for processing, marketing, transporting, and preparing food for consumption. Field crop production in the Tennessee Valley expends the majority of the gasoline (91.4%) and diesel (85.8%) inputs in the farm system. Livestock production consumes the majority of the electricity (89.9%), L.P. gas (70.0%), fuel oil (97.2%), and liquid fuel (99.3%). Dairy cow production is the most energy-intensive production in livestock. It consumes 63.4% of the gasoline, 78.6% of the diesel, 40.5% of the L.P. gas, and 64.5% of the electricity inputs in livestock.

  8. Reservoir monitoring---1990: Bacteriological conditions in the Tennessee Valley. Second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Fehring, J.P.

    1991-05-01

    Twenty-three designated swimming beaches, two informal swimming areas, and four canoe launching sites were sampled at least ten times during a 30-day period in 1990. All 29 met the regulatory limits of a geometric mean of less than 200 colonies of fecal coliform bacteria per l00 milliliters (ml). However, four sites had one sample each with at least 1000 colonies per 100 ml, which is a violation of recreation criteria in two of the seven Tennessee Valley states. Forty-four nonrecreation sites were also sampled to provide generic bacteriological water quality data on several reservoirs and streams and to determine if the Georgia Mountain Fair was having an adverse impact on the bacteriological water quality of Chatuge Reservoir. No impact was observed. Thirty-three sites on 15 reservoirs were sampled, and all but three met recreation criteria. Eleven locations were sampled on three streams: Cotaco Creek near Huntsville, and Beaver and Bullrun Creeks near Knoxville. A comparison of 1990 sampling results at 16 sites with results from a 1974 survey was made.

  9. Regional inventory of karst activity in the Valley and Ridge Province, eastern Tennessee: Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, J.G.; Tanner, J.M.

    1987-09-01

    A data collection form was developed for use in compiling information in the inventory. Information sources included files on subsidence, state and county highway departments, county agents and executives, soil conservation service representative, etc. Data obtained included location, date of occurrence, number of subsidence features at the reported site, size, topographic setting, geologic setting, and probable causative factors. The regional inventory obtained information on over 300 historic subsidence events at more than 200 sites in East Tennessee. Areas having the greatest areal density of active subsidence include Hamblen, Jefferson, and Loudon Counties. Reported subsidence events occurred between 1945 and 1986. The Knox Group dolomites account for about two-thirds of all reported sinkholes in the inventory. Most of the karst activity occurs in valleys or flat areas. In cases where causative factors could be established, the combination of surface water drainage alteration or impoundment combined with soil disturbance associated with construction activity were most often precursors to subsidence. 54 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Ambient ammonia in terrestrial ecosystems: a comparative study in the Tennessee Valley, USA.

    PubMed

    Allen, Ridwaana; Myles, LaToya; Heuer, Mark W

    2011-06-15

    Atmospheric ammonia has been shown to degrade regional air quality and affect environmental health. In-situ measurements of ammonia are needed to determine how ambient concentrations vary in different ecosystems and the extent to which emission sources contribute to those levels. The objective of this study was to measure and compare ammonia concentrations in two Tennessee Valley (USA) ecosystems: a forested rural area and a metropolitan site adjacent to a main transportation route. Integrated samples of atmospheric ammonia were collected with annular denuder systems for ~4 weeks during the summer of 2009 in both ecosystems. Ancillary measurements of meteorological variables, such as wind direction and precipitation, were also conducted to determine any relationships with ammonia concentration. Measurements in the two ecosystems revealed ammonia concentrations that were mostly representative of background levels. Arithmetic means were 1.57±0.68 μg m(-3) at the metropolitan site and 1.60±0.77 μg m(-3) in the forest. The geometric mean concentrations for both sites were ~1.46 μg m(-3). Wind direction, and to a lesser extent air temperature and precipitation, did influence measured concentrations. At the metropolitan site, ammonia concentrations were slightly higher in winds emanating from the direction of the interstate highway. Meteorological variables, such as wind direction, and physical factors, such as topography, can affect measurement of ambient ammonia concentrations, especially in ecosystems distant from strong emission sources. The 12-h integrated sampling method used in this study was unable to measure frequent changes in ambient ammonia concentrations and illustrates the need for measurements with higher temporal resolution, at least ~1-2h, in a variety of diverse ecosystems to determine the behavior of atmospheric ammonia and its environmental effects.

  11. Selenium bioaccumulation in fish exposed to coal ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston spill site.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Teresa J; Fortner, Allison M; Jett, R Trent; Morris, Jesse; Gable, Jennifer; Peterson, Mark J; Carriker, Neil

    2014-10-01

    In December 2008, 4.1 million cubic meters of coal ash were released into the Emory and Clinch Rivers by the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant. Coal ash contains several contaminants, including the bioaccumulative metalloid selenium (Se). Because Se is predominantly accumulated in aquatic organisms through dietary rather than aqueous exposure, tissue-based toxicity thresholds for Se are currently being considered. The proposed threshold concentrations range between 4 μg/g and 9 μg/g Se (dry wt.) in whole body fish, with a proposed fillet threshold of 11.8 μg/g. In the present study, the authors examined the spatial and temporal trends in Se bioaccumulation and examined the relationship between the Se content in fillets and in whole bodies of fish collected around the Kingston spill site to determine whether Se bioaccumulation was a significant concern at the ash spill site. Whereas Se concentrations in fish (whole bodies and fillets) were elevated at sampling locations affected by the Kingston ash spill relative to reference locations, concentrations do not appear to be above risk thresholds and have not been increasing over the 5-yr period since the spill. These findings are not only relevant to guiding the human health and ecological risk assessments at the Kingston ash spill site, but because of current national discussions on appropriate guidelines for Se in fish as well for the disposal of coal combustion wastes, the results are also relevant to the general understanding of Se bioaccumulation in contaminated water bodies. © 2014 SETAC.

  12. Gaining, losing, and dry stream reaches at Bear Creek Valley, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, March and September 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, J.A.; Mitchell, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to delineate stream reaches that were gaining flow, losing flow, or that were dry in the upper reaches of Bear Creek Valley near the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The study included a review of maps and discharge data from a seepage investigation conducted at Bear Creek Valley; preparation of tables showing site identification and discharge and stream reaches that were gaining flow, losing flow, or that were dry; and preparation of maps showing measurement site locations and discharge measurements, and gaining, losing, and dry stream reaches. This report will aid in developing a better understanding of ground-water and surface-water interactions in the upper reaches of Bear Creek.

  13. Phase I Archaeological Survey of Parcel ED-3 and Historic Assessement of the Happy Valley Worker Camp Roane County, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    New South Associates

    2009-08-17

    Parcel ED-3 was the location of a portion of 'Happy Valley', a temporary worker housing area occupied from 1943 to 1947 during the construction of the K-25 Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The project was carried out under subcontract for the Department of Energy. The survey report will be used in the preparation of an Environmental Assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). New South Associates conducted a Phase I Archaeological Survey of Parcel ED-3 at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation in Roane County, Tennessee. The survey was conducted in two parts. The first survey was carried out in 2008 and covered an area measuring approximately 110 acres. The second survey took place in 2009 and focused on 72 acres west of the first survey area. The objective of the surveys was to identify any archaeological remains associated with Happy Valley and any additional sites on the property and to assess these sites for National Register eligibility. New South Associates also conducted a historic assessment to gather information on Happy Valley. This historic assessment was used in conjunction with the archaeological survey to evaluate the significance of the Happy Valley site. Archaeological remains of Happy Valley were located throughout the parcel, but no additional sites were located. The official state site number for Happy Valley is 40RE577. During the two surveys a total of 13 artifact concentrations, 14 isolated finds, and 75 structural features were located. Due to the Happy Valley's stron gassociation with the Manhattan Project, the site is recommended eligible for the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion A.

  14. Archaeological site stabilization in the Tennessee River Valley: Phase 3, Research Paper No. 7, Tennessee Valley Authority Publications in Anthropology No. 49

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    Destruction of archaeological properties within the Tennessee River system, particularly along its main stem, has been a problem almost since TVA was established. In an attempt to stop the loss of massive portions of our cultural resources, the TVA contracted in 1983 to establish a program of site stabilization using experimental techniques. This report is the first installation of observations on the site protection measures placed during 1983. This report also contains pertinent observations on preserved sites not within TVA holdings. 20 refs., 25 figs.

  15. Statistical and simulation analysis of hydraulic-conductivity data for Bear Creek and Melton Valleys, Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connell, J.F.; Bailey, Z.C.

    1989-01-01

    A total of 338 single-well aquifer tests from Bear Creek and Melton Valley, Tennessee were statistically grouped to estimate hydraulic conductivities for the geologic formations in the valleys. A cross-sectional simulation model linked to a regression model was used to further refine the statistical estimates for each of the formations and to improve understanding of ground-water flow in Bear Creek Valley. Median hydraulic-conductivity values were used as initial values in the model. Model-calculated estimates of hydraulic conductivity were generally lower than the statistical estimates. Simulations indicate that (1) the Pumpkin Valley Shale controls groundwater flow between Pine Ridge and Bear Creek; (2) all the recharge on Chestnut Ridge discharges to the Maynardville Limestone; (3) the formations having smaller hydraulic gradients may have a greater tendency for flow along strike; (4) local hydraulic conditions in the Maynardville Limestone cause inaccurate model-calculated estimates of hydraulic conductivity; and (5) the conductivity of deep bedrock neither affects the results of the model nor does it add information on the flow system. Improved model performance would require: (1) more water level data for the Copper Ridge Dolomite; (2) improved estimates of hydraulic conductivity in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and Maynardville Limestone; and (3) more water level data and aquifer tests in deep bedrock. (USGS)

  16. Site and canopy characteristics associated with oak advance reproduction in mature oak-hickory forests in the ridge and valley province in Tennessee

    Treesearch

    Leslie S. Chadwell; David S. Buckley

    2003-01-01

    To investigate hypotheses regarding effects of competitors and site quality on oak regeneration, we documented site factors and oak seedling composition, size, and abundance in the Ridge and Valley Province of Tennessee. Small oak seedlings were most abundant on productive soils and mesic landform positions, whereas large oak seedlings were most abundant on less...

  17. Anthropic signatures in alluvium of the Upper Little Tennessee River valley, Southern Blue Ridge Mountains, USA

    Treesearch

    Lixin Wang; David S. Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Human activities have become important influences on the fluvial systems of eastern North America since post-colonial settlement. This research identifies post-settlement anthropic signatures in alluvial sediments in the Upper Little Tennessee River, USA. Agricultural and mining activities were scattered and discontinuous in this relatively remote region of...

  18. Results of a seepage investigation at Bear Creek Valley, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, January through September 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, J.A.; Johnson, G.C.

    1996-01-01

    A seepage investigation was conducted of 4,600 acres of Bear Creek Valley southwest of the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for the period of January through September 1994. The data were collected to help the Y-12 Environmental Restoration Program develop a better understanding of ground-water and surface-water interactions, recharge and discharge relations, and ground-water flow patterns. The project was divided into three phases: a reconnaissance and mapping of seeps, springs, and stream-measurment sites; a high base flow seepage investigation; and a low base flow seepage investigation. The reconnaissance was conducted from January 6 to March 1, 1994, to identify and map the locations of seeps, springs, and stream-measurement sites. A total of 701 sites were identified. They consisted of 382 stream- measurement sites, 265 seeps, 48 springs, and 6 wetlands. A global positioning system was used to locate 680 sites to within 3- to 5-meter accuracy. The high base flow seepage investigation was conducted from March 14 through March 19, 1994. Measurements were made at 579 of the 701 sites identified in the reconnaissance that still had flowing water. Flow rates ranged from less than 0.005 to 6.89 cubic feet per second for the streams, from less than 0.005 to 0.13 cubic foot per second for the seeps, and from less than 0.005 to 1 cubic foot per second for the springs. pH ranged from 5.0 to 8.4 for the streams, from 5.1 to 8.2 for the seeps, from 5.3 to 8.0 for the springs, and from 6.7 to 6.8 for the wetland sites. Specific conductance ranged from 16 to 1,670 microsiemens per centimeter for the streams, from 17 to 1,710 microsiemens per centimeter for the seeps, from 14 to 1,150 microsiemens per centimeter for the springs, and from 102 to 160 microsiemens per centimeter for the wetland sites. Temperature ranged from 4.5 to 16.0 degrees Celsius for the streams, from 5.0 to 21.0 degrees Celsius for the seeps, from 6.0 to 13.5 degrees Celsius for the springs, and from 13

  19. Relating fish health and reproductive metrics to contaminant bioaccumulation at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston coal ash spill site.

    PubMed

    Pracheil, Brenda M; Marshall Adams, S; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Fortner, Allison M; Greeley, Mark S; Murphy, Cheryl A; Mathews, Teresa J; Peterson, Mark J

    2016-08-01

    A 4.1 million m(3) coal ash release into the Emory and Clinch rivers in December 2008 at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Kingston Fossil Plant in east Tennessee, USA, prompted a long-term, large-scale biological monitoring effort to determine if there are chronic effects of this spill on resident biota. Because of the magnitude of the ash spill and the potential for exposure to coal ash-associated contaminants [e.g., selenium (Se), arsenic (As), and mercury (Hg)] which are bioaccumulative and may present human and ecological risks, an integrative, bioindicator approach was used. Three species of fish were monitored-bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), redear sunfish (L. microlophus), and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)-at ash-affected and reference sites annually for 5 years following the spill. On the same individual fish, contaminant burdens were measured in various tissues, blood chemistry parameters as metrics of fish health, and various condition and reproduction indices. A multivariate statistical approach was then used to evaluate relationships between contaminant bioaccumulation and fish metrics to assess the chronic, sub-lethal effects of exposure to the complex mixture of coal ash-associated contaminants at and around the ash spill site. This study suggests that while fish tissue concentrations of some ash-associated contaminants are elevated at the spill site, there was no consistent evidence of compromised fish health linked with the spill. Further, although relationships between elevated fillet burdens of ash-associated contaminants and some fish metrics were found, these relationships were not indicative of exposure to coal ash or spill sites. The present study adds to the weight of evidence from prior studies suggesting that fish populations have not incurred significant biological effects from spilled ash at this site: findings that are relevant to the current national discussions on the safe disposal of coal ash waste.

  20. Soil sampling and analysis plan for the Bear Creek Valley Floodplain at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Floodplain presents the approach and rationale for characterizing potentially contaminated soils and sediments of the Bear Creek floodplain and the impact of any contaminants on the floodplain ecosystem. In addition to this SAP, the Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Bear Creek (Y02-S600) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ES/ER-19&D2) presents background information pertaining to this floodplain investigation.

  1. Stable isotopic evidence for fluid flow and fluid/rock interaction during thrust faulting in Pumpkin Valley shale and Rome Formation, east Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, B.K.; Haase, C.S. )

    1989-08-01

    The Pumpkin Valley Shale and the underlying Rome Formation form the lower portions of the Copper Creek and White Oak Mountain thrust sheets in east Tennessee. The Pumpkin Valley Shale consists of shale and mudstone with subordinate amounts of interbedded siltstone. The Rome Formation is composed predominantly of sandstone with interbedded shale and siltstone toward the base of the formation. The percentage of illite increases from 20% to over 80% of the bulk clay mineralogy toward the base of the section. Porosity is occluded by quartz, phyllosilicate, and calcite cements. Both formations contain calcite-filled and, less commonly, quartz-filled Alleghenian fractures and joints.

  2. Reconnaissance of surficial geology, regolith thickness, and configuration of the bedrock surface in Bear Creek and Union Valleys, near Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoos, A.B.; Bailey, Z.C.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary interpretation of the lithology, thickness of regolith, and configuration of the bedrock surface underlying Bear Creek and Union Valleys near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was made based on geologic and geophysical data from boreholes and cores in Bear Creek Valley and on related work of other investigators. Analysis of drillers ' logs and lithologic logs and comparison of these data with a topographic map indicated that topography and depth of weathering are interdependent and are ultimately controlled by lithology. Topographic patterns were, therefore, used to extend localized geologic data to a larger scale. Maps of the surficial geology, thickness of regolith, and configuration of the bedrock surface are presented. (Author 's abstract)

  3. Chronostratigraphic and paleoclimatic data for Quaternary loessial and fluvial deposits in the Mississippi River Valley of Arkansas and Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Markewich, H.W. ); Millard, H.T. Jr. ); Pavich, M.J. ); Rodbell, D.T. ); Rich, F.J. ); Rutledge, E.M. ); Ward, L. . Soil Conservation Service); Van Valkenberg, S. ); Wysocki, D. . Soil Conservation Service)

    1992-01-01

    Ongoing investigations into Quaternary paleoclimates of the Mississippi River Valley in eastern Arkansas and western Tennessee include age estimations using [sup 14]C, [sup 10]Be, thermoluminescent (TL), and optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) analyses; compositional studies using petrographic and diffractometer analyses; pedological analyses with complete characterization studies; and magnetic susceptibility measurements with laboratory analyses to investigate the source of the magnetism. Preliminary data on composition of the < 63-micron fraction, thickness, and age of the loesses and associated paleosols are available from selected stratigraphic sections that are being described and sampled in detail. These data suggest the following: (1) overall thickness of loess, as well as thickness of each loess sheet, decreases by one-half to two-thirds within the 96-km distance from the south end of Crowleys Ridge near Helena, AR northward to Forest City, AR and Memphis, TN; (2) near Helena, loess thicknesses are 25 to 30 m, 7 m, 6 m, and 6 m for the Peoria, Roxana, Loveland, and Crowleys Ridge respectively; (3) the depth of weathering in the Peoria ranges from 4.5 to 8.5 m near Helena, depending on slope position; (4) at the south end of Crowleys Ridge, near Helena, the Roxana has two associated paleosols and an intervening layer of weathered parent material; (5) isotopic data suggest that (a) loess deposition took place between 4,500 ka and 10 ka and that (b) each younger disconformity represents less time than the one before; (6) the predominantly illite and illite/smectite mineralogy of the paleosols, even that of the Sangamon soil, suggests minimal weathering of labile loessial minerals prior to pedogenic development; (7) pollen data indicate that by 10 ka this part of the valley had vegetation indicative of a cool temperate climate, with minimal cypress and no boreal components.

  4. Radon and radon progeny in 70 houses in the Tennessee Valley area: study design and measurement methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, C.S.; Hawthorne, A.R.; Monar, K.P.; Quillen, J.L.; Clark, C. Jr.; Doane, R.W.; Wallace, R.G.; Reed, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Levels of radon and its short-lived airborne progeny are being measured in a year-long study of 70 houses in four states in the Tennessee Valley. Various methods were used to solicit volunteers with differing degrees of success. Criteria for selection of houses in the study included presence of a lower level with cement floor and one or more block walls in contact with the soil, absence of obvious indications of technologically enhanced sources of radium, and proximity to one of four cities (Knoxville, Chattanooga, Birmingham, or Florence). By design, most houses in the study are in the same neighborhood as at least one other house in the study. Houses range in age from newly constructed to about 40 years old. Most of the houses have more than 2000 square feet of finished floor space. The lower level encompasses a garage in most cases. More complete information pertaining to house characteristics will be gathered in the course of the study. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Tennessee Valley Authority atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor simulation interim annual report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, J.W.; Krishnan, R.P.

    1980-10-01

    This report contains a detailed description of the work performed during 1979 for the Tennessee Valley Authority in support of the TVA Fluidized-Bed Combustor (FBC) Demonstration Plant Program. The work was carried out under task 4, modeling and simulation of atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) systems. The overall objective of this task is to develop a steady-state mathematical model with the capability of predicting trends in bed performance under various feed and operating conditions. As part of this effort, three predictive subprograms (subcodes) were developed during 1979: (1) bubble-growth subcode, (2) sorbent-coal ash elutriation and attrition subcode, and (3) coal combustion subcode. These codes, which are currently being tested with experimental data, are capable of predicting how some of the important operating variables in the AFBC affect its performance. After testing against field data, these subcodes will be incorporated into an overall AFBC system code, which was developed earlier at ORNL for analysis of the Department of Energy (DOE) Component Test and Integration Unit (CTIU) at Morgantown, West Virginia. In addition to these predictive subcodes, the overall system code previously developed for the CTIU is described. The material balance is closed, based on vendor-supplied data. This balance is then used to predict the heat transfer characteristics of the surfaces (submerged and freeboard) in the AFBC. Existing correlations for heat transfer in AFBC are used in the code along with thermophysical properties of the various streams.

  6. Regression models of ecological streamflow characteristics in the Cumberland and Tennessee River Valleys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, Rodney R.; Gain, W. Scott; Wolfe, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Predictive equations were developed using stepbackward regression for 19 ecologically relevant streamflow characteristics grouped in five major classes (magnitude, ratio, frequency, variability, and date) for use in the Tennessee and Cumberland River watersheds. Basin characteristics explain 50 percent or more of the variation for 10 of the 19 equations. Independent variables identified through stepbackward regression were statistically significant in 81 of 304 coefficients tested across 19 models (⬚ < 0.0001) and represent four major groups: climate, physical landscape features, regional indicators, and land use. The most influential variables for determining hydrologic response were in the land-use and climate groups: daily temperature range, percent agricultural land use, and monthly mean precipitation. These three variables were major explanatory factors in 17, 15, and 13 models, respectively. The equations and independent datasets were used to explore the broad relation between basin properties and streamflow and its implications for the study of ecological flow requirements. Key results include a high degree of hydrologic variability among least disturbed Blue Ridge streams, similar hydrologic behavior for watersheds with widely varying degrees of forest cover, and distinct hydrologic profiles for streams in different geographic regions.

  7. Hydrology of the Melton Valley radioactive-waste burial grounds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, D.A.; Bradley, Michael W.

    1988-01-01

    Burial grounds 4, 5, and 6 of the Melton Valley Radioactive-waste Burial Grounds, Oak Ridge, TN, were used sequentially from 1951 to the present for the disposal of solid, low level radioactive waste by burial in shallow trenches and auger holes. Abundant rainfall, a generally thin unsaturated zone, geologic media of inherently low permeability, and the operational practices employed have contributed to partial saturation of the buried waste, leaching of radionuclides, and transport of dissolved matter from the burial areas. Two primary methods of movement of wastes from these sites are transport in groundwater, and the overflow of fluid in trenches and subsequent flow across land surface. Whiteoak Creek and its tributaries receive all overland flow from trench spillage, surface runoff from each site, and discharge of groundwater from the regolith of each site. Potentiometric data, locally, indicate that this drainage system also receives groundwater discharges from the bedrock of burial ground 5. By projection of the bedrock flow patterns characteristic of this site to other areas of Melton Valley, it is inferred that discharges from the bedrock underlying burial grounds 4 and 6 also is to the Whiteoak Creek drainage system. The differences in potentiometric heads and a comparatively thin saturated zone in bedrock do not favor the development of deep flow through bedrock from one river system to another. (USGS)

  8. Landslides triggered by earthquakes in the central Mississippi Valley, Tennessee and Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jibson, Randall W.; Keefer, David K.

    1988-01-01

    We mapped 221 large (more than 200 ft across) landslides of three morphologically distinct types on the bluffs bordering the Mississippi alluvial plain in western Tennessee and Kentucky Old coherent slides (146 landslides, or 66 percent of the total) include translational block slides and single and multiple-block rotational slumps, all of which are covered by mature vegetation and have eroded features; no active analogs exist in the area. Earth flows (51 landslides, or 23 percent of the total) are also largely revegetated and eroded, though a few active earth flows are present on bluffs that have been cleared of vegetation. Young rotational slumps (24 landslides, or 11 percent of the total) form solely along actively eroding near-river bluffs and are the only active or recently active landslides in the area. Two investigations conducted around 1900 indicate that the old coherent slides, in at least part of the area, formed during the 1811-12 earthquakes. The present investigation uses dendrochronology, geomorphology, historic topographic maps, local historical accounts, and comparisons with landslides triggered by other earthquakes to show that most or all of the old coherent slides and earth flows formed during the 1811-12 New Madrid earthquakes. Evidence clearly indicates that the only large, aseismic landslide activity in the area results from fluvial undercutting of near-river bluffs. This erosion of the base of the bluffs triggers slumps that are morphologically distinct from the old slumps on bluffs away from the river. Our conclusions are consistent with the findings of other recent investigations of the same landslides that indicate extensive seismic triggering of coherent slides and earth flows during the 1811-12 New Madrid earthquakes.

  9. Well construction, lithology, and geophysical logs for boreholes in Bear Creek Valley near Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Z.C.; Hanchar, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-four wells were constructed at nine sites at Bear Creek Valley to provide geologic and hydrologic information. Lithologic samples and suits of geophysical logs were obtained from the deepest boreholes at six of the sites. Two of these boreholes at the base of Chestnut Ridge were completed in the Maynardville Limestone and two were completed in the Nolichucky Shale. Two boreholes along Pine Ridge were completed in the Rome Formation. Zones of similar lithology within a borehole were delineated from rock cutting refined by examination of geophysical logs. The contact between the Maynardville Limestone and Nolichucky Shale was identified in two of the boreholes. Fractures and cavities were readily identifiable on the acoustic-televiewer and caliper logs. Distinct water-bearing intervals were also identified from the temperature, fluid resistance, and resistivity logs. Depths at which the drilling encounterd a thrust were identified in two boreholes in the Rome Formation from both rock cutting and geophysical logs. (USGS)

  10. Monitoring and evaluation of aquatic resource health and use suitability in Tennessee Valley Authority reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

    1993-06-01

    TVA initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program in 1990 with two objectives -- to evaluate the health of the reservoir ecosystem and to examine how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act. In 1990 reservoir health was evaluated subjectively using a weight-of-evidence approach (a reservoir was deemed healthy if most of the physical, chemical, and biological monitoring components appeared healthy). In the second year (1991) a more objective, quantitative approach was developed using information on five important indicators of reservoir health -- dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, sediment quality, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fishes. The most recent information (1992) was evaluated with the same basic approach, modified to incorporate improvements based on comments from reviewers and additional data. Reservoirs were stratified into two groups for evaluation: run-of-the-river reservoirs and tributary storage reservoirs. Key locations are sampled in each reservoir (forebay, transition zone or midreservoir, inflow, and major embayments) for most or all of these five reservoir health indicators. For each indicator (or metric), scoring criteria have been developed that assign a score ranging from 1 to 5 representing poor to good conditions, respectively. Scores for the metrics at a location are summed and then the sums for all locations are totaled. Each reservoir has one to four sample locations depending on reservoir characteristics. The resultant total is divided by the maximum possible score (all metrics good at all locations) for the reservoir. Thus, the possible range of scores is from 20 percent (all metrics poor) to 100 percent (all metrics good). This reservoir ecological health evaluation method is proving to be a valuable tool for providing the public with information about the condition of the Valley`s reservoirs, for allowing meaningful comparisons among reservoirs, and for tracking changes in reservoir health with time.

  11. Ground-water flow in Melton Valley, Oak Ridge reservation, Roane County, Tennessee; preliminary model analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucci, Patrick

    1986-01-01

    Shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste has been practiced since 1951 in Melton Valley. Groundwater flow modeling was used to better understand the geohydrology of the valley, and to provide a foundation for future contaminant transport modeling. The three-dimensional, finite difference model simulates the aquifer as a two layer system that represents the regolith and bedrock. Transmissivities, which were adjusted during model calibration, range from 8 to 16 sq ft/day for the regolith, and from 0.2 to 1.5 sq ft/day for bedrock. An anisotropy ratio of 1:3 for strike-normal to strike-parallel transmissivity values, in conjunction with recharge rate = 6% of precipitation that is uniformly distributed over the model area, produces the best match between simulated and observed water levels. Simulated water levels generally compare well to observed or estimated 1978 groundwater conditions. Simulated water levels for the regolith for 39 of 69 comparison points are within +/- 10 ft of average 1978 levels. Simulated vertical flow components are in the observed direction for 9 of 11 comparison points. Preliminary simulations indicate that nearly all groundwater flow is within the regolith and discharges to either the Clinch River or the White Oak Creek-Melton Branch drainage systems. Less than 3% of the flow is between the regolith and bedrock, and < 1% of total groundwater flow discharges to the Clinch River through bedrock. Additional data needed to refine and further calibrate the model, include: (1) quantity and areal distribution of recharge; (2) water levels in the regolith near the model boundaries and beyond the Clinch River; (3) water levels and aquifer characteristics for bedrock; and (4) additional surface water data. (Author 's abstract)

  12. Water quality of springs in the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province in the upper Tennessee River basin, 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Gregory C.

    2002-01-01

    In the fall of 1997, 35 springs in the carbonate rocks of the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province of the upper Tennessee River Basin were sampled for nutrients, fecal-indicator bacteria, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. About half of the randomly selected springs were used as untreated domestic drinking-water supplies, either by direct pumpage from the spring or as roadside filling sites. Nutrient concentrations generally were less than 2 milligrams per liter. Nitrate, the most frequently detected nutrient, ranged from 0.091 to 2.17 milligrams per liter, with a median concentration of 1.16 milligrams per liter. Fecal-indicator bacteria were detected at all springs, with total coliform ranging from 10 to 1,900 colonies per 100 milliliters and Escherichia coli ranging from less than 1 to 660 colonies per 100 milliliters. Concentrations of bacteria at all springs sampled exceeded bacteriological drinking-water standards for public water supplies. Eight pesticides or degradation byproducts, all below U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water maximum contaminant levels, were detected in samples from 24 of the 35 springs. The most frequently detected pesticide was atrazine and its degradation byproduct, deethylatrazine, which were found in water samples from 57 and 54 percent of the springs, respectively. Some pesticides were detected more frequently in water samples from the springs than in ground-water samples from wells in similar NAWQA studies nationwide. Concentrations of VOCs in the springs also were below maximum contaminant levels. The most frequently detected VOCs were chloroform (20 springs), methyl chloride (18 springs), styrene (12 springs), and tetrachloroethene (11 springs). These detection frequencies of VOCs are consistent with the national NAWQA results when comparing wells and springs in a mixture of urban and rural land uses.

  13. Relating fish health and reproductive metrics to contaminant bioaccumulation at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston coal ash spill site

    DOE PAGES

    Pracheil, Brenda M.; Marshall Adams, S.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; ...

    2016-05-06

    A 4.1 million m3 release of coal ash into the Emory and Clinch rivers in December 2008 at Tennessee Valley Authority s Kingston Fossil Plant has prompted a long-term, large-scale biological monitoring effort to determine if there are chronic effects of this spill on biota. Of concern in this spill were arsenic (As) and selenium (Se), heavy metal constituents of coal ash that can be toxic to fish and wildlife and also mercury (Hg): a legacy contaminant that can interact with Se in organisms. We used fish filet bioaccumulation data from Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, Redear Lepomis microlophus, Largemouth Bass Micropterusmore » salmoides and Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus and metrics of fish health including fish condition indices, blood chemistry parameters and liver histopathology data collected from 2009-2013 to determine whether tissue heavy metal burdens relate 1) to each other 2) to metrics of fish health (e.g., blood chemistry characteristics and liver histopathology) and condition, and 3) whether relationships between fish health characteristics and heavy metals are related to site and ash-exposure. We found that burdens of Se and As are generally related to each other between tissues, but burdens of Hg between tissues are not generally positively associated. Taking analyses together, there appears to be reductions in growth and sublethal liver and kidney dysfunction in Bluegill and Largemouth Bass as indicated by blood chemistry parameters (elevated blood protein, glucose, phosphorous, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine in ash-affected sites) and related to concentrations of As and Se. Seeing sub-lethal effects in these species of fish is interesting because Redear had the highest filet burdens of Se, but did not have biomarkers indicating disease or dysfunction. We conclude our study by highlighting the complexities inherent in multimetric fish health data and the need for continued monitoring to further untangle contaminant and fish health

  14. Relating fish health and reproductive metrics to contaminant bioaccumulation at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston coal ash spill site

    SciTech Connect

    Pracheil, Brenda M.; Marshall Adams, S.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Fortner, Allison M.; Greeley, Mark S.; Murphy, Cheryl A.; Mathews, Teresa J.; Peterson, Mark J.

    2016-05-06

    A 4.1 million m3 release of coal ash into the Emory and Clinch rivers in December 2008 at Tennessee Valley Authority s Kingston Fossil Plant has prompted a long-term, large-scale biological monitoring effort to determine if there are chronic effects of this spill on biota. Of concern in this spill were arsenic (As) and selenium (Se), heavy metal constituents of coal ash that can be toxic to fish and wildlife and also mercury (Hg): a legacy contaminant that can interact with Se in organisms. We used fish filet bioaccumulation data from Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, Redear Lepomis microlophus, Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides and Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus and metrics of fish health including fish condition indices, blood chemistry parameters and liver histopathology data collected from 2009-2013 to determine whether tissue heavy metal burdens relate 1) to each other 2) to metrics of fish health (e.g., blood chemistry characteristics and liver histopathology) and condition, and 3) whether relationships between fish health characteristics and heavy metals are related to site and ash-exposure. We found that burdens of Se and As are generally related to each other between tissues, but burdens of Hg between tissues are not generally positively associated. Taking analyses together, there appears to be reductions in growth and sublethal liver and kidney dysfunction in Bluegill and Largemouth Bass as indicated by blood chemistry parameters (elevated blood protein, glucose, phosphorous, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine in ash-affected sites) and related to concentrations of As and Se. Seeing sub-lethal effects in these species of fish is interesting because Redear had the highest filet burdens of Se, but did not have biomarkers indicating disease or dysfunction. We conclude our study by highlighting the complexities inherent in multimetric fish health data and the need for continued monitoring to further untangle contaminant and fish health

  15. Relating fish health and reproductive metrics to contaminant bioaccumulation at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston coal ash spill site

    SciTech Connect

    Pracheil, Brenda M.; Marshall Adams, S.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Fortner, Allison M.; Greeley, Mark S.; Murphy, Cheryl A.; Mathews, Teresa J.; Peterson, Mark J.

