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Sample records for 50-391 tennessee valley

  1. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391): Supplement No. 19

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Supplement No. 19 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for license to operate Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, located in Rhea County Tennessee, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation with (1) additional information submitted by the applicant since Supplement No. 18 was issued, and (2) matters that the staff had under review when Supplement No. 18 was issued.

  2. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 12

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, P.S.

    1993-10-01

    Supplement No. 12 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for license to operate Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, located in Rhea County, Tennessee, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation of (1) additional information submitted by the applicant since Supplement No. 11 was issued, and (2) matters that the staff had under review when Supplement No. 11 was issued.

  3. 21st Century jobs initiative - Tennessee`s Resource Valley. Progress report 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-20

    Tennessee`s Resource Valley, a regional economic development organization, was asked to facilitate a two-year, $750,000 grant from the Department of Energy. The grant`s purpose is to make the East Tennessee region less dependent on federal funds for its economic well-being and to increase regional awareness of the advantages of proximity to the Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge. Tennessee`s Resource Valley`s mission is to market the mid-East Tennessee region`s business location advantages to corporate decision makers and to facilitate regional initiatives that impact the creation of quality job opportunities. Tennessee`s Resource Valley represents the following fifteen (15) counties in East Tennessee: Anderson, Blount, Campbell, Claiborne, Cocke, Grainger, Jefferson, Knox, Loudon, Monroe, Morgan, Scott, Sevier, and Union.

  4. 21st Century jobs initiative - Tennessee`s Resource Valley. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-23

    Tennessee`s Resource Valley, a regional economic development organization, was asked to facilitate a two-year, $750,000 grant from the Department of Energy. The grant`s purpose was to make the East Tennessee region less dependent on federal funds for its economic well-being and to increase regional awareness of the advantages of proximity to the Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge. The mission of Tennessee`s Resource Valley is to market the business location advantages of mid-East Tennessee to corporate decision makers and to facilitate regional initiatives that impact the creation of quality job opportunities. Tennessee`s Resource Valley represents fifteen (15) counties in East Tennessee: Anderson, Blount, Campbell, Claiborne, Cocke, Grainger, Jefferson, Knox, Loudon, Monroe, Morgan, Roane, Scott, Sevier and Union.

  5. Biomass analyses for four areas in the Tennessee Valley Authority

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    Analyses for four biomass procurement areas in the Tennessee Valley are presented. The Marlow and Perryville, Tennessee, sites can provide 38,000 dry tons of industrial residue annually. Mulberry Creek, Alabama, and Watts Bar, Tennessee, can annually provide 330,000 dry tons of industrial residue and/or forest biomass. Methanol can be produced at the Perryville and Marlow sites and ethanol at Mulberry Creek and Watts Bar. 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 15

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, P.S.

    1995-06-01

    This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April 1993), Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), Supplement No. 13 (April 1994), and Supplement No. 14 (December 1994) issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the outstanding and confirmatory items, and proposed license conditions identified in the SER.

  7. Lessons from the Tennessee Valley Authority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchens, Carl Thomas

    This dissertation is a program evaluation of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) the largest publicly owned utility in the United States. The first essay in this dissertation examines the TVA's use of eminent domain in order to acquire property for the construction of reservoirs. It develops a new model of asymmetric information and then tests the model predictions using property level data from TVA property purchases in the 1930's. The second essay of this dissertation examines the unintended consequences of reservoir development my examining changes in the malaria rate associated with TVA reservoirs. Using panel data methods, I find that the presence of a TVA reservoir leads to large increases in the malaria mortality and morbidity rate, which cost up to 30 percent of TVA federal appropriations. The final essay in this dissertation examines the impact of TVA electrification programs on economic growth. It combines archival and panel data methods to show that contrary to the historical account, TVA electric rates did not differ substantially from the rates charged by private utilities, and secondly, shows that counties that had electricity contracts with the TVA did not have differential economic growth rates for a variety of economic outcomes. In order to control for selection into contracts, I adopt an instrumental variables strategy based on the cost of electric service.

  8. A Total Lightning Climatology for the Tennessee Valley Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCaul, E. W.; Goodman, S. J.; Buechler, D. E.; Blakeslee, R.; Christian, H.; Boccippio, D.; Koshak, W.; Bailey, J.; Hallm, J.; Bateman, M.

    2003-01-01

    Total flash counts derived from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array are being processed for 2002 to form a climatology of total lightning for the Tennessee Valley region. The data from this active and interesting period will be compared to data fiom the National Lightning Detection Network, space-based lightning sensors, and weather radars.

  9. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 17

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, P.S.

    1995-10-01

    This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April.1993), Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), Supplement No. 13 (April 1994), Supplement No. 14 (December 1994), Supplement No. 15 (June 1995), and Supplement No. 16 (September 1995) issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50--390 and 50--391). The facility is located in Rhea county, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. In this supplement, NRC examines the significant problems of construction quality and quality assurance effectiveness that led TVA to withdraw its certification in 1985 that Watts Bar Unit I was ready to load fuel. Also discussed are the extensive corrective actions performed by TVA according to its nuclear performance plans and other supplemental programs, and NRC`s extensive oversight to determine whether the Watts Bar Unit 1 construction quality and TVA`s operational readiness and quality assurance effectiveness are adequate for a low-power operating license to be issued. SSER 17 does not address Watts Bar Unit 2, except for the systems which are necessary to support Unit 1 operation.

  10. Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Katie Stokes

    2012-05-03

    In December 2009, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE), through a partnership with the Appalachian Regional Commission, EKPC, Kentucky's Department for Energy Development and Independence, SACE, Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation, and TVA, and through a contract with the Department of Energy, established the Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group (TVEKWWG). TVEKWWG consists of a strong network of people and organizations. Working together, they provide information to various organizations and stakeholders regarding the responsible development of wind power in the state. Members include representatives from utility interests, state and federal agencies, economic development organizations, non-government organizations, local decision makers, educational institutions, and wind industry representatives. The working group is facilitated by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. TVEKWWG supports the Department of Energy by helping educate and inform key stakeholders about wind energy in the state of Tennessee.

  11. Agricultural fuel crops, 201-county Tennessee Valley region

    SciTech Connect

    Madewell, C.E.; D'Souza, G.E.; Esensoy, Y.; Broder, J.D.; Simpson, G.S.

    1983-11-01

    The main objective of the report is to identify and analyze the potential economic and environmental impacts arising from the supplementation of a conventional liquid fuels energy system utilizing fossil-derived fuels with a renewable liquid fuels energy source relying primarily on agricultural fuel crops. The scope of this study is limited to the 201 counties of the Tennessee Valley region. Corn and soybeans, the two predominant crops in this region, are used as surrogates around which certain scenarios are constructed to evaluate the impacts of agricultural fuel crops production. Corn and soybeans are believed to represent greatest regional impact cases. Further, this report presents a data base and inventory summary of the region's agricultural land resources, crops and crop residues, land use patterns, erosion problems, conservation needs, and land suitability and potential availability for fuel crop production. Also included is a profile of institutions associated with agricultural fuel crop production, together with functions and responsibilities. The study is multidisciplinary in nature and is part of the overall biomass integrated environmental assessment for the Tennessee Valley region. The report contains the following sections: (1) inventory summary of Tennessee Valley agricultural resources; crops and crop residues; land use; current erosion status; trends in crop and use and yields; land suitability and potential availability for fuel crops production; and background information on alcohol and major economic related factors; (2) economic and environmental impacts arising from production of corn for ethanol fuel; (3) crop residue availability in the Tennessee Valley; (4) an integrated environmental assessment of vegetable oil crops; and (5) profile of institutions associated with agricultural fuel crops production including policies, functions, and responsibilities. 87 references, 17 figures, 29 tables.

  12. Phosphorus Retention Models for Tennessee Valley Authority Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, John M.; Kim, Byung R.

    1981-06-01

    Data for the 18 largest Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) reservoirs are compared with previously developed models for predicting steady state phosphorus concentrations in lakes. A plug flow model is presented for lakes and reservoirs which have significant longitudinal variation in phosphorus concentration. The results indicate that phosphorus sedimentation and retention coefficients developed for natural lakes are not directly applicable to TVA reservoirs. The apparent settling velocity of phosphorus in TVA reservoirs was substantially higher than previously reported values for natural lakes. Application of the plug flow model to Cherokee Reservoir showed good agreement with measured in-lake phosphorus concentrations.

  13. Tennessee Valley Authority National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Gautney, J.

    1991-01-01

    The National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) is a unique part of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), a government agency created by an Act of Congress in 1933. The Center, located in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, is a national laboratory for research, development, education and commercialization for fertilizers and related agricultural chemicals including their economic and environmentally safe use, renewable fuel and chemical technologies, alternatives for solving environmental/waste problems, and technologies which support national defense- NFERC projects in the pesticide waste minimization/treatment/disposal areas include Model Site Demonstrations and Site Assessments,'' Development of Waste Treatment and Site Remediation Technologies for Fertilizer/Agrichemical Dealers,'' Development of a Dealer Information/Education Program,'' and Constructed Wetlands.''

  14. Agricultural fuel crops: 201-County Tennessee Valley region policy assessment

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, G.E.; Bohac, C.E.

    1985-10-01

    Almost no fuel can be produced without environmental implications. Similarly, the production of crops for fuel is associated with certain externalities. The primary one is the erosive nature of some of these fuel crops, causing a long-term loss in soil productivity. This environmental spillover was examined within the framework of two fuel crop production scenarios, impacts from these scenarios assumed to be the upper bounds for those that could possibly occur. Corn was used as a surrogate crop for the assessment, which was limited to the 201 counties of the Tennessee Valley region, and included a timeframe extending to the year 2000. Due to the paucity of data and time limitations, a large portion of this discussion was based more on casual observation rather than hard empirical evidence. 30 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Orphans of the Valley. A status report on abandoned surface mines in the Tennessee Valley. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Muncy, J.A.; Bollinger, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Volume 1 of this report provides an overview of abandoned coal and noncoal mineral surface mine lands in the Tennessee Valley. It calls attention to problems associated with abandoned mines and points out reclamation accomplishments by State and Federal agencies. It discusses the upcoming task of returning these sites to productive capabilities and minimizing further damage to the environment. Volume II includes 34 color coded (by mine type), thematic maps of abandoned surface mine lands in the Tennessee Valley. The maps are historical in that they depicted conditions at, or about, the time of enactment of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act on August 3, 1977. Of the 117,000 acres of coal lands and 53,000 acres of noncoal mineral lands surface mined in the Tennessee Valley prior to comprehensive reclamation requirements, some 54,742 acres remain either inadequately or totally unreclaimed.

  16. 76 FR 73665 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority and the University of Tennessee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... Little Tennessee River. Both historical and archeological research indicate that a historic Cherokee... Tennessee River. Both historical and archeological research indicate that a historic Cherokee occupation... the documentary evidence of associated glass beads indicate that these were historic Cherokee...

  17. 78 FR 28897 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... COMMISSION Tennessee Valley Authority; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Pursuant to delegation by the Commission dated December 29, 1972, see 37 FR 28710 (1972), and the Commission's... that an Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (Board) is being established to preside over the...

  18. 77 FR 71454 - Notice of Atomic Safety And Licensing Board Reconstitution, Tennessee Valley Authority (Watts Bar...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... COMMISSION Notice of Atomic Safety And Licensing Board Reconstitution, Tennessee Valley Authority (Watts Bar, Unit 2) Pursuant to 10 CFR 2.313(c) and 2.321(b), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (Board) in the... 16th day of November 2012. E. Roy Hawkens, Chief Administrative Judge, Atomic Safety and...

  19. Inventory of karst subsidence in the Valley and Ridge Province of East Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelle, R.H.; Newton, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The first regional inventory of karst activity in the Valley and Ridge Province of East Tennessee was performed as a part of ongoing studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory pertaining to environmental impact assessment of waste disposal in karst settings. More than half the land area in the Valley and Ridge Province of East Tennessee is underlain by karst-prone carbonate bedrock. The regional karst inventory was initiated to obtain current information on the extent of active karst subsidence in the region for use in decision making by the Department of Energy in planning future waste disposal facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The inventory was performed by contacting personnel of federal, state, and county agencies to obtain reports of known active karst subsidence within the region. Data from these interviews were tabulated resulting in identificaton of more than 250 karst subsidence incidents in East Tennessee, most of which have occurred since 1980. Although the infomation obtained was largely anecdotal, approximate location, date, size, and circumstances under which the collapses occurred were recorded for as many cases as could be documented. The study also included detailed reconnaissance of selected areas similar in geology and hydrology to a study area at Oak Ridge, Tennessee to identify causative factors which contribute to karst subsidence in the region and for comparison of the occurrence of visible karst features at different sites. Human activities affecting site hydrology such as large scale land clearing and earthmoving projects were related to most of the subsidence incidents inventoried.

  20. Holocene ethnobotanical and paleoecological record of human impact on vegetation in the Little Tennessee River Valley, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcourt, Paul A.; Delcourt, Hazel R.; Cridlebaugh, Patricia A.; Chapman, Jefferson

    1986-05-01

    Human occupation and utilization of plant resources have affected vegetation in the lower Little Tennessee River Valley of East Tennessee for 10,000 yr. Changes in Indian cultures and land use are documented by radiocarbon chronologies, lithic artifacts, ceramics, settlement patterns, and ethnobotanical remains from 25 stratified archaeological sites within the Holocene alluvial terrace. The ethnobotanical record consists of 31,500 fragments (13.7 kg) of wood charcoal identified to species and 7.7 kg of carbonized fruits, seeds, nutshells, and cultigens from 956 features. Pollen and plant macrofossils from small ponds both in the uplands and on lower stream terraces record local vegetational changes through the last 1500 to 3000 yr. Human impact increased after cultigens, including squash and gourd, were introduced ca. 4000 yr B.P. during the Archaic cultural period. Forest clearance and cultivation disturbed vegetation on both the floodplain and lower terraces after 2800 yr B.P., during the Woodland period. Permanent Indian settlements and maize and bean agriculture extended to higher terraces 1.5 km from the floodplain by the Mississippian period (1000 to 300 yr B.P.). After 300 yr B.P., extensive land clearance and cultivation by Historic Overhill Cherokee and Euro-Americans spread into the uplands beyond the river valley.

  1. ERTS-B imagery interpretation techniques in the Tennessee Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, R. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. The proposed investigation is a continuation of an ERTS-1 project. The principal missions are to serve as the principal supporter on computer and image processing problems for the multidisciplinary ERTS effort of the University of Tennessee, and to carry out research in improved methods for the computer processing, enhancement, and recognition of ERTS imagery.

  2. Case studies in technology choice. Volume 4. Tennessee Valley Authority. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney, R.L.; Sicherman, A.

    1985-07-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has been considering different technological alternatives for managing their spent nuclear fuel. This report illustrates the use of the Technology Choice Model (TCM) to assist decision makers with this decision. A preliminary TCM application which addresses two spent fuel storage alternatives is presented and discussed. The report includes a procedure to elicit ''values'' from members of the public to evaluate alternatives. Use of the procedure was demonstrated through an illustrative example.

  3. The Use of Radar to Improve Rainfall Estimation over the Tennessee and San Joaquin River Valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Felix, Mariana; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation provides an overview of the collaborative radar rainfall project between the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Von Braun Center for Science & Innovation (VCSI), NASA MSFC and UAHuntsville. Two systems were used in this project, Advanced Radar for Meteorological & Operational Research (ARMOR) Rainfall Estimation Processing System (AREPS), a demonstration project of real-time radar rainfall using a research radar and NEXRAD Rainfall Estimation Processing System (NREPS). The objectives, methodology, some results and validation, operational experience and lessons learned are reviewed. The presentation. Another project that is using radar to improve rainfall estimations is in California, specifically the San Joaquin River Valley. This is part of a overall project to develop a integrated tool to assist water management within the San Joaquin River Valley. This involves integrating several components: (1) Radar precipitation estimates, (2) Distributed hydro model, (3) Snowfall measurements and Surface temperature / moisture measurements. NREPS was selected to provide precipitation component.

  4. Hydrologic and hydraulic analyses at Akin Branch and Cayce Valley Branch, Columbia, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Outlaw, George S.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Columbia, Tennessee, conducted hydrologic and hydraulic analyses at Akin Branch and Cayce Valley Branch in the Little Bigby Creek watershed, Columbia, Tennessee, from 1990 through 1991. Results of the analyses can be used by city planners in the development of plans to replace several deteriorating and inadequate drainage structures. Akin Branch and Cayce Valley Branch drain small watersheds of 1.69 and 1.04 square miles, respectively. Flood discharges for 5-, lo-, and 25-year recurrence-interval storm events were calculated at the stream mouths using flood-frequency relations developed for use at small urban streams in Tennessee. For each stream, flood discharges at locations upstream from the mouth were calculated by subdividing the watershed and assigning a percentage of the discharge at the mouth, based on drainage area, to each subarea. Flood profiles for the selected recurrence-interval flood discharges were simulated for Akin Branch and Cayce Valley Branch for existing conditions and conditions that might exist if drainage improvements such as larger culverts and bridges and channel improvements are constructed. The results of the simulations were used to predict changes in flood elevations that might result from such drainage improvements. Analyses indicate that reductions in existing flood elevations of as much as 2.1 feet for the 5-year flood at some sites on Akin Branch and as much as 3.8 feet for the 5-year flood at some sites on Cayce Valley Branch might be expected with the drainage improvements.

  5. Preliminary direct heat geothermal resource assessment of the Tennessee Valley region

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, W.P.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary appraisal of the direct heat geothermal energy resources of the Tennessee Valley region has been completed. This region includes Kentucky, Tennessee and parts of adjacent states. Intermediate and deep aquifers were selected for study. Basement and Top-of-Knox structure and temperature maps were compiled from oil and gas well data on file at various state geological survey offices. Results of this study indicate that the New Madrid seismic zone is the only area within the region that possesses potential for direct heat utilization. In other areas geothermal energy is either too deep for economical extraction or it will not be able to compete with other local energy resources. The only anomalously high temperature well outside the New Madrid seismic zone was located in the Rome Trough and near the central part of the eastern Kentucky coal basin. Geothermal energy in that region would face strong competition from coal, oil and natural gas.

  6. Population trends and environmental contaminants in herons in the Tennessee Valley, 1980-81

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Pullin, B.P.; Swineford, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) eggs (N = 40) collected in 1980 from four of the largest colonies in the Tennessee Valley contained organochlorine pesticide, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), and chromium concentrations below those associated with reduced productivity. Low concentrations of organochlorine pesticide and PCB residues also were found in eggs (N = 31) from three of the larger Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) colonies in the Tennessee Valley. However, DDE concentrations in two of the Black-crowned Night-Heron eggs exceeded levels associated with reduced nesting success. Mercury was found in all eggs of both species with residues ranging to a high of 2.0 ppm; residues of this magnitude have not been identified as reducing nesting success of either of these two species. Green-backed Heron (Butorides striatus) eggs collected in 1981 near a former DDT manufacturing site in the Tennessee Valley had the highest DDE concentrations ever reported for this species; the effect of these high concentrations on productivity is not known. Eggshell thickness of Great Blue Heron, Green-backed Heron, and Black- crowned Night-Heron eggs averaged 7.5%, 7.6%, and 3% thinner, respectively, than shell thickness of eggs collected before 1947. This amount of thinning is not deleterious; intraclutch variation in shell thickness is often this high. Shell thickness in all three species was correlated (P lt 0.1) with DDE concentrations. The number of nesting pairs of Great Blue Herons and Black-crowned Night-Herons at each of the colonies studied has been stable or increasing during the previous decade. These population data, combined with the residue data, suggest that organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, mercury, and chromium are not adversely affecting these populations. However, we did not assess nesting success which would be a requisite for confirming this.

  7. 40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.72 Section 81.72 Protection of... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Scottsboro (Alabama... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region and revised to consist...

  8. 40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.72 Section 81.72 Protection of... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Scottsboro (Alabama... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region and revised to consist...

  9. 40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.72 Section 81.72 Protection of... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Scottsboro (Alabama... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region and revised to consist...

  10. 40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.72 Section 81.72 Protection of... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Scottsboro (Alabama... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region and revised to consist...

  11. 40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.72 Section 81.72 Protection of... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Scottsboro (Alabama... (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control Region and revised to consist...

  12. Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell, Kevin R.

    2011-05-01

    This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds

  13. Trophic classification of Tennessee Valley area reservoirs derived from LANDSAT multispectral scanner data. [Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and North Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinert, D. L.; Malone, D. L.; Voss, A. W. (Principal Investigator); Scarpace, F. L.

    1980-01-01

    LANDSAT MSS data from four different dates were extracted from computer tapes using a semiautomated digital data handling and analysis system. Reservoirs were extracted from the surrounding land matrix by using a Band 7 density level slice of 3; and descriptive statistics to include mean, variance, and ratio between bands for each of the four bands were calculated. Significant correlations ( 0.80) were identified between the MSS statistics and many trophic indicators from ground truth water quality data collected at 35 reservoirs in the greater Tennessee Valley region. Regression models were developed which gave significant estimates of each reservoir's trophic state as defined by its trophic state index and explained in all four LANDSAT frames at least 85 percent of the variability in the data. To illustrate the spatial variations within reservoirs as well as the relative variations between reservoirs, a table look up elliptical classification was used in conjunction with each reservoir's trophic state index to classify each reservoir on a pixel by pixel basis and produce color coded thematic representations.

  14. Cost of electric-power interruptions to residences in the Tennessee Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmer, R W; Mack, R S

    1982-03-01

    This report assesses the cost of electric power outages to residential customers of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The assessment focuses primarily on costs associated with rationing electric power by means of rotating blackouts of 1 to 3 h, exercised several times per year and perhaps as often as once each month. The cost of these blackouts is assessed in terms of several measures of lost consumer's surplus and lost production within the home. Estimates are developed by season for the typical home, for homes in different parts of the Tennessee Valley, and for homes with different mixes of appliances. Estimates for a typical home in the TVA region vary from 20 cents to 50 cents per kilowatthour depending upon the season and the method of measurement used. These valuations for the TVA region are compared to cost estimates for the US as a whole. The implications of outages lasting longer than 3 h are considered, and costs sustained in such outages are outlined.

  15. Relating streamflow characteristics to specialized insectivores in the Tennessee River Valley: a regional approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, Rodney R.; Gregory, M. Brian; Wales, Amy K.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of hydrologic time series and fish community data across the Tennessee River Valley identified three hydrologic metrics essential to habitat suitability and food availability for insectivorous fish communities in streams of the Tennessee River Valley: constancy (flow stability or temporal invariance), frequency of moderate flooding (frequency of habitat disturbance), and rate of streamflow recession. Initial datasets included 1100 fish community sites and 300 streamgages. Reduction of these datasets to sites with coexisting data yielded 33 sites with streamflow and fish community data for analysis. Identification of critical hydrologic metrics was completed using a multivariate correlation procedure that maximizes the rank correlation between the hydrologic metrics and fish community resemblance matrices. Quantile regression was used to define thresholds of potential ranges of insectivore scores for given values of the hydrologic metrics. Increased values of constancy and insectivore scores were positively correlated. Constancy of streamflow maintains wetted perimeter, which is important for providing habitat for fish spawning and increased surface area for invertebrate colonization and reproduction. Site scores for insectivorous fish increased as the frequency of moderate flooding (3 times the median annual streamflow) decreased, suggesting that insectivorous fish communities respond positively to less frequent disturbance and a more stable habitat. Increased streamflow recession rates were associated with decreased insectivore scores. Increased streamflow recession can strand fish in pools and other areas that are disconnected from flowing water and remove invertebrates as food sources that were suspended during high-streamflow events.

  16. Evaluation of the water quality in the releases from thirty dams in the Tennessee River Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Butkus, S.R.

    1990-09-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has routinely monitored dissolved oxygen (DO) and temperature from the tailwater releases of its dams since the 1950s. The original objective of this monitoring was to collect baseline information to support reaeration research and determine the relative impact of impoundments on the assimilative capacity of the river system. This monitoring has continued even though the original objective was satisfied. New purposes for this monitoring data have arisen in support of several programs, without new consideration of the monitoring strategy and sampling design. The primary purpose of this report is to compare the historical release data for 30 dams in the Tennessee Valley based on four different objectives: (1) comparison of seasonal patterns, (2) comparison of baseline conditions using descriptive statistics, (3) evaluation of monotonic trends, and (4) discussion of monitoring strategies that might be required to determine compliance with existing and proposed criteria. A secondary purpose of the report is to compile the existing database into tables and figures that would be useful for other investigators. 51 refs., 210 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Integrated Regional Resources Management. A Syllabus for an International Training Course Based on the Experience of the Tennessee Valley Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville.

    This syllabus outlines a course of study in integrated regional resources management based on the experience of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The course has been developed for resource practitioners, in developing countries, who have responsibilities related to topics addressed in the course's 14 instructional modules. These topics are:…

  18. Preliminary evaluation of ground-water flow in Bear Creek Valley, the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Z.C.

    1988-01-01

    Bear Creek Valley, Tennessee contains hazardous waste disposal sites where contaminants leach into ground and surface water. Groundwater flow and the potential migration of contaminants is poorly understood. The Valley is underlain by calcareous shale that contains limestone units. Ridges to the north and south are underlain by interbedded sandstones, siltstone and shale, and by massive, siliceous dolomite, respectively. The bedrock, which dips about 45 degrees southeast, is overlain by regolith to a maximum thickness of 80 ft. Observed hydraulic conductivities for the regolith range from 0.01 to 13 ft/day, and for the bedrock, from 0.001 to 11 ft/day. Groundwater flow is probably toward streams and is preferential along strike because of an areal anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity. A cross sectional groundwater flow model was used to test the conceptualized flow system and to help identify areas where additional data are needed. The preliminary model shows a pattern of recharge at both ridges, flow toward the valley, and upward flow that discharges into Bear Creek. Final model values of hydraulic conductivity in the bedrock range from 0.01 to 0.1 ft/day and reflect an areal anisotropy ratio of 1:5. Simulated recharge was 10 inches/year. (USGS)

  19. Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balthrop, B. H., (compiler); Carney, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), established in 1879, is an agency of the U.S. Department of the Interior. For more than a century, the USGS has provided reports, maps, data, and other information to aid in the development, management, and portection of the Nation's water, energy, mineral, and land resources. This brochure outlines the USGS in Tennessee and highlights hydrologic investigations.

  20. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the Tennessee Valley Authority (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-06-01

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the Tennessee Valley Authority provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  1. Tennessee Valley Authority National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center. An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gautney, J.

    1991-12-31

    The National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) is a unique part of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), a government agency created by an Act of Congress in 1933. The Center, located in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, is a national laboratory for research, development, education and commercialization for fertilizers and related agricultural chemicals including their economic and environmentally safe use, renewable fuel and chemical technologies, alternatives for solving environmental/waste problems, and technologies which support national defense- NFERC projects in the pesticide waste minimization/treatment/disposal areas include ``Model Site Demonstrations and Site Assessments,`` ``Development of Waste Treatment and Site Remediation Technologies for Fertilizer/Agrichemical Dealers,`` ``Development of a Dealer Information/Education Program,`` and ``Constructed Wetlands.``

  2. Evaluation of sinkhole occurrence in the Valley and Ridge Province, East Tennessee: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, J.G.; Tanner, J.M.

    1987-11-01

    Data from a reconnaissance-type inventory of sinkhole occurrence and from more detailed inventories in selected areas were used to determine regional density and frequency of sinkhole occurrence in the Valley and Ridge Province, Tennessee. The overall database consisted of 333 sinkholes of which 211, or 63 percent of the total, were classified as induced. Almost all induced sinkholes resulted from construction activities, such as grading, ditching, and impoundment of water. Extrapolation of data to provide estimates of regional sinkhole density necessitated adjustment of the reconnaissance inventory. Adjustment factors were calculated by comparing reconnaissance inventories from selected areas with those obtained from detailed inventories in the same areas. The number of sinkholes in the detailed inventories was 5 and 8.5 times greater than the number in the reconnaissance inventories.

  3. Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and maintain additional storage capacity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW). New capacity would be provided by a facility partitioned into six individual tank vaults containing one 100,000 gallon LLLW storage tank each. The storage tanks would be located within the existing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) facility. This action would require the extension of a potable water line approximately one mile from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) area to the proposed site to provide the necessary potable water for the facility including fire protection. Alternatives considered include no-action, cease generation, storage at other ORR storage facilities, source treatment, pretreatment, and storage at other DOE facilities.

  4. Results of a seepage investigation at Bear Creek Valley, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, January through September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.A.; Johnson, G.C.

    1996-12-31

    A seepage investigation was conducted of 4,600 acres of Bear Creek Valley southwest of the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for the period of January through September 1994. The data was collected to help the Y-12 Environmental Restoration Program develop a better understanding of ground-water and surface-water interactions, recharge and discharge relations, and ground-water flow patterns. The project was divided into three phases: a reconnaissance and mapping of seeps, springs, and stream-measurement sites; a high base flow seepage investigation; and a low base flow seepage investigation. This report describes the results of the investigation. It includes a map showing measurement site locations and tables that list the coordinates for each site and measurements of discharge, pH, specific conductance, temperature, and dissolved oxygen.

  5. Final review of the Campbell Creek demonstrations showcased by Tennessee Valley Authority

    SciTech Connect

    Gehl, Anthony C.; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Boudreaux, Philip R.; Miller, William A.; New, Joshua Ryan; Khowailed, Giannate

    2015-06-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery and Utilization Office funded and managed a showcase demonstration located in the suburbs of west Knox county, Tennessee. Work started March 2008 with the goal of documenting best practices for retrofitting existing homes and for building new high-efficiency homes. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided technical support. An analytical base was developed for helping homeowners, homebuyers, builders, practitioners and the TVA make informed economic decisions for the materials and incentives necessary to build a new high-efficiency home or retrofit an existing home. New approaches to more efficiently control active energy subsystems and information for selecting or upgrading to Energy Star appliances, changing all lights to 100% CFL s and upgrading windows to low-E gas filled glazing yields a 40% energy savings with neutral cash flow for the homeowner. Passive designs were reviewed and recommendations made for envelope construction that is durable and energy efficient. The Campbell Creek project complements the DOE Building Technologies Program strategic goal. Results of the project created technologies and design approaches that will yield affordable energy efficient homes. The 2010 DOE retrofit goals are to find retrofit packages that attain 30% whole house energy savings as documented by pre and post Home Energy rating scores (HERS). Campbell Creek met these goals.

  6. Reservoir monitoring: 1990 summary of vital signs and use impairment monitoring on Tennessee Valley Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

    1991-08-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program on 12 TVA reservoirs (the nine main stream Tennessee river reservoirs -- Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary storage reservoirs -- Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris) in autumn 1989. The objective of the Reservoir Monitoring Program is to provide basic information on the health'' or integrity of the aquatic ecosystem in each TVA reservoir ( Vital Signs'') and to provide screening level information for describing how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act (Use Impairments). This is the first time in the history of the agency that a commitment to a long-term, systematic sampling of major TVA reservoirs has been made. The basis of the Vital Signs Monitoring is examination of appropriate physical, chemical, and biological indicators in three areas of each reservoir. These three areas are the forebay immediately upstream of the dam; the transition zone (the mid-reservoir region where the water changes from free flowing to more quiescent, impounded water); and the inflow or headwater region of the reservoir. The Use Impairments monitoring provides screening level information on the suitability of selected areas within TVA reservoirs for water contact activities (swimmable) and suitability of fish from TVA reservoirs for human consumption (fishable).

  7. Surface-geophysical investigations in Melton Valley, Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucci, Patrick

    1987-01-01

    Surface geophysical methods were found to be valuable for refining knowledge of the geohydrology of Melton Valley, an area used for burial of low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. The valley is characterized by locally complex geologic structures in lithologies of interbedded shale and limestone. Radionuclides have been transported away from the burial areas by groundwater along paths that are, in part, controlled by geologic structures and rock type. Direct current resistivity soundings were used to determine the depth to bedrock and to aid in the delineation of subsurface stratigraphy. Depth to bedrock, as indicated by an increase in resistivity in the interpreted geoelectric layering, was compared to auger-hole data at five sites, where bedrock depths ranged from 1 to 14 ft and were within 3 ft at four sites. The subsurface contact between shale and limestone was indicated by an increase in model calculated resistivity from < 100 to > 150 ohm-meters at four different sites. Terrain conductivity profiles were used to aid in mapping surficial geologic contacts between shale and limestone units. Terrain conductivity for shale at 33-ft coil separation was generally greater than 15 millimhos/m and ranged from about 10 to 40 millimhos/m. Conductivity for limestone was generally < 15 millimhos/m and ranged from 5 to 25 millimhos/m. Azimuthal conductivity surveys indicated that conductivity was generally greatest when the transmitter and receiver coils were oriented parallel to strike. This anisotropy in terrain conductivity shows the need to keep the coil orientation consistent throughout the length of a profile. (Author 's abstract)

  8. Regional inventory of karst activity in the Valley and Ridge Province, eastern Tennessee: Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, J.G.; Tanner, J.M.

    1987-09-01

    A data collection form was developed for use in compiling information in the inventory. Information sources included files on subsidence, state and county highway departments, county agents and executives, soil conservation service representative, etc. Data obtained included location, date of occurrence, number of subsidence features at the reported site, size, topographic setting, geologic setting, and probable causative factors. The regional inventory obtained information on over 300 historic subsidence events at more than 200 sites in East Tennessee. Areas having the greatest areal density of active subsidence include Hamblen, Jefferson, and Loudon Counties. Reported subsidence events occurred between 1945 and 1986. The Knox Group dolomites account for about two-thirds of all reported sinkholes in the inventory. Most of the karst activity occurs in valleys or flat areas. In cases where causative factors could be established, the combination of surface water drainage alteration or impoundment combined with soil disturbance associated with construction activity were most often precursors to subsidence. 54 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Ambient ammonia in terrestrial ecosystems: a comparative study in the Tennessee Valley, USA.

    PubMed

    Allen, Ridwaana; Myles, LaToya; Heuer, Mark W

    2011-06-15

    Atmospheric ammonia has been shown to degrade regional air quality and affect environmental health. In-situ measurements of ammonia are needed to determine how ambient concentrations vary in different ecosystems and the extent to which emission sources contribute to those levels. The objective of this study was to measure and compare ammonia concentrations in two Tennessee Valley (USA) ecosystems: a forested rural area and a metropolitan site adjacent to a main transportation route. Integrated samples of atmospheric ammonia were collected with annular denuder systems for ~4 weeks during the summer of 2009 in both ecosystems. Ancillary measurements of meteorological variables, such as wind direction and precipitation, were also conducted to determine any relationships with ammonia concentration. Measurements in the two ecosystems revealed ammonia concentrations that were mostly representative of background levels. Arithmetic means were 1.57±0.68 μg m(-3) at the metropolitan site and 1.60±0.77 μg m(-3) in the forest. The geometric mean concentrations for both sites were ~1.46 μg m(-3). Wind direction, and to a lesser extent air temperature and precipitation, did influence measured concentrations. At the metropolitan site, ammonia concentrations were slightly higher in winds emanating from the direction of the interstate highway. Meteorological variables, such as wind direction, and physical factors, such as topography, can affect measurement of ambient ammonia concentrations, especially in ecosystems distant from strong emission sources. The 12-h integrated sampling method used in this study was unable to measure frequent changes in ambient ammonia concentrations and illustrates the need for measurements with higher temporal resolution, at least ~1-2h, in a variety of diverse ecosystems to determine the behavior of atmospheric ammonia and its environmental effects.

  10. Phase I Archaeological Survey of Parcel ED-3 and Historic Assessement of the Happy Valley Worker Camp Roane County, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    New South Associates

    2009-08-17

    Parcel ED-3 was the location of a portion of 'Happy Valley', a temporary worker housing area occupied from 1943 to 1947 during the construction of the K-25 Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The project was carried out under subcontract for the Department of Energy. The survey report will be used in the preparation of an Environmental Assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). New South Associates conducted a Phase I Archaeological Survey of Parcel ED-3 at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation in Roane County, Tennessee. The survey was conducted in two parts. The first survey was carried out in 2008 and covered an area measuring approximately 110 acres. The second survey took place in 2009 and focused on 72 acres west of the first survey area. The objective of the surveys was to identify any archaeological remains associated with Happy Valley and any additional sites on the property and to assess these sites for National Register eligibility. New South Associates also conducted a historic assessment to gather information on Happy Valley. This historic assessment was used in conjunction with the archaeological survey to evaluate the significance of the Happy Valley site. Archaeological remains of Happy Valley were located throughout the parcel, but no additional sites were located. The official state site number for Happy Valley is 40RE577. During the two surveys a total of 13 artifact concentrations, 14 isolated finds, and 75 structural features were located. Due to the Happy Valley's stron gassociation with the Manhattan Project, the site is recommended eligible for the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion A.

  11. Archaeological site stabilization in the Tennessee River Valley: Phase 3, Research Paper No. 7, Tennessee Valley Authority Publications in Anthropology No. 49

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    Destruction of archaeological properties within the Tennessee River system, particularly along its main stem, has been a problem almost since TVA was established. In an attempt to stop the loss of massive portions of our cultural resources, the TVA contracted in 1983 to establish a program of site stabilization using experimental techniques. This report is the first installation of observations on the site protection measures placed during 1983. This report also contains pertinent observations on preserved sites not within TVA holdings. 20 refs., 25 figs.

  12. Statistical and simulation analysis of hydraulic-conductivity data for Bear Creek and Melton Valleys, Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connell, J.F.; Bailey, Z.C.

    1989-01-01

    A total of 338 single-well aquifer tests from Bear Creek and Melton Valley, Tennessee were statistically grouped to estimate hydraulic conductivities for the geologic formations in the valleys. A cross-sectional simulation model linked to a regression model was used to further refine the statistical estimates for each of the formations and to improve understanding of ground-water flow in Bear Creek Valley. Median hydraulic-conductivity values were used as initial values in the model. Model-calculated estimates of hydraulic conductivity were generally lower than the statistical estimates. Simulations indicate that (1) the Pumpkin Valley Shale controls groundwater flow between Pine Ridge and Bear Creek; (2) all the recharge on Chestnut Ridge discharges to the Maynardville Limestone; (3) the formations having smaller hydraulic gradients may have a greater tendency for flow along strike; (4) local hydraulic conditions in the Maynardville Limestone cause inaccurate model-calculated estimates of hydraulic conductivity; and (5) the conductivity of deep bedrock neither affects the results of the model nor does it add information on the flow system. Improved model performance would require: (1) more water level data for the Copper Ridge Dolomite; (2) improved estimates of hydraulic conductivity in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and Maynardville Limestone; and (3) more water level data and aquifer tests in deep bedrock. (USGS)

  13. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 18

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, P.S.

    1995-10-01

    In June 1982, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff (NRC staff or staff) issued a Safety Evaluation Report, NUREG-0847, regarding the application by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA or the applicant) for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2. Each of the following sections and appendices of this supplement is numbered the same as the section or appendix of the SER that is being updated, and the discussions are supplementary to, and not in lieu of, the discussion in the SER, unless otherwise noted. Accordingly, Appendix A continues the chronology of the safety review. Appendix E lists principal contributors to this supplement. Appendix FF is added in this supplement. The other appendices are not changed by this supplement.

  14. Landslides triggered by earthquakes in the central Mississippi Valley, Tennessee and Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Jibson, R.W.; Keefer, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    Historical accounts indicate that the 1811-12 New Madrid Missouri, earthquakes triggered massive and widespread landsliding. This report inventories and describes more than 220 large landslides along the Mississippi River bluffs in western Tennessee and Kentucky and examines a variety of evidence to determine their probable ages and origins. Results show that, in aseismic conditions, large landslides occur solely along bluffs currently being eroded by the river channel; landslides along bluffs away from the river channel formed during the 1811-12 earthquakes.

