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Sample records for 50-g oral glucose

  1. Oral glucose tolerance and hormonal response in heroin-dependent males.

    PubMed

    Reed, J L; Ghodse, A H

    1973-06-09

    Tests on 12 heroin addicts showed that their response to a glucose load differed from that in normal controls. Though the fasting blood sugar was normal, the rise in blood glucose after a standard 50-g oral glucose tolerance test was delayed and the rise smaller than in the controls. The heroin addicts had high resting insulin levels and a delayed peak response to an oral glucose load, and their growth hormone response was also abnormal.

  2. Effect of glycemia on plasma incretins and the incretin effect during oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Marzieh; Aulinger, Benedict; D'Alessio, David A

    2012-11-01

    The incretin effect, reflecting the enhancement of postprandial insulin secretion by factors including the intestinal hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, increases in proportion to meal size. However, it is unknown whether the incretin effect is dependent on ambient glucose. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of plasma glycemia on the incretin effect. Thirteen healthy subjects consumed 50 g oral glucose solution mixed with d-xylose during fixed hyperglycemia at 8 and 10.5 mmol/L, on 3 separate days, twice at lower glycemia (LOW) and once at higher values (HIGH). The relative increase in insulin release after glucose ingestion at fixed hyperglycemia, a surrogate for the incretin effect, was similar among all three studies. The GLP-1 response to oral glucose was significantly lower at higher plasma glycemia, as was the appearance of d-xylose after the meal. Between the two LOW studies, the reproducibility of insulin release in response to intravenous glucose alone and intravenous plus ingested glucose was similar. These findings indicate that the incretin contribution to postprandial insulin release is independent of glycemia in healthy individuals, despite differences in GLP-1 secretion. The incretin effect is a reproducible trait among humans with normal glucose tolerance.

  3. Meal related glucose monitoring is a method of diagnosing glucose intolerance in pregnancies with high probability of gestational diabetes but normal glucose tolerance by oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    John, Mathew; Gopinath, Deepa

    2013-06-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus diagnosed by classical oral glucose tolerance test can result in fetal complications like macrosomia and polyhydramnios. Guidelines exist on management of patients diagnose by abnormal oral glucose tolerance test with diet modification followed by insulin. Even patients with abnormal oral glucose tolerance test maintaining apparently normal blood sugars with diet are advised insulin if there is accelerated fetal growth. But patients with normal oral glucose tolerance test can present with macrosomia and polyhydramnios. These patients are labelled as not having gestational diabetes mellitus and are followed up with repeat oral glucose tolerance test. We hypothesise that these patients may have an altered placental threshold to glucose or abnormal sensitivity of fetal tissues to glucose. Meal related glucose monitoring in these patients can identify minor abnormalities in glucose disturbance and should be treated to targets similar to physiological levels of glucose in non pregnant adults.

  4. Metabolite Profiles During Oral Glucose Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jennifer E.; Larson, Martin G.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Ghorbani, Anahita; Cheng, Susan; Rhee, Eugene P.; Florez, Jose C.; Clish, Clary B.; Gerszten, Robert E.; Wang, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    To identify distinct biological pathways of glucose metabolism, we conducted a systematic evaluation of biochemical changes after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a community-based population. Metabolic profiling was performed on 377 nondiabetic Framingham Offspring cohort participants (mean age 57 years, 42% women, BMI 30 kg/m2) before and after OGTT. Changes in metabolite levels were evaluated with paired Student t tests, cluster-based analyses, and multivariable linear regression to examine differences associated with insulin resistance. Of 110 metabolites tested, 91 significantly changed with OGTT (P ≤ 0.0005 for all). Amino acids, β-hydroxybutyrate, and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates decreased after OGTT, and glycolysis products increased, consistent with physiological insulin actions. Other pathways affected by OGTT included decreases in serotonin derivatives, urea cycle metabolites, and B vitamins. We also observed an increase in conjugated, and a decrease in unconjugated, bile acids. Changes in β-hydroxybutyrate, isoleucine, lactate, and pyridoxate were blunted in those with insulin resistance. Our findings demonstrate changes in 91 metabolites representing distinct biological pathways that are perturbed in response to an OGTT. We also identify metabolite responses that distinguish individuals with and without insulin resistance. These findings suggest that unique metabolic phenotypes can be unmasked by OGTT in the prediabetic state. PMID:23382451

  5. Metabolite profiles during oral glucose challenge.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jennifer E; Larson, Martin G; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Ghorbani, Anahita; Cheng, Susan; Rhee, Eugene P; Florez, Jose C; Clish, Clary B; Gerszten, Robert E; Wang, Thomas J

    2013-08-01

    To identify distinct biological pathways of glucose metabolism, we conducted a systematic evaluation of biochemical changes after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a community-based population. Metabolic profiling was performed on 377 nondiabetic Framingham Offspring cohort participants (mean age 57 years, 42% women, BMI 30 kg/m(2)) before and after OGTT. Changes in metabolite levels were evaluated with paired Student t tests, cluster-based analyses, and multivariable linear regression to examine differences associated with insulin resistance. Of 110 metabolites tested, 91 significantly changed with OGTT (P ≤ 0.0005 for all). Amino acids, β-hydroxybutyrate, and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates decreased after OGTT, and glycolysis products increased, consistent with physiological insulin actions. Other pathways affected by OGTT included decreases in serotonin derivatives, urea cycle metabolites, and B vitamins. We also observed an increase in conjugated, and a decrease in unconjugated, bile acids. Changes in β-hydroxybutyrate, isoleucine, lactate, and pyridoxate were blunted in those with insulin resistance. Our findings demonstrate changes in 91 metabolites representing distinct biological pathways that are perturbed in response to an OGTT. We also identify metabolite responses that distinguish individuals with and without insulin resistance. These findings suggest that unique metabolic phenotypes can be unmasked by OGTT in the prediabetic state.

  6. Continuous glucose monitoring, oral glucose tolerance, and insulin - glucose parameters in adolescents with simple obesity.