    2016-05-06

    A 4.1 million m3 release of coal ash into the Emory and Clinch rivers in December 2008 at Tennessee Valley Authority s Kingston Fossil Plant has prompted a long-term, large-scale biological monitoring effort to determine if there are chronic effects of this spill on biota. Of concern in this spill were arsenic (As) and selenium (Se), heavy metal constituents of coal ash that can be toxic to fish and wildlife and also mercury (Hg): a legacy contaminant that can interact with Se in organisms. We used fish filet bioaccumulation data from Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, Redear Lepomis microlophus, Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides and Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus and metrics of fish health including fish condition indices, blood chemistry parameters and liver histopathology data collected from 2009-2013 to determine whether tissue heavy metal burdens relate 1) to each other 2) to metrics of fish health (e.g., blood chemistry characteristics and liver histopathology) and condition, and 3) whether relationships between fish health characteristics and heavy metals are related to site and ash-exposure. We found that burdens of Se and As are generally related to each other between tissues, but burdens of Hg between tissues are not generally positively associated. Taking analyses together, there appears to be reductions in growth and sublethal liver and kidney dysfunction in Bluegill and Largemouth Bass as indicated by blood chemistry parameters (elevated blood protein, glucose, phosphorous, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine in ash-affected sites) and related to concentrations of As and Se. Seeing sub-lethal effects in these species of fish is interesting because Redear had the highest filet burdens of Se, but did not have biomarkers indicating disease or dysfunction. We conclude our study by highlighting the complexities inherent in multimetric fish health data and the need for continued monitoring to further untangle contaminant and fish health

  16. Spatial and temporal trends in contaminant concentrations in Hexagenia nymphs following a coal ash spill at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Kingston Fossil Plant

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Tyler F; Jett, Robert Trent; Smith, John G.; ...

    2016-02-25

    A dike failure at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee, United States, in December 2008, released approximately 4.1 million m3 of coal ash into the Emory River. From 2009 through 2012, samples of mayfly nymphs (Hexagenia bilineata) were collected each spring from sites in the Emory, Clinch, and Tennessee Rivers upstream and downstream of the spill. Samples were analyzed for 17 metals. Concentrations of metals were generally highest the first 2 miles downstream of the spill, and then decreased with increasing distance from the spill. Arsenic, B, Ba, Be, Mo, Sb, Se, Sr, and V appearedmore » to have strong ash signatures, whereas Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb appeared to be associated with ash and other sources. Furthermore, the concentrations for most of these contaminants were modest and are unlikely to cause widespread negative ecological effects. Trends in Hg, Cd, and Zn suggested little (Hg) or no (Cd, Zn) association with ash. Temporal trends suggested that concentrations of ash-related contaminants began to subside after 2010, but because of the limited time period of that analysis (4 yr), further monitoring is needed to verify this trend. The present study provides important information on the magnitude of contaminant exposure to aquatic receptors from a major coal ash spill, as well as spatial and temporal trends for transport of the associated contaminants in a large open watershed. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1159 1171. Published 2015 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.« less

  17. Spatial and temporal trends in contaminant concentrations in Hexagenia nymphs following a coal ash spill at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Kingston Fossil Plant.

    PubMed

    Smith, John G; Baker, Tyler F; Murphy, Cheryl A; Jett, R Trent

    2016-05-01

    A dike failure at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee, United States, in December 2008, released approximately 4.1 million m(3) of coal ash into the Emory River. From 2009 through 2012, samples of mayfly nymphs (Hexagenia bilineata) were collected each spring from sites in the Emory, Clinch, and Tennessee Rivers upstream and downstream of the spill. Samples were analyzed for 17 metals. Concentrations of metals were generally highest the first 2 miles downstream of the spill, and then decreased with increasing distance from the spill. Arsenic, B, Ba, Be, Mo, Sb, Se, Sr, and V appeared to have strong ash signatures, whereas Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb appeared to be associated with ash and other sources. However, the concentrations for most of these contaminants were modest and are unlikely to cause widespread negative ecological effects. Trends in Hg, Cd, and Zn suggested little (Hg) or no (Cd, Zn) association with ash. Temporal trends suggested that concentrations of ash-related contaminants began to subside after 2010, but because of the limited time period of that analysis (4 yr), further monitoring is needed to verify this trend. The present study provides important information on the magnitude of contaminant exposure to aquatic receptors from a major coal ash spill, as well as spatial and temporal trends for transport of the associated contaminants in a large open watershed. Published 2015 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  18. Spatial and temporal trends in contaminant concentrations in Hexagenia nymphs following a coal ash spill at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Kingston Fossil Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Tyler F; Jett, Robert Trent; Smith, John G.; Murphy, Cheryl A.

    2016-02-25

    A dike failure at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee, United States, in December 2008, released approximately 4.1 million m3 of coal ash into the Emory River. From 2009 through 2012, samples of mayfly nymphs (Hexagenia bilineata) were collected each spring from sites in the Emory, Clinch, and Tennessee Rivers upstream and downstream of the spill. Samples were analyzed for 17 metals. Concentrations of metals were generally highest the first 2 miles downstream of the spill, and then decreased with increasing distance from the spill. Arsenic, B, Ba, Be, Mo, Sb, Se, Sr, and V appeared to have strong ash signatures, whereas Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb appeared to be associated with ash and other sources. Furthermore, the concentrations for most of these contaminants were modest and are unlikely to cause widespread negative ecological effects. Trends in Hg, Cd, and Zn suggested little (Hg) or no (Cd, Zn) association with ash. Temporal trends suggested that concentrations of ash-related contaminants began to subside after 2010, but because of the limited time period of that analysis (4 yr), further monitoring is needed to verify this trend. The present study provides important information on the magnitude of contaminant exposure to aquatic receptors from a major coal ash spill, as well as spatial and temporal trends for transport of the associated contaminants in a large open watershed. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1159 1171. Published 2015 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  19. Impact assessment of dredging to remove coal fly ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil plant using fathead minnow elutriate exposures.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Jacob K; Kennedy, Alan J; Bednar, Anthony J; Chappell, Mark A; Seiter, Jennifer M; Averett, Daniel E; Steevens, Jeffery A

    2013-04-01

    On December 22, 2008, failure of an earthen containment structure resulted in the release of approximately 4.1 million m(3) of coal fly ash into the Emory River and the surrounding area from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant near Kingston, Tennessee, USA. The purpose of the present study was to assess the potential of dredging activities performed to remove the fly ash from the river to result in increased risk to pelagic fish, with special consideration of mobilization of metals. Elutriates were created using two sources of fly ash by bubbling with air over 10 d. This elutriate preparation method was designed to represent worst-case conditions for oxidation, metal release, and dissolution. Larval and juvenile Pimephales promelas underwent 10-d exposures to these elutriates. Larval end points included survival and biomass, and juvenile end points included survival, length, biomass, liver somatic index, and bioaccumulation. No significant toxicity was observed. Bioaccumulation of metals in juveniles was found to be primarily attributable to metals associated with particles in the gut. Results suggest little potential for toxicity to related fish species due to fly ash removal dredging activities given the extreme conditions represented by the elutriates in the present study.

  20. Impacts of nuclear plant shutdown on coal-fired power generation and infant health in the Tennessee Valley in the 1980s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severnini, Edson

    2017-04-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011 generated deep public anxiety and uncertainty about the future of nuclear energy. However, differently to fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants produce virtually no greenhouse gas emissions or air pollutants during power generation. Here we show the effect on air pollution and infant health in the context of the temporary closure of nuclear plants by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in the 1980s. After the Three Mile Island accident in 1979, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission intensified inspections throughout the nation, leading to the shutdown of two large nuclear power plants in the TVA area. In response to that shutdown, electricity generation shifted one to one to coal-fired power plants within TVA, increasing particle pollution in counties where they were located. Consequently, infant health may have deteriorated in the most affected places, indicating deleterious effects to public health.

  1. Safety Evaluation Report for the Tennessee Valley Authority's Plan to Decommission its Low-Level Radioactive Waste Burial Site at Muscle Shoals, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Gant, K.S.; Kettelle, R.H.

    1998-11-01

    From 1966 to 1981, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) operated a burial site, licensed under the former 10 CFR 20.304, for low-level radioactive waste on its Muscle Shoals, Alabama, reservation. TVA submitted a decommissioning plan for the burial site and requested approval for unrestricted use of the site. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate this plan to determine if the site meets the radiological requirements for unrestricted use as specified in 10 CFR 20.1402; that is, an average member of the critical group would not receive more than 25 mrem/y from residual radioactivity at the TVA Low-Level Radioactive Waste Burial Site and the radioactivity has been reduced to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

  2. Bioaccumulation of metals in three freshwater mussel species exposed in situ during and after dredging at a coal ash spill site (Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant).

    PubMed

    Otter, Ryan R; McKinney, David; Brown, Bobby; Lainer, Susan; Monroe, William; Hubbs, Don; Read, Bob

    2015-06-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing coal fly ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant (TN, USA) failed, and within months, dredging operations began to remove ash-contaminated sediments. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in the bioaccumulation of metals in three mussel species during and after dredging operations. Mussels were caged for approximately 1 year during dredging and after, and then mussel condition index values and As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Ni, Se, Hg, U, Fe, Mg, Al, Sb, Ba, Be, Co, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ag, Sr, Tl, V, and Zn concentrations in soft tissue were determined via inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometery. Overall, the differences observed in metal bioaccumulation and mussel health suggest that mussels in the immediate downstream area of the dredging site may have been impacted, as evidenced by a significant decrease in mussel condition index values, but that this impact did not result in increased tissue concentrations of metals.

  3. Environmental impacts of the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston coal ash spill. 2. Effect of coal ash on methylmercury in historically contaminated river sediments.

    PubMed

    Deonarine, Amrika; Bartov, Gideon; Johnson, Thomas M; Ruhl, Laura; Vengosh, Avner; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2013-02-19

    The Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston coal ash spill in December 2008 deposited approximately 4.1 million m(3) of fly ash and bottom ash into the Emory and Clinch River system (Harriman, Tennessee, U.S.A.). The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of the ash on surface water and sediment quality over an eighteen month period after the spill, with a specific focus on mercury and methylmercury in sediments. Our results indicated that surface water quality was not impaired with respect to total mercury concentrations. However, in the sediments of the Emory River near the coal ash spill, total mercury concentrations were 3- to 4-times greater than sediments several miles upstream of the ash spill. Similarly, methylmercury content in the Emory and Clinch River sediments near the ash spill were slightly elevated (up to a factor of 3) at certain locations compared to upstream sediments. Up to 2% of the total mercury in sediments containing coal ash was present as methylmercury. Mercury isotope composition and sediment geochemical data suggested that elevated methylmercury concentrations occurred in regions where native sediments were mixed with coal ash (e.g., less than 28% as coal ash in the Emory River). This coal ash may have provided substrates (such as sulfate) that stimulated biomethylation of mercury. The production of methylmercury in these areas is a concern because this neurotoxic organomercury compound can be highly bioaccumulative. Future risk assessments of coal ash spills should consider not only the leaching potential of mercury from the wastes but also the potential for methylmercury production in receiving waters.

  4. Wetland Survey of the X-10 Bethel Valley and Melton Valley Groundwater Operable Units at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rosensteel, B.

    1993-01-01

    This wetland survey report regarding wetlands within Melton Valley and Bethel Valley areas of the Oak Ridge Reservation was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act for reporting the results of a site characterization for public review. This work was done under Work Breakdown Structure number 1.4.12.6.1.15.41. This document provides the Environmental Restoration program with information on the results of the wetland survey conducted during fiscal year 1995. it includes information on the physical characteristics, location, approximate size, and classification of wetland areas identified during the field survey.

  5. Remedial investigation report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (rust spoil area, spoil area 1, and SY-200 yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2. Appendixes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document contains the appendices to the Remedial Investigation Report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, Spoil Area 1, and SY-200 Yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The appendices include Current and historical soil boring and groundwater monitoring well information, well construction logs, and field change orders; Analytical data; Human health risk assessment data; and Data quality.

  6. Environmental impacts of the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston coal ash spill. 1. Source apportionment using mercury stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Bartov, Gideon; Deonarine, Amrika; Johnson, Thomas M; Ruhl, Laura; Vengosh, Avner; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2013-02-19

    Mercury stable isotope abundances were used to trace transport of Hg-impacted river sediment near a coal ash spill at Harriman, Tennessee, USA. δ(202)Hg values for Kingston coal ash released into the Emory River in 2008 are significantly negative (-1.78 ± 0.35‰), whereas sediments of the Clinch River, into which the Emory River flows, are contaminated by an additional Hg source (potentially from the Y-12 complex near Oak Ridge, Tennessee) with near-zero values (-0.23 ± 0.16‰). Nominally uncontaminated Emory River sediments (12 miles upstream from the Emory-Clinch confluence) have intermediate values (-1.17 ± 0.13‰) and contain lower Hg concentrations. Emory River mile 10 sediments, possibly impacted by an old paper mill has δ(202)Hg values of -0.47 ± 0.04‰. A mixing model, using δ(202)Hg values and Hg concentrations, yielded estimates of the relative contributions of coal ash, Clinch River, and Emory River sediments for a suite of 71 sediment samples taken over a 30 month time period from 13 locations. Emory River samples, with two exceptions, are unaffected by Clinch River sediment, despite occasional upstream flow from the Clinch River. As expected, Clinch River sediment below its confluence with the Emory River are affected by Kingston coal ash; however, the relative contribution of the coal ash varies among sampling sites.

  7. Analysis of the inversion monitoring capabilities of a monostatic acoustic radar in complex terrain. [Tennessee River Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepf, D.; Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    A qualitative interpretation of the records from a monostatic acoustic radar is presented. This is achieved with the aid of airplane, helicopter, and rawinsonde temperature soundings. The diurnal structure of a mountain valley circulation pattern is studied with the use of two acoustic radars, one located in the valley and one on the downwind ridge. The monostatic acoustic radar was found to be sufficiently accurate in locating the heights of the inversions and the mixed layer depth to warrant use by industry even in complex terrain.

  8. Experimental reestablishment of red wolves (Canis rufus) on the Tennessee Valley Authority's Land Between the Lakes (LBL)

    SciTech Connect

    Carley, C.J.; Mechler, J.L.

    1983-10-01

    For all practical purposes the red wolf (Canis rufus) is extirpated in its final range in southeast Texas and southwest Louisiana. Although the species can be preserved in captivity, the only means by which it can be preserved as a naturally occurring element of our national heritage is to reestablish viable populations within the wolf's historic range in the southeastern United States. This proposal outlines a suggested procedure for reestablishing red wolves at Land Between The Lakes (LBL) by initially releasing five adult mated pairs of animals on the area over a two-year period. Recommendations for additions, changes, and deletions to this proposal have been received from the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, other governmental agencies, and interested organizations and individuals in the surrounding area. This proposal includes information describing probable environmental impacts associated with the experimental reestablishment of red wolves at LBL. 39 references, 16 figures, 6 tables.

  9. Wetland survey of the X-10 Bethel Valley and Melton Valley groundwater operable units at Oak Ridge National Labortory Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rosensteel, B.A.

    1996-03-01

    Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands, (May 24, 1977) requires that federal agencies avoid, to the extent possible, adverse impacts associated with the destruction and modification of wetlands and that they avoid direct and indirect support of wetlands development when there is a practicable alternative. In accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) Regulations for Compliance with Floodplains and Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements (Subpart B, 10 CFR 1022.11), surveys for wetland presence or absence were conducted in both the Melton Valley and the Bethel Valley Groundwater Operable Units (GWOU) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) from October 1994 through September 1995. As required by the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act of 1992, wetlands were identified using the criteria and methods set forth in the Wetlands Delineation Manual (Army Corps of Engineers, 1987). Wetlands were identified during field surveys that examined and documented vegetation, soils, and hydrologic evidence. Most of the wetland boundary locations and wetland sizes are approximate. Boundaries of wetlands in Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and on the former proposed site of the Advanced Neutron Source in the upper Melton Branch watershed were located by civil survey during previous wetland surveys; thus, the boundary locations and areal sizes in these areas are accurate. The wetlands were classified according to the system developed by Cowardin et al. (1979) for wetland and deepwater habitats of the United States. A total of 215 individual wetland areas ranging in size from 0.002 ha to 9.97 ha were identified in the Bethel Valley and Melton Valley GWOUs. The wetlands are classified as palustrine forested broad-leaved deciduous (PFO1), palustrine scrub-shrub broad-leaved deciduous (PSS1), and palustrine persistent emergent (PEM1).

  10. Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3: Appendix C

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions. The industrial and recreational exposure scenarios are used to provide a risk assessment reference context to evaluate levels of contamination in surface water, groundwater, soil, and sediment within each subbasin of the Melton Valley watershed. All available analytical results for the media of interest that could be qualified for use in the risk assessment were screened to determine carcinogenic risk values and noncarcinogenic hazard indexes and to identify the chemicals of concern (COCs) for each evaluated media in each subbasin.

  11. Relationship between selenium body burdens and tissue concentrations in fish exposed to coal ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston spill site

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, Teresa J; Fortner, Allison M; Jett, Robert T; Peterson, Mark J; Carriker, Neil; Morris, Jesse G; Gable, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    In December 2008, 4.1 million m3 of coal ash were released into the Emory and Clinch Rivers by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant. Coal ash contains several contaminants, including the bioaccumulative metalloid selenium (Se). Because Se is predominantly accumulated in aquatic organisms through dietary, rather than aqueous exposure, tissue-based toxicity thresholds for Se are currently being considered. The proposed threshold concentrations range between 4-9 g/g Se (dry wt.) in whole body fish, with a proposed fillet threshold of 11.8 g/g. In the present study we examined the spatial and temporal trends in Se bioaccumulation and examined the relationship between the Se content in fillets and in whole bodies of fish collected around the Kingston spill site to determine whether Se bioaccumulation was a significant concern at the ash spill site. While Se concentrations in fish (whole bodies and fillets) were elevated at sampling locations affected by the Kingston ash spill relative to reference locations, concentrations do not appear to be above risk thresholds and have not been increasing over the five year period since the spill. Our results are not only relevant to guiding the human health and ecological risk assessments at the Kingston ash spill site, but because of current national discussions on appropriate guidelines for Se in fish as well for the disposal of coal combustion wastes, our results are also relevant to the general understanding of Se bioaccumulation in contaminated water bodies.

  12. Prehistoric Versus Historic Floodplain Sedimentation Rates in the Upper Little Tennessee River Valley, Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    Late prehistoric and historic floodplain sedimentation rates were examined along the Upper Little Tennessee River within a 363 km2 catchment of the Southern Blue Ridge Mountains in western North Carolina. Sedimentation rates were derived from stratigraphy, sedimentology, radiocarbon and cesium-137 dates at three mainstem floodplain sample sites using cores and outcrops. Particle size was measured in continuous down-column overbank sediment samples (1-3 cm increments) to document individual floods as time markers. Results indicate that late prehistoric sedimentation rates were less than 1 mm/yr, whereas historical sedimentation rates are about an order of magnitude higher (5 to 17 mm/yr). The historical floodplain has accreted up to two meters higher than prehistoric levels, while the channel bed remains approximately at prehistoric levels. The most rapid historical sedimentation rates of 13-17 mm/yr occurred between 1963 and 2004, corresponding to a time period of second home construction, road construction, and other erosive land uses related to population and infrastructure growth; whereas pre-1963 historical sedimentation rates correspond to former timber harvest and agricultural activities. The most recent phase from1963 to present also corresponds to a time of relatively rapid lateral migration, incipient floodplain formation, and natural levee progradation on historically terraced cutbanks. Ongoing research relates channel morphogenesis, bank erosion, and remobilization of historical sediment to the overall sediment budget.

  13. Stratigraphic variations and secondary porosity within the Maynardville Limestone in Bear Creek Valley, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstrand, P.M.

    1995-05-01

    To evaluate groundwater and surface water contamination and migration near the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, a Comprehensive Groundwater Monitoring Plan was developed. As part of the Maynardville exit pathways monitoring program, monitoring well clusters were ii installed perpendicular to the strike of the Maynardville Limestone, that underlies the southern part of the Y-12 Plant and Bear Creek Valley (BCV). The Maynardville Project is designed to locate potential exit pathways of groundwater, study geochemical characteristics and factors affecting the occurrence and distribution of water-bearing intervals, and provide hydrogeologic information to be used to reduce the potential impacts of contaminants entering the Maynardville Limestone.

  14. Surface radiological investigations along State Highway 95, Lagoon Road, and Melton Valley Drive, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Tiner, P.F.; Uziel, M.S.; Rice, D.E.; Williams, J.K.

    1995-08-01

    The surface radiological investigation along State Highway 95, Lagoon Road, and Melton Valley Drive at the Oak Ridge Reservation was conducted as part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program Surveillance and Maintenance activities. This report was prepared to document results of the investigation and subsequent remedial actions. The report details surface gamma radiation levels including gamma anomalies; surface beta radiation levels including beta anomalies; results of analysis of soil, water, and vegetation samples and smear samples collected from paved surfaces; remediation activities conducted as a result of the survey; and recommendations for further corrective measures.

  15. Lithologic, geophysical, and well-construction data for observation wells in the Melton Valley area, Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucci, Patrick; Hanchar, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen wells were installed at nine sites in the Melton Valley area. The wells are intended to provide information on water levels in both regolith and bedrock, aquifer characteristics, and subsurface lithology. Well depths range from 24 to 86 ft for shallow wells, and from 126 to 301 ft for deep wells. Four inch diameter cores were obtained from four of the deep wells. Caliper, gamma, neutron, and gamma-gamma density borehole geophysical logs were obtained for each deep well. Lithologic description of cores and analysis of geophysical logs indicate that one deep well (UA2) is completed entirely within the Nolichucky Shale; one deep well (UD2) is completely entirely within the Pumpkin Valley Shale; two deep wells (UB2, UE2) are completed entirely within the Maryville Limestone; four deep wells (UF2, UG2, UH2, UI2) penetrate both the Nolichucky Shale and the Maryville Limestone. Well UC2, located near the crest of Haw Ridge, penetrates an imbricate splay of the Copper Creek thrust fault, which places the older Rome Formation above the younger Chickamauga Limestone, at a depth of about 100 to 117 ft. (USGS)

  16. Porosity development in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and Maynardville Limestone, Bear Creek Valley and Chestnut Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstrand, P.M.; Menefee, L.S.; Dreier, R.B.

    1995-12-01

    Matrix porosity data from deep core obtained in Bear Creek Valley indicate that porosities in the Maynardville Limestone are lithology and depth dependent. Matrix porosities are greater in the Cooper Ridge Dolomite than in the Maynardville Limestone, yet there is no apparent correlation with depth. Two interrelated diagenetic processes are the major controlling factors on porosity development in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and Maynardville Limestone; dissolution of evaporate minerals and dedolomitization. Both of these diagenetic processes produce matrix porosities between 2.1 and 1.3% in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and upper part of the Maynardville Limestone (Zone 6) to depths of approximately 600 ft bgs. Mean matrix porosities in Zones 5 through 2 of the Maynardville Limestone range from 0.8 to 0.5%. A large number of cavities have been intersected during drilling activities in nearly all zones of the Maynardville Limestone in Bear Creek Valley. Therefore, any maynardville Limestone zone within approximately 200 ft of the ground surface is likely to contain cavities that allow significant and rapid flow of groundwater. Zone 6 could be an important stratigraphic unit in the Maynardville Limestone for groundwater flow and contaminant transport because of the abundance of vuggy and moldic porosities. There are large variations in the thickness and lithology in the lower part of the Maynardville (Zones 2, 3, and 4 in the Burial Grounds region). The direction and velocity of strike-parallel groundwater flow may be altered in this area within the lower Maynardville Limestone.

  17. Longitudinal load and cascading failure risk assessment (CASE): Tennessee Valley Authority`s 161-kV Lowndes-West Point transmission line. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ostendorp, M.

    1998-03-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI) Cascading Failure Risk Assessment (CASE) methodology was used to determine extreme event, unbalanced loads on Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) 161-kV, single circuit, Lowndes-West Point transmission line and to identify the cascading potential of the line under five different loading conditions. More specifically, TVA wanted to evaluate the cascading potential of the Type HS-1G and BHS-1G tangent structures which comprise the majority of the line. While other cascading assessment methods primarily focus on the magnitude of the unbalanced loads acting on the first structure from the initiating event, EPRI`s CASE method incorporates the dynamic response and damping characteristics of the transmission line to determine the unbalanced longitudinal loads at any structure away from the initiating failure event. The CASE application constituted an investigation into the nature of the extreme loads that are expected to occur on the 161-kV Lowndes-West Point transmission line during a cascading failure and the corresponding dynamic response. The goals of the investigation were: to quantify unbalanced longitudinal loads acting on structures adjacent to the broken insulator, shield wire, or conductor failure as well as down-line structures; to assess the cascading potential of the Lowndes-West Point transmission line by considering the energy dissipation at successive spans and supports. The results of the CASE method indicate that the lack of longitudinal strength of the Type HS-1G and BHS-1G steel pole H-frame coupled with the dynamic characteristics of the Lowndes-West Point line was likely to result in a cascading failure for the more severe initiating event and load case combinations.

  18. Soil sampling and analysis plan for the Bear Creek Valley floodplain at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Floodplain presents the approach and rationale for characterizing potentially contaminated soils and sediments of the Bear Creek floodplain and the impact of any contaminants on the floodplain ecosystem. It is an addendum to a previously issued document, the Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Bear Creek (Y02-S600) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ES/ER-19&D2), which presents background information pertaining to this floodplain investigation. The strategy presented in the SAP is to divide the investigation into three component parts: a large-scale characterization of the floodplain; a fine-scale characterization of the floodplain beginning with a known contaminated location; and a stream sediment characterization. During the large-scale and the fine-scale characterizations, soil and biota samples (i.e., small mammals, earthworms, and vegetation) will be collected in order to characterize the nature and extent of floodplain soil contamination and the impact of this contamination on floodplain biota. The fine-scale characterization will begin with an investigation of a site corresponding to the location noted in the Remedial Investigation Work Plan (ES/ER-19&D2) as an area where uranium and PCBs are concentrated in discrete strata. During this fine-scale characterization, a 1 m deep soil profile excavation will be dug into the creek berm, and individual soil strata in the excavation will be screened for alpha radiation, PCBs, and VOCs. After the laboratory analysis results are received, biota samples will be collected in the vicinity of those locations.

  19. Channelization and floodplain forests: Impacts of accelerated sedimentation and valley plug formation on floodplain forests of the Middle Fork Forked Deer River, Tennessee, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oswalt, S.N.; King, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the severe degradation of floodplain habitats resulting from channelization and concomitant excessive coarse sedimentation on the Middle Fork Forked Deer River in west Tennessee from 2000 to 2003. Land use practices have resulted in excessive sediment in the tributaries and river system eventually resulting in sand deposition on the floodplain, increased overbank flooding, a rise in the groundwater table, and ponding of upstream timber. Our objectives were to: (1) determine the composition of floodplain vegetation communities along the degraded river reach, (2) to isolate relationships among these communities, geomorphic features, and environmental variables and (3) evaluate successional changes based on current stand conditions. Vegetation communities were not specifically associated with predefined geomorphic features; nevertheless, hydrologic and geomorphic processes as a result of channelization have clearly affected vegetation communities. The presence of valley plugs and continued degradation of upstream reaches and tributaries on the impacted study reach has arrested recovery of floodplain plant communities. Historically common species like Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Quercus spp. L. were not important, with importance values (IV) less than 1, and occurred in less than 20% of forested plots, while Acer rubrum L., a disturbance-tolerant species, was the most important species on the site (IV = 78.1) and occurred in 87% of forested plots. The results of this study also indicate that channelization impacts on the Middle Fork Forked Deer River are more temporally and spatially complex than previously described for other river systems. Rehabilitation of this system necessitates a long-term, landscape-scale solution that addresses watershed rehabilitation in a spatially and temporally hierarchical manner. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Logs of exploratory trenches through liquefaction features on late Quaternary terraces in the Obion River Valley, northwestern Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodbell, Donald T.; Bradley, Lee-Ann

    1993-01-01

    From December 1811 to February 1812, four large earthquakes (mb≥7.0) occured in the New Madrid (Missouri) Seismic Zone (NMSZ). These have been the largest historical earthquakes in eastern North America. Although this area has been the focus of considerable seismological research, estimates of the repeat time of large-magnitude seismic events remain poorly constrained. Past estimates were primarily based on earthquake-frequency statistics and on paleoseismology studies. Johnston and Nava (1985) compiled historical seismicity data covering about 180 years and instrumental data covering 10 years, and they concluded that the repeat time for large-magnitude events (mb≥7.0) is between 500 and 1,100 yrs. However, this estimate is based on assumptions that the data set is representative of the seismicity of the region over the past 1,000 yrs, and that the relation between earthquake frequency and magnitude is constant (Johnston and Nava, 1985). Because these assumptions cannot be verified, this estimated recurrence interval of 550-1,100 hrs must be considered tentative (S. G. Wesnousky and L. M. Leffler, written commun., 1991). Investigation of exploratory trenches across the Reelfoot scarp in northwestern Tennessee documented the only unequivocal Holocene surface faulting in the upper Mississippi embayment (Russ and others, 1978; Russ, 1979). Fluvial sediment younger than about 2,250 yrs old is faulted, and the net vertical displacement is more than 3 m. Stratigraphic relations indicate at least two episodes of faulting occurred between about 2,250 yr B.P. and the 1811-12 events to estimate an average recurrence interval of less than 600 yrs for large-magnitude earthquakes in the NMSZ. However, inasmuch as Russ (1970) found no evidence for any historical offset on the Reelfoot scarp, the relation between the Reelfoot scarp and large paleoeartchquakes in the NMSZ has not been clearly established. The development of widespread liquefaction features suring the 1811

  1. Phase 1 report on the Bear Creek Valley treatability study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Bear Creek Valley (BCV) is located within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation and encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes associated with past operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The BCV Remedial Investigation determined that disposal of wastes at the S-3 Site, Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) has caused contamination of both deep and shallow groundwater. The primary contaminants include uranium, nitrate, and VOCs, although other metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and cadmium persist. The BCV feasibility study will describe several remedial options for this area, including both in situ and ex situ treatment of groundwater. This Treatability Study Phase 1 Report describes the results of preliminary screening of treatment technologies that may be applied within BCV. Four activities were undertaken in Phase 1: field characterization, laboratory screening of potential sorbents, laboratory testing of zero valent iron products, and field screening of three biological treatment systems. Each of these activities is described fully in technical memos attached in Appendices A through G.

  2. Hydraulic testing plan for the Bear Creek Valley Treatability Study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Treatability Study is intended to provide site-specific data defining potential treatability technologies applicable to contaminated groundwater and surface water. The ultimate goal of this effort is to install a treatment system that will remove uranium, technetium, nitrate, and several metals from groundwater before it reaches Bear Creek. This project directly supports the BCV Feasibility Study. Part of the Treatability Study, Phase II Hydraulic Performance Testing, will produce hydraulic and treatment performance data required to design a long-term treatment system. This effort consists of the installation and testing of two groundwater collection systems: a trench in the vicinity of GW-835 and an angled pumping well adjacent to NT-1. Pumping tests and evaluations of gradients under ambient conditions will provide data for full-scale design of treatment systems. In addition to hydraulic performance, in situ treatment chemistry data will be obtained from monitoring wells installed in the reactive media section of the trench. The in situ treatment work is not part of this test plan. This Hydraulic Testing Plan describes the location and installation of the trench and NT-1 wells, the locations and purpose of the monitoring wells, and the procedures for the pumping tests of the trench and NT-1 wells.

  3. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, Tennessee Valley Authority. Supplement number 20

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April 1993), Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), Supplement No. 13 (April 1994), Supplement No. 14 (December 1994), Supplement No. 15 (June 1995), Supplement No. 16 (September 1995), Supplement No. 17 (October 1995), Supplement No. 18 (October 1995), and Supplement No. 19 (November 1995) issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the issues identified in the SER.

  4. Use of Dual-Polarization Radar Variables to Assess Low-Level Wind Shear in Severe Thunderstorm Near-storm Environments in the Tennessee Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, Christina C.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Kumjian, Matthew; Carey, Lawerence D.; Petersen, Walter A.