  15. Soil sampling and analysis plan for the Bear Creek Valley Floodplain at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Floodplain presents the approach and rationale for characterizing potentially contaminated soils and sediments of the Bear Creek floodplain and the impact of any contaminants on the floodplain ecosystem. In addition to this SAP, the Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Bear Creek (Y02-S600) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ES/ER-19&D2) presents background information pertaining to this floodplain investigation.

  16. Relating fish health and reproductive metrics to contaminant bioaccumulation at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston coal ash spill site.

    PubMed

    Pracheil, Brenda M; Marshall Adams, S; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Fortner, Allison M; Greeley, Mark S; Murphy, Cheryl A; Mathews, Teresa J; Peterson, Mark J

    2016-08-01

    A 4.1 million m(3) coal ash release into the Emory and Clinch rivers in December 2008 at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Kingston Fossil Plant in east Tennessee, USA, prompted a long-term, large-scale biological monitoring effort to determine if there are chronic effects of this spill on resident biota. Because of the magnitude of the ash spill and the potential for exposure to coal ash-associated contaminants [e.g., selenium (Se), arsenic (As), and mercury (Hg)] which are bioaccumulative and may present human and ecological risks, an integrative, bioindicator approach was used. Three species of fish were monitored-bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), redear sunfish (L. microlophus), and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)-at ash-affected and reference sites annually for 5 years following the spill. On the same individual fish, contaminant burdens were measured in various tissues, blood chemistry parameters as metrics of fish health, and various condition and reproduction indices. A multivariate statistical approach was then used to evaluate relationships between contaminant bioaccumulation and fish metrics to assess the chronic, sub-lethal effects of exposure to the complex mixture of coal ash-associated contaminants at and around the ash spill site. This study suggests that while fish tissue concentrations of some ash-associated contaminants are elevated at the spill site, there was no consistent evidence of compromised fish health linked with the spill. Further, although relationships between elevated fillet burdens of ash-associated contaminants and some fish metrics were found, these relationships were not indicative of exposure to coal ash or spill sites. The present study adds to the weight of evidence from prior studies suggesting that fish populations have not incurred significant biological effects from spilled ash at this site: findings that are relevant to the current national discussions on the safe disposal of coal ash waste. PMID:27154845

  17. Stable isotopic evidence for fluid flow and fluid/rock interaction during thrust faulting in Pumpkin Valley shale and Rome Formation, east Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, B.K.; Haase, C.S. )

    1989-08-01

    The Pumpkin Valley Shale and the underlying Rome Formation form the lower portions of the Copper Creek and White Oak Mountain thrust sheets in east Tennessee. The Pumpkin Valley Shale consists of shale and mudstone with subordinate amounts of interbedded siltstone. The Rome Formation is composed predominantly of sandstone with interbedded shale and siltstone toward the base of the formation. The percentage of illite increases from 20% to over 80% of the bulk clay mineralogy toward the base of the section. Porosity is occluded by quartz, phyllosilicate, and calcite cements. Both formations contain calcite-filled and, less commonly, quartz-filled Alleghenian fractures and joints.

  18. Chronostratigraphic and paleoclimatic data for Quaternary loessial and fluvial deposits in the Mississippi River Valley of Arkansas and Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Markewich, H.W. ); Millard, H.T. Jr. ); Pavich, M.J. ); Rodbell, D.T. ); Rich, F.J. ); Rutledge, E.M. ); Ward, L. . Soil Conservation Service); Van Valkenberg, S. ); Wysocki, D. . Soil Conservation Service)

    1992-01-01

    Ongoing investigations into Quaternary paleoclimates of the Mississippi River Valley in eastern Arkansas and western Tennessee include age estimations using [sup 14]C, [sup 10]Be, thermoluminescent (TL), and optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) analyses; compositional studies using petrographic and diffractometer analyses; pedological analyses with complete characterization studies; and magnetic susceptibility measurements with laboratory analyses to investigate the source of the magnetism. Preliminary data on composition of the < 63-micron fraction, thickness, and age of the loesses and associated paleosols are available from selected stratigraphic sections that are being described and sampled in detail. These data suggest the following: (1) overall thickness of loess, as well as thickness of each loess sheet, decreases by one-half to two-thirds within the 96-km distance from the south end of Crowleys Ridge near Helena, AR northward to Forest City, AR and Memphis, TN; (2) near Helena, loess thicknesses are 25 to 30 m, 7 m, 6 m, and 6 m for the Peoria, Roxana, Loveland, and Crowleys Ridge respectively; (3) the depth of weathering in the Peoria ranges from 4.5 to 8.5 m near Helena, depending on slope position; (4) at the south end of Crowleys Ridge, near Helena, the Roxana has two associated paleosols and an intervening layer of weathered parent material; (5) isotopic data suggest that (a) loess deposition took place between 4,500 ka and 10 ka and that (b) each younger disconformity represents less time than the one before; (6) the predominantly illite and illite/smectite mineralogy of the paleosols, even that of the Sangamon soil, suggests minimal weathering of labile loessial minerals prior to pedogenic development; (7) pollen data indicate that by 10 ka this part of the valley had vegetation indicative of a cool temperate climate, with minimal cypress and no boreal components.

  19. Radon and radon progeny in 70 houses in the Tennessee Valley area: study design and measurement methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, C.S.; Hawthorne, A.R.; Monar, K.P.; Quillen, J.L.; Clark, C. Jr.; Doane, R.W.; Wallace, R.G.; Reed, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Levels of radon and its short-lived airborne progeny are being measured in a year-long study of 70 houses in four states in the Tennessee Valley. Various methods were used to solicit volunteers with differing degrees of success. Criteria for selection of houses in the study included presence of a lower level with cement floor and one or more block walls in contact with the soil, absence of obvious indications of technologically enhanced sources of radium, and proximity to one of four cities (Knoxville, Chattanooga, Birmingham, or Florence). By design, most houses in the study are in the same neighborhood as at least one other house in the study. Houses range in age from newly constructed to about 40 years old. Most of the houses have more than 2000 square feet of finished floor space. The lower level encompasses a garage in most cases. More complete information pertaining to house characteristics will be gathered in the course of the study. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Tennessee Valley Authority atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor simulation interim annual report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, J.W.; Krishnan, R.P.

    1980-10-01

    This report contains a detailed description of the work performed during 1979 for the Tennessee Valley Authority in support of the TVA Fluidized-Bed Combustor (FBC) Demonstration Plant Program. The work was carried out under task 4, modeling and simulation of atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) systems. The overall objective of this task is to develop a steady-state mathematical model with the capability of predicting trends in bed performance under various feed and operating conditions. As part of this effort, three predictive subprograms (subcodes) were developed during 1979: (1) bubble-growth subcode, (2) sorbent-coal ash elutriation and attrition subcode, and (3) coal combustion subcode. These codes, which are currently being tested with experimental data, are capable of predicting how some of the important operating variables in the AFBC affect its performance. After testing against field data, these subcodes will be incorporated into an overall AFBC system code, which was developed earlier at ORNL for analysis of the Department of Energy (DOE) Component Test and Integration Unit (CTIU) at Morgantown, West Virginia. In addition to these predictive subcodes, the overall system code previously developed for the CTIU is described. The material balance is closed, based on vendor-supplied data. This balance is then used to predict the heat transfer characteristics of the surfaces (submerged and freeboard) in the AFBC. Existing correlations for heat transfer in AFBC are used in the code along with thermophysical properties of the various streams.

  1. Preliminary delineation and description of the regional aquifers of Tennessee : basal sandstone west of the Valley and Ridge Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brahana, J.V.; Bradley, Michael W.; Macy, Jo Ann; Mulderink, Dolores

    1986-01-01

    The basal sandstone is a poorly sorted, well indurated sandstone, which lies below the Conasauga Group and above the Precambrian crystalline rocks. It is an unknown resource defined by limited data, with only 14 data points (wells) for the entire State of Tennessee. The basal sandstone is thought to occur throughout most of the State west of the Valley and Ridge province at depths of generally more than 5,500 feet below land surface. The basal sandstone probably does not receive significant vertical recharge because the sandstone is overlain by such a thick sequence of flat-lying, low-porosity lower Paleozoic carbonates and shales. Data from two sites indicate that the rocks of the basal sandstone have relatively low porosity and permeability. The concentrations of dissolved solids in water from the basal sandstone range from less than 40,000 milligrams per liter to more than 200,000 milligrams per liter. The basal sandstone is not being used as a source of drinking water because of its great depth, the presence of shallower sources of drinking water, and possible concentrations of more than 10,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids throughout its area of occurrence.

  2. Regression models of ecological streamflow characteristics in the Cumberland and Tennessee River Valleys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, Rodney R.; Gain, W. Scott; Wolfe, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Predictive equations were developed using stepbackward regression for 19 ecologically relevant streamflow characteristics grouped in five major classes (magnitude, ratio, frequency, variability, and date) for use in the Tennessee and Cumberland River watersheds. Basin characteristics explain 50 percent or more of the variation for 10 of the 19 equations. Independent variables identified through stepbackward regression were statistically significant in 81 of 304 coefficients tested across 19 models (⬚ < 0.0001) and represent four major groups: climate, physical landscape features, regional indicators, and land use. The most influential variables for determining hydrologic response were in the land-use and climate groups: daily temperature range, percent agricultural land use, and monthly mean precipitation. These three variables were major explanatory factors in 17, 15, and 13 models, respectively. The equations and independent datasets were used to explore the broad relation between basin properties and streamflow and its implications for the study of ecological flow requirements. Key results include a high degree of hydrologic variability among least disturbed Blue Ridge streams, similar hydrologic behavior for watersheds with widely varying degrees of forest cover, and distinct hydrologic profiles for streams in different geographic regions.

  3. Hydrology of the Melton Valley radioactive-waste burial grounds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, D.A.; Bradley, Michael W.

    1988-01-01

    Burial grounds 4, 5, and 6 of the Melton Valley Radioactive-waste Burial Grounds, Oak Ridge, TN, were used sequentially from 1951 to the present for the disposal of solid, low level radioactive waste by burial in shallow trenches and auger holes. Abundant rainfall, a generally thin unsaturated zone, geologic media of inherently low permeability, and the operational practices employed have contributed to partial saturation of the buried waste, leaching of radionuclides, and transport of dissolved matter from the burial areas. Two primary methods of movement of wastes from these sites are transport in groundwater, and the overflow of fluid in trenches and subsequent flow across land surface. Whiteoak Creek and its tributaries receive all overland flow from trench spillage, surface runoff from each site, and discharge of groundwater from the regolith of each site. Potentiometric data, locally, indicate that this drainage system also receives groundwater discharges from the bedrock of burial ground 5. By projection of the bedrock flow patterns characteristic of this site to other areas of Melton Valley, it is inferred that discharges from the bedrock underlying burial grounds 4 and 6 also is to the Whiteoak Creek drainage system. The differences in potentiometric heads and a comparatively thin saturated zone in bedrock do not favor the development of deep flow through bedrock from one river system to another. (USGS)

  4. Landslides triggered by earthquakes in the central Mississippi Valley, Tennessee and Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jibson, Randall W.; Keefer, David K.

    1988-01-01

    We mapped 221 large (more than 200 ft across) landslides of three morphologically distinct types on the bluffs bordering the Mississippi alluvial plain in western Tennessee and Kentucky Old coherent slides (146 landslides, or 66 percent of the total) include translational block slides and single and multiple-block rotational slumps, all of which are covered by mature vegetation and have eroded features; no active analogs exist in the area. Earth flows (51 landslides, or 23 percent of the total) are also largely revegetated and eroded, though a few active earth flows are present on bluffs that have been cleared of vegetation. Young rotational slumps (24 landslides, or 11 percent of the total) form solely along actively eroding near-river bluffs and are the only active or recently active landslides in the area. Two investigations conducted around 1900 indicate that the old coherent slides, in at least part of the area, formed during the 1811-12 earthquakes. The present investigation uses dendrochronology, geomorphology, historic topographic maps, local historical accounts, and comparisons with landslides triggered by other earthquakes to show that most or all of the old coherent slides and earth flows formed during the 1811-12 New Madrid earthquakes. Evidence clearly indicates that the only large, aseismic landslide activity in the area results from fluvial undercutting of near-river bluffs. This erosion of the base of the bluffs triggers slumps that are morphologically distinct from the old slumps on bluffs away from the river. Our conclusions are consistent with the findings of other recent investigations of the same landslides that indicate extensive seismic triggering of coherent slides and earth flows during the 1811-12 New Madrid earthquakes.

  5. Well construction, lithology, and geophysical logs for boreholes in Bear Creek Valley near Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Z.C.; Hanchar, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-four wells were constructed at nine sites at Bear Creek Valley to provide geologic and hydrologic information. Lithologic samples and suits of geophysical logs were obtained from the deepest boreholes at six of the sites. Two of these boreholes at the base of Chestnut Ridge were completed in the Maynardville Limestone and two were completed in the Nolichucky Shale. Two boreholes along Pine Ridge were completed in the Rome Formation. Zones of similar lithology within a borehole were delineated from rock cutting refined by examination of geophysical logs. The contact between the Maynardville Limestone and Nolichucky Shale was identified in two of the boreholes. Fractures and cavities were readily identifiable on the acoustic-televiewer and caliper logs. Distinct water-bearing intervals were also identified from the temperature, fluid resistance, and resistivity logs. Depths at which the drilling encounterd a thrust were identified in two boreholes in the Rome Formation from both rock cutting and geophysical logs. (USGS)

  6. Ground-water flow in Melton Valley, Oak Ridge reservation, Roane County, Tennessee; preliminary model analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucci, Patrick

    1986-01-01

    Shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste has been practiced since 1951 in Melton Valley. Groundwater flow modeling was used to better understand the geohydrology of the valley, and to provide a foundation for future contaminant transport modeling. The three-dimensional, finite difference model simulates the aquifer as a two layer system that represents the regolith and bedrock. Transmissivities, which were adjusted during model calibration, range from 8 to 16 sq ft/day for the regolith, and from 0.2 to 1.5 sq ft/day for bedrock. An anisotropy ratio of 1:3 for strike-normal to strike-parallel transmissivity values, in conjunction with recharge rate = 6% of precipitation that is uniformly distributed over the model area, produces the best match between simulated and observed water levels. Simulated water levels generally compare well to observed or estimated 1978 groundwater conditions. Simulated water levels for the regolith for 39 of 69 comparison points are within +/- 10 ft of average 1978 levels. Simulated vertical flow components are in the observed direction for 9 of 11 comparison points. Preliminary simulations indicate that nearly all groundwater flow is within the regolith and discharges to either the Clinch River or the White Oak Creek-Melton Branch drainage systems. Less than 3% of the flow is between the regolith and bedrock, and < 1% of total groundwater flow discharges to the Clinch River through bedrock. Additional data needed to refine and further calibrate the model, include: (1) quantity and areal distribution of recharge; (2) water levels in the regolith near the model boundaries and beyond the Clinch River; (3) water levels and aquifer characteristics for bedrock; and (4) additional surface water data. (Author 's abstract)

  7. Monitoring and evaluation of aquatic resource health and use suitability in Tennessee Valley Authority reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

    1993-06-01

    TVA initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program in 1990 with two objectives -- to evaluate the health of the reservoir ecosystem and to examine how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act. In 1990 reservoir health was evaluated subjectively using a weight-of-evidence approach (a reservoir was deemed healthy if most of the physical, chemical, and biological monitoring components appeared healthy). In the second year (1991) a more objective, quantitative approach was developed using information on five important indicators of reservoir health -- dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, sediment quality, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fishes. The most recent information (1992) was evaluated with the same basic approach, modified to incorporate improvements based on comments from reviewers and additional data. Reservoirs were stratified into two groups for evaluation: run-of-the-river reservoirs and tributary storage reservoirs. Key locations are sampled in each reservoir (forebay, transition zone or midreservoir, inflow, and major embayments) for most or all of these five reservoir health indicators. For each indicator (or metric), scoring criteria have been developed that assign a score ranging from 1 to 5 representing poor to good conditions, respectively. Scores for the metrics at a location are summed and then the sums for all locations are totaled. Each reservoir has one to four sample locations depending on reservoir characteristics. The resultant total is divided by the maximum possible score (all metrics good at all locations) for the reservoir. Thus, the possible range of scores is from 20 percent (all metrics poor) to 100 percent (all metrics good). This reservoir ecological health evaluation method is proving to be a valuable tool for providing the public with information about the condition of the Valley`s reservoirs, for allowing meaningful comparisons among reservoirs, and for tracking changes in reservoir health with time.

  8. Relating fish health and reproductive metrics to contaminant bioaccumulation at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston coal ash spill site

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pracheil, Brenda M.; Marshall Adams, S.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Fortner, Allison M.; Greeley, Mark S.; Murphy, Cheryl A.; Mathews, Teresa J.; Peterson, Mark J.

    2016-05-06

    A 4.1 million m3 release of coal ash into the Emory and Clinch rivers in December 2008 at Tennessee Valley Authority s Kingston Fossil Plant has prompted a long-term, large-scale biological monitoring effort to determine if there are chronic effects of this spill on biota. Of concern in this spill were arsenic (As) and selenium (Se), heavy metal constituents of coal ash that can be toxic to fish and wildlife and also mercury (Hg): a legacy contaminant that can interact with Se in organisms. We used fish filet bioaccumulation data from Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, Redear Lepomis microlophus, Largemouth Bass Micropterusmore » salmoides and Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus and metrics of fish health including fish condition indices, blood chemistry parameters and liver histopathology data collected from 2009-2013 to determine whether tissue heavy metal burdens relate 1) to each other 2) to metrics of fish health (e.g., blood chemistry characteristics and liver histopathology) and condition, and 3) whether relationships between fish health characteristics and heavy metals are related to site and ash-exposure. We found that burdens of Se and As are generally related to each other between tissues, but burdens of Hg between tissues are not generally positively associated. Taking analyses together, there appears to be reductions in growth and sublethal liver and kidney dysfunction in Bluegill and Largemouth Bass as indicated by blood chemistry parameters (elevated blood protein, glucose, phosphorous, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine in ash-affected sites) and related to concentrations of As and Se. Seeing sub-lethal effects in these species of fish is interesting because Redear had the highest filet burdens of Se, but did not have biomarkers indicating disease or dysfunction. We conclude our study by highlighting the complexities inherent in multimetric fish health data and the need for continued monitoring to further untangle contaminant and fish health

  9. Water quality of springs in the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province in the upper Tennessee River basin, 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Gregory C.

    2002-01-01

    In the fall of 1997, 35 springs in the carbonate rocks of the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province of the upper Tennessee River Basin were sampled for nutrients, fecal-indicator bacteria, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. About half of the randomly selected springs were used as untreated domestic drinking-water supplies, either by direct pumpage from the spring or as roadside filling sites. Nutrient concentrations generally were less than 2 milligrams per liter. Nitrate, the most frequently detected nutrient, ranged from 0.091 to 2.17 milligrams per liter, with a median concentration of 1.16 milligrams per liter. Fecal-indicator bacteria were detected at all springs, with total coliform ranging from 10 to 1,900 colonies per 100 milliliters and Escherichia coli ranging from less than 1 to 660 colonies per 100 milliliters. Concentrations of bacteria at all springs sampled exceeded bacteriological drinking-water standards for public water supplies. Eight pesticides or degradation byproducts, all below U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water maximum contaminant levels, were detected in samples from 24 of the 35 springs. The most frequently detected pesticide was atrazine and its degradation byproduct, deethylatrazine, which were found in water samples from 57 and 54 percent of the springs, respectively. Some pesticides were detected more frequently in water samples from the springs than in ground-water samples from wells in similar NAWQA studies nationwide. Concentrations of VOCs in the springs also were below maximum contaminant levels. The most frequently detected VOCs were chloroform (20 springs), methyl chloride (18 springs), styrene (12 springs), and tetrachloroethene (11 springs). These detection frequencies of VOCs are consistent with the national NAWQA results when comparing wells and springs in a mixture of urban and rural land uses.

  10. Spatial and temporal trends in contaminant concentrations in Hexagenia nymphs following a coal ash spill at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Kingston Fossil Plant

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baker, Tyler F; Jett, Robert Trent; Smith, John G.; Murphy, Cheryl A.

    2016-02-25

    A dike failure at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee, United States, in December 2008, released approximately 4.1 million m3 of coal ash into the Emory River. From 2009 through 2012, samples of mayfly nymphs (Hexagenia bilineata) were collected each spring from sites in the Emory, Clinch, and Tennessee Rivers upstream and downstream of the spill. Samples were analyzed for 17 metals. Concentrations of metals were generally highest the first 2 miles downstream of the spill, and then decreased with increasing distance from the spill. Arsenic, B, Ba, Be, Mo, Sb, Se, Sr, and V appearedmore » to have strong ash signatures, whereas Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb appeared to be associated with ash and other sources. Furthermore, the concentrations for most of these contaminants were modest and are unlikely to cause widespread negative ecological effects. Trends in Hg, Cd, and Zn suggested little (Hg) or no (Cd, Zn) association with ash. Temporal trends suggested that concentrations of ash-related contaminants began to subside after 2010, but because of the limited time period of that analysis (4 yr), further monitoring is needed to verify this trend. The present study provides important information on the magnitude of contaminant exposure to aquatic receptors from a major coal ash spill, as well as spatial and temporal trends for transport of the associated contaminants in a large open watershed. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1159 1171. Published 2015 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.« less

  11. Safety Evaluation Report for the Tennessee Valley Authority's Plan to Decommission its Low-Level Radioactive Waste Burial Site at Muscle Shoals, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Gant, K.S.; Kettelle, R.H.

    1998-11-01

    From 1966 to 1981, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) operated a burial site, licensed under the former 10 CFR 20.304, for low-level radioactive waste on its Muscle Shoals, Alabama, reservation. TVA submitted a decommissioning plan for the burial site and requested approval for unrestricted use of the site. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate this plan to determine if the site meets the radiological requirements for unrestricted use as specified in 10 CFR 20.1402; that is, an average member of the critical group would not receive more than 25 mrem/y from residual radioactivity at the TVA Low-Level Radioactive Waste Burial Site and the radioactivity has been reduced to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

  12. Analysis of Seasat orbital radar imagery for geologic mapping in the appalachian Valley and Ridge province, Tennessee-Kentucky-Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    The terrain-surface features of the Appalachian Valley and Ridge province were analyzed using Seasat synthetic aperture radar imagery. Particular attention was given to determining the efficiency and capability of this microwave imaging system for geologic mapping.

  13. Wetland Survey of the X-10 Bethel Valley and Melton Valley Groundwater Operable Units at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rosensteel, B.

    1993-01-01

    This wetland survey report regarding wetlands within Melton Valley and Bethel Valley areas of the Oak Ridge Reservation was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act for reporting the results of a site characterization for public review. This work was done under Work Breakdown Structure number 1.4.12.6.1.15.41. This document provides the Environmental Restoration program with information on the results of the wetland survey conducted during fiscal year 1995. it includes information on the physical characteristics, location, approximate size, and classification of wetland areas identified during the field survey.

  14. Remedial investigation report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (rust spoil area, spoil area 1, and SY-200 yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2. Appendixes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document contains the appendices to the Remedial Investigation Report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, Spoil Area 1, and SY-200 Yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The appendices include Current and historical soil boring and groundwater monitoring well information, well construction logs, and field change orders; Analytical data; Human health risk assessment data; and Data quality.

  15. Environmental impacts of the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston coal ash spill. 2. Effect of coal ash on methylmercury in historically contaminated river sediments.

    PubMed

    Deonarine, Amrika; Bartov, Gideon; Johnson, Thomas M; Ruhl, Laura; Vengosh, Avner; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2013-02-19

    The Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston coal ash spill in December 2008 deposited approximately 4.1 million m(3) of fly ash and bottom ash into the Emory and Clinch River system (Harriman, Tennessee, U.S.A.). The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of the ash on surface water and sediment quality over an eighteen month period after the spill, with a specific focus on mercury and methylmercury in sediments. Our results indicated that surface water quality was not impaired with respect to total mercury concentrations. However, in the sediments of the Emory River near the coal ash spill, total mercury concentrations were 3- to 4-times greater than sediments several miles upstream of the ash spill. Similarly, methylmercury content in the Emory and Clinch River sediments near the ash spill were slightly elevated (up to a factor of 3) at certain locations compared to upstream sediments. Up to 2% of the total mercury in sediments containing coal ash was present as methylmercury. Mercury isotope composition and sediment geochemical data suggested that elevated methylmercury concentrations occurred in regions where native sediments were mixed with coal ash (e.g., less than 28% as coal ash in the Emory River). This coal ash may have provided substrates (such as sulfate) that stimulated biomethylation of mercury. The production of methylmercury in these areas is a concern because this neurotoxic organomercury compound can be highly bioaccumulative. Future risk assessments of coal ash spills should consider not only the leaching potential of mercury from the wastes but also the potential for methylmercury production in receiving waters. PMID:23249246

  16. Analysis of the inversion monitoring capabilities of a monostatic acoustic radar in complex terrain. [Tennessee River Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepf, D.; Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    A qualitative interpretation of the records from a monostatic acoustic radar is presented. This is achieved with the aid of airplane, helicopter, and rawinsonde temperature soundings. The diurnal structure of a mountain valley circulation pattern is studied with the use of two acoustic radars, one located in the valley and one on the downwind ridge. The monostatic acoustic radar was found to be sufficiently accurate in locating the heights of the inversions and the mixed layer depth to warrant use by industry even in complex terrain.

  17. Wetland survey of the X-10 Bethel Valley and Melton Valley groundwater operable units at Oak Ridge National Labortory Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rosensteel, B.A.

    1996-03-01

    Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands, (May 24, 1977) requires that federal agencies avoid, to the extent possible, adverse impacts associated with the destruction and modification of wetlands and that they avoid direct and indirect support of wetlands development when there is a practicable alternative. In accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) Regulations for Compliance with Floodplains and Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements (Subpart B, 10 CFR 1022.11), surveys for wetland presence or absence were conducted in both the Melton Valley and the Bethel Valley Groundwater Operable Units (GWOU) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) from October 1994 through September 1995. As required by the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act of 1992, wetlands were identified using the criteria and methods set forth in the Wetlands Delineation Manual (Army Corps of Engineers, 1987). Wetlands were identified during field surveys that examined and documented vegetation, soils, and hydrologic evidence. Most of the wetland boundary locations and wetland sizes are approximate. Boundaries of wetlands in Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and on the former proposed site of the Advanced Neutron Source in the upper Melton Branch watershed were located by civil survey during previous wetland surveys; thus, the boundary locations and areal sizes in these areas are accurate. The wetlands were classified according to the system developed by Cowardin et al. (1979) for wetland and deepwater habitats of the United States. A total of 215 individual wetland areas ranging in size from 0.002 ha to 9.97 ha were identified in the Bethel Valley and Melton Valley GWOUs. The wetlands are classified as palustrine forested broad-leaved deciduous (PFO1), palustrine scrub-shrub broad-leaved deciduous (PSS1), and palustrine persistent emergent (PEM1).

  18. Experimental reestablishment of red wolves (Canis rufus) on the Tennessee Valley Authority's Land Between the Lakes (LBL)

    SciTech Connect

    Carley, C.J.; Mechler, J.L.

    1983-10-01

    For all practical purposes the red wolf (Canis rufus) is extirpated in its final range in southeast Texas and southwest Louisiana. Although the species can be preserved in captivity, the only means by which it can be preserved as a naturally occurring element of our national heritage is to reestablish viable populations within the wolf's historic range in the southeastern United States. This proposal outlines a suggested procedure for reestablishing red wolves at Land Between The Lakes (LBL) by initially releasing five adult mated pairs of animals on the area over a two-year period. Recommendations for additions, changes, and deletions to this proposal have been received from the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, other governmental agencies, and interested organizations and individuals in the surrounding area. This proposal includes information describing probable environmental impacts associated with the experimental reestablishment of red wolves at LBL. 39 references, 16 figures, 6 tables.

  19. Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3: Appendix C

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions. The industrial and recreational exposure scenarios are used to provide a risk assessment reference context to evaluate levels of contamination in surface water, groundwater, soil, and sediment within each subbasin of the Melton Valley watershed. All available analytical results for the media of interest that could be qualified for use in the risk assessment were screened to determine carcinogenic risk values and noncarcinogenic hazard indexes and to identify the chemicals of concern (COCs) for each evaluated media in each subbasin.

  20. Relationship between selenium body burdens and tissue concentrations in fish exposed to coal ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston spill site

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, Teresa J; Fortner, Allison M; Jett, Robert T; Peterson, Mark J; Carriker, Neil; Morris, Jesse G; Gable, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    In December 2008, 4.1 million m3 of coal ash were released into the Emory and Clinch Rivers by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant. Coal ash contains several contaminants, including the bioaccumulative metalloid selenium (Se). Because Se is predominantly accumulated in aquatic organisms through dietary, rather than aqueous exposure, tissue-based toxicity thresholds for Se are currently being considered. The proposed threshold concentrations range between 4-9 g/g Se (dry wt.) in whole body fish, with a proposed fillet threshold of 11.8 g/g. In the present study we examined the spatial and temporal trends in Se bioaccumulation and examined the relationship between the Se content in fillets and in whole bodies of fish collected around the Kingston spill site to determine whether Se bioaccumulation was a significant concern at the ash spill site. While Se concentrations in fish (whole bodies and fillets) were elevated at sampling locations affected by the Kingston ash spill relative to reference locations, concentrations do not appear to be above risk thresholds and have not been increasing over the five year period since the spill. Our results are not only relevant to guiding the human health and ecological risk assessments at the Kingston ash spill site, but because of current national discussions on appropriate guidelines for Se in fish as well for the disposal of coal combustion wastes, our results are also relevant to the general understanding of Se bioaccumulation in contaminated water bodies.

  1. Stratigraphic variations and secondary porosity within the Maynardville Limestone in Bear Creek Valley, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstrand, P.M.

    1995-05-01

    To evaluate groundwater and surface water contamination and migration near the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, a Comprehensive Groundwater Monitoring Plan was developed. As part of the Maynardville exit pathways monitoring program, monitoring well clusters were ii installed perpendicular to the strike of the Maynardville Limestone, that underlies the southern part of the Y-12 Plant and Bear Creek Valley (BCV). The Maynardville Project is designed to locate potential exit pathways of groundwater, study geochemical characteristics and factors affecting the occurrence and distribution of water-bearing intervals, and provide hydrogeologic information to be used to reduce the potential impacts of contaminants entering the Maynardville Limestone.

  2. Lithologic, geophysical, and well-construction data for observation wells in the Melton Valley area, Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucci, Patrick; Hanchar, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen wells were installed at nine sites in the Melton Valley area. The wells are intended to provide information on water levels in both regolith and bedrock, aquifer characteristics, and subsurface lithology. Well depths range from 24 to 86 ft for shallow wells, and from 126 to 301 ft for deep wells. Four inch diameter cores were obtained from four of the deep wells. Caliper, gamma, neutron, and gamma-gamma density borehole geophysical logs were obtained for each deep well. Lithologic description of cores and analysis of geophysical logs indicate that one deep well (UA2) is completed entirely within the Nolichucky Shale; one deep well (UD2) is completely entirely within the Pumpkin Valley Shale; two deep wells (UB2, UE2) are completed entirely within the Maryville Limestone; four deep wells (UF2, UG2, UH2, UI2) penetrate both the Nolichucky Shale and the Maryville Limestone. Well UC2, located near the crest of Haw Ridge, penetrates an imbricate splay of the Copper Creek thrust fault, which places the older Rome Formation above the younger Chickamauga Limestone, at a depth of about 100 to 117 ft. (USGS)

  3. Porosity development in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and Maynardville Limestone, Bear Creek Valley and Chestnut Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstrand, P.M.; Menefee, L.S.; Dreier, R.B.

    1995-12-01

    Matrix porosity data from deep core obtained in Bear Creek Valley indicate that porosities in the Maynardville Limestone are lithology and depth dependent. Matrix porosities are greater in the Cooper Ridge Dolomite than in the Maynardville Limestone, yet there is no apparent correlation with depth. Two interrelated diagenetic processes are the major controlling factors on porosity development in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and Maynardville Limestone; dissolution of evaporate minerals and dedolomitization. Both of these diagenetic processes produce matrix porosities between 2.1 and 1.3% in the Copper Ridge Dolomite and upper part of the Maynardville Limestone (Zone 6) to depths of approximately 600 ft bgs. Mean matrix porosities in Zones 5 through 2 of the Maynardville Limestone range from 0.8 to 0.5%. A large number of cavities have been intersected during drilling activities in nearly all zones of the Maynardville Limestone in Bear Creek Valley. Therefore, any maynardville Limestone zone within approximately 200 ft of the ground surface is likely to contain cavities that allow significant and rapid flow of groundwater. Zone 6 could be an important stratigraphic unit in the Maynardville Limestone for groundwater flow and contaminant transport because of the abundance of vuggy and moldic porosities. There are large variations in the thickness and lithology in the lower part of the Maynardville (Zones 2, 3, and 4 in the Burial Grounds region). The direction and velocity of strike-parallel groundwater flow may be altered in this area within the lower Maynardville Limestone.

  4. Soil sampling and analysis plan for the Bear Creek Valley floodplain at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Floodplain presents the approach and rationale for characterizing potentially contaminated soils and sediments of the Bear Creek floodplain and the impact of any contaminants on the floodplain ecosystem. It is an addendum to a previously issued document, the Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Bear Creek (Y02-S600) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ES/ER-19&D2), which presents background information pertaining to this floodplain investigation. The strategy presented in the SAP is to divide the investigation into three component parts: a large-scale characterization of the floodplain; a fine-scale characterization of the floodplain beginning with a known contaminated location; and a stream sediment characterization. During the large-scale and the fine-scale characterizations, soil and biota samples (i.e., small mammals, earthworms, and vegetation) will be collected in order to characterize the nature and extent of floodplain soil contamination and the impact of this contamination on floodplain biota. The fine-scale characterization will begin with an investigation of a site corresponding to the location noted in the Remedial Investigation Work Plan (ES/ER-19&D2) as an area where uranium and PCBs are concentrated in discrete strata. During this fine-scale characterization, a 1 m deep soil profile excavation will be dug into the creek berm, and individual soil strata in the excavation will be screened for alpha radiation, PCBs, and VOCs. After the laboratory analysis results are received, biota samples will be collected in the vicinity of those locations.

  5. Channelization and floodplain forests: Impacts of accelerated sedimentation and valley plug formation on floodplain forests of the Middle Fork Forked Deer River, Tennessee, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oswalt, S.N.; King, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the severe degradation of floodplain habitats resulting from channelization and concomitant excessive coarse sedimentation on the Middle Fork Forked Deer River in west Tennessee from 2000 to 2003. Land use practices have resulted in excessive sediment in the tributaries and river system eventually resulting in sand deposition on the floodplain, increased overbank flooding, a rise in the groundwater table, and ponding of upstream timber. Our objectives were to: (1) determine the composition of floodplain vegetation communities along the degraded river reach, (2) to isolate relationships among these communities, geomorphic features, and environmental variables and (3) evaluate successional changes based on current stand conditions. Vegetation communities were not specifically associated with predefined geomorphic features; nevertheless, hydrologic and geomorphic processes as a result of channelization have clearly affected vegetation communities. The presence of valley plugs and continued degradation of upstream reaches and tributaries on the impacted study reach has arrested recovery of floodplain plant communities. Historically common species like Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Quercus spp. L. were not important, with importance values (IV) less than 1, and occurred in less than 20% of forested plots, while Acer rubrum L., a disturbance-tolerant species, was the most important species on the site (IV = 78.1) and occurred in 87% of forested plots. The results of this study also indicate that channelization impacts on the Middle Fork Forked Deer River are more temporally and spatially complex than previously described for other river systems. Rehabilitation of this system necessitates a long-term, landscape-scale solution that addresses watershed rehabilitation in a spatially and temporally hierarchical manner. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Logs of exploratory trenches through liquefaction features on late Quaternary terraces in the Obion River Valley, northwestern Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodbell, Donald T.; Bradley, Lee-Ann

    1993-01-01

    From December 1811 to February 1812, four large earthquakes (mb≥7.0) occured in the New Madrid (Missouri) Seismic Zone (NMSZ). These have been the largest historical earthquakes in eastern North America. Although this area has been the focus of considerable seismological research, estimates of the repeat time of large-magnitude seismic events remain poorly constrained. Past estimates were primarily based on earthquake-frequency statistics and on paleoseismology studies. Johnston and Nava (1985) compiled historical seismicity data covering about 180 years and instrumental data covering 10 years, and they concluded that the repeat time for large-magnitude events (mb≥7.0) is between 500 and 1,100 yrs. However, this estimate is based on assumptions that the data set is representative of the seismicity of the region over the past 1,000 yrs, and that the relation between earthquake frequency and magnitude is constant (Johnston and Nava, 1985). Because these assumptions cannot be verified, this estimated recurrence interval of 550-1,100 hrs must be considered tentative (S. G. Wesnousky and L. M. Leffler, written commun., 1991). Investigation of exploratory trenches across the Reelfoot scarp in northwestern Tennessee documented the only unequivocal Holocene surface faulting in the upper Mississippi embayment (Russ and others, 1978; Russ, 1979). Fluvial sediment younger than about 2,250 yrs old is faulted, and the net vertical displacement is more than 3 m. Stratigraphic relations indicate at least two episodes of faulting occurred between about 2,250 yr B.P. and the 1811-12 events to estimate an average recurrence interval of less than 600 yrs for large-magnitude earthquakes in the NMSZ. However, inasmuch as Russ (1970) found no evidence for any historical offset on the Reelfoot scarp, the relation between the Reelfoot scarp and large paleoeartchquakes in the NMSZ has not been clearly established. The development of widespread liquefaction features suring the 1811

  7. Hydraulic testing plan for the Bear Creek Valley Treatability Study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Treatability Study is intended to provide site-specific data defining potential treatability technologies applicable to contaminated groundwater and surface water. The ultimate goal of this effort is to install a treatment system that will remove uranium, technetium, nitrate, and several metals from groundwater before it reaches Bear Creek. This project directly supports the BCV Feasibility Study. Part of the Treatability Study, Phase II Hydraulic Performance Testing, will produce hydraulic and treatment performance data required to design a long-term treatment system. This effort consists of the installation and testing of two groundwater collection systems: a trench in the vicinity of GW-835 and an angled pumping well adjacent to NT-1. Pumping tests and evaluations of gradients under ambient conditions will provide data for full-scale design of treatment systems. In addition to hydraulic performance, in situ treatment chemistry data will be obtained from monitoring wells installed in the reactive media section of the trench. The in situ treatment work is not part of this test plan. This Hydraulic Testing Plan describes the location and installation of the trench and NT-1 wells, the locations and purpose of the monitoring wells, and the procedures for the pumping tests of the trench and NT-1 wells.

  8. Phase 1 report on the Bear Creek Valley treatability study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Bear Creek Valley (BCV) is located within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation and encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes associated with past operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The BCV Remedial Investigation determined that disposal of wastes at the S-3 Site, Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) has caused contamination of both deep and shallow groundwater. The primary contaminants include uranium, nitrate, and VOCs, although other metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and cadmium persist. The BCV feasibility study will describe several remedial options for this area, including both in situ and ex situ treatment of groundwater. This Treatability Study Phase 1 Report describes the results of preliminary screening of treatment technologies that may be applied within BCV. Four activities were undertaken in Phase 1: field characterization, laboratory screening of potential sorbents, laboratory testing of zero valent iron products, and field screening of three biological treatment systems. Each of these activities is described fully in technical memos attached in Appendices A through G.