    PubMed

    El Awwa, A; Soliman, A; Al-Ali, M; Yassin, M; De Sanctis, V

    2012-09-01

    In obese adolescents pancreatic beta-cells may not be able to cope with insulin resistance leading to hyperglycemia and type2 diabetes (T2DM To assess oral glucose tolerance, 72-h continuous blood glucose concentrations (CGM) and calculate homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) in 13 adolescents with simple obesity (BMI SDS=4 ± 1.06). OGTT performed in 13 obese adolescents (13.47 ± 3 years) revealed 3 cases (23%) with impaired fasting glucose (IFG: fasting glucose >5.6 mmol/L), 4 cases (30%) with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT: 2h blood glucose >7.8 <11.1 mmol/L), and none with diabetes. Using the continuous glucose monitoring system ( CGMS), IFG was detected in 4 cases, the maximum serum blood glucose (BG : 2h or more after meal) was >7.8 and <11.1 mmol/L (IGT) in 9 children (69%) and >11.1 mmol/L (diabetes) in one case (7.6%). Five cases had a minimum BG recorded of <2.7 mmol/L (hypoglycemia). No glycemic abnormality was detected using HbA1C (5.7 ± 0.3%). 11/13 patients had HOMA values >2.6 and QUICKI values <0.35 denoting insulin resistance. Beta cell mass percent (B %) = 200 ± 94.8% and insulin sensitivity values (IS)=50.4 ± 45.5% denoted insulin resistance with hyper-insulinaemia and preserved beta cell mass. In obese adolescents, CGMS is superior to OGTT and HbA1C in detecting glycemic abnormalities, which appears to be secondary to insulin resistance.

  7. An integrated glucose-insulin model to describe oral glucose tolerance test data in type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Jauslin, Petra M; Silber, Hanna E; Frey, Nicolas; Gieschke, Ronald; Simonsson, Ulrika S H; Jorga, Karin; Karlsson, Mats O

    2007-10-01

    An integrated model for the glucose-insulin system describing oral glucose tolerance test data was developed, extending on a previously introduced model for intravenous glucose provocations. Model extensions comprised the description of glucose absorption by a chain of transit compartments with a mean transit time of 35 minutes, a bioavailability of 80%, and a representation of the incretin effect, expressed as a direct effect of the glucose absorption rate on insulin secretion. The ability of the model to predict the incretin effect was assessed by simulating the observed difference in insulin response following an oral glucose tolerance test compared with an isoglycemic glucose infusion mimicking an oral glucose tolerance test profile. The extension of the integrated glucose-insulin model to gain information from oral glucose tolerance test data considerably expands its range of applications because the oral glucose tolerance test is one of the most common glucose challenge experiments for assessing the efficacy of hypoglycemic agents in clinical drug development.

  8. Evaluation of Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Children With Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Varlamis, Sotirios; Vavatsi, Norma; Pavlou, Evangelos; Kotsis, Vasileios; Spilioti, Martha; Kavga, Maria; Varlamis, George; Sotiriadou, Foteini; Agakidou, Eleni; Voutoufianakis, Spyridon; Evangeliou, Athanasios E

    2013-11-01

    Glucose metabolism of children with drug-resistant epilepsy, controlled by antiepileptic drugs epilepsy, and first-time nonfebrile seizures was studied through the performance of an oral glucose tolerance test and through insulin, C-peptide, and glycosylated hemoglobin measurements. In the refractory epilepsy group, there were more abnormal oral glucose tolerance test results (62.07%) in comparison to the controlled epilepsy group (25%) and the group of first-time seizures (21.21%). There was a significant difference between the group of refractory epilepsy and every other group concerning the abnormality of the oral glucose tolerance test (P < .05). The mean values of insulin, HbA1c, and C-peptide levels were normal for all groups. The results of the present study suggest that there is a distinction of refractory epilepsies from the drug-controlled ones and the first-induced seizures relating to their metabolic profile, regardless of the type of seizures.

  9. Orally administered glucagon-like peptide-1 affects glucose homeostasis following an oral glucose tolerance test in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Steinert, R E; Poller, B; Castelli, M C; Friedman, K; Huber, A R; Drewe, J; Beglinger, C

    2009-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) exerts several effects on glucose homeostasis and reduces food intake. After its release from intestinal L cells, GLP-1 is subject to (i) rapid breakdown by dipeptidyl peptidase IV and (ii) high liver extraction. The highest concentrations of GLP-1 are found in the splanchnic blood rather than in the systemic circulation. An oral delivery system would mimic endogenous secretion. Here we investigated the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) effects of a single dose (2 mg) of oral GLP-1 administered prior to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 16 healthy males. GLP-1 was rapidly absorbed from the gut, leading to tenfold higher plasma concentrations compared with controls. The PD profile was consistent with reported pharmacology; GLP-1 significantly stimulated basal insulin release (P < 0.027), with marked effects on glucose levels. The postprandial glucose peak was delayed with GLP-1, suggesting an effect on gastric emptying.

  10. Correspondence of continuous interstitial glucose measurement against arterialised and capillary glucose following an oral glucose tolerance test in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dye, Louise; Mansfield, Michael; Lasikiewicz, Nicola; Mahawish, Lena; Schnell, Rainer; Talbot, Duncan; Chauhan, Hitesh; Croden, Fiona; Lawton, Clare

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to validate the Glucoday continuous interstitial ambulatory glucose-monitoring device (AGD) against plasma glucose measured from arterialised venous (AV) and glucose from capillary whole blood (finger prick, FP) in non-diabetic subjects in response to an oral glucose tolerance test. Fifteen healthy overweight men (age 30-49 years, BMI 26-31 kg/m2) participated. Glucose levels were measured before, during and after consumption of an oral 75 g glucose load using twelve FP samples and forty-four 1 ml AV blood samples during 180 min. Interstitial glucose was measured via the AGD. Three venous samples for fasting insulin were taken to estimate insulin resistance. Profiles of AGD, AV and FP glucose were generated for each participant. Glucose values for each minute of the measurement period were interpolated using a locally weighted scatterplot smoother. Data were compared using Bland-Altman plots that showed good correspondence between all pairs of measurements. Concordance between the three methods was 0.8771 (Kendall's W, n 15, P < 0.001). Concordance was greater between AV and FP (W = 0.9696) than AGD and AV (W = 0.8770) or AGD and FP (W = 0.8764). Analysis of time to peak glucose indicated that AGD measures lagged approximately 15 min behind FP and AV measures. Percent body fat was significantly correlated with time to peak glucose levels for each measure, while BMI and estimated insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment, HOMA) were not. In conclusion, AGD shows good correspondence with FP and AV glucose measures in response to a glucose load with a 15 min time lag. Taking this into account, AGD has potential application in nutrition and behaviour studies.

  11. New insulin sensitivity index from the oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Youichiro; Takamura, Toshinari; Sakurai, Masaru; Shindo, Hisakazu; Ohkubo, Eizho; Aida, Kaoru; Harii, Norikazu; Taki, Katsumi; Kaneshige, Masahiro; Tanaka, Shoichiro; Shimura, Hiroki; Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2008-01-01

    A new insulin sensitivity index was devised on the basis of an autoregressive model and its validity was investigated. Using data from the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), 115 subjects were divided into 3 groups: 40 with normal glucose tolerance, 34 with impaired glucose tolerance, and 41 with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The new insulin sensitivity index: oral glucose insulin sensitivity index (GSI) was calculated from five sets of plasma glucose and insulin levels obtained at 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min during OGTT using a formula based on an autoregressive model. Forty-three of the 115 subjects were examined for insulin sensitivity index (ISI) by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. GSI decreased in the order of normal glucose tolerance group>impaired glucose tolerance group>diabetic group. There was a significant correlation between GSI and the ISI derived from euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study data in all 43 subjects who underwent both tests (r=0.72; P<0.0001). The ISI calculated by previous methods poorly correlated with the ISIs obtained by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study. In conclusion, this new insulin sensitivity index based on the data obtained from OGTT using an autoregressive model is comparable to an insulin sensitivity index by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique and may be superior to previous indexes that have been devised to determine insulin sensitivity from OGTT data.