    2011-01-01

    The upgrade of the National Weather Service (NWS) network of S ]band dual-polarization radars is currently underway, and the incorporation of polarimetric information into the real ]time forecasting process will enhance the forecaster fs ability to assess thunderstorms and their near ]storm environments. Recent research has suggested that the combination of polarimetric variables differential reflectivity (ZDR) and specific differential phase (KDP) can be useful in the assessment of low level wind shear within a thunderstorm. In an environment with strong low ]level veering of the wind, ZDR values will be largest along the right inflow edge of the thunderstorm near a large gradient in horizontal reflectivity (indicative of large raindrops falling with a relative lack of smaller drops), and take the shape of an arc. Meanwhile, KDP values, which are proportional to liquid water content and indicative of a large number of smaller drops, are maximized deeper into the forward flank precipitation shield than the ZDR arc as the smaller drops are being advected further from the updraft core by the low level winds than the larger raindrops. Using findings from previous work, three severe weather events that occurred in North Alabama were examined in order to assess the utility of these signatures in determining the potential for tornadic activity. The first case is from October 26, 2010, where a large number of storms indicated tornadic potential from a standard reflectivity and velocity analysis but very few storms actually produced tornadoes. The second event is from February 28, 2011, where tornadic storms were present early on in the event, but as the day progressed, the tornado threat transitioned to a high wind threat. The third case is from April 27, 2011, where multiple rounds of tornadic storms ransacked the Tennessee Valley. This event provides a dataset including multiple modes of tornadic development, including QLCS and supercell structures. The overarching goal

  5. View of Tennessee, Virginia, Kentucky border area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A near vertical view of the Tennessee, Virginia, Kentucky border area is seen in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Experiments Package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The clock is in the most southerly corner of the picture. Interstate 81 under construction extends northeast-southwest across the bottom portion of the photograph. The larger urban area nearest the center of the picture is Kingsport, Tennessee. On the southern side of I-80 and east of Kingsport is the city of Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia. Johnson City, Tennessee is the urban area near the edge of the picture southeast of Kingsport. The Holston RIver, a tributary of the Tennessee River, meanders through the Kingsport area. The characteristic ridge and valley features in the Cumberland Plateau of Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia are clearly visible. Forests (dark green) occur on the ridges and clearly outline the folded and faulted rock formations. Agricultur

  6. Channelization and floodplain forests: impacts of accelerated sedimentation and valley plug formation on floodplain forests of the Middle Fork Forked Deer River, Tennessee, USA

    Treesearch

    Sonja N. Oswalt; Sammy L. King

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the severe degradation of floodplain habitats resulting from channelization and concomitant excessive coarse sedimentation on the Middle Fork Forked Deer River in west Tennessee from 2000 to 2003. Land use practices have resulted in excessive sediment in the tributaries and river system eventually resulting in sand deposition on the floodplain, increased...

  7. 18 CFR 1304.11 - Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...; date of formal submission. 1304.11 Section 1304.11 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND OTHER ALTERATIONS Procedures for Approval of Construction § 1304.11 Little Tennessee River; date of...

  8. 18 CFR 1304.11 - Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...; date of formal submission. 1304.11 Section 1304.11 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND OTHER ALTERATIONS Procedures for Approval of Construction § 1304.11 Little Tennessee River; date of...

  9. 18 CFR 1304.11 - Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission. 1304.11 Section 1304.11 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND...

  10. 18 CFR 1304.11 - Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission. 1304.11 Section 1304.11 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND...

  11. 18 CFR 1304.11 - Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND OTHER ALTERATIONS Procedures for Approval of Construction § 1304.11 Little Tennessee River; date of... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Little Tennessee...

  12. A watershed survey and educational program to enhance environmental quality in the Upper Little Tennessee River Valley. Year 4, Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Work carried out during 1992 under TVA grant No. TV-74216A, administered by the Western North Carolina Alliance, may be broken down into four categories: Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI), Macroinvertebrate Biomonitoring, Visual Reconnaissance, and Survey of Brook Trout. In 1992, we began to shift emphasis from merely studying the watershed to activities aimed at protecting, restoring, or improving water and habitat quality. The ``target`` area for this work in the upper Little Tennessee River watershed was the 10.0 square mile Rabbit Creek watershed (Holly Springs Community), and work conducted in Holly Springs is here reported separately from watershed-wide monitoring activities. Additional topics treated in this report include the relation of this project to other activities in the upper Little Tennessee watershed, significant changes in the watershed which occurred independently of this project, a list of other reports prepared to be made available through the project and a list of meetings. Work carried out under this grant in the Spring Creek and Laurel River watersheds (Madison County, North Carolina) will be reported on separately by Mark Hopey.

  13. White Oak Creek watershed: Melton Valley area Remedial Investigation report, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 2, Appendixes A and B

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    This document contains Appendixes A ``Source Inventory Information for the Subbasins Evaluated for the White Oak Creek Watershed`` and B ``Human Health Risk Assessment for White Oak Creek / Melton Valley Area`` for the remedial investigation report for the White Oak Creek Watershed and Melton Valley Area. Appendix A identifies the waste types and contaminants for each subbasin in addition to the disposal methods. Appendix B identifies potential human health risks and hazards that may result from contaminants present in the different media within Oak Ridge National Laboratory sites.

  14. New insight into the origin of manganese oxide ore deposits in the Appalachian Valley and Ridge of northeastern Tennessee and northern Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carmichael, Sarah K.; Doctor, Daniel H.; Wilson, Crystal G.; Feierstein, Joshua; McAleer, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Manganese oxide deposits have long been observed in association with carbonates within the Appalachian Mountains, but their origin has remained enigmatic for well over a century. Ore deposits of Mn oxides from several productive sites located in eastern Tennessee and northern Virginia display morphologies that include botryoidal and branching forms, massive nodules, breccia matrix cements, and fracture fills. The primary ore minerals include hollandite, cryptomelane, and romanèchite. Samples of Mn oxides from multiple localities in these regions were analyzed using electron microscopy, X-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and trace and rare earth element (REE) geochemistry. The samples from eastern Tennessee have biological morphologies, contain residual biopolymers, and exhibit REE signatures that suggest the ore formation was due to supergene enrichment (likely coupled with microbial activity). In contrast, several northern Virginia ores hosted within quartz-sandstone breccias exhibit petrographic relations, mineral morphologies, and REE signatures indicating inorganic precipitation, and a likely hydrothermal origin with supergene overprinting. Nodular accumulations of Mn oxides within weathered alluvial deposits that occur close to breccia-hosted Mn deposits in Virginia show geochemical signatures that are distinct from the breccia matrices and appear to reflect remobilization of earlier-emplaced Mn and concentration within supergene traps. Based on the proximity of all of the productive ore deposits to mapped faults or other zones of deformation, we suggest that the primary source of all of the Mn may have been deep seated, and that Mn oxides with supergene and/or biological characteristics resulted from the local remobilization and concentration of this primary Mn.

  15. Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Appendixes A and B

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions. The industrial and recreational exposure scenarios are used to provide a risk assessment reference context to evaluate levels of contamination in surface water, groundwater, soil, and sediment within each subbasin of the Melton Valley watershed. All available analytical results for the media of interest that could be qualified for use in the risk assessment were screened to determine carcinogenic risk values and noncarcinogenic hazard indexes and to identify the chemicals of concern (COCs) for each evaluated media in each subbasin.

  16. Final environmental statement related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2: Docket Numbers 50-390 and 50-391, Tennessee Valley Authority. Supplement Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Final Environmental Statement-Operating License (FES-OL) issued in 1978 represents the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) previous environmental review related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear (WBN) Plant. The NRC staff has determined that it is appropriate to re-examine the issues associated with the environmental review before issuance of an operating license. The purpose of this NRC review is to discuss the effects of observed changes in the environment and to evaluate the changes in environmental impacts that have occurred as a result of changes in the WBN Plant design and proposed methods of operations since the last environmental review. A full scope of environmental topics has been evaluated, including regional demography, land and water use, meteorology, terrestrial and aquatic ecology, radiological and non-radiological impacts on humans and the environment, socioeconomic impacts, and environmental justice. The staff concluded that there are no significant changes in the environmental impacts since the NRC 1978 FES-OL from changes in plant design, proposed methods of operations, or changes in the environment. The Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA`s) preoperational and operational monitoring programs were reviewed and found to be appropriate for establishing baseline conditions and ongoing assessments of environmental impacts. The staff also conducted an analysis of plant operation with severe accident mitigation design alternatives (SAMDAs) and concluded that none of the SAMDAs, beyond the three procedural changes that the TVA committed to implement, would be cost-beneficial for further mitigating environmental impacts.

  17. Tennessee Williams.

    PubMed

    Jeste, Neelum D; Palmer, Barton W; Jeste, Dilip V

    2004-01-01

    Tennessee Williams was one of the greatest American playwrights of all time. Born into a family with a strong history of serious mental illness, Williams seemed to have had several major depressive episodes during his early adulthood, along with severe and worsening alcohol and drug dependence and abuse involving sedatives and stimulants throughout his adult life. He received treatment of variable quality and duration in middle and old age. Despite his mental illness, Williams continued to be a productive writer even after age 60, although his later works were less successful. The authors consider both the strengths and limitations of Williams' coping mechanisms.

  18. Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Evaluation, interpretation, and data summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions.

  19. Data management implementation plan for the Bear Creek Valley treatability study phase 2 hydraulic performance testing, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The overall objective of the Bear Creek Valley treatability study is to provide site-specific data defining potential treatment technologies applicable to contaminated groundwater and surface water. The ultimate goal of this effort is to install a treatment system that will remove uranium, technetium, nitrate, and several metals from groundwater before it reaches Bear Creek. This project, the Bear Creek Valley treatability study Phase 2 hydraulic performance testing, directly supports the Bear Creek Valley Feasibility Study. Specific project objectives include (1) installing monitoring and extraction wells, (2) installing a groundwater extraction trench, (3) performing pumping tests of the extraction wells and trench, (4) determining hydraulic gradients, and (5) collecting water quality parameters. The primary purpose of environmental data management is to provide a system for generating and maintaining technically defensible data. To meet current regulatory requirements for the Environmental Restoration Program, complete documentation of the information flow must be established. To do so, each step in the data management process (collection, management, storage, and analysis) must be adequately planned and documented. This document will serve to identify data management procedures, expected data types and flow, and roles and responsibilities for all data management activities associated with this project.

  20. Sampling and analysis plan for the Bear Creek Valley Boneyard/Burnyard Accelerated Action Project, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    In the Bear Creek Valley Watershed Remedial Investigation, the Boneyard/Burnyard was identified as the source of the largest releases of uranium into groundwater and surface water in Bear Creek Valley. The proposed action for remediation of this site is selective excavation and removal of source material and capping of the remainder of the site. The schedule for this action has been accelerated so that this is the first remedial action planned to be implemented in the Bear Creek Valley Record of Decision. Additional data needs to support design of the remedial action were identified at a data quality objectives meeting held for this project. Sampling at the Boneyard/Burnyard will be conducted through the use of a phased approach. Initial or primary samples will be used to make in-the-field decisions about where to locate follow-up or secondary samples. On the basis of the results of surface water, soil, and groundwater analysis, up to six test pits will be dug. The test pits will be used to provide detailed descriptions of source materials and bulk samples. This document sets forth the requirements and procedures to protect the personnel involved in this project. This document also contains the health and safety plan, quality assurance project plan, waste management plan, data management plan, implementation plan, and best management practices plan for this project as appendices.

  1. Bear Creek Valley Floodplain hot spot removal early action characterization field data summary report, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes the field and laboratory efforts as a result of the Bear Creek Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Project Early Action. The purpose of this project was to collect data necessary to assess contaminant levels in the Bear Creek Valley Floodplain and evaluate the risk posed by the sites. This report provides information on the background of the site, characterization of site and field activities, results of field and laboratory data collected, extent and distribution of contamination, and an assessment of the future risk posed by the site.

  2. White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 3 Appendix C

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    This report provides details on the baseline ecological risk assessment conducted in support of the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for the Melton Valley areas of the White Oak Creek watershed (WOCW). The RI presents an analysis meant to enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. The ecological risk assessment builds off of the WOCW screening ecological risk assessment. All information available for contaminated sites under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy`s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Federal Facilities Agreement within the White Oak Creek (WOC) RI area has been used to identify areas of potential concern with respect to the presence of contamination posing a potential risk to ecological receptors within the Melton Valley area of the White Oak Creek watershed. The risk assessment report evaluates the potential risks to receptors within each subbasin of the watershed as well as at a watershed-wide scale. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminant releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent waste area groupings.

  3. 'Tennessee' Clues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image shows the area within 'Endurance Crater,' currently being investigated by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover is inspecting a hole it drilled into a flat rock (center) dubbed 'Tennessee,' which scientists believe may be made up of the same evaporite-rich materials as those found in 'Eagle Crater.'

    The overall geography inside Endurance is more complex than scientists anticipated, with at least three distinct bands of rock visible in front of the rover. Scientists hope to investigate the second and third layers of rock for more clues to Mars' history. This image was taken on sol 133 (June 8, 2004) with the rover's panoramic camera, using the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

  4. 'Tennessee' Clues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image shows the area within 'Endurance Crater,' currently being investigated by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover is inspecting a hole it drilled into a flat rock (center) dubbed 'Tennessee,' which scientists believe may be made up of the same evaporite-rich materials as those found in 'Eagle Crater.'

    The overall geography inside Endurance is more complex than scientists anticipated, with at least three distinct bands of rock visible in front of the rover. Scientists hope to investigate the second and third layers of rock for more clues to Mars' history. This image was taken on sol 133 (June 8, 2004) with the rover's panoramic camera, using the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

  5. Treatability study on the Bear Creek Valley characterization area at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Phase II work plan for S-3 site contaminated groundwater interception--in-field media evaluation and groundwater capture methods

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    A treatability study is being conducted to support implementation:of early actions at the S-3 Site in the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Characterization Area (CA). The objectives of the early actions Will be (1) to reduce concentrations of uranium and nitrate in Bear Creek and (2) to reduce contaminants of concern in North Tributary (NT)-1 and NT-2. The BCV CA is located within the US DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. Hazardous and radioactive materials from the Y-12 Plant operations were, disposed of at various sites within BCV. Groundwater and surface water in the BCV CA have been contaminated. The remedial investigation (RI) for the BCV CA identified that the greatest mass flux of contaminants from the various sources migrates via groundwater at the source and discharges to surface water in Bear Creek and its tributaries. In the RI, the combined discharge from the S-3 Site and the Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY) was identified as accounting for 75% of the cancer risk and more than 80% of the chemical toxicity to Potential downgradient human receptors. In addition, the S-3 Site has caused degradation of surface water quality in upper Bear Creek and two of its tributaries. The BCV CA treatability study focuses on capture and treatment of shallow groundwater before it discharges to tributary waters. The objectives Of treatment of this groundwater are (1) to reduce the concentrations of uranium and nitrate in NT-1 and Bear Creek such that the concentrations of these chemicals in surface water and groundwater are reduced to acceptable levels, (2) to reduce the concentrations of nitrate and metals, and reduce the overall concentration of total dissolved solids; and (3) to hydraulically contain the plume of contaminated, groundwater that is moving in bedrock in the Nolichucky Shale such that the rate of contaminant discharge will be reduced in the long term. The objective of Phase II is to produce conceptual designs for treatment system configurations.

  6. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6: Appendix G -- Baseline ecological risk assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix G contains ecological risks for fish, benthic invertebrates, soil invertebrates, plants, small mammals, deer, and predator/scavengers (hawks and fox). This risk assessment identified significant ecological risks from chemicals in water, sediment, soil, and shallow ground water. Metals and PCBs are the primary contaminants of concern.

  7. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV.

  8. White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 1 Main Text

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this Remedial Investigation (RI) report is to present an analysis of the Melton Valley portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, which will enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of cost-effective remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. In this RI existing levels of contamination and radiological exposure are compared to levels acceptable for future industrial and potential recreational use levels at the site. This comparison provides a perspective for the magnitude of remedial actions required to achieve a site condition compatible with relaxed access restrictions over existing conditions. Ecological risk will be assessed to evaluate measures required for ecological receptor protection. For each subbasin, this report will provide site-specific analyses of the physical setting including identification of contaminant source areas, description of contaminant transport pathways, identification of release mechanisms, analysis of contaminant source interactions with groundwater, identification of secondary contaminated media associated with the source and seepage pathways, assessment of potential human health and ecological risks from exposure to contaminants, ranking of each source area within the subwatershed, and outline the conditions that remedial technologies must address to stop present and future contaminant releases, prevent the spread of contamination and achieve the goal of limiting environmental contamination to be consistent with a potential recreational use of the site.

  9. Health and safety plan for phase II of the Bear Creek Valley treatability study Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HASP) addresses the health and safety (H&S) concerns and requirements for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Treatability Study at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Samples will be collected from effluent following treatment tests of extraction columns, algal mats, and mature wetlands supplied by surface water locations and existing groundwater monitoring well locations. The project Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses the project description, technical objectives, procedures, and planned work activities in greater detail. It is the responsibility of the project managers, field manager, and site health and safety officer (SHSO) to determine that the requirements of this HASP are sufficiently protective. If it is determined that the requirements of this HASP are not sufficiently protective, a field change order(s) (FCO) will be prepared. FCOs will include a completed job hazard analysis or similar worksheet to ensure complete hazard assessment. FCOs must be approved by the Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities (EMEF) project manager, EMEF H&S manager, subcontractor project or field manager, and subcontractor H&S representative. As a minimum, FCOs will be prepared if additional tasks will be performed or if contaminant exposure is anticipated.

  10. Best management practices plan for Phase II of the Bear Creek Valley treatability study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is currently under a Federal Agreement to define soil and groundwater contamination and develop remedies to protect human health and the environment. The western end of the site is known to have a former nitric acid disposal pit that has been remediated and capped. Remedial investigation data indicate this pit was a source of nitrate, uranium, technetium, and other metals contamination in groundwater. The downgradient receptor of this contamination includes Bear Creek and its tributaries. A feasibility study is under way to develop a remedy to prevent further contaminant migration to this receptor. To support the feasibility study, the treatability study is being completed to examine groundwater treatment at the S-3 site. This document serves as the top-level command medium for Phase II of the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Treatability Study and, as such, will be the primary resource for management and implementation of field activities. Many of the details and standard operating procedures referred to herein can be found in other Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), documents. Several supporting documents specific to this project are also cited. These include the Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), the Health and Safety Plan (HASP), and the Waste Management Plan (WMP).

  11. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 4: Appendix E -- Valley-wide fate and transport report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix E addresses contaminant releases and migration pathways from a valley-wide perspective and provides estimates of changes in contaminant fluxes in BCV.

  12. Waste management plan for phase II of the Bear Creek Valley Treatability study Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This Waste Management Plan (WMP) for the Bear Creek Valley Treatability Study addresses waste management requirements for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The study is intended to produce treatment performance data required to design a treatment system for contaminated groundwater. The treatability study will consist of an evaluation of various treatment media including continuous column tests, with up to six columns being employed to evaluate the performance of different media in the treatment of groundwater; an evaluation of the dentrifying capacity and metal uptake capacity of a wetland system; and the long-term dentrifying capacity and metal uptake capacity of algal mats. Additionally, the treatability study involves installation of a trench and incline well to evaluate and assess hydraulic impacts of pumping groundwater. The Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) covers the project description, technical objectives, procedures, and planned work activities in greater detail. The Health and Safety Plan (HASP) addresses the health and safety concerns and requirements for the proposed sampling activities. This WMP identifies the types and estimates the volumes of various wastes that may be generated during the proposed treatability studies. The approach to managing waste outlined in this WMP emphasizes the following points: (1) management of the waste generated in a manner that is protective of human health and the environment; (2) minimization of waste generation, thereby reducing unnecessary costs and usage of limited permitted storage and disposal capacities; and (3) compliance with federal, state, and site requirements. Prior sampling at the site has detected organic, radioactive, and metals contamination in groundwater and surface water. Proposed field operations are not expected to result in worker exposures greater than applicable exposure or action limits.

  13. Sampling and analysis plan for Phase II of the Bear Creek Valley Treatability Study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Treatability Study is intended to provide site-specific data defining potential treatment technologies applicable to contaminated groundwater and surface water. This project directly supports Alternative 5 of the base action in the BCV Feasibility Study and indirectly supports other alternatives through proof of concept. In that role, the ultimate goal is to install a treatment system that will remove uranium and nitrate from groundwater before it reaches Bear Creek. A secondary goal is the concurrent removal of technetium and several metals that affect ecological risk. This project is intended to produce hydraulic and treatment performance data required to design the treatment system to reach those goals. This project will also generate information that can be applied at other facilities within the Oak Ridge Reservation. This report is the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for the field work component of Phase II of the BCV Treatability Study. Field work for this phase of the BCV Treatability Study consists of environmental and media testing. The SAP addresses environmental sampling at the S-3 Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Samples will be taken from groundwater, surface water, seeps, effluent from test columns, effluent from an algal mat reactor, and effluent from a pilot-scale wetland. Groundwater, surface water, and seeps will be monitored continuously for field parameters and sampled for analytical parameters during pump tests conducted periodically during the investigation. In-field continuous flow tests will be conducted over an extended time period (5 weeks) to generate data on long-term treatment effects on potential treatment effects on potential treatment media including sorbents and zero valent iron, over 28 weeks for constructed wetlands treatment, and over 24 weeks for algal mats treatment.

  14. Sampling and analysis plan for phase II of the Bear Creek Valley treatability study Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Treatability Study is intended to provide site-specific data defining potential treatment technologies applicable to contaminated groundwater and surface water. This project directly supports Alternative 5 of the base action in the BCV Feasibility Study, and indirectly supports other alternatives through proof of concept. In that role, the ultimate goal is to install a treatment system that will remove uranium and nitrate from groundwater before it reaches Bear Creek. A secondary goal is the concurrent removal of technetium and several metals that impact ecological risk. This project is intended to produce hydraulic and treatment performance data required to design the treatment system to reach those goals. This project will also generate information that can be applied at other facilities within the Oak Ridge Reservation. This report is the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for the field work component of Phase II of the BCV Treatability Study. Field work for this phase of the BCV Treatability Study consists of media testing. In-field continuous flow tests will be conducted over an extended time period (5 weeks) to generate data on long-term treatment effects on potential treatment media including sorbents and zero valent iron, over 28 weeks for constructed wetlands treatment, and over 24 weeks for algal mats treatment. The SAP addresses environmental sampling at the S-3 Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Samples will be taken from groundwater, effluent from test columns, effluent from an algal mat reactor, and effluent from a pilot-scale wetlands. This plan will be implemented as part of the BCV Phase II Treatability Study Best Management Practices Plan and in conjunction with the BCV Phase II Treatability Study Health and Safety Plan and the BCV Phase II Treatability Study Waste Management Plan.

  15. View of Tennessee, Virginia, Kentucky border area

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-08-15

    SL3-88-053 (July-September 1973) --- A near vertical view of the Tennessee-Virginia-Kentucky border area is seen in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Experiments Package S190-B (five-inch Earth terrain camera) photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The clock is in the most southerly corner of the picture. Interstate 81 under construction extends northeast-southwest across the bottom portion of the photograph. The larger urban area nearest the center of the picture is Kingsport, Tennessee. On the southern side of I-80 and east of Kingsport is the city of Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia. Johnson City, Tennessee is the urban area near the edge of the picture southeast of Kingsport. The Holston River, a tributary of the Tennessee River, meanders through the Kingsport area. The characteristic ridge and valley features in the Cumberland Plateau of Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia are clearly visible. Forests (dark green) occur on the ridges and clearly outline the folded and faulted rock formations. The valleys (light) were formed in the softer rocks as a result of erosion. Agricultural areas are indicated by the characteristic rectangular patterns. Coal production is an important industry of this area; and it is mined by surface open pit operations. The irregular light areas in the Kentucky-Virginia border area are the strip mines which follow the contour of the land. Reclamation of the strip mine areas is aided through accurate knowledge of the mine and drainage systems. Dr. Ronald Brooks of the Wolf Research and Development Corporation can use this photograph in study of strip mine areas in the east central U.S. Federal agencies participating with NASA on the EREP project are the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Corps of Engineers. All EREP photography is available to the public through the Department of Interior’s Earth Resources Observations Systems Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota

  16. 76 FR 39261 - Tennessee Valley Authority Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... the Sunshine Act. TVA is adding procedures related to classified national security information. DATES: Effective Date: July 6, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mark R. Winter, Senior Information Security... amended. On December 29, 2009, Executive Order 13526, Classified National Security Information,...

  17. 75 FR 11735 - Tennessee Valley Authority Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... paragraphs (d) and (f) to read as follows: Sec. 1301.12 Definitions. * * * * * (d) The term TVA system notice... the definitions of ``news media'' and ``news media requesters'' to reflect changes in the way news is delivered; conform references to Privacy Act systems of records to the most current publication of...

  18. Inclusion in Middle Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Brandalyn; Ashley, Mandi; Salter, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to provide school districts within Tennessee with more research about how weekly hours of inclusion impact student achievement. Specifically, researchers examined which models of inclusion were in use in two school districts in Tennessee, administrators' and teachers' perceptions of inclusion, and whether or…

  19. Inclusion in Middle Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Brandalyn; Ashley, Mandi; Salter, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to provide school districts within Tennessee with more research about how weekly hours of inclusion impact student achievement. Specifically, researchers examined which models of inclusion were in use in two school districts in Tennessee, administrators' and teachers' perceptions of inclusion, and whether or…

  20. Forests of Tennessee, 2013

    Treesearch

    Christopher Oswalt

    2016-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resource attributes for the State of Tennessee based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program at the Southern Research Station of the Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture Division of Forestry....

  1. Eastern equine encephalitis in Tennessee: 2002-2008.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sudeshna; Moody, Erin E; Lewokzco, Kenneth; Huddleston, Dora B; Huang, Junjun; Rowland, Meghan E; Wilson, Ron; Dunn, John R; Jones, Timothy F; Moncayo, Abelardo C

    2012-05-01

    Human and equine outbreaks caused by eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus (EEEV) typically occur in North America adjacent to coastal wetlands associated with the presence of Culiseta melanura (Coquillet) mosquitoes. Eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE) is an emerging disease in Tennessee, as the first records of equine disease began in 2002. In 2006 we trapped and tested mosquitoes for EEEV at hardwood swamps in western Tennessee that were at the epicenter of a multi-equine outbreak in fall of 2005. Additionally, the Tennessee Valley Authority tested mosquito pools collected in Tennessee swamps from 2000 to 2007 for the presence of arboviruses. Two pools of EEEV positive Culex erraticus (Dyer and Knab) mosquitoes were found (one each in 2003 and 2004) in a county adjacent to where the 2005 outbreak occurred. In 2008, another EEE outbreak involving multiple horses occurred in West Tennessee. A brain specimen was collected from a horse during this outbreak and the first isolate of EEEV from Tennessee was obtained. In total, 74,531 mosquitoes collected from 2000 to 2008 were tested via polymerase chain reaction and VecTest for EEEV. The traditional enzootic vector, Cs. melanura, was found in low numbers at all collection sites. Cx. erraticus, however, was consistently found in high numbers and was the only mosquito species in which EEEV was detected. We suggest that EEE transmission may be maintained by Cx. erraticus in a nontraditional cycle. We discuss the importance of a nontraditional cycle from the perspective of EEEV adaptation and emergence.

  2. Benchmarking East Tennessee`s economic capacity

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-20

    This presentation is comprised of viewgraphs delineating major economic factors operating in 15 counties in East Tennessee. The purpose of the information presented is to provide a benchmark analysis of economic conditions for use in guiding economic growth in the region. The emphasis of the presentation is economic infrastructure, which is classified into six categories: human resources, technology, financial resources, physical infrastructure, quality of life, and tax and regulation. Data for analysis of key indicators in each of the categories are presented. Preliminary analyses, in the form of strengths and weaknesses and comparison to reference groups, are given.

  3. Forest statistics for Tennessee

    Treesearch

    Philip R. Wheeler

    1952-01-01

    The Southern Forest Survey, an activity of the Southern Forest Experiment Station, covers the seven States of the Station' territory--Alabama, Arkansas. Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas. This Survey is a part of the nation-wide Forest Survey authorized by the McSweeney-McNary Forest Research Act of 1928. Its five-fold purpose is (1) to take...

  4. Tennessee and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB)is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Tennessee and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to…

  5. Tennessee forest resources

    Treesearch

    Richard A. Birdsey

    1979-01-01

    This report presents the principal findings of a new forest survey of Tennessee. Field work was conducted between March 1979 and November 1980. The inventory is reported for 1980. Data for growth and cut are given for the inter-survey period from 1971 to 1980. A canvass of forest products output in the 1979 provided additional information on removals.

  6. Delineation and description of the regional aquifers of Tennessee; the Knox Aquifer in central and west Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brahana, J.V.; Bradley, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Knox aquifer is composed of the Cambrian and Ordovician age carbonate rocks of the Knox Group. This aquifer occurs throughout Tennessee, west of the Valley and Ridge province. The Knox crops out in the Sequatchie Valley and in the Wells Creeks cryptoexplosive structure on the Northwestern Highland Rim. Groundwater in the upper Knox occurs primarily in solution openings. The aquifer may be recharged through fractures and faults in the overlying Ordovician limestones in Middle Tennessee. The underlying Conasauga Shale acts as the lower confining layer. Throughout parts of the Central Basin province, the Knox aquifer is an important source of water for rural domestic supplies. In these areas, groundwater from the Knox generally has less than 1,000 milligrams/L dissolved solids. Away from the Central Basin, the dissolved solids concentrations increases. It may approach brine concentrations under the Cumberland Plateau. (USGS)

  7. Geologic structure and hydrocarbon potential along the Saltville and Pulaski Thrusts in Southwestern Virginia and Northeastern Tennessee: Part A, Part B, Part C. Publication 23

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, M.J.; Milici, R.C.; Schultz, A.P.; LeVan, D.C.; Wilkes, G.P.

    1980-01-01

    This field guide describes three stops in the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau of Virginia and Tennessee. Part A gives the regional structure and hydrocarbon potential; part B describes the deformation in the hanging wall of the Pulaski Thrust sheet near Ironto, Virginia, and part C describes the Saltville Fault footwall structure of Stone Mountain, Tennessee. (ACR)

  8. History of suspended-sediment data collection and inventory of available data for the Tennessee and Cumberland River basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, William P.; Brown, Russell T.; Chatham, Carrie G.

    1988-01-01

    In 1934 and 1935, the Tennessee Valley Authority established 51 daily record suspended-sediment stations on the Tennessee River and its major tributaries. Most of these stations were operated for 8 years. From 1962 to 1965, the Tennessee Valley Authority again collected daily sediment record at 10 of the original 49 stations. In addition to the data sets collected on the major rivers, the Tennessee Valley Authority has conducted several intensive studies of small watersheds throughout the Tennessee River basin. In the Cumberland River basin, daily sediment records have been collected primarily by the Survey. Daily stations have been operated for various periods on 17 basins ranging in size from 0.67 to 1,977 sq mi, with the earliest data of daily record being October 1953. All of these daily stations are located in the upper Cumberland River basin upstream of any major impoundments. Periodic sediment data have been collected by the Survey at 194 stations in the Tennessee River basin and at 106 stations in the Cumberland River basin, however; the number of samples/station is quite low. 86% of the periodic stations in the Tennessee River basin and 91% of the periodic stations in the Cumberland River basin have 30 samples or less. (USGS)

  9. Addendum to the remedial investigation report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, Spoil Area 1, and SY-200 Yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Main text

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This addendum to the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting the results of a site characterization for public review. This addendum is a supplement to a document that was previously issued in January 1995 and that provided the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of the 1993 investigation performed at OU 2. The January 1995 D2 version of the RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 included information on risk assessments that have evaluated impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in the document formed the basis for the development of the Feasibility Study Report. This addendum includes revisions to four chapters of information that were a part of the document issued in January 1995. Specifically, it includes revisions to Chaps. 2, 3, 4, and 9. Volume 1 of this document is not being reissued in its entirety as a D3 version because only the four chapters just mentioned have been affected by requested changes. Note also that Volume 2 of this RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 is not being reissued in conjunction with Volume 1 of this document because there have been no changes requested or made to the previously issued version of Volume 2 of this document.

  10. 75 FR 70076 - Tennessee Southern Railroad Company, Patriot Rail, LLC, Patriot Rail Holdings LLC, and Patriot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Tennessee Southern Railroad Company, Patriot Rail, LLC, Patriot Rail Holdings LLC, and Patriot Rail Corp.--Continuance in Control Exemption--Columbia & Cowlitz Railway, LLC, DeQueen and Eastern Railroad, LLC, Golden Triangle Railroad, LLC, Mississippi & Skuna Valley Railroad, LLC...

  11. Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, SY-200 Yard, Spoil Area 1) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The enactment of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976 and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to RCRA in 1984 created management requirements for hazardous waste facilities. The facilities within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were in the process of meeting the RCRA requirements when ORR was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priorities List (NPL) on November 21, 1989. Under RCRA, the actions typically follow the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA)/RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS)/Corrective Measures implementation process. Under CERCLA the actions follow the PA/SI/Remedial Investigation (RI)/Feasibility Study (FS)/Remedial Design/Remedial Action process. The development of this document will incorporate requirements under both RCRA and CERCLA into an RI work plan for the characterization of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Operable Unit (OU) 2.