  9. Use of Dual-Polarization Radar Variables to Assess Low-Level Wind Shear in Severe Thunderstorm Near-storm Environments in the Tennessee Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, Christina C.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Kumjian, Matthew; Carey, Lawerence D.; Petersen, Walter A.

    2011-01-01

    The upgrade of the National Weather Service (NWS) network of S ]band dual-polarization radars is currently underway, and the incorporation of polarimetric information into the real ]time forecasting process will enhance the forecaster fs ability to assess thunderstorms and their near ]storm environments. Recent research has suggested that the combination of polarimetric variables differential reflectivity (ZDR) and specific differential phase (KDP) can be useful in the assessment of low level wind shear within a thunderstorm. In an environment with strong low ]level veering of the wind, ZDR values will be largest along the right inflow edge of the thunderstorm near a large gradient in horizontal reflectivity (indicative of large raindrops falling with a relative lack of smaller drops), and take the shape of an arc. Meanwhile, KDP values, which are proportional to liquid water content and indicative of a large number of smaller drops, are maximized deeper into the forward flank precipitation shield than the ZDR arc as the smaller drops are being advected further from the updraft core by the low level winds than the larger raindrops. Using findings from previous work, three severe weather events that occurred in North Alabama were examined in order to assess the utility of these signatures in determining the potential for tornadic activity. The first case is from October 26, 2010, where a large number of storms indicated tornadic potential from a standard reflectivity and velocity analysis but very few storms actually produced tornadoes. The second event is from February 28, 2011, where tornadic storms were present early on in the event, but as the day progressed, the tornado threat transitioned to a high wind threat. The third case is from April 27, 2011, where multiple rounds of tornadic storms ransacked the Tennessee Valley. This event provides a dataset including multiple modes of tornadic development, including QLCS and supercell structures. The overarching goal

  10. A watershed survey and educational program to enhance environmental quality in the Upper Little Tennessee River Valley. Year 4, Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Work carried out during 1992 under TVA grant No. TV-74216A, administered by the Western North Carolina Alliance, may be broken down into four categories: Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI), Macroinvertebrate Biomonitoring, Visual Reconnaissance, and Survey of Brook Trout. In 1992, we began to shift emphasis from merely studying the watershed to activities aimed at protecting, restoring, or improving water and habitat quality. The ``target`` area for this work in the upper Little Tennessee River watershed was the 10.0 square mile Rabbit Creek watershed (Holly Springs Community), and work conducted in Holly Springs is here reported separately from watershed-wide monitoring activities. Additional topics treated in this report include the relation of this project to other activities in the upper Little Tennessee watershed, significant changes in the watershed which occurred independently of this project, a list of other reports prepared to be made available through the project and a list of meetings. Work carried out under this grant in the Spring Creek and Laurel River watersheds (Madison County, North Carolina) will be reported on separately by Mark Hopey.

  11. White Oak Creek watershed: Melton Valley area Remedial Investigation report, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 2, Appendixes A and B

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    This document contains Appendixes A ``Source Inventory Information for the Subbasins Evaluated for the White Oak Creek Watershed`` and B ``Human Health Risk Assessment for White Oak Creek / Melton Valley Area`` for the remedial investigation report for the White Oak Creek Watershed and Melton Valley Area. Appendix A identifies the waste types and contaminants for each subbasin in addition to the disposal methods. Appendix B identifies potential human health risks and hazards that may result from contaminants present in the different media within Oak Ridge National Laboratory sites.

  12. Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Appendixes A and B

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions. The industrial and recreational exposure scenarios are used to provide a risk assessment reference context to evaluate levels of contamination in surface water, groundwater, soil, and sediment within each subbasin of the Melton Valley watershed. All available analytical results for the media of interest that could be qualified for use in the risk assessment were screened to determine carcinogenic risk values and noncarcinogenic hazard indexes and to identify the chemicals of concern (COCs) for each evaluated media in each subbasin.

  13. Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Evaluation, interpretation, and data summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions.

  14. Data management implementation plan for the Bear Creek Valley treatability study phase 2 hydraulic performance testing, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The overall objective of the Bear Creek Valley treatability study is to provide site-specific data defining potential treatment technologies applicable to contaminated groundwater and surface water. The ultimate goal of this effort is to install a treatment system that will remove uranium, technetium, nitrate, and several metals from groundwater before it reaches Bear Creek. This project, the Bear Creek Valley treatability study Phase 2 hydraulic performance testing, directly supports the Bear Creek Valley Feasibility Study. Specific project objectives include (1) installing monitoring and extraction wells, (2) installing a groundwater extraction trench, (3) performing pumping tests of the extraction wells and trench, (4) determining hydraulic gradients, and (5) collecting water quality parameters. The primary purpose of environmental data management is to provide a system for generating and maintaining technically defensible data. To meet current regulatory requirements for the Environmental Restoration Program, complete documentation of the information flow must be established. To do so, each step in the data management process (collection, management, storage, and analysis) must be adequately planned and documented. This document will serve to identify data management procedures, expected data types and flow, and roles and responsibilities for all data management activities associated with this project.

  15. Sampling and analysis plan for the Bear Creek Valley Boneyard/Burnyard Accelerated Action Project, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    In the Bear Creek Valley Watershed Remedial Investigation, the Boneyard/Burnyard was identified as the source of the largest releases of uranium into groundwater and surface water in Bear Creek Valley. The proposed action for remediation of this site is selective excavation and removal of source material and capping of the remainder of the site. The schedule for this action has been accelerated so that this is the first remedial action planned to be implemented in the Bear Creek Valley Record of Decision. Additional data needs to support design of the remedial action were identified at a data quality objectives meeting held for this project. Sampling at the Boneyard/Burnyard will be conducted through the use of a phased approach. Initial or primary samples will be used to make in-the-field decisions about where to locate follow-up or secondary samples. On the basis of the results of surface water, soil, and groundwater analysis, up to six test pits will be dug. The test pits will be used to provide detailed descriptions of source materials and bulk samples. This document sets forth the requirements and procedures to protect the personnel involved in this project. This document also contains the health and safety plan, quality assurance project plan, waste management plan, data management plan, implementation plan, and best management practices plan for this project as appendices.

  16. Bear Creek Valley Floodplain hot spot removal early action characterization field data summary report, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes the field and laboratory efforts as a result of the Bear Creek Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Project Early Action. The purpose of this project was to collect data necessary to assess contaminant levels in the Bear Creek Valley Floodplain and evaluate the risk posed by the sites. This report provides information on the background of the site, characterization of site and field activities, results of field and laboratory data collected, extent and distribution of contamination, and an assessment of the future risk posed by the site.

  17. Field characterization report on Phase 1 of the Bear Creek Valley treatability study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    A treatability study is being performed to investigate the practicability of using passive, in situ treatment systems to remove contaminants from the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Characterization Area (CA). This draft document is a report of the site characterization results and is part of Phase 1 of this study. Field activities performed are outlined in Bear Creek Valley Passive Surface Water Treatment Technology Demonstrations, Phase 1, Site Characterization. The focus of the characterization was to obtain sufficient site-specific data on hydrogeology of NT-1, NT-2, and upper Bear Creek (above its confluence with NT-1) to support selection of groundwater capture and treatment systems in Phases 2 and 3. Groundwater samples from the S-3 Site and NT-1 area were also collected for the principal investigators to test during Phase 1 laboratory work. Three contaminant migration pathways were delineated in the S-3 Area. Each is described and briefly characterized by field observations and analysis of surface and groundwater collected within each pathway.

  18. White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 3 Appendix C

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    This report provides details on the baseline ecological risk assessment conducted in support of the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for the Melton Valley areas of the White Oak Creek watershed (WOCW). The RI presents an analysis meant to enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. The ecological risk assessment builds off of the WOCW screening ecological risk assessment. All information available for contaminated sites under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy`s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Federal Facilities Agreement within the White Oak Creek (WOC) RI area has been used to identify areas of potential concern with respect to the presence of contamination posing a potential risk to ecological receptors within the Melton Valley area of the White Oak Creek watershed. The risk assessment report evaluates the potential risks to receptors within each subbasin of the watershed as well as at a watershed-wide scale. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminant releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent waste area groupings.

  19. Treatability study on the Bear Creek Valley characterization area at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Phase II work plan for S-3 site contaminated groundwater interception--in-field media evaluation and groundwater capture methods

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    A treatability study is being conducted to support implementation:of early actions at the S-3 Site in the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Characterization Area (CA). The objectives of the early actions Will be (1) to reduce concentrations of uranium and nitrate in Bear Creek and (2) to reduce contaminants of concern in North Tributary (NT)-1 and NT-2. The BCV CA is located within the US DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. Hazardous and radioactive materials from the Y-12 Plant operations were, disposed of at various sites within BCV. Groundwater and surface water in the BCV CA have been contaminated. The remedial investigation (RI) for the BCV CA identified that the greatest mass flux of contaminants from the various sources migrates via groundwater at the source and discharges to surface water in Bear Creek and its tributaries. In the RI, the combined discharge from the S-3 Site and the Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY) was identified as accounting for 75% of the cancer risk and more than 80% of the chemical toxicity to Potential downgradient human receptors. In addition, the S-3 Site has caused degradation of surface water quality in upper Bear Creek and two of its tributaries. The BCV CA treatability study focuses on capture and treatment of shallow groundwater before it discharges to tributary waters. The objectives Of treatment of this groundwater are (1) to reduce the concentrations of uranium and nitrate in NT-1 and Bear Creek such that the concentrations of these chemicals in surface water and groundwater are reduced to acceptable levels, (2) to reduce the concentrations of nitrate and metals, and reduce the overall concentration of total dissolved solids; and (3) to hydraulically contain the plume of contaminated, groundwater that is moving in bedrock in the Nolichucky Shale such that the rate of contaminant discharge will be reduced in the long term. The objective of Phase II is to produce conceptual designs for treatment system configurations.

  20. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 4: Appendix E -- Valley-wide fate and transport report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix E addresses contaminant releases and migration pathways from a valley-wide perspective and provides estimates of changes in contaminant fluxes in BCV.

  1. Best management practices plan for Phase II of the Bear Creek Valley treatability study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is currently under a Federal Agreement to define soil and groundwater contamination and develop remedies to protect human health and the environment. The western end of the site is known to have a former nitric acid disposal pit that has been remediated and capped. Remedial investigation data indicate this pit was a source of nitrate, uranium, technetium, and other metals contamination in groundwater. The downgradient receptor of this contamination includes Bear Creek and its tributaries. A feasibility study is under way to develop a remedy to prevent further contaminant migration to this receptor. To support the feasibility study, the treatability study is being completed to examine groundwater treatment at the S-3 site. This document serves as the top-level command medium for Phase II of the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Treatability Study and, as such, will be the primary resource for management and implementation of field activities. Many of the details and standard operating procedures referred to herein can be found in other Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), documents. Several supporting documents specific to this project are also cited. These include the Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), the Health and Safety Plan (HASP), and the Waste Management Plan (WMP).

  2. Health and safety plan for phase II of the Bear Creek Valley treatability study Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HASP) addresses the health and safety (H&S) concerns and requirements for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Treatability Study at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Samples will be collected from effluent following treatment tests of extraction columns, algal mats, and mature wetlands supplied by surface water locations and existing groundwater monitoring well locations. The project Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses the project description, technical objectives, procedures, and planned work activities in greater detail. It is the responsibility of the project managers, field manager, and site health and safety officer (SHSO) to determine that the requirements of this HASP are sufficiently protective. If it is determined that the requirements of this HASP are not sufficiently protective, a field change order(s) (FCO) will be prepared. FCOs will include a completed job hazard analysis or similar worksheet to ensure complete hazard assessment. FCOs must be approved by the Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities (EMEF) project manager, EMEF H&S manager, subcontractor project or field manager, and subcontractor H&S representative. As a minimum, FCOs will be prepared if additional tasks will be performed or if contaminant exposure is anticipated.

  3. White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 1 Main Text

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this Remedial Investigation (RI) report is to present an analysis of the Melton Valley portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, which will enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of cost-effective remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. In this RI existing levels of contamination and radiological exposure are compared to levels acceptable for future industrial and potential recreational use levels at the site. This comparison provides a perspective for the magnitude of remedial actions required to achieve a site condition compatible with relaxed access restrictions over existing conditions. Ecological risk will be assessed to evaluate measures required for ecological receptor protection. For each subbasin, this report will provide site-specific analyses of the physical setting including identification of contaminant source areas, description of contaminant transport pathways, identification of release mechanisms, analysis of contaminant source interactions with groundwater, identification of secondary contaminated media associated with the source and seepage pathways, assessment of potential human health and ecological risks from exposure to contaminants, ranking of each source area within the subwatershed, and outline the conditions that remedial technologies must address to stop present and future contaminant releases, prevent the spread of contamination and achieve the goal of limiting environmental contamination to be consistent with a potential recreational use of the site.

  4. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6: Appendix G -- Baseline ecological risk assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix G contains ecological risks for fish, benthic invertebrates, soil invertebrates, plants, small mammals, deer, and predator/scavengers (hawks and fox). This risk assessment identified significant ecological risks from chemicals in water, sediment, soil, and shallow ground water. Metals and PCBs are the primary contaminants of concern.

  5. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV.

  6. 'Tennessee' Clues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image shows the area within 'Endurance Crater,' currently being investigated by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover is inspecting a hole it drilled into a flat rock (center) dubbed 'Tennessee,' which scientists believe may be made up of the same evaporite-rich materials as those found in 'Eagle Crater.'

    The overall geography inside Endurance is more complex than scientists anticipated, with at least three distinct bands of rock visible in front of the rover. Scientists hope to investigate the second and third layers of rock for more clues to Mars' history. This image was taken on sol 133 (June 8, 2004) with the rover's panoramic camera, using the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

  7. Waste management plan for phase II of the Bear Creek Valley Treatability study Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This Waste Management Plan (WMP) for the Bear Creek Valley Treatability Study addresses waste management requirements for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The study is intended to produce treatment performance data required to design a treatment system for contaminated groundwater. The treatability study will consist of an evaluation of various treatment media including continuous column tests, with up to six columns being employed to evaluate the performance of different media in the treatment of groundwater; an evaluation of the dentrifying capacity and metal uptake capacity of a wetland system; and the long-term dentrifying capacity and metal uptake capacity of algal mats. Additionally, the treatability study involves installation of a trench and incline well to evaluate and assess hydraulic impacts of pumping groundwater. The Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) covers the project description, technical objectives, procedures, and planned work activities in greater detail. The Health and Safety Plan (HASP) addresses the health and safety concerns and requirements for the proposed sampling activities. This WMP identifies the types and estimates the volumes of various wastes that may be generated during the proposed treatability studies. The approach to managing waste outlined in this WMP emphasizes the following points: (1) management of the waste generated in a manner that is protective of human health and the environment; (2) minimization of waste generation, thereby reducing unnecessary costs and usage of limited permitted storage and disposal capacities; and (3) compliance with federal, state, and site requirements. Prior sampling at the site has detected organic, radioactive, and metals contamination in groundwater and surface water. Proposed field operations are not expected to result in worker exposures greater than applicable exposure or action limits.

  8. 75 FR 11735 - Tennessee Valley Authority Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... Saturdays, Sundays, and the following holidays: New Year's Day, Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr., Presidents' Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day, and... Official within 30 days of the date of the letter denying your request. Your appeal letter may include...

  9. 76 FR 39261 - Tennessee Valley Authority Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... and directives of the Information Security Oversight Office, the incorporation, paraphrasing... information requested is not the subject of pending litigation. (c) Requests shall be in writing, and shall...

  10. Inclusion in Middle Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Derrick; Ashley, Mandi; Hayes, Brandalyn

    2013-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to provide school districts within Tennessee with more research about how weekly hours of inclusion impact student achievement. Specifically, researchers examined which models of inclusion were in use in two school districts in Tennessee, administrators' and teachers' perceptions of inclusion, and whether or…

  11. Benchmarking East Tennessee`s economic capacity

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-20

    This presentation is comprised of viewgraphs delineating major economic factors operating in 15 counties in East Tennessee. The purpose of the information presented is to provide a benchmark analysis of economic conditions for use in guiding economic growth in the region. The emphasis of the presentation is economic infrastructure, which is classified into six categories: human resources, technology, financial resources, physical infrastructure, quality of life, and tax and regulation. Data for analysis of key indicators in each of the categories are presented. Preliminary analyses, in the form of strengths and weaknesses and comparison to reference groups, are given.

  12. Geologic structure and hydrocarbon potential along the Saltville and Pulaski Thrusts in Southwestern Virginia and Northeastern Tennessee: Part A, Part B, Part C. Publication 23

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, M.J.; Milici, R.C.; Schultz, A.P.; LeVan, D.C.; Wilkes, G.P.

    1980-01-01

    This field guide describes three stops in the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau of Virginia and Tennessee. Part A gives the regional structure and hydrocarbon potential; part B describes the deformation in the hanging wall of the Pulaski Thrust sheet near Ironto, Virginia, and part C describes the Saltville Fault footwall structure of Stone Mountain, Tennessee. (ACR)

  13. Addendum to the remedial investigation report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, Spoil Area 1, and SY-200 Yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Main text

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This addendum to the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting the results of a site characterization for public review. This addendum is a supplement to a document that was previously issued in January 1995 and that provided the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of the 1993 investigation performed at OU 2. The January 1995 D2 version of the RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 included information on risk assessments that have evaluated impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in the document formed the basis for the development of the Feasibility Study Report. This addendum includes revisions to four chapters of information that were a part of the document issued in January 1995. Specifically, it includes revisions to Chaps. 2, 3, 4, and 9. Volume 1 of this document is not being reissued in its entirety as a D3 version because only the four chapters just mentioned have been affected by requested changes. Note also that Volume 2 of this RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 is not being reissued in conjunction with Volume 1 of this document because there have been no changes requested or made to the previously issued version of Volume 2 of this document.

  14. Tennessee and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB)is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Tennessee and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to lead the…

  15. History of suspended-sediment data collection and inventory of available data for the Tennessee and Cumberland River basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, William P.; Brown, Russell T.; Chatham, Carrie G.

    1988-01-01

    In 1934 and 1935, the Tennessee Valley Authority established 51 daily record suspended-sediment stations on the Tennessee River and its major tributaries. Most of these stations were operated for 8 years. From 1962 to 1965, the Tennessee Valley Authority again collected daily sediment record at 10 of the original 49 stations. In addition to the data sets collected on the major rivers, the Tennessee Valley Authority has conducted several intensive studies of small watersheds throughout the Tennessee River basin. In the Cumberland River basin, daily sediment records have been collected primarily by the Survey. Daily stations have been operated for various periods on 17 basins ranging in size from 0.67 to 1,977 sq mi, with the earliest data of daily record being October 1953. All of these daily stations are located in the upper Cumberland River basin upstream of any major impoundments. Periodic sediment data have been collected by the Survey at 194 stations in the Tennessee River basin and at 106 stations in the Cumberland River basin, however; the number of samples/station is quite low. 86% of the periodic stations in the Tennessee River basin and 91% of the periodic stations in the Cumberland River basin have 30 samples or less. (USGS)

  16. Energy- and water-development appropriations for Fiscal Year 1982. Hearings before the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session on H. R. 4144, an act making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1982, and for other purposes. Part 2 (pages 679-1574). Department of Energy, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Tennessee Valley Authority

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Part 2 of the hearing record on appropriations for the fiscal year 1982 DOE budget for certain energy and water development programs opens with remarks by Energy Secretary James B. Edwards, who summarizes the Reagan energy policy of reducing federal participation in the funding and regulation of these projects and gives an overview of DOE programs. Subsequent hearings covered the Federal Power Marketing Administration; high-energy physics and basic energy science, and magnetic fusion; nuclear fission and uranium enrichment programs, conservation and renewable energy programs; departmental and related activities; Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Tennessee Valley Authority, and national security and defense programs. The record covers nine days of hearings. (DCK)

  17. Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, SY-200 Yard, Spoil Area 1) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The enactment of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976 and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to RCRA in 1984 created management requirements for hazardous waste facilities. The facilities within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were in the process of meeting the RCRA requirements when ORR was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priorities List (NPL) on November 21, 1989. Under RCRA, the actions typically follow the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA)/RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS)/Corrective Measures implementation process. Under CERCLA the actions follow the PA/SI/Remedial Investigation (RI)/Feasibility Study (FS)/Remedial Design/Remedial Action process. The development of this document will incorporate requirements under both RCRA and CERCLA into an RI work plan for the characterization of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Operable Unit (OU) 2.

  18. 78 FR 52219 - Notice of Acceptance of Renewal Application for Special Nuclear Materials License From Tennessee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... Valley Authority for Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 2, Opportunity To Request a Hearing, and... Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 2, license renewal application, dated August 23, 2012, is available... (SNM) license for Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 2 (WBN2), located at Spring City, Tennessee....

  19. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 5: Appendix F -- Baseline human health risk assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix F documents potential risks and provides information necessary for making remediation decisions. A quantitative analysis of the inorganic, organic, and radiological site-related contaminants found in various media is used to characterize the potential risks to human health associated with exposure to these contaminants.

  20. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3: Appendix D -- Nature and extent of contamination report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix D describes the nature and extent of contamination in environmental media and wastes.

  1. Earthquake history of Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von Hake, C. A.

    1977-01-01

     The western part of the State was shaken strongly by the New Madrid, Mo., earthquakes of 1811-12 and by earthquakes in 1843 and 1895. The area has also experienced minor shocks. Additional activity has occurred in the eastern part of the State, near the North Carolina border. Forty shocks of intensity V (Modified Mercalli scale) or greater have been cataloged as occurring within the State. Many other earthquakes centered in bordering States have affected points in Tennessee. The following summary covers only hose shocks of intensity VI or greater. 

  2. Regulatory Facility Guide for Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O.; Rymer, A.C.

    1994-02-28

    This guide provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation related regulations applicable to shipments originating at or destined to Tennessee facilities. Information on preferred routes is also given.

  3. GEE CREEK WILDERNESS, TENNESSEE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Epstein, Jack B.; Gazdik, Gertrude C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and mine and prospect surveys, it was determined that the Gee Creek Wilderness, Tennessee has little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. Iron ore was formerly mined, but the deposits are small, have a high phosphorous content, and are inaccessible. Shale, suitable for brick or lightweight aggregate, and sandstone, which could be utilized for crushed stone or sand, are found in the area, but are also found in areas closer to potential markets. The geologic setting precludes the presence of oil and gas resources in the surface rocks, but the possibility of finding natural gas at depth below the rocks exposed in the area cannot be discounted. Geophysical exploration would be necessary to define the local structure in rocks at depth to properly evaluate the potential of the area for gas.

  4. Mapping of Landsat satellite and gravity lineaments in west Tennessee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argialas, Demetre P.; Stearns, Richard G.; Shahrokhi, Firouz

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of earthquake fault lineament patterns within the alluvial valley of west Tennessee, which is often made difficult by the presence of unconsolidated sediments, is presently undertaken through a synergistic use of Landsat satellite images in conjunction with gravity anomaly data, which were quantitatively analyzed and compared by means of two-dimensional histograms and rose diagrams. The northeastern trend revealed for the lineaments corresponds to faults and is in keeping with reactivation of the Reelfoot rift near the Mississippi River; this suggests that deeper features, perhaps at earthquake focal depth, may extend to the land surface as Landsat-detectable lineaments.

  5. Valley Crossing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    24 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the walls and floor of a valley in the western Memnonia region of Mars. The finely-textured ridges and pits found on the valley walls and upland outside of the valley were formed by wind erosion.

    Location near: 487.5oS, 155.8oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Spring

  6. Valley Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-529, 30 October 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the floor of an ancient valley located near the Pyrrhae Chaos region of Mars. This valley might have been carved by liquid water, but today no evidence remains that a fluid ever flowed through it. Long after the valley formed, its floor was covered by large, windblown, ripple-like dunes. This picture is located near 13.0oS, 31.2oW. The image is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  7. Preliminary evaluation of the Highland Rim aquifer system in Tennessee for receiving injected wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    The EPA has authority under the Safe Drinking Water Act to protect underground sources of drinking water from contamination by deep well injection. An aquifer, however, may be exempted from protection and used for injected wastes where the aquifer meets criteria established in the Agency 's Underground Injection Control program. The Highland Rim aquifer system in Tennessee consists of Mississippian age carbonate rocks and occurs from the Valley and Ridge of East Tennessee to west of the Tennessee River. This aquifer contains potable water and is an important source of drinking water for municipal and domestic supplies on the Highland Rim. The Highland Rim aquifer system under parts of the Cumberland Plateau is not currently used as a source of drinking water and is not expected to be used in the future. These areas meet parts of the EPA 's Underground Injection Control criteria for exempting aquifers to receive injected waste. (Author 's abstract)

  8. State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Mike

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Tennessee. The 17th largest state, Tennessee is home to 2.01% of the nation's inhabitants. Funding of K-12 education in Tennessee is accomplished via a formula known as the Basic Educational Program (BEP). This plan primarily utilizes school district enrollment numbers to…

  9. The Soil Conservation District Movement in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Thomas Cochran; And Others

    The development of soil conservation districts in Tennessee is the subject of this graduate study. Related literature, existing records, and personal interviews are used to record progress since Tennessee adopted Public Law 46 establishing soil conservation districts in 1939. In 1959 all 95 counties of Tennessee had organized soil conservation…

  10. The February 21, 1993 tornadoes of East Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Fricke, K.E.; Kornegay, F.C.

    1993-08-11

    A series of tornadoes struck the east Tennessee area on Sunday afternoon, February 21, 1993 around Knoxville, Lenoir City, and Oak Ridge causing millions of dollars worth of damage to both homes and businesses in the area, killing one, injuring a number of persons, and leaving a large area without power for many hours or even days due to damage to the local TVA transmission line network. One tornado touched down in the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation near the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, continued through the Union Valley business district located just east of the plant, through the adjacent University of Tennessee Arboretum and then continued into the communities of Claxton and Powell. The path length of the tornado was approximately 13 miles. Damage to the Y-12 Plant was minimal, but the Union Valley business district was seriously damaged, including the Fusion Energy Design Center (FEDC) which houses a number of DOE related projects. The preliminary cost estimate of the damage to DOE facilities (both at Y-12 and at the FEDC) was around $520,000. This paper describes the local meteorological data, the tornado that struck near the Y-12 plant, the resulting damage both to the DOE facilities and to the surrounding communities, the plant emergency response and recovery activities, and the current hazard analyses being undertaken at the plant.

  11. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in raccoons from Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Jenny; Newsome, Anthony; Huang, Junjun; Kirby, Jordona; Kranz, Melissa; Wateska, Angela; Dunlap, Brett; Yabsley, Michael J; Dunn, John R; Jones, Timothy F; Moncayo, Abelardo C

    2010-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. Autochthonous human and canine transmission of T. cruzi has been documented in Tennessee, but little is known about its ecology, including the prevalence of T. cruzi among wildlife in Tennessee. Serum samples from 706 raccoons (Procyon lotor) from 10 counties in the Ridge and Valley and Blue Ridge Mountains ecoregions of eastern Tennessee were tested for antibodies reactive with T. cruzi using the indirect fluorescent antibody assay. Two hundred six (29.2%) samples were seropositive, with 9 counties yielding positive samples (range 14.6-63.6%). Significantly more raccoons from rural habitats (35.1%) were found positive for T. cruzi exposure than were those from suburban habitats (23.1%, P < 0.001). Land cover class was not associated with seropositivity status (P = 0.441), even though deciduous forest was the most common site from where raccoons were trapped and the most common site of positive raccoons in rural areas (42%). Interestingly, age was positively associated with seropositivity. Raccoons older than 1 yr (adults) were 40.1% seropositive compared to 12.2% of those less than 1 yr (juveniles; P < 0.001). Female adults were significantly more likely to be exposed to T. cruzi than were male adult raccoons (P < 0.001). No significant seroprevalence difference was seen among male and female juveniles. This study contributes to understanding the dynamics of T. cruzi exposure within raccoon populations in Tennessee. The importance of habitat (rural vs. suburban) and microhabitat (dens) in risk of exposure to these populations is also discussed.

  12. Landsat analysis of east-central Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, B.; Kent, R.; Noel, J.A.; Sers, S.

    1986-05-01

    Regional Landsat analysis was completed in an area of east-central Tennessee, about 65 mi southeast of Nashville. The study area encompassed the eastern edge of the Great Basin, the Highland Rim, and the western edge of the Cumberland Plateau. The area is roughly bounded on the north by Interstate 40 and on the south by US Highway 41. The study was undertaken to learn the relationships between the fracture production of gas from the McMinnville field and the surface areal extent and orientation of the fractures, if any. Production from the McMinnville gas field is primarily from fractures in the Trenton limestone. Density logs show that formations penetrated have very low interstitial porosity. The eastern edge of the Great Basin is underlain by sediments of lower paleozoic age, which are successively overlain by limestone and shale of Mississippian age in the Highland Rim. Sandstone, shale, and coal of Pennsylvanian age top the Cumberland Plateau and its erosional outliers on the eastern edge of the Highland Rim. Three sets of lineaments were evident on the enhanced Landsat imagery. The dominant set trends northeast-southwest, and parallels the thrust faults of the Sequatchie Valley and the Valley and Ridge province to the east. The second set trends at right angles to the first, and the third set trends at some angle to the other two. On the west side of the study area is a broad arcuate anomaly that is not expressed on topographic maps nor in the outcrop patterns of geologic maps, but may be a feature of the rim of the Great Basin. Subsurface mapping of the McMinnville field, which is still proprietary, indicates that the field is a small dome of low closure with several normal faults located parallel to the lineament systems.

  13. SCHOOL PLANNING LABORATORY, THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

    DISCUSSES THE SERVICES, PROJECTS, AND PLANNING PROCESS OF THE SCHOOL PLANNING LABORATORY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE. SERVICES INCLUDE--(1) ASSISTING SCHOOL SYSTEMS AND COLLEGES IN PLANNING FUNCTIONAL EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES, (2) CONDUCTING RESEARCH TO DISCOVER NEW AND BETTER SOLUTIONS TO SCHOOL PLANNING PROBLEMS, AND (3) DISSEMINATING IDEAS FOR…

  14. 77 FR 32982 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority and the University of Tennessee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... appropriate Indian tribes, and have determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects, and a present-day Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe... objects to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward....

  15. Construction data and retrieval procedures for selected wells drilled from 1985 through 1987 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zehner, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-eight wells were constructed by the U. S. Geological Survey for use in describing the groundwater flow system in Melton Valley, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in eastern Tennessee. The wells were installed at 18 locations in Melton Valley and along the Clinch River during the period 1985 through 1987. During the same period, 19 wells were constructed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 7 locations in or near radioactive-waste burial grounds in Melton Valley. Construction data for all 47 wells are in the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Site Inventory data system, where information is also stored for 450 wells that were completed at the laboratory in earlier years. The data can be electronically retrieved by personnel who have access to the U.S. Geological Survey Prime computer located in Nashville, Tennessee, and retrieval procedures are given in the report. (USGS)

  16. Tennessee Minimum School Bus Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Board of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The School Bus Specifications and Procedures adopted by the 2000 National Conference on School Transportation and the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) were used as guides by the Tennessee State Board of Education Pupil Transportation Advisory Committee in developing the revised minimum specifications for school bus chassis and school…

  17. Cremation weights in east Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Bass, William M; Jantz, Richard L

    2004-09-01

    In spite of increasing number of cremations in the U.S., little is known about weights of cremated remains. This research was undertaken in order to add to the limited literature on cremains weights and to explore variation. Weights of cremated remains were obtained from the East Tennessee Crematorium. The sample consists of 151 males and 155 females. Age, sex, and race were obtained for each individual. Males are about 1000 g heavier than females. Both sexes lose weight with age, but females lose weight at about twice the rate of males. East Tennessee cremation weights were compared with those from Florida reported by Warren and Maples, and those from Southern California reported by Sonek. East Tennessee results were also compared with an earlier study on ash weight of anatomical human skeletons carried out by Trotter and Hixon. East Tennessee cremations weigh about 500 g more than the samples from Florida and California, and about the same as the earlier anatomical samples. We hypothesize that variation reflects variation in body weight and activity. This variation must be taken into account when cremation weights are at issue.

  18. River restoration strategies in channelized, low-gradient landscapes of West Tennessee, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.P.; Diehl, T.H.; Turrini-Smith, L. A.; Maas-Baldwin, J.; Croyle, Z.

    2009-01-01

    West Tennessee has a complex history of watershed disturbance, including agricultural erosion, channelization, accelerated valley sedimentation, and the removal and reestablishment of beaver. Watershed management has evolved from fl oodplain drainage via pervasive channelization to include local drainage canal maintenance and local river restoration. Many unmaintained canals are undergoing excessive aggradation and complex channel evolution driven by upland erosion and low valley gradient. The locus of aggradation in fully occluded canals (valley plugs) moves up-valley as sediment continues to accumulate in the backwater behind the plug. Valley plugs that cause canal avulsion can lead to redevelopment of meandering channels in less disturbed areas of the fl oodplain, in a process of passive self-restoration. Some valley plugs have brought restored fl oodplain function, reoccupation of extant historic river channels, and formation of a "sediment shadow" that protects downstream reaches from excess sedimentation. Despite the presence of numerous opportunities, there is presently no mechanism for including valley plugs in mitigation projects. In 1997 a survey of 14 reference reach cross sections documented relations between drainage area and bankfull geometry of relatively unmodified streams in West Tennessee. Reassessment of seven of those sites in 2007 showed that one had been dammed by beaver and that two sites could not be analyzed further because of signifi cant vertical or lateral instability. In contrast to other regions of North America, the results suggest that stream channels in this region fl ood more frequently than once each year, and can remain out of banks for several weeks each year. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  19. Examining Tennessee's collateral source rule.

    PubMed

    Regan, Judith; Hadley, Edward; Regan, William M

    2008-11-01

    The common law collateral source rule was established to prevent the defendant from benefiting from their wrongful actions. Despite a trend in the United States to limit the effects of the collateral source rule, the rule remains in force in courts of the State of Tennessee. However, to assist with the malpractice crisis, the legislature prohibited this rule by statute in regards to the Medical Malpractice Act. Although this statutory prohibition of the collateral source rule worked to lessen verdicts in malpractice cases after passage, the availability of consortium damages resulting from Jordan v. Baptist Three Rivers Hospital in 1999 has worked to drive verdicts substantially higher. Regardless the Medical Malpractice Act has been held as constitutional and has been clarified through several recent Tennessee court decisions. PMID:19024250

  20. Radiometric ages of Tennessee rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Corgan, J.X.; Bradley, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    This report compiles and summarizes all known radiometric age determinations based on bedrock samples from Tennessee. Data are available for 89 sites. Specimens record both igneous and metamorphic events ranging in age from 1.3 billion to 220 million years before present. Tennessee rocks have been dated by techniques that measure the results of four different kinds of radioactive decay: thorium-lead, uranium-lead, potassium-argon, and rubidium-strontium. Most determinations meet normal scientific standards for reliability. This study focuses on clarifying published data by bringing together geochemical, geological, and geographical information for each site. In addition to data on the age of bedrock samples, this study presents basic information on the ages of meteorites from Tennessee and on the ages of sediments and organic remains from Ice Age fossil sites and more recent archeological sites. While bedrock ages are the thrust of the report, other kinds of absolute age determinations are briefly discussed. 98 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Patterns of cave biodiversity and endemism in the Appalachians and Interior Plateau of Tennessee, USA.

    PubMed

    Niemiller, Matthew L; Zigler, Kirk S

    2013-01-01

    Using species distribution data, we developed a georeferenced database of troglobionts (cave-obligate species) in Tennessee to examine spatial patterns of species richness and endemism, including >2000 records for 200 described species. Forty aquatic troglobionts (stygobionts) and 160 terrestrial troglobionts are known from caves in Tennessee, the latter having the greatest diversity of any state in the United States. Endemism was high, with 25% of terrestrial troglobionts (40 species) and 20% of stygobionts (eight species) known from just a single cave and nearly two-thirds of all troglobionts (130 species) known from five or fewer caves. Species richness and endemism were greatest in the Interior Plateau (IP) and Southwestern Appalachians (SWA) ecoregions, which were twice as diverse as the Ridge and Valley (RV). Troglobiont species assemblages were most similar between the IP and SWA, which shared 59 species, whereas the RV cave fauna was largely distinct. We identified a hotspot of cave biodiversity with a center along the escarpment of the Cumberland Plateau in south-central Tennessee defined by both species richness and endemism that is contiguous with a previously defined hotspot in northeastern Alabama. Nearly half (91 species) of Tennessee's troglobiont diversity occurs in this region where several cave systems contain ten or more troglobionts, including one with 23 species. In addition, we identified distinct troglobiont communities across the state. These communities corresponded to hydrological boundaries and likely reflect past or current connectivity between subterranean habitats within and barriers between hydrological basins. Although diverse, Tennessee's subterranean fauna remains poorly studied and many additional species await discovery and description. We identified several undersampled regions and outlined conservation and management priorities to improve our knowledge and aid in protection of the subterranean biodiversity in Tennessee.

  2. NREPS Applications for Water Supply and Management in California and Tennessee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, P.; Scott, M.; Carery, L. D.; Petersen, W. A.

    2011-01-01

    Management of water resources is a balancing act between temporally and spatially limited sources and competitive needs which can often exceed the supply. In order to manage water resources over a region such as the San Joaquin Valley or the Tennessee River Valley, it is pertinent to know the amount of water that has fallen in the watershed and where the water is going within it. Since rain gauge networks are typically sparsely spaced, it is typical that the majority of rainfall on the region may not be measured. To mitigate this under-sampling of rainfall, weather radar has long been employed to provide areal rainfall estimates. The Next-Generation Weather Radars (NEXRAD) make it possible to estimate rainfall over the majority of the conterminous United States. The NEXRAD Rainfall Estimation Processing System (NREPS) was developed specifically for the purpose of using weather radar to estimate rainfall for water resources management. The NREPS is tailored to meet customer needs on spatial and temporal scales relevant to the hydrologic or land-surface models of the end-user. It utilizes several techniques to mitigate artifacts in the NEXRAD data from contaminating the rainfall field. These techniques include clutter filtering, correction for occultation by topography as well as accounting for the vertical profile of reflectivity. This presentation will focus on improvements made to the NREPS system to map rainfall in the San Joaquin Valley for NASA s Water Supply and Management Project in California, but also ongoing rainfall mapping work in the Tennessee River watershed for the Tennessee Valley Authority and possible future applications in other areas of the continent.

  3. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Tennessee, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Tennessee for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Tennessee showed across-the-board gains--improvements in reading and math at the proficient-and-above, and advanced levels for all racial/ethnic subgroups, low-income…

  4. West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Anna; Hailey, Beth

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference held at Union University in Jackson, Tennessee on October 14, 2006. The conference theme, Turning the Pages: A Focus on Children's Literature, was emphasized throughout the day. During the conference, the early childhood classroom teachers, preservice teachers, and administrators…

  5. Tennessee and Its Children: Unmet Needs, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Pam; Delk, Fay L.; Petty, Steve; Wynn, Debbie; O'Neal, Linda

    Based on the view that the tax structure in Tennessee is inadequate and produces chronic problems, especially for the state's children, this Kids Count report identifies unmet education, health care, and resource needs of the children in Tennessee. Following introductory remarks discussing the current tax structure and state spending, Section 1 of…

  6. West Tennessee Research Development Consortium. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colmey, James W.

    The West Tennessee Research Development Consortium, formed to increase the potentiality of research in two small West Tennessee Colleges, consists of a project designed to train in research methodology one research person on each of the two campuses, and to offer concurrently an inservice training program to eight faculty members in each of the…

  7. Evaluation System Weighing down Tennessee Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitin, Liana

    2011-01-01

    A state law, which helped Tennessee win Race to the Top money, pushed schools to implement a system that had limited pilot-testing. Education officials in Tennessee are taking flak from teachers and unions for rushing the implementation of the new teacher-evaluation system that will eventually undergird tenure decisions--a move, some worry, that…

  8. 75 FR 73065 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application November 18, 2010. Take notice that on November 5, 2010 Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street... directed to Mr. Thomas Joyce, Manager, Certificates, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, 1001 Louisiana...