  12. Effect of oral glucose on serum zinc in the elderly

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.L.; Kohrs, M.B.; Horwitz, D.L.; Cyborski, C.K.; Czajka-Narins, D.M.; Kamath, S.

    1986-03-05

    To determine the effect of glucose loading on serum zinc concentrations, 34 elderly subjects aged 60-86 y were studied. Anthropometric data, medical and dietary histories were obtained. Serum zinc and glucose concentrations were obtained fasting and 1/2, 1, 1 1/2, 2 and 3 h after 75 g oral glucose load; glycohemoglobin and fasting serum lipids were also determined. For comparison, the subjects were categorized as: normal or low serum zinc concentrations; normal or high body mass index BMI; normal or high sum of skinfolds and normal or high serum cholesterol. Results showed that low serum zinc concentrations increased significantly over baseline values after the glucose load and did not return to fasting levels. On the other hand, mean serum zinc concentrations significantly declined without recovery for those with normal zinc values. For the total group, no significant differences were noted between fasting values and subsequent time periods. No correlations were noted between fasting serum zinc and area under the curve for zinc except in the high BMI group (positive correlation observed). For the high BMI group, fasting serum zinc differed significantly from the succeeding measurements except for 30 min. For the group as a whole, mean serum zinc concentration was within normal limits (76.9 +/- 2.8 mcg/ml): mean zinc intake was less than 2/3rds the RDA. They conclude that glucose ingestion may alter serum zinc and should be considered in interpreting these levels.

  13. An integrated glucose-insulin model to describe oral glucose tolerance test data in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Silber, Hanna E; Frey, Nicolas; Karlsson, Mats O

    2010-03-01

    The extension of the previously developed integrated models for glucose and insulin (IGI) to include the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in healthy volunteers could be valuable to better understand the differences between healthy individuals and those with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Data from an OGTT in 23 healthy volunteers were used. Analysis was based on the previously developed intravenous model with extensions for glucose absorption and incretin effect on insulin secretion. The need for additional structural components was evaluated. The model was evaluated by simulation and a bootstrap. Multiple glucose and insulin concentration peaks were observed in most individuals as well as hypoglycemic episodes in the second half of the experiment. The OGTT data were successfully described by the extended basic model. An additional control mechanism of insulin on glucose production improved the description of the data. The model showed good predictive properties, and parameters were estimated with good precision. In conclusion, a previously presented integrated model has been extended to describe glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy volunteers following an OGTT. The characterization of the differences between the healthy and diabetic stages in the IGI model could potentially be used to extrapolate drug effect from healthy volunteers to T2DM.

  14. [Flat curves of oral glucose tolerance tests (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Slama, G; Tchobroutsky, G

    1980-04-26

    Patients are often referred to diabetologists on account of a flat curve of oral glucose tolerance test. This abnormality, however, is virtually never associated with a serious metabolic disorder and in any case, it never points to a disease that cannot be diagnosed by questioning or by straightforward clinical examination, nor confirmed by a more specific laboratory test. The curve may be flat for technical reasons (e.g. rejection of the glucose administered, timing of blood withdrawals and assays), for physiological reasons (differences between venous and arteriolo-capillary blood), or for pathological reasons (interaction with drugs, pituitary, thyroid or adrenal insufficiency, digestive malabsorption) but it never implies organic hypoglycaemia nor diabetes mellitus.

  15. Genetic variation in GIPR influences the glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose challenge

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Richa; Hivert, Marie-France; Langenberg, Claudia; Tanaka, Toshiko; Pankow, James S; Vollenweider, Peter; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Dupuis, Josée; Jackson, Anne U; Kao, W H Linda; Li, Man; Glazer, Nicole L; Manning, Alisa K; Luan, Jian’an; Stringham, Heather M; Prokopenko, Inga; Johnson, Toby; Grarup, Niels; Boesgaard, Trine W; Lecoeur, Cécile; Shrader, Peter; O’Connell, Jeffrey; Ingelsson, Erik; Couper, David J; Rice, Kenneth; Song, Kijoung; Andreasen, Camilla H; Dina, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; Le Bacquer, Olivier; Pattou, François; Taneera, Jalal; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Rybin, Denis; Ardlie, Kristin; Sampson, Michael; Qi, Lu; van Hoek, Mandy; Weedon, Michael N; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Voight, Benjamin F; Grallert, Harald; Balkau, Beverley; Bergman, Richard N; Bielinski, Suzette J; Bonnefond, Amelie; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Böttcher, Yvonne; Brunner, Eric; Buchanan, Thomas A; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chines, Peter S; Collins, Francis S; Cornelis, Marilyn; Crawford, Gabriel J; Delplanque, Jerome; Doney, Alex; Egan, Josephine M; Erdos, Michael R; Firmann, Mathieu; Forouhi, Nita G; Fox, Caroline S; Goodarzi, Mark O; Graessler, Jürgen; Hingorani, Aroon; Isomaa, Bo; Jørgensen, Torben; Kivimaki, Mika; Kovacs, Peter; Krohn, Knut; Kumari, Meena; Lauritzen, Torsten; Lévy-Marchal, Claire; Mayor, Vladimir; McAteer, Jarred B; Meyre, David; Mitchell, Braxton D; Mohlke, Karen L; Morken, Mario A; Narisu, Narisu; Palmer, Colin N A; Pakyz, Ruth; Pascoe, Laura; Payne, Felicity; Pearson, Daniel; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Sandbaek, Annelli; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Scott, Laura J; Sharp, Stephen J; Sijbrands, Eric; Singleton, Andrew; Siscovick, David S; Smith, Nicholas L; Sparsø, Thomas; Swift, Amy J; Syddall, Holly; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Valle, Timo T; Waeber, Gérard; Walley, Andrew; Waterworth, Dawn M; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhao, Jing Hua; Illig, Thomas; Wichmann, H Erich; Wilson, James F; van Duijn, Cornelia; Hu, Frank B; Morris, Andrew D; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Nilsson, Peter; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Shuldiner, Alan R; Walker, Mark; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter; Williams, Gordon H; Nathan, David M; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Cooper, Cyrus; Marmot, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Mooser, Vincent; Stumvoll, Michael; Loos, Ruth J F; Altshuler, David; Psaty, Bruce M; Rotter, Jerome I; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Florez, Jose C; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Barroso, Inês; Sladek, Robert; Froguel, Philippe; Meigs, James B; Groop, Leif; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watanabe, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    Glucose levels 2 h after an oral glucose challenge are a clinical measure of glucose tolerance used in the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. We report a meta-analysis of nine genome-wide association studies (n = 15,234 nondiabetic individuals) and a follow-up of 29 independent loci (n = 6,958–30,620). We identify variants at the GIPR locus associated with 2-h glucose level (rs10423928, β (s.e.m.) = 0.09 (0.01) mmol/l per A allele, P = 2.0 × 10−15). The GIPR A-allele carriers also showed decreased insulin secretion (n = 22,492; insulinogenic index, P = 1.0 × 10−17; ratio of insulin to glucose area under the curve, P = 1.3 × 10−16) and diminished incretin effect (n = 804; P = 4.3 × 10−4). We also identified variants at ADCY5 (rs2877716, P = 4.2 × 10−16), VPS13C (rs17271305, P = 4.1 × 10−8), GCKR (rs1260326, P = 7.1 × 10−11) and TCF7L2 (rs7903146, P = 4.2 × 10−10) associated with 2-h glucose. Of the three newly implicated loci (GIPR, ADCY5 and VPS13C), only ADCY5 was found to be associated with type 2 diabetes in collaborating studies (n = 35,869 cases, 89,798 controls, OR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.09–1.15, P = 4.8 × 10−18). PMID:20081857