  12. Blastomycosis in northeast Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, J E; Mehta, J B; Agrawal, R; Sarubbi, F A

    1998-08-01

    To study the epidemiologic and clinical features of blastomycosis in northeast Tennessee. Retrospective review of blastomycosis cases in the region from 1980 through 1995. Hospitals located in the Tri-Cities region of northeast Tennessee. Seventy-two patients with confirmed blastomycosis infection. None. During the 1980 to 1995 study period, we documented 72 cases of blastomycosis. The mean age was 52 years (range, 13 to 86 years), most were male (69.4%), and nine were immunocompromised. A possible environmental exposure was noted for 28 patients. Pulmonary involvement represented the most common site of infection (61 cases), but multiorgan involvement was common (17 cases). Most patients with pulmonary blastomycosis (66%) presented with a chronic illness, and radiologic findings usually revealed local consolidation or a mass-like lesion. Nine patients developed ARDS with an associated mortality rate of 89%, compared with a 10% mortality for non-ARDS pulmonary cases. Antifungal treatment regimens varied widely, with amphotericin B often used for sicker patients. An epidemiologic evaluation revealed that the mean yearly incidence rate for blastomycosis quadrupled between 1980 and 1987 (0.31 cases/ 100,000 population) and 1988 to 1995 (1.23 cases/100,000 population) (p=0.00001). Most new blastomycosis cases in the 1988 to 1995 period occurred in three counties in the region where significant new construction projects have been underway. Blastomycosis is endemic in northeast Tennessee and the number of cases is increasing, coinciding with major new construction in the region. Clinicians in the area must be alert to this condition.

  13. Retailing in Tennessee 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Data on retail sales compiled from sales tax records are summarized. Contained in this report are retail sales estimates for the 95 counties in the State of Tennessee and 303 cities, towns, or parts of towns which are shown in various degrees of detail depending on disclosure restrictions. Number of firms is determined by the total number of reports submitted. Sales and percent distribution of sales are shown for the State of Tennessee and counties by Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA) designation and by various county groupings based on the size of largest city. A list of counties by SMSA designation and by size class of largest city is given in the Appendix. The number of firms and estimated retail sales are also shown for 10 business groups defined by the US Department of Commerce along with the total retail sales for each of the 95 counties in Tennessee and for 137 of the larger cities, towns, or parts of towns in the state. Sales for 37 smaller incorporated places or parts of towns are given. Any attempt to report retail activity in the same detail that is possible for large cities is hampered by disclosure restrictions for towns in this group. Through the use of fewer categories, the amount of information that can be revealed is maximized while maintaining confidentiality for individual businesses. A classification widely adopted by economists and planners is the use of the broad retail categories of shoppers' goods, convenience goods, and all other stores. Shoppers' goods stores include department and variety stores, apparel and accessory shops, and furniture and home furnishings outlets. Convenience goods stores are food stores, gasoline service stations, drug stores, and eating and drinking places. The remaining category of all other stores includes building materials, hardware, automotive, and miscellaneous retail stores. Total sales are given for 129 very small incorporated towns.

  14. Earthquake history of Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von Hake, C. A.

    1977-01-01

     The western part of the State was shaken strongly by the New Madrid, Mo., earthquakes of 1811-12 and by earthquakes in 1843 and 1895. The area has also experienced minor shocks. Additional activity has occurred in the eastern part of the State, near the North Carolina border. Forty shocks of intensity V (Modified Mercalli scale) or greater have been cataloged as occurring within the State. Many other earthquakes centered in bordering States have affected points in Tennessee. The following summary covers only hose shocks of intensity VI or greater. 

  15. 33 CFR 117.949 - Tennessee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tennessee River. 117.949 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Tennessee § 117.949 Tennessee River. The draws of the Chief John Ross Bridge over the Tennessee River, mile 464.1, at Chattanooga, and the Southern Railway...

  16. 33 CFR 117.949 - Tennessee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tennessee River. 117.949 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Tennessee § 117.949 Tennessee River. The draws of the Chief John Ross Bridge over the Tennessee River, mile 464.1, at Chattanooga, and the Southern Railway...

  17. 33 CFR 117.949 - Tennessee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tennessee River. 117.949 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Tennessee § 117.949 Tennessee River. The draws of the Chief John Ross Bridge over the Tennessee River, mile 464.1, at Chattanooga, and the Southern Railway...

  18. 33 CFR 117.949 - Tennessee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tennessee River. 117.949 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Tennessee § 117.949 Tennessee River. The draws of the Chief John Ross Bridge over the Tennessee River, mile 464.1, at Chattanooga, and the Southern Railway...

  19. 33 CFR 117.949 - Tennessee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tennessee River. 117.949 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Tennessee § 117.949 Tennessee River. The draws of the Chief John Ross Bridge over the Tennessee River, mile 464.1, at Chattanooga, and the Southern Railway...

  20. 76 FR 20433 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster TN-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is a an amendment of the Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Tennessee...'s disaster declaration in the State of Tennessee, dated 03/23/2011, is hereby amended to establish...

  1. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 5: Appendix F -- Baseline human health risk assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix F documents potential risks and provides information necessary for making remediation decisions. A quantitative analysis of the inorganic, organic, and radiological site-related contaminants found in various media is used to characterize the potential risks to human health associated with exposure to these contaminants.

  2. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3: Appendix D -- Nature and extent of contamination report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix D describes the nature and extent of contamination in environmental media and wastes.

  3. GEE CREEK WILDERNESS, TENNESSEE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Epstein, Jack B.; Gazdik, Gertrude C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and mine and prospect surveys, it was determined that the Gee Creek Wilderness, Tennessee has little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. Iron ore was formerly mined, but the deposits are small, have a high phosphorous content, and are inaccessible. Shale, suitable for brick or lightweight aggregate, and sandstone, which could be utilized for crushed stone or sand, are found in the area, but are also found in areas closer to potential markets. The geologic setting precludes the presence of oil and gas resources in the surface rocks, but the possibility of finding natural gas at depth below the rocks exposed in the area cannot be discounted. Geophysical exploration would be necessary to define the local structure in rocks at depth to properly evaluate the potential of the area for gas.

  4. Regulatory Facility Guide for Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O.; Rymer, A.C.

    1994-02-28

    This guide provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation related regulations applicable to shipments originating at or destined to Tennessee facilities. Information on preferred routes is also given.

  5. Tennessee trauma care system plan, Part II.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joseph B; Barker, Donald; Enderson, Blaine

    2005-04-01

    Tennessee implemented a statewide trauma care system in 1988. This system serves the state of Tennessee and supports eight neighboring states. The demographics and geography of Tennessee have ensured that nearly all residents have rapid access to the trauma care system. However, since 1988, many changes have occurred in healthcare in general, and trauma care in particular, that point out problems and issues with the Tennessee trauma care system. Therefore, the Tennessee Trauma Care Advisory Council has developed this Trauma Care System Plan to look at needs and opportunities for the future of trauma care in Tennessee. This plan will be presented in four segments: History, Administrative Components, Operational Components, and Clinical Components.

  6. Tennessee trauma care system plan, Part 1.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joseph B; Barker, Donald; Dunn, Julie; Enderson, Blaine

    2005-03-01

    Tennessee implemented a statewide trauma care system in 1988. This system serves the state of Tennessee and supports eight neighboring states. The demographics and geography of Tennessee have ensured that nearly all residents have rapid access to the trauma care system. However, since 1988, many changes have occurred in healthcare in general, and trauma care in particular, that point out problems and issues with the Tennessee trauma care system. Therefore, the Tennessee Trauma Care Advisory Council has developed this Trauma Care System Plan to look at needs and opportunities for the future of trauma care in Tennessee. This plan will be presented in four segments: History, Administrative Components, Operational Components, and Clinical Components.

  7. Tennessee Trauma Care System Plan, part III.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joseph B; Barker, Donald; Enderson, Blaine

    2005-05-01

    Tennessee implemented a statewide trauma care system in 1988. This system serves the state of Tennessee and supports eight neighboring states. The demographics and geography of Tennessee have ensured that nearly all residents have rapid access to the trauma care system. However, since 1988, many changes have occurred in healthcare in general, and trauma care in particular, that point out problems and issues with the Tennessee trauma care system. Therefore, the Tennessee Trauma Care Advisory Council has developed this Trauma Care System Plan to look at needs and opportunities for the future of trauma care in Tennessee. This plan will be presented in four segments: History, Administrative Components, Operational Components, and Clinical Components.

  8. Mapping of Landsat satellite and gravity lineaments in west Tennessee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argialas, Demetre P.; Stearns, Richard G.; Shahrokhi, Firouz

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of earthquake fault lineament patterns within the alluvial valley of west Tennessee, which is often made difficult by the presence of unconsolidated sediments, is presently undertaken through a synergistic use of Landsat satellite images in conjunction with gravity anomaly data, which were quantitatively analyzed and compared by means of two-dimensional histograms and rose diagrams. The northeastern trend revealed for the lineaments corresponds to faults and is in keeping with reactivation of the Reelfoot rift near the Mississippi River; this suggests that deeper features, perhaps at earthquake focal depth, may extend to the land surface as Landsat-detectable lineaments.

  9. Mapping of Landsat satellite and gravity lineaments in west Tennessee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argialas, Demetre P.; Stearns, Richard G.; Shahrokhi, Firouz

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of earthquake fault lineament patterns within the alluvial valley of west Tennessee, which is often made difficult by the presence of unconsolidated sediments, is presently undertaken through a synergistic use of Landsat satellite images in conjunction with gravity anomaly data, which were quantitatively analyzed and compared by means of two-dimensional histograms and rose diagrams. The northeastern trend revealed for the lineaments corresponds to faults and is in keeping with reactivation of the Reelfoot rift near the Mississippi River; this suggests that deeper features, perhaps at earthquake focal depth, may extend to the land surface as Landsat-detectable lineaments.

  10. Libraries in Tennessee: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/tennessee.html Libraries in Tennessee To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Chattanooga Erlanger Health System Medical Library ILL Attn: Rachel Bohannon 975 East 3RD Street ...

  11. State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Mike

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Tennessee. The 17th largest state, Tennessee is home to 2.01% of the nation's inhabitants. Funding of K-12 education in Tennessee is accomplished via a formula known as the Basic Educational Program (BEP). This plan primarily utilizes school district enrollment numbers to…

  12. Zero Tolerance in Tennessee Schools: An Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Kim; Njie, Bintou; Detch, Ethel R.; Walton, Jason

    As required by Tennessee law, this report examines the state's zero-tolerance disciplinary data collected by the Tennessee Department of Education for school years 1999-00, 2000-01, and 2001-02. The first section displays statewide zero-tolerance statistics. The second section focuses on the zero-tolerance statistics of Tennessee's five major…

  13. State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Mike

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Tennessee. The 17th largest state, Tennessee is home to 2.01% of the nation's inhabitants. Funding of K-12 education in Tennessee is accomplished via a formula known as the Basic Educational Program (BEP). This plan primarily utilizes school district enrollment numbers to…

  14. The Soil Conservation District Movement in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Thomas Cochran; And Others

    The development of soil conservation districts in Tennessee is the subject of this graduate study. Related literature, existing records, and personal interviews are used to record progress since Tennessee adopted Public Law 46 establishing soil conservation districts in 1939. In 1959 all 95 counties of Tennessee had organized soil conservation…

  15. 78 FR 12806 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00074

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster TN-00074 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Tennessee dated 02/14... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Henderson. Contiguous Counties: Tennessee: Carroll...

  16. 40 CFR 81.428 - Tennessee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tennessee. 81.428 Section 81.428... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.428 Tennessee. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land... Carolina, and 241,207 acres are in Tennessee. 2 Joyce Kilmer Slickrock Wilderness, 14,033 acres overall, of...

  17. 40 CFR 81.428 - Tennessee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tennessee. 81.428 Section 81.428... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.428 Tennessee. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land... Carolina, and 241,207 acres are in Tennessee. 2 Joyce Kilmer Slickrock Wilderness, 14,033 acres overall, of...

  18. 75 FR 55833 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00042

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster TN-00042 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Tennessee dated 09/07... determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Putnam. Contiguous Counties: Tennessee...

  19. 76 FR 18288 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster TN-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Tennessee dated 03/23... determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Knox. Contiguous Counties: Tennessee...

  20. 40 CFR 81.428 - Tennessee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tennessee. 81.428 Section 81.428... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.428 Tennessee. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land... Carolina, and 241,207 acres are in Tennessee. 2 Joyce Kilmer Slickrock Wilderness, 14,033 acres overall, of...

  1. 40 CFR 81.428 - Tennessee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tennessee. 81.428 Section 81.428... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.428 Tennessee. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land... Carolina, and 241,207 acres are in Tennessee. 2 Joyce Kilmer Slickrock Wilderness, 14,033 acres overall, of...

  2. Preliminary evaluation of the Highland Rim aquifer system in Tennessee for receiving injected wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    The EPA has authority under the Safe Drinking Water Act to protect underground sources of drinking water from contamination by deep well injection. An aquifer, however, may be exempted from protection and used for injected wastes where the aquifer meets criteria established in the Agency 's Underground Injection Control program. The Highland Rim aquifer system in Tennessee consists of Mississippian age carbonate rocks and occurs from the Valley and Ridge of East Tennessee to west of the Tennessee River. This aquifer contains potable water and is an important source of drinking water for municipal and domestic supplies on the Highland Rim. The Highland Rim aquifer system under parts of the Cumberland Plateau is not currently used as a source of drinking water and is not expected to be used in the future. These areas meet parts of the EPA 's Underground Injection Control criteria for exempting aquifers to receive injected waste. (Author 's abstract)

  3. The February 21, 1993 tornadoes of East Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Fricke, K.E.; Kornegay, F.C.

    1993-08-11

    A series of tornadoes struck the east Tennessee area on Sunday afternoon, February 21, 1993 around Knoxville, Lenoir City, and Oak Ridge causing millions of dollars worth of damage to both homes and businesses in the area, killing one, injuring a number of persons, and leaving a large area without power for many hours or even days due to damage to the local TVA transmission line network. One tornado touched down in the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation near the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, continued through the Union Valley business district located just east of the plant, through the adjacent University of Tennessee Arboretum and then continued into the communities of Claxton and Powell. The path length of the tornado was approximately 13 miles. Damage to the Y-12 Plant was minimal, but the Union Valley business district was seriously damaged, including the Fusion Energy Design Center (FEDC) which houses a number of DOE related projects. The preliminary cost estimate of the damage to DOE facilities (both at Y-12 and at the FEDC) was around $520,000. This paper describes the local meteorological data, the tornado that struck near the Y-12 plant, the resulting damage both to the DOE facilities and to the surrounding communities, the plant emergency response and recovery activities, and the current hazard analyses being undertaken at the plant.

  4. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in raccoons from Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Jenny; Newsome, Anthony; Huang, Junjun; Kirby, Jordona; Kranz, Melissa; Wateska, Angela; Dunlap, Brett; Yabsley, Michael J; Dunn, John R; Jones, Timothy F; Moncayo, Abelardo C

    2010-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. Autochthonous human and canine transmission of T. cruzi has been documented in Tennessee, but little is known about its ecology, including the prevalence of T. cruzi among wildlife in Tennessee. Serum samples from 706 raccoons (Procyon lotor) from 10 counties in the Ridge and Valley and Blue Ridge Mountains ecoregions of eastern Tennessee were tested for antibodies reactive with T. cruzi using the indirect fluorescent antibody assay. Two hundred six (29.2%) samples were seropositive, with 9 counties yielding positive samples (range 14.6-63.6%). Significantly more raccoons from rural habitats (35.1%) were found positive for T. cruzi exposure than were those from suburban habitats (23.1%, P < 0.001). Land cover class was not associated with seropositivity status (P = 0.441), even though deciduous forest was the most common site from where raccoons were trapped and the most common site of positive raccoons in rural areas (42%). Interestingly, age was positively associated with seropositivity. Raccoons older than 1 yr (adults) were 40.1% seropositive compared to 12.2% of those less than 1 yr (juveniles; P < 0.001). Female adults were significantly more likely to be exposed to T. cruzi than were male adult raccoons (P < 0.001). No significant seroprevalence difference was seen among male and female juveniles. This study contributes to understanding the dynamics of T. cruzi exposure within raccoon populations in Tennessee. The importance of habitat (rural vs. suburban) and microhabitat (dens) in risk of exposure to these populations is also discussed.

  5. SCHOOL PLANNING LABORATORY, THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

    DISCUSSES THE SERVICES, PROJECTS, AND PLANNING PROCESS OF THE SCHOOL PLANNING LABORATORY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE. SERVICES INCLUDE--(1) ASSISTING SCHOOL SYSTEMS AND COLLEGES IN PLANNING FUNCTIONAL EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES, (2) CONDUCTING RESEARCH TO DISCOVER NEW AND BETTER SOLUTIONS TO SCHOOL PLANNING PROBLEMS, AND (3) DISSEMINATING IDEAS FOR…

  6. Cremation weights in east Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Bass, William M; Jantz, Richard L

    2004-09-01

    In spite of increasing number of cremations in the U.S., little is known about weights of cremated remains. This research was undertaken in order to add to the limited literature on cremains weights and to explore variation. Weights of cremated remains were obtained from the East Tennessee Crematorium. The sample consists of 151 males and 155 females. Age, sex, and race were obtained for each individual. Males are about 1000 g heavier than females. Both sexes lose weight with age, but females lose weight at about twice the rate of males. East Tennessee cremation weights were compared with those from Florida reported by Warren and Maples, and those from Southern California reported by Sonek. East Tennessee results were also compared with an earlier study on ash weight of anatomical human skeletons carried out by Trotter and Hixon. East Tennessee cremations weigh about 500 g more than the samples from Florida and California, and about the same as the earlier anatomical samples. We hypothesize that variation reflects variation in body weight and activity. This variation must be taken into account when cremation weights are at issue.

  7. Forest resources of Tennessee - 1972

    Treesearch

    Paul A. Murphy

    1972-01-01

    This report states the principal findings of a new forest survey of Tennessee. Data for growth and cut are given for 1970, and the inventory is reported for January 1, 1971. A canvass of forest products output in 1970 also contributed information.

  8. Forest resources of Tennessee - 1991

    Treesearch

    Dennis M. May

    1991-01-01

    The principal findings of the fifth forest survey of Tennessee (1989) and changes that have occurred since earlier surveys are presented in the report. Topics examined include the status and trends in forest area, timber volume, growth, removals, mortality, and timber-product output.

  9. Demography of Disadvantage in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lewis W., Comp.; And Others

    In this report, demography conceptualizes significant characteristics to serve as a basis for more intensive study, planning, and procedures focusing on the target group. A compilation of the latest reports available and primarily tabular in form, identifies and locates Tennessee's disadvantaged people, ranking the 95 counties on each of 8…

  10. Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Tennessee Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity International, Washington, DC.

    Designed for middle school through high school students, this unit contains eight lesson plans that focus on Tennessee state law. The state lessons correspond to lessons in the volume, "Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Drug Avoidance Lessons for Middle School & High School Students." Developed to be presented by educators, law…

  11. Corporal Punishment in Tennessee Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnard, Karren Q; Rust, James O.

    1981-01-01

    Responses of 101 Tennessee school superintendents indicate: all allow and use corporal punishment; 57 keep records of corporal punishment usage; corporal punishment is considered effective in many cases; the community is seen as supportive of corporal punishment; and the paddle appears to be the most popular method of corporal punishment. (NEC)

  12. Tennessee Minimum School Bus Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Board of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The School Bus Specifications and Procedures adopted by the 2000 National Conference on School Transportation and the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) were used as guides by the Tennessee State Board of Education Pupil Transportation Advisory Committee in developing the revised minimum specifications for school bus chassis and school…

  13. Urban forests of Tennessee, 2009

    Treesearch

    David J. Nowak; Anne B. Cumming; Daniel Twardus; Robert E. Hoehn; Christopher M. Oswalt; Thomas J. Brandeis

    2012-01-01

    Trees in cities can contribute significantly to human health and environmental quality. Unfortunately, little is known about the urban forest resource in the State of Tennessee and what it contributes locally and regionally in terms of ecology, economy, and social wellbeing. In an effort to better understand this resource and its values, the U.S. Department of...

  14. Tennessee emergency medicine workforce, 2009.

    PubMed

    Keenum, Amy J; Rawlings, Luke M; Odoi, Agricola; Wortley, Michael G; Lamsen, Leonard; Jones, Louis; Wallace, Lorraine S

    2013-03-01

    Describe the characteristics of the Tennessee (TN) Emergency Medicine (EM) workforce. A cross-sectional mail survey of all non-government emergency departments (EDs) in TN was performed between January and April 2009. Data collected included: number and residency training of physicians, ED volume, employment and type of mid-level providers. Survey datawere compared to recent national EM workforce data. Subgroup analysis of rural EDs using Rural-Urban Commuting Area Code (RUCA) criteria was conducted. We received responses from 50 of the 100 emergency departments surveyed. Roughly half (53 percent) were rural, based on RUCA criteria. Mid-level providers worked with physicians in 31 departments, with physician assistants(PAs) being employed more commonly than nurse practitioners(NPs). Paramedics and emergency medical technicians (EMTs) were employed less frequently. Most EM residency trained physicians in Tennessee are working in EDs with approximately 39,000 annual visits per year or greater. Subspecialty physicians such as neurosurgeons, gastroenterologists and otorhinolaryngologists are generally not available to rural EDs, except by patient transfer, illustrating the marked differences in the work environments. While there is clearly a need for more emergency medicine residency training programs in Tennessee, the need to continue to provide advanced training for family medicine residency trained physicians is also clear. Family medicine doctors provide most of the rural emergency medicine in Tennessee.

  15. Shaping Tennessee's Career Ladder Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handler, Janet R.

    This paper highlights selected key findings and discusses several issues emerging from an extended case study of the development and operation of a statewide teacher career ladder enacted into law in Tennessee in 1984. Data for the study were gathered through interviews, observations, elimination of documents, and a survey of selected teachers.…

  16. Pasteuria Nishizawae Studies in Tennessee

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spores of Pasteuria nishizawae were first recovered in Tennessee in 2008 attached to soybean cyst nematode juveniles, Heterodera glycines, and inside cysts extracted from soil collected at Ames Plantation, Grand Junction, TN. The field had a 15% increase from 1997 through 2004 in number of samples ...

  17. Environmental Appeals Board Order on Tennessee Valley Authority

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  18. Coal gasification tests at TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority): Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, M.C.; Williamson, P.C.

    1987-02-01

    This report presents the results obtained from the EPRI cofunded tests conducted at TVA's 200 tpd Texaco coal gasification facility equipped with a water quench gasifier. Four US coals were tested at TVA: (1) Utah coal from the SUFCO mine, (2) Illinois No. 6 coal from the Amax Delta mine, (3) Pittsburgh No. 8 coal from the Blacksville No. 2 mine and (4) a high ash-fusion Maryland coal. The TVA tests were of short term duration totaling approximately 10 to 20 days of cumulative operation on each coal. The gasification behavior of each coal was tested under a wide range of process conditions and feed characteristics. All four coals produced carbon conversion of 92% or higher. Utah and Illinois No. 6 coals achieved carbon conversions of 95 to 97%. The high heating value Pittsburgh No. 8 coal had lower carbon conversion because the maximum allowable gasifier temperature was reached at relatively low O/C ratios. The high-ash fusion Maryland coal was gasified with a fluxing agent at temperatures within the design limit of the TVA gasifier. The gasification behavior of the coals was similar to that observed from tests at other Texaco gasifiers. However, earlier experiments at Texaco's Montebello Research Laboratories showed higher values for both carbon conversion and coal gas efficiency. 27 figs., 35 tabs.

  19. Construction data and retrieval procedures for selected wells drilled from 1985 through 1987 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zehner, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-eight wells were constructed by the U. S. Geological Survey for use in describing the groundwater flow system in Melton Valley, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in eastern Tennessee. The wells were installed at 18 locations in Melton Valley and along the Clinch River during the period 1985 through 1987. During the same period, 19 wells were constructed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 7 locations in or near radioactive-waste burial grounds in Melton Valley. Construction data for all 47 wells are in the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Site Inventory data system, where information is also stored for 450 wells that were completed at the laboratory in earlier years. The data can be electronically retrieved by personnel who have access to the U.S. Geological Survey Prime computer located in Nashville, Tennessee, and retrieval procedures are given in the report. (USGS)

  20. 76 FR 73665 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority and the University of Tennessee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ...) have completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and have determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian... human remains may contact the TVA and McClung Museum. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian...

  1. Valley Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-529, 30 October 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the floor of an ancient valley located near the Pyrrhae Chaos region of Mars. This valley might have been carved by liquid water, but today no evidence remains that a fluid ever flowed through it. Long after the valley formed, its floor was covered by large, windblown, ripple-like dunes. This picture is located near 13.0oS, 31.2oW. The image is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  2. Valley fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... southwestern United States, and in Central and South America. You get it by breathing in the fungus ... that causes Valley fever) Chest x-ray Sputum culture Sputum smear (KOH test) Tests done for more ...

  3. River restoration strategies in channelized, low-gradient landscapes of West Tennessee, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.P.; Diehl, T.H.; Turrini-Smith, L. A.; Maas-Baldwin, J.; Croyle, Z.

    2009-01-01

    West Tennessee has a complex history of watershed disturbance, including agricultural erosion, channelization, accelerated valley sedimentation, and the removal and reestablishment of beaver. Watershed management has evolved from fl oodplain drainage via pervasive channelization to include local drainage canal maintenance and local river restoration. Many unmaintained canals are undergoing excessive aggradation and complex channel evolution driven by upland erosion and low valley gradient. The locus of aggradation in fully occluded canals (valley plugs) moves up-valley as sediment continues to accumulate in the backwater behind the plug. Valley plugs that cause canal avulsion can lead to redevelopment of meandering channels in less disturbed areas of the fl oodplain, in a process of passive self-restoration. Some valley plugs have brought restored fl oodplain function, reoccupation of extant historic river channels, and formation of a "sediment shadow" that protects downstream reaches from excess sedimentation. Despite the presence of numerous opportunities, there is presently no mechanism for including valley plugs in mitigation projects. In 1997 a survey of 14 reference reach cross sections documented relations between drainage area and bankfull geometry of relatively unmodified streams in West Tennessee. Reassessment of seven of those sites in 2007 showed that one had been dammed by beaver and that two sites could not be analyzed further because of signifi cant vertical or lateral instability. In contrast to other regions of North America, the results suggest that stream channels in this region fl ood more frequently than once each year, and can remain out of banks for several weeks each year. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  4. Patterns of cave biodiversity and endemism in the Appalachians and Interior Plateau of Tennessee, USA.

    PubMed

    Niemiller, Matthew L; Zigler, Kirk S

    2013-01-01

    Using species distribution data, we developed a georeferenced database of troglobionts (cave-obligate species) in Tennessee to examine spatial patterns of species richness and endemism, including >2000 records for 200 described species. Forty aquatic troglobionts (stygobionts) and 160 terrestrial troglobionts are known from caves in Tennessee, the latter having the greatest diversity of any state in the United States. Endemism was high, with 25% of terrestrial troglobionts (40 species) and 20% of stygobionts (eight species) known from just a single cave and nearly two-thirds of all troglobionts (130 species) known from five or fewer caves. Species richness and endemism were greatest in the Interior Plateau (IP) and Southwestern Appalachians (SWA) ecoregions, which were twice as diverse as the Ridge and Valley (RV). Troglobiont species assemblages were most similar between the IP and SWA, which shared 59 species, whereas the RV cave fauna was largely distinct. We identified a hotspot of cave biodiversity with a center along the escarpment of the Cumberland Plateau in south-central Tennessee defined by both species richness and endemism that is contiguous with a previously defined hotspot in northeastern Alabama. Nearly half (91 species) of Tennessee's troglobiont diversity occurs in this region where several cave systems contain ten or more troglobionts, including one with 23 species. In addition, we identified distinct troglobiont communities across the state. These communities corresponded to hydrological boundaries and likely reflect past or current connectivity between subterranean habitats within and barriers between hydrological basins. Although diverse, Tennessee's subterranean fauna remains poorly studied and many additional species await discovery and description. We identified several undersampled regions and outlined conservation and management priorities to improve our knowledge and aid in protection of the subterranean biodiversity in Tennessee.

  5. Tennessee and Its Children: Unmet Needs, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Pam; Delk, Fay L.; Petty, Steve; Wynn, Debbie; O'Neal, Linda

    Based on the view that the tax structure in Tennessee is inadequate and produces chronic problems, especially for the state's children, this Kids Count report identifies unmet education, health care, and resource needs of the children in Tennessee. Following introductory remarks discussing the current tax structure and state spending, Section 1 of…

  6. Chronic Absenteeism in Tennessee's Early Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attridge, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Although the average daily attendance rate for Tennessee students is 95 percent, almost 45,000, or 10 percent, of Tennessee K-3 students missed at least a month's worth of school days during the 2014-15 school year. These "chronically absent" students present a particular problem for schools that are charged with developing foundational…

  7. Tennessee, 2008 forest inventory and analysis factsheet

    Treesearch

    Christopher Oswalt; Christopher King

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for the State of Tennessee based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program at the Southern Research Station of the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture Division of Forestry. These...

  8. Teacher Morale in Rural Northeast Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggers, Brenda Dishman

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate the factors that influence the morale levels of teachers in the public school systems of 3 contiguous counties in rural northeast Tennessee. The level of teacher morale was measured using the Purdue Teacher Opinionaire. Data associated with the Tennessee Value-Added Assessment System…

  9. West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Anna; Hailey, Beth

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference held at Union University in Jackson, Tennessee on October 14, 2006. The conference theme, Turning the Pages: A Focus on Children's Literature, was emphasized throughout the day. During the conference, the early childhood classroom teachers, preservice teachers, and administrators…

  10. Evaluation System Weighing down Tennessee Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitin, Liana

    2011-01-01

    A state law, which helped Tennessee win Race to the Top money, pushed schools to implement a system that had limited pilot-testing. Education officials in Tennessee are taking flak from teachers and unions for rushing the implementation of the new teacher-evaluation system that will eventually undergird tenure decisions--a move, some worry, that…

  11. 76 FR 29286 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00054

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster TN-00054 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Tennessee (FEMA- 1978-DR), dated 05/09/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, Tornadoes, and...

  12. 75 FR 57997 - Tennessee Disaster # TN-00043

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster TN-00043 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Tennessee (FEMA- 1937-DR), dated 09/15/2010. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding. Incident...

  13. 76 FR 45309 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00058

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster TN-00058 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Tennessee (FEMA- 4005-DR), dated 07/20/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Straight-line Winds...

  14. Outreach and Engagement at Tennessee State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesney, Clyde E.; Samuel, Javiette; Fuller, Deena Sue

    2009-01-01

    Tennessee State University has a rich history of public service and civic engagement--thus the motto "Think, Work, Serve." Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University has grown dramatically from a small college to two campuses. We actively engage in adhering to the cornerstone of the land-grant universities: teaching, research, and outreach. Our…

  15. Targeted Merit Aid: Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ness, Erik C.; Noland, Brian E.

    2004-01-01

    This research provides an overview of the Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship program. This research reviews the development of the program and provides a description of House bill 787. The research also provides baseline data on higher education in Tennessee. Information related to enrollments, graduates, student-faculty ratios, and…

  16. Tennessee County Higher Education Profiles, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The "Tennessee County Higher Education Profiles 2010" provide basic information with respect to higher education for each county in Tennessee. The 2010 "Profiles" represent the fourth year for this report. In the demographic and enrollment sections, a few changes were made to better meet the needs of policymakers. This document…

  17. Tennessee, 2010 forest inventory and analysis factsheet

    Treesearch

    Christopher M. Oswalt

    2012-01-01

    This science update provides an overview of forest resource attributes for the State of Tennessee based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program at the Southern Research Station of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture Division of Forestry. These annual...

  18. Tennessee, 2011-forest inventory and analysis factsheet

    Treesearch

    Christopher M. Oswalt

    2013-01-01

    This science update provides an overview of forest resource attributes for the State of Tennessee based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program at the Southern Research Station of the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture Division of Forestry. These...

  19. West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Anna; Hailey, Beth

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference held at Union University in Jackson, Tennessee on October 14, 2006. The conference theme, Turning the Pages: A Focus on Children's Literature, was emphasized throughout the day. During the conference, the early childhood classroom teachers, preservice teachers, and administrators…

  20. Tennessee Higher Education Profiles and Trends, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Tennessee Code Annotated (T.C.A.) Section 49-7-202 (c) (7) requires the Tennessee Higher Education Commission to "submit a biennial report to the governor and the general assembly, commenting upon major developments, trends, new policies, budgets and financial considerations which in the judgment of the commission will be useful to the…

  1. Tennessee Higher Education Profiles and Trends, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Tennessee Code Annotated (T.C.A.) Section 49-7-202 (c) (7) requires the Tennessee Higher Education Commission to "submit a biennial report to the governor and the general assembly, commenting upon major developments, trends, new policies, budgets and financial considerations which in the judgment of the commission will be useful to the…

  2. Teacher Supply and Demand in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornett, Lynn

    This report presents data on Tennessee's teaching workforce. There has been a recent increase in the percentage of new, inexperienced teachers hired in Tennessee. While there was no change in teacher turnover in recent years, the loss of new teachers became more serious throughout the 1990s. Lack of teacher and administrator diversity remained a…

  3. Martian Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    21 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of a martian valley, perhaps long, long ago carved by a liquid such as water, in northern Terra Cimmeria. The channel that might have once run down through the valley is no longer visible; the floor is covered with large, light-toned, windblown ripples.