  9. 75 FR 9197 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application February 19, 2010. Take notice that on February 9, 2010, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street... application may be directed to Thomas G. Joyce, Manager, Certificates, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company,...

  10. Historical suspended sediment data in the Tennessee and Cumberland River basins

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.T. ); Carey, W.P. . Water Resources Div.)

    1989-07-01

    This report summarizes the available daily suspended sediment data for the Tennessee and Cumberland river basins. These historical data provide an overview of sediment yield and stream transport of suspended sediment (SS) from a variety of watersheds and stream locations within these river basins. Almost all of these data were collected by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) or the United States Geological Survey (USGS) during the past 50 years. The monthly summaries of these daily data presented in this report are intended to: document the period of record for the sampling sites, show the strong effects of hydrologic conditions on sediment yield and transport patterns, and demonstrate similarities in sediment response among the different watersheds sampled. Many other stations have been sampled periodically for suspended sediment. This report documents only the daily records because these provide the most accurate estimates of average concentrations and loads. 15 refs., 116 figs., 111 tabs.

  11. Three approaches to the classification of inland wetlands. [Dismal Swamp, Tennessee, and Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, P. T.; Malone, D.; Brooks, P. D.; Carter, V.

    1977-01-01

    In the Dismal Swamp project, seasonal, color-infrared aerial photographs and LANDSAT digital data were interpreted for a detailed analysis of the vegetative communities in a large, highly altered wetland. In Western Tennessee, seasonal high altitude color-infrared aerial photographs provided the hydrologic and vegetative information needed to map inland wetlands, using a classification system developed for the Tennessee Valley Region. In Florida, color-infrared aerial photographs were analyzed to produce wetland maps using three existing classification systems to evaluate the information content and mappability of each system. The methods used in each of the three projects can be extended or modified for use in the mapping of inland wetlands in other parts of the United States.

  12. Barge loading facilities in conjunction with wood chipping and sawlog mill, Tennessee River Mile 145. 9R: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental consequences of approving, denying, or adopting reasonable alternatives to a request for barge loading facilities. These facilities would serve a proposed wood chipping and sawlog products operation at Tennessee River Mile (TRM) 145.9, right descending bank, (Kentucky Lake), in Perry County, Tennessee. The site is located between Short Creek and Peters Landing. The applicant is Southeastern Forest Products, L.P. (SFP), Box 73, Linden, Tennessee and the proposed facilities would be constructed on or adjacent to company owned land. Portions of the barge terminal would be constructed on land over which flood easement rights are held by the United States of America and administered by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) and TVA have regulatory control over the proposed barge terminal facilities since the action would involve construction in the Tennessee River which is a navigable water of the United States. The wood chipping and sawlog products facilities proposed on the upland property are not regulated by the CE or TVA. On the basis of the analysis which follows, it has been determined that a modified proposal (as described herein) would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment, and does not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement. 8 refs.

  13. 76 FR 27138 - Tennessee Disaster # TN-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... State of Tennessee (FEMA- 1974-DR), dated 05/01/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Associated Flooding. Incident Period: 04/25/2011 through 04/28/2011. Effective Date:...

  14. Libraries in Tennessee: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... 38163 901-448-5635 http://library.uthsc.edu Mountain Home EAST TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY - MEDICAL LIBRARY Quillen College of Medicine Library 4th Street Mountain Home, TN 37684 423-439-7032 http://www. ...

  15. FLINT MILL ROADLESS AREA, TENNESSEE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffitts, Wallace R.; Jones, Jay G.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey was made on the Flint Mill Roadless Area in northeastern Tennessee. Studies of known manganese deposits, most of which are small and mined out, evaluation of iron prospects, and the results of a geochemical survey for other metals in stream sediments indicate there is probable resource potential for the occurrence of small iron-manganese resources in the roadless area. Nonmetallic minerals such as clay, carbonate rock, and other industrial raw material are found in the area but, similar commodites are found outside the area. The remote possibility of deep oil or gas in the southern Appalachians, of which the roadless area is a part, cannot be evaluated with existing data. Further geophysical study and possibly drilling would be necessary to evaluate the resource potential for gas and oil in the roadless area.

  16. Valley Divide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03664 Valley Divide

    These small channels join to become Sabis Vallis.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -35.3N, Longitude 159.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. Saline Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Figure 2

    These images of the Saline Valley area, California, were acquired March 30, 2000 and cover a full ASTER scene (60 by 60 km). Each image displays data from a different spectral region, and illustrates the complementary nature of surface compositional information available as a function of wavelength. This image displays visible and near infrared bands 3, 2, and 1 in red, green, and blue (RGB). Vegetation appears red, snow and dry salt lakes are white, and exposed rocks are brown, gray, yellow and blue. Rock colors mainly reflect the presence of iron minerals, and variations in albedo. Figure 1 displays short wavelength infrared bands 4, 6, and 8 as RGB. In this wavelength region, clay, carbonate, and sulfate minerals have diagnostic absorption features, resulting in distinct colors on the image. For example, limestones are yellow-green, and purple areas are kaolinite-rich. Figure 2 displays thermal infrared bands 13, 12 and 10 as RGB. In this wavelength region, variations in quartz content appear as more or less red; carbonate rocks are green, and mafic volcanic rocks are purple. The image is located at 36.8 degrees north latitude and 117.7 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  18. Seismicity map of the state of Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reagor, B.G.; Stover, C.W.; Algermissen, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    This map is one of a series of seismicity maps produced by the U.S. Geological Survey that show earthquake data of individual states or groups of states at the scale of 1:1,000,000.  This map shows only those earthquakes with epicenters located within the boundaries of Tennessee, even though earthquakes in nearby states or countries may have been felt or may have caused damage in Tennessee.

  19. Environmental setting and water-quality issues in the lower Tennessee River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kingsbury, James A.; Hoos, Anne B.; Woodside, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program are to describe current water-quality conditions for a large part of the Nation's water resources, identify water-quality changes over time, and identify the primary natural and human factors that affect water quality. The lower Tennessee River Basin is one of 59 river basins selected for study. The water-quality assessment of the lower Tennessee River Basin study unit began in 1997. The lower Tennessee River Basin study unit encompasses an area of about 19,500 square miles and extends from Chattanooga, Tennessee, to Paducah, Kentucky. The study unit had a population of about 1.5 million people in 1995.The study unit was subdivided into subunits with relatively homogeneous geology and physiography. Subdivision of the study unit creates a framework to assess the effects of natural and cultural settings on water quality. Nine subunits were delineated in the study unit; their boundaries generally coincide with level III and level IV ecoregion boundaries. The nine subunits are the Coastal Plain, Transition, Western Highland Rim, Outer Nashville Basin, Inner Nashville Basin, Eastern Highland Rim, Plateau Escarpment and Valleys, Cumberland Plateau, and Valley and Ridge.The lower Tennessee River Basin consists of predominantly forest (51 percent) and agricultural land (40 percent). Activities related to agricultural land use, therefore, are the primary cultural factors likely to have a widespread effect on surface- and ground-water quality in the study unit. Inputs of total nitrogen and phosphorus from agricultural activities in 1992 were about 161,000 and 37,900 tons, respectively. About 3.7 million pounds (active ingredient) of pesticides was applied to crops in the lower Tennessee River Basin in 1992.State water-quality agencies identified nutrient enrichment and pathogens as water-quality issues affecting both surface and ground water in the lower Tennessee River Basin. Water-quality data collected by State

  20. Preliminary delineation and description of the regional aquifers of Tennessee : the Highland Rim aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brahana, J.V.; Bradley, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Highland Rim aquifer system in Tennessee is primarily composed of Mississippian carbonates and occurs west of the Valley and Ridge Province. It crops out in the Highland Rim and the Sequatchie Valley. It has been removed by erosion from the Central Basin. Groundwater in the Highland Rim aquifer system occurs primarily in secondary openings including solution openings, joints, and faults. The Chattanooga Shale is the lower confining layer for the Highland Rim aquifer system. Under the Cumberland plateau, this aquifer system is separated from the overlying Pennsylvanian formations by the Pennington Shale. The Highland Rim aquifer system is an important source of drinking water. It supplies most of the rural, domestic, and many public supplies of drinking water in the Highland Rim. Where there is a dynamic flow system, dissolved solids concentrations are less than 500 mg/L. However, isolated cells may exist where the groundwater has dissolved solids concentrations of more than 1 ,000 mg/L. (USGS)

  1. 75 FR 27008 - TENNESSEE Disaster Number TN-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... Only for the State of TENNESSEE (FEMA-1909-DR), dated 05/04/2010 . Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of TENNESSEE, dated 05/04/2010,...

  2. 75 FR 27009 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... Only for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-1909-DR), dated 05/04/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Tennessee, dated 05/04/2010,...

  3. 75 FR 27010 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... Only for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-1909-DR), dated 05/04/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Tennessee, dated 05/04/2010,...

  4. Karst subsidence in East Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelle, R.H.; Newton, J.G.; Tanner, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Waste disposal site selection and facility design in regions dominated by carbonate bedrock must carefully consider karst development and the factors which contribute to subsidence activity. The Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory has completed a three phase study of karst subsidence in East Tennessee to quantify historical subsidence activity. The purpose of the study was to determine the principal factors which cause karst subsidence in the region. Techniques used and results obtained in this study form a basis for more detailed risk assessment at the local scale within the region. As development pressures diminish available land for various uses, risk-based land use decisions must be made to site critical facilities. To fulfill the study objectives a three phase study was designed including, (1) collection of subsidence data and compilation of a database, (2) performance of detailed studies of subsidence in three, two-to-five square-mile areas, and (3) synthesis of data obtained to; quantify the predominant sinkhole collapse dimensions, and identify events prior to subsidence or collapse events which may have caused the event, and estimate the intensity of subsidence as a function of geologic unit within subregional areas of higher and lower subsidence risk. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Appendix A -- Waste sites, source terms, and waste inventory report; Appendix B -- Description of the field activities and report database; Appendix C -- Characterization of hydrogeologic setting report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix A includes descriptions of waste areas and estimates of the current compositions of the wastes. Appendix B contains an extensive database of environmental data for the Bear Creek Valley Characterization Area. Information is also presented about the number and location of samples collected, the analytes examined, and the extent of data validation. Appendix C describes the hydrogeologic conceptual model for Bear Creek Valley. This model is one of the principal components of the conceptual site models for contaminant transport in BCV.

  6. 76 FR 18747 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application Take notice that on March 9, 2011, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), filed an application in Docket No. CP11-133... transportation services provided to shippers on the interstate pipeline systems owned by National Fuel Gas...

  7. 76 FR 19338 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application Take notice that on March 18, 2011, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed an application in Docket No. CP11-142-000 pursuant to section 7(b) of the Natural Gas Act...

  8. 75 FR 74705 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application November 24, 2010. Take notice that on November 12, 2010, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana... the Natural Gas Act for a certificate of public convenience and necessity to construct, and...

  9. 76 FR 22093 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application On March 31, 2011, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) an application under section 7(c) of the Natural Gas...

  10. 75 FR 18190 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application April 2, 2010. Take notice that on March 30, 2010, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston... Gas Act (NGA) and Part 157 of the Commission's regulations, requesting authorization to abandon...

  11. 75 FR 80483 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application December 15, 2010. Take notice that on December 13, 2010, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana... Natural Gas Act (NGA) and the Commission's regulations, an application for authority to convey...

  12. 75 FR 82378 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application December 22, 2010. Take notice that on December 15, 2010, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana... the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and the Commission Regulations, for authorization to abandon by sale...

  13. 75 FR 74027 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application November 23, 2010. Take notice that on November 17, 2010, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana...) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) for authorization to construct a new 2,000 horsepower compressor...

  14. 75 FR 53281 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application August 24, 2010. On August 12, 2010, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee) filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) an application under section 7(b) of the Natural Gas Act and section 157 of...

  15. 75 FR 38801 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application June 24, 2010. Take notice that on June 11, 2010, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston... Gas Act (NGA) and Part 157 of the Commission's regulations, requesting authorization to abandon...

  16. Broadband Access for Students at East Tennessee State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Thomas Scott

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the availability of Internet access for students attending East Tennessee State University during the fall semester 2013. It has been unknown to what degree broadband access is available in the East Tennessee State University service area that includes counties in East Tennessee, Southwest Virginia, and…

  17. 78 FR 9803 - Tennessee Abandoned Mine Land Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    .... See 47 FR 34753. Withdrawal of Tennessee's Regulatory Program: As a result of Tennessee's failure to.... See 49 FR 15496. On May 16, 1984, the State repealed most of the Tennessee Coal Surface Mining Law of... program in full, effective October 1, 1984. See 49 FR 38874. Abandoned Mine Lands Program (Title...

  18. Surficial Geologic Map of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park Region, Tennessee and North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southworth, Scott; Schultz, Art; Denenny, Danielle; Triplett, James

    2004-01-01

    The Surficial Geology of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park Region, Tennessee and North Carolina was mapped from 1993 to 2003 under a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Park Service (NPS). This 1:100,000-scale digital geologic map was compiled from 2002 to 2003 from unpublished field investigations maps at 1:24,000-scale. The preliminary surficial geologic data and map support cooperative investigations with NPS, the U.S. Natural Resource Conservation Service, and the All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory (http://www.dlia.org/) (Southworth, 2001). Although the focus of our work was within the Park, the geology of the surrounding area is provided for regional context. Surficial deposits document the most recent part of the geologic history of this part of the western Blue Ridge and eastern Tennessee Valley of the Valley and Ridge of the Southern Appalachians. Additionally, there is great variety of surficial materials, which directly affect the different types of soil and associated flora and fauna. The surficial deposits accumulated over tens of millions of years under varied climatic conditions during the Cenozoic era and resulted from a composite of geologic processes.

  19. Water use, availability, and net demand in the Tennessee River watershed within Alabama, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, Amy C.; Harper, Michael J.; Littlepage, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Survey of Alabama. Net water demand for the watershed was calculated by subtracting the Tennessee Valley Authority estimates of return flow from water withdrawals. The net water demand was 136 Mgal/d, which is less than 1 percent of the estimated water available.

  20. Floods of February 1989 in Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones, Ferdinand; Gamble, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    Rainfall amounts of over 5 inches the night of February 13 and the morning of February 14, 1989, caused flooding in areas of Middle and West Tennessee. The towns of Lebanon in Middle Tennessee and Obion in West Tennessee were most severely affected. Most of the business district in Lebanon and many residential areas in Obion were flooded. Recurrence intervals for 24-hour rainfall totals were as high as 25 years at some sites but most peak discharges had recurrence intervals of less than 10 years. Rainfall amounts for the period February 13-20, 1989, peak stages and discharges for this flood, the peak of record, and a list of discharge measurements made during the flood are documented. (USGS)

  1. Patterns of Cave Biodiversity and Endemism in the Appalachians and Interior Plateau of Tennessee, USA

    PubMed Central

    Niemiller, Matthew L.; Zigler, Kirk S.

    2013-01-01

    Using species distribution data, we developed a georeferenced database of troglobionts (cave-obligate species) in Tennessee to examine spatial patterns of species richness and endemism, including >2000 records for 200 described species. Forty aquatic troglobionts (stygobionts) and 160 terrestrial troglobionts are known from caves in Tennessee, the latter having the greatest diversity of any state in the United States. Endemism was high, with 25% of terrestrial troglobionts (40 species) and 20% of stygobionts (eight species) known from just a single cave and nearly two-thirds of all troglobionts (130 species) known from five or fewer caves. Species richness and endemism were greatest in the Interior Plateau (IP) and Southwestern Appalachians (SWA) ecoregions, which were twice as diverse as the Ridge and Valley (RV). Troglobiont species assemblages were most similar between the IP and SWA, which shared 59 species, whereas the RV cave fauna was largely distinct. We identified a hotspot of cave biodiversity with a center along the escarpment of the Cumberland Plateau in south-central Tennessee defined by both species richness and endemism that is contiguous with a previously defined hotspot in northeastern Alabama. Nearly half (91 species) of Tennessee’s troglobiont diversity occurs in this region where several cave systems contain ten or more troglobionts, including one with 23 species. In addition, we identified distinct troglobiont communities across the state. These communities corresponded to hydrological boundaries and likely reflect past or current connectivity between subterranean habitats within and barriers between hydrological basins. Although diverse, Tennessee’s subterranean fauna remains poorly studied and many additional species await discovery and description. We identified several undersampled regions and outlined conservation and management priorities to improve our knowledge and aid in protection of the subterranean biodiversity in Tennessee

  2. Food habits of bobcats in eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Story, J.D.; Galbraith, W.J.; Kitchings, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    Food habits of bobcats (Lynx rufus) in eastern Tennessee were determined from analyzing 176 cat samples collected on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park. Remains of cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) were the most frequently occurring food item. White-tail deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and pine vole (Microtus pinetorum) remains also were found frequently in samples. Data obtained from this study indicated that food preferences for bobcats in eastern Tennessee are similar to those in other southeastern states where the habitat is similar to the Oak Ridge area and somewhat different from those with significantly different habitat.

  3. Ecological risk assessment for residual coal fly ash at Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee: Site setting and problem formulation.

    PubMed

    Walls, Suzanne J; Jones, Daniel S; Stojak, Amber R; Carriker, Neil E

    2015-01-01

    A baseline ecological risk assessment (BERA) was performed for residual ash in the Watts Bar Reservoir following a release of fly ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant. The site consists of parts of 3 rivers in eastern Tennessee comprising over 32 river kilometers. The purpose of the assessment was to determine if residual ash negatively impacts maintenance and reproduction of balanced communities or populations of potentially exposed ecological receptor groups in these rivers. This introductory article summarizes the site and environmental setting, assessment and measurement endpoints, risk characterization methods, and the study approach. Subsequent articles describe ecological risks to fish, benthic invertebrates, aquatic- and riparian-feeding wildlife, and aerial-feeding insectivores; and the role ecological risk characterization played in determining the most effective management of the residual ash, setting project remediation objectives and targets, and designing long-term monitoring to measure the effectiveness of the selected removal action. PMID:25234753

  4. 78 FR 48762 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00076

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster TN-00076 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Application Deadline Date: 05/02/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small...

  5. 76 FR 19515 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00050

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... State of Tennessee (FEMA- 1965-DR), dated 04/01/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Flooding. Incident Period: 02/28/2011 through 03/01/2011. Effective Date: 04/01/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 05/31/2011. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date: 01/03/2012....

  6. Brain Dominance Patterns of Tennessee School Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Cynthia J.

    This exploratory study investigated the leadership styles of selected administrators in Tennessee's public schools. Styles of leadership were viewed against a backdrop of current brain research, and the subjects' underlying patterns of cognitive processing were identified by means of a self-report measurement of brain dominance--the Herrmann Brain…

  7. International Trade: Tennessee's Window on the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Miriam; And Others

    The activities and discussion questions in this unit can be used in secondary social studies classes to teach students about world trade and its role in their personal lives. Although designed for Tennessee classrooms, the unit can be easily adapted for use elsewhere. Many of the activities are self-contained. However, some require the use of…

  8. Teenage Drinking in Rural Middle Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mookherjee, Harsha N.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the extent to which alcoholic beverages are consumed by high school teenagers (N=622) in rural communities of middle Tennessee. Results showed that about 63 percent of the subjects do drink alcoholic beverages, and that most of the drinking is done in the company of friends. (LLL)

  9. 77 FR 51100 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00068

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster TN-00068 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Application Deadline Date: 05/16/2013. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small...

  10. Career Ladder Instrumentation: The Tennessee Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLarty, Joyce R.

    The evaluation instruments used in the Tennessee Career Ladder program are described, and their evolution over the first three years of program implementation is traced. The instruments are designed to measure teacher performance and to determine outstanding teachers. They include: the Career Ladder Test of Professional Skills (a multiple-choice…

  11. Creating Opportunities: Tennessee's Southeast Regional Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    2002-01-01

    Rural Marion County (Tennessee), the town of Kimball, the Appalachian Regional Commission, and a local community college founded a regional skills center. The center offers a 2-year associate of science degree and classes in GED preparation, parenting, drug abuse prevention, cosmetology, and air conditioning and refrigeration. It has expanded…

  12. 76 FR 45309 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00058

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster TN-00058 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street,...

  13. Florida and Tennessee: Accountability in Civic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delander, Brady

    2014-01-01

    While most states require testing in social studies or civic education, two states attach consequences for students and schools based on required statewide civics exams. Lawmakers in Florida, in 2010, and in Tennessee, in 2012, approved legislation that holds students accountable for their civics knowledge. Students are taking the tests for the…

  14. Evaluation of the Tennessee Child Restraint Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Allan F.

    This paper reports on a study of the effects of a Tennessee law aimed at increasing the protection of children in cars. The law, which came into force January 1, 1978, requires parents to use child restraints properly when transporting their children who are less than 4 years old. Alternatively, the law permits children to be held in arms, a…

  15. Effective Teacher Retention Bonuses: Evidence From Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Matthew G.; Swain, Walker A.; Rodriguez, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    We report findings from a quasi-experimental evaluation of the recently implemented US$5,000 retention bonus program for effective teachers in Tennessee's Priority Schools. We estimate the impact of the program on teacher retention using a fuzzy regression discontinuity design by exploiting a discontinuity in the probability of treatment…

  16. Education and Manpower in Tennessee Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, James E.

    All of the libraries in Tennessee were surveyed in an effort to determine both the manpower needs and the classification of all library personnel on the basis of the newly-adopted categories in the American Library Association (ALA) policy on library education and manpower. The purpose of the study was to reveal information pertinent to library…

  17. Process Control Research, Training Center for Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Tennessee have established a measurement and controls research center and a master's-level academic engineering program. A description of this university/industry cooperative research center is provided. Indicates that a doctoral program is planned when the master's program is well…

  18. Tennessee Killing Underscores Job Dangers for Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonn, Jessica L.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author stresses the dangers facing school leaders on the job. The school shooting at Campbell County Comprehensive High School in Jacksboro, Tennessee, on November 8, 2005, which left one assistant principal dead and the principal and another assistant principal seriously wounded, is an extreme example of dangers school…

  19. Geology in Tennessee Colleges 1826 - 1850.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corgan, James X.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the establishment of geology in the curricula of Tennessee colleges during the years from 1826 to 1850. The growth of a museum, the growth of learned societies, and the appearance of college courses in geology seem to be closely related. (Author/WB)

  20. Shoals and valley plugs in the Hatchie River watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diehl, Timothy H.

    2000-01-01

    Agricultural land use and gully erosion have historically contributed more sediment to the streams of the Hatchie River watershed than those streams can carry. In 1970, the main sedimentation problem in the watershed occurred in the tributary flood plains. This problem motivated channelization projects (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1970). By the mid-1980's, concern had shifted to sedimentation in the Hatchie River itself where channelized tributaries were understood to contribute much of the sediment. The Soil Conservation Service [Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) since 1996] estimated that 640,000 tons of bedload (sand) accumulates in the Hatchie River each year and identified roughly the eastern two-thirds of the watershed, where loess is thin or absent, as the main source of sand (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1986a). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the West Tennessee River Basin Authority (WTRBA), conducted a study of sediment accumulation in the Hatchie River and its tributaries. This report identifies the types of tributaries and evaluates sediment, shoal formation, and valley-plug problems. The results presented here may contribute to a better understanding of similar problems in West Tennessee and the rest of the southeastern coastal plain. This information also will help the WTRBA manage sedimentation and erosion problems in the Hatchie River watershed.The source of the Mississippi section of the Hatchie River is in the sand hills southwest of Corinth, Mississippi (fig. 1). This section of the Hatchie River flows northward in an artificial drainage canal, gathering water from tributary streams that also are channelized. The drainage canal ends 2 miles south of the Tennessee State line. The Tennessee section of the Hatchie River winds north and west in a meandering natural channel to the Mississippi River. Although most of the Hatchie River tributaries are also drainage canals, the river's main stem has kept most of

  1. Long Valley Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Hill, David

    2008-01-01

    The ~300-year-old lava on Paoha Island in Mono Lake was produced by the most recent eruption in the Long Valley Caldera area in east-central California. The Long Valley Caldera was formed by a massive volcanic eruption 760,000 years ago. The region is monitored by the Long Valley Observatory (LVO), one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about the Long Valley Caldera region and LVO at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/lvo.

  2. Down in the Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Linda Graef

    1999-01-01

    Describes the partnerships formed by West Valley Mission Community College District (California) with its surrounding Silicon Valley business community in an effort to benefit workforce development. Asserts that community colleges are uniquely positioned to provide a lifelong education that will yield a skilled workforce to meet the needs of…

  3. Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus or arbovirus that is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa. In the last decade, Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have resulted in loss of human and animal life, as well as had significant economic impact. The disease in livestock is primarily a...

  4. California: San Joaquin Valley

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Fog and Haze in California's San Joaquin Valley   ... is noted for its hazy overcasts and a low, thick ground fog known as the Tule. Owing to the effects of the atmosphere on reflected ... as the angle of view changes. An area of thick, white fog in the San Joaquin Valley is visible in all three of the images. However, ...

  5. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K.

    2011-08-01

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  6. Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 1 (S-3 Ponds, Boneyard/Burnyard, Oil Landfarm, Sanitary Landfill 1, and the Burial Grounds, including Oil Retention Ponds 1 and 2) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1, Main text

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The intent and scope of the work plan are to assemble all data necessary to facilitate selection of remediation alternatives for the sites in Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 1 (BCV OU 1) such that the risk to human health and the environment is reduced to acceptable levels based on agreements with regulators. The ultimate goal is to develop a final Record Of Decision (ROD) for all of the OUs in BCV, including the integrator OU. However, the initial aim of the source OUs is to develop a ROD for interim measures. For source OUs such as BCV OU 1, data acquisition will not be carried out in a single event, but will be carried out in three stages that accommodate the schedule for developing a ROD for interim measures and the final site-wide ROD. The three stages are as follows: Stage 1, Assemble sufficient data to support decisions such as the need for removal actions, whether to continue with the remedial investigation (RI) process, or whether no further action is required. If the decision is made to continue the RI/FS process, then: Stage 2, Assemble sufficient data to allow for a ROD for interim measures that reduce risks to the human health and the environment. Stage 3, Provide input from the source OU that allows a final ROD to be issued for all OUs in the BCV hydrologic regime. One goal of the RI work plan will be to ensure that sampling operations required for the initial stage are not repeated at later stages. The overall goals of this RI are to define the nature and extent of contamination so that the impact of leachate, surface water runoff, and sediment from the OU I sites on the integrator OU can be evaluated, the risk to human health and the environment can be defined, and the general physical characteristics of the subsurface can be determined such that remedial alternatives can be screened.

  7. Tennessee advanced practice nurse compensation survey results 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, representatives from Middle Tennessee Advanced Practice Nurses (MTAPN), Greater Memphis Area Advanced Practice Nurses (GMAAPN), and Northeast Tennessee Nurse Practitioners Association (NETNPA) decided to poll APNs in Tennessee to compare data with the most recent results from the Advance for Nurse Practitioners national NP survey. Every other year, Advance for Nurse Practitioners publishes salary survey results from their survey. Most recently, in January 2006, an average nationwide salary for all APNs was reported at $74,812, with Tennessee's average at $71,068.

  8. Recharge rates and aquifer hydraulic characteristics for selected drainage basins in middle and east Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoos, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative information concerning aquifer hydrologic and hydraulic characteristics is needed to manage the development of ground-water resources. These characteristics are poorly defined for the bedrock aquifers in Middle and East Tennessee where demand for water is increasing. This report presents estimates of recharge rate, storage coefficient, diffusivity, and transmissivity for representative drainage basins in Middle and East Tennessee, as determined from analyses of stream-aquifer interactions. The drainage basins have been grouped according to the underlying major aquifer, then statistical descriptions applied to each group, in order to define area1 distribution of these characteristics. Aquifer recharge rates are estimated for representative low, average, and high flow years for 63 drainage basins using hydrograph analysis techniques. Net annual recharge during average flow years for all basins ranges from 4.1 to 16.8 in/yr (inches per year), with a mean value of 7.3 in. In general, recharge rates are highest for basins underlain by the Blue Ridge aquifer (mean value11.7 in/yr) and lowest for basins underlain by the Central Basin aquifer (mean value 5.6 in/yr). Mean recharge values for the Cumberland Plateau, Highland Rim, and Valley and Ridge aquifers are 6.5, 7.4, and 6.6 in/yr, respectively. Gravity drainage characterizes ground-water flow in most surficial bedrock aquifer in Tennessee. Accordingly, a gravity yield analysis, which compares concurrent water-level and streamflow hydrographs, was used to estimate aquifer storage coefficient for nine study basins. The basin estimates range from 0.002 to 0.140; however, most estimates are within a narrow range of values, from 0.01 to 0.025. Accordingly, storage coefficient is estimated to be 0.01 for all aquifers in Middle and East Tennessee, with the exception of the aquifer in the inner part of the Central Basin, for which storage coefficient is estimated to be 0.002. Estimates of aquifer hydraulic

  9. Faulting along the southern margin of Reelfoot Lake, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Arsdale, R.; Purser, J.; Stephenson, W.; Odum, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Reelfoot Lake basin, Tennessee, is structurally complex and of great interest seismologically because it is located at the junction of two seismicity trends of the New Madrid seismic zone. To better understand the structure at this location, a 7.5-km-long seismic reflection profile was acquired on roads along the southern margin of Reelfoot Lake. The seismic line reveals a westerly dipping basin bounded on the west by the Reelfoot reverse fault zone, the Ridgely right-lateral transpressive fault zone on the east, and the Cottonwood Grove right-lateral strike-slip fault in the middle of the basin. The displacement history of the Reelfoot fault zone appears to be the same as the Ridgely fault zone, thus suggesting that movement on these fault zones has been synchronous, perhaps since the Cretaceous. Since the Reelfoot and Ridgely fault systems are believed responsible for two of the mainshocks of 1811-1812, the fault history revealed in the Reelfoot Lake profile suggests that multiple mainshocks may be typical of the New Madrid seismic zone. The Ridgely fault zone consists of two northeast-striking faults that lie at the base of and within the Mississippi Valley bluff line. This fault zone has 15 m of post-Eocene, up-to-the-east displacement and appears to locally control the eastern limit of Mississippi River migration. The Cottonwood Grove fault zone passes through the center of the seismic line and has approximately 5 m up-to-the-east displacement. Correlation of the Cottonwood Grove fault with a possible fault scarp on the floor of Reelfoot Lake and the New Markham fault north of the lake suggests the Cottonwood Grove fault may change to a northerly strike at Reelfoot Lake, thereby linking the northeast-trending zones of seismicity in the New Madrid seismic zone.

  10. The upper crust of the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone: Insights from potential fields inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandmayr, Enrico; Vlahovic, Gordana

    2016-08-01

    The study investigates the crustal structure of the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) by means of potential field inversion through the located Euler deconvolution method. Inversion of magnetic field data shows that the top of the magnetic basement ranges between 6 and 12 km depth in the Valley and Ridge physiographic province while it is shallower (< 2 km depth) and locally outcropping in the Blue Ridge and Cumberland Plateau provinces. The estimated depth to the top of the magnetic basement is in general agreement with existing sedimentary cover maps of the broad study area. The inversion of gravity data is much more ambiguous, pointing to a generally deeper source, than magnetic data inversion. The findings support the interpretation of ETSZ seismicity as originating in basement structures not related to Appalachian orogeny and likely dating to Grenville age.

  11. Pre-Alleghenian (Pennsylvanian-Permian) hydrocarbon emplacement along Ordovician Knox unconformity, eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, F.M.; Kesler, S.E.

    1989-03-01

    Cores taken during exploration for Mississippi Valley-type lead and zinc ores in the Mascot-Jefferson City zinc district of eastern Tennessee commonly contain hydrocarbon residues in carbonate rocks of the Knox Group immediately below the Lower Ordovician Knox unconformity. The location and number of these residue-bearing strata reveal information about the Paleozoic history of hydrocarbon emplacement in the region. Contour maps, generated from nearly 800 holes covering more than 20 km/sup 2/, indicate that zones with elevated organic content in the uppermost 30 m of the Lower Ordovician Mascot Dolomite show a strong spatial correlation with Middle Ordovician paleotopographic highs. These same zones show no spatial association with present-day structural highs, which were formed during Pennsylvanian-Permian Alleghenian tectonism. This suggests that the physical entrapment of hydrocarbons migrating through the upper permeable units of the Mascot must have occurred prior to the principal tectonism of the Alleghenian orogeny. 7 figures, 1 table.

  12. Environmental impacts of the coal ash spill in Kingston, Tennessee: an 18-month survey.

    PubMed

    Ruhl, Laura; Vengosh, Avner; Dwyer, Gary S; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Deonarine, Amrika

    2010-12-15

    An 18 month investigation of the environmental impacts of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) coal ash spill in Kingston, Tennessee combined with leaching experiments on the spilled TVA coal ash have revealed that leachable coal ash contaminants (LCACs), particularly arsenic, selenium, boron, strontium, and barium, have different effects on the quality of impacted environments. While LCACs levels in the downstream river water are relatively low and below the EPA drinking water and ecological thresholds, elevated levels were found in surface water with restricted water exchange and in pore water extracted from the river sediments downstream from the spill. The high concentration of arsenic (up to 2000 μg/L) is associated with some degree of anoxic conditions and predominance of the reduced arsenic species (arsenite) in the pore waters. Laboratory leaching simulations show that the pH and ash/water ratio control the LCACs' abundance and geochemical composition of the impacted water. These results have important implications for the prediction of the fate and migration of LCACs in the environment, particularly for the storage of coal combustion residues (CCRs) in holding ponds and landfills, and any potential CCRs effluents leakage into lakes, rivers, and other aquatic systems.

  13. Results of fish tissue screening studies from sites in the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers in 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Dycus, D.L.

    1990-07-01

    TVA analyzes tissues of Tennessee Valley area fish as part of intensive evaluations and as pat of screening level evaluations. Intensive studies are conducted in reservoirs where contamination problems are known or suspected and include analysis of individual fillets from important fish species from several areas in the reservoir. This information is used by State public health officials to determine whether fish consumption advisories are necessary to protect human health. Screening studies are based on analysis of composite rather than individual samples and are intended to provide trend information and to identify areas where problems may exist indicating need for an intensive evaluation. All studies are coordinated with State agencies because they ultimately must make management decisions regarding public health. TVA has two fish tissue screening programs. One examines fish on an annual basis at inflow points from eight of the major tributaries into the Tennessee River reservoir system. The other examines fish from within the reservoirs on a rotating basis with the goal of sampling each reservoir at least once every three years. 7 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  14. Preliminary evaluation of the basal sandstone in Tennessee for receiving injected wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulderink, Dolores; Bradley, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    The EPA is authorized, under the Safe Drinking Water Act, to administer the Underground Injection Control program. This program allows for the regulation of deep-well disposal of wastes and establishes criteria to protect underground sources of drinking water from contamination. The basal sandstone in Tennessee occurs west of the Valley and Ridge province at depths of 5,000 to 9,000 ft below land surface. The basal sandstone consists of about 30 to 750 ft of Cambrian sandstone overlying the crystalline basement complex. The basal sandstone is overlain and confined by shale and carbonate rocks of the Middle and Upper Cambrian Conasauga Group. Hydrologic data for the basal sandstone, available from only three sites (four wells) in Tennessee, indicate that the basal sandstone generally has low porosity and permeability with a few zones having enough permeability to accept injected fluids. Limited water quality data indicate the basal sandstone contains water with dissolved solids concentrations exceeding 10,000 mg/L. Since the dissolved-solids concentrations exceed 10,000 mg/L, the basal sandstone is not classified as an underground source of drinking water according to EPA regulations. (Author 's abstract)

  15. Rift Valley Fever (RVF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Outbreak resources, VHF information for specific groups, virus ecology, references... RVF Distribution Map Rift Valley Fever Transmission ... Outbreaks Outbreak Summaries RVF Distribution Map Resources Virus Ecology File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  16. Ariel's transecting valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This highest-resolution Voyager 2 view of Ariel's terminator shows a complex array of transecting valleys with super-imposed impact craters. Voyager obtained this clear-filter, narrow-angle view from a distance of 130,000 kilometers (80,000 miles) and with a resolution of about 2.4 km (1.5 mi). Particularly striking to Voyager scientists is the fact that the faults that bound the linear valleys are not visible where they transect one another across the valleys. Apparently these valleys were filled with deposits sometime after they were formed by tectonic processes, leaving them flat and smooth. Sinuous rilles (trenches) later formed, probably by some flow process. Some type of fluid flow may well have been involved in their evolution. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  17. California: Diamond Valley

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... County is billed as the largest earthworks construction project in U.S. history. Construction began in 1995 and involved 31 million ... water storage capacity. In addition to routine water management, Diamond Valley Lake is designed to provide protection against ...

  18. Lily of the valley

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the valley poisoning occurs when someone eats parts of this plant. This article is for information only. DO NOT ... information: Person's age, weight, and condition Name and part of the plant swallowed, if known Time it was swallowed Amount ...

  19. NV PFA - Steptoe Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Faulds

    2015-10-29

    All datasets and products specific to the Steptoe Valley model area. Includes a packed ArcMap project (.mpk), individually zipped shapefiles, and a file geodatabase for the northern Steptoe Valley area; a GeoSoft Oasis montaj project containing GM-SYS 2D gravity profiles along the trace of our seismic reflection lines; a 3D model in EarthVision; spreadsheet of links to published maps; and spreadsheets of well data.

  20. Aerial view of the entire bridge crossing the Tennessee River ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view of the entire bridge crossing the Tennessee River looking up river. The swing bridge, when open, permits river navigational traffic to ply the river. Construction of a replacement bridge, to be located 93.27 feet down river, has now started. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  1. 77 FR 40265 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Tennessee River, Decatur, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Tennessee River, Decatur, AL AGENCY... across the Tennessee River, mile 304.4, at Decatur, AL. The deviation is necessary to install new rail... A. Washburn, Bridge Administrator, Western Rivers, Coast Guard; telephone 314-269-2378, email...

  2. 76 FR 33805 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... Assistance Only for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-1974-DR), dated 05/01/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Associated Flooding. Incident Period: 04/25/2011 through 04/28/2011... major disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Tennessee, dated...

  3. 76 FR 33806 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00051

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... Tennessee (FEMA-1974-DR), dated 05/01/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and... Tennessee, dated 05/01/2011 is hereby amended to include the following areas as adversely affected by the... Loan Application Deadline Date: 06/30/2011. EIDL Loan Application Deadline Date: 02/01/2012....

  4. 76 FR 35261 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... Only for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-1974-DR), dated 05/01/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Associated Flooding. Incident Period: 04/25/2011 through 04/28/2011. Effective... major disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Tennessee, dated...

  5. 76 FR 27739 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00051

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... Tennessee (FEMA-1974-DR), dated 05/01/ 2011. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and associated flooding. Incident Period: 04/25/2011 through 04/28/2011. Effective Date: 05/04/2011. Physical... State of Tennessee, dated 05/01/2011 is hereby amended to include the following areas as...

  6. 76 FR 33395 - Tennessee; Disaster Number TN-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Assistance Only for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-1974-DR), dated 05/01/2011. Incident: Severe Storms.... Effective Date: 05/27/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 06/30/2011. Economic Injury (Eidl) Loan... major disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Tennessee, dated...