  16. Effects of celiac superior mesenteric ganglionectomy on glucose homeostasis and hormonal changes during oral glucose tolerance testing in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumakura, Atsushi; Shikuma, Junpei; Ogihara, Norikazu; Eiki, Jun-ichi; Kanazawa, Masao; Notoya, Yōko; Kikuchi, Masatoshi; Odawara, Masato

    2013-01-01

    The liver plays an important role in maintaining glucose homeostasis in the body. In the prandial state, some of the glucose which is absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract is converted into glycogen and stored in the liver. In contrast, the liver produces glucose by glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis while fasting. Thus, the liver contributes to maintaining blood glucose level within normoglycemic range. Glycogenesis and glycogenolysis are regulated by various mechanisms including hormones, the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems and the hepatic glucose content. In this study, we examined a rat model in which the celiac superior mesenteric ganglion (CSMG) was resected. We attempted to elucidate how the celiac sympathetic nervous system is involved in regulating glucose homeostasis by assessing the effects of CSMG resection on glucose excursion during an oral glucose tolerance test, and by examining hepatic glycogen content and hepatic glycogen phosphorylase (GP) activity. On the oral glucose tolerance test, CSMG-resected rats demonstrated improved glucose tolerance and significantly increased GP activity compared with sham-operated rats, whereas there were no significant differences in insulin, glucagon or catecholamine levels between the 2 groups. These results suggest that the celiac sympathetic nervous system is involved in regulating the rate of glycogen consumption through GP activity. In conclusion, the examined rat model showed that the celiac sympathetic nervous system regulates hepatic glucose metabolism in conjunction with vagal nerve innervations and is a critical component in the maintenance of blood glucose homeostasis.

  17. The immediate effects of a single bout of aerobic exercise on oral glucose tolerance across the glucose tolerance continuum

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Sine H.; Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Bente K.; van Hall, Gerrit; Solomon, Thomas P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We investigated glucose tolerance and postprandial glucose fluxes immediately after a single bout of aerobic exercise in subjects representing the entire glucose tolerance continuum. Twenty‐four men with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), or type 2 diabetes (T2D; age: 56 ± 1 years; body mass index: 27.8 ± 0.7 kg/m2, P > 0.05) underwent a 180‐min oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) combined with constant intravenous infusion of [6,6‐2H2]glucose and ingestion of [U‐13C]glucose, following 1 h of exercise (50% of peak aerobic power) or rest. In both trials, plasma glucose concentrations and kinetics, insulin, C‐peptide, and glucagon were measured. Rates (mg kg−1 min−1) of glucose appearance from endogenous (RaEndo) and exogenous (oral glucose; RaOGTT) sources, and glucose disappearance (Rd) were determined. We found that exercise increased RaEndo, RaOGTT, and Rd (all P < 0.0001) in all groups with a tendency for a greater (~20%) peak RaOGTT value in NGT subjects when compared to IGT and T2D subjects. Accordingly, following exercise, the plasma glucose concentration during the OGTT was increased in NGT subjects (P < 0.05), while unchanged in subjects with IGT and T2D. In conclusion, while a single bout of moderate‐intensity exercise increased the postprandial glucose response in NGT subjects, glucose tolerance following exercise was preserved in the two hyperglycemic groups. Thus, postprandial plasma glucose responses immediately following exercise are dependent on the underlying degree of glycemic control. PMID:25168869

  18. Rise of Oxyntomodulin in Response to Oral Glucose after Gastric Bypass Surgery in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Laferrère, Blandine; Swerdlow, Nicholas; Bawa, Baani; Arias, Sara; Bose, Mousumi; Oliván, Blanca; Teixeira, Julio; McGinty, James; Rother, Kristina I.

    2010-01-01

    Context: The mechanisms by which Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (GBP) results in sustained weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes are not fully understood. Objective: We hypothesized that the anorexic hormone oxyntomodulin (OXM) might contribute to the marked weight reduction and the rapid improvement in glucose metabolism observed in morbidly obese diabetic patients after GBP. Methods: Twenty obese women with type 2 diabetes were studied before and 1 month after GBP (n = 10) or after a diet-induced equivalent weight loss (n = 10). Patients from both groups were matched for age, body weight, body mass index, and diabetes duration and control. OXM concentrations were measured during a 50-g oral glucose challenge before and after weight loss. Results: At baseline, OXM levels (fasting and stimulated values) were indistinguishable between the GBP and the diet group. However, OXM levels rose remarkably in response to an oral glucose load more than 2-fold (peak, 5.25 ± 1.31 to13.8 ± 16.2 pmol/liter; P = 0.025) after GBP but not after diet. The peak of OXM after glucose was significantly correlated with glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY3-36. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the observed changes in OXM primarily occur in response to GBP and not as a consequence of weight loss. These changes were observed early after surgery and occurred in parallel with previously reported increases in incretins and peptide YY. We speculate that the combination of gut hormone changes is essential for the improved glucose homeostasis and may partially explain the success of this surgery on diabetes resolution and weight loss. PMID:20501690