    Location near: 5.7oS, 227.6oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  4. Volume Tables and Point-Sampling Factors for Shortleaf Pines in Plantation on Abandoned Fields in Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia Highlands

    Treesearch

    Glendon W. Smalley; David R. Bower

    1968-01-01

    The tables and equations published here provide ways to estimate total and merchantable cubic-foot volumes, both inside and outside bark, of shortleaf pines (Pinus echinata Mill.) planted on abandoned fields in the Ridge and Valley, Cumberland Plateau, Eastern Highland Rim, and Western Highland Rim regions of Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia (fig. 1). There already are...

  5. Methods for assessing channel conditions related to scour-critical conditions at bridges in Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bryan, B.A.; Simon, Andrew; Outlaw, G.S.; Thomas, Randy

    1995-01-01

    The ability to assess quickly the potential for scour at a bridge site, to evaluate those bridges with the greatest potential for significant amounts of scour, and to then identify scour-critical structures is important for public protection and bridge maintenance planning. A bridge-scour assessment information form was developed for collecting data describing the bridge site; the hydraulic geomorphic, and vegetation characteristics of the channel. Information from site assessments of 3,964 bridges in Tennessee was used to develop indexes of potential scour characteristics over broad geographic areas, such as counties, regions, or drainage basins. Channel instability charac- teristics differ from region to region. In west Tennessee counties, channel instability has progressed from valley bottoms into the uplands through headward degradation. In middle and east counties of Tennessee, channel widening is a dominant process, but widespread degradation has been prevented by stream beds being lines with erosion-resistant bedrock, boulder, cobble, and gravel, and by the absence of channelization. Neither quantifiable headcutting nor degradation in bedrock channels was noted at any site in the State. However, potential for lateral scour is prevalent in Middle and East Tennessee.

  6. NREPS Applications for Water Supply and Management in California and Tennessee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, P.; Scott, M.; Carery, L. D.; Petersen, W. A.

    2011-01-01

    Management of water resources is a balancing act between temporally and spatially limited sources and competitive needs which can often exceed the supply. In order to manage water resources over a region such as the San Joaquin Valley or the Tennessee River Valley, it is pertinent to know the amount of water that has fallen in the watershed and where the water is going within it. Since rain gauge networks are typically sparsely spaced, it is typical that the majority of rainfall on the region may not be measured. To mitigate this under-sampling of rainfall, weather radar has long been employed to provide areal rainfall estimates. The Next-Generation Weather Radars (NEXRAD) make it possible to estimate rainfall over the majority of the conterminous United States. The NEXRAD Rainfall Estimation Processing System (NREPS) was developed specifically for the purpose of using weather radar to estimate rainfall for water resources management. The NREPS is tailored to meet customer needs on spatial and temporal scales relevant to the hydrologic or land-surface models of the end-user. It utilizes several techniques to mitigate artifacts in the NEXRAD data from contaminating the rainfall field. These techniques include clutter filtering, correction for occultation by topography as well as accounting for the vertical profile of reflectivity. This presentation will focus on improvements made to the NREPS system to map rainfall in the San Joaquin Valley for NASA s Water Supply and Management Project in California, but also ongoing rainfall mapping work in the Tennessee River watershed for the Tennessee Valley Authority and possible future applications in other areas of the continent.

  7. Tennessee Higher Education Fact Book, 2008-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Tennessee Higher Education Commission was created in 1967 by the Tennessee General Assembly to achieve coordination and foster unity with regard to higher education. The Commission coordinates two systems of higher education: the University of Tennessee institutions governed by the University of Tennessee Board of Trustees, and the state…

  8. 75 FR 73065 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application November 18, 2010. Take notice that on November 5, 2010 Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street... directed to Mr. Thomas Joyce, Manager, Certificates, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, 1001 Louisiana...

  9. 75 FR 27332 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application May 6, 2010. Take notice that on April 30, 2010, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston... this application should be directed to Susan T. Halbach, Senior Counsel, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company...

  10. Sediment characteristics of Tennessee streams and reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trimble, Stanley W.; Carey, William P.

    1984-01-01

    Measured suspended-sediment data and reservoir sedimentation data have been analyzed to determine sediment yields and transport characteristics of Tennessee streams. Measured suspended-sediment is mostly silt and clay size material even in the sand-bed channels of western Tennessee. Unmeasured load accounts for less than 10 percent of the total sediment load in western Tennessee. Unmeasured load in middle and eastern Tennessee streams is believed to be only a small percentage of total load because bed material is generally coarse and quite variable. Sediment of total load because bed material is generally coarse and quite variable. Sediment yields for middle and eastern Tennessee basins generally are less than 800 tons per square mile per year ((tons/mi2)/yr), however, highly disturbed basins can have yields from 1,000 to 3,000 (tons/mi2)/yr. Yields for the heavily agricultural and channelized basins of western Tennessee generally range from 700 to 1,000 (tons/mi2)/yr. Yields for the Hatchie River in western Tennessee are less than 200 (tons/mi2)/yr reflecting the lack of floodplain agriculture and channelization. (USGS)

  11. Three approaches to the classification of inland wetlands. [Dismal Swamp, Tennessee, and Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, P. T.; Malone, D.; Brooks, P. D.; Carter, V.

    1977-01-01

    In the Dismal Swamp project, seasonal, color-infrared aerial photographs and LANDSAT digital data were interpreted for a detailed analysis of the vegetative communities in a large, highly altered wetland. In Western Tennessee, seasonal high altitude color-infrared aerial photographs provided the hydrologic and vegetative information needed to map inland wetlands, using a classification system developed for the Tennessee Valley Region. In Florida, color-infrared aerial photographs were analyzed to produce wetland maps using three existing classification systems to evaluate the information content and mappability of each system. The methods used in each of the three projects can be extended or modified for use in the mapping of inland wetlands in other parts of the United States.

  12. Barge loading facilities in conjunction with wood chipping and sawlog mill, Tennessee River Mile 145. 9R: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental consequences of approving, denying, or adopting reasonable alternatives to a request for barge loading facilities. These facilities would serve a proposed wood chipping and sawlog products operation at Tennessee River Mile (TRM) 145.9, right descending bank, (Kentucky Lake), in Perry County, Tennessee. The site is located between Short Creek and Peters Landing. The applicant is Southeastern Forest Products, L.P. (SFP), Box 73, Linden, Tennessee and the proposed facilities would be constructed on or adjacent to company owned land. Portions of the barge terminal would be constructed on land over which flood easement rights are held by the United States of America and administered by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) and TVA have regulatory control over the proposed barge terminal facilities since the action would involve construction in the Tennessee River which is a navigable water of the United States. The wood chipping and sawlog products facilities proposed on the upland property are not regulated by the CE or TVA. On the basis of the analysis which follows, it has been determined that a modified proposal (as described herein) would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment, and does not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement. 8 refs.

  13. LITTLE FROG ROADLESS AREA, TENNESSEE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Force, Eric R.; Gazdik, Gertrude C.

    1984-01-01

    No mineral-resource potential was identified during studies of the Little Frog Roadless Area, Tennessee. Possibilities exist, however, for the occurrence of massive sulfide-bearing rocks of the type mined in the adjacent Ducktown Basin at depth beneath the roadless area. A possibility also exists for the presence of natural gas in sedimentary rocks at great depth. Insufficient data to support these concepts precludes assessing any of the roadless area as having resource potential. A limited amount of geologic mapping coupled with seismic work would be useful to test whether rocks of the Ducktown Basin are present at depth under the roadless areas. Seismic work and drilling would be necessary also to test for the presence of gas at great depths.

  14. FLINT MILL ROADLESS AREA, TENNESSEE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffitts, Wallace R.; Jones, Jay G.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey was made on the Flint Mill Roadless Area in northeastern Tennessee. Studies of known manganese deposits, most of which are small and mined out, evaluation of iron prospects, and the results of a geochemical survey for other metals in stream sediments indicate there is probable resource potential for the occurrence of small iron-manganese resources in the roadless area. Nonmetallic minerals such as clay, carbonate rock, and other industrial raw material are found in the area but, similar commodites are found outside the area. The remote possibility of deep oil or gas in the southern Appalachians, of which the roadless area is a part, cannot be evaluated with existing data. Further geophysical study and possibly drilling would be necessary to evaluate the resource potential for gas and oil in the roadless area.

  15. 76 FR 19515 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00050

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... State of Tennessee (FEMA- 1965-DR), dated 04/01/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Flooding..., Moore, Morgan, Pickett, Scott, Union. The Interest Rates are: Percent For Physical Damage: Non-Profit...

  16. The woody biomass resource of Tennessee, 1989

    Treesearch

    James F. Rosson

    1993-01-01

    Tabulates fresh and dry biomass estimates of major trees in Tennessee by forest type, ownership, species, stand basal area, tree class, diameter, and height. Information is presented for total tree, stem, and crown components.

  17. View of Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky border area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A vertical view of the Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky border area, as photographed from Earth orbit by one of the six lenses of the Itek-furnished S190-A Multispectral Photographic Facility Experiment aboard the Skylab space station. The long, narrow ridge is Pine Mountain; and it is crossed by U.S. 25E as it passes through the famed Cumberland Gap which at 1,600 feet elevation crosses Cumberland Mountain. Kingsport, Tennessee is located east of Cumberland Gap near the center of the picture. Interstate 81 under construction can be seen southeast of Kingsport. Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia is further east. Greenville and Elizabethton, Tennessee can also be seen in this photograph. The clouds across the southeast edge of the picture are over the Blue Ridge Mountains.

  18. Environmental setting and water-quality issues in the lower Tennessee River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kingsbury, James A.; Hoos, Anne B.; Woodside, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program are to describe current water-quality conditions for a large part of the Nation's water resources, identify water-quality changes over time, and identify the primary natural and human factors that affect water quality. The lower Tennessee River Basin is one of 59 river basins selected for study. The water-quality assessment of the lower Tennessee River Basin study unit began in 1997. The lower Tennessee River Basin study unit encompasses an area of about 19,500 square miles and extends from Chattanooga, Tennessee, to Paducah, Kentucky. The study unit had a population of about 1.5 million people in 1995.The study unit was subdivided into subunits with relatively homogeneous geology and physiography. Subdivision of the study unit creates a framework to assess the effects of natural and cultural settings on water quality. Nine subunits were delineated in the study unit; their boundaries generally coincide with level III and level IV ecoregion boundaries. The nine subunits are the Coastal Plain, Transition, Western Highland Rim, Outer Nashville Basin, Inner Nashville Basin, Eastern Highland Rim, Plateau Escarpment and Valleys, Cumberland Plateau, and Valley and Ridge.The lower Tennessee River Basin consists of predominantly forest (51 percent) and agricultural land (40 percent). Activities related to agricultural land use, therefore, are the primary cultural factors likely to have a widespread effect on surface- and ground-water quality in the study unit. Inputs of total nitrogen and phosphorus from agricultural activities in 1992 were about 161,000 and 37,900 tons, respectively. About 3.7 million pounds (active ingredient) of pesticides was applied to crops in the lower Tennessee River Basin in 1992.State water-quality agencies identified nutrient enrichment and pathogens as water-quality issues affecting both surface and ground water in the lower Tennessee River Basin. Water-quality data collected by State

  19. Perceptions of Tennessee School Principals about the Tennessee Educator Acceleration Model (Team)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Carmen Belcher

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to analyze the perceptions of Tennessee principals about the implementation of the Tennessee Educator Acceleration Model (TEAM) and the impact of TEAM on teachers' instructional practice and professional growth. Participants in this study were PK-12 public school principals from 12 districts in the First…

  20. Large springs of east Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Pao-chang P.; Criner, J.H.; Poole, J.L.

    1963-01-01

    Springs constitute an important source of water in east Tennessee, and many individual springs are capable of supplying the large quantities needed for municipal and industrial supplies. Most of the springs in east Tennessee issue from solution openings and fractured and faulted zones in limestone and dolomite of the Knox Group, Chickamauga Limestone, and Conasauga Group. The ability of these rocks to yield a sustained flow of water to springs is dependent on a system of interconnected openings through which water can infiltrate from the land surface and move to points of natural discharge. Ninety springs were selected for detailed study, and 84 of these are analyzed in terms of magnitude and variability of discharge. Of the 84 springs analyzed, 4 flow at an average rate of 10 to 100 cfs (cubic feet per second), 62 at an average rate of 1 to 10 cfs, and 18 at an average rate of 1 cfs or less. Of the 90 springs, 75 are variable in their discharge; that is, the ratio of their fluctuations to their average discharges exceeds 100 percent. Mathematical analysis of the flow recession curve of Mill Spring near Jefferson City shows that the hydrologic system contributing to the flow of the spring has an effective capacity of about 70 million cubic feet of water. The rate of depletion of this volume of water, in the absence of significant precipitation, averages 0.0056 cfs per day between the time when the hydrologic system is full and the time when the spring ceases to flow. From such a curve it is possible to determine at any time the residual volume of water remaining in the system and the expected rate of decrease in discharge from that time to cessation of flow. Correlation of discharge measurements of 22 springs with those of Mill Spring shows that rough approximations of discharge can be projected for springs for which few measurements are available. Seventeen of the springs analyzed in this manner show good correlation with Mill Spring: that is, their coefficients

  1. VIEW OF TENNESSEE COAL & IRON (TCI) U.S. STEEL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF TENNESSEE COAL & IRON (TCI) - U.S. STEEL, ENSLEY RAIL MILL SITE. POWERHOUSE IN LEFT BACKGROUND, MIXER IN RIGHT FOREGROUND. - Tennessee Coal & Iron Company, Ensley Works, West of residential & commercial districts, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  2. Preliminary delineation and description of the regional aquifers of Tennessee : the Highland Rim aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brahana, J.V.; Bradley, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Highland Rim aquifer system in Tennessee is primarily composed of Mississippian carbonates and occurs west of the Valley and Ridge Province. It crops out in the Highland Rim and the Sequatchie Valley. It has been removed by erosion from the Central Basin. Groundwater in the Highland Rim aquifer system occurs primarily in secondary openings including solution openings, joints, and faults. The Chattanooga Shale is the lower confining layer for the Highland Rim aquifer system. Under the Cumberland plateau, this aquifer system is separated from the overlying Pennsylvanian formations by the Pennington Shale. The Highland Rim aquifer system is an important source of drinking water. It supplies most of the rural, domestic, and many public supplies of drinking water in the Highland Rim. Where there is a dynamic flow system, dissolved solids concentrations are less than 500 mg/L. However, isolated cells may exist where the groundwater has dissolved solids concentrations of more than 1 ,000 mg/L. (USGS)

  3. Karst subsidence in East Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelle, R.H.; Newton, J.G.; Tanner, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Waste disposal site selection and facility design in regions dominated by carbonate bedrock must carefully consider karst development and the factors which contribute to subsidence activity. The Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory has completed a three phase study of karst subsidence in East Tennessee to quantify historical subsidence activity. The purpose of the study was to determine the principal factors which cause karst subsidence in the region. Techniques used and results obtained in this study form a basis for more detailed risk assessment at the local scale within the region. As development pressures diminish available land for various uses, risk-based land use decisions must be made to site critical facilities. To fulfill the study objectives a three phase study was designed including, (1) collection of subsidence data and compilation of a database, (2) performance of detailed studies of subsidence in three, two-to-five square-mile areas, and (3) synthesis of data obtained to; quantify the predominant sinkhole collapse dimensions, and identify events prior to subsidence or collapse events which may have caused the event, and estimate the intensity of subsidence as a function of geologic unit within subregional areas of higher and lower subsidence risk. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Bits, Bytes, and Barriers: Tennessee Teachers' Use of Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachia Educational Lab., Charleston, WV.

    This report presents the results of a study conducted with 449 Tennessee educators that investigated the use of educational technology in the state's classrooms. The Tennessee Education Association, as part of its Tennessee Teachers' Technology Initiative, funded in part by a grant from BellSouth, collaborated with the Appalachia Educational…

  5. Broadband Access for Students at East Tennessee State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Thomas Scott

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the availability of Internet access for students attending East Tennessee State University during the fall semester 2013. It has been unknown to what degree broadband access is available in the East Tennessee State University service area that includes counties in East Tennessee, Southwest Virginia, and…

  6. 75 FR 53281 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application August 24, 2010. On August 12, 2010, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee) filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) an application under section 7(b) of the Natural Gas Act and section 157 of...

  7. 75 FR 38801 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ...] Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application June 24, 2010. Take notice that on June 11, 2010, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed in the above referenced docket an application pursuant to section 7(b) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and Part 157 of...

  8. 75 FR 74705 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application November 24, 2010. Take notice that on November 12, 2010, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana... the Natural Gas Act for a certificate of public convenience and necessity to construct, and...

  9. 76 FR 22093 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application On March 31, 2011, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) an application under section 7(c) of the Natural Gas...

  10. 75 FR 80483 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application December 15, 2010. Take notice that on December 13, 2010, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana... ownership interest in approximately 400 feet of 24-inch interconnecting pipe to Rockies Express Pipeline...

  11. 76 FR 18747 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application Take notice that on March 9, 2011, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), filed an application in Docket No. CP11-133... transportation services provided to shippers on the interstate pipeline systems owned by National Fuel Gas...

  12. 76 FR 47220 - Tennessee; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Tennessee; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-4005-DR), dated July 20, 2011, and related... determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Tennessee resulting from severe storms, straight...

  13. 77 FR 20043 - Tennessee; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Tennessee; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-4060-DR), dated March 16, 2012, and related... have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Tennessee resulting from severe storms...

  14. 76 FR 33395 - Tennessee; Disaster Number TN-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Tennessee; Disaster Number TN-00052 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment... Assistance Only for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-1974-DR), dated 05/01/2011. Incident: Severe Storms... major disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Tennessee, dated 05/01...

  15. 76 FR 33773 - Tennessee; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Tennessee; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-1978-DR), dated May 9, 2011, and related... determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Tennessee resulting from severe storms, flooding...

  16. 76 FR 35261 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00052 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... Only for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-1974-DR), dated 05/01/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes... major disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Tennessee, dated 05/01...

  17. 76 FR 32369 - Tennessee; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Tennessee; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of an emergency for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-3321-EM), dated May 4, 2011, and related... emergency conditions in certain areas of the State of Tennessee resulting from flooding beginning on April...

  18. 75 FR 30874 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00038 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 6... Only for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-1909-DR), dated 05/04/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding... major disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Tennessee, dated 05/04...

  19. 40 CFR 282.92 - Tennessee State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tennessee State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.92 Tennessee State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Tennessee is approved to administer and enforce a petroleum...

  20. 76 FR 35260 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00053

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00053 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... Tennessee (FEMA-1979-DR), dated 05/09/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line, Winds, and... the State of Tennessee, dated 05/09/2011 is hereby amended to establish the incident period for this...

  1. 78 FR 55770 - [Tennessee Disaster greek-iTN-00077

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    .... SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of TENNESSEE dated... Counties: Tennessee: Cheatham; Robertson; Rutherford; Sumner; Williamson; Wilson. The Interest Rates are... 13738 0. The State which received an EIDL Declaration is Tennessee. (Catalog of Federal Domestic...

  2. 76 FR 35260 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00055

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00055 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Only for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-1979-DR), dated 05/09/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes... major disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Tennessee, dated 05/09...

  3. 40 CFR 282.92 - Tennessee State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tennessee State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.92 Tennessee State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Tennessee is approved to administer and enforce a petroleum...

  4. 76 FR 27739 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00051

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00051 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Tennessee (FEMA-1974-DR), dated 05/01/ 2011. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and... State of Tennessee, dated 05/01/2011 is hereby amended to include the following areas as adversely...

  5. 40 CFR 282.92 - Tennessee State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tennessee State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.92 Tennessee State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Tennessee is approved to administer and enforce a petroleum...

  6. 76 FR 36165 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00053

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00053 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4... Tennessee (FEMA-1979-DR), dated 05/09/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line, Winds, and... of Tennessee, dated 05/09/2011 is hereby amended to extend the deadline for filing applications for...

  7. 76 FR 32387 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00053

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00053 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Tennessee (FEMA-1979-DR), dated 05/09/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line, Winds, and.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The notice of the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of Tennessee, dated...

  8. 75 FR 38155 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00039 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 8... Tennessee (FEMA-1909-DR), dated 05/04/ 2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, Straight-line Winds, and... State of Tennessee, dated 05/04/2010 is hereby amended to extend the deadline for filing applications...

  9. 40 CFR 282.92 - Tennessee State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tennessee State-Administered Program... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.92 Tennessee State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Tennessee is approved to administer and enforce a petroleum...

  10. 75 FR 30873 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00038 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 7... Only for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-1909-DR), dated 05/04/2010 . Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding... major disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Tennessee, dated 05/04...

  11. Broadband Access for Students at East Tennessee State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Thomas Scott

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the availability of Internet access for students attending East Tennessee State University during the fall semester 2013. It has been unknown to what degree broadband access is available in the East Tennessee State University service area that includes counties in East Tennessee, Southwest Virginia, and…

  12. Floods of February 1989 in Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones, Ferdinand; Gamble, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    Rainfall amounts of over 5 inches the night of February 13 and the morning of February 14, 1989, caused flooding in areas of Middle and West Tennessee. The towns of Lebanon in Middle Tennessee and Obion in West Tennessee were most severely affected. Most of the business district in Lebanon and many residential areas in Obion were flooded. Recurrence intervals for 24-hour rainfall totals were as high as 25 years at some sites but most peak discharges had recurrence intervals of less than 10 years. Rainfall amounts for the period February 13-20, 1989, peak stages and discharges for this flood, the peak of record, and a list of discharge measurements made during the flood are documented. (USGS)

  13. Surficial Geologic Map of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park Region, Tennessee and North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southworth, Scott; Schultz, Art; Denenny, Danielle; Triplett, James

    2004-01-01

    The Surficial Geology of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park Region, Tennessee and North Carolina was mapped from 1993 to 2003 under a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Park Service (NPS). This 1:100,000-scale digital geologic map was compiled from 2002 to 2003 from unpublished field investigations maps at 1:24,000-scale. The preliminary surficial geologic data and map support cooperative investigations with NPS, the U.S. Natural Resource Conservation Service, and the All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory (http://www.dlia.org/) (Southworth, 2001). Although the focus of our work was within the Park, the geology of the surrounding area is provided for regional context. Surficial deposits document the most recent part of the geologic history of this part of the western Blue Ridge and eastern Tennessee Valley of the Valley and Ridge of the Southern Appalachians. Additionally, there is great variety of surficial materials, which directly affect the different types of soil and associated flora and fauna. The surficial deposits accumulated over tens of millions of years under varied climatic conditions during the Cenozoic era and resulted from a composite of geologic processes.

  14. Water use, availability, and net demand in the Tennessee River watershed within Alabama, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, Amy C.; Harper, Michael J.; Littlepage, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Survey of Alabama. Net water demand for the watershed was calculated by subtracting the Tennessee Valley Authority estimates of return flow from water withdrawals. The net water demand was 136 Mgal/d, which is less than 1 percent of the estimated water available.

  15. Food habits of bobcats in eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Story, J.D.; Galbraith, W.J.; Kitchings, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    Food habits of bobcats (Lynx rufus) in eastern Tennessee were determined from analyzing 176 cat samples collected on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park. Remains of cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) were the most frequently occurring food item. White-tail deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and pine vole (Microtus pinetorum) remains also were found frequently in samples. Data obtained from this study indicated that food preferences for bobcats in eastern Tennessee are similar to those in other southeastern states where the habitat is similar to the Oak Ridge area and somewhat different from those with significantly different habitat.

  16. Patterns of Cave Biodiversity and Endemism in the Appalachians and Interior Plateau of Tennessee, USA

    PubMed Central

    Niemiller, Matthew L.; Zigler, Kirk S.

    2013-01-01

    Using species distribution data, we developed a georeferenced database of troglobionts (cave-obligate species) in Tennessee to examine spatial patterns of species richness and endemism, including >2000 records for 200 described species. Forty aquatic troglobionts (stygobionts) and 160 terrestrial troglobionts are known from caves in Tennessee, the latter having the greatest diversity of any state in the United States. Endemism was high, with 25% of terrestrial troglobionts (40 species) and 20% of stygobionts (eight species) known from just a single cave and nearly two-thirds of all troglobionts (130 species) known from five or fewer caves. Species richness and endemism were greatest in the Interior Plateau (IP) and Southwestern Appalachians (SWA) ecoregions, which were twice as diverse as the Ridge and Valley (RV). Troglobiont species assemblages were most similar between the IP and SWA, which shared 59 species, whereas the RV cave fauna was largely distinct. We identified a hotspot of cave biodiversity with a center along the escarpment of the Cumberland Plateau in south-central Tennessee defined by both species richness and endemism that is contiguous with a previously defined hotspot in northeastern Alabama. Nearly half (91 species) of Tennessee’s troglobiont diversity occurs in this region where several cave systems contain ten or more troglobionts, including one with 23 species. In addition, we identified distinct troglobiont communities across the state. These communities corresponded to hydrological boundaries and likely reflect past or current connectivity between subterranean habitats within and barriers between hydrological basins. Although diverse, Tennessee’s subterranean fauna remains poorly studied and many additional species await discovery and description. We identified several undersampled regions and outlined conservation and management priorities to improve our knowledge and aid in protection of the subterranean biodiversity in Tennessee

  17. Saline Valley

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-22

    These images of the Saline Valley area, California, were acquired March 30, 2000 and cover a full ASTER scene (60 by 60 km). Each image displays data from a different spectral region, and illustrates the complementary nature of surface compositional information available as a function of wavelength. This image displays visible and near infrared bands 3, 2, and 1 in red, green, and blue (RGB). Vegetation appears red, snow and dry salt lakes are white, and exposed rocks are brown, gray, yellow and blue. Rock colors mainly reflect the presence of iron minerals, and variations in albedo. Figure 1 displays short wavelength infrared bands 4, 6, and 8 as RGB. In this wavelength region, clay, carbonate, and sulfate minerals have diagnostic absorption features, resulting in distinct colors on the image. For example, limestones are yellow-green, and purple areas are kaolinite-rich. Figure 2 displays thermal infrared bands 13, 12 and 10 as RGB. In this wavelength region, variations in quartz content appear as more or less red; carbonate rocks are green, and mafic volcanic rocks are purple. The image is located at 36.8 degrees north latitude and 117.7 degrees west longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11164

  18. Saline Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Figure 2

    These images of the Saline Valley area, California, were acquired March 30, 2000 and cover a full ASTER scene (60 by 60 km). Each image displays data from a different spectral region, and illustrates the complementary nature of surface compositional information available as a function of wavelength. This image displays visible and near infrared bands 3, 2, and 1 in red, green, and blue (RGB). Vegetation appears red, snow and dry salt lakes are white, and exposed rocks are brown, gray, yellow and blue. Rock colors mainly reflect the presence of iron minerals, and variations in albedo. Figure 1 displays short wavelength infrared bands 4, 6, and 8 as RGB. In this wavelength region, clay, carbonate, and sulfate minerals have diagnostic absorption features, resulting in distinct colors on the image. For example, limestones are yellow-green, and purple areas are kaolinite-rich. Figure 2 displays thermal infrared bands 13, 12 and 10 as RGB. In this wavelength region, variations in quartz content appear as more or less red; carbonate rocks are green, and mafic volcanic rocks are purple. The image is located at 36.8 degrees north latitude and 117.7 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  19. Valley precession and valley polarization in graphene with inter-valley coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing-Ping; Liu, Zheng-Fang; Chen, Ai-Xi; Xiao, Xian-Bo; Zhang, Heng; Miao, Guo-Xing

    2017-10-01

    We theoretically investigate the valley precession and valley polarization in graphene under inter-valley coupling. Our results show that the inter-valley coupling can induce valley polarization in graphene and also precess valleys in real space in a manner similar to the Rashba spin-orbit interaction rotating spins. Moreover, using strain modulation, we can achieve high valley polarization with large valley-polarized currents. These findings provide a new way to create and manipulate valley polarization in graphene.

  20. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Appendix A -- Waste sites, source terms, and waste inventory report; Appendix B -- Description of the field activities and report database; Appendix C -- Characterization of hydrogeologic setting report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix A includes descriptions of waste areas and estimates of the current compositions of the wastes. Appendix B contains an extensive database of environmental data for the Bear Creek Valley Characterization Area. Information is also presented about the number and location of samples collected, the analytes examined, and the extent of data validation. Appendix C describes the hydrogeologic conceptual model for Bear Creek Valley. This model is one of the principal components of the conceptual site models for contaminant transport in BCV.

  1. Ecological risk assessment for residual coal fly ash at Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee: Site setting and problem formulation.

    PubMed

    Walls, Suzanne J; Jones, Daniel S; Stojak, Amber R; Carriker, Neil E

    2015-01-01

    A baseline ecological risk assessment (BERA) was performed for residual ash in the Watts Bar Reservoir following a release of fly ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant. The site consists of parts of 3 rivers in eastern Tennessee comprising over 32 river kilometers. The purpose of the assessment was to determine if residual ash negatively impacts maintenance and reproduction of balanced communities or populations of potentially exposed ecological receptor groups in these rivers. This introductory article summarizes the site and environmental setting, assessment and measurement endpoints, risk characterization methods, and the study approach. Subsequent articles describe ecological risks to fish, benthic invertebrates, aquatic- and riparian-feeding wildlife, and aerial-feeding insectivores; and the role ecological risk characterization played in determining the most effective management of the residual ash, setting project remediation objectives and targets, and designing long-term monitoring to measure the effectiveness of the selected removal action. © 2014 SETAC.

  2. Teenage Drinking in Rural Middle Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mookherjee, Harsha N.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the extent to which alcoholic beverages are consumed by high school teenagers (N=622) in rural communities of middle Tennessee. Results showed that about 63 percent of the subjects do drink alcoholic beverages, and that most of the drinking is done in the company of friends. (LLL)

  3. Computer Utilization in Middle Tennessee High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Sam

    In order to determine the capacity of high schools to profit from the pre-high school computer experiences of its students, a study was conducted to measure computer utilization in selected high schools of Middle Tennessee. Questionnaires distributed to 50 principals in 28 school systems covered the following areas: school enrollment; number and…

  4. Forest statistics for Central Tennessee counties - 1989

    Treesearch

    Dennis M. May; John S. Vissage

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 survey of the Central Unit of Tennessee revealed the following:Timberland now covers 2,416.3 thousand acres, an increase of 14 percent since 1980.Ninety-five percent of the unit’s timberland is privately owned.Cedar and mixed cedar-hardwood stands occupy 456.1 thousand acres of timberland....

  5. Curriculum Outline for Tennessee Transition Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esch, B. J.

    This curriculum outline for the Sevier County, Tennessee, transition program for special needs students provides goals and objectives for the following domains: domestic, vocational, community functioning, and recreation/leisure. The domestic domain covers personal hygiene/grooming, first aid, home nursing, birth control/pregnancy, parenting, drug…

  6. Forest statistics for West Tennessee counties

    Treesearch

    No Author Named

    1982-01-01

    These tables were derived from data obtained during a 1980 inventory of 18 counties comprising the West Unit of Tennessee (fig. 1). The data on forest acreage and timber volume were secured by a systematic sampling method involving a forest-nonforest classification on aerial photographs and on-the-ground measurements of trees at sample locations. The sample locations...

  7. Forest statistics for plateau Tennessee counties

    Treesearch

    Renewable Resources Evaluation Research Work Unit

    1982-01-01

    These tables were derived from data obtained during a 1980 inventory of 16 counties comprising the Plateau Unit of Tennessee (fib. 1). The data on forest acreage and timber volume were secured by a systematic sampling method involving a forest-nonforest classification on aerial photographs and on-the-ground measurements of trees at sample locations. The sample...

  8. Forest statistics for Central Tennessee counties

    Treesearch

    Renewable Resources Evaluation Research Work Unit

    1981-01-01

    These tables were derived from data obtained during a 1980 inventory of 23 counties comprising the Central Unit of Tennessee (fig. 1). The data on forest acreage and timber volume were secured by a systematic sampling method involving a forest-non-forest classification on aerial photographs and on-the-ground measurements of trees at sample locations. The sample...

  9. Process Control Research, Training Center for Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Tennessee have established a measurement and controls research center and a master's-level academic engineering program. A description of this university/industry cooperative research center is provided. Indicates that a doctoral program is planned when the master's program is well…

  10. Evaluation of the Tennessee Child Restraint Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Allan F.

    This paper reports on a study of the effects of a Tennessee law aimed at increasing the protection of children in cars. The law, which came into force January 1, 1978, requires parents to use child restraints properly when transporting their children who are less than 4 years old. Alternatively, the law permits children to be held in arms, a…

  11. Tennessee Extension Agents' Perceptions of Performance Appraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Joseph L.; French, Russell L.