  7. KIDS COUNT, 2002: The State of the Child in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Pam; Chappell, Edwina; Delk, Fay L.; Jones, Ben; Petty, Steve; Tomlin, D'Andrea; Wynn, Debbie

    This KIDS COUNT report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Tennessee's children. The statistical portrait is based on 34 indicators of children's well-being in 5 broad areas: (1) infant, child, and teen health, including enrollment in the TennCare (replacement for Tennessee's Medicaid Program) insurance program, prenatal, low…

  8. 77 FR 5740 - Tennessee Abandoned Mine Land Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    .... See 49 FR 15496. On May 16, 1984, the State repealed most of the Tennessee Coal Surface Mining Law of... program in full, effective October 1, 1984. See 49 FR 38874. Abandoned Mine Lands Program (Title IV..., 1982. See 47 FR 34753. Withdrawal of Tennessee's Regulatory Program: Because of the State's failure...

  9. The CREATE Network (Computer Resource Educational Access in Tennessee Education).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Fletcher F.

    The CREATE Network (Computer Resource Educational Access in Tennessee Education) brought together library professionals from Tennessee's seven historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) for purposes of training and implementation of library applications of computer-based information technology. Annual training seminars were held at…

  10. The PATS Project: A State of Tennessee School Reform Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, E. Dean; And Others

    The first-year results of a Tennessee college-school partnership program to implement a data-based school improvement change model--the Positive Attitudes in Tennessee Schools Project (PATS)--are summarized in this report. Two major goals of the first year (1989-90) included assessing and improving school climate and enhancing student and teacher…

  11. Does "God Hate Hair?": A Study of Censorship in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, L. B.

    A study was conducted to investigate censorship attempts in Tennessee during the period 1966-1975 by consulting issues of the "Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom" published by the American Library Association's Office of Intellectual Freedom. Tennessee's rate of censorship was found to be exactly the same as the national average. A total of 45…

  12. 76 FR 32369 - Tennessee; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Tennessee; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of the Presidential declaration of an emergency for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-3321-EM), dated May 4, 2011, and...

  13. Tennessee Higher Education Fact Book, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Division of Policy, Planning, and Research has assembled the Tennessee Higher Education Fact Book which is a compilation of statistical information pertaining to higher education in Tennessee. The 2009-2010 Fact Book contains tables and charts with data relevant to enrollment, persistence, graduation, tuition, financial aid, lottery…

  14. KIDS COUNT, 2001: State of the Child in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Pam; Delk, Fay L.; Henderson, Crystal; Huddleston, Jennifer; Petty, Steve; Wynn, Debbie; Young, Carmen

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Tennessee's children. The statistical portrait is based on 34 indicators of children's well-being in 5 broad areas: (1) infant, child, and teen health, including enrollment in the TennCare (replacement for Tennessee's Medicaid Program) insurance program, prenatal, low…

  15. Teacher Evaluation and Classroom Practice: Teacher Perceptions in Northeast Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogart, Christopher Dean

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate the perceptions of K-12 teachers as they relate to the implementation of the Tennessee Educator Acceleration (TEAM) evaluation framework. Survey links were sent to 1,115 K-12 teachers from 4 Northeast Tennessee school districts. The survey achieved a 24% return rate for a total of 270…

  16. 30 CFR 942.700 - Tennessee Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....700 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.700 Tennessee Federal program. (a) This part contains all rules that are applicable to surface coal mining operations...

  17. 30 CFR 942.700 - Tennessee Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....700 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.700 Tennessee Federal program. (a) This part contains all rules that are applicable to surface coal mining operations...

  18. Initial Teacher Licensure Testing in Tennessee: Legislative Requirements and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, John R.; Bowman, Harry L.

    The licensure of public school personnel in Tennessee is a function of the State Department of Education (SDE). Additional requirements for this certification function were added by the Comprehensive Education Reform Act (Senate Bill Number 1) of the 1984 Tennessee General Assembly. The Act mandated that the SDE use tests to assess the competence…

  19. Evaluation of East Tennessee's Child Health and Development Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banta, Trudy W.; And Others

    The Child Health and Development Project (CHDP), a home-based early intervention program operated in six East Tennessee counties, provides well-child clinics, developmental evaluation, individualized early childhood education for disadvantaged children, and training in parenting skills for their parents. The University of Tennessee's Bureau of…

  20. Tennessee KIDS COUNT: The State of the Child in Tennessee, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Commission on Children and Youth, Nashville.

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Tennessee's children. The statistical portrait is based on indicators of children's well-being in four main areas: (1) child health; (2) education; (3) social indicators; and (4) economic status. The report begins with an executive summary and a lengthy listing of the major…

  1. The Teen Report: A Factual Assessment of Today's Tennessee Teens. A Tennessee KIDS COUNT Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Commission on Children and Youth, Nashville.

    This Kids Count report focuses on the well being of Tennessee's teenagers. The statistical portrait is based on 10 indicators of well being: (1) teen pregnancy; (2) drug abuse; (3) HIV infection; (4) sexually transmitted diseases; (5) high school dropout; (6) scores on the American College Testing Program (ACT); (7) teen employment; (8) school…

  2. Grizzly Valley fault system, Sierra Valley, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Ryan; Stephenson, William; Odum, Jack; Briggs, Rich; Crone, Anthony; Angster, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The Grizzly Valley fault system (GVFS) strikes northwestward across Sierra Valley, California and is part of a network of active, dextral strike-slip faults in the northern Walker Lane (Figure 1). To investigate Quaternary motion across the GVFS, we analyzed high-resolution (0.25 m) airborne LiDAR data (Figure 2) in combination with six, high-resolution, P-wave, seismic-reflection profiles [Gold and others, 2012]. The 0.5- to 2.0-km-long seismic-reflection profiles were sited orthogonal to suspected tectonic lineaments identified from previous mapping and our analysis of airborne LiDAR data. To image the upper 400–700 m of subsurface stratigraphy of Sierra Valley (Figure 3), we used a 230-kg accelerated weight drop source. Geophone spacing ranged from 2 to 5 m and shots were co-located with the geophones. The profiles reveal a highly reflective, deformed basal marker that we interpret to be the top of Tertiary volcanic rocks, overlain by a 120- to 300-m-thick suite of subhorizontal reflectors we interpret as Plio-Pleistocene lacustrine deposits. Three profiles image the principle active trace of the GVFS, which is a steeply dipping fault zone that offsets the volcanic rocks and the basin fill (Figures 4 & 5).

  3. General surgery at rural Tennessee hospitals: a survey of rural Tennessee hospital administrators.

    PubMed

    Cofer, Joseph B; Petros, Tommy J; Burkholder, Hans C; Clarke, P Chris

    2011-07-01

    Rural communities face an impending surgical workforce crisis. The purpose of this study is to describe perceptions of rural Tennessee hospital administrators regarding the importance of surgical services to their hospitals. In collaboration with the Tennessee Hospital Association, we developed and administered a 13-item survey based on a recently published national survey to 80 rural Tennessee hospitals in August 2008. A total of 29 responses were received for an overall 36.3 per cent response rate. Over 44 per cent of rural surgeons were older than 50 years of age, and 27.6 per cent of hospitals reported they would lose at least one surgeon in the next 2 years. The responding hospitals reported losing 10.4 per cent of their surgical workforce in the preceding 2 years. Over 53 per cent were actively recruiting a general surgeon with an average time to recruit a surgeon of 11.8 months. Ninety-seven per cent stated that having a surgical program was very important to their financial viability with the mean and median reported revenue generated by a single general surgeon being $1.8 million and $1.4 million, respectively. Almost 11 per cent of the hospitals stated they would have to close if they lost surgical services. Although rural Tennessee hospitals face similar difficulties to national rural hospitals with regard to retaining and hiring surgeons, slightly more Tennessee hospitals (54 vs 36%) were actively attempting to recruit a general surgeon. The shortage of general surgeons is a threat to the accessibility of comprehensive hospital-based care for rural Tennesseans. PMID:21944341

  4. General surgery at rural Tennessee hospitals: a survey of rural Tennessee hospital administrators.

    PubMed

    Cofer, Joseph B; Petros, Tommy J; Burkholder, Hans C; Clarke, P Chris

    2011-07-01

    Rural communities face an impending surgical workforce crisis. The purpose of this study is to describe perceptions of rural Tennessee hospital administrators regarding the importance of surgical services to their hospitals. In collaboration with the Tennessee Hospital Association, we developed and administered a 13-item survey based on a recently published national survey to 80 rural Tennessee hospitals in August 2008. A total of 29 responses were received for an overall 36.3 per cent response rate. Over 44 per cent of rural surgeons were older than 50 years of age, and 27.6 per cent of hospitals reported they would lose at least one surgeon in the next 2 years. The responding hospitals reported losing 10.4 per cent of their surgical workforce in the preceding 2 years. Over 53 per cent were actively recruiting a general surgeon with an average time to recruit a surgeon of 11.8 months. Ninety-seven per cent stated that having a surgical program was very important to their financial viability with the mean and median reported revenue generated by a single general surgeon being $1.8 million and $1.4 million, respectively. Almost 11 per cent of the hospitals stated they would have to close if they lost surgical services. Although rural Tennessee hospitals face similar difficulties to national rural hospitals with regard to retaining and hiring surgeons, slightly more Tennessee hospitals (54 vs 36%) were actively attempting to recruit a general surgeon. The shortage of general surgeons is a threat to the accessibility of comprehensive hospital-based care for rural Tennesseans.

  5. Impact of the Complete College Tennessee Act's Retention and Graduation Benchmarks on Budget Appropriations at Tennessee State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Sedric D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the Tennessee State University (TSU) fall 2005 Freshmen Cohort (N = 1205) based on the variables of race, gender, persistence, retention and graduation, as well as to examine the impact of the newly implemented Complete College Tennessee Act's (CCTA) funding formula component on the university's budget…

  6. Outcomes of Persons with Disabilities Who Receive Vocational Training at Tennessee Rehabilitation Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perdue, James M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the perception of Tennessee Rehabilitation Center (TRC) students' education. TRC is a vocational rehabilitation training school in Middle Tennessee for individuals with disabilities throughout the state of Tennessee that are seeking employment after graduating from their training. In Tennessee,…

  7. 77 FR 23472 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application Take notice that on April 4, 2012, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street... application may be directed to Thomas G. Joyce, Manager, Certificates, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company,...

  8. 77 FR 43277 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application Take notice that on July 6, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston..., Manager, Certificates, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas...

  9. 77 FR 8247 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. Notice of Application Take notice that on February 2, 2012, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street..., Manager, Certificates, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C., 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas...

  10. Regionalization of winter low-flow characteristics of Tennessee streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bingham, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Procedures were developed for estimating winter (December-April) low flows at ungaged stream sites in Tennessee based on surface geology and drainage area size. One set of equations applies to West Tennessee streams, and another set applies to Middle and East Tennessee streams. The equations do not apply to streams where flow is significantly altered by the activities of man. Standard errors of estimate of equations for West Tennessee are 22% - 35% and for middle and East Tennessee 31% - 36%. Statistical analyses indicate that summer low-flow characteristics are the same as annual low-flow characteristics, and that winter low flows are larger than annual low flows. Streamflow-recession indexes, in days per log cycle of decrease in discharge, were used to account for effects of geology on low flow of streams. The indexes in Tennessee range from 32 days/log cycle for clay and shale to 350 days/log cycle for gravel and sand, indicating different aquifer characteristics of the geologic units that contribute to streamflows during periods of no surface runoff. Streamflow-recession rate depends primarily on transmissivity and storage characteristics of the aquifers, and the average distance from stream channels to basin divides. Geology and drainage basin size are the most significant variables affecting low flow in Tennessee streams according to regression analyses. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Regional differences in mercury levels in aquatic ecosystems: A discussion of possible causal factors with implications for the Tennessee river system and the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joslin, J. Devereux

    1994-07-01

    Concern about mercury pollution from atmospheric deposition has risen markedly in the last decade because of high levels of mercury in freshwater fish from relatively pristine waters. Whereas high concentrations have been found principally in Canada, the northern United States, and Scandinavia, they have also recently been observed throughout much of Florida. Recent surveys of the Tennessee River system, however, have found no locations where fish levels exceed EPA guidelines for fish consumption. This paper evaluates a number of factors that may cause certain regions in the northern hemisphere to experience unacceptable fish mercury levels while other regions do not. Relevant regional differences include: (1) Waters of the Tennessee River system are generally nonacidic (pH>6) and well buffered, whereas 16%, 22%, and 40% of the lakes in upper Midwest, Northeast, and Florida, respectively, have acid-neutralizing capacities below 50 µeq/liter. Acidity correlates highly with fish mercury levels in a number of lake surveys, and experimental manipulations of acidity have significantly raised fish mercury levels. (2) The ratio of land area to water surface area in the Tennessee Valley averages about 30, whereas it is 15 in the upper Midwest and 6 in Florida. Low ratios allow mercury in precipitation to be directly deposited to aquatic bodies, without an opportunity for the mercury to be sequestered by terrestrial ecosystems. (3) Stream organic matter concentrations in Florida, the upper Midwest, and Sweden are 2 10 times those in the Tennessee Valley. Mercury binds strongly to organic matter, and organic matter transport in runoff is a major pathway by which mercury enters aquatic ecosystems.

  12. Fretted Terrain Valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    30 October 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows shallow tributary valleys in the Ismenius Lacus fretted terrain region of northern Arabia Terra. These valleys exhibit a variety of typical fretted terrain valley wall and floor textures, including a lineated, pitted material somewhat reminiscent of the surface of a brain. Origins for these features are still being debated within the Mars science community; there are no clear analogs to these landforms on Earth. This image is located near 39.9oN, 332.1oW. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  13. Origin and interpretation of knickpoints in the Big South Fork River basin, Kentucky-Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jonathan D.; McCormack, Sarah; Duan, Jidan; Russo, Joseph P.; Schumacher, Anne M.; Tripathi, Ganesh N.; Brockman, Ruth B.; Mays, Adam B.; Pulugurtha, Sruti

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the causes of knickpoints and knickzones in the bedrock-controlled streams of the Big South Fork River basin in Kentucky and Tennessee. Knickpoints in the Big South Fork River area vary in form and apparent origins. While some are likely related to base level change and incision in the Cumberland River drainage system, the locations and drainage relations of the knickpoints are not consistent with transmission of an incision signal throughout the network. Local controls predominate in forming steeper channel segments, with no single factor dominant. Knickpoints in the study area are characterized by polygenesis and multiple causality, though several archetypes can be identified. These include rock fall rapids, created by mass wasting from adjacent valley slopes; structurally controlled headwater cliffs; and lithological knickpoints. A fourth category, local incision knickpoints, may be attributable to a variety of factors influencing force:resistance relationships. These results imply that the simple presence of a knickpoint cannot be attributed to any particular cause or history without consideration of the local controls. This further implies that factors such as the spacing of knickpoints may not be an indication of migration rates or that migration has even occurred. However, the analysis of individual profile convexities can shed light on various controls (such as lithology and structure) and other processes (such as valley side mass wasting and local bed incision) important in evolution of fluvially dissected landscapes.

  14. Structural and stratigraphic controls on cave development in the Oak Ridge area, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, P A; Lemiszki, P J

    1992-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) is located in the northwestern part of the Valley and Ridge province in east Tennessee. The Valley and Ridge province is the topographic expression of the southern Appalachian foreland fold-thrust belt, which formed during the late Paleozoic Alleghanian orogeny. In the Oak Ridge area, three major northwest verging thrust faults (Kingston, Whiteoak Mountain, and Copper Creek) imbricate and juxtapose carbonate and clastic stratigraphic units that range in age from the lower Cambrian to the lower Mississippian. The carbonate stratigraphic units range in thickness from 1278 to 1748 m and include the Maynardville Limestone in the Conasauga Group (hereby included as part of the Knox Group), the Knox Group, and the Chickamauga Group. Stratigraphic relationships and repetition of units by thrust faulting has produced three northeast striking and southeast dipping carbonate bands bounded to the northwest and southeast by noncarbonate units. Preliminary results indicate that within two of these carbonate bands, formations composed of mudstone and argillaceous limestone appear to further subdivide groundwater basins. Our efforts have focused on relating the stratigraphic and structural characteristics of these rock units with cave development in the region.

  15. Treatment for Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Institutes of Health (NIH) is sponsoring a randomized controlled trial to learn more about the best ... recently called attention to Valley fever and this randomized controlled trial . How is Valley fever treated? For ...

  16. Rippled Valley Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    15 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a ripple-covered valley floor in the Hyblaeus Fossae region. Winds blowing up and down the length of the valley have helped to concentrate windblown grains to form these large, megaripples.

    Location near: 26.3oN, 225.1oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  17. Fiscal Year 1998 Well Installation, Plugging and Abandonment, and Redevelopment summary report Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This report summarizes the well installation, plugging and abandonment, and redevelopment activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1998 at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Five new groundwater monitoring wells were installed at the Y-12 Plant under the FY 1998 drilling program. Two of the wells are located in west Bear Creek Valley, one is in the eastern Y-12 Plant area near Lake Reality, and two are located near the Oil Landfarm Waste Management Area, which were installed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (Bechtel Jacobs) as part of a site characterization activity for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Disposal Cell. Also, two existing wells were upgraded and nine temporary piezometers were installed to characterize hydrogeologic conditions at the Disposal Cell site. In addition, 40 temporary piezometers were installed in the Boneyard/Bumyard area of Bear Creek Valley by Bechtel Jacobs as part of the accelerated remedial actions conducted by the Environmental Restoration Program. Ten monitoring wells at the Y-12 Plant were decommissioned in FY 1998. Two existing monitoring wells were redeveloped during FY 1998 (of these, GW-732 was redeveloped tsvice). All well installation and development (including redevelopment) was conducted following industry-standard methods and approved procedures from the Environmental Surveillance Procedures Quality Control Program (Energy Systems 1988); the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Groundwater Monitoring Technical Enforcement Guidance Document (EPA 1992); and the Monitoring Well Installation Plan for the Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Energy Systems 1997a). Well installation and development of the non-Y-12 Plant GWPP oversight installation projects were conducted using procedures/guidance defined in the following documents: Work Plan for Support to Upper East Fork Poplar Creek East End Volatile Organic Compound Plumes Well Installation Project, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge

  18. Superfund GIS - 1:250,000 Geology of Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, D.C.; Wolfe, W.J.

    2000-01-01

    This data set is a digital representation of the printed 1:250,000 geologic maps from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Division of Geology. The coverage was designed primarily to provide a more detailed geologic base than the 1:2,500,000 King and Beikman (1974). 1:24,000 scale coverage of the state is available for about 40 percent of the state. Formation names and geologic unit codes used in the coverage are from the Tennessee Division of Geology published maps and may not conform to USGS nomenclature. The Tennessee Division of Geology can be contacted at (615) 532-1500

  19. Session: Long Valley Exploratory Well

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Finger, John T.; Eichelberger, John C.; Hickox, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Long Valley Exploratory Well - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations'' by John T. Finger; ''Geologic results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well'' by John C. Eichelberger; and ''A Model for Large-Scale Thermal Convection in the Long Valley Geothermal Region'' by Charles E. Hickox.

  20. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 95-0192-2538, Schlegel Tennessee, Inc., Maryville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Reh, B.D.

    1995-11-01

    In response to a request from the safety engineer at Schlegel Tennessee, Inc., Maryville, Tennessee, an investigation was conducted of possible hazardous working conditions at this company. The company produced automotive rubber vehicle sealing. Concern was expressed because workers in the extrusion department had been experiencing symptoms of shortness of breath, dizziness, light headedness, disorientation, headaches, and nausea. In January of 1995 a new coating application was added on one line. Air sampling for nitrosamines and volatile organic compounds was performed in the extrusion department and a symptoms survey questionnaire distributed among the workers there. The sampling revealed very low concentrations of nitrosodimethylamine. The questionnaire data did not reaveal any significant relationships between symptoms and extrusion lines. The author concludes that no identifiable exposure problem or complaint area in the facility was found.

  1. Floating in hydrocarbons: Water-based recreation and the future of Tennessee`s waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Kocak, J.M.; Sirk, R.A.

    1996-10-01

    Careful environmental monitoring and preservation practices, when applied to surface water systems, provide necessary maintenance for aquatic ecosystem and human-needs satisfaction. For much of the state of Tennessee, recent history has seen a significant increase in the standard of living. Here, as elsewhere, increase in standard of living has often translated into increased leisure time and disposable income. Tennessee offers a wealth of recreational waters, and an increase in the number and duration of recreational boating experiences serves as a visible reminder of this affluence. With increasing access comes the potential for explosive growth in hydrocarbon-based air and water pollution. Given the increased emphasis in pollution control under Clean Air and Clean Water acts legislation, petroleum-based water recreation should be an issue for coordinated examination. Paradoxically, pollution from water-based recreation has remained almost wholly unregulated.

  2. Smart Valley Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maule, R. William

    1994-01-01

    Discusses prototype information infrastructure projects in northern California's Silicon Valley. The strategies of the public and private telecommunications carriers vying for backbone services and industries developing end-user infrastructure technologies via office networks, set-top box networks, Internet multimedia, and "smart homes" are…

  3. Echoes of Spring Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyken, J. Clarine J.

    Designed to preserve the rich heritage of the rural school system which passed from the education scene in the 1930's and 1940's, this narrative, part history and part nostalgia, describes the author's own elementary education and the secure community life centered in the one room Spring Valley School in Hamilton County, Iowa, in the early decades…

  4. Paradise Valley Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Paradise Valley Community College (PVCC), located in Phoenix, Arizona, is part of the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD). PVCC was founded in 1987 and in the fall of 2007 served 8,739 students in credit courses. Since 1997, PVCC has been on a quest to become a "more learning centered" college. As a result of placing student…

  5. Rift Valley Fever Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a disease of animals and humans that occurs in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. A Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae causes the disease that is transmitted by mosquitoes. Epidemics occur during years of unusually heavy rainfall that assessment models are being develo...

  6. 76 FR 33805 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00055

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ..., Straight-line, Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/19/2011 and continuing. Effective Date: 06/01/2011... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Tennessee, dated 05/09/2011,...

  7. 76 FR 48939 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00058

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... Only for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-4005-DR), dated 07/20/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Straight-line Winds, Tornadoes, and Flooding. Incident Period: 06/18/2011 through 06/24/2011. Effective Date:...

  8. 75 FR 35103 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00039 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 7... declaration remains unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James...

  9. 75 FR 35103 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00038 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 8... Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for...

  10. 75 FR 27008 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00039 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... declaration remains unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James...

  11. 75 FR 27009 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00039 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for Disaster Assistance....

  12. Backfill hydrologic characteristics in a Tennessee area surface coal mine

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, C.G.

    1996-12-31

    The hydrological characteristics of backfill in a Tennessee area surface coal mine provide useful information concerning the aqueous environment in a recovering water table within a reclaimed surface mine. Chemical analysis of water samples provide a measure of reclamation activities.

  13. Getting Started in TQM-A Tennessee Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Career Planning and Employment, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Describes experiences of University of Tennessee as attempts were made to spread total quality management (TQM) concepts more effectively across the campus. Describes what TQM is, background and initiation of project, and results of project implementation. (NB)

  14. Bringing Silicon Valley inside.

    PubMed

    Hamel, G

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, Silicon Valley companies produced 41 IPOs, which by January 1999 had a combined market capitalization of $27 billion--that works out to $54,000 in new wealth creation per worker in a single year. Multiply the number of employees in your company by $54,000. Did your business create that much new wealth last year? Half that amount? It's not a group of geniuses generating such riches. It's a business model. In Silicon Valley, ideas, capital, and talent circulate freely, gathering into whatever combinations are most likely to generate innovation and wealth. Unlike most traditional companies, which spend their energy in resource allocation--a system designed to avoid failure--the Valley operates through resource attraction--a system that nurtures innovation. In a traditional company, people with innovative ideas must go hat in hand to the guardians of the old ideas for funding and for staff. But in Silicon Valley, a slew of venture capitalists vie to attract the best new ideas, infusing relatively small amounts of capital into a portfolio of ventures. And talent is free to go to the companies offering the most exhilarating work and the greatest potential rewards. It should actually be easier for large, traditional companies to set up similar markets for capital, ideas, and talent internally. After all, big companies often already have extensive capital, marketing, and distribution resources, and a first crack at the talent in their own ranks. And some of them are doing it. The choice is yours--you can do your best to make sure you never put a dollar of capital at risk, or you can tap into the kind of wealth that's being created every day in Silicon Valley.

  15. Socioeconomic Disparities and Influenza Hospitalizations, Tennessee, USA.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Chantel; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Mitchel, Edward; Schaffner, William; Lindegren, Mary Lou

    2015-09-01

    We examined population-based surveillance data from the Tennessee Emerging Infections Program to determine whether neighborhood socioeconomic status was associated with influenza hospitalization rates. Hospitalization data collected during October 2007-April 2014 were geocoded (N = 1,743) and linked to neighborhood socioeconomic data. We calculated age-standardized annual incidence rates, relative index of inequality, and concentration curves for socioeconomic variables. Influenza hospitalizations increased with increased percentages of persons who lived in poverty, had female-headed households, lived in crowded households, and lived in population-dense areas. Influenza hospitalizations decreased with increased percentages of persons who were college educated, were employed, and had health insurance. Higher incidence of influenza hospitalization was also associated with lower neighborhood socioeconomic status when data were stratified by race. PMID:26292106

  16. Integrated solid waste management of Sevierville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Sevierville, Tennessee integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM systems.

  17. Indoor air quality study of forty east Tennessee homes

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Hingerty, B.E.; Schuresko, D.D.; Parzyck, D.C.; Womack, D.R.; Morris, S.A.; Westley, R.R.; White, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    Over a one-year period, measurements of indoor air pollutants (CO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, formaldehyde, volatile organics, particulates, and radon) were made in 40 homes in East Tennessee. The houses were of various ages with different types of insulation and heating. Over one-half of the houses exceeded the ASHRAE indoor ceiling guideline of 0.1 ppM for formaldehyde on at least one occasion. Over the duration of the study, older houses averaged 0.04 ppM of formaldehyde while houses less than 5 years old averaged 0.08 ppM (P < 0.01). The highest concentration of formaldehyde measured was 0.4 ppM in a new home. Diurnal and seasonal fluctuations in levels of formaldehyde in some homes were as much as twofold and tenfold, respectively. The highest levels of formaldehyde were usually recorded during summer months. The concentration in indoor air of various organics was at least tenfold higher than in outdoor air. Carbon monoxide and nitrgen oxides were usually <2 and <0.02 ppM, respectively, except when gas stoves or kerosene space heaters were operating, or when a car was running in the garage. In 30% of the houses, the annual indoor guideline for radon, 4 pCi/L, was exceeded. The mean radon level in houses built on the ridgelines was 4.4 pCi/L, while houses located in the valleys had a mean level of 1.7 pCi/L (P < 0.01). The factor having the most impact on infiltration was operation of the central duct fan of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system. The mean rate of air exchange increased from 0.39 to 0.74 h/sup -1/ when the duct fan was operated (measurements prior to December 1982). This report presents the study design and implementation, describes the monitoring protocols, and provides a complete set of the data collected during the project. 25 references, 29 figures, 42 tables.

  18. 76 FR 58050 - Tennessee Valley Authority, Bellefonte Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 1; Environmental Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ..., nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, lead, and particulate matter). On November 30, 1993 (58 FR 63214... rule, and effective July 6, 2010 (75 FR 17254). The latest rule, in part, adds and revises definitions... during the 1972, reconnaissance survey as surficial remains (lithic debris) dating to the Archaic...

  19. Tennessee Valley Total and Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Climatology Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechler, Dennis; Blakeslee, R. J.; Hall, J. M.; McCaul, E. W.

    2008-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) has been in operation since 2001 and consists often VHF receivers deployed across northern Alabama. The NALMA locates sources of impulsive VHF radio signals from total lightning by accurately measuring the time that the signals arrive at the different receiving stations. The sources detected are then clustered into flashes by applying spatially and temporally constraints. This study examines the total lightning climatology of the region derived from NALMA and compares it to the cloud-to-ground (CG) climatology derived from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) The presentation compares the total and CG lightning trends for monthly, daily, and hourly periods.

  20. 78 FR 52571 - Tennessee Valley Authority, Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, Unit 1; Applications and Amendments to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Information Exchange System, users will be required to install a Web browser plug-in from the NRC's Web site. Further information on the Web-based submission form, including the installation of the Web browser plug... Web site: Go to http://www.regulations.gov and search for Docket ID NRC-2013-0198. Address...

  1. 75 FR 3946 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Bellefonte Efficiency and Sustainability Team, and the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy in response to a Federal Register Notice published on March 13, 2009 (74 FR 10,969) stating that any person adversely... delegation by the Commission dated December 29, 1972, published in the Federal Register, 37 FR 28,710...

  2. 75 FR 13609 - Tennessee Valley Authority Sequoyah Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... provide, among other things, that the facility is subject to all rules, regulations, and orders of the U.S... those previously imposed by Commission orders issued after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001... requested an exemption in accordance with 10 CFR 73.5, ``Specific exemptions.'' Portions of the...

  3. 76 FR 62457 - Tennessee Valley Authority (Bellefonte Nuclear Plant, Unit 1)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ..., published in the Federal Register on October 14, 1987 (52 FR 38077), are at the applicant's site in Jackson... (ADAMS Accession No. ML102440618), TVA informed the NRC that it was ] funding for initial engineering..., Jackson County, Alabama,'' as published in the Federal Register on August 30, 2011 (76 FR 53994). TVA...

  4. 78 FR 33117 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 1; Applications and Amendments to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... reasons why intervention should be permitted with particular reference to the following general... entities participating under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR... determines that the reason for granting the exemption from use of E-Filing no longer exists....

  5. 78 FR 62709 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... construction (FES-CP) of WBN, Units 1 and 2, issued on November 9, 1972 (ADAMS Accession No. ML073470580... on TVA's FES-CP as part of its review. In December 1978, the NRC staff issued NUREG-0498, ``Final.... ML082540803) for the operating-license stage (FES-OL), which addressed environmental impacts of...

  6. 77 FR 40384 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Notice of Withdrawal of Application for Amendment to Facility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ... Consideration of Issuance of Amendment published in the Federal Register on November 15, 2011 (76 FR 70775... Management System (ADAMS) in the NRC Library at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/adams.html . Persons who do not have access to ADAMS or who encounter problems in accessing the documents located in ADAMS...

  7. 78 FR 76328 - Application for Renewal of Special Nuclear Material License SNM-2014 From Tennessee Valley...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... Federal Register on June 14, 2013 (78 FR 35989). The NRC has not yet issued the Operating License for WBN2... Register on August 15, 2007 (72 FR 45859), and TVA submitted its 2007, Final Supplemental EIS to the NRC on... for WBN2 (ML100120487). On June 13, 2011, (76 FR 34273) the NRC published an EA and FONSI for...

  8. 75 FR 13327 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, Units 1, 2, and 3; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... update aging equipment and incorporate state-of-the-art technology to meet or exceed regulatory... requirements. This change was incorporated into the final rule (74 FR 13926, March 27, 2009). From this, it is... have a significant effect on the quality of the human environment (75 FR 5354, dated February 2,...

  9. 75 FR 12314 - Tennessee Valley Authority: Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... update aging equipment and incorporate state-of-the-art technology to meet or exceed regulatory... change was incorporated into the final rule (74 FR 13926, March 27, 2009). From this, it is clear that... have a significant effect on the quality of the human environment (75 FR 3945, dated January 25,...

  10. 75 FR 39285 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Notice of Receipt of Updated Antitrust Information and Opportunity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... either the Web-based search (advanced search) engine or the ADAMS find tool in Citrix. Within 30 days... FR 20350). The OL application is currently pending review before the NRC. At the time the NRC issued... with the review of the application for a construction permit for Watts Bar, Unit 2 (37 FR 27646)....

  11. Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1992: Bacteriological conditions in the Tennessee Valley. Fourth annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Fehring, J.P.

    1993-05-01

    Twenty-eight designated swimming beaches, four informal swimming areas, two canoe launching or landing sites, and two additional sites on a canoeing stream were sampled at least ten times each during 30-day sampling periods in the summer of 1992. One designated swimming beach, one informal swimming area, and two canoe launching or landing sites exceeded the recommended criterion of geometric mean concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria of 200/100 mL. In addition to these four sites, five designated swimming beaches and one informal swimming area exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommended criterion by having more than 10 percent of the fecal coliform samples with concentrations greater than 400/100 mL. Rainfall was an important factor for these six sites and the four sites that did not meet the geometric mean criterion. Some sampling sites are affected by rainfall more than others. When bacteria concentrations increase after rainfall, it indicates that site is vulnerable to contamination from nonpoint sources of pollution. Recreational use of these sites following rainfall is discouraged. If samples collected within 24 hours of rainfall (one-half inch or more) are excluded, all-but one of the ten sites have better bacteriological water quality, and two meet both the geometric mean and maximum concentration criteria. Five canoe access locations on the Bear Creek floatway, plus one site upstream and another downstream of the floatway were sampled eight times each during 1992. All seven sites met recreation criteria.

  12. Hydrology of the Melton Valley radioactive-waste burial grounds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, D.A.; Bradley, M.W.

    1988-12-31

    Burial grounds 4, 5, and 6 were used sequentially from 1951 to the present for the disposal of solid, low-level radioactive waste by burial in shallow trenches and auger holes. Abundant rainfall, a generally thin unsaturated zone, geologic media of inherently low permeability, and the operational practices employed have contributed to partial saturation of the buried waste, leaching of radionuclides, and transport of dissolved matter from the burial areas. Two primary methods of transport from these sites are by dissolution in circulating ground water, and the overflow of fluids in trenches and subsequent flow across land surface. The waste-disposal areas are underlain by the Conasauga Group (Cambrian age), a complex sequence of mudstone, siltstone, and limestone interbeds grading from one lithotype to the other, both laterally and vertically. Compressional forces that caused regional thrust faulting also caused much internal deformation of the beds. Folds, bedding-plane faults, and joints are widespread. Small solution openings have developed in some areas where the structurally-related openings have provided ingress to ground water.

  13. 78 FR 79506 - Tennessee Valley Authority: Exemption From Requirements To Revise Combined License Application To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... revise their COL application to comply with the EP rules published in the Federal Register (76 FR 72560... revise their combined license (COL) application in order to address enhancements to the Emergency Preparedness (EP) rules at the same time as requesting the NRC to resume the review of their COL...

  14. 78 FR 79503 - Tennessee Valley Authority, Combined License Application for Bellefonte Units 3 and 4 Exemption...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... (COL) application until further notice. On October 28, 2013, TVA requested an exemption from certain...) until requesting the NRC to resume its review of their COL application. The NRC staff reviewed this... report must be submitted prior to requesting the NRC resume its review of the COL application or...

  15. 78 FR 35989 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... published in the Federal Register on May 1, 2009 (74 FR 20350). A notice of intent to prepare a supplement... scoping process was published in the Federal Register on September 11, 2009 (74 FR 46799). On October 6...). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Notice of Filing in the Federal Register (76 FR...

  16. Status report on the Tennessee Valley Authority Cumberlandian Mollusc Conservation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkinson, J.J.

    1983-10-01

    The Cumberlandian Mollusc Conservation Program (CMCP) is still in existence and is beginning to accomplish its purposes. Many of the research phase activities are nearing completion, and the conservation phase activities are taking shape. Current mussel populations have been assessed, some fish hosts have been identified, and an artificial culture medium has been (re)discovered. The large and varied data sets that have been collected have been used to select transplant sites for Conradilla caelata, are in the process of being used to characterize and enhance mussel habitats, and are available for other ecological analyses. Much of this information is being assembled in reports which, in the near future, will be available to interested malacologists and many others. This program has been successful so far because it has been a rare blending of competent people, good ideas, adequate funding, and luck. Let's hope the components stay together until the job is completed.

  17. 75 FR 3762 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Sequoyah Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... actions required by the revised 10 CFR part 73, does not involve any physical changes to the reactor, fuel... revisions to 10 CFR part 73 (74 FR 13967). There will be no change to radioactive effluents that affect..., ``Physical protection of plants and materials,'' for Facility Operating License Nos. DPR-77 and...

  18. ERTS-1 imagery interpretation techniques in the Tennessee Valley. [land use and soil mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The feasibility of delineating major soil associations and land uses through computerized analyses is discussed. Useful and potential applications in detecting landscape change and land use mapping are described. Recommendations for improving the data processing effort in a multidisciplinary program are presented.

  19. 78 FR 12365 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Notice of Receipt and Availability of Application for Renewal of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ...), expires on September 15, 2021. Both units are pressurized-water reactors designed by Westinghouse, and are... http://www.nrc.gov/reactors/operating/licensing/renewal/applications.html . Persons who do not have... Regulatory Commission. John W. Lubinski, Director, Division of License Renewal, Office of Nuclear...

  20. 78 FR 14362 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Notice of Acceptance for Docketing of Application and Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ...) was published in the Federal Register on February 22, 2013 (78 FR 12365). The Commission's staff has... issuance of the requested renewed licenses, the NRC will have made the findings required by the Atomic... during the period of extended operation on the functionality of structures and components that have...

  1. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR ZONE 1 OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK IN OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    King, David A.

    2012-08-16

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted in-process inspections and independent verification (IV) surveys in support of DOE's remedial efforts in Zone 1 of East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Inspections concluded that the remediation contractor's soil removal and survey objectives were satisfied and the dynamic verification strategy (DVS) was implemented as designed. Independent verification (IV) activities included gamma walkover surveys and soil sample collection/analysis over multiple exposure units (EUs).

  2. Towards guided data assimilation for operational hydrologic forecasting in the US Tennessee River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weerts, Albrecht; Wood, Andy; Carney, Shaun; Day, Jay; Lemans, Matthijs; Sumihar, Julius; Verkade, Jan; Newman, Andy

    2015-04-01

    In the US, the forecasting approach used by the NWS River Forecast Centers and other regional organizations such as the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) or Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has traditionally involved manual model input and state modifications made by forecasters in real-time. This process is time consuming and requires expert knowledge and experience. The benefits of automated data assimilation (DA) as a strategy for avoiding manual modification approaches have been demonstrated in research studies (eg. Seo et al., 2009). This study explores the usage of various ensemble DA algorithms within the operational platform used by TVA. The final goal is to identify a DA algorithm that will guide the manual modification process used by TVA forecasters and realize considerable time gains (without loss of quality or even enhance the quality) within the forecast process. We evaluate the usability of various popular algorithms for DA that have been applied on a limited basis for operational hydrology. To this end, Delft-FEWS was wrapped (via piwebservice) in OpenDA to enable execution of FEWS workflows (and the chained models within these workflows, including SACSMA, UNITHG and LAGK) in a DA framework. Within OpenDA, several filter methods are available. We considered 4 algorithms: particle filter (RRF), Ensemble Kalman Filter and Asynchronous Ensemble Kalman and Particle filter. The initial results are promising. We will present verification results for these methods (and possible more) for a variety of sub basins in the Tennessee River basin. Finally, we will offer recommendations for guided DA based on our results. References Seo, D.-J., L. Cajina, R. Corby and T. Howieson, 2009: Automatic State Updating for Operational Streamflow Forecasting via Variational Data Assimilation, 367, Journal of Hydrology, 255-275.

  3. Valley South of Cerberus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-413, 6 July 2003

    To date, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) narrow angle system has only imaged about 3% of the martian surface. Thus, a new discovery can come at any time, as additional places are covered every day. This MOC image shows a portion of a shallow valley south of Cerberus that was just discovered in April 2003. The valley may have been cut but torrents of mud-laden water; alternatively, an extremely fluid lava was involved. This picture was acquired in May 2003; it covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated from the left. North is toward the top/upper right. The picture is located near 4.6oN, 204.3oW.