  19. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide confers early phase insulin release to oral glucose in rats: demonstration by a receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J T; Dayanandan, B; Habener, J F; Kieffer, T J

    2000-10-01

    A novel GIP receptor antagonist was developed to evaluate the acute role of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) in the insulin response to oral glucose in rats. Antisera to an extracellular epitope of the GIP receptor (GIPR) detected immunoreactive GIPR on rat pancreatic beta-cells. Purified GIPR antibody (GIPR Ab) specifically displaced GIP binding to the receptor and blocked GIP-mediated increases in intracellular cAMP. When delivered to rats by ip injection, GIPR Ab had a half-life of approximately 4 days. Treatment with GIPR Ab (1 microg/g BW) blocked the potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by GIP (60 pmol) but not glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, 60 pmol) in anesthetized rats. The insulin response to oral glucose was delayed in conscious unrestrained rats that were pretreated with GIPR Ab. Plasma insulin levels were approximately 35% lower at 10 min in GIPR Ab treated animals compared with controls. As a result, the glucose excursion was greater in the GIPR Ab treated group. Fasting plasma glucose levels were not altered by GIPR Ab. We conclude that release of GIP following oral glucose may act as an anticipatory signal to pancreatic beta-cells to promote rapid release of insulin for glucose disposal.

  20. Effects of alpha and beta adrenergic blockade on hepatic glucose balance before and after oral glucose. Role of insulin and glucagon.

    PubMed Central

    Chap, Z; Ishida, T; Chou, J; Michael, L; Hartley, C; Entman, M; Field, J B

    1986-01-01

    In conscious dogs, phentolamine infusion significantly increased fasting portal vein insulin, glucagon, and decreased net hepatic glucose output and plasma glucose. Propranolol significantly decreased portal vein insulin, portal flow, and increased hepatic glucose production and plasma glucose. Phentolamine, propranolol, and combined blockade reduced glucose absorption after oral glucose. alpha, beta, and combined blockade abolished the augmented fractional hepatic insulin extraction after oral glucose. Despite different absolute amounts of glucose absorbed and different amounts of insulin reaching the liver, the percent of the absorbed glucose retained by the liver was similar for control and with alpha- or beta blockade, but markedly decreased with combined blockade. Our conclusions are: (a) phentolamine and propranolol effects on basal hepatic glucose production may predominantly reflect their action on insulin and glucagon secretion; (b) after oral glucose, alpha- and beta-blockers separately or combined decrease glucose release into the portal system; (c) net hepatic glucose uptake is predominantly determined by hyperglycemia but can be modulated by insulin and glucagon; (d) direct correlation does not exist between hepatic delivery and uptake of insulin and net hepatic glucose uptake; (e) alterations in oral glucose tolerance due to adrenergic blockers, beyond their effects on glucose absorption, can be, to a large extent, mediated by their effects on insulin and glucagon secretion reflecting both hepatic and peripheral glucose metabolism. PMID:2870078

  1. Hepatic portal vein denervation impairs oral glucose tolerance but not exenatide's effect on glycemia.

    PubMed

    Ionut, Viorica; Castro, Ana Valeria B; Woolcott, Orison O; Stefanovski, Darko; Iyer, Malini S; Broussard, Josiane L; Burch, Miguel; Elazary, Ram; Kolka, Cathryn M; Mkrtchyan, Hasmik; Bediako, Isaac Asare; Bergman, Richard N

    2014-10-15

    The hepatoportal area is an important glucohomeostatic metabolic sensor, sensing hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, and hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). We have reported previously that activation of hepatoportal sensors by intraportal infusion of glucose and GLP-1 or by subcutaneous administration of GLP-1 receptor activator exenatide and of intraportal glucose improved glycemia independent of corresponding changes in pancreatic hormones. It is not clear whether this effect is mediated via the portal vein (PV) or by direct action on the liver itself. To test whether receptors in the PV mediate exenatide's beneficial effect on glucose tolerance, we performed 1) paired oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) with and without exenatide and 2) intravenous glucose tolerance tests before and after PV denervation in canines. Denervation of the portal vein affected oral glucose tolerance; post-denervation (POST-DEN) OGTT glucose and insulin AUC were 50% higher than before denervation (P = 0.01). However, portal denervation did not impair exenatide's effect to improve oral glucose tolerance (exenatide effect: 48 ± 12 mmol·l⁻¹·min before vs. 64 ± 26 mmol·l⁻¹·min after, P = 0.67). There were no changes in insulin sensitivity or secretion during IVGTTs. Portal vein sensing might play a role in controlling oral glucose tolerance during physiological conditions but not in pharmacological activation of GLP-1 receptors by exenatide.

  2. Serum progranulin concentrations are not responsive during oral lipid tolerance test and oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Schmid, A; Leszczak, S; Ober, I; Schäffler, A; Karrasch, T

    2015-07-01

    The postprandial regulation of progranulin by oral uptake of lipids and carbohydrates in healthy individuals has not yet been investigated. The regulation of progranulin in 2 large cohorts of healthy volunteers during oral lipid tolerance test (OLTT; n=100) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; n=100) was analyzed. One hundred healthy volunteers underwent OLTT and OGTT in an outpatient setting. Venous blood was drawn at 0 hours (h) (fasting) and at 2, 4, and 6 h in OLTT or 1 and 2 h in OGTT. A novel OLTT solution completely free of carbohydrates and protein was applied. Subjects were characterized by anthropometric and laboratory parameters. Serum concentrations of progranulin were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Circulating progranulin levels remained unchanged during OLTT and OGTT. Fasting progranulin levels ranged between 31.3±8.7 and 40.6±7.7 ng/ml and were not different in subgroups addressing BMI, gender, family history, smoking habits, and hormonal contraception. There was a reciprocal correlation of progranulin with HDL (negative) and LDL cholesterol levels (positive). In healthy adults, fasting and postprandial circulating progranulin levels are not different in BMI subgroups. Oral uptake of carbohydrates and lipids does not influence circulating progranulin levels in a short-term manner. A postprandial and short-term regulation of this adipokine is absent, at least in healthy subjects. There is a negative correlation of progranulin with HDL cholesterol, but a positive correlation with LDL cholesterol. This reciprocal association might be of physiological importance for an individual's atherosclerotic risk.