    2013-01-01

    Performance appraisal is necessary for summative decisions about employees, such as merit pay and promotion. The research reported here describes Extension agent perceptions of their performance appraisal system. The population studied consisted of all Tennessee Extension agents (N = 312). Surveys were completed by 218 respondents, for a completed…

  12. Creating Opportunities: Tennessee's Southeast Regional Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    2002-01-01

    Rural Marion County (Tennessee), the town of Kimball, the Appalachian Regional Commission, and a local community college founded a regional skills center. The center offers a 2-year associate of science degree and classes in GED preparation, parenting, drug abuse prevention, cosmetology, and air conditioning and refrigeration. It has expanded…

  13. Teenage Drinking in Rural Middle Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mookherjee, Harsha N.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the extent to which alcoholic beverages are consumed by high school teenagers (N=622) in rural communities of middle Tennessee. Results showed that about 63 percent of the subjects do drink alcoholic beverages, and that most of the drinking is done in the company of friends. (LLL)

  14. View of Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky border area

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-08-30

    SL3-45-020 (July-September 1973) --- A vertical view of the Virginia-Tennessee-Kentucky border area as photographed from Earth orbit by one of the six lenses of the Itek-furnished S190-A Multispectral Photographic Facility Experiment aboard the Skylab space station. This picture was taken with type 2443 infrared color film. The S190-A experiment is part of the Skylab Earth Resources Experiments Package. The long, narrow ridge is Pine Mountain; and it is crossed by U.S. 25E at Pineville near its southernmost end. Some 25 miles south of Pineville U.S. 25E passes through the famed Cumberland Gap which at 1,600 feet elevation crosses Cumberland Mountain. Kingsport, Tennessee is located east of Cumberland Gap near the center of the picture. Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia is further east. Greenville and Elizabethton, Tennessee can also be seen in this photograph. The clouds across the southeast edge of the picture are over the Blue Ridge Mountains. Federal agencies participating with NASA on the EREP project are the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Corps of Engineers. All EREP photography is available to the public through the Department of Interior?s Earth Resources Observations Systems Data Center, Sioux Falls, 57198. Photo credit: NASA

  15. Brain Dominance Patterns of Tennessee School Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Cynthia J.

    This exploratory study investigated the leadership styles of selected administrators in Tennessee's public schools. Styles of leadership were viewed against a backdrop of current brain research, and the subjects' underlying patterns of cognitive processing were identified by means of a self-report measurement of brain dominance--the Herrmann Brain…

  16. International Trade: Tennessee's Window on the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Miriam; And Others

    The activities and discussion questions in this unit can be used in secondary social studies classes to teach students about world trade and its role in their personal lives. Although designed for Tennessee classrooms, the unit can be easily adapted for use elsewhere. Many of the activities are self-contained. However, some require the use of…

  17. Management Development at the University of Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fly, Emerson H.; High, Katherine N.

    1984-01-01

    The University of Tennessee's management training and development efforts are described. The program is designed to improve the performance of academic and nonacademic department heads (middle managers) and includes an 8-day workshop called the Institute for Leadership Effectiveness. In addition to the attention given to the formation of networks,…

  18. Creating Opportunities: Tennessee's Southeast Regional Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    2002-01-01

    Rural Marion County (Tennessee), the town of Kimball, the Appalachian Regional Commission, and a local community college founded a regional skills center. The center offers a 2-year associate of science degree and classes in GED preparation, parenting, drug abuse prevention, cosmetology, and air conditioning and refrigeration. It has expanded…

  19. A Statewide Needs Assessment in Tennessee: Employers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNelly, Don E.; And Others

    Tennessee employers were surveyed regarding secondary vocational education as a source of entry-level employees and on their perceptions of issues in the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Act of 1990. A survey instrument secured ratings for various types and levels of educational and governmental agencies. The population consisted…

  20. Forest statistics for West Tennessee counties - 1989

    Treesearch

    Dennis M. May; John S. Vissage

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 survey of the west unit of Tennessee revealed the following:Timberland now covers 1,970.0 thousand acres, an 8.5 percent decline since 1980.Bottomland hardwood types fell 14.4 percent since 1980.Timberland acres in other federal ownership doubled to 71.2 thousand acres.

  1. International Trade: Tennessee's Window on the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Miriam; And Others

    The activities and discussion questions in this unit can be used in secondary social studies classes to teach students about world trade and its role in their personal lives. Although designed for Tennessee classrooms, the unit can be easily adapted for use elsewhere. Many of the activities are self-contained. However, some require the use of…

  2. Writing Center Practices in Tennessee Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, James Emil

    The purpose of this dissertation was to develop a profile of writing centers in 12 community colleges governed by the Tennessee Board of Regents, including information on how the centers were established, funding and staffing sources, services provided, constituency demographic information, professional staff development, and the use of electronic…

  3. Forest industries in Appalachia counties of Tennessee

    Treesearch

    Charles C. Van Sickle

    1967-01-01

    This report offers information on 1965 timber products output, plant residue production, and timber cut in the Appalachian Region of eastern Tennessee. The 49 counties that comprise this region are a part of the area defined by the Appalachian Regional Development Act of March 9, 1965.

  4. Curriculum Outline for Tennessee Transition Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esch, B. J.

    This curriculum outline for the Sevier County, Tennessee, transition program for special needs students provides goals and objectives for the following domains: domestic, vocational, community functioning, and recreation/leisure. The domestic domain covers personal hygiene/grooming, first aid, home nursing, birth control/pregnancy, parenting, drug…

  5. Technology Usage of Tennessee Agriculture Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, Michael D.; Warner, Wendy J.; Stair, Kristin S.; Flowers, James L.; Croom, D. Barry

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the accessibility and use of instructional technologies by agriculture teachers in Tennessee. Data were collected using a survey instrument to investigate teachers' adoption of technology, sources of acquired technology skills, accessibility and use of technological equipment, and barriers to technology integration. The study…

  6. Tennessee health plan tobacco cessation coverage.

    PubMed

    Kolade, Folasade M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the smoking cessation coverage available from public and private Tennessee health plans. Cross-sectional study. The sampling frame for private plans was a register of licensed plans obtained from the Tennessee Commerce Department. Government websites and reports provided TennCare data. Data were abstracted from plan manuals and formularies for benefit year 2012. Classification of coverage included comprehensive-all seven recommended medications plus individual and group counseling; moderate-at least two forms of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) plus bupropion and varenicline and one form of counseling; inadequate-at least one treatment, or none-no medications or counseling, or coverage only for pregnant women. Of nine private plans, one provided comprehensive coverage; two, moderate coverage; four, inadequate coverage, as did TennCare; and two plans provided no coverage. Over 362,800 smokers had inadequate access to cessation treatments under TennCare, while 119,094 smokers had inadequate or no cessation coverage under private plans. In 2012, Tennessee fell short of Healthy People goals for total managed care and comprehensive TennCare coverage of smoking cessation. If Tennessee mandates that all health plans provide full coverage, 481,900 smokers may immediately be in a better position to quit. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. TN State Profile. Tennessee: Gateway Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about Tennessee's Gateway Examinations. The purpose of the test is to: (1) Provide schools with student academic diagnostic information; (2) Determine prospective high school graduates' mastery of the state curriculum; (3) Encourage districts and schools to identify and serve students at risk of academic failure;…

  8. Evaluation of the Tennessee Child Restraint Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Allan F.

    This paper reports on a study of the effects of a Tennessee law aimed at increasing the protection of children in cars. The law, which came into force January 1, 1978, requires parents to use child restraints properly when transporting their children who are less than 4 years old. Alternatively, the law permits children to be held in arms, a…

  9. Florida and Tennessee: Accountability in Civic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delander, Brady

    2014-01-01

    While most states require testing in social studies or civic education, two states attach consequences for students and schools based on required statewide civics exams. Lawmakers in Florida, in 2010, and in Tennessee, in 2012, approved legislation that holds students accountable for their civics knowledge. Students are taking the tests for the…

  10. Tennessee's Extension Food and Nutrition Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Univ., Knoxville. Agricultural Extension Service.

    The Extension Food and Nutrition Education program was set up by the University of Tennessee Agricultural Extension Service to assist low-income families in improving their diets. Carrying out the program on a one-to-one basis are 365 assistants who are taught the basics of nutrition by trained home economics extension agents. These assistants…

  11. 75 FR 26814 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ...This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Tennessee (FEMA- 1909-DR), dated 05/04/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, Straight-Line Winds and Tornadoes. Incident Period: 04/30/2010 and continuing.

  12. 75 FR 26815 - Tennessee Disaster # TN-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ...This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-1909-DR), dated 05/04/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, Straight-line Winds, and Tornadoes. Incident Period: 04/30/2010 and continuing.

  13. 76 FR 52043 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00056

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Tennessee dated 08/12/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes and Flooding. Incident Period: 06/18/2011 through 06/25/2011. Effective Date: 08/12/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 10/11/2011. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date: 05/12/2012.

  14. Tennessee Killing Underscores Job Dangers for Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonn, Jessica L.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author stresses the dangers facing school leaders on the job. The school shooting at Campbell County Comprehensive High School in Jacksboro, Tennessee, on November 8, 2005, which left one assistant principal dead and the principal and another assistant principal seriously wounded, is an extreme example of dangers school…

  15. Effective Teacher Retention Bonuses: Evidence From Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Matthew G.; Swain, Walker A.; Rodriguez, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    We report findings from a quasi-experimental evaluation of the recently implemented US$5,000 retention bonus program for effective teachers in Tennessee's Priority Schools. We estimate the impact of the program on teacher retention using a fuzzy regression discontinuity design by exploiting a discontinuity in the probability of treatment…

  16. Effective Teacher Retention Bonuses: Evidence From Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Matthew G.; Swain, Walker A.; Rodriguez, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    We report findings from a quasi-experimental evaluation of the recently implemented US$5,000 retention bonus program for effective teachers in Tennessee's Priority Schools. We estimate the impact of the program on teacher retention using a fuzzy regression discontinuity design by exploiting a discontinuity in the probability of treatment…

  17. Process Control Research, Training Center for Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Tennessee have established a measurement and controls research center and a master's-level academic engineering program. A description of this university/industry cooperative research center is provided. Indicates that a doctoral program is planned when the master's program is well…

  18. A Statewide Needs Assessment in Tennessee: Employers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNelly, Don E.; And Others

    Tennessee employers were surveyed regarding secondary vocational education as a source of entry-level employees and on their perceptions of issues in the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Act of 1990. A survey instrument secured ratings for various types and levels of educational and governmental agencies. The population consisted…

  19. Sacramento Valley, CA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Sacramento Valley (40.5N, 121.5W) of California is the northern extension of the Central Valley, main agriculture region of the state. Hundreds of truck farms, vineyards and orchards can be seen throughout the length and breadth of the valley which was reclaimed from the desert by means of intensive and extensive irrigation projects.

  20. Water resources data, Tennessee, water year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flohr, D.F.; Garrett, J.W.; Hamilton, J.T.; Phillips, T.D.

    2005-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2004 water year for Tennessee consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 107 gaging stations; stage only for 1 gaging station, elevation and contents for 32 lakes reservoirs; water quality at 18 gaging stations and 17 wells; and water levels for 8 observation wells; and 1 precipitation station. Also included are data for 84 crest stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various stream sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent the part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Tennessee.

  1. 40 CFR 81.428 - Tennessee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... manager Great Smoky Mountains NP 1 241,207 69-268 USDI-NPS Joyce Kilmer-Slickrock Wild 2 3,832 93-622 USDA-FS 1 Great Smoky Mountains National Park, 514,758 acres overall, of which 273,551 acres are in North Carolina, and 241,207 acres are in Tennessee. 2 Joyce Kilmer Slickrock Wilderness, 14,033 acres overall, of...

  2. Addicted mothers to be criminalized in Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Koren, Gideon; Hutson, Janine

    2014-01-01

    In April 2014 Tennessee acted to criminalize pregnant women who use illegal drugs and have an offspring "considered harmed". We discuss seven major reasons why this law is wrong and dangerous.  Criminalizing vulnerable, addicted mothers scare them away from treatment. The new law will practically target the poor, vulnerable, uninsured non-white pregnant woman. It is hoped that, similar to previous cases, the American justice system will once again reverse the decision and allow the true American values to prevail.

  3. 76 FR 32983 - Tennessee; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... State of Tennessee have been designated as adversely affected by this declared major disaster: Bradley, Greene, Hamilton, and Washington Counties for Individual Assistance. Bradley, Greene, Hamilton,...

  4. Shoals and valley plugs in the Hatchie River watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diehl, Timothy H.

    2000-01-01

    Agricultural land use and gully erosion have historically contributed more sediment to the streams of the Hatchie River watershed than those streams can carry. In 1970, the main sedimentation problem in the watershed occurred in the tributary flood plains. This problem motivated channelization projects (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1970). By the mid-1980's, concern had shifted to sedimentation in the Hatchie River itself where channelized tributaries were understood to contribute much of the sediment. The Soil Conservation Service [Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) since 1996] estimated that 640,000 tons of bedload (sand) accumulates in the Hatchie River each year and identified roughly the eastern two-thirds of the watershed, where loess is thin or absent, as the main source of sand (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1986a). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the West Tennessee River Basin Authority (WTRBA), conducted a study of sediment accumulation in the Hatchie River and its tributaries. This report identifies the types of tributaries and evaluates sediment, shoal formation, and valley-plug problems. The results presented here may contribute to a better understanding of similar problems in West Tennessee and the rest of the southeastern coastal plain. This information also will help the WTRBA manage sedimentation and erosion problems in the Hatchie River watershed.The source of the Mississippi section of the Hatchie River is in the sand hills southwest of Corinth, Mississippi (fig. 1). This section of the Hatchie River flows northward in an artificial drainage canal, gathering water from tributary streams that also are channelized. The drainage canal ends 2 miles south of the Tennessee State line. The Tennessee section of the Hatchie River winds north and west in a meandering natural channel to the Mississippi River. Although most of the Hatchie River tributaries are also drainage canals, the river's main stem has kept most of

  5. Recharge rates and aquifer hydraulic characteristics for selected drainage basins in middle and east Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoos, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative information concerning aquifer hydrologic and hydraulic characteristics is needed to manage the development of ground-water resources. These characteristics are poorly defined for the bedrock aquifers in Middle and East Tennessee where demand for water is increasing. This report presents estimates of recharge rate, storage coefficient, diffusivity, and transmissivity for representative drainage basins in Middle and East Tennessee, as determined from analyses of stream-aquifer interactions. The drainage basins have been grouped according to the underlying major aquifer, then statistical descriptions applied to each group, in order to define area1 distribution of these characteristics. Aquifer recharge rates are estimated for representative low, average, and high flow years for 63 drainage basins using hydrograph analysis techniques. Net annual recharge during average flow years for all basins ranges from 4.1 to 16.8 in/yr (inches per year), with a mean value of 7.3 in. In general, recharge rates are highest for basins underlain by the Blue Ridge aquifer (mean value11.7 in/yr) and lowest for basins underlain by the Central Basin aquifer (mean value 5.6 in/yr). Mean recharge values for the Cumberland Plateau, Highland Rim, and Valley and Ridge aquifers are 6.5, 7.4, and 6.6 in/yr, respectively. Gravity drainage characterizes ground-water flow in most surficial bedrock aquifer in Tennessee. Accordingly, a gravity yield analysis, which compares concurrent water-level and streamflow hydrographs, was used to estimate aquifer storage coefficient for nine study basins. The basin estimates range from 0.002 to 0.140; however, most estimates are within a narrow range of values, from 0.01 to 0.025. Accordingly, storage coefficient is estimated to be 0.01 for all aquifers in Middle and East Tennessee, with the exception of the aquifer in the inner part of the Central Basin, for which storage coefficient is estimated to be 0.002. Estimates of aquifer hydraulic

  6. Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 1 (S-3 Ponds, Boneyard/Burnyard, Oil Landfarm, Sanitary Landfill 1, and the Burial Grounds, including Oil Retention Ponds 1 and 2) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1, Main text

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The intent and scope of the work plan are to assemble all data necessary to facilitate selection of remediation alternatives for the sites in Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 1 (BCV OU 1) such that the risk to human health and the environment is reduced to acceptable levels based on agreements with regulators. The ultimate goal is to develop a final Record Of Decision (ROD) for all of the OUs in BCV, including the integrator OU. However, the initial aim of the source OUs is to develop a ROD for interim measures. For source OUs such as BCV OU 1, data acquisition will not be carried out in a single event, but will be carried out in three stages that accommodate the schedule for developing a ROD for interim measures and the final site-wide ROD. The three stages are as follows: Stage 1, Assemble sufficient data to support decisions such as the need for removal actions, whether to continue with the remedial investigation (RI) process, or whether no further action is required. If the decision is made to continue the RI/FS process, then: Stage 2, Assemble sufficient data to allow for a ROD for interim measures that reduce risks to the human health and the environment. Stage 3, Provide input from the source OU that allows a final ROD to be issued for all OUs in the BCV hydrologic regime. One goal of the RI work plan will be to ensure that sampling operations required for the initial stage are not repeated at later stages. The overall goals of this RI are to define the nature and extent of contamination so that the impact of leachate, surface water runoff, and sediment from the OU I sites on the integrator OU can be evaluated, the risk to human health and the environment can be defined, and the general physical characteristics of the subsurface can be determined such that remedial alternatives can be screened.

  7. Faulting along the southern margin of Reelfoot Lake, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Arsdale, R.; Purser, J.; Stephenson, W.; Odum, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Reelfoot Lake basin, Tennessee, is structurally complex and of great interest seismologically because it is located at the junction of two seismicity trends of the New Madrid seismic zone. To better understand the structure at this location, a 7.5-km-long seismic reflection profile was acquired on roads along the southern margin of Reelfoot Lake. The seismic line reveals a westerly dipping basin bounded on the west by the Reelfoot reverse fault zone, the Ridgely right-lateral transpressive fault zone on the east, and the Cottonwood Grove right-lateral strike-slip fault in the middle of the basin. The displacement history of the Reelfoot fault zone appears to be the same as the Ridgely fault zone, thus suggesting that movement on these fault zones has been synchronous, perhaps since the Cretaceous. Since the Reelfoot and Ridgely fault systems are believed responsible for two of the mainshocks of 1811-1812, the fault history revealed in the Reelfoot Lake profile suggests that multiple mainshocks may be typical of the New Madrid seismic zone. The Ridgely fault zone consists of two northeast-striking faults that lie at the base of and within the Mississippi Valley bluff line. This fault zone has 15 m of post-Eocene, up-to-the-east displacement and appears to locally control the eastern limit of Mississippi River migration. The Cottonwood Grove fault zone passes through the center of the seismic line and has approximately 5 m up-to-the-east displacement. Correlation of the Cottonwood Grove fault with a possible fault scarp on the floor of Reelfoot Lake and the New Markham fault north of the lake suggests the Cottonwood Grove fault may change to a northerly strike at Reelfoot Lake, thereby linking the northeast-trending zones of seismicity in the New Madrid seismic zone.

  8. Sacramento Valley, CA, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-06-22

    SL2-04-179 (22 June 1973) --- The Sacramento Valley (40.5N, 121.5W) of California is the northern extension of the Central Valley, main agriculture region of the state. Hundreds of truck farms, vineyards and orchards can be seen throughout the length and breadth of the valley which was reclaimed from the desert by means of intensive and extensive irrigation projects. Photo credit: NASA

  9. Preliminary evaluation of the basal sandstone in Tennessee for receiving injected wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulderink, Dolores; Bradley, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    The EPA is authorized, under the Safe Drinking Water Act, to administer the Underground Injection Control program. This program allows for the regulation of deep-well disposal of wastes and establishes criteria to protect underground sources of drinking water from contamination. The basal sandstone in Tennessee occurs west of the Valley and Ridge province at depths of 5,000 to 9,000 ft below land surface. The basal sandstone consists of about 30 to 750 ft of Cambrian sandstone overlying the crystalline basement complex. The basal sandstone is overlain and confined by shale and carbonate rocks of the Middle and Upper Cambrian Conasauga Group. Hydrologic data for the basal sandstone, available from only three sites (four wells) in Tennessee, indicate that the basal sandstone generally has low porosity and permeability with a few zones having enough permeability to accept injected fluids. Limited water quality data indicate the basal sandstone contains water with dissolved solids concentrations exceeding 10,000 mg/L. Since the dissolved-solids concentrations exceed 10,000 mg/L, the basal sandstone is not classified as an underground source of drinking water according to EPA regulations. (Author 's abstract)

  10. Environmental impacts of the coal ash spill in Kingston, Tennessee: an 18-month survey.

    PubMed

    Ruhl, Laura; Vengosh, Avner; Dwyer, Gary S; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Deonarine, Amrika

    2010-12-15

    An 18 month investigation of the environmental impacts of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) coal ash spill in Kingston, Tennessee combined with leaching experiments on the spilled TVA coal ash have revealed that leachable coal ash contaminants (LCACs), particularly arsenic, selenium, boron, strontium, and barium, have different effects on the quality of impacted environments. While LCACs levels in the downstream river water are relatively low and below the EPA drinking water and ecological thresholds, elevated levels were found in surface water with restricted water exchange and in pore water extracted from the river sediments downstream from the spill. The high concentration of arsenic (up to 2000 μg/L) is associated with some degree of anoxic conditions and predominance of the reduced arsenic species (arsenite) in the pore waters. Laboratory leaching simulations show that the pH and ash/water ratio control the LCACs' abundance and geochemical composition of the impacted water. These results have important implications for the prediction of the fate and migration of LCACs in the environment, particularly for the storage of coal combustion residues (CCRs) in holding ponds and landfills, and any potential CCRs effluents leakage into lakes, rivers, and other aquatic systems.

  11. Results of fish tissue screening studies from sites in the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers in 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Dycus, D.L.

    1990-07-01

    TVA analyzes tissues of Tennessee Valley area fish as part of intensive evaluations and as pat of screening level evaluations. Intensive studies are conducted in reservoirs where contamination problems are known or suspected and include analysis of individual fillets from important fish species from several areas in the reservoir. This information is used by State public health officials to determine whether fish consumption advisories are necessary to protect human health. Screening studies are based on analysis of composite rather than individual samples and are intended to provide trend information and to identify areas where problems may exist indicating need for an intensive evaluation. All studies are coordinated with State agencies because they ultimately must make management decisions regarding public health. TVA has two fish tissue screening programs. One examines fish on an annual basis at inflow points from eight of the major tributaries into the Tennessee River reservoir system. The other examines fish from within the reservoirs on a rotating basis with the goal of sampling each reservoir at least once every three years. 7 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  12. Medical screening after a coal fly ash spill in Roane County, Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Gregory P; Cragle, Donna L; Benitez, John G

    2014-08-01

    To assess the health of community residents following a coal fly ash spill at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant in Harriman, Tennessee, on December 22, 2008. A uniform health assessment was developed by epidemiologists at Oak Ridge Associated Universities and medical toxicologists at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Residents who believed that their health may have been affected by the coal fly ash spill were invited to participate in the medical screening program. Among the 214 individuals who participated in the screening program, the most commonly reported symptoms were related to upper airway irritation. No evidence of heavy metal toxicity was found. This is the first report, to our knowledge, regarding the comprehensive health evaluation of a community after a coal fly ash spill. Because this evaluation was voluntary, the majority of residents screened represented those with a high percentage of symptoms and concerns about the potential for toxic exposure. Based on known toxicity of the constituents present in the coal fly ash, health complaints did not appear to be related to the fly ash. This screening model could be used to assess immediate or baseline toxicity concerns after other disasters.

  13. Ecological risk assessment for residual coal fly ash at Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Carriker, Neil E; Jones, Daniel S; Walls, Suzanne J; Stojak, Amber R

    2015-01-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority conducted a Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment (BERA) for the Kingston Fossil Plant ash release site to evaluate potential effects of residual coal ash on biota in Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee. The BERA was in response to a release of 4.1 million m(3) of coal ash on December 22, 2008. It used multiple lines of evidence to assess risks for 17 different ecological receptors to approximately 400000 m(3) of residual ash in the Emory and Clinch rivers. Here, we provide a brief overview of the BERA results and then focus on how the results were used to help shape risk management decisions. Those decisions included selecting monitored natural recovery for remediation of the residual ash in the Emory and Clinch rivers and designing a long-term monitoring plan that includes adaptive management principles for timely adjustment to changing conditions. This study demonstrates the importance of site-specific ecological data (e.g., tissue concentrations for food items, reproductive data, and population data) in complex ecological risk assessments. It also illustrates the value of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) data quality objectives process in building consensus and identifying multiple uses of results. The relatively limited adverse effects of this likely worst-case scenario for ash-related exposures in a lotic environment provide important context for the USEPA's new coal combustion residue disposal rules. © 2014 SETAC.

  14. The upper crust of the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone: Insights from potential fields inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandmayr, Enrico; Vlahovic, Gordana

    2016-08-01

    The study investigates the crustal structure of the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) by means of potential field inversion through the located Euler deconvolution method. Inversion of magnetic field data shows that the top of the magnetic basement ranges between 6 and 12 km depth in the Valley and Ridge physiographic province while it is shallower (< 2 km depth) and locally outcropping in the Blue Ridge and Cumberland Plateau provinces. The estimated depth to the top of the magnetic basement is in general agreement with existing sedimentary cover maps of the broad study area. The inversion of gravity data is much more ambiguous, pointing to a generally deeper source, than magnetic data inversion. The findings support the interpretation of ETSZ seismicity as originating in basement structures not related to Appalachian orogeny and likely dating to Grenville age.

  15. Pre-Alleghenian (Pennsylvanian-Permian) hydrocarbon emplacement along Ordovician Knox unconformity, eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, F.M.; Kesler, S.E.

    1989-03-01

    Cores taken during exploration for Mississippi Valley-type lead and zinc ores in the Mascot-Jefferson City zinc district of eastern Tennessee commonly contain hydrocarbon residues in carbonate rocks of the Knox Group immediately below the Lower Ordovician Knox unconformity. The location and number of these residue-bearing strata reveal information about the Paleozoic history of hydrocarbon emplacement in the region. Contour maps, generated from nearly 800 holes covering more than 20 km/sup 2/, indicate that zones with elevated organic content in the uppermost 30 m of the Lower Ordovician Mascot Dolomite show a strong spatial correlation with Middle Ordovician paleotopographic highs. These same zones show no spatial association with present-day structural highs, which were formed during Pennsylvanian-Permian Alleghenian tectonism. This suggests that the physical entrapment of hydrocarbons migrating through the upper permeable units of the Mascot must have occurred prior to the principal tectonism of the Alleghenian orogeny. 7 figures, 1 table.

  16. Long Valley Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Hill, David

    2008-01-01

    The ~300-year-old lava on Paoha Island in Mono Lake was produced by the most recent eruption in the Long Valley Caldera area in east-central California. The Long Valley Caldera was formed by a massive volcanic eruption 760,000 years ago. The region is monitored by the Long Valley Observatory (LVO), one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about the Long Valley Caldera region and LVO at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/lvo.

  17. 30 CFR 942.700 - Tennessee Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....700 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.700 Tennessee Federal program. (a) This part contains all rules that are applicable to surface coal mining operations in...

  18. 30 CFR 942.700 - Tennessee Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....700 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.700 Tennessee Federal program. (a) This part contains all rules that are applicable to surface coal mining operations in...

  19. 30 CFR 942.700 - Tennessee Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....700 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.700 Tennessee Federal program. (a) This part contains all rules that are applicable to surface coal mining operations in...

  20. 30 CFR 942.700 - Tennessee Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....700 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.700 Tennessee Federal program. (a) This part contains all rules that are applicable to surface coal mining operations in...

  1. 30 CFR 942.700 - Tennessee Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....700 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.700 Tennessee Federal program. (a) This part contains all rules that are applicable to surface coal mining operations in...

  2. KIDS COUNT, 2001: State of the Child in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Pam; Delk, Fay L.; Henderson, Crystal; Huddleston, Jennifer; Petty, Steve; Wynn, Debbie; Young, Carmen

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Tennessee's children. The statistical portrait is based on 34 indicators of children's well-being in 5 broad areas: (1) infant, child, and teen health, including enrollment in the TennCare (replacement for Tennessee's Medicaid Program) insurance program, prenatal, low…

  3. Aerial view of the entire bridge crossing the Tennessee River ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view of the entire bridge crossing the Tennessee River looking up river. The swing bridge, when open, permits river navigational traffic to ply the river. Construction of a replacement bridge, to be located 93.27 feet down river, has now started. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  4. 75 FR 35103 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00039 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 7... Tennessee, dated 05/04/2010 is hereby amended to include the following areas as adversely affected by...

  5. Status and trends in gypsy moth defoliation hazard in Tennessee

    Treesearch

    Dennis M. May; Bruce W. Kauffman

    1990-01-01

    The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), a major defoliator of eastern hardwood forests, has become established in Virginia and is moving towards Tennessee. In preparation for its inevitable arrival, Tennessee’s timberlands are hazard rated to identify those areas most susceptible to gypsy moth defoliation. Tree, stand, and site characteristics...

  6. 77 FR 40265 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Tennessee River, Decatur, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Tennessee River, Decatur, AL AGENCY... across the Tennessee River, mile 304.4, at Decatur, AL. The deviation is necessary to install new rail..., at Decatur, AL. The vertical clearance of the bridge in the closed position is 10.5 feet. The...

  7. The CREATE Network (Computer Resource Educational Access in Tennessee Education).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Fletcher F.

    The CREATE Network (Computer Resource Educational Access in Tennessee Education) brought together library professionals from Tennessee's seven historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) for purposes of training and implementation of library applications of computer-based information technology. Annual training seminars were held at…

  8. Teacher Evaluation and Classroom Practice: Teacher Perceptions in Northeast Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogart, Christopher Dean

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate the perceptions of K-12 teachers as they relate to the implementation of the Tennessee Educator Acceleration (TEAM) evaluation framework. Survey links were sent to 1,115 K-12 teachers from 4 Northeast Tennessee school districts. The survey achieved a 24% return rate for a total of 270…

  9. KIDS COUNT, 2002: The State of the Child in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Pam; Chappell, Edwina; Delk, Fay L.; Jones, Ben; Petty, Steve; Tomlin, D'Andrea; Wynn, Debbie

    This KIDS COUNT report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Tennessee's children. The statistical portrait is based on 34 indicators of children's well-being in 5 broad areas: (1) infant, child, and teen health, including enrollment in the TennCare (replacement for Tennessee's Medicaid Program) insurance program, prenatal, low…

  10. Does "God Hate Hair?": A Study of Censorship in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, L. B.

    A study was conducted to investigate censorship attempts in Tennessee during the period 1966-1975 by consulting issues of the "Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom" published by the American Library Association's Office of Intellectual Freedom. Tennessee's rate of censorship was found to be exactly the same as the national average. A total…

  11. 78 FR 42514 - City of Clarksville, Tennessee; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission City of Clarksville, Tennessee; Notice of Application Take notice that on June 26, the City of Clarksville, Tennessee (Clarksville) filed an application pursuant to section 7(f...

  12. The University of Tennessee Medical Center at Knoxville.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Mitchell H

    2012-09-01

    The University of Tennessee Medical Center at Knoxville hosts the University Health Services and the University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine. Founded in 1956, the center along with the Department of Surgery has grown in size and in academic stature to become an outstanding tertiary clinical, medical education, and research center.

  13. Recent Retirement Trends of Tennessee Teachers. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Tennessee has undertaken several wide-ranging reforms aimed at educator practice and effectiveness over the past several years, including the launch of a new teacher evaluation system, modification of teacher tenure policy, and initial implementation of Common Core State Standards. This report from the Tennessee Department of Education (TDOE)…

  14. The Tennessee Lottery Scholarship Program: Impact on Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puryear, Carol G.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined if the Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship (TELS), which began in 2004, was related to student retention at the six Tennessee Board of Regents four-year institutions. This study investigated the impact of the TELS on student retention at TBR universities and general knowledge regarding retention. Post-facto data were…

  15. Does "God Hate Hair?": A Study of Censorship in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, L. B.

    A study was conducted to investigate censorship attempts in Tennessee during the period 1966-1975 by consulting issues of the "Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom" published by the American Library Association's Office of Intellectual Freedom. Tennessee's rate of censorship was found to be exactly the same as the national average. A total…

  16. Tennessee Higher Education Fact Book, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Division of Policy, Planning, and Research has assembled the Tennessee Higher Education Fact Book which is a compilation of statistical information pertaining to higher education in Tennessee. The 2009-2010 Fact Book contains tables and charts with data relevant to enrollment, persistence, graduation, tuition, financial aid, lottery…

  17. 77 FR 5740 - Tennessee Abandoned Mine Land Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... recommendations noted above: The plan was revised to indicate that the division of Water Pollution Control, Land... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 942 Tennessee Abandoned Mine Land... announcing receipt of a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Abandoned Mine Land (AML) Reclamation Plan under...