  4. The Owens Valley LWA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallinan, Gregg

    2014-04-01

    The Owens Valley LWA is a new array of 256 dual polarization antennas at Caltech's Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO). It hosts the LEDA correlator, which provides full cross-correlation capability and enables instantaneous snapshot imaging of most of the viewable sky, as well as a dedicated back-end for transient searching. Developed in collaboration between Caltech, JPL and the LEDA and LWA consortia, the array targets the 28-88 MHz band with primary focus on high redshift HI (Dark Ages), radio transients (particularly radio exoplanets), solar dynamic imaging spectroscopy and measurement of coronal magnetic fields, and production of a full-Stokes, low frequency, all-sky catalog. The array comprises a 230m diameter dense core and outriggers at 365m capable of imaging with a resolution of 1 degree. Over the next 12 months, 32 additional antennas will be installed, powered by solar panels and serviced by optical fiber, with the goal of delivering instantaneous all-sky images with ~10' resolution. The associated data rate for the latter array will be extremely large, at 1.5 GB per integration, corresponding to 45,000 baselines x 4 polarizations x 2000 channels (60 MHz). Our collaboration is also working towards a much larger next generation array for study of HI and transients, sited at or near the Owens Valley observatory. I will briefly discuss some of the related ongoing technical development and data processing challenges.

  5. Fretted Terrain Valley Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    30 December 2003 This December 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows lineated textures on the floor of a valley in the Deuteronilus region of Mars. Deuteronilus, and neighboring Protonilus and Nilosyrtis, have been known since the Mariner 9 mission as regions of 'fretted terrain.' In this context, 'fretted' does not mean 'worried,' it means 'eroded.' The fretted terrains of Mars are regions along the boundary between cratered highlands and northern lowland plains that have been broken-down into mesas, buttes, and valleys. On the floors of some of these valleys occurs a distinctive lineated and pitted texture--like the example shown here. The cause of the textures is not known, although for decades some scientists have speculated that ice is involved. While this is possible, it is far from a demonstrated fact. This picture is located near 40.1oN, 335.1oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide; sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  6. 1996 structural integrity assessments for the Category C Liquid Low-Level Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This document provides a report of the efforts made to satisfy the Federal Facility Agreement for the structural integrity certification of ten Category C Liquid Low Level Waste (LLLW) tank systems on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Within this document, each Category C tank system is described including the associated pipeline segments evaluated as a part of those tank systems. A separate structural integrity assessment was conducted for each of the LLLW Tank Systems, four of which are located in Melton Valley, and six of which are located in Bethel Valley. The results of the structural integrity assessments are reported herein. The assessments are based on (1) a review of available tank design drawings, (2) a qualitative assessment of corrosion on the tank and pipelines, and primarily (3) leak testing program results.

  7. Evaluation of Invertebrate Bioaccumulation of Fly Ash Contaminants in the Emory, Clinch, and Tennessee Rivers, 2009 - 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, John G

    2012-05-01

    This report provides a summary of results from studies on invertebrate bioaccumulation of potential contaminants associated with a major fly ash spill into the Emory River following the failure of a dike at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant (KIF) in Kingston, Tennessee, in late December 2008. Data included in this report cover samples collected in calendar years 2009 and 2010. Samples collected from most sites in 2009 were processed by two different laboratories using different approved U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical methods: ALS Laboratory Group in Ft. Collins, CO, processed sampling using EPA method 6010 (but method 6020 for uranium and SW7470 for mercury), and PACE Analytical in Minneapolis, MN, used EPA method 6020. A preliminary evaluation of results from both laboratories indicated that some differences exited in measured concentrations of several elements, either because of specific differences of the two methods or inter-laboratory differences. While concentration differences between the laboratories were noted for many elements, spatial trends depicted from the results of both methods appeared to be similar. However, because samples collected in the future will be analyzed by Method 6020, only the results from PACE were included in this report to reduce data variation potentially associated with inter-laboratory and analytical method differences.

  8. Plasma engineering analysis of Tennessee Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, K.E.; Lacatski, J.T.; Miller, J.B.; Bryan, W.E.; King, P.W.; Santoro, R.T.; Shannon, T.E.; Uckan, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the plasma engineering and systems analysis studies for the Tennessee Tokamak (TENTOK) fusion power reactor. TENTOK is a 3000-MW(t) central station power plant that uses dueterium-tritium fuel in a D-shaped tokamak plasma configuration with a double-null poloidal divertor. Detailed analyses are performed in the areas of (1) transport simulation using the 1-1/2-D WHIST transport code, (2) equilibrium/poloidal field coil systems, (3) neutral beam and radiofrequency (rf) heating, and (4) pellet fueling. In addition, impurity control sytems, diagnostics and controls, and possible microwave plasma preheating and steady-state current drive options are also considered. Some of the major features of TENTOK include rf heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies, superconducting equilibrium field coils outside the superconducting toroidal field coils, a double-null poloidal divertor for impurity control and alpha ash removal, and rf-assisted plasma preheating and current startup.

  9. Estimated use of water in Tennessee, 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutson, Susan S.

    1994-01-01

    Water withdrawals in Tennessee in 1990 were estimated to average 9,210 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) for offstream uses--a 9-percent increase from the 1985 estimate. Average per capita water use for all offstream uses was 1,890 gallons per day. Public-supply with- drawals (712 Mgal/d) represented a 14-percent increase from 1985 withdrawals. Self-supplied withdrawals during 1990 changed since 1985 as follows: domestic (59 Mgal/d), 16-percent decrease; commercial (55 Mgal/d), 1,000-percent increase; industrial (882 Mgal/d), 590-percent increase; and thermoelectric (7,320 Mgal/d), 21-percent increase. Total surface-water with- drawals in 1990 averaged 8,760 Mgal/d, which represents a 9-percent increase since 1985. Total ground-water withdrawals averaged 451 Mgal/d, which represents a 2-percent increase since 1985. Ninety-seven percent of the water used (8,950 Mgal/d) was returned to streams.

  10. Geographic information system index for the State of Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, William R.; Norris, Pamela G.

    1989-01-01

    Recently the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) has increased within Tennessee. As a result, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Tennessee State Planning Office, and the Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury entered into an agreement to conduct a survey of GIS users within the State. Two hundred and sixty three agencies were contacted. One hundred and thirty-nine agencies maintained one or more computer system (including personal computers). Twenty-five agencies used GIS software. The number of coverages or layers that exist upon completion of the survey as computerized digital data for Tennessee was 4,741. One hundred and twenty location-specific data bases were available. The U.S. Geological Survey, National Mapping Division map accuracy standards and digital cartographic data standards were included as minimum guidelines for GIS users. General data sharing techniques were described. The most common one was the use of magnetic tapes. A GIS index data base containing the survey data was built for inquiries. A 7.5 minute quadrangle coverage of Tennessee was created to allow for identification on a quadrangle basis of existing coverages contained in the GIS data base. (USGS)

  11. Slope-area and stream length index analysis in the eastern Tennessee seismic zone: evidence for differential uplift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stearns, C.; Arroucau, P.; Vlahovic, G.

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that Digital Elevation Model (DEM) analysis could be used to quantify surface deformation in tectonically active regions, including slowly deforming areas such as intraplate continental interiors. Here, we investigate slope/area relationships and determine stream length index (SLI) spatial variations in 287 watersheds located in the Valley and Ridge physiographic province of the southern Appalachians, in a region known as the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ). The goal is to identify possible spatial variations in drainage network characteristics that could reveal different deformation rates and styles within the study area. The ETSZ, although seismically active, does not show any evidence of recent surface deformation that could be related to tectonic activity. The earthquakes mostly occur between 5 and 25 km depth and their epicenters form a SSW-NNE trending, 300 km long by 100 km wide, band of diffuse seismicity that aligns along the New York Alabama (NYAL) magnetic lineament, a linear magnetic feature attributed to a fault affecting the Precambrian basement but without signature at the surface. DEMs with a resolution of 30 meters and watershed boundaries of 287 drainage basins were obtained from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Elevation Dataset (NED) and National Hydrography Dataset (NHD), respectively. After determining the local slope and drainage area for each 30 m x 30 m cell, reference concavity and steepness index values were calculated for the entire region. Then, the steepness index of each watershed was determined using the obtained reference concavity index. SLI values were also determined along extracted river profiles and average values calculated for each watershed. A good correlation is observed between steepness index and SLI, with low to mid-range values found in the Valley and Ridge province and higher values in two specific areas: at the transition between the Valley and Ridge province and

  12. Health-hazard-evaluation report HETA 89-212-2020, Schlegel Tennessee, Inc. , Maryville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Kiken, S.; Newman, M.; Cox, C.

    1990-03-01

    In response to a request from the company, an investigation was made of possible hazardous conditions at the Schlegel Tennessee, Inc. (SIC-2822), Maryville, Tennessee. Concern had been expressed by union representatives about possible exposures to airborne nitrosamines, and the incidence of cancer in employees. The company produces rubber weather stripping for automobiles. Approximately 70 salaried and 200 production workers were employed by the company. Packers were experiencing dizziness, nausea, tingling lips, headaches, and depression. These problems had been attributed to odors in the workplace. Three employees had abnormal neurologic examinations and two other had reported abnormal urine iodine-azide tests. Current testing did not reveal any employees with 2-thiothiazolidine-4-carboxylic-acid (TTCA) in their urine, indicating that workers were not exposed to more than 0.5ppm carbon-disulfide (75150) (CS2). No personal breathing or area air sampling tests showed CS2 contamination above acceptable levels. No excess of reported cancers was noted following a standardized morbidity ratio analysis compared to the general population of the United States. Detectable levels of nitrosamines were not found. According to the authors, the etiology of medical problems experienced by workers could not be definitively determined. The authors recommend measures to lower potential hazardous exposures at the site.

  13. Transition Plan for the K-1203 Sewage Treatment Plant, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmeister J.

    2008-10-05

    The K-1203 Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) was previously used to treat and process all sanitary sewage waste from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The plant was shut down on May 29, 2008 as a result of the transition of sewage treatment for ETTP to the City of Oak Ridge. The City of Oak Ridge expanded the Rarity Ridge Sewage Treatment Plant (RRSTP) to include capacity to treat the waste from the ETTP and the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) constructed a new ETTP lift station and force main to RRSTP. In preparation for the shutdown of K-1203, the US Department of Energy (DOE) in conjunction with Operation Management International (OMI) developed a shut down plan to outline actions that need to occur prior to the transition of the facility to Bechtel Jacob Company, LLC (BJC) for decontamination and demolition (D and D). This plan outlines the actions, roles, and responsibilities for BJC in order to support the transition of the K-1203 STP from OMI to the BJC Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) and D and D programs. The D and D of the K-1203 Facilities is planned under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Remaining Facilities D and D Action Memorandum in the Balance of Site-Utilities D and D Subproject in fiscal year (FY) 2014.

  14. Juvenile Delinquency in Rural Areas. An Exploratory Study in East Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, William Dan

    Examining delinquency problems/services in rural Tennessee, existing secondary data on rural-urban delinquency patterns in the U.S. and Tennessee were compiled; officials and professionals (N=51) working with juveniles in East Tennessee were surveyed; and a preliminary estimation of costs associated with possibilities for improving juvenile…

  15. 30 CFR 942.25 - Approval of Tennessee abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of Tennessee abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. 942.25 Section 942.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE TENNESSEE § 942.25 Approval of Tennessee abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments....

  16. 30 CFR 942.25 - Approval of Tennessee abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of Tennessee abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. 942.25 Section 942.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE TENNESSEE § 942.25 Approval of Tennessee abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments....

  17. Creating Partnerships for a Better Tennessee. Master Plan, 2005-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Tennessee Higher Education Commission is statutorily charged to develop a statewide master plan for the future development of public higher education. In response to this, the Master Plan, "Creating Partnerships for a Better Tennessee," was developed for 2005-2010. The Master Plan is a collaborative effort with the Tennessee Board of Regents,…

  18. 76 FR 79673 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application On December 9, 2011, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) an application under section 7(c)...

  19. 77 FR 64972 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application Take notice that on October 10, 2012, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed in the above captioned docket an application pursuant to sections 7(b) and...

  20. 78 FR 6313 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application Take notice that on January 14, 2013, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street... Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, by telephone at (713)...

  1. 78 FR 53744 - East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on August 14, 2013, East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC (East Tennessee), 5400 Westheimer Court, Houston, Texas 77056-5310, filed an application pursuant to Section 7(b) and 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and...

  2. 75 FR 15426 - East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC; Notice of Application March 22, 2010. Take notice that on March 8, 2010, East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC (East Tennessee), 5400 Westheimer Court...) and 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) for authorization to: (i) Install an approximately 8.4-mile,...

  3. 77 FR 47619 - East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on July 20, 2012, East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC (East Tennessee), 5400 Westheimer Court, Houston, TX 77056-5310, filed in the above referenced docket an application pursuant to section 7(c) of the...

  4. Tennessee School Finance Equity as Determined by Locally Funded Teaching Positions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peevely, Gary L.; Ray, John R.

    The Tennessee School Finance Equity Study was begun in 1978 to review the equity and adequacy of Tennessee's Public School Finance Program. Changes in the structure of the Tennessee Foundation Program (TFP) did achieve greater equity in the amount of funds local districts obtained from the foundation program even though the residence of the…

  5. The California Valley grassland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, J.E.; Schoenherr, Allan A.

    1990-01-01

    Grasslands are distributed throughout California from Oregon to Baja California Norte and from the coast to the desert (Brown 1982) (Figure 1). This review will focus on the dominant formation in cismontane California, a community referred to as Valley Grassland (Munz 1959). Today, Valley Grassland is dominated by non-native annual grasses in genera such as Avena (wild oat), Bromus (brome grass), and Hordeum (barley), and is often referred to as the California annual grassland. On localized sites, native perennial bunchgrasses such as Stipa pultra (purple needle grass) may dominate and such sites are interpreted to be remnants of the pristine valley grassland. In northwestern California a floristically distinct formation of the Valley Grassland, known as Coast Prairie (Munz 1959) or Northern Coastal Grassland (Holland and Keil 1989) is recognized. The dominant grasses include many native perennial bunchgrasses in genera such as Agrostis, Calamagrostis, Danthonia, Deschampsia, Festuca, Koeleria and Poa (Heady et al. 1977). Non-native annuals do not dominate, but on some sites non-native perennials like Anthoxanthum odoratum may colonize the native grassland (Foin and Hektner 1986). Elevationally, California's grasslands extend from sea level to at leas 1500 m. The upper boundary is vague because montane grassland formations are commonly referred to as meadows; a community which Munz (1959) does not recognize. Holland and Keil (1989) describe the montane meadow as an azonal community; that is, a community restricted not so much to a particular climatic zone but rather controlled by substrate characteristics. They consider poor soil-drainage an over-riding factor in the development of montane meadows and, in contrast to grasslands, meadows often remain green through the summer drought. Floristically, meadows are composed of graminoids; Cyperaceae, Juncaceae, and rhizomatous grasses such as Agropyron (wheat grass). Some bunchgrasses, such as Muhlenbergia rigens, are

  6. Synthetic River Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2011-12-01

    The description of fluvial form has evolved from anecdotal descriptions to artistic renderings to 2D plots of cross section or longitudinal profiles and more recently 3D digital models. Synthetic river valleys, artificial 3D topographic models of river topography, have a plethora of potential applications in fluvial geomorphology, and the earth sciences in general, as well as in computer science and ecology. Synthetic river channels have existed implicitly since approximately the 1970s and can be simulated from a variety of approaches spanning the artistic and numerical. An objective method of synthesizing 3D stream topography based on reach scale attributes would be valuable for sizing 3D flumes in the physical and numerical realms, as initial input topography for morphodynamic models, stream restoration design, historical reconstruction, and mechanistic testing of interactions of channel geometric elements. Quite simply - simulation of synthetic channel geometry of prescribed conditions can allow systematic evaluation of the dominant relationships between river flow and geometry. A new model, the control curve method, is presented that uses hierarchically scaled parametric curves in over-lapping 2D planes to create synthetic river valleys. The approach is able to simulate 3D stream geometry from paired 2D descriptions and can allow experimental insight into form-process relationships in addition to visualizing past measurements of channel form that are limited to two dimension descriptions. Results are presented that illustrate the models ability to simulate fluvial topography representative of real world rivers as well as how channel geometric elements can be adjusted. The testing of synthetic river valleys would open up a wealth of knowledge as to why some 3D attributes of river channels are more prevalent than others as well as bridging the gap between the 2D descriptions that have dominated fluvial geomorphology the past century and modern, more complete, 3D

  7. Flow Along Valley Floors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 9 May 2003

    Lines indicative of flow in a valley floor (east to west) cut across similar lines in a slightly smaller valley (southeast to northwest), indicating both that material flowed along the valley floor (as opposed to across it) and that relative flow ages may be determined from crosscutting relationships.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 39.6, Longitude 31.1East (328.9). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Exploration and production results, Morgan County, eastern Tennessee: subsurface fracturing, oil production, and proposed extension of Clear Creek-Emory River fault

    SciTech Connect

    Egloff, J.

    1986-05-01

    West of the Ridge and Valley province of the southern Appalachians, in eastern Kentucky and Tennessee, the uplifted, less disturbed Paleozoic carbonates are capped by Pennsylvanian sandstones of the Cumberland Plateau. Great faults and escarpments outline overthrust allochthonous and reentrant autochthonous blocks, and the reentrant blocks presently produces oil and gas. Morgan County, Tennessee, an exploration frontier, occupies much of the reentrant block. The Appalachian orogene changes its trend near Morgan County and the adjoining Oak Ridge-Knoxville area, which is centered on the reentrant block. The Jacksboro fault, striking N30/sup 0/W on the south side of the Pine Mountain Overthrust block (northeast Tennessee and Kentucky), is the northern boundary of the autochthonous block and is the analog to the Emory River fault, striking N55/sup 0/W on the southern side of the same block. Where they erode a gorge in the fault trend, the Emory and Obed Rivers and the lower course of Clear Creek mark the distinctive northeastern limit of the Cumberland Overthrust. Early maps and the east-central geologic map of Tennessee indicate the trace of the Cumberland Overthrust extends from the Emory River (and Obed River) gorge generally marking the cross fault, to the Hatfield Mountain faults trending east-west along the outcrop of the thrust fault. Subsurface tests and varied results in oil and gas production indicate the Emory River fault extends northwest along Clear Creek, where its gorge extends approximately N45/sup 0/W, and fracturing trends northwest across the Clear Creek and Douglas Branch oil and gas fields. Another study proposed that Clear Creek follows part of the Cumberland Overthrust faulted boundary.

  9. Shallow ground-water quality adjacent to burley tobacco fields in northeastern Tennessee and southwestern Virginia, spring 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, G.C.; Connell, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    In 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey began an assessment of the upper Tennessee River Basin as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. A ground-water land-use study conducted in 1996 focused on areas with burley tobacco production in northeastern Tennessee and southwestern Virginia. Land-use studies are designed to focus on specific land uses and to examine natural and human factors that affect the quality of shallow ground water underlying specific types of land use. Thirty wells were drilled in shallow regolith adjacent to and downgradient of tobacco fields in the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province of the upper Tennessee River Basin. Ground-water samples were collected between June 4 and July 9, 1997, to coincide with the application of the majority of pesticides and fertilizers used in tobacco production. Ground-water samples were analyzed for nutrients, major ions, 79 pesticides, 7 pesticide degradation products, 86 volatile organic compounds, and dissolved organic carbon. Nutrient concentrations were lower than the levels found in similar NAWQA studies across the United States during 1993-95. Five of 30 upper Tennessee River Basin wells (16.7 percent) had nitrate levels exceeding 10 mg/L while 19 percent of agricultural land-use wells nationally and 7.9 percent in the Southeast had nitrate concentrations exceeding 10 mg/L. Median nutrient concentrations were equal to or less than national median concentrations. All pesticide concentrations in the basin were less than established drinking water standards, and pesticides were detected less frequently than average for other NAWQA study units. Atrazine was detected at 8 of 30 (27 percent) of the wells, and deethylatrazine (an atrazine degradation product) was found in 9 (30 percent) of the wells. Metalaxyl was found in 17 percent of the wells, and prometon, flumetralin, dimethomorph, 2,4,5-T, 2,4-D, dichlorprop, and silvex were detected once each (3 percent). Volatile organic compounds

  10. An overview of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Samuel R.

    1985-03-01

    When the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway of Mississippi and Alabama opened to commercial and recreational traffic on January 16, 1985—some 21 months ahead of schedule—it signaled the completion of the largest Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works project ever undertaken, and perhaps the last of its kind After more than a century of studies and re-studies and major funding battles in Congress, the Tennessee-Tombigbee construction faced, predictably, great opposition on environmental grounds The first major project to be completed under the National Environmental Policy Act, it brought environmental design to the same level of prominence as engineering design.

  11. Final report for CRADA No. Y1293-0163 with the Tennessee Technology Foundation on behalf of the State of Tennessee. April 1993--April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    During the time from April 1993 through April 1994, the State of Tennessee and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., were engaged in a jointly supported economic development effort. This project was accomplished through collaboration with the Tennessee Technology Foundation (TTF) and supported a consultant to the Tennessee Commission of Economic and Community Development. This document will serve as the final report of that effort and will summarize the activities during the effective period of the subject agreement.

  12. Strategy for definition and protection of east Tennessee karst groundwater basins

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, P.A.; Lemiszki, P.J.; Poling, R.S.

    1992-12-31

    This paper describes and gives suggestions for protecting the bedrock geology of eastern Tennessee which is typical of the southern Appalachian Valley and Ridge province. Carbonate beds (limestones and dolomites) of the Knox and Chickamauga Groups are bounded by non-carbonate beds, most of which strike northeast and dip steeply (10{degrees}--45{degrees}) to the southeast. The carbonate aquifers are maturely karstified and are extremely vulnerable to contaminant infiltration, thus necessitating appropriate land use planning focused on their environmental sensitivity. Urban expansion is resulting in greater land development in karst regions. Planned and existing activities produce wastes that may potentially leach into underlying karst systems. This waste may flow rapidly and untreated for many miles along strike. The potential degradation of aquifers and receiving streams due to the cumulative waste loading of numerous small enterprises may be more environmentally destructive than a few hazardous waste sites. Costs to remediate contaminated water supplies and streams can be in the millions of dollars versus the substantially lower costs of prudent land use planning.

  13. Strategy for definition and protection of east Tennessee karst groundwater basins

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, P.A.; Lemiszki, P.J. ); Poling, R.S. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes and gives suggestions for protecting the bedrock geology of eastern Tennessee which is typical of the southern Appalachian Valley and Ridge province. Carbonate beds (limestones and dolomites) of the Knox and Chickamauga Groups are bounded by non-carbonate beds, most of which strike northeast and dip steeply (10[degrees]--45[degrees]) to the southeast. The carbonate aquifers are maturely karstified and are extremely vulnerable to contaminant infiltration, thus necessitating appropriate land use planning focused on their environmental sensitivity. Urban expansion is resulting in greater land development in karst regions. Planned and existing activities produce wastes that may potentially leach into underlying karst systems. This waste may flow rapidly and untreated for many miles along strike. The potential degradation of aquifers and receiving streams due to the cumulative waste loading of numerous small enterprises may be more environmentally destructive than a few hazardous waste sites. Costs to remediate contaminated water supplies and streams can be in the millions of dollars versus the substantially lower costs of prudent land use planning.

  14. Calendar year 1996 annual groundwater monitoring report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This annual monitoring report contains groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The East Fork Regime encompasses several confirmed and suspected sources of groundwater contamination within industrialized areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Groundwater and surface water monitoring in the East Fork Regime are performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Included are the groundwater monitoring data obtained in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the East Fork Regime issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) on August 30, 1996. The post-closure permit addresses post-closure monitoring requirements for two closed RCRA-regulated surface impoundments: the S-3 Ponds and New Hope Pond.

  15. Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report For The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.

    1998-02-01

    This report contains the groundwater monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 1997 in compliance with the Resource Conservation Wd Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), the PCP defines the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring requirements for the portion of the groundwater contaminant plume that has migrated into the East Fork Regime ftom the S-3 Ponds, a closed RCW-regulated former surface impoundment located in Bear Creek Valley near the west end of the Y-12 Plant. In addition to the RCIL4 post-closure corrective action monitoring results, this report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 1997 to fulfill requirements of DOE Order 5400.1.

  16. Coachella Valley, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These band composites, acquired on June 4, 2000, cover a 11 by 13.5 km sub-scene in the Coachella Valley, CA. The area is shown by the yellow box on the full scene in the LOWER RIGHT corner, northwest of the Salton Sea. This is a major agricultural region of California, growing fruit and produce throughout the year. Different combinations of ASTER bands help identify the different crop types. UPPER LEFT: bands 3, 2, 1 as red, green, and blue (RGB); UPPER RIGHT: bands 4, 2, 1 as RGB; LOWER LEFT: bands 4, 3, 2 as RGB. The image is centered at 33.6 degrees north latitude, 116.1 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  17. Long Valley Coring Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, John; Finger, John; McConnel, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    In December 1997, the California Energy Commission (CEC) agreed to provide funding for Phase III continued drilling of the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) near Mammoth Lakes, CA, from its present depth. The CEC contribution of $1 million completes a funding package of $2 million from a variety of sources, which will allow the well to be cored continuously to a depth of between 11,500 and 12,500 feet. The core recovered from Phase III will be crucial to understanding the origin and history of the hydrothermal systems responsible for the filling of fractures in the basement rock. The borehole may penetrate the metamorphic roof of the large magmatic complex that has fed the volcanism responsible for the caldera and subsequent activity.

  18. Death Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of Death Valley, California, centered at 36.629 degrees north latitude, 117.069 degrees west longitude. The image shows Furnace Creek alluvial fan and Furnace Creek Ranch at the far right, and the sand dunes near Stove Pipe Wells at the center. The dark fork-shaped feature between Furnace Creek fan and the dunes is a smooth flood-plain which encloses Cottonball Basin. The bright dots near the center of the image are corner refectors that have been set-up to calibrate the radar as the Shuttle passes overhead with the SIR-C/X-SAR system. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43883.

  19. Tennessee's High School Dropouts: Examining the Fiscal Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Andrea, Christian

    2010-01-01

    High school dropouts adversely impact the state of Tennessee each year--financially and socially. Dropouts' lower incomes, high unemployment rates, increased need for medical care, and higher propensity for incarceration create a virtual vortex that consumes Tennesseans' tax dollars at a vicious rate. Hundreds of millions of dollars are spent on…

  20. An Examination of Innovation in Tennessee's Charter Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Aaron J.

    2011-01-01

    Similar to other states, charter schools in Tennessee were established to improve student learning, provide options for parents, encourage the use of innovative methods, and provide new opportunities for teachers. With the passage of the TN Public Charter School Law, the first four charter schools opened in the 2003-04 academic year. Since that…

  1. Tennessee Higher Education Fact Book: 2012-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In January 2010, the General Assembly passed the Complete College Tennessee Act (CCTA), a comprehensive reform agenda that seeks to transform public higher education through changes in academic, fiscal and administrative policies at the state and institutional level. At the center of these reforms is the need for more Tennesseans to be better…

  2. Teachers in Rural Middle Tennessee Are Ready to Negotiate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Richard K.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The study was conducted to gather information regarding teachers' opinions on collective bargaining. Participants included those attending the 30th Annual Educational Conference held in Tennessee. The results of the study indicate a mood among school personnel for establishing negotiating teams for school districts of the Upper Cumberland region…

  3. 40 CFR 282.92 - Tennessee State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Tennessee obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant to... and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6991 et seq. The State's program, as... RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991d and 6991e, as well as under other statutory and regulatory provisions. EPA...

  4. The Audience of WDCN-TV, Nashville, Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Washington, DC. Office of Communication Research.

    During March 1974, a telephone survey to determine television viewing patterns was conducted in a four-county area surrounding Nashville, Tennessee. Data were gathered concerning family characteristics and time spent watching WDCN, Nashville's public broadcasting station. Results characterized viewers according to total time spent watching…

  5. The Navajo Student and the Tennessee Self Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempest, Phyllis

    1985-01-01

    Using Tennessee Self Concept, the follow-up study evaluated 33 Navajo eighth graders who were part of a seventh grade daily prescriptive intervention program and were part of a previous study of 222 Navajo fifth graders given tests assessing their strength and needs so that an appropriate curriculum could be adopted. (NEC)

  6. 40 CFR 282.92 - Tennessee State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Tennessee obtains approval for the revised requirements pursuant to.... 282.92 Section 282.92 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.92...

  7. Core Leadership: Teacher Leaders and Common Core Implementation in Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspen Institute, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, thousands of teachers across the United States attended several days of professional development workshops. The workshops, which focused on the Common Core State Standards, were part of a Tennessee Department of Education initiative in teacher leadership. The department recruited and trained 200 highly-effective teachers to…

  8. Nutritional Practices of Selected Homemakers in Weakley County, Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Grace S.; And Others

    Nutritional practices of home demonstration club members in Weakley County, Tennessee, are compared with those of nonmembers in this master's thesis. Marked differences appeared in the adequacy of breakfast; cooking vegetables only until tender; inclusion of Vitamin C once a day; following recommended principles of planning meals; buying…

  9. Tennessee and the Southern Regional Education Board, December 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This document details Tennessee's participation in Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) programs and services from December 2013 through November 2014. Each member state receives a number of general services, plus access to targeted programs funded by grants, contracts and fees. Appropriations from member states support SREB's core operations…

  10. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Tennessee. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

  11. KIDS COUNT, 2000: The State of the Child in Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Commission on Children and Youth, Nashville.

    This KIDS COUNT report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Tennessee's children. The statistical portrait is based on indicators of children's well-being in five broad areas: (1) healthy babies, including enrollment in the TennCare insurance program, prenatal care, infant mortality and child deaths, and immunizations; (2) healthy…

  12. Archives of the Tennessee College Women's Sports Federation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooker, Jane; And Others

    This guide to the archives of the Tennessee College Women's Sports Federation (TCWSF), now dissolved, details the contents of the 13 cartons of materials which constitute the TCWSF collection. Materials are organized into series under particular topics. The guide describes the arrangement of documents in each series and then lists the contents of…

  13. Kids Count: The State of the Child in Tennessee, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Commission on Children and Youth, Nashville.

    This Kids Count report examines trends in the well being of Tennessee's children. The statistical portrait is based on 23 indicators of child well being: (1) single-parent families; (2) family income/poverty; (3) children receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); (4) student participation in school nutrition programs; (5) child…

  14. Potential hydrologic effects of lignite mining in West Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, P.L.; Olem, H.

    1982-12-01

    Paper primarily describes possible adverse hydrologic effects of lignite mining in West Tennessee. Potential effects to the land include erosion, subsidence, flooding, and faulty drainage. Possible consequences to surface streams and groundwater include diminishment of quantity, quality, and a change in flow. If enforced, the existing state law provides sufficient remedy for the avoidance of environmental hazards.

  15. School Capital Funding: Tennessee in a National Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurley, Richard

    This report evaluates the need for K-12 capital spending in Tennessee and the methods the state uses to meet this need within a national context. The report examines the benefits of capital outlay spending and its impact on student performance. It identifies the major drivers of capital expenses. The report then investigates the roles the federal…

  16. Teaching Tennessee History: Lesson Plans for the Classroom. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakley, Lisa, Ed.

    These teacher developed lessons focus on the Civil War's impact on east Tennessee. The forum for develop ling the lessons includes a series of inservice lectures by experts in the areas of Civil War scholarship and interpretation, tours, and hands-on experiences at historic sites in the region. During the week-long program, teachers traveled…

  17. Tennessee Rural Manpower Service Report, 1974. MA-5-79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Sherrill W., Comp.

    Reviewing the operations of the Rural Manpower Services as administered by the Tennessee Department of Employment, this annual report reveals factors which have influenced 1974 placement services for rural employers and workers. Areas covered include: planning; economic developments; employment and unemployment trends; services for rural people;…

  18. The Condition of Rural Education in Tennessee: A Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, Pam; And Others

    With the exception of four major metropolitan areas--Chattanooga, Knoxville, Memphis, and Nashville--Tennessee is a predominantly rural state with 56% (or 79) of its 142 school districts classified as rural. A rural school district is defined as one in which 75% or more of the population lives outside Standard Metropolitan Areas or in which…

  19. Perceptions of Tennessee FCS Faculty and Administrators in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Patricia M.; Crase, Dixie R.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to general higher education challenges, family and consumer sciences (FCS) programs may confront the possibility of reorganization and/or loss of programs. In Tennessee, eight American Association of Family & Consumer Sciences (AAFCS) accredited units have faced these issues within the last five years. Faculty and administrators in…

  20. 76 FR 36166 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00051

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00051 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4...: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and...

  1. Screening Mammography Utilization in Tennessee Women: The Association with Residence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kathleen C.; Fitzhugh, Eugene C.; Neutens, James J.; Klein, Diane A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Approximately 70% of US women over age 40 report mammography screening within 2 years. However, rates are likely to vary by age, income, educational level, and residence. Purpose: To describe the prevalence of screening mammography and associated factors in women living in rural and urban areas of Tennessee. Methods: Using pooled data…

  2. Effective Uses of CSP Grant Funds in Tennessee Charter Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Andrew; Webb, Leigh

    2013-01-01

    The topic of educational spending and its connection to student achievement was long-debated before charter schools entered the conversation. With the rise in government spending on education, particularly charter school funding, the financial debate has strengthened and evoked much controversy. Though the Tennessee Department of Education (TNDOE)…

  3. Alex Haley: At Home in the Hills of East Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawthorne, Ann

    1992-01-01

    An interview with Alex Haley six months before his death in February 1992 discusses his impressions of life in Appalachia; the media image of Appalachia; reminiscences of his hometown, Henning, Tennessee; race relations in Appalachia; and his plans for future books. Included are photographs and a eulogy from his funeral. (SV)

  4. Chattanooga, Tennessee: Train Town. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankins, Caneta Skelley

    Railroads influenced and reflected U.S. settlement and development patterns from the 1830s to the 1950s. In cities, they shaped and stimulated economic growth, planning, and architecture. Chattanooga, Tennessee's sprawling Terminal Station, is a tribute to the town's importance as a southeastern transportation hub. This lesson is based on the…

  5. Issues Concerning School Violence in Middle Tennessee Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddick, Thomas L.; Peach, Larry E.

    School violence and related disruptions have become common occurrences in American schools. This paper examines how violence is manifesting itself in schools. The report offers the results of a study in which a survey was administered to the schools in the midstate area of Tennessee. The survey were created in consultation with school resource…

  6. Tennessee Title I Directors Evaluate Teacher Aide Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Donald; Peach, Larry

    1981-01-01

    Teacher aides have made a major contribution to educationally disadvantaged children in Tennessee. Title I directors recommend that: (1) the teacher aide program should be continued; (2) inservice training programs for teachers and aides should be coordinated; and (3) additional study on qualification and educational preparation of aides is…

  7. Northeast Tennessee Educators' Perception of STEM Education Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Kristin Beard

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative nonexperimental survey study was developed to investigate Northeast Tennessee K-8 educators' perceptions of STEM education. This study was an examination of current perceptions of STEM education. Perceived need, current implementation practices, access to STEM resources, definition of STEM, and the current condition of STEM in…

  8. Kids Count: The State of the Child in Tennessee, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Commission on Children and Youth, Nashville.

    This Kids Count report examines trends in the well being of Tennessee's children. The statistical portrait is based on 23 indicators of child well being: (1) single-parent families; (2) family income/poverty; (3) children receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children; (4) students participating in school nutrition programs; (5) teen…

  9. Financial Reporting for Tennessee Public Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Nashville.

    This manual provides a framework for accounting practices, budgeting and reporting procedures for Tennessee public higher education institutions. Emphasis is placed on principles and procedures of accounting and financial reporting; the balance sheet; statement of changes in fund balances; statement of current funds revenues, expenditures, and…

  10. Inequity of Human Services: The Rural Tennessee Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Univ., Nashville.

    Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, and Cheatham counties of Tennessee were the setting for a study that sought to determine the types of health and social services provided to residents of rural areas and to assess the present status of the service delivery system. Interviews with both agency representatives and randomly selected household…

  11. Characteristics of thrust fault imbrication near the frontal edge of the Blue Ridge thrust sheet, Buffalo Mountain, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Duddy, M.M.; Woodward, N.B.

    1985-01-01

    The Buffalo Mountain thrust sheet, located along the western margin of the Blue Ridge in northeastern Tennessee, provides an excellent opportunity to examine transitional structural styles and deformation mechanisms between the Valley and Ridge and Blue Ridge. Previous interpretation suggests that, because of pre-fault tilting, thrust faults within the Buffalo Mountain complex cut down stratigraphic section. Geometric data from the present study indicate, however, that the thrust faults cut up section with stratigraphic separations of up to 16,500'. Footwall and hanging wall bedding orientations reveal a stair-step thrust geometry; the Unicoi Fm. (basal Chilhowee Gp. quartzite) is a hanging wall flat, and the Knox Gp. (Cambro-Ordovician carbonate) is a footwall ramp. Ductile and brittle deformation mechanisms are represented by mesofabric elements. Important deformation mechanisms and elements include: flexural slip and flexural flow folding styles, pressure solution cleavage, extensional and contractional fractures, quartz filled tensional fractures and cataclastic fault zones. Although previous workers have determined that thrusting within the Blue Ridge occurs in an out-of-sequence pattern, the Buffalo Mountain thrust complex provides an example of in-sequence thrusting. Thus, based on this example, deformation styles and mechanisms within the Blue Ridge appear to be similar to Valley and Ridge deformation styles and mechanisms.

  12. 27 CFR 9.82 - Potter Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potter Valley. 9.82... Potter Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Potter Valley.” (b) Approved map. The approved maps for the Potter Valley viticultural area are the U.S.G.S....

  13. Federal Facility Agreement Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1999 Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

    2000-01-01

    Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and/or the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This plan will be implemented by means of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) incorporating its terms with the United States EPA and TDEC. The majority of projects described in this report are grouped into five watersheds. They are the East Tennessee Technical Park (ETTP) Watershed (formerly the K-25 Site), the Melton Valley (MV) and Bethel Valley (BV) Watersheds at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) and Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Watersheds at the Y-12 Plant.

  14. Northeast Tennessee Educators' Perception of STEM Education Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Kristin Beard

    A quantitative nonexperimental survey study was developed to investigate Northeast Tennessee K-8 educators' perceptions of STEM education. This study was an examination of current perceptions of STEM education. Perceived need, current implementation practices, access to STEM resources, definition of STEM, and the current condition of STEM in Northeast Tennessee were also examined. The participating school districts are located in the Northeast Region of Tennessee: Bristol City Schools, Hamblen County Schools, Johnson City Schools, Johnson County Schools, Kingsport City Schools, Sullivan County Schools, and Washington County Schools. Educational professionals including both administrators and teachers in the elementary and/or middle school setting were surveyed. The closed and open form survey consisted of 20 research items grouped by 5 core research questions. Quantitative data were analyzed using single sample t tests. A 4 point Likert scale was used to measure responses with a 2.5 point of neutrality rating. The open-ended question was summarized and recorded for frequency. Research indicated that Northeast Tennessee K-8 educators perceive a need for STEM education to a significant extent. However, many do not feel prepared for implementation. Lack of professional development opportunities and STEM assets were reported as areas of need. Teachers reported implementation of inquiry-based, problem solving activities in their classrooms. The majority of participants reported that the current condition of STEM education in Northeast Tennessee is not meeting the needs of 21st century learners. Challenges facing STEM instruction include: funding designated for STEM is too low, professional development for STEM teacher is insufficient, and STEM Education in K-8 is lacking or inadequate.