  3. Effects of oral administration of titanium dioxide fine-sized particles on plasma glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ning; Hu, Hailong; Guo, Qian; Jin, Sanli; Wang, Changlin; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is an authorized additive used as a food colorant, is composed of nano-sized particles (NP) and fine-sized particles (FP). Previous study reported that oral administration of TiO2 NPs triggers an increase in plasma glucose of mice. However, no previous studies have focused on toxic effects of TiO2 FPs on plasma glucose homeostasis following oral administration. In the current study, mice were orally administered TiO2 FPs greater than 100 nm in size (64 mg/kg body weight per day), and effects on plasma glucose levels examined. Our results showed that titanium levels was not changed in mouse blood, livers and pancreases after mice were orally administered TiO2 FPs. Biochemical analyzes showed that plasma glucose and ROS levels were not affected by TiO2 FPs. Histopathological results showed that TiO2 FPs did not induce pathology changes in organs, especially plasma glucose homeostasis regulation organs, such as pancreas and liver. Western blotting showed that oral administration of TiO2 FPs did not induce insulin resistance (IR) in mouse liver. These results showed that, TiO2 FPs cannot be absorbed via oral administration and affect plasma glucose levels in mice.

  4. Simulation of oral glucose tolerance tests and the corresponding isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion studies for calculation of the incretin effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeungseon; Oh, Tae Jung; Lee, Jung Chan; Choi, Karam; Kim, Min Young; Kim, Hee Chan; Cho, Young Min; Kim, Sungwan

    2014-03-01

    The incretin effect, which is a unique stimulus of insulin secretion in response to oral ingestion of nutrients, is calculated by the difference in insulin secretory responses from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a corresponding isoglycemic intravenous glucose infusion (IIGI) study. The OGTT model of this study, which is individualized by fitting the glucose profiles during an OGTT, was developed to predict the glucose profile during an IIGI study in the same subject. Also, the model predicts the insulin and incretin profiles during both studies. The incretin effect, estimated by simulation, was compared with that measured by physiologic studies from eight human subjects with normal glucose tolerance, and the result exhibited a good correlation (r > 0.8); the incretin effect from the simulation was 56.5% ± 10.6% while the one from the measured data was 52.5% ± 19.6%. In conclusion, the parameters of the OGTT model have been successfully estimated to predict the profiles of both OGTTs and IIGI studies. Therefore, with glucose data from the OGTT alone, this model could control and predict the physiologic responses, including insulin secretion during OGTTs and IIGI studies, which could eventually eliminate the need for complex and cumbersome IIGI studies in incretin research.

  5. Intestinal transit of a glucose bolus and incretin kinetics: a mathematical model with application to the oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Salinari, Serenella; Bertuzzi, Alessandro; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2011-06-01

    The rate of appearance (R(a)) of exogenous glucose in plasma after glucose ingestion is presently measured by tracer techniques that cannot be used in standard clinical testing such as the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We propose a mathematical model that represents in a simple way the gastric emptying, the transport of glucose along the intestinal tract, and its absorption from gut lumen into portal blood. The model gives the R(a) time course in terms of parameters with a physiological counterpart and provides an expression for the release of incretin hormones as related to glucose transit into gut lumen. Glucose absorption was represented by assuming two components related to a proximal and a distal transporter. Model performance was evaluated by numerical simulations. The model was then validated by fitting OGTT glucose and GLP-1 data in healthy controls and type 2 diabetic patients, and useful information was obtained for the rate of gastric emptying, the rate of glucose absorption, the R(a) profile, the insulin sensitivity, and the glucose effectiveness. Model-derived estimates of insulin sensitivity were well correlated (r = 0.929 in controls and 0.886 in diabetic patients) to data obtained from the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Although the proposed OGTT analysis requires the measurement of an additional hormone concentration (GLP-1), it appears to be a reasonable choice since it avoids complex and expensive techniques, such as isotopes for glucose R(a) measurement and direct assessment of gastric emptying and intestinal transit, and gives additional correlated information, thus largely compensating for the extra expense.

  6. Response of incretins (GIP and GLP-1) to an oral glucose load in female and male subjects with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiro; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Katsuno, Tomoyuki; Ikawa, Takashi; Akagami, Takafumi; Murai, Kazuki; Miuchi, Masayuki; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro; Namba, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the blood glucose profile and the response of incretins in healthy young subjects by the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We first reported that plasma glucose and GIP levels were higher in males during the early phase of the OGTT.

  7. Oral glucose tolerance test reduces arterial baroreflex sensitivity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Madden, Kenneth M; Tedder, Gale; Lockhart, Chris; Meneilly, Graydon S

    2008-03-01

    Although postprandial decreases in blood pressure are a common cause of syncope in the older adult population, the postprandial effects of the oral glucose tolerance test on blood pressure and the arterial baroreflex remain poorly characterized in older adults. Therefore, arterial blood pressure and the arterial baroreflex were studied in 19 healthy older adults (mean age 71.7 +/- 1.1 years) who were given a standardized oral glucose load (75 g) or an isovolumetric sham drink during 2 separate sessions. All measures were taken for 120 min after treatment. Baroreflex function was assessed by using the spontaneous baroreflex method (baroreflex sensitivity, BRS). Subjects demonstrated a decrease in BRS after oral glucose that was not seen in the placebo session (two-way analysis of variance, p = 0.04). There was no significant change in systolic, mean, or diastolic blood pressure; together with a drop in BRS, this resulted in a significant tachycardia post glucose (two-way analysis of variance, p < 0.001). We conclude that healthy older adults can successfully maintain blood pressure during an oral glucose tolerance test despite a decrease in arterial BRS. Decreased BRS resulted in a tachycardic response to glucose.

  8. Metabolic Profiling of the Response to an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Detects Subtle Metabolic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Wopereis, Suzan; Rubingh, Carina M.; van Erk, Marjan J.; Verheij, Elwin R.; van Vliet, Trinette; Cnubben, Nicole H. P.; Smilde, Age K.; van der Greef, Jan; van Ommen, Ben; Hendriks, Henk F. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The prevalence of overweight is increasing globally and has become a serious health problem. Low-grade chronic inflammation in overweight subjects is thought to play an important role in disease development. Novel tools to understand these processes are needed. Metabolic profiling is one such tool that can provide novel insights into the impact of treatments on metabolism. Methodology To study the metabolic changes induced by a mild anti-inflammatory drug intervention, plasma metabolic profiling was applied in overweight human volunteers with elevated levels of the inflammatory plasma marker C-reactive protein. Liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometric methods were used to detect high and low abundant plasma metabolites both in fasted conditions and during an oral glucose tolerance test. This is based on the concept that the resilience of the system can be assessed after perturbing a homeostatic situation. Conclusions Metabolic changes were subtle and were only detected using metabolic profiling in combination with an oral glucose tolerance test. The repeated measurements during the oral glucose tolerance test increased statistical power, but the metabolic perturbation also revealed metabolites that respond differentially to the oral glucose tolerance test. Specifically, multiple metabolic intermediates of the glutathione synthesis pathway showed time-dependent suppression in response to the glucose challenge test. The fact that this is an insulin sensitive pathway suggests that inflammatory modulation may alter insulin signaling in overweight men. PMID:19242536