  18. Initial Teacher Licensure Testing in Tennessee: Test Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, E. Dean

    The process of development of tests for teacher certification in Tennessee is described. In response to the Tennessee Comprehensive Education Reform Act of 1984 requiring the use of tests for individuals seeking initial teacher licensure, the Department of Education identified 12 areas of teacher endorsement for which no currently validated and…

  19. Tennessee KIDS COUNT: The State of the Child in Tennessee, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Commission on Children and Youth, Nashville.

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Tennessee's children. The statistical portrait is based on indicators of children's well-being in four main areas: (1) child health; (2) education; (3) social indicators; and (4) economic status. The report begins with an executive summary and a lengthy listing of the major…

  20. Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP): Tennessee Student Test Results, 2004-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Board of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Currently, the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP) encompasses four mandated testing programs. This document includes results from the TCAP Achievement Test in reading/language, mathematics, science, and social studies in grades 3-8; the Writing Assessment in grades 5, 8, and 11; the Gateway Assessments, administered initially to…

  1. The Effects of Mountaintop Mines and Valley Fills on Aquatic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, The Effects of Mountaintop Mines and Valley Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Central Appalachian Coalfields. This report assesses the state of the science on the environmental impacts of mountaintop mines and valley fills (MTM-VF) on streams in the central Appalachian coalfields. These coalfields cover about 48,000 square kilometers (122 million acres) in West Virginia, Kentucky, Virginia and Tennessee, USA. Our reviews focused on the impacts on mountaintop removal coal mining, which as its name suggests, involves removing all or some portion of the top of a mountain or ridge to expose and mine one or more coal seams. The excess overburden is disposed of in constructed fills in small valleys or hollows adjacent to the mining site. Our conclusions, based on evidence from the peer-reviewed literature and from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement released in 2005, are that mountaintop mines and valley fills lead directly to five principal alterations of stream ecosystems: springs and ephemeral, intermittent and perennial streams are permanently lost with the removal of the mountain and from burial under fill, concentrations of major chemical ions are persistently elevated downstream, degraded water quality reaches levels that are acutely lethal to organisms in standard aquatic toxicity tests, selenium concentrations are elevated, reaching concentrations t

  2. General surgery at rural Tennessee hospitals: a survey of rural Tennessee hospital administrators.

    PubMed

    Cofer, Joseph B; Petros, Tommy J; Burkholder, Hans C; Clarke, P Chris

    2011-07-01

    Rural communities face an impending surgical workforce crisis. The purpose of this study is to describe perceptions of rural Tennessee hospital administrators regarding the importance of surgical services to their hospitals. In collaboration with the Tennessee Hospital Association, we developed and administered a 13-item survey based on a recently published national survey to 80 rural Tennessee hospitals in August 2008. A total of 29 responses were received for an overall 36.3 per cent response rate. Over 44 per cent of rural surgeons were older than 50 years of age, and 27.6 per cent of hospitals reported they would lose at least one surgeon in the next 2 years. The responding hospitals reported losing 10.4 per cent of their surgical workforce in the preceding 2 years. Over 53 per cent were actively recruiting a general surgeon with an average time to recruit a surgeon of 11.8 months. Ninety-seven per cent stated that having a surgical program was very important to their financial viability with the mean and median reported revenue generated by a single general surgeon being $1.8 million and $1.4 million, respectively. Almost 11 per cent of the hospitals stated they would have to close if they lost surgical services. Although rural Tennessee hospitals face similar difficulties to national rural hospitals with regard to retaining and hiring surgeons, slightly more Tennessee hospitals (54 vs 36%) were actively attempting to recruit a general surgeon. The shortage of general surgeons is a threat to the accessibility of comprehensive hospital-based care for rural Tennesseans.

  3. Velocity structure and seismicity of southeastern Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Ronald Douglas; Long, Leland Timothy

    1996-04-01

    The seismic zone in southeastern Tennessee is at the confluence of major crustal features, which have been interpreted largely from potential data, and their relation to seismicity could help us understand why major earthquakes sometimes occur in the eastern United States. In this paper we solve for the previously unknown velocity structure of the upper crust by an inversion of travel time residuals from relocated earthquakes. The gravity anomalies are included by using a linear relation between average anomalous density and average anomalous velocity. The velocity model demonstrates that the seismicity is concentrated in areas of average to below average velocity and does not appear to be associated with one of the previously identified major crustal features. The high-velocity zones mark areas that are generally lacking in seismicity. The association of earthquake hypocenters with regions of low-velocity crustal rocks is consistent with other intraplate seismic zones, and this association supports the conjecture that intraplate earthquakes occur in crust that may have been weakened. The velocity anomalies at midcrustal depths do not support the New York-Alabama (NY-AL) lineament as a linear feature extending through southeastern Tennessee and parallel to contours in gravity anomalies as originally proposed. A continuation of the (NY-AL) lineament to the southwest requires either a 15 degree southwestward change in direction or a displacement to be consistent with the velocity anomalies. The seismically active areas in southeastern Tennessee do not appear to be constrained by the major crustal features, but instead, the seismicity is characterized by the distribution of hypocenters and their association with low-velocity regions at midcrustal depths.

  4. Impact of the Complete College Tennessee Act's Retention and Graduation Benchmarks on Budget Appropriations at Tennessee State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Sedric D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the Tennessee State University (TSU) fall 2005 Freshmen Cohort (N = 1205) based on the variables of race, gender, persistence, retention and graduation, as well as to examine the impact of the newly implemented Complete College Tennessee Act's (CCTA) funding formula component on the university's budget…

  5. Impact of the Complete College Tennessee Act's Retention and Graduation Benchmarks on Budget Appropriations at Tennessee State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Sedric D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the Tennessee State University (TSU) fall 2005 Freshmen Cohort (N = 1205) based on the variables of race, gender, persistence, retention and graduation, as well as to examine the impact of the newly implemented Complete College Tennessee Act's (CCTA) funding formula component on the university's budget…

  6. Tennessee Public Education: Positioned for Progress in the 1990s. Annual Joint Report on Preschool through Graduate Education in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Nashville.

    Plans for restructuring Tennessee public education have been interrupted by the prolonged national recession and a $276.4 million reduction in the 1991-92 state education budget. The state's 1991 Annual Joint Report identified 26 essential educational objectives. Although progress in some areas has been limited, Tennessee has achieved a 25 percent…

  7. Fireball Over Tennessee and North Carolina

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-05

    We observed a fireball the morning of May 4 around 12:50am EDT, traveling southwest at about 77,000 mph over the Nantahala National Forest on the Tennessee/North Carolina state line. At its brightest point, it rivaled the full moon. According to Dr. Bill Cooke in NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. , "The fireball was bright enough to be seen through clouds, which is an attention getter. In Chickamauga, Ga., one would have thought it was a flash of lightning lighting up the clouds beneath."

  8. 77 FR 34306 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee; 110(a)(1) and (2) Infrastructure...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... the State of Tennessee, through the Tennessee ] Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) as... submissions provide an overview of the provisions of the Tennessee's Air Pollution Control Requirements... possible. 2. 110(a)(2)(B) Ambient air quality monitoring/data system: Tennessee's Air Pollution...

  9. 77 FR 23472 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application Take notice that on April 4, 2012, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street... application may be directed to Thomas G. Joyce, Manager, Certificates, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company,...

  10. 77 FR 8247 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. Notice of Application Take notice that on February 2, 2012, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street..., Manager, Certificates, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C., 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas...

  11. 77 FR 43277 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application Take notice that on July 6, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston..., Manager, Certificates, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas...

  12. 77 FR 64972 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application Take notice that on October 10, 2012, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street... Counsel, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C., 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, phone:...

  13. 76 FR 60016 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization Take notice that on September 9, 2011, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana... Tennessee's authorization in Docket No. CP82-413-000, to abandon in place and by removal an inactive supply...

  14. 75 FR 39681 - Tennessee Pipeline Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Pipeline Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization July 1, 2010. Take notice that on June 18, 2010, Tennessee Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana... TTY, (202) 502-8659. Specifically, Tennessee proposes to abandon an inactive offshore supply lateral...

  15. 76 FR 45253 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization July 20, 2011. Take notice that on July 11, 2011, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee Gas... up to the higher MAOP. Specifically, Tennessee Gas proposes to increase the MAOP of Line 2B-100 from...

  16. 75 FR 5317 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization January 26, 2010. Take notice that on January 25, 2010, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee... TTY, (202) 502-8659. Specifically, Tennessee proposes to abandon in place Line 509A-3600 and...

  17. An Evaluation of Tennessee's Performance Funding Policy at Walters State Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Thomas A.

    Walters State Community College (WSCC) (Tennessee), founded in 1970, began participating in Tennessee's Performance Funding Project in 1979. Changes made in the state funding formula in 1979 were intended to provide an impetus for improving the quality of education on Tennessee's college campuses. The Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC)…

  18. Rift Valley Fever Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus or arbovirus that is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa. In the last decade, Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have resulted in loss of human and animal life, as well as had significant economic impact. The disease in livestock is primarily a...

  19. Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-02

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys are a row of valleys west of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. They are so named because of their extremely low humidity and lack of snow and ice cover. This image was acquired December 8, 2002 by NASA Terra spacecraft.

  20. Down in the Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Linda Graef

    1999-01-01

    Describes the partnerships formed by West Valley Mission Community College District (California) with its surrounding Silicon Valley business community in an effort to benefit workforce development. Asserts that community colleges are uniquely positioned to provide a lifelong education that will yield a skilled workforce to meet the needs of…

  1. Down in the Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Linda Graef

    1999-01-01

    Describes the partnerships formed by West Valley Mission Community College District (California) with its surrounding Silicon Valley business community in an effort to benefit workforce development. Asserts that community colleges are uniquely positioned to provide a lifelong education that will yield a skilled workforce to meet the needs of…

  2. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K.

    2011-08-01

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  3. Fishes in paleochannels of the Lower Mississippi River alluvial valley: A national treasure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.

    2016-01-01

    Fluvial geomorphology of the alluvial valley of the Lower Mississippi River reveals a fascinating history. A prominent occupant of the valley was the Ohio River, estimated to have flowed 25,000 years ago over western Tennessee and Mississippi to join the Mississippi River north of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 750–800 km south of the present confluence. Over time, shifts in the Mississippi and Ohio rivers toward their contemporary positions have left a legacy of abandoned paleochannels supportive of unique fish assemblages. Relative to channels abandoned in the last 500 years, paleochannels exhibit harsher environmental conditions characteristic of hypereutrophic lakes and support tolerant fish assemblages. Considering their ecological, geological, and historical importance, coupled with their primordial scenery, the hundreds of paleochannels in the valley represent a national treasure. Altogether, these waterscapes are endangered by human activities and would benefit from the conservation attention afforded to our national parks and wildlife refuges.

  4. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 95-0192-2538, Schlegel Tennessee, Inc., Maryville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Reh, B.D.

    1995-11-01

    In response to a request from the safety engineer at Schlegel Tennessee, Inc., Maryville, Tennessee, an investigation was conducted of possible hazardous working conditions at this company. The company produced automotive rubber vehicle sealing. Concern was expressed because workers in the extrusion department had been experiencing symptoms of shortness of breath, dizziness, light headedness, disorientation, headaches, and nausea. In January of 1995 a new coating application was added on one line. Air sampling for nitrosamines and volatile organic compounds was performed in the extrusion department and a symptoms survey questionnaire distributed among the workers there. The sampling revealed very low concentrations of nitrosodimethylamine. The questionnaire data did not reaveal any significant relationships between symptoms and extrusion lines. The author concludes that no identifiable exposure problem or complaint area in the facility was found.

  5. Old Martian Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-578, 18 December 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an ancient, unnamed, martian valley in the Xanthe Terra region, located near 3.3oS, 54.9oW. This valley might have been a conduit for flowing water, but there is no way to be certain because it is so old that none of its original features have been preserved. Bright, windblown ripples are now found on the valley floor. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide; sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  6. West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Under the West Valley Demonstration Project Act, Public Law 96-368, liquid high-level radioactive waste stored at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center in West Valley, New York, is to be solidified (vitrified) in borosilicate glass and transported to a federal repository for geologic disposal. This waste material resulted from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing operations conducted between 1966 and 1972. Project costs are shared by the US Department of Energy (90 percent) and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (10 percent). The site on which the Project is located is owned by New York State. This report is an overview of West Valley's plans and accomplishments.

  7. MX Siting Investigation. Geotechnical Evaluation. Aggregate Resources Studies, Dry Lake Valley, Muleshoe Valley, Delamar Valley, Pahroc Valley, Nevada.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-06

    Cretaceous to Pliocene in age and consist predominantly of welded and nonwelded pyro- w clastics (air falls, ash flows, ignimbrites ) of rhyolitic and...Vu Ignimbrite Valley 53 DLCDP-A53 Delamar Vu Rhyolite Valley 54 DLCDP-A54 Delamar Vu Andesite Valley 55 DLCDP-A55 Delamar Vu Rhyolitic Tuff Valley 56

  8. Regional differences in mercury levels in aquatic ecosystems: A discussion of possible causal factors with implications for the Tennessee river system and the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joslin, J. Devereux

    1994-07-01

    Concern about mercury pollution from atmospheric deposition has risen markedly in the last decade because of high levels of mercury in freshwater fish from relatively pristine waters. Whereas high concentrations have been found principally in Canada, the northern United States, and Scandinavia, they have also recently been observed throughout much of Florida. Recent surveys of the Tennessee River system, however, have found no locations where fish levels exceed EPA guidelines for fish consumption. This paper evaluates a number of factors that may cause certain regions in the northern hemisphere to experience unacceptable fish mercury levels while other regions do not. Relevant regional differences include: (1) Waters of the Tennessee River system are generally nonacidic (pH>6) and well buffered, whereas 16%, 22%, and 40% of the lakes in upper Midwest, Northeast, and Florida, respectively, have acid-neutralizing capacities below 50 µeq/liter. Acidity correlates highly with fish mercury levels in a number of lake surveys, and experimental manipulations of acidity have significantly raised fish mercury levels. (2) The ratio of land area to water surface area in the Tennessee Valley averages about 30, whereas it is 15 in the upper Midwest and 6 in Florida. Low ratios allow mercury in precipitation to be directly deposited to aquatic bodies, without an opportunity for the mercury to be sequestered by terrestrial ecosystems. (3) Stream organic matter concentrations in Florida, the upper Midwest, and Sweden are 2 10 times those in the Tennessee Valley. Mercury binds strongly to organic matter, and organic matter transport in runoff is a major pathway by which mercury enters aquatic ecosystems.

  9. Fiscal Year 1998 Well Installation, Plugging and Abandonment, and Redevelopment summary report Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This report summarizes the well installation, plugging and abandonment, and redevelopment activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1998 at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Five new groundwater monitoring wells were installed at the Y-12 Plant under the FY 1998 drilling program. Two of the wells are located in west Bear Creek Valley, one is in the eastern Y-12 Plant area near Lake Reality, and two are located near the Oil Landfarm Waste Management Area, which were installed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (Bechtel Jacobs) as part of a site characterization activity for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Disposal Cell. Also, two existing wells were upgraded and nine temporary piezometers were installed to characterize hydrogeologic conditions at the Disposal Cell site. In addition, 40 temporary piezometers were installed in the Boneyard/Bumyard area of Bear Creek Valley by Bechtel Jacobs as part of the accelerated remedial actions conducted by the Environmental Restoration Program. Ten monitoring wells at the Y-12 Plant were decommissioned in FY 1998. Two existing monitoring wells were redeveloped during FY 1998 (of these, GW-732 was redeveloped tsvice). All well installation and development (including redevelopment) was conducted following industry-standard methods and approved procedures from the Environmental Surveillance Procedures Quality Control Program (Energy Systems 1988); the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Groundwater Monitoring Technical Enforcement Guidance Document (EPA 1992); and the Monitoring Well Installation Plan for the Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Energy Systems 1997a). Well installation and development of the non-Y-12 Plant GWPP oversight installation projects were conducted using procedures/guidance defined in the following documents: Work Plan for Support to Upper East Fork Poplar Creek East End Volatile Organic Compound Plumes Well Installation Project, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge

  10. Structural and stratigraphic controls on cave development in the Oak Ridge area, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, P A; Lemiszki, P J

    1992-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) is located in the northwestern part of the Valley and Ridge province in east Tennessee. The Valley and Ridge province is the topographic expression of the southern Appalachian foreland fold-thrust belt, which formed during the late Paleozoic Alleghanian orogeny. In the Oak Ridge area, three major northwest verging thrust faults (Kingston, Whiteoak Mountain, and Copper Creek) imbricate and juxtapose carbonate and clastic stratigraphic units that range in age from the lower Cambrian to the lower Mississippian. The carbonate stratigraphic units range in thickness from 1278 to 1748 m and include the Maynardville Limestone in the Conasauga Group (hereby included as part of the Knox Group), the Knox Group, and the Chickamauga Group. Stratigraphic relationships and repetition of units by thrust faulting has produced three northeast striking and southeast dipping carbonate bands bounded to the northwest and southeast by noncarbonate units. Preliminary results indicate that within two of these carbonate bands, formations composed of mudstone and argillaceous limestone appear to further subdivide groundwater basins. Our efforts have focused on relating the stratigraphic and structural characteristics of these rock units with cave development in the region.

  11. Origin and interpretation of knickpoints in the Big South Fork River basin, Kentucky-Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jonathan D.; McCormack, Sarah; Duan, Jidan; Russo, Joseph P.; Schumacher, Anne M.; Tripathi, Ganesh N.; Brockman, Ruth B.; Mays, Adam B.; Pulugurtha, Sruti

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the causes of knickpoints and knickzones in the bedrock-controlled streams of the Big South Fork River basin in Kentucky and Tennessee. Knickpoints in the Big South Fork River area vary in form and apparent origins. While some are likely related to base level change and incision in the Cumberland River drainage system, the locations and drainage relations of the knickpoints are not consistent with transmission of an incision signal throughout the network. Local controls predominate in forming steeper channel segments, with no single factor dominant. Knickpoints in the study area are characterized by polygenesis and multiple causality, though several archetypes can be identified. These include rock fall rapids, created by mass wasting from adjacent valley slopes; structurally controlled headwater cliffs; and lithological knickpoints. A fourth category, local incision knickpoints, may be attributable to a variety of factors influencing force:resistance relationships. These results imply that the simple presence of a knickpoint cannot be attributed to any particular cause or history without consideration of the local controls. This further implies that factors such as the spacing of knickpoints may not be an indication of migration rates or that migration has even occurred. However, the analysis of individual profile convexities can shed light on various controls (such as lithology and structure) and other processes (such as valley side mass wasting and local bed incision) important in evolution of fluvially dissected landscapes.

  12. Planetary-Scale Influences on the 1-2 May 2010 Tennessee Flooding Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, A. C.; Martin, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    An historic flooding event across the southern Mississippi River Valley occurred over the two-day period of 1-2 May 2010. Rainfall totals greater than 25 cm (10 in.) were common over a large portion of western Tennessee with some areas tallying as much as 50 cm (20 in.). Diagnosis of this event, performed using a combination of analyses from operational forecast models, radar and satellite observations, and a fine-scale WRF simulation implicates an anomalously deep and moist boundary layer in conjunction with a vigorous upper-level front in the development and propagation of convection across the region. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the life cycle of the strong upper-level jet streak that characterized this case. This feature developed over the western Pacific Ocean roughly a week prior to the onset of heavy precipitation over the southern Mississippi Valley. The analysis suggests that this development is directly tied to the outflow from organized convection in the tropical western Pacific. As the jet nosed into the southwestern United States, the low-level, poleward directed Sawyer-Eliassen circulation at is exit region served to advect copious amounts of moisture into the affected region where synoptic and mesoscale forcing worked in concert to provide adequate ascent to initiate convection. The analysis provides another example of the manner by which tropical/extratropical interaction can directly impact the evolution of high impact, mid-latitude weather events.

  13. Purge at West Valley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Warren

    1977-01-01

    Tells how the adviser of the student newspaper at West Valley College (Saratoga, California) was dismissed after the newspaper published stories based on investigations into alleged wrongdoings by administration members. (GW)

  14. Mzab Valley, Algeria

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    Located 600 km south of Algiers, Algeria in the heart of the Sahara Desert, the five ksour fortified villages of the MZab Valley form an extraordinarily homogenous ensemble in this image captured by NASA Terra spacecraft.

  15. Death Valley, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-29

    Death Valley, Calif., has the lowest point in North America, Badwater at 85.5 meters 282 feet below sea level. It is also the driest and hottest location in North America. This image is from NASA Terra spacecraft.

  16. California: Diamond Valley

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... water storage capacity. In addition to routine water management, Diamond Valley Lake is designed to provide protection against ... to stand out prominently by taking advantage of the strong change in brightness between the two view angles and the contrasting angular ...

  17. Let the People Speak. The Tennessee Indian Council: A History and Analysis of the Development of Native American Programs in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Michael

    Since 1976, the Tennessee Indian Council has grown from an idea into an organization staffed by 24 native Americans in 3 offices, administering $500,000 a year, and providing educational, employment, housing, health, and cultural revitalization programs for 8,500 Native American residents of Tennessee. The situation in Tennessee is a microcosm of…

  18. NV PFA - Steptoe Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Faulds

    2015-10-29

    All datasets and products specific to the Steptoe Valley model area. Includes a packed ArcMap project (.mpk), individually zipped shapefiles, and a file geodatabase for the northern Steptoe Valley area; a GeoSoft Oasis montaj project containing GM-SYS 2D gravity profiles along the trace of our seismic reflection lines; a 3D model in EarthVision; spreadsheet of links to published maps; and spreadsheets of well data.

  19. Heartland virus associated death in Tennessee

    PubMed Central

    Muehlenbachs, Atis; Fata, Cynthia R.; Lambert, Amy J.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Velez, Jason O.; Blau, Dianna M.; Staples, J. Erin; Karlekar, Mohana B.; Bhatnagar, Julu; Nasci, Roger S.; Zaki, Sherif R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heartland virus (HRTV) is a tick-borne phlebovirus recently described in Missouri that is associated with fever, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. The virus has also been detected in Ambylommaamericanum ticks. Methods and Results Here we report the first fatal case of HRTV disease in an 80 year-old Tennessee resident. He was hospitalized with fever, confusion, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia and developed multi-organ failure and hemorrhage. A tick-borne illness was suspected and testing for ehrlichiosis was negative. He died on hospital day 15 and autopsy specimens were tested for various pathogens as part of an unexplained death evaluation. HRTV antigens were detected in post-mortem spleen and lymph nodes by immunohistochemistry, and HRTV was detected in pre-mortem blood by RT-PCR and by isolation in cell culture. Conclusions This case demonstrates that HRTV infection can cause severe disease and death and expands the geographic range of HRTV within the United States. PMID:24917656

  20. Fentress County, Tennessee unconventional gas program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    In March 1982, an experimental gas well was drilled at the Fentress County Industrial Park site, a 32.5-acre tract adjacent to the northwest corporate limits of the City of Jamestown, Tennessee. The purpose of this well was to determine the feasibility of developing unconventional gas resources throughout the site. This report describes the drilling and testing program, the test results, and an evaluation of the site's feasibility. Results of calculations indicate that if all available gas could be recovered from a 19-inch-thick Nemo coal seam on the 32.5-acee tract, the yield would be approximately 408 cubic feet of gas. At the federally regulated price of $2.59 per cubic foot, the approximate value of the in-place gas would be $1,056.72. Since this calculation is most likely an overestimate of gas volume, there is little feasibility of developing unconventional gas resources at the site.

  1. Integrated solid waste management of Sevierville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Sevierville, Tennessee integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM systems.

  2. Socioeconomic Disparities and Influenza Hospitalizations, Tennessee, USA

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Chantel; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Mitchel, Edward; Schaffner, William

    2015-01-01

    We examined population-based surveillance data from the Tennessee Emerging Infections Program to determine whether neighborhood socioeconomic status was associated with influenza hospitalization rates. Hospitalization data collected during October 2007–April 2014 were geocoded (N = 1,743) and linked to neighborhood socioeconomic data. We calculated age-standardized annual incidence rates, relative index of inequality, and concentration curves for socioeconomic variables. Influenza hospitalizations increased with increased percentages of persons who lived in poverty, had female-headed households, lived in crowded households, and lived in population-dense areas. Influenza hospitalizations decreased with increased percentages of persons who were college educated, were employed, and had health insurance. Higher incidence of influenza hospitalization was also associated with lower neighborhood socioeconomic status when data were stratified by race. PMID:26292106

  3. Socioeconomic Disparities and Influenza Hospitalizations, Tennessee, USA.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Chantel; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Mitchel, Edward; Schaffner, William; Lindegren, Mary Lou

    2015-09-01

    We examined population-based surveillance data from the Tennessee Emerging Infections Program to determine whether neighborhood socioeconomic status was associated with influenza hospitalization rates. Hospitalization data collected during October 2007-April 2014 were geocoded (N = 1,743) and linked to neighborhood socioeconomic data. We calculated age-standardized annual incidence rates, relative index of inequality, and concentration curves for socioeconomic variables. Influenza hospitalizations increased with increased percentages of persons who lived in poverty, had female-headed households, lived in crowded households, and lived in population-dense areas. Influenza hospitalizations decreased with increased percentages of persons who were college educated, were employed, and had health insurance. Higher incidence of influenza hospitalization was also associated with lower neighborhood socioeconomic status when data were stratified by race.

  4. CITICO CREEK WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, TENNESSEE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, John F.; Behum, Paul T.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Citico Creek Wilderness Study Area, in easternmost Tennessee, indicated that the area offers little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Geochemical sampling found traces of gold, copper, cobalt, barium, arsenic, lead, zinc, and thorium in rocks, stream sediments, and panned concentrates, but not in sufficient quantities to indicate the presence of metallic mineral deposits. The only apparent resources are nonmetallic commodities including rock suitable for construction materials, and small amounts of sand and gravel; however, these commodities are found in abundance outside the study area. The potential for oil and natural gas at great depths could not be evaluated by this study. Deep drilling would test the potential for hydrocarbon resources underlying the metamorphic rocks.

  5. 76 FR 33806 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00053

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... Tennessee (FEMA-1979-DR), dated 05/09/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and..., Moore. All other information in the original declaration remains unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic...

  6. Region 4: Tennessee 2006 Adequate Letter (3/27/2017)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation determined Knoxville Area’s motor vehicle emission budgets are adequate for transportation conformity purposes and will be announced in the Federal Register (FR).

  7. Region 4: Tennessee Adequate Letter (4/22/2010)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation determined motor vehicle emission budgets are adequate for transportation conformity purposes and will be announced in the Federal Register (FR).

  8. Region 4: Tennessee 1997 Adequate Letter (3/27/2017)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation determined Knoxville Area’s motor vehicle emission budgets are adequate for transportation conformity purposes and will be announced in the Federal Register (FR).

  9. Region 4: Tennessee Adequate Letter (9/30/2010)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter acknowledges that the EPA has reviewed Tennessee's Knoxville Area redesignation request and maintenace plan, as well as the motor vehicle emissions budgets (MVEBs) and have determined that these MVEBs are adequate for transportation conformity

  10. Unified resource development of the Tennessee River watershed. Appendix

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This volume contains: the TVA act, the 1936 report to the Congress on the unified development of the Tennessee River system, a history of the TVA, generator/motor specifications, and ac induction motor (squirrel-cage type) specifications. (DLC)

  11. Getting Started in TQM-A Tennessee Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Career Planning and Employment, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Describes experiences of University of Tennessee as attempts were made to spread total quality management (TQM) concepts more effectively across the campus. Describes what TQM is, background and initiation of project, and results of project implementation. (NB)

  12. 75 FR 27009 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00038 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... remains unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera...

  13. 14. Newfound Gap Road, view from atop tunnel, Tennessee side. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Newfound Gap Road, view from atop tunnel, Tennessee side. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Newfound Gap Road, Between Gatlinburg, TN & Cherokee, NC, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  14. Correlates and predictors of physical inactivity among Tennessee adults.

    PubMed

    Hart, Peter D; Barreira, Tiago V; Kang, Minsoo

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the sociodemographic predictors and health-related correlates of no leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) in a representative sample of Tennessee adults. Data from 5024 adults participating in the 2008 Tennessee Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were used for the analysis. Overall, 28.9 percent of Tennessee adults (26.2 percent of men and 31.4 percent of women) reported no LTPA. The sociodemographic predictors of no LTPA were age, race, and education. No LTPA was a useful predictor of health status markers such as self-report health, obesity, smoking, and cardiovascular disease. This study found that selected sociodemographic characteristics were adequate predictors of no LTPA among Tennessee adults. Also, the absence of LTPA was found to be a significant predictor of health status.

  15. 75 FR 82378 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... directed to James D. Johnston, Associate General Counsel, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002 at (713) 420-4998 or by e- mail at james.johnston@elpaso.com ....

  16. Green Valley Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, S.

    2014-12-01

    The "green valley" is a wide region separating the blue and the red peaks in the ultraviolet-optical color magnitude diagram, first revealed using GALEX UV photometry. The term was coined by Christopher Martin (Caltech), in 2005. Green valley highlights the discriminating power of UV to very low relative levels of ongoing star formation, to which the optical colors, including u-r, are insensitive. It corresponds to massive galaxies below the star-forming, "main" sequence, and therefore represents a critical tool for the study of the quenching of star formation and its possible resurgence in otherwise quiescent galaxies. This article reviews the results pertaining to (predominanlty disk) morphology, structure, environment, dust content and gas properties of green valley galaxies in the local universe. Their relationship to AGN is also discussed. Attention is given to biases emerging from defining the "green valley" using optical colors. We review various evolutionary scenarios and we present evidence for a new one, the quasi-static view of the green valley, in which the majority (but not all) of galaxies currently in the green valley were only partially quenched in the distant past and now participate in a slow cosmic decline of star formation, which also drives down the activity on the main sequence, presumably as a result of the dwindling accretion/cooling onto galaxy disks. This emerging synthetic picture is based on the findings from Fang et al. (2012), Salim et al. (2012) and Martin et al. (2007), as well as other results.

  17. Expanded functions for dental auxiliaries education in Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Morris L

    2011-01-01

    Access to care continues to be an overriding issue in dentistry. The development of new categories of dental auxiliaries, such as mid-level providers, is a matter of concern to many states and the dental profession. Tennessee has an EFDA educational program for dental auxiliaries taught by dental school educators who have trained more than 300 auxiliary personnel in restorative and prosthetic dentistry. Graduates of this educational program have helped keep Tennessee's dentists well ahead of any increased demand for dental care.

  18. Use and availability of continuous streamflow records in Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowery, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    This report documents the results of the data uses and funding part of a study of the cost-effectiveness of the streamflow information program in Tennessee. Presently, 88 continuous surface water gaging stations are operated in Tennessee on a budget of $490,800. Data uses and funding sources are identified for each of the 88 stations. Data from most stations have multiple uses. (USGS)

  19. Grizzly Valley fault system, Sierra Valley, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Ryan; Stephenson, William; Odum, Jack; Briggs, Rich; Crone, Anthony; Angster, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The Grizzly Valley fault system (GVFS) strikes northwestward across Sierra Valley, California and is part of a network of active, dextral strike-slip faults in the northern Walker Lane (Figure 1). To investigate Quaternary motion across the GVFS, we analyzed high-resolution (0.25 m) airborne LiDAR data (Figure 2) in combination with six, high-resolution, P-wave, seismic-reflection profiles [Gold and others, 2012]. The 0.5- to 2.0-km-long seismic-reflection profiles were sited orthogonal to suspected tectonic lineaments identified from previous mapping and our analysis of airborne LiDAR data. To image the upper 400–700 m of subsurface stratigraphy of Sierra Valley (Figure 3), we used a 230-kg accelerated weight drop source. Geophone spacing ranged from 2 to 5 m and shots were co-located with the geophones. The profiles reveal a highly reflective, deformed basal marker that we interpret to be the top of Tertiary volcanic rocks, overlain by a 120- to 300-m-thick suite of subhorizontal reflectors we interpret as Plio-Pleistocene lacustrine deposits. Three profiles image the principle active trace of the GVFS, which is a steeply dipping fault zone that offsets the volcanic rocks and the basin fill (Figures 4 & 5).

  20. Indoor air quality study of forty east Tennessee homes

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Hingerty, B.E.; Schuresko, D.D.; Parzyck, D.C.; Womack, D.R.; Morris, S.A.; Westley, R.R.; White, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    Over a one-year period, measurements of indoor air pollutants (CO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, formaldehyde, volatile organics, particulates, and radon) were made in 40 homes in East Tennessee. The houses were of various ages with different types of insulation and heating. Over one-half of the houses exceeded the ASHRAE indoor ceiling guideline of 0.1 ppM for formaldehyde on at least one occasion. Over the duration of the study, older houses averaged 0.04 ppM of formaldehyde while houses less than 5 years old averaged 0.08 ppM (P < 0.01). The highest concentration of formaldehyde measured was 0.4 ppM in a new home. Diurnal and seasonal fluctuations in levels of formaldehyde in some homes were as much as twofold and tenfold, respectively. The highest levels of formaldehyde were usually recorded during summer months. The concentration in indoor air of various organics was at least tenfold higher than in outdoor air. Carbon monoxide and nitrgen oxides were usually <2 and <0.02 ppM, respectively, except when gas stoves or kerosene space heaters were operating, or when a car was running in the garage. In 30% of the houses, the annual indoor guideline for radon, 4 pCi/L, was exceeded. The mean radon level in houses built on the ridgelines was 4.4 pCi/L, while houses located in the valleys had a mean level of 1.7 pCi/L (P < 0.01). The factor having the most impact on infiltration was operation of the central duct fan of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system. The mean rate of air exchange increased from 0.39 to 0.74 h/sup -1/ when the duct fan was operated (measurements prior to December 1982). This report presents the study design and implementation, describes the monitoring protocols, and provides a complete set of the data collected during the project. 25 references, 29 figures, 42 tables.