  15. Invitational Symposium on Recruitment, Selection, & Retention of Principals for Tennessee's Schools: Proceedings (Nashville, Tennessee, May 8-9, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Univ., Nashville. Center of Excellence: Basic Skills.

    At a 1990 symposium on principals, speakers from Tennessee and other states shared their perspectives on school leadership. The symposium proceedings contains the following presentations: (1) "Under Fire: The School, the Principal and the Preparation Program" (Barbara Nye and Mary Jane Connelly); (2) "The Roles of Principals: Today's and…

  16. Addendum to the East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    SAIC

    2011-04-01

    The East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan (DOE 2004) describes the planned fieldwork to support the remedial investigation (RI) for residual contamination at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) not addressed in previous Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) decisions. This Addendum describes activities that will be conducted to gather additional information in Zone 1 of the ETTP for groundwater, surface water, and sediments. This Addendum has been developed from agreements reached in meetings held on June 23, 2010, August 25, 2010, October 13, 2010, November 13, 2010, December 1, 2010, and January 13, 2011, with representatives of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). Based on historical to recent groundwater data for ETTP and the previously completed Sitewide Remedial Investigation for the ETTP (DOE 2007a), the following six areas of concern have been identified that exhibit groundwater contamination downgradient of these areas above state of Tennessee and EPA drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs): (1) K-720 Fly Ash Pile, (2) K-770 Scrap Yard, (3) Duct Island, (4) K-1085 Firehouse Burn/J.A. Jones Maintenance Area, (5) Contractor's Spoil Area (CSA), and (6) Former K-1070-A Burial Ground. The paper presents a brief summary of the history of the areas, the general conceptual models for the observed groundwater contamination, and the data gaps identified.

  17. Accelerating optimization by tracing valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing-Xiao; He, Rong-Qiang; Lu, Zhong-Yi

    2016-06-01

    We propose an algorithm to accelerate optimization when an objective function locally resembles a long narrow valley. In such a case, a conventional optimization algorithm usually wanders with too many tiny steps in the valley. The new algorithm approximates the valley bottom locally by a parabola that is obtained by fitting a set of successive points generated recently by a conventional optimization method. Then large steps are taken along the parabola, accompanied by fine adjustment to trace the valley bottom. The effectiveness of the new algorithm has been demonstrated by accelerating the Newton trust-region minimization method and the Levenberg-Marquardt method on the nonlinear fitting problem in exact diagonalization dynamical mean-field theory and on the classic minimization problem of the Rosenbrock's function. Many times speedup has been achieved for both problems, showing the high efficiency of the new algorithm.

  18. East African Rift Valley, Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This rare, cloud free view of the East African Rift Valley, Kenya (1.5N, 35.5E) shows a clear view of the Turkwell River Valley, an offshoot of the African REift System. The East African Rift is part of a vast plate fracture which extends from southern Turkey, through the Red Sea, East Africa and into Mozambique. Dark green patches of forests are seen along the rift margin and tea plantations occupy the cooler higher ground.

  19. Use of Supply/Demand Data in Tennessee Secondary Vocational-Technical Education. Research in Tennessee Secondary Vocational-Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Walter A.; Blowers, Sally

    A study was conducted to assess the potential use of available supply/demand data in planning for secondary vocational education programs in Tennessee. Literature was reviewed for ideas and an analysis was made of the data in the Tennessee Occupational Information System (TOIS). In addition, expert opinion was collected from a selected group of 12…

  20. Deep Residential Retrofits in East Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, Philip R; Hendrick, Timothy P; Christian, Jeffrey E; Jackson, Roderick K

    2012-04-01

    Executive Summary Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is furthering residential energy retrofit research in the mixed-humid climate of East Tennessee by selecting 10 homes and guiding the homeowners in the energy retrofit process. The homeowners pay for the retrofits, and ORNL advises which retrofits to complete and collects post-retrofit data. This effort is in accordance with the Department of Energy s Building America program research goal of demonstrating market-ready energy retrofit packages that reduce home energy use by 30 50%. Through this research, ORNL researchers hope to understand why homeowners decide to partake in energy retrofits, the payback of home energy retrofits, and which retrofit packages most economically reduce energy use. Homeowner interviews help the researchers understand the homeowners experience. Information gathered during the interviews will aid in extending market penetration of home energy retrofits by helping researchers and the retrofit industry understand what drives homeowners in making positive decisions regarding these retrofits. This report summarizes the selection process, the pre-retrofit condition, the recommended retrofits, the actual cost of the retrofits (when available), and an estimated energy savings of the retrofit package using EnergyGauge . Of the 10 households selected to participate in the study, only five completed the recommended retrofits, three completed at least one but no more than three of the recommended retrofits, and two households did not complete any of the recommended retrofits. In the case of the two homes that did none of the recommended work, the pre-retrofit condition of the homes and the recommended retrofits are reported. The five homes that completed the recommended retrofits are monitored for energy consumption of the whole house, appliances, space conditioning equipment, water heater, and most of the other circuits with miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) and lighting. Thermal comfort is

  1. Railroad Valley, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Information from images of Railroad Valley, Nevada captured on August 17,2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer(ASTER) may provide a powerful tool for monitoring crop health and maintenance procedures.

    These images cover an area of north central Nevada. The top image shows irrigated fields, with healthy vegetation in red. The middle image highlights the amount of vegetation. The color code shows highest vegetation content in red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple and the lowest in black. The final image is a thermal infrared channel, with warmer temperatures in white and colder in black.

    In the thermal image, the northernmost and westernmost fields are markedly colder on their northwest areas, even though no differences are seen in the visible image or the second, Vegetation Index image. This can be attributed to the presence of excess water, which can lead to crop damage.

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER)is an imaging instrument that is flying on Terra, a satellite launched in December 1999 as part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). The instrument is being used to obtain detailed maps of land surface temperature, emissivity, reflectance and elevation. The Earth Observing System (EOS) platforms are part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, whose goal is to obtain a better understanding of the interactions between the biosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and atmosphere.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.

  2. [Rift Valley fever].

    PubMed

    Pépin, M

    2011-06-01

    Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a zoonotic arbovirosis. Among animals, it mainly affects ruminants, causing abortions in gravid females and mortality among young animals. In humans, RVF virus infection is usually asymptomatic or characterized by a moderate fever. However, in 1 to 3% of cases, more severe forms of the disease (hepatitis, encephalitis, retinitis, hemorrhagic fever) can lead to the death of infected individuals or to major sequels. The RVF virus (Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) was identified for the first time in the 1930s in Kenya. It then spread over almost all African countries, sometimes causing major epizootics/epidemics. In 2000, the virus was carried out of Africa, in the Middle East Arabian Peninsula. In 2007-2008, Eastern-African countries, including Madagascar, reported significant episodes of RVF virus, this was also the case for the Comoros archipelago and the French island of Mayotte. This ability to spread associated with many vectors, including in Europe, and high viral loads in infected animals led the health authorities worldwide to warn about the potential emergence of RVF virus in areas with a temperate climate. The awareness has increased in recent years with climate changes, which may possibly modify the vector distribution and competence, and prompted many RVF virus-free countries to better prepare for a potential implantation of RVF.

  3. Towards guided data assimilation for operational hydrologic forecasting in the US Tennessee River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weerts, A.; Wood, A. W.; Clark, M. P.; Carney, S.; Day, G. N.; Lemans, M.; Sumihar, J.; Newman, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    In the US, the forecasting approach used by the NWS River Forecast Centers and other regional organizations such as the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) or Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has traditionally involved manual model input and state modifications made by forecasters in real-time. This process is time consuming and requires expert knowledge and experience. The benefits of automated data assimilation (DA) as a strategy for avoiding manual modification approaches have been demonstrated in research studies (eg. Seo et al., 2009). This study explores the usage of various ensemble DA algorithms within the operational platform used by TVA. The final goal is to identify a DA algorithm that will guide the manual modification process used by TVA forecasters and realize considerable time gains (without loss of quality or even enhance the quality) within the forecast process. We evaluate the usability of various popular algorithms for DA that have been applied on a limited basis for operational hydrology. To this end, Delft-FEWS was wrapped (via piwebservice) in OpenDA to enable execution of FEWS workflows (and the chained models within these workflows, including SACSMA, UNITHG and LAGK) in a DA framework. Within OpenDA, several filter methods are available. We considered 4 algorithms: particle filter (RRF), Ensemble Kalman Filter and Asynchronous Ensemble Kalman and Particle filter. Retrospective simulation results for one location and algorithm (AEnKF) are illustrated in Figure 1. The initial results are promising. We will present verification results for these methods (and possible more) for a variety of sub basins in the Tennessee River basin. Finally, we will offer recommendations for guided DA based on our results. References Seo, D.-J., L. Cajina, R. Corby and T. Howieson, 2009: Automatic State Updating for Operational Streamflow Forecasting via Variational Data Assimilation, 367, Journal of Hydrology, 255-275. Figure 1. Retrospectively simulated

  4. Improving HIV Surveillance Among Transgender Populations in Tennessee

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiro, Peter F.; McGoy, Shanell L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: HIV prevalence and outcome disparities among sexual and gender minorities are profound in the United States. Tennessee HIV surveillance practices have not been uniform for transgender status, although data collection capabilities exist. We, therefore, describe current reporting of data on transgender individuals in Tennessee to identify targets for improvement. Methods: Data for all HIV-diagnosed individuals living in Tennessee as of December 31, 2013, were extracted from the Enhanced HIV/AIDS Reporting System (eHARS). The birth_sex (“Male” or “Female”) and current_gender (“Male,” “Female,” “Male-to-Female,” “Female-to-Male,” or “Additional Gender Identity”) variables were examined, and proportion missing current_gender data by region was ascertained. Transgender individuals were defined as having different birth_sex and current_gender values. To ensure the protection of health information, data were cleaned, deidentified, and aggregated using Statistical Analysis Software (SAS) Version 9.3 (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, NC). Results: Among 16,063 HIV-diagnosed individuals in Tennessee, 27 were transgender: 52% (n = 14) with “Male-to-Female,” 26% (n = 7) with “Female,” and 22% (n = 6) with “Male” as their current_gender values. Proportions missing current_gender differed significantly by region across Tennessee (global, P < 0.01). Conclusion: While HIV-positive transgender individuals should be recognized as integral members of the LGBT community, they should also be acknowledged as a separate subgroup when appropriate. Collecting information about current self-identified gender identity should no longer be optional in Tennessee HIV surveillance. Although making efforts to collect both birth_sex and current_gender mandatory with each interview will improve surveillance, it is critical to train all staff properly on the correct way to inquire about gender identity in a culturally sensitive manner

  5. Valley blockade quantum switching in Silicon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Prati, Enrico

    2011-10-01

    In analogy to the Coulomb and the Pauli spin blockade, based on the electrostatic repulsion and the Pauli exclusion principle respectively, the concept of valley blockade in Silicon nanostructures is explored. The valley parity operator is defined. Valley blockade is determined by the parity conservation of valley composition eigenvectors in quantum transport. A Silicon quantum changeover switch based on a triple of donor quantum dots capable to separate electrons having opposite valley parity by virtue of the valley parity conservation is proposed. The quantum changeover switch represents a novel kind of hybrid quantum based classical logic device.

  6. Nonlocal topological valley transport at large valley Hall angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beconcini, Michael; Taddei, Fabio; Polini, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Berry curvature hot spots in two-dimensional materials with broken inversion symmetry are responsible for the existence of transverse valley currents, which give rise to giant nonlocal dc voltages. Recent experiments in high-quality gapped graphene have highlighted a saturation of the nonlocal resistance as a function of the longitudinal charge resistivity ρc ,x x, when the system is driven deep into the insulating phase. The origin of this saturation is, to date, unclear. In this work we show that this behavior is fully compatible with bulk topological transport in the regime of large valley Hall angles (VHAs). We demonstrate that, for a fixed value of the valley diffusion length, the dependence of the nonlocal resistance on ρc ,x x weakens for increasing VHAs, transitioning from the standard ρc,x x 3 power law to a result that is independent of ρc ,x x.

  7. Flood of December 25, 1987, in Millington, Tennessee and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, James G.; Gamble, Charles R.

    1989-01-01

    Intense rainfall totaling 9.2 in. in a 12-hour period on December 24-25, 1987, and 14.8 in for the period December 24-27 caused record floods in Millington, Tennessee and vicinity. The peak discharge of Big Creek at Raleigh-Millington Road was almost twice the discharge of the 100-year flood discharge and that of Loosahatchie River near Arlington was about equal to the 50-year flood discharge. The inundated area and flood elevations are depicted on a map of Millington, Tennessee and vicinity. Water surface profiles for the peak of December 25, 1987, for Loosahatchie River, Big Creek, Royster Creek, North Fork Creek, Casper Creek, and an unnamed tributary to Big Creek are shown. Flood damages and cleanup costs for this record flood have been estimated at about $9.2 million. (USGS)

  8. Trends in concentrations of atmospheric gaseous and particulate species in rural eastern Tennessee as related to primary emission reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, R. L.; Bairai, S. T.; Mueller, S. F.

    2015-09-01

    Air quality measurements at Look Rock, Tennessee - on the western edge of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park - were begun in 1980 and expanded during the 1980s to a National Park Service (NPS) IMPROVE network station. Measurements were expanded again by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA, 1999-2007) to examine the effects of electric generating unit (EGU) emission reductions of SO2 and NOx on air quality at the station. Analysis of temporal trends (1999-2013) has been conducted at the site in collaboration with activities related to the 2013 Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS) at Look Rock and other southeastern US locations. Key findings from these trend studies include the observation that primary pollutant levels have consistently tracked emission reductions from EGUs and other primary sources in the region, but reductions in secondary pollutants such as particulate sulfate and, specifically, ozone have been smaller compared to reductions in primary emissions. Organic carbonaceous material (OM) remains a major contributor (30-40 % in the period 2009-2013) to fine particulate mass at the site, as confirmed by ACSM measurements at the site in 2013. A large portion (65-85 %) of carbon in OM derives from modern carbon sources based on 14C measurements. Important parameters affecting ozone levels, fine mass, and visibility also include the specific diurnal meteorology at this ridge-top site, its location in a predominantly mixed-deciduous forest, and the presence of primary sources of precursors at distances of 50-500 km from the site in all directions.

  9. Trends in concentrations of atmospheric gaseous and particulate species in rural eastern Tennessee as related to primary emissions reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, R. L.; Bairai, S. T.; Mueller, S. F.

    2015-05-01

    Air quality measurements at Look Rock, Tennessee - on the western edge of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park - were begun in 1980 and expanded during the 1980s to a National Park Service (NPS) IMPROVE network station. Measurements were expanded again by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA, 1999-2007) to examine the effects of electric generating unit (EGU) emission reductions of SO2 and NOx on air quality at the station. Analysis of temporal trends (1999-2013) has been conducted at the site in collaboration with activities related to the 2013 Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS) at Look Rock and other southeastern US locations. Key findings from these trend studies include the observation that primary pollutant levels have consistently tracked emissions reductions from EGUs and other primary sources in the region but reductions in secondary pollutants such as particulate sulfate and, specifically, ozone have been smaller compared to reductions in primary emissions. Organic carbonaceous material (OM) remains a major contributor (30-40% in the period 2009-2013) to fine particulate mass at the site, as confirmed by ACSM measurements at the site in 2013. A large portion (65-85%) of carbon in OM derives from modern carbon sources based on 14C measurements. Important parameters affecting ozone levels, fine mass and visibility also include the specific diurnal meteorology at this ridge-top site, its location in a predominantly mixed-deciduous forest, and the presence of primary sources of precursors at distances of 50-500 km from the site in all directions.

  10. 77 FR 12525 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee: Prevention of Significant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... Significant Deterioration; Greenhouse Gases--Automatic Rescission Provisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection... relate to greenhouse gases (GHGs). Specifically, Tennessee amended its PSD regulations to add...

  11. Martian oceans, valleys and climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    The new Mars Global Surveyor altimetry shows that the heavily cratered southern hemisphere of Mars is 5 km higher that the sparely cratered plains of the northern hemisphere. Previous suggestions that oceans formerly occupied that northern plains as evidenced by shorelines are partly supported by the new data. A previously identified outer boundary has a wide range of elevations and is unlikely to be a shoreline but an inner contact with a narrow range of elevations is a more likely candidate. No shorelines are visible in the newly acquired, 2.5 metre/pixel imaging. Newly imaged valleys provide strong support for sustained or episodic flow of water across the Martian surface. A major surprise, however, is the near absence of valleys less than 100 m across. Martian valleys seemingly do not divide into ever smaller valleys as terrestrial valleys commonly do. This could be due to lack of precipitation or lack of surface runoff because of high infiltration rates. High erosion rates and supports warm climates and presence of large bodies of water during heavy bombardment. The climate history and fate of the water after heavy bombardment remain cotroversial.

  12. Solar heating system installed at Jackson, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    The solar energy heating system installed at the Coca-Cola Bottling Works in Jackson, Tennessee is described. The system consists of 9480 square feet of Owens-Illinois evacuated tubular solar collectors with attached specular cylindrical reflectors and will provide space heating for the 70,000 square foot production building in the winter, and hot water for the bottle washing equipment the remainder of the year. Component specifications and engineering drawings are included. (WHK)

  13. POND MOUNTAIN AND POND MOUNTAIN ADDITION ROADLESS AREAS, TENNESSEE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffitts, W.R.; Bitar, Richard

    1984-01-01

    As a result of a mineral study of the Pond Mountain Roadless Areas, Tennessee, a probable potential for the occurrence of tin, niobium, and tungsten resource with associated beryllium, molybdenum, zinc, and fluorite was identified in rocks of Precambrian age particularly in the southeastern part of the area. Detailed geologic mapping and geochemical sampling of the soils and rocks in the area of Precambrian rocks is recommended to identify and delimit the areas of potential resources of tin, niobium, and tungsten.

  14. Technique for estimating depth of 100-year floods in Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamble, Charles R.; Lewis, James G.

    1977-01-01

    Preface: A method is presented for estimating the depth of the loo-year flood in four hydrologic areas in Tennessee. Depths at 151 gaging stations on streams that were not significantly affected by man made changes were related to basin characteristics by multiple regression techniques. Equations derived from the analysis can be used to estimate the depth of the loo-year flood if the size of the drainage basin is known.

  15. Acid mine drainage contaminates groundwater of a Tennessee watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bara, Christopher J.; Don Estes, R.

    1985-09-01

    Water samples were collected from 18 natural springs within the West Fork of the Obey River watershed. Overton County, Tennessee, to determine if groundwater was adversely affected by runoff from abandoned surface coal mines Six springs were found to be affected severely and deemed unfit as a source of potable water Water quality of the remaining springs was essentially unaffected it appeared that proximity to surface mines, elevation at the outflow, and geology of the surrounding strata determined the quality of the groundwater

  16. Health Information Technology: An Expanded Care Coordination in Rural Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Wodarski, John S; Green, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    The Expanded Care Coordination through the Use of Health Information Technology in Rural Tennessee was a 3-year initiative implemented by The University of Tennessee Children's Mental Health Services Research Center and the Helen Ross McNabb Center Regional Mental Health System. The program targeted rural adults in the East Tennessee area. This intervention utilized the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST), and AC-COD screening tools. After the initial screening, the appropriate level of intervention was assessed. Clients completed modules on the program's website and met with a clinician for a minimum for four face-to-face meetings. Alcohol use and drug use declined significantly over the course of the program. Alcohol use and outpatient treatment for alcohol and substance abuse declined significantly over the course of the program. There were also significant decreases in days of probations, depression, physical complaints, and violent behaviors. Health information technology is becoming more common in mental health treatment facilities. However, more testing needs to be done with larger samples to assess the efficacy of the program.

  17. Synthesized flood frequency for small urban streams in Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.H.

    1984-01-01

    Bridge, culvert, and highway design often require knowledge of the magnitude and frequency of flood discharge from small streams where the drainage basin is urbanized. The results of a 6-year study by the U.S. Geological Survey provide methods for estimating flood magnitudes for selected frequencies on small streams draining urban areas in Tennessee. A total of 22 rainfall-runoff sites located in basins with drainage areas of 0.21 to 24.3 square miles in size and in municipalities with populations between 5,000 and 100,000 were used to derive regionalized flood-frequency equations. Impervious area, measured from recent aerial photographs, ranged between 4.7 percent and 74.0 percent of the basin. The equations were derived by multiple regression analyses of snythetic flood-frequency estimates, derived from a rainfall-runoff modeling procedure, versus physical basin characteristics and a precipitation factor. These equations can be used to estimate the magnitude of future floods with recurrence intervals of 2 to 100 years on ungaged urbanized streams in Tennessee. One equation for each recurrence interval applies statewide. Flood-frequency estimates for stations used in the analyses and example computations demonstrating applications of the regression equations to urban streams in Tennessee are given in the report. (USGS)

  18. Human Infections by Multiple Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae in Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Delisle, Josie; Mendell, Nicole L; Stull-Lane, Annica; Bloch, Karen C; Bouyer, Donald H; Moncayo, Abelardo C

    2016-06-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is the most common tick-borne disease in Tennessee. However, Rickettsia rickettsii has rarely been isolated from endemic ticks, suggesting rickettsioses may be caused by other species. A total of 56 human serum samples that were serologically positive for exposure to Rickettsia were obtained from commercial laboratories in 2010 and 2011. In addition, 20 paired sera from patients with encephalitis and positive Rickettsia serology were obtained from the Tennessee Unexplained Encephalitis Surveillance (TUES) study. Using an immunofluorescence assay, reactivity of the sera to R. rickettsii, Rickettsia montanensis, Rickettsia parkeri, and Rickettsia amblyommii was tested, and a comparison of endpoint titers was used to determine the probable antigen that stimulated the antibody response. Cross-absorption was conducted for 94.8% (N = 91) of the samples due to serologic cross-reactivity. Of the commercial laboratory samples, 55.4% (N = 31) had specific reactivity to R. amblyommii and 44.6% (N = 25) were indeterminate. Of the paired TUES samples, 20% (N = 4) had specific reactivity to R. amblyommii, 5% (N = 1) to R. montanensis, and 5% (N = 1) to R. parkeri Patients with specific reactivity to R. amblyommii experienced fever (75%), headache (68%) and myalgia (58%). Rash (36%) and thrombocytopenia (40%) were less common. To our knowledge, this is the first time R. amblyommii has been reported as a possible causative agent of rickettsioses in Tennessee.

  19. QSource quality initiative. Reversing the diabetes epidemic in Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Bailey, James E; Gibson, Deborah V; Jain, Manoj; Connelly, Stephanie A; Ryder, Kathryn M; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel

    2003-12-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a recent report on diabetes in Tennessee. Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in Tennessee. In 2001, an estimated 7.7% of the population was diabetic, an increase from 5.8% a decade earlier. This increase is largely due to widespread unhealthy eating habits, physical inactivity, and associated obesity. The majority of diabetes is preventable and can be effectively treated through daily exercise and a healthy diet. Diabetes prevention efforts in Tennessee schools and communities, however, are grossly inadequate. Providers and payers underemphasize prevention. Since the causes of diabetes can be traced to childhood habits, early prevention is the key to reversing the diabetes epidemic. Immediate statewide action must be taken to promote daily exercise and decrease access to high-calorie, high-fat "junk" food in our schools and communities. Physicians, health professional organizations, health plans, government, churches, schools, and employers must work together to battle the diabetes epidemic through public education, community-wide health promotion programs, and efforts to improve quality of diabetes care for all Tennesseans.

  20. Dark Valley in Newton Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-418, 11 July 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) high resolution image shows part of a dark-floored valley system in northern Newton Crater. The valley might have been originally formed by liquid water; the dark material is probably sand that has blown into the valley in more recent times. The picture was acquired earlier this week on July 6, 2003, and is located near 39.2oS, 157.9oW. The picture covers an area 2.3 km (1.4 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  1. Fatal Firearm Injuries in Tennessee: A Comparison Study of Tennessee's Two Most Populous Counties 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Amy McMaster; Chancellor, Karen E; Rogers, William R; Ledford, Jennifer A

    2016-05-01

    Firearm injuries are a leading cause of violent death in Tennessee. This study was designed to compare the demographic and epidemiologic features of fatal firearm injuries in Shelby County and Davidson County, Tennessee between 2009 and 2012. We identified 1081 gunshot fatalities for the study period in these two counties. Shelby County had a higher overall, age-adjusted gunshot mortality rate, a higher male age-adjusted gunshot mortality rate, and a higher age-adjusted gunshot homicide rate than Davidson. Age groups 25-34 years and 35-44 years had higher crude mortality rates for gunshot deaths in Shelby County than Davidson County. Both counties had higher age-adjusted gunshot mortality rates for black males than white males, higher homicide rate for black race than white, and higher suicide rate for white race than black. Homicide was the most common manner of death, and handguns were the most common type of firearm used in both counties. PMID:27113699

  2. Tennessee`s East Fork Poplar Creek: A biological monitoring and abatement program

    SciTech Connect

    Halbrook, R.S.; Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Black, M.C.; Boston, H.L.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Hill, W.R.; Hinzman, R.L.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Schilling, E.M.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Gatz, A.J.

    1991-12-31

    On May 1985, a Biological Monitoring Program was developed for East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in eastern Tennessee, United States. This stream originates within the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant that produces nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy. Water and sediment in the stream contain metals, organic chemicals, and radionuclides from releases that have occurred over the past 45 years. The creek also receives urban and some agricultural runoff and effluent from the City of Oak Ridge`s Wastewater Treatment Facility (WTF). The biological monitoring program includes four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing: (2) bioaccumulation studies; (3) biological indicator studies; and (4) ecological monitoring of stream communities, including periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish. Biological conditions are monitored at six sites on EFPC ranging from kilometer 24.4 near the headwaters to kilometer 6.3 near the month. A site on Brushy Fork, A stream just north of Oak Ridge, is used as reference. Ambient (instream) toxicity was monitored through the use of 7-day static-renewal tests that measured the survival and growth of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larvae and the survival and reproduction of a microstrustacean (Ceriodaphnia dubia). Full-strength water from EFPC within the Y-12 Plant boundary was frequently toxic to Ceriodaphnia, but less frequently toxic to the minnow larvae. Chlorine has been identified as an important toxicant in upper EFPC. Water samples from six sites in EFPC downstream from the Y-12 Plant boundary were tested eight times with both species during a 2-year period (October, 1986 through October, 1988). These sites were ranked by the number of times they were ``best`` or ``worst`` for each species. Water samples collected for use in the ambient toxicity tests were routinely analyzed for conductivity, pH, alkalinity, hardness, total residual and free chlorine, and temperature.

  3. 27 CFR 9.153 - Redwood Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Boundary. The Redwood Valley viticultural area is located in the east central interior portion of Mendocino County, California. The boundaries of the Redwood Valley viticultural area, using landmarks and points...

  4. 27 CFR 9.153 - Redwood Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Boundary. The Redwood Valley viticultural area is located in the east central interior portion of Mendocino County, California. The boundaries of the Redwood Valley viticultural area, using landmarks and points...

  5. 27 CFR 9.153 - Redwood Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Boundary. The Redwood Valley viticultural area is located in the east central interior portion of Mendocino County, California. The boundaries of the Redwood Valley viticultural area, using landmarks and points...

  6. 27 CFR 9.153 - Redwood Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Boundary. The Redwood Valley viticultural area is located in the east central interior portion of Mendocino County, California. The boundaries of the Redwood Valley viticultural area, using landmarks and points...

  7. Valley evolution by meandering rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Ajay Brian Sanjay

    Fluvial systems form landscapes and sedimentary deposits with a rich hierarchy of structures that extend from grain- to valley scale. Large-scale pattern formation in fluvial systems is commonly attributed to forcing by external factors, including climate change, tectonic uplift, and sea-level change. Yet over geologic timescales, rivers may also develop large-scale erosional and depositional patterns that do not bear on environmental history. This dissertation uses a combination of numerical modeling and topographic analysis to identify and quantify patterns in river valleys that form as a consequence of river meandering alone, under constant external forcing. Chapter 2 identifies a numerical artifact in existing, grid-based models that represent the co-evolution of river channel migration and bank strength over geologic timescales. A new, vector-based technique for bank-material tracking is shown to improve predictions for the evolution of meander belts, floodplains, sedimentary deposits formed by aggrading channels, and bedrock river valleys, particularly when spatial contrasts in bank strength are strong. Chapters 3 and 4 apply this numerical technique to establishing valley topography formed by a vertically incising, meandering river subject to constant external forcing---which should serve as the null hypothesis for valley evolution. In Chapter 3, this scenario is shown to explain a variety of common bedrock river valley types and smaller-scale features within them---including entrenched channels, long-wavelength, arcuate scars in valley walls, and bedrock-cored river terraces. Chapter 4 describes the age and geometric statistics of river terraces formed by meandering with constant external forcing, and compares them to terraces in natural river valleys. The frequency of intrinsic terrace formation by meandering is shown to reflect a characteristic relief-generation timescale, and terrace length is identified as a key criterion for distinguishing these

  8. Tectonic controls of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc mineralization in orogenic forelands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, D.C.; Leach, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    Most of the world's Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) zinc-lead deposits occur in orogenic forelands. We examine tectonic aspects of foreland evolution as part of a broader study of why some forelands are rich in MVT deposits, whereas others are barren. The type of orogenic foreland (collisional versus Andean-type versus inversion-type) is not a first-order control, because each has MVT deposits (e.g., Northern Arkansas, Pine Point, and Cevennes, respectively). In some MVT districts (e.g., Tri-State and Central Tennessee), mineralization took place atop an orogenic forebulge, a low-amplitude (a few hundred meters), long-wavelength (100-200 km) swell formed by vertical loading of the foreland plate. In the foreland of the active Banda Arc collision zone, a discontinuous forebulge reveals some of the physiographic and geologic complexities of the forebulge environment, and the importance of sea level in determining whether or not a forebulge will emerge and thus be subject to erosion. In addition to those on extant forebulges, some MVT deposits occur immediately below unconformities that originated at a forebulge, only to be subsequently carried toward the orogen by the plate-tectonic conveyor (e.g., Daniel's Harbour and East Tennessee). Likewise, some deposits are located along syn-collisional, flexure-induced normal and strike-slip faults in collisional forelands (e.g., Northern Arkansas, Daniel's Harbour, and Tri-State districts). These findings reveal the importance of lithospheric flexure, and suggest a conceptual tectonic model that accounts for an important subset of MVT deposits-those in the forelands of collisional orogens. The MVT deposits occur both in flat-lying and in thrust-faulted strata; in the latter group, mineralization postdated thrusting in some instances (e.g., Picos de Europa) but may have predated thrusting in other cases (e.g., East Tennessee).

  9. The East Tennessee Technology Park Progress Report for the Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act for Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

    2000-03-01

    This report is prepared for the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) (ETTP) in compliance with the ''Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act of 1990'' (THWRA) (TDEC 1990), Tennessee Code Annotated 68-212-306. Annually, THWRA requires a review of the site waste reduction plan, completion of summary waste reduction information as part of the site's annual hazardous waste reporting, and completion of an annual progress report analyzing and quantifying progress toward THWRA-required waste stream-specific reduction goals. This THWRA-required progress report provides information about ETTP's hazardous waste streams regulated under THWRA and waste reduction progress made in calendar year (CY) 1999. This progress report also documents the annual review of the site plan, ''Oak Ridge Operations Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities (EMEF) Pollution Prevention Program Plan'', BJC/OR-306/R1 (Bechtel Jacobs Company 199a). In 1996, ETTP established new goal year ratios that extended the goal year to CY 1999 and targeted 50 percent waste stream-specific reduction goals. In CY 1999, these CY 1999 goals were extended to CY 2000 for all waste streams that generated waste in 1999. Of the 70 ETTP RCRA waste streams tracked in this report from base years as early as CY 1991, 51 waste streams met or exceeded their reduction goal based on the CY 1999 data.

  10. The East Tennessee Technology Park Progress Report for the Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act for Calendar Year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

    2001-03-01

    This report is prepared for the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) (ETTP) in compliance with the ''Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act of 1990'' (THWRA) (TDEC 1990), Tennessee Code Annotated 68-212-306. Annually, THWRA requires a review of the site waste reduction plan, completion of summary waste reduction information as part of the site's annual hazardous waste reporting, and completion of an annual progress report analyzing and quantifying progress toward THWRA-required waste stream-specific reduction goals. This THWRA-required progress report provides information about ETTP's hazardous waste streams regulated under THWRA and waste reduction progress made in calendar year (CY) 2000. This progress report also documents the annual review of the site plan, ''Oak Ridge Operations Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities (EMEF) Pollution Prevention Program Plan'', BJC/OR-306/R1 (Bechtel Jacobs Company 2000). In 1996, ETTP established new goal year ratios that extended the goal year to CY 1999 and targeted 50 percent waste stream-specific reduction goals. In CY 2000, these goals were extended to CY 2001 for all waste streams that generated waste in 2000. Of the 70 ETTP RCRA waste streams tracked in this report from base years as early as CY 1991, 50 waste streams met or exceeded their reduction goal based on the CY 2000 data.

  11. 27 CFR 9.57 - Green Valley of Russian River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Green Valley of Russian... Areas § 9.57 Green Valley of Russian River Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Green Valley of Russian River Valley”. For purposes of part 4 of this...

  12. 27 CFR 9.57 - Green Valley of Russian River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Green Valley of Russian... Areas § 9.57 Green Valley of Russian River Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Green Valley of Russian River Valley”. For purposes of part 4 of this...

  13. Geological mapping of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Lemiszki, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly known as the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant) is located in the southern Appalachian Valley and Ridge province of east Tennessee and overlies an area of folded and faulted Cambrian through Ordovician sedimentary rocks in the footwall of the Whiteoak Mountain fault. Environmental restoration plans for the area require that the geology of the site be well understood because various aspects of the groundwater system are directly influenced by stratigraphic and structural characteristics of the bedrock. This study involved mapping the bedrock geology of an 18-square mile area in and around the plant site. Field mapping focused on: (1) checking the accuracy of previously mapped stratigraphic and fault contacts, (2) dividing the bedrock into distinct stratigraphic units based on field criteria, (3) determining the geometry of map-scale folds and faults, and (4) documenting various aspects of the local fracture system. Besides accomplishing all of the above tasks, results from this study have led to a number of new hypotheses regarding various aspects of the site geology. First, faulting and folding within carbonates of the Chickamauga Supergroup in the plant area has repeated certain rock units, which requires that there be a thrust fault in the subsurface below them. This thrust fault may project to the surface with the Carters Limestone. Second, thrust slices of the Rome Formation that overlie the Chickamauga carbonates may be extremely thin and have a limited aerial extent. Third, part of the Knox Group on McKinney Ridge is folded into an anticline. Evaluating the above hypotheses will require information about the subsurface that can only be acquired through drilling and surface geophysical surveys. The geologic map produced from this study can be used to evaluate the location of coreholes that will more effectively intersect a combination of stratigraphic, structural, and hydrologic targets.

  14. Proceedings of the information exchange workshop: Design basis floods, March 20, 1990, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, W.R.; Lee, D.W. )

    1990-09-01

    An information exchange workshop was held on March 20, 1990, at the K-25 Plant to discuss Design Basis Floods (DBFLs) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PAD) as required by the Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Upgrade Program. The attendees consisted of representatives of the Department of Energy (DOE)-Headquarters, DOE-Oak Ridge Operations, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and recognized experts in the flood evaluation field from Jack R. Benjamin and Associates (JRBA), the Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The principal goal of this workshop was to develop a consensus approach for defining the DBFL for PAD, based on information and direction from the team of experts assembled and DOE and Energy Systems representatives. To accomplish this, the applicable DOE order and related guidance documents were addressed and discussed for application to PAD. The representatives from JRBA, COE, and TVA made technical presentations that summarized flood-evalutation techniques. These presentations portrayed several different points of view for evaluating extreme flooding events. The JRBA approach is based on probabilistic methods. The approaches used by COE and TVA are based on deterministic methods. Both COE and TVA recognized Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) as a very extreme, deterministic flooding event. A discussion focused around the possiblity of defining (postulating) the PMF for the portion of the Ohio River Basin that would affect PAD. The representitive from JRBA expressed some technical concerns pertaining to a PMF approach. Several Energy Systems representatives felt that if a PMF were postulated for PAD, the calculated maximum flood stage would probably remain below plant grade. 30 figs.

  15. Karst hydrogeology and hydrochemistry of the Cave Springs basin near Chattanooga, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavlicek, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    The Cave Springs ground-water basin, located near Chattanooga, Tennessee, was chosen as one of the Valley and Ridge physiographic province type area studies for the Appalachian Valley-Piedmont Regional Aquifer-System Analysis study in 1990. Karstic Paleozoic carbonate rocks, residual clay-rich regolith, and coarse alluvium form the aquifer framework. Recharge from rainfall dispersed over the basin enters the karst aquifer through the thick regolith. The area supplying recharge to the Cave Springs Basin is approximately 7 square miles. Recharge from North Chickamauga Creek may contribute recharge to the Cave Springs Basin along losing reaches. The flow medium consists of mixed dolomite and limestone with cavernous and fracture porosity. Flow type as determined by the coefficient of variation of long-term continuous specific conductance (18 and 15 percent) from two wells completed in cavernous intervals about 150 feet northeast of Cave Springs, indicates an aquifer with conduit flow. Flow type, based on the ratio (6:1) of spring flood-flow discharge to spring base-flow discharge, indicates an aquifer with diffuse flow. Conduit flow probably dominates the aquifer system west of Cave Springs Ridge from the highly transmissive, unconfined, alluvium capped aquifer and along losing reaches of North Chickamauga Creek. Diffuse flow probably predominates in the areas along and east of Cave Springs Ridge covered with the thick, clay-rich regolith that forms a leaky confining layer. Based on average annual long-term precipitation and runoff records, the amount of water available for recharge to Cave Springs is 11.8 cubic feet per second. The mean annual long-term discharge of Cave Springs is 16.4 cubic feet per second which leaves 4.6 cubic feet per second of recharge unaccounted for. As determined by low-flow stream discharge measurements, recharge along losing reaches of North Chickamauga Creek may be an important source of unaccounted-for-recharge to the Cave Springs Basin

  16. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, Robert D

    2005-11-30

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employed the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempted to characterize the P-T parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempted to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is worked with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) geochemically characterized the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Third-year results include: All project milestones have been met and addressed. We also have disseminated this research and related information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky are more extendible than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that has been successfully tested by a local independent and is now producing commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. If this structure is productive along strike, it will be one of the largest producing structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our

  17. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Southern Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Robert D. Hatcher

    2003-05-31

    This report summarizes the first-year accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employs the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempts to characterize the T-P parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempts to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is working with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) is geochemically characterizing the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). First-year results include: (1) meeting specific milestones (determination of thrust movement vectors, fracture analysis, and communicating results at professional meetings and through publication). All milestones were met. Movement vectors for Valley and Ridge thrusts were confirmed to be west-directed and derived from pushing by the Blue Ridge thrust sheet, and fan about the Tennessee salient. Fracture systems developed during Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic to Holocene compressional and extensional tectonic events, and are more intense near faults. Presentations of first-year results were made at the Tennessee Oil and Gas Association meeting (invited) in June, 2003, at a workshop in August 2003 on geophysical logs in Ordovician rocks, and at the Eastern Section AAPG meeting in September 2003. Papers on thrust tectonics and a major prospect discovered during the first year are in press in an AAPG Memoir and published in the July 28, 2003, issue of the Oil and Gas Journal. (2) collaboration with industry and USGS partners. Several Middle Ordovician black shale samples were sent to USGS for organic carbon analysis. Mississippian and Middle Ordovician rock samples were collected by John Repetski (USGS) and

  18. 27 CFR 9.46 - Livermore Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., (1956, Photorevised 1971, Minor Revision 1994); (8) Mendenhall Springs, CA (1996); (9) La Costa Valley... Valley viticultural area is located in the State of California in Contra Costa and Alameda Counties. The.../R2E range line on the La Costa Valley map, T4S; then (16) Continue southwest in a straight...

  19. 27 CFR 9.46 - Livermore Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., (1956, Photorevised 1971, Minor Revision 1994); (8) Mendenhall Springs, CA (1996); (9) La Costa Valley... Valley viticultural area is located in the State of California in Contra Costa and Alameda Counties. The.../R2E range line on the La Costa Valley map, T4S; then (16) Continue southwest in a straight...

  20. 27 CFR 9.46 - Livermore Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., (1956, Photorevised 1971, Minor Revision 1994); (8) Mendenhall Springs, CA (1996); (9) La Costa Valley... Valley viticultural area is located in the State of California in Contra Costa and Alameda Counties. The.../R2E range line on the La Costa Valley map, T4S; then (16) Continue southwest in a straight...

  1. 27 CFR 9.46 - Livermore Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., (1956, Photorevised 1971, Minor Revision 1994); (8) Mendenhall Springs, CA (1996); (9) La Costa Valley... Valley viticultural area is located in the State of California in Contra Costa and Alameda Counties. The.../R2E range line on the La Costa Valley map, T4S; then (16) Continue southwest in a straight...

  2. 27 CFR 9.46 - Livermore Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., (1956, Photorevised 1971, Minor Revision 1994); (8) Mendenhall Springs, CA (1996); (9) La Costa Valley... Valley viticultural area is located in the State of California in Contra Costa and Alameda Counties. The.../R2E range line on the La Costa Valley map, T4S; then (16) Continue southwest in a straight...

  3. 27 CFR 9.82 - Potter Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.82 Potter Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Potter Valley.” (b) Approved map. The approved maps for the Potter Valley viticultural area are the U.S.G.S....

  4. 27 CFR 9.29 - Sonoma Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.29 Sonoma Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The maps showing the boundaries of the Sonoma valley viticultural area...

  5. 27 CFR 9.29 - Sonoma Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.29 Sonoma Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The maps showing the boundaries of the Sonoma valley viticultural area...

  6. 27 CFR 9.23 - Napa Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.23 Napa Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Napa Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The maps showing the boundaries of the Napa Valley viticultural area are the: (1) “Mt....

  7. 27 CFR 9.100 - Mesilla Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.100 Mesilla Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mesilla Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of Mesilla Valley...

  8. 27 CFR 9.29 - Sonoma Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.29 Sonoma Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The maps showing the boundaries of the Sonoma valley viticultural area...

  9. 27 CFR 9.58 - Carmel Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.58 Carmel Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Carmel Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Carmel Valley...

  10. 27 CFR 9.29 - Sonoma Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.29 Sonoma Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The maps showing the boundaries of the Sonoma valley viticultural area...

  11. 27 CFR 9.69 - Yakima Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.69 Yakima Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Yakima Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Yakima Valley...

  12. 27 CFR 9.69 - Yakima Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.69 Yakima Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Yakima Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Yakima Valley...

  13. 27 CFR 9.23 - Napa Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.23 Napa Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Napa Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The maps showing the boundaries of the Napa Valley viticultural area are the: (1) “Mt....

  14. 27 CFR 9.69 - Yakima Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.69 Yakima Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Yakima Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Yakima Valley...

  15. 27 CFR 9.82 - Potter Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.82 Potter Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Potter Valley.” (b) Approved map. The approved maps for the Potter Valley viticultural area are the U.S.G.S....

  16. 27 CFR 9.58 - Carmel Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.58 Carmel Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Carmel Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Carmel Valley...

  17. 27 CFR 9.58 - Carmel Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.58 Carmel Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Carmel Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Carmel Valley...

  18. 27 CFR 9.50 - Temecula Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.50 Temecula Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Temecula Valley.” (b) Approved map.The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Temecula Valley...

  19. 27 CFR 9.82 - Potter Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.82 Potter Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Potter Valley.” (b) Approved map. The approved maps for the Potter Valley viticultural area are the U.S.G.S....

  20. 27 CFR 9.82 - Potter Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.82 Potter Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Potter Valley.” (b) Approved map. The approved maps for the Potter Valley viticultural area are the U.S.G.S....

  1. 27 CFR 9.23 - Napa Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.23 Napa Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Napa Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The maps showing the boundaries of the Napa Valley viticultural area are the: (1) “Mt....

  2. 27 CFR 9.29 - Sonoma Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.29 Sonoma Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The maps showing the boundaries of the Sonoma valley viticultural area...

  3. 27 CFR 9.23 - Napa Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.23 Napa Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Napa Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The maps showing the boundaries of the Napa Valley viticultural area are the: (1) “Mt....

  4. 27 CFR 9.23 - Napa Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.23 Napa Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Napa Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The maps showing the boundaries of the Napa Valley viticultural area are the: (1) “Mt....

  5. 27 CFR 9.58 - Carmel Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.58 Carmel Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Carmel Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Carmel Valley...

  6. 27 CFR 9.100 - Mesilla Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.100 Mesilla Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mesilla Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of Mesilla Valley...

  7. 27 CFR 9.58 - Carmel Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.58 Carmel Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Carmel Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Carmel Valley...

  8. 27 CFR 9.100 - Mesilla Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.100 Mesilla Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mesilla Valley.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of Mesilla Valley...

  9. A comparison of avian communities and habitat characteristics in floodplain forests associated with valley plugs and unchannelized streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, A.R.; King, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    Channelization of streams associated with floodplain forested wetlands has occurred extensively throughout the world and specifically in the southeastern United States. Channelization of fluvial systems alters the hydrologic and sedimentation processes that sustain these systems. In western Tennessee, channelization and past land-use practices have caused drastic geomorphic and hydrologic changes, resulting in altered habitat conditions that may affect avian communities. The objective of this study was to determine if there were differences in avian communities utilizing floodplain forests along unchannelized streams compared to channelized streams with valley plugs, areas where sediment has completely filled the channel. During point count surveys, 58 bird species were observed at unchannelized sites and 60 species were observed at valley plug sites. Species associated with baldcypress-tupelo (Taxodium-Nyssa) swamps (e.g. Great Egret (Ardea albus) and Black-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax)) and mature hardwood forests with open midstories (e.g. Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens), Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons), Cerulean Warbler (Dendroica cerulea) and Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea)) were either only found at unchannelized sites or were more abundant at unchannelized sites. Conversely, species associated with open and early successional habitats (e.g. Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor), Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) and Blue Grosbeak (Passerina caerulea)) were either only found at valley plug sites or were more abundant at valley plug sites. Results of habitat modelling suggest that the habitat characteristics of floodplain forests at unchannelized sites are more suitable for Neotropical migrant bird species of conservation concern in the region than at valley plug sites. This study, in combination with previous research, demonstrates the ecological impacts of valley plugs span across abiotic and biotic processes and tropic

  10. A comparison of avian communities and habitat characteristics in floodplain forests associated with valley plugs and unchannelized streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, A.R.; King, Sammy L.

    2011-01-01

    Channelization of streams associated with floodplain forested wetlands has occurred extensively throughout the world and specifically in the southeastern United States. Channelization of fluvial systems alters the hydrologic and sedimentation processes that sustain these systems. In western Tennessee, channelization and past land-use practices have caused drastic geomorphic and hydrologic changes, resulting in altered habitat conditions that may affect avian communities. The objective of this study was to determine if there were differences in avian communities utilizing floodplain forests along unchannelized streams compared to channelized streams with valley plugs, areas where sediment has completely filled the channel. During point count surveys, 58 bird species were observed at unchannelized sites and 60 species were observed at valley plug sites. Species associated with baldcypress-tupelo (Taxodium-Nyssa) swamps (e.g. Great Egret (Ardea albus) and Black-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax)) and mature hardwood forests with open midstories (e.g. Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens), Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons), Cerulean Warbler (Dendroica cerulea) and Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea)) were either only found at unchannelized sites or were more abundant at unchannelized sites. Conversely, species associated with open and early successional habitats (e.g. Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor), Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) and Blue Grosbeak (Passerina caerulea)) were either only found at valley plug sites or were more abundant at valley plug sites. Results of habitat modelling suggest that the habitat characteristics of floodplain forests at unchannelized sites are more suitable for Neotropical migrant bird species of conservation concern in the region than at valley plug sites. This study, in combination with previous research, demonstrates the ecological impacts of valley plugs span across abiotic and biotic processes and tropic

  11. McMurdo Dry Valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    One of the few areas of Antarctica not covered by thousands of meters of ice, the McMurdo Dry Valleys stand out in this satellite image. For a few weeks each summer temperatures are warm enough to melt glacial ice, creating streams that feed freshwater lakes that lie at the bottom of the valleys. Beneath a cap of ice these lakes remains unfrozen year-round, supporting colonies of bacteria and phytoplankton. Over the past 14 years, however, summers have been colder than usual, and the lakes are becoming more and more frozen. If the trend continues, the biological communities they support may go into hibernation. Most of Antarctica has cooled along with the Dry Valleys, in contrast to much of the rest of the Earth, which has warmed over the past 100 years. No one knows if the trend is related to global climate, or just a quirk in the weather. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) instrument on December 18, 1999. For more information, visit: National Public Radio's Mixed Signals from Antarctica Declassified Satellite Imagery of the McMurdo Dry Valleys Image by Robert Simmon, based on data provided by the NASA GSFC Oceans and Ice Branch and the Landsat 7 Science Team

  12. Atmospheric turbidity over Kathmandu valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, Balkrishna; Dhaubhadel, Rajan

    The atmosphere of Kathmandu Valley has been investigated by using Sunphotometer and Nephelometer during the pre-monsoon period of 1999. The atmospheric turbidity parameters (extinction coefficient for 500 nm wavelength τAG and Angstrom coefficient β) are found high in the morning and show decreasing trends from morning to late afternoon on average. Vertical dispersion of pollutants and increasing pollutant flushing rate by increasing wind speed from morning to late afternoon is the cause for this decreasing trend of turbidity over the valley. Being surrounded by high hills all around the valley, horizontal exit of pollutants without vertical dispersion is not possible. The scattering coefficient bscat of aerosols in ground level troposphere is also found high in the morning, which decreases and becomes minimum during afternoon. During late afternoon, bscat again shows a slightly increasing trend. The reason is the increasing vehicular emission during late afternoon rush period. The average values of Angstrom exponent α, β, τAG and bscat are found to be 0.624±0.023, 0.299±0.009, 0.602±0.022 and 0.353±0.014 km -1, respectively. About 76.8% of the observed values of β lie above 0.2 indicating heavy particulate pollution in the valley. A comparison of observed values of turbidity parameters with other major cities of the world shows that Kathmandu is as polluted as cities like Jakarta, Kansas, Beijing, Vienna, etc.

  13. Navigating the valley of death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacey, James

    2014-11-01

    Taking an innovation from the lab to the market is hard in any discipline, but physics start-ups face some unique challenges crossing the so-called "valley of death". James Dacey speaks to scientists and business professionals in the Boston area of the US who have dared to take on this journey.

  14. 75 FR 45108 - East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental... Tennessee Project proposed by East Tennessee Natural Gas (ETNG) in the above referenced docket. ETNG requests authorization to construct, replace and abandon natural gas pipeline transmission facilities...

  15. The Study of Success of Individuals with Exceptional Needs in Tennessee Virtual Academy in Grades 5-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, Nichole

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the success of students in Exceptional Education in Tennessee Virtual Academy. Students participating in this study are in grades 5-8, have a diagnosis of Specific Learning Disabilities, residents of Tennessee, currently enrolled in Tennessee Virtual Academy, and received Exceptional Education services.…

  16. 78 FR 37218 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization Take notice that on May 30, 2013, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C. (Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas...

  17. [Preliminary Report on the Activities of the Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation for the School Year 1974-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Student Assistance Corp., Nashville.

    The Tennessee Educational Loan Corporation and the Tennessee Student Assistance Agency have merged into a single state agency, the Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation, for the purpose of administering the state's student assistance programs. These are: (1) the Tuition Grant Program; (2) Guaranteed Student Loan Program; (3) Medical…

  18. 78 FR 71502 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee; Revisions to the Knox County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... action'' subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR... State of Tennessee, through the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) on December.... The SIP submittal revises the definition of ``Modification'' in Knox County Air Quality...

  19. Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship Program Annual Report: Recipient Outcomes through Fall 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship (TELS) program was designed to meet the unique needs of the state of Tennessee while also incorporating the hallmark elements of existing merit-based aid programs in other states. Developed through a process involving elected officials and members of the academic community, the TELS program aims to…

  20. Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship Program Annual Report, Outcomes through Fall 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship (TELS) program was designed to meet the unique needs of the state of Tennessee by incorporating the hallmark elements of existing merit-based aid programs in other states. Developed through a process involving elected officials and members of the academic community, the TELS program aims to address the…

  1. 77 FR 42997 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee; 110(a)(1) and (2) Infrastructure...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ...) and (J) for the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS by March 1, 2008. See 73 FR 16205. Infrastructure elements 110... 77 FR 14976. On April 16, 2012, EPA proposed to approve Tennessee's December 14, 2007, infrastructure...) requirements for Tennessee. See 77 FR 14976. 110(a)(2)(A): Emission limits and other control measures....

  2. Tennessee Higher Education Commission Staff Study. Re: House Resolution No. 107.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Nashville.

    The Tennessee Higher Education Commission conducted a study of the salaries of teaching staff and faculty in response to Tennessee House Resolution 107 on sexual discrimination. This study is the first known statewide effort to determine academic salaries. A multiple regression analysis model was used. Among the general findings were that: (1)…

  3. Annual Joint Report on Pre-Kindergarten through Higher Education in Tennessee, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The "Annual Joint Report on Pre-Kindergarten through Higher Education in Tennessee" complies with the requirements established in T.C.A. Section 49-1-302(a)(10). The act directs the State Board of Education and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission to provide a report to the Governor and General Assembly, all public schools, and…

  4. Annual Joint Report on Pre-Kindergarten through Higher Education in Tennessee, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Board of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report complies with the requirements established in T.C.A. (Tennessee Code Annotated) Section 49-1-302(a)(10). The act directs the State Board of Education and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission to provide a report to the Governor and General Assembly, all public schools, and institutions of higher learning and their respective…

  5. 40 CFR 81.119 - Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.119 Section 81.119 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.119 Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed...

  6. First to the Finish Line: The Tennessee State Tigerbelles 1944-1994

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Tracey M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the history and analyze the influence of the women's track and field team at the historically black college, Tennessee State University located in Nashville, Tennessee. The study was divided into three major sections. The first part examined the founding, early development and growth of the TSU women's…

  7. School TVAAS Rank and Teacher Perceptions of Elementary School Culture in East Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvin, Janice Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this study was a comparison between the perceptions of school culture characteristics as measured by the TELL Tennessee Survey taken by school-based licensed educators in Tennessee and each school's overall composite TVAAS score. 9 factor variables were discussed in the literature review. This dissertation was a quantitative study of…

  8. The Correlation between a Teacher Selection Instrument and Teacher Quality in Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhirter, Amy Balthrop

    2014-01-01

    It is not known to what extent the pre-employment teacher selection instrument scores used by a Tennessee school district correlate to teachers' post-employment quality after their first year of service. Two research questions guided the study on the Correlation Between a Teacher Selection Instrument and Teacher Quality in Tennessee: (1) To what…

  9. Country People in the New South: Tennessee's Upper Cumberland. Studies in Rural Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Jeanette

    In the summer of 1925, national attention focused on Dayton, Tennessee, where John T. Scopes was on trial for teaching evolution in violation of state law. The Tennessee "monkey trial" symbolized the confrontation of modern, secular, urban America with conservative, religious, rural America. Although urban journalists and social critics scorned on…

  10. 40 CFR 81.120 - Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.120 Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region....

  11. 40 CFR 81.120 - Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.120 Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region....

  12. 40 CFR 81.120 - Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.120 Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region....

  13. 40 CFR 81.120 - Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.120 Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region....

  14. 40 CFR 81.120 - Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.120 Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region....

  15. Engaging the Learner. Annual Instructional Technology Conference (12th, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, April 1-3, 2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carter F.; Schneider, Gary F.; Kontos, George; Kuzat, Hanan; Janossy, James; Thurmond, Karen; Moore, Beth; Whitledge, Lynn; Speer, Priscilla; Harber, Annette; Bailey, Kathrine; Penney, Samantha

    2007-01-01

    The following is a collection of papers presented at the 12th annual Instructional Technology Conference at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This conference is an opportunity for higher-education professionals from across the country to discuss opportunities and challenges presented by instructional technology. The…

  16. 76 FR 52652 - National Fuel Gas Supply Corporation; Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission National Fuel Gas Supply Corporation; Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice... Access Project and Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company's (TGP) proposed Station 230C Project in the above... County, to permit bi-directional flow; Modifications to underground piping and valves at the...

  17. 77 FR 60919 - Tennessee: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... Secondary 73 FR 57 1200-01-11-.01(2)(a); 1200-01-11- Materials Processed in a Gasification 01/02/08 .02(1)(d...? Tennessee initially received final authorization on January 22, 1985, effective February 5, 1985 (50 FR 2820... Tennessee's program on the following dates: June 12, 1987, effective August 11, 1987 (52 FR 22443); June...

  18. 77 FR 51794 - East Tennessee Natural Gas, LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... abandon in place two standby compressor units and abandon in place or remove related appurtenant equipment at its Glade Spring ] Compressor Station in Washington County, Virginia, under East Tennessee's...). East Tennessee proposes to abandon in place two standby 660 horsepower reciprocating natural...

  19. The effects of mountaintop mines and valley fills on the physicochemical quality of stream ecosystems in the central Appalachians: a review.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Michael B; Norton, Susan B; Alexander, Laurie C; Pollard, Amina I; LeDuc, Stephen D

    2012-02-15

    This review assesses the state of the science on the effects of mountaintop mines and valley fills (MTM-VF) on the physicochemical characteristics of streams in the central Appalachian coalfields of West Virginia, Kentucky, Virginia and Tennessee, USA. We focus on the impacts of mountaintop removal coal mining, which involves removing all - or some portion - of the top of a mountain or ridge to expose and mine one or more coal seams. Excess overburden is disposed in constructed fills in small valleys adjacent to the mining site. MTM-VF leachate persistently increases the downstream concentrations of major ions. Conductivity is a coarse measure of these ions, which are dominated by a distinct mixture of SO(4)(2-), HCO(3)(-), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), that reflects their source, the oxidation of pyrite to form acid followed by neutralization of the acidity by carbonate minerals within the valley fills. This results in neutral to alkaline pHs, a range at which many metals are relatively insoluble. Other compounds within coal or overburden are solubilized and occur at elevated albeit lower concentrations, including K(+), Na(+), Cl(-), Se and Mn. In terms of physical characteristics, the valley fills act like headwater aquifers, baseflows increase in streams below valley fills and water temperatures exhibit reduced seasonal variation. Peak discharges may be increased in response to intense precipitation events, because of compaction of base surfaces of the MTM-VF areas, but newer approaches to reclamation reduce this compaction and may ameliorate these peak flows. Although the sedimentation pond is intended to capture fine particles that wash downstream from the valley fill, some studies found increased fine sediments in streams downstream from valley fills. However, a proportion of these fines may be eroded from stream banks rather than the valley fills. This is probably a result of the alterations in stream flows.

  20. Topological spin and valley pumping in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Sheng, L.; Wang, B. G.; Xing, D. Y.

    2016-08-01

    We propose to realize adiabatic topological spin and valley pumping by using silicene, subject to the modulation of an in-plane ac electric field with amplitude Ey and a vertical electric field consisting of an electrostatic component and an ac component with amplitudes and . By tuning and , topological valley pumping or spin-valley pumping can be achieved. The low-noise valley and spin currents generated can be useful in valleytronic and spintronic applications. Our work also demonstrates that bulk topological spin or valley pumping is a general characteristic effect of two-dimensional topological insulators, irrelevant to the edge state physics.

  1. Topological spin and valley pumping in silicene

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Sheng, L.; Wang, B. G.; Xing, D. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We propose to realize adiabatic topological spin and valley pumping by using silicene, subject to the modulation of an in-plane ac electric field with amplitude Ey and a vertical electric field consisting of an electrostatic component and an ac component with amplitudes and . By tuning and , topological valley pumping or spin-valley pumping can be achieved. The low-noise valley and spin currents generated can be useful in valleytronic and spintronic applications. Our work also demonstrates that bulk topological spin or valley pumping is a general characteristic effect of two-dimensional topological insulators, irrelevant to the edge state physics. PMID:27507592

  2. Public Water-Supply Systems and Associated Water Use in Tennessee, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webbers, Ank

    2003-01-01

    Public water-supply systems in Tennessee provide water to meet customer needs for domestic, industrial, and commercial users and municipal services. In 2000, more than 500 public water-supply systems distributed about 890 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of surface water and ground water to a population of about 5 million in Tennessee. Surface-water sources provided 64 percent (about 569 Mgal/d) of the State?s water supplies, primarily in Middle and East Tennessee. Ground water produced from wells and springs in Middle and East Tennessee and from wells in West Tennessee provided 36 percent (about 321 Mgal/d) of the public water supplies. Springs in Middle and East Tennessee provided about 14 percent (about 42 Mgal/d) of ground-water supplies used in the State. Per capita water use for Tennessee in 2000 was about 136 gallons per day. An additional 146 public water-supply systems provided approximately 84 Mgal/d of water supplies that were purchased from other water systems. Water withdrawals by public water-supply systems in Tennessee have increased by over 250 percent; from 250 Mgal/d in 1955 to 890 Mgal/d in 2000. Although Tennessee public water-supply systems withdraw less ground water than surface water, ground-water withdrawal rates reported by these systems continue to increase. In addition, the number of public water-supply systems reporting ground-water withdrawals of 1 Mgal/d or more in West Tennessee is increasing.

  3. Identification of aggregates for Tennessee bituminous surface courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, Heather Jean

    Tennessee road construction is a major venue for federal and state spending. Tax dollars each year go to the maintenance and construction of roads. One aspect of highway construction that affects the public is the safety of its state roads. There are many factors that affect the safety of a given road. One factor that was focused on in this research was the polish resistance capabilities of aggregates. Several pre-evaluation methods have been used in the laboratory to predict what will happen in a field situation. A new pre-evaluation method was invented that utilized AASHTO T 304 procedure upscaled to accommodate surface bituminous aggregates. This new method, called the Tennessee Terminal Textural Condition Method (T3CM), was approved by Tennessee Department of Transportation to be used as a pre-evaluation method on bituminous surface courses. It was proven to be operator insensitive, repeatable, and an accurate indication of particle shape and texture. Further research was needed to correlate pre-evaluation methods to the current field method, ASTM E 274-85 Locked Wheel Skid Trailer. In this research, twenty-five in-place bituminous projects and eight source evaluations were investigated. The information gathered would further validate the T3CM and find the pre-evaluation method that best predicted the field method. In addition, new sources of aggregates for bituminous surface courses were revealed. The results of this research have shown T3CM to be highly repeatable with an overall coefficient of variation of 0.26% for an eight sample repeatability test. It was the best correlated pre-evaluation method with the locked wheel skid trailer method giving an R2 value of 0.3946 and a Pearson coefficient of 0.710. Being able to predict field performance of aggregates prior to construction is a powerful tool capable of saving time, money, labor, and possibly lives.

  4. Morphology of large valleys on Hawaii - Evidence for groundwater sapping and comparisons with Martian valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochel, R. Craig; Piper, Jonathan F.

    1986-01-01

    Morphometric data on the runoff and sapping valleys on the slopes of Hawaii and Molokai in Hawaii are analyzed. The analysis reveals a clear distinction between the runoff valleys and sapping valleys. The Hawaiian sapping valleys are characterized by: (1) steep valley walls and flat floors, (2) amphitheater heads, (3) low drainage density, (4) paucity of downstream tributaries, (5) low frequency of up-dip tributaries, and (6) structural and stratigraphic control on valley patterns. The characteristics of the Hawaiian sapping valleys are compared to Martian valleys and experimental systems, and good correlation between the data is detected. Flume experiments were also conducted to study the evolution of sapping valleys in response to variable structure and stratigraphy.

  5. Morphology of large valleys on Hawaii - Evidence for groundwater sapping and comparisons with Martian valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochel, R. Craig; Piper, Jonathan F.

    1986-11-01

    Morphometric data on the runoff and sapping valleys on the slopes of Hawaii and Molokai in Hawaii are analyzed. The analysis reveals a clear distinction between the runoff valleys and sapping valleys. The Hawaiian sapping valleys are characterized by: (1) steep valley walls and flat floors, (2) amphitheater heads, (3) low drainage density, (4) paucity of downstream tributaries, (5) low frequency of up-dip tributaries, and (6) structural and stratigraphic control on valley patterns. The characteristics of the Hawaiian sapping valleys are compared to Martian valleys and experimental systems, and good correlation between the data is detected. Flume experiments were also conducted to study the evolution of sapping valleys in response to variable structure and stratigraphy.

  6. Education of the rural surgeon: experience from Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Giles, W Heath; Arnold, Joshua D; Layman, Thomas S; Sumida, Michael P; Brown, Preston W; Burns, R Phillip; Cofer, Joseph B

    2009-12-01

    The rural surgery rotation that is contained within the general surgery residency program at The University of Tennessee College of Medicine-Chattanooga is described in this article. The advantages of this experience, including the extensive endoscopy experience and the close exposure to practicing general surgeons, are also outlined. The rotation receives uniformly positive evaluations from residents at completion, and it has become the primary gastrointestinal endoscopy educational experience in this program. The description serves as a model that can be used by other programs to construct a rural surgery rotation.

  7. Technique for estimating depth of floods in Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamble, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates of flood depths are needed for design of roadways across flood plains and for other types of construction along streams. Equations for estimating flood depths in Tennessee were derived using data for 150 gaging stations. The equations are based on drainage basin size and can be used to estimate depths of the 10-year and 100-year floods for four hydrologic areas. A method also was developed for estimating depth of floods having recurrence intervals between 10 and 100 years. Standard errors range from 22 to 30 percent for the 10-year depth equations and from 23 to 30 percent for the 100-year depth equations. (USGS)

  8. Drought-related West Tennessee channel bank failures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, W.J.; Bryan, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    Massive bank failures occurred in 1988 along a 14-kilometer reach of the lower Obion River channel in Dyer County, West Tennessee where the river flows through an abandoned Mississippi River meander. Bank failures in this reach extend as far as 50 meters from the channel and reach depths of 20 meters below ground surface. The critical elements that led to the failures appear to have been the combination of high soil moisture content and low river stage against a background of substantial recent bank accretion.

  9. Criticality safety research at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, H.L.

    1997-06-01

    A list of seven research projects in nuclear criticality safety being conducted at the University of Tennessee is given. One of the projects is very briefly described. The study of space-dependent kinetics analysis of a hypothetical criticality accident involving an array of bottles containing UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} is being conducted for the US DOE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, K-25 plant. Preliminary results for power versus time are presented, which indicate that space-time effects are significant after approximately 70 seconds. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Water quality in the lower Tennessee River Basin, Tennessee, Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Georgia, 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodside, Michael D.; Hoos, Anne B.; Kingsbury, James A.; Powell, Jeffrey R.; Knight, Rodney R.; Garrett, Jerry W.; Mitchell, Reavis L.; Robinson, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This report contains the major findings of a 1999?2001 assessment of water quality in the Lower Tennessee River Basin. It is one of a series of reports by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program that present major findings in 51 major river basins and aquifer systems across the Nation. In these reports, water quality is discussed in terms of local, State, and regional issues. Conditions in a particular basin or aquifer system are compared to conditions found elsewhere and to selected national benchmarks, such as those for drinking-water quality and the protection of aquatic organisms. This report is intended for individuals working with water-resource issues in Federal, State, or local agencies, universities, public interest groups, or in the private sector. The information will be useful in addressing a number of current issues, such as the effects of agricultural and urban land use on water quality, human health, drinking water, source-water protection, hypoxia and excessive growth of algae and plants, pesticide registration, and monitoring and sampling strategies. This report is also for individuals who wish to know more about the quality of streams and ground water in areas where they live, and how that water quality compares to the quality of water in other areas across the Nation. The water-quality conditions in the Lower Tennessee River Basin summarized in this report are discussed in detail in other reports that can be accessed from the Lower Tennessee River Basin Web site (http://tn.water.usgs.gov/lten/lten.html). Detailed technical information, data and analyses, collection and analytical methodology, models, graphs, and maps that support the findings presented in this report in addition to reports in this series from other basins can be accessed from the national NAWQA Web site (http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa).

  11. Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 4 (shallow groundwater in Bear Creek Valley) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    To effectively evaluate the cumulative impact of releases from multiple sources of contamination, a structured approach has been adopted for Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) based on studies of the groundwater and surface water separate from studies of the sources. Based on the realization of the complexity of the hydrogeologic regime of the ORR, together with the fact that there are numerous sources contributing to groundwater contamination within a geographical area, it was agreed that more timely investigations, at perhaps less cost, could be achieved by separating the sources of contamination from the groundwater and surface water for investigation and remediation. The result will be more immediate attention [Records of Decision (RODs) for interim measures or removal actions] for the source Operable Units (OUs) while longer-term remediation investigations continue for the hydrogeologic regimes, which are labeled as integrator OUs. This remedial investigation work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to the unit. Taking advantage of the historical data base and ongoing monitoring activities and applying the observational approach to focus data gathering activities will allow the feasibility study to evaluate all probable or likely alternatives.

  12. Remedial Investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 4 (shallow groundwater in Bear Creek Valley) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    To effectively evaluate the cumulative impact of releases from multiple sources of contamination, a structured approach has been adopted for Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) based on studies of the groundwater and surface water separate from studies of the sources. Based on the realization of the complexity of the hydrogeologic regime of the ORR, together with the fact that there are numerous sources contributing to groundwater contamination within a geographical area, it was agreed that more timely investigations, at perhaps less cost, could be achieved by separating the sources of contamination from the groundwater and surface water for investigation and remediation. The result will be more immediate attention [Records of Decision (RODS) for interim measures or removal actions] for the source Operable Units (OUs) while longer-term remediation investigations continue for the hydrogeologic regime`s, which are labeled as integrator OUs. This Remedial Investigation work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to the unit. Taking advantage of the historical data base and ongoing monitoring activities and applying the observational approach to focus data gathering activities will allow the Feasibility Study to evaluate all probable or likely alternatives.

  13. Survey of the potential environmental and health impacts in the immediate aftermath of the coal ash spill in Kingston, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Laura Ruhl; Avner Vengosh; Gary S. Dwyer; Heileen Hsu-Kim; Amrika Deonarine; Mike Bergin; Julia Kravchenko

    2009-08-15

    An investigation of the potential environmental and health impacts in the immediate aftermath of one of the largest coal ash spills in U.S. history at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston coal-burning power plant has revealed three major findings. First, the surface release of coal ash with high levels of toxic elements (As = 75 mg/kg; Hg = 150 {mu}g/kg) and radioactivity ({sup 226}Ra + {sup 228}Ra = 8 pCi/g) to the environment has the potential to generate resuspended ambient fine particles (<10 {mu}m) containing these toxics into the atmosphere that may pose a health risk to local communities. Second, leaching of contaminants from the coal ash caused contamination of surface waters in areas of restricted water exchange, but only trace levels were found in the downstream Emory and Clinch Rivers due to river dilution. Third, the accumulation of Hg- and As-rich coal ash in river sediments has the potential to have an impact on the ecological system in the downstream rivers by fish poisoning and methylmercury formation in anaerobic river sediments. 61 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Calendar year 1995 groundwater quality report for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This annual groundwater quality report (GWQR) contains groundwater and surface water quality data obtained during the 1995 calendar year (CY) at several hazardous and nonhazardous waste management facilities associated with the Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The sites addressed by this document are located in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) west of the Y-12 Plant complex within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime. The Bear Creek Regime is one of three hydrogeologic regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater and surface water quality monitoring at the Y-12 Plant. The purpose of the Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) is to characterize the hydrogeology and to monitor groundwater quality at the Y-12 Plant and surrounding area to provide for protection of groundwater resources consistent with federal, state, and local requirements. Part 1 (this report) consists primarily of data appendices and serves as a reference for the groundwater quality data obtained each CY under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. Part 2 of the report, to be issued mid-year, will contain an evaluation of the data with respect to regime-wide groundwater quality, present the findings and status of ongoing hydrogeologic studies, describe changes in monitoring priorities, and present planned modifications to the groundwater sampling and analysis program for the following CY.

  15. Statistical Description of Liquid Low-Level Waste System Transssuranic Wastes at Oak Ridge Nation Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The US DOE has presented plans for processing liquid low-level wastes (LLLW) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the LLLW tank system. These wastes are among the most hazardous on the Oak Ridge reservation and exhibit both RCRA toxic and radiological hazards. The Tennessee Department of Health and Environment has mandated that the processing of these wastes must begin by the year 2002 and the the goal should be permanent disposal at a site off the Oak Ridge Reservation. To meet this schedule, DOE will solicit bids from various private sector companies for the construction of a processing facility on land located near the ORNL Melton Valley Storage Tanks to be operated by the private sector on a contract basis. This report will support the Request for Proposal process and will give potential vendors information about the wastes contained in the ORNL tank farm system. The report consolidates current data about the properties and composition of these wastes and presents methods to calculate the error bounds of the data in the best technically defensible manner possible. The report includes information for only the tank waste that is to be included in the request for proposal.

  16. RABIES SURVEILLANCE AMONG BATS IN TENNESSEE, USA, 1996-2010.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Amy T; McCracken, Gary F; Sheeler, Lorinda L; Muller, Lisa I; O'Rourke, Dorcas; Kelch, William J; New, John C

    2015-10-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) infects multiple bat species in the Americas, and enzootic foci perpetuate in bats principally via intraspecific transmission. In recent years, bats have been implicated in over 90% of human rabies cases in the US. In Tennessee, two human cases of rabies have occurred since 1960: one case in 1994 associated with a tricolored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) RABV variant and another in 2002 associated with the tricolored/silver-haired bat (P. subflavus/Lasionycteris noctivagans) RABV variant. From 1996 to 2010, 2,039 bats were submitted for rabies testing in Tennessee. Among 1,943 bats in satisfactory condition for testing and with a reported diagnostic result, 96% (1,870 of 1,943) were identified to species and 10% (196 of 1,943) were rabid. Big brown (Eptesicus fuscus), tricolored, and eastern red (Lasiurus borealis) bats comprised 77% of testable bat submissions and 84% of rabid bats. For species with five or more submissions during 1996-2010, the highest proportion of rabid bats occurred in hoary (Lasiurus cinereus; 46%), unspecified Myotis spp. (22%), and eastern red (17%) bats. The best model to predict rabid bats included month of submission, exposure history of submission, species, and sex of bat.

  17. The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium: Identification of ocular mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Monica M.; Wang, Xiaofei; Lu, Lu; Miller, Darla R; Rinchik, Eugene M; Williams, Robert; Goldowitz, Daniel

    2005-06-01

    The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium (TMGC) is in its fifth year of a ethylnitrosourea (ENU)-based mutagenesis screen to detect recessive mutations that affect the eye and brain. Each pedigree is tested by various phenotyping domains including the eye, neurohistology, behavior, aging, ethanol, drug, social behavior, auditory, and epilepsy domains. The utilization of a highly efficient breeding protocol and coordination of various universities across Tennessee makes it possible for mice with ENU-induced mutations to be evaluated by nine distinct phenotyping domains within this large-scale project known as the TMGC. Our goal is to create mutant lines that model human diseases and disease syndromes and to make the mutant mice available to the scientific research community. Within the eye domain, mice are screened for anterior and posterior segment abnormalities using slit-lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, fundus photography, eye weight, histology, and immunohistochemistry. As of January 2005, we have screened 958 pedigrees and 4800 mice, excluding those used in mapping studies. We have thus far identified seven pedigrees with primary ocular abnormalities. Six of the mutant pedigrees have retinal or subretinal aberrations, while the remaining pedigree presents with an abnormal eye size. Continued characterization of these mutant mice should in most cases lead to the identification of the mutated gene, as well as provide insight into the function of each gene. Mice from each of these pedigrees of mutant mice are available for distribution to researchers for independent study.

  18. Radon, lung cancer, and geology in Livingston, Overton County, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Officer, C.; Shimek, S.; Fitzgerald, F.

    1995-12-31

    During the fall of 1994 tests defined radon levels of 76 piC/l in the basement level of a home in Overton Heights development in Livingston, Tennessee. Subsequent tests confirmed this elevation and also defined a value of 52 PiC/l in the second home tested in the same area. Subsequent discussions with local residents indicated 10 to 15 probable lung cancer cases in the previous +/-5 years in a population of about 100 households. When this situation was brought to the attention of the Tennessee Program the response was to immediately offer support for additional testing. This consisted of the placement of approximately 40 was to immediately offer support for additional testing. This consisted of the placement of approximately 40 Airchek charcoal packets on a somewhat random basis in February and March of 1995. Each house was tested in the location with potential for greatest radon elevation. The results showed that elevated radon levels were widespread with values as high as 105 piC/l. More significantly, most of the homes tested showed elevations. The next phase of the program involved some retesting of previously defined elevations but the majority of this stage concentrated on repeating those tests which were inconclusive and on the extension of the test area to establish the limits of the elevated values. Retesting verified elevations as previously defined but the values were generally lower due to testing main living levels and warmer which encouraged more ventilation.

  19. Urolithiasis in Tennessee: an occupational window into a regional problem.

    PubMed Central

    Thun, M J; Schober, S

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Urinary tract stones (stones) are believed to be unusually common in the southeastern United States but neither the incidence of nor the risk factors for stones are known. METHODS: In three well-defined occupational populations in eastern Tennessee, we assessed the prevalence, incidence, and cumulative incidence of stones and measured biochemical risk factors for lithogenesis. RESULTS: The age-adjusted prevalence of stones was 18.5 percent in Tennessee compared to 7.7 percent among White males in US NHANES (prevalence ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.7, 3.3). The cumulative incidence (risk) was 27.8 percent by age 65, higher than in any other reported population. Risk factors were age, a family history, and urinary saturation with calcium-oxalate (COAX). Persons with a positive family history and the highest measured CAOX index had a predicted lifetime risk of 88.8 percent. Biochemical factors affecting lithogenesis were hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, and low urine volume. CONCLUSION: Future research should characterize the geographic boundaries of a southeastern "stone-belt" and explore genetic and dietary hypotheses that might explain it. PMID:2014858

  20. Effects of Projected Transient Changes in Climate on Tennessee Forests

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Virginia H; Tharp, M Lynn; Lannom, Karen O.; Hodges, Donald G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines transient effects of projected climate change on the structure and species composition of forests in Tennessee. The climate change scenarios for 2030 and 2080 were provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) from three General Circulation Models (GCMs) that simulate the range of potential climate conditions for the state. The precipitation and temperature projections from the three GCMs for 2030 and 2080 were related to changes in the ecoregions by using the monthly record of temperature and precipitation from 1980 to 1997 for each 1 km cell across the state as aggregated into the five ecological provinces. Temperatures are projected to increase in all ecological provinces in all months for all three GCMs for both 2030 and 2080. Precipitation patterns are more complex with one model projecting wetter summers and two models projecting drier summers. The forest ecosystem model LINKAGES was used to simulate conditions in forest stands for the five ecological provinces of Tennessee from 1989 to 2300. These model runs suggest there will be a change in tree diversity and species composition in all ecological provinces with the greatest changes occurring in the Southern Mixed Forest province. Most projections show a decline in total tree biomass followed by recovery as species replacement occurs in stands. The changes in forest biomass and composition, as simulated in this study, are likely to have implications on forest economy, tourism, understory conditions, wildlife habitat, mast provisioning, and other services provided by forest systems.