  9. Correlation of salivary glucose, blood glucose and oral candidal carriage in the saliva of type 2 diabetics: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Padmashree, S.; Jayalekshmi, Rema

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To study the correlation between blood glucose levels and salivary glucose levels in type 2 diabetic patients, to study the relationship between salivary glucose levels and oral candidal carriage in type 2 diabetic patients and to determine whether salivary glucose levels could be used as a noninvasive tool for the measurement of glycemic control in type 2 diabetics. Study Design: The study population consisted of three groups: Group 1 consisted of 30 controlled diabetics and Group 2 consisted of 30 uncontrolled diabetics based on their random nonfasting plasma glucose levels. Group 3 consisted of 30 healthy controls. Two milliliters of peripheral blood was collected for the estimation of random nonfasting plasma glucose levels and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Unstimulated saliva was collected for the estimation of salivary glucose. Saliva was collected by the oral rinse technique for the estimation of candidal counts. Results: The salivary glucose levels were significantly higher in controlled and uncontrolled diabetics when compared with controls. The salivary candidal carriage was also significantly higher in uncontrolled diabetics when compared with controlled diabetics and nondiabetic controls. The salivary glucose levels showed a significant correlation with blood glucose levels, suggesting that salivary glucose levels can be used as a monitoring tool for predicting glycemic control in diabetic patients. Conclusion: The present study found that estimation of salivary glucose levels can be used as a noninvasive, painless technique for the measurement of diabetic status of a patient in a dental set up. Increased salivary glucose levels leads to increased oral candidal carriage; therefore, oral diagnosticians are advised to screen the diabetic patients for any oral fungal infections and further management. PMID:25191065

  10. Sucralose Affects Glycemic and Hormonal Responses to an Oral Glucose Load

    PubMed Central

    Pepino, M. Yanina; Tiemann, Courtney D.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Wice, Burton M.; Klein, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Nonnutritive sweeteners (NNS), such as sucralose, have been reported to have metabolic effects in animal models. However, the relevance of these findings to human subjects is not clear. We evaluated the acute effects of sucralose ingestion on the metabolic response to an oral glucose load in obese subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Seventeen obese subjects (BMI 42.3 ± 1.6 kg/m2) who did not use NNS and were insulin sensitive (based on a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance score ≤2.6) underwent a 5-h modified oral glucose tolerance test on two separate occasions preceded by consuming either sucralose (experimental condition) or water (control condition) 10 min before the glucose load in a randomized crossover design. Indices of β-cell function, insulin sensitivity (SI), and insulin clearance rates were estimated by using minimal models of glucose, insulin, and C-peptide kinetics. RESULTS Compared with the control condition, sucralose ingestion caused 1) a greater incremental increase in peak plasma glucose concentrations (4.2 ± 0.2 vs. 4.8 ± 0.3 mmol/L; P = 0.03), 2) a 20 ± 8% greater incremental increase in insulin area under the curve (AUC) (P < 0.03), 3) a 22 ± 7% greater peak insulin secretion rate (P < 0.02), 4) a 7 ± 4% decrease in insulin clearance (P = 0.04), and 5) a 23 ± 20% decrease in SI (P = 0.01). There were no significant differences between conditions in active glucagon-like peptide 1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, glucagon incremental AUC, or indices of the sensitivity of the β-cell response to glucose. CONCLUSIONS These data demonstrate that sucralose affects the glycemic and insulin responses to an oral glucose load in obese people who do not normally consume NNS. PMID:23633524

  11. The role of ranitidine infusion on glucose, insulin and C-peptide serum levels induced by oral glucose tolerance test in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gentile, S; Marmo, R; Costume, A; Orlando, C; D'Alessandro, R; De Bellis, G; Porcellini, M; Coltorti, M

    1986-01-01

    In 9 healthy subjects we evaluated the effect of a constant ranitidine infusion (100 mg) on glucose (mg/dl), insulin (microU/ml) and C-peptide (ng/ml) serum levels promoted by oral glucose tolerance test (75 g). Ranitidine significantly increased the area under concentration/time curves for glucose and insulin but not that of C-peptide. Our data indicate that ranitidine does not affect pancreatic insulin release nor peripheral glucose utilization and are consistent with the hypothesis that ranitidine influences the hepatic clearance of glucose and insulin both of which undergo high first-pass liver extraction.

  12. Oral glucose for pain relief during examination for retinopathy of prematurity: a masked randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Marlene Coelho; Eckert, Gabriela Unchalo; Fortes, Bárbara Gastal Borges; Filho, João Borges Fortes; Silveira, Rita C.; Procianoy, Renato S

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ophthalmologic examination for retinopathy of prematurity is a painful procedure. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions have been proposed to reduce pain during eye examinations. This study aims to evaluate the analgesic effect of 25% glucose using a validated pain scale during the first eye examination for retinopathy of prematurity in preterm infants with birth weight ≤1,500 g and/or gestational age ≤32 weeks. METHODS: A masked, randomized clinical trial for one dose of 1 ml of oral 25% glucose solution 2 minutes before the first ophthalmologic examination for retinopathy of prematurity was conducted between March 2008 and April 2010. The results were compared to those of a control group that did not receive oral glucose solution. Pain was evaluated using a Neonatal Infant Pain Scale immediately before and immediately after the ophthalmologic examination in both groups. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00648687 RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-four patients who were examined for the first time for retinopathy of prematurity were included. Seventy were included in the intervention group and 54 in the control group. The number of patients with pain immediately before the procedure was similar in both groups. The number of patients with pain after ophthalmologic examination was 15.7% in the intervention group and 68.5% in the control group (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: One ml of oral 25% glucose solution given 2 minutes before an ophthalmologic examination for retinopathy of prematurity was an effective measure for pain relief. PMID:23525316

  13. Insulin Response to Oral Stimuli and Glucose Effectiveness Increased in Neuroglycopenia Following Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Patti, Mary Elizabeth; Li, Ping; Goldfine, Allison B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with neuroglycopenia is a rare complication following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery for weight management. This study evaluates insulin secretion and action in response to oral and intravenous stimuli in persons with and without neuroglycopenia following RYGB. Design and Methods Cross-sectional cohort studies were performed at a single academic institution to assess insulin secretion and action during oral mixed meal tolerance test (MMTT) and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). Results Insulin secretion was increased more following oral mixed meal than intravenous glucose in individuals with neuroglycopenia compared to the asymptomatic group. Reduced insulin clearance did not contribute to higher insulinemia. Glucose effectiveness at zero insulin, estimated during the intravenous glucose tolerance test, was also higher in those with neuroglycopenia. Insulin sensitivity did not differ between groups. Conclusions Increased beta cell response to oral stimuli and insulin-independent glucose disposal may both contribute to severe hypoglycemia after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. PMID:25755084

  14. Effects of an oral glucose tolerance test on the myogenic response in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Lott, Mary E J; Hogeman, Cynthia; Herr, Michael; Gabbay, Robert; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2007-01-01

    The myogenic response, the inherent ability of blood vessels to rapidly respond to changes in transmural pressure, is involved in local blood flow autoregulation. Animal studies suggest that both acute hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia may impair myogenic vasoconstriction. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an oral glucose load on brachial mean blood velocity (MBV) during increases in forearm transmural pressure in humans. Eight healthy men and women (38 +/- 5 yr) underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). MBV (in cm/s; Doppler ultrasound) responses to a rise in forearm transmural pressure (arm tank suction, -50 mmHg) were studied before and every 30 min for 120 min during the OGTT. Before the start of the OGTT, MBV was lower than baseline values 30 and 60 s after the application of negative pressure. This suggests that myogenic constriction was present. During the OGTT, blood glucose rose from 88 +/- 2 to 120 +/- 6 mg/dl (P < 0.05) and insulin rose from 14 +/- 1 to 101 +/- 32 microU/ml (P < 0.05). Glucose loading attenuated the reduction in MBV with arm suction (Delta-0.73 +/- 0.14 vs. Delta-1.67 +/- 0.43 cm/s and Delta-1.07 +/- 0.14 vs. Delta-2.38 +/- 0.54 cm/s, respectively, during 30 and 60 s of suction postglucose compared with preglucose values; all P < 0.05). We observed no such time effect for myogenic responses during a sham OGTT. In an additional 5 subjects, glucose loading had no effect on brachial diameters with the application of negative pressure. Oral glucose loading leads to attenuated myogenic vasoconstriction in healthy individuals. The role that this diminished postglucose reactivity plays in mediating postprandial hypotension and/or orthostasis needs to be further explored.

  15. [Insulin response and NEFA behavior in volunteers with a flat response to oral glucose tolerance test].

    PubMed

    Viviani, G; Cordera, R; Maiello, M; De Micheli, A; Odetti, P; Corsi, L; Boeri, D; Prando, R

    1979-07-15

    The insulin response and the NEFA behaviour of 7 lean and 8 obese subjects with a flat response to an oral glucose tolerance test have been studied. A flat response has been defined as one in which the maximum glycemic increase and the area of increase does not exceed 32 mg% and 18 mg% respectively. The insulin response and the NEFA behaviour were similar both in lean and in obese subjects to controls with normal O.G.T.T. The glucose/I.R.I. ratios were increased. A possible physiopathological interpretation is proposed.

  16. The effect of low-oestrogen combined pill, progestogen-only pill and medroxyprogesterone acetate on oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Kamau, R K; Maina, F W; Kigondu, C; Mati, J K

    1990-08-01

    The effect of a low-oestrogen combined pill, progestogen-only pill and medroxyprogesterone acetate on oral glucose tolerance test was studied in 29, 30 and 9 indigenous Kenyan women respectively. Glucose tolerance test was performed before treatment was started and then after 1,3 and 6 months in microgynon users. The mean areas under the glucose curves were also significantly elevated. Significant increase in blood glucose values were noted only at 30 minutes after 6 months of use of the progestogen-only oral contraceptive but the mean blood glucose values were higher than in the control after 1,3 and 6 months of use. However, the mean values of the areas under the glucose curves were significantly elevated after 1,3, and 6 months of use. Medroxyprogesterone acetate users showed significantly lower fasting blood glucose values at 60 and 90 minutes after 1 month of use, after which the blood glucose values returned to the pre-treatment values. The mean values of the glucose curve areas showed no significant change. It is concluded that both microgynon and minipill cause relative impairment of glucose tolerance test as early as after 1 month of use. Medroxyprogesterone acetate does not impair oral glucose tolerance for at least the first 6 months of use. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  17. SGLT1 sugar transporter/sensor is required for post-oral glucose appetition

    PubMed Central

    Koepsell, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that the intestinal sodium-glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) glucose transporter and sensor mediates, in part, the appetite-stimulation actions of intragastric (IG) glucose and nonmetabolizable α-methyl-d-glucopyranoside (MDG) infusions in mice. Here, we investigated the role of SGLT1 in sugar conditioning using SGLT1 knockout (KO) and C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice. An initial experiment revealed that both KO and WT mice maintained on a very low-carbohydrate diet display normal preferences for saccharin, which was used in the flavored conditioned stimulus (CS) solutions. In experiment 2, mice were trained to drink one flavored solution (CS+) paired with an IG MDG infusion and a different flavored solution (CS−) paired with IG water infusion. In contrast to WT mice, KO mice decreased rather than increased the intake of the CS+ during training and failed to prefer the CS+ over the CS− in a choice test. In experiment 3, the KO mice also decreased their intake of a CS+ paired with IG glucose and avoided the CS+ in a choice test, unlike WT mice, which preferred the CS+ to CS−. In experiment 4, KO mice, like WT mice preferred a glucose + saccharin solution to a saccharin solution. These findings support the involvement of SGLT1 in post-oral glucose and MDG conditioning. The results also indicate that sugar malabsorption in KO mice has inhibitory effects on sugar intake but does not block their natural preference for sweet taste. PMID:26791832

  18. SGLT1 sugar transporter/sensor is required for post-oral glucose appetition.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Koepsell, Hermann; Ackroff, Karen

    2016-04-01

    Recent findings suggest that the intestinal sodium-glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) glucose transporter and sensor mediates, in part, the appetite-stimulation actions of intragastric (IG) glucose and nonmetabolizable α-methyl-d-glucopyranoside (MDG) infusions in mice. Here, we investigated the role of SGLT1 in sugar conditioning using SGLT1 knockout (KO) and C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice. An initial experiment revealed that both KO and WT mice maintained on a very low-carbohydrate diet display normal preferences for saccharin, which was used in the flavored conditioned stimulus (CS) solutions. In experiment 2, mice were trained to drink one flavored solution (CS+) paired with an IG MDG infusion and a different flavored solution (CS-) paired with IG water infusion. In contrast to WT mice, KO mice decreased rather than increased the intake of the CS+ during training and failed to prefer the CS+ over the CS- in a choice test. In experiment 3, the KO mice also decreased their intake of a CS+ paired with IG glucose and avoided the CS+ in a choice test, unlike WT mice, which preferred the CS+ to CS-. In experiment 4, KO mice, like WT mice preferred a glucose + saccharin solution to a saccharin solution. These findings support the involvement of SGLT1 in post-oral glucose and MDG conditioning. The results also indicate that sugar malabsorption in KO mice has inhibitory effects on sugar intake but does not block their natural preference for sweet taste.

  19. Improved high