  1. Tennessee smiles: the UT grassroots oral health outreach initiative.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Maurice W; Wasson, Waletha; Scarbecz, Mark; Aubertin, Mary A; Woods, Marjorie; Himel, Van T

    2011-01-01

    Access to and awareness of oral healthcare in the United States have been highlighted in the mass media and discussed among diverse populations. The current surge to provide access to oral healthcare for citizens springs from this quagmire of oral healthcare issues which affects global to local (grassroots) communities. Publications by the World Health Organization's (WHO) Health for All and the United States' Healthy People have set into motion an agenda by which institutions, healthcare professionals and governments can develop action plans to foster and nurture grassroots organizations to address these issues. An initiative has been undertaken by members of the faculty, student doctors and staff of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, College of Dentistry (UTHSC CoD) and its partners. This cadre of volunteers has implemented grassroots efforts for the citizens of western Tennessee to date as the flagship of Tennessee Smiles: UT Grassroots Oral Health Outreach Initiative (Tennessee Smiles). By participation in health fairs, school programs and other cultural events, these volunteers have made a difference in the lives of thousands of Tennessee citizens who need exposure to information regarding their oral health care needs. The authors discuss the basis for the Tennessee Smiles organization, their successes and challenges. Future plans and the need for support of the organization are emphasized.

  2. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR ZONE 1 OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK IN OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    King, David A.

    2012-08-16

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted in-process inspections and independent verification (IV) surveys in support of DOE's remedial efforts in Zone 1 of East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Inspections concluded that the remediation contractor's soil removal and survey objectives were satisfied and the dynamic verification strategy (DVS) was implemented as designed. Independent verification (IV) activities included gamma walkover surveys and soil sample collection/analysis over multiple exposure units (EUs).

  3. Towards guided data assimilation for operational hydrologic forecasting in the US Tennessee River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weerts, Albrecht; Wood, Andy; Carney, Shaun; Day, Jay; Lemans, Matthijs; Sumihar, Julius; Verkade, Jan; Newman, Andy

    2015-04-01

    In the US, the forecasting approach used by the NWS River Forecast Centers and other regional organizations such as the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) or Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has traditionally involved manual model input and state modifications made by forecasters in real-time. This process is time consuming and requires expert knowledge and experience. The benefits of automated data assimilation (DA) as a strategy for avoiding manual modification approaches have been demonstrated in research studies (eg. Seo et al., 2009). This study explores the usage of various ensemble DA algorithms within the operational platform used by TVA. The final goal is to identify a DA algorithm that will guide the manual modification process used by TVA forecasters and realize considerable time gains (without loss of quality or even enhance the quality) within the forecast process. We evaluate the usability of various popular algorithms for DA that have been applied on a limited basis for operational hydrology. To this end, Delft-FEWS was wrapped (via piwebservice) in OpenDA to enable execution of FEWS workflows (and the chained models within these workflows, including SACSMA, UNITHG and LAGK) in a DA framework. Within OpenDA, several filter methods are available. We considered 4 algorithms: particle filter (RRF), Ensemble Kalman Filter and Asynchronous Ensemble Kalman and Particle filter. The initial results are promising. We will present verification results for these methods (and possible more) for a variety of sub basins in the Tennessee River basin. Finally, we will offer recommendations for guided DA based on our results. References Seo, D.-J., L. Cajina, R. Corby and T. Howieson, 2009: Automatic State Updating for Operational Streamflow Forecasting via Variational Data Assimilation, 367, Journal of Hydrology, 255-275.

  4. Effects of coal fly ash on tree swallow reproduction in Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Walls, Suzanne J; Meyer, Carolyn B; Iannuzzi, Jacqueline; Schlekat, Tamar H

    2015-01-01

    Coal-fly ash was released in unprecedented amounts (4.1 × 10(6) m(3) ) into the Emory River from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant on Watts Bar Reservoir in Tennessee. Tree swallows were exposed to ash-related constituents at the ash release via their diet of emergent aquatic insects, whose larval forms can accumulate constituents from submerged river sediments. Reproduction of tree swallow colonies was assessed over a 2-year period by evaluating whether 1) ash constituent concentrations were elevated in egg, eggshell, and nestling tissues at colonies near ash-impacted river reaches compared to reference colonies, 2) production of fledglings per nesting female was significantly lower in ash-impacted colonies versus reference colonies, and 3) ash constituent concentrations or diet concentrations were correlated with nest productivity measures (clutch size, hatching success, and nestling survival, and fledglings produced per nest). Of the 26 ash constituents evaluated, 4 (Se, Sr, Cu, and Hg) were significantly elevated in tissues potentially from the ash, and 3 (Se, Sr, and Cu) in tissues or in swallow diet items were weakly correlated to at least one nest-productivity measure or egg weight. Tree swallow hatching success was significantly reduced by 12%, but fledgling production per nest was unaffected due to larger clutch sizes in the impacted than reference colonies. Bioconcentration from the ash to insects in the diet to tree swallow eggs appears to be low. Overall, adverse impacts of the ash on tree swallow reproduction were not observed, but monitoring is continuing to further ensure Se from the residual ash does not adversely affect tree swallow reproduction over time. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2015;11:56-66. © 2014 SETAC.

  5. 78 FR 33117 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 1; Applications and Amendments to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Andrew Hon, Project Manager, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U... Manager, Plant Licensing Branch II-2, Division of Operating Reactor Licensing, Office of Nuclear Reactor... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR...

  6. 76 FR 62457 - Tennessee Valley Authority (Bellefonte Nuclear Plant, Unit 1)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... (ADAMS Accession No. ML102440618), TVA informed the NRC that it was ] funding for initial engineering....gov/site-help/e-submittals.html . Participants may attempt to use other software not listed on the Web site, but should note that the NRC's E-Filing system does not support unlisted software, and the NRC...

  7. 78 FR 52571 - Tennessee Valley Authority, Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, Unit 1; Applications and Amendments to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... the NRC's E-Filing system does not support unlisted software, and the NRC Meta System Help Desk will... electronically using the NRC's adjudicatory E- Filing system may seek assistance by contacting the NRC Meta...-672-7640. The NRC Meta System Help Desk is available between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., Eastern Time,...

  8. 76 FR 58050 - Tennessee Valley Authority, Bellefonte Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 1; Environmental Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... capacity would address the need for new capacity, such as fossil fuel, wind, solar, biomass, and hydropower... diesel fuel fired construction equipment to prevent excessive exhaust emissions, and managing shift... Protection Against Radiation,'' and 10 CFR part 50, ``Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization...

  9. Tennessee Valley Authority, Paradise Fossil Plant; Order Responding Petition to Object to Title V Operating Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Petition Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-petition-database.

  10. Tennessee Valley Authority, Paradise Fossil Plant; Petition to Object to Title V Operating Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Petition Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-petition-database.

  11. Hydrology of the Melton Valley radioactive-waste burial grounds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, D.A.; Bradley, M.W.

    1988-12-31

    Burial grounds 4, 5, and 6 were used sequentially from 1951 to the present for the disposal of solid, low-level radioactive waste by burial in shallow trenches and auger holes. Abundant rainfall, a generally thin unsaturated zone, geologic media of inherently low permeability, and the operational practices employed have contributed to partial saturation of the buried waste, leaching of radionuclides, and transport of dissolved matter from the burial areas. Two primary methods of transport from these sites are by dissolution in circulating ground water, and the overflow of fluids in trenches and subsequent flow across land surface. The waste-disposal areas are underlain by the Conasauga Group (Cambrian age), a complex sequence of mudstone, siltstone, and limestone interbeds grading from one lithotype to the other, both laterally and vertically. Compressional forces that caused regional thrust faulting also caused much internal deformation of the beds. Folds, bedding-plane faults, and joints are widespread. Small solution openings have developed in some areas where the structurally-related openings have provided ingress to ground water.

  12. Tennessee Valley Total and Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Climatology Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechler, Dennis; Blakeslee, R. J.; Hall, J. M.; McCaul, E. W.

    2008-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) has been in operation since 2001 and consists often VHF receivers deployed across northern Alabama. The NALMA locates sources of impulsive VHF radio signals from total lightning by accurately measuring the time that the signals arrive at the different receiving stations. The sources detected are then clustered into flashes by applying spatially and temporally constraints. This study examines the total lightning climatology of the region derived from NALMA and compares it to the cloud-to-ground (CG) climatology derived from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) The presentation compares the total and CG lightning trends for monthly, daily, and hourly periods.

  13. Alkali-Silica Reaction in Concrete from Fontana Dam, North Carolina, Tennessee Valley Authority.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    crossed polarized 1.482 > n < 1.502 light. Alternating growth layers of clear and of tan translucent 1.480 > n < 1.520 gel; some of the clear material is... vermiculite was present in one piece of aggregate; a small amount of amphibole was tentatively identified in several pieces. Small amounts of iron sulfide were...the alkali-silica reaction, which is present in all the cores from block 31 examined here, contribute to the stress developed, to growth in height, and

  14. 78 FR 14362 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Notice of Acceptance for Docketing of Application and Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... issuance of the requested renewed licenses, the NRC will have made the findings required by the Atomic... during the period of extended operation on the functionality of structures and components that have been... officer designated by the Commission or by the Chief Administrative Judge of the Atomic Safety...

  15. Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1992: Bacteriological conditions in the Tennessee Valley. Fourth annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Fehring, J.P.

    1993-05-01

    Twenty-eight designated swimming beaches, four informal swimming areas, two canoe launching or landing sites, and two additional sites on a canoeing stream were sampled at least ten times each during 30-day sampling periods in the summer of 1992. One designated swimming beach, one informal swimming area, and two canoe launching or landing sites exceeded the recommended criterion of geometric mean concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria of 200/100 mL. In addition to these four sites, five designated swimming beaches and one informal swimming area exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommended criterion by having more than 10 percent of the fecal coliform samples with concentrations greater than 400/100 mL. Rainfall was an important factor for these six sites and the four sites that did not meet the geometric mean criterion. Some sampling sites are affected by rainfall more than others. When bacteria concentrations increase after rainfall, it indicates that site is vulnerable to contamination from nonpoint sources of pollution. Recreational use of these sites following rainfall is discouraged. If samples collected within 24 hours of rainfall (one-half inch or more) are excluded, all-but one of the ten sites have better bacteriological water quality, and two meet both the geometric mean and maximum concentration criteria. Five canoe access locations on the Bear Creek floatway, plus one site upstream and another downstream of the floatway were sampled eight times each during 1992. All seven sites met recreation criteria.

  16. 75 FR 39285 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Notice of Receipt of Updated Antitrust Information and Opportunity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... either the Web-based search (advanced search) engine or the ADAMS find tool in Citrix. Within 30 days.... To search for other related documents in ADAMS using the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant Unit 2...

  17. 75 FR 13609 - Tennessee Valley Authority Sequoyah Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... those previously imposed by Commission orders issued after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001... September 11, 2001, security orders. It is from two of these new requirements that SQN now seeks an... those required by the security orders issued in response to the events of September 11, 2001. Therefore...

  18. Quick Reaction Report on DoD Procurements Through the Tennessee Valley Authority

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-03

    Cont’d) or. Slax 0Oefte ee6 er 3.91beob 3, 2 " 1 no. S mo" Oi~eroKLED naval Sea SystmI o8d Code SEA 04FAF WAjhLqbtos, be 20)36-101 Isr. :. W. Engles D...action taken is needed for followup on Recommendations 1 ., 2 ., and 4. APPENDIX G 57 REPORT DISTRIBUTION Office of the Secretary of Defense Under...also request that the Army, Navy, and Air Force provide comments on the revised monetary benefits (Appendix F and G ). If you nonconcur with the

  19. 78 FR 35989 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ..., Maryland 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Elaine N. Keegan, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U... second light-water nuclear reactor (the facility), WBN Unit 2, located on the applicant's site in Rhea... Branch II-1, Division of Operating Reactor Licensing, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. BILLING...

  20. Status report on the Tennessee Valley Authority Cumberlandian Mollusc Conservation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkinson, J.J.

    1983-10-01

    The Cumberlandian Mollusc Conservation Program (CMCP) is still in existence and is beginning to accomplish its purposes. Many of the research phase activities are nearing completion, and the conservation phase activities are taking shape. Current mussel populations have been assessed, some fish hosts have been identified, and an artificial culture medium has been (re)discovered. The large and varied data sets that have been collected have been used to select transplant sites for Conradilla caelata, are in the process of being used to characterize and enhance mussel habitats, and are available for other ecological analyses. Much of this information is being assembled in reports which, in the near future, will be available to interested malacologists and many others. This program has been successful so far because it has been a rare blending of competent people, good ideas, adequate funding, and luck. Let's hope the components stay together until the job is completed.

  1. Applicability of Nonattainment NSR To Tennessee Valley Authority Shawnee Plant Demonstration Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  2. Tennessee Valley Total and Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Climatology Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechler, Dennis; Blakeslee, R. J.; Hall, J. M.; McCaul, E. W.

    2008-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) has been in operation since 2001 and consists often VHF receivers deployed across northern Alabama. The NALMA locates sources of impulsive VHF radio signals from total lightning by accurately measuring the time that the signals arrive at the different receiving stations. The sources detected are then clustered into flashes by applying spatially and temporally constraints. This study examines the total lightning climatology of the region derived from NALMA and compares it to the cloud-to-ground (CG) climatology derived from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) The presentation compares the total and CG lightning trends for monthly, daily, and hourly periods.

  3. INDOOR 222RN IN TENNESSEE VALLEY HOUSES: SEASONAL, BUILDING AND GEOLOGICAL FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-season survey of indoor 222Rn concentrations was conducted in 226 occupied houses in Roane County, TN, during 1985 and 1986. A similar survey of 86 houses in Madison County, AL, was conducted in 1988 and 1989. Alpha track detectors were placed in each of the houses for thre...

  4. 78 FR 62709 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... construction (FES-CP) of WBN, Units 1 and 2, issued on November 9, 1972 (ADAMS Accession No. ML073470580... on TVA's FES-CP as part of its review. In December 1978, the NRC staff issued NUREG-0498, ``Final... activities not addressed previously in TVA's FES-CP. The activities included: (1) Construction of the...

  5. INDOOR 222RN IN TENNESSEE VALLEY HOUSES: SEASONAL, BUILDING AND GEOLOGICAL FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-season survey of indoor 222Rn concentrations was conducted in 226 occupied houses in Roane County, TN, during 1985 and 1986. A similar survey of 86 houses in Madison County, AL, was conducted in 1988 and 1989. Alpha track detectors were placed in each of the houses for thre...

  6. ERTS-1 imagery interpretation techniques in the Tennessee Valley. [land use and soil mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The feasibility of delineating major soil associations and land uses through computerized analyses is discussed. Useful and potential applications in detecting landscape change and land use mapping are described. Recommendations for improving the data processing effort in a multidisciplinary program are presented.

  7. 75 FR 3762 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Sequoyah Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... actions required by the revised 10 CFR part 73, does not involve any physical changes to the reactor, fuel..., ``Physical protection of plants and materials,'' for Facility Operating License Nos. DPR-77 and DPR-79... for physical protection of licensed activities in nuclear power reactors against radiological sabotage...

  8. 78 FR 76328 - Application for Renewal of Special Nuclear Material License SNM-2014 From Tennessee Valley...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... does not result in changes to land use, water use, or result in changes to the quality or quantity of... has received 193 fuel assemblies from Westinghouse for use in the first operating cycle of WBN2. These... Fuel Cycle Safety and Safeguards, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards. BILLING CODE...

  9. Fretted Terrain Valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    30 October 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows shallow tributary valleys in the Ismenius Lacus fretted terrain region of northern Arabia Terra. These valleys exhibit a variety of typical fretted terrain valley wall and floor textures, including a lineated, pitted material somewhat reminiscent of the surface of a brain. Origins for these features are still being debated within the Mars science community; there are no clear analogs to these landforms on Earth. This image is located near 39.9oN, 332.1oW. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  10. Valley near Olympus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-539, 9 November 2003

    A suite of channels and valleys are carved into the plains southeast of the martian volcano, Olympus Mons. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example located near 16.5oN, 124.8oW. Whether the valley was cut by water is unknown. Today it is dry, has dust-covered wind ripples on the floor of the innermost channel, and small craters have formed here and there on the valley terrain. This picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  11. Fretted Terrain Valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    30 October 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows shallow tributary valleys in the Ismenius Lacus fretted terrain region of northern Arabia Terra. These valleys exhibit a variety of typical fretted terrain valley wall and floor textures, including a lineated, pitted material somewhat reminiscent of the surface of a brain. Origins for these features are still being debated within the Mars science community; there are no clear analogs to these landforms on Earth. This image is located near 39.9oN, 332.1oW. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  12. 78 FR 24386 - Electronic Fund Transfers; Determination of Effect on State Laws (Maine and Tennessee)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ... scope of Tennessee's definition of ``gift certificate'' may differ in some respects from that of ``gift... of the purchase price. Id. Sec. 66-29-135(b). The Bureau notes that a Tennessee trial court held in...

  13. 78 FR 55057 - Foreign-Trade Zone 134-Chattanooga, Tennessee; Authorization of Production Activity; Komatsu...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 134--Chattanooga, Tennessee; Authorization of Production Activity; Komatsu America Corporation, (Construction and Forestry Equipment), Chattanooga, Tennessee On May...

  14. 78 FR 29027 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee; Transportation Conformity Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... of Tennessee, through the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), ] Bureau of Environment, Air Pollution Control Division (APCD), on July 12, 2012. This revision consists of updates to... CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Carbon monoxide, Incorporation...

  15. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Mendon, Vrushali V.; Zhao, Mingjie; Taylor, Zachary T.; Poehlman, Eric A.

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Tennessee. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2006 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Tennessee.

  16. Rift Valley fever vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Makino, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), which belongs to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae, is a negative-stranded RNA virus carrying a tripartite RNA genome. RVFV is transmitted by mosquitoes and causes large outbreaks among ruminants and humans in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Human patients develop an acute febrile illness, followed by a fatal hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis or ocular diseases, whereas ruminants experience abortions during outbreak. Effective vaccination of both humans and ruminants is the best approach to control Rift Valley fever. This article summarizes the development of inactivated RVFV vaccine, live attenuated vaccine, and other new generation vaccines. PMID:19837291

  17. Beyond palisades: The nature and frequency of late prehistoric deliberate violent trauma in the Chickamauga reservoir of east Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Smith, Maria Ostendorf

    2003-08-01

    Based on the presence of palisades and an iconography suggesting a warrior elite, warfare is presumed to be endemic in the Late Mississippian period (AD 1200-1600) of the southeastern United States. Warfare is theorized to play a vital role in the cycling of chiefdoms. However, apart from a few exemplary cases that display double-digit frequencies, very little direct (i.e., skeletal) evidence of violent trauma has dovetailed with the archaeological presumptions of warfare. Eight sites from the Chickamauga Reservoir of east Tennessee were examined for skeletal evidence of deliberate violent trauma. Violent trauma was anticipated because these sites are in close proximity and consist of two adjacent, sociopolitically distinct, and temporally overlapping phases: Dallas (AD 1300-1600) and Mouse Creek (AD 1400-1600). In addition to small, round, nonlethal ectocranial blunt-force trauma (BFT) on the frontal and upper parietal bones, inflicted projectile points and scalping were identified. The low total trauma frequency in the Dallas sample (3.86%, n = 259) is consistent with emerging evidence from east and west Tennessee Late Mississippian data, but significantly different from Mouse Creek (8.06%, n = 273). The proportion of nonlethal cranial BFT in the collective Chickamauga sample is large and at odds with the Tennessee River Valley comparative literature. Based on other bioarchaeological literature, this pattern suggests intragroup violence, but not face-to-face ritual contests. It is better explained as interpersonal conflict resolution along codified lines. This is consistent with southeastern ethnohistoric data and may explain the more frequent cranial BFT in the less stratified Mouse Creek phase, which likely would not have had an overarching civil authority. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Session: Long Valley Exploratory Well

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Finger, John T.; Eichelberger, John C.; Hickox, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Long Valley Exploratory Well - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations'' by John T. Finger; ''Geologic results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well'' by John C. Eichelberger; and ''A Model for Large-Scale Thermal Convection in the Long Valley Geothermal Region'' by Charles E. Hickox.

  19. 1996 structural integrity assessments for the Category C Liquid Low-Level Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This document provides a report of the efforts made to satisfy the Federal Facility Agreement for the structural integrity certification of ten Category C Liquid Low Level Waste (LLLW) tank systems on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Within this document, each Category C tank system is described including the associated pipeline segments evaluated as a part of those tank systems. A separate structural integrity assessment was conducted for each of the LLLW Tank Systems, four of which are located in Melton Valley, and six of which are located in Bethel Valley. The results of the structural integrity assessments are reported herein. The assessments are based on (1) a review of available tank design drawings, (2) a qualitative assessment of corrosion on the tank and pipelines, and primarily (3) leak testing program results.

  20. Heartland virus-associated death in tennessee.

    PubMed

    Muehlenbachs, Atis; Fata, Cynthia R; Lambert, Amy J; Paddock, Christopher D; Velez, Jason O; Blau, Dianna M; Staples, J Erin; Karlekar, Mohana B; Bhatnagar, Julu; Nasci, Roger S; Zaki, Sherif R

    2014-09-15

    Heartland virus (HRTV) is a tick-borne phlebovirus recently described in Missouri that is associated with fever, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The virus has also been detected in Ambylomma americanum ticks. Here we report the first fatal case of HRTV disease in an 80-year-old Tennessee resident. He was hospitalized with fever, confusion, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia and developed multiorgan failure and hemorrhage. A tick-borne illness was suspected and testing for ehrlichiosis was negative. He died on hospital day 15, and autopsy specimens were tested for various pathogens as part of an unexplained death evaluation. HRTV antigens were detected in postmortem spleen and lymph nodes by immunohistochemistry, and HRTV was detected in premortem blood by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and by isolation in cell culture. This case demonstrates that HRTV infection can cause severe disease and death and expands the geographic range of HRTV within the United States. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Cancer mortality near Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Mangano, J J

    1994-01-01

    Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is the site of one of the two oldest nuclear facilities in the United States. Although precise records have not been maintained, low levels of radioactive products have been released into the environment since the facility began operation in World War II. Changes in age-adjusted cancer mortality rates for whites between the periods 1950-1952 and 1987-1989 were analyzed to assess whether these radioactive releases have had any adverse effects on the population living near Oak Ridge. Results indicate that the increases in the local area (under 100 miles from Oak Ridge) exceeded regional increases and far exceeded national increases. Within the region, increases were greatest in rural areas, in Anderson County (where Oak Ridge is located), in mountainous counties, and in the region downwind of Oak Ridge. Each of these findings suggest that low levels of radiation, ingested gradually by local residents, were a factor in the increases in local cancer death rates. Results indicate that more studies of this type are called for and that cessation of all future radioactive emissions from nuclear facilities should be considered.

  2. Geographic information system index for the State of Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, William R.; Norris, Pamela G.

    1989-01-01

    Recently the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) has increased within Tennessee. As a result, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Tennessee State Planning Office, and the Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury entered into an agreement to conduct a survey of GIS users within the State. Two hundred and sixty three agencies were contacted. One hundred and thirty-nine agencies maintained one or more computer system (including personal computers). Twenty-five agencies used GIS software. The number of coverages or layers that exist upon completion of the survey as computerized digital data for Tennessee was 4,741. One hundred and twenty location-specific data bases were available. The U.S. Geological Survey, National Mapping Division map accuracy standards and digital cartographic data standards were included as minimum guidelines for GIS users. General data sharing techniques were described. The most common one was the use of magnetic tapes. A GIS index data base containing the survey data was built for inquiries. A 7.5 minute quadrangle coverage of Tennessee was created to allow for identification on a quadrangle basis of existing coverages contained in the GIS data base. (USGS)

  3. Transition Plan for the K-1203 Sewage Treatment Plant, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmeister J.

    2008-10-05

    The K-1203 Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) was previously used to treat and process all sanitary sewage waste from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The plant was shut down on May 29, 2008 as a result of the transition of sewage treatment for ETTP to the City of Oak Ridge. The City of Oak Ridge expanded the Rarity Ridge Sewage Treatment Plant (RRSTP) to include capacity to treat the waste from the ETTP and the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) constructed a new ETTP lift station and force main to RRSTP. In preparation for the shutdown of K-1203, the US Department of Energy (DOE) in conjunction with Operation Management International (OMI) developed a shut down plan to outline actions that need to occur prior to the transition of the facility to Bechtel Jacob Company, LLC (BJC) for decontamination and demolition (D and D). This plan outlines the actions, roles, and responsibilities for BJC in order to support the transition of the K-1203 STP from OMI to the BJC Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) and D and D programs. The D and D of the K-1203 Facilities is planned under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Remaining Facilities D and D Action Memorandum in the Balance of Site-Utilities D and D Subproject in fiscal year (FY) 2014.

  4. Health-hazard-evaluation report HETA 89-212-2020, Schlegel Tennessee, Inc. , Maryville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Kiken, S.; Newman, M.; Cox, C.

    1990-03-01

    In response to a request from the company, an investigation was made of possible hazardous conditions at the Schlegel Tennessee, Inc. (SIC-2822), Maryville, Tennessee. Concern had been expressed by union representatives about possible exposures to airborne nitrosamines, and the incidence of cancer in employees. The company produces rubber weather stripping for automobiles. Approximately 70 salaried and 200 production workers were employed by the company. Packers were experiencing dizziness, nausea, tingling lips, headaches, and depression. These problems had been attributed to odors in the workplace. Three employees had abnormal neurologic examinations and two other had reported abnormal urine iodine-azide tests. Current testing did not reveal any employees with 2-thiothiazolidine-4-carboxylic-acid (TTCA) in their urine, indicating that workers were not exposed to more than 0.5ppm carbon-disulfide (75150) (CS2). No personal breathing or area air sampling tests showed CS2 contamination above acceptable levels. No excess of reported cancers was noted following a standardized morbidity ratio analysis compared to the general population of the United States. Detectable levels of nitrosamines were not found. According to the authors, the etiology of medical problems experienced by workers could not be definitively determined. The authors recommend measures to lower potential hazardous exposures at the site.

  5. Evaluation of Invertebrate Bioaccumulation of Fly Ash Contaminants in the Emory, Clinch, and Tennessee Rivers, 2009 - 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, John G

    2012-05-01

    This report provides a summary of results from studies on invertebrate bioaccumulation of potential contaminants associated with a major fly ash spill into the Emory River following the failure of a dike at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant (KIF) in Kingston, Tennessee, in late December 2008. Data included in this report cover samples collected in calendar years 2009 and 2010. Samples collected from most sites in 2009 were processed by two different laboratories using different approved U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical methods: ALS Laboratory Group in Ft. Collins, CO, processed sampling using EPA method 6010 (but method 6020 for uranium and SW7470 for mercury), and PACE Analytical in Minneapolis, MN, used EPA method 6020. A preliminary evaluation of results from both laboratories indicated that some differences exited in measured concentrations of several elements, either because of specific differences of the two methods or inter-laboratory differences. While concentration differences between the laboratories were noted for many elements, spatial trends depicted from the results of both methods appeared to be similar. However, because samples collected in the future will be analyzed by Method 6020, only the results from PACE were included in this report to reduce data variation potentially associated with inter-laboratory and analytical method differences.

  6. Magnetic susceptibility measurements to detect coal fly ash from the Kingston Tennessee spill in Watts Bar Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Ellen A; Seramur, Keith C; Hageman, Steven J

    2013-03-01

    An estimated 229,000 m(3) of coal fly ash remains in the river system after dredging to clean-up the 2008 Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) spill in Kingston, Tennessee. The ash is heterogeneous with clear, orange and black spheres and non-spherical amorphous particles. Combustion produces iron oxides that allow low field magnetic susceptibility (χ(LF)) and percent frequency dependent susceptibility (χ(FD)%) to be used to discriminate between coal fly ash and sediments native to the watershed. Riverbed samples with χ(LF) greater than 3.0 × 10(-6) m(3)/kg, have greater than 15% ash measured by optical point counting. χ(LF) is positively correlated with total ash, allowing ash detection in riverbed sediments and at depth in cores. The ratio of ash sphere composition is altered by river transport introducing variability in χ(LF). Measurement of χ(LF) is inexpensive, non-destructive, and a reliable analytical tool for monitoring the fate of coal ash in this fluvial environment.

  7. Hydrogeologic, water-quality, streamflow, bottom-sediment analyses, and biological data near the Wayne County landfill, Wayne County, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones, F.; Bradfield, Arthur D.; Wescott, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the data collected as part of a hydrogeologic investigation to determine the effects of the Wayne County landfill on local water quality. The investigation was conducted from 1988 through 1989 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment, Division of Superfund. The landfill was closed in November 1984 after allegations that contaminants from the landfill were affecting the quality of water from domestic wells in the Banjo Branch-Hardin Hollow valley. Test well construction data; water-quality data for selected wells, seeps, and surface-water sites: streamflow data from Banjo Branch; analyses of bottom-sediment samples: and biological data for the study area are documented in this report.

  8. Crayfish fauna of the Tennessee River drainage in Mississippi, including new state species records

    Treesearch

    Susan B. Adams; Christopher A. Taylor; Chris Lukhaup

    2010-01-01

    We present new state records for 3 crayfish species in the Tennessee River basin in Mississippi, and the first drainage-specific distributional information in the state for a fourth. The species - Cambarus girardianus, Cambarus rusticiformis, Orconectes spinosus, and Orconectes wright, - are all known from the Tennessee River basin in Tennessee, while all but O....

  9. 75 FR 15426 - East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC; Notice of Application March 22, 2010. Take notice that on March 8, 2010, East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC (East Tennessee), 5400 Westheimer Court...) and 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) for authorization to: (i) Install an approximately 8.4-mile, 24...

  10. 78 FR 53744 - East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on August 14, 2013, East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC (East Tennessee), 5400 Westheimer Court, Houston, Texas 77056-5310, filed an application pursuant to Section 7(b) and 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and Part...

  11. 77 FR 47619 - East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on July 20, 2012, East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC (East Tennessee), 5400 Westheimer Court, Houston, TX 77056-5310, filed in the above referenced docket an application pursuant to section 7(c) of the Natural...

  12. Tennessee School Finance Equity as Determined by Locally Funded Teaching Positions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peevely, Gary L.; Ray, John R.

    The Tennessee School Finance Equity Study was begun in 1978 to review the equity and adequacy of Tennessee's Public School Finance Program. Changes in the structure of the Tennessee Foundation Program (TFP) did achieve greater equity in the amount of funds local districts obtained from the foundation program even though the residence of the…

  13. 78 FR 63148 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee; Bristol; 2010 Lead Base Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... the State of Tennessee, through the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) on... conditional approvals to full approvals for Tennessee's 1997 annual fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) NAAQS... in the rule entitled ``Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) for Particulate Matter Less Than...

  14. 30 CFR 942.25 - Approval of Tennessee abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of Tennessee abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. 942.25 Section 942.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE TENNESSEE § 942.25 Approval of Tennessee abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The...

  15. 30 CFR 942.25 - Approval of Tennessee abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of Tennessee abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. 942.25 Section 942.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE TENNESSEE § 942.25 Approval of Tennessee abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The...

  16. Voices from the Classroom: Results from the 2016 Tennessee Educator Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Isaiah

    2016-01-01

    The Tennessee Educator Survey, created in partnership with the Tennessee Education Research Alliance at Vanderbilt University (TERA), aims to take the pulse of teacher perceptions, monitor school climate and culture across the state, and include educators' voices in the policy discussion. The survey offers a snapshot of where Tennessee is--and…

  17. Juvenile Delinquency in Rural Areas. An Exploratory Study in East Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, William Dan

    Examining delinquency problems/services in rural Tennessee, existing secondary data on rural-urban delinquency patterns in the U.S. and Tennessee were compiled; officials and professionals (N=51) working with juveniles in East Tennessee were surveyed; and a preliminary estimation of costs associated with possibilities for improving juvenile…

  18. Preparing a New Breed of Principals in Tennessee: Instructional Leadership Redesign in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    From 2005 through 2008, the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) worked with the Tennessee State Board of Education and two universities in Tennessee--East Tennessee State University (ETSU) and the University of Memphis--to redesign educational leadership preparation. These two universities served as pilot sites for a redesign that would be…

  19. 78 FR 6313 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application Take notice that on January 14, 2013, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street... Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, by telephone at (713)...

  20. 76 FR 79673 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application On December 9, 2011, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002... Pipeline Company, L.L.C., 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, phone: (713) 420-4544, fax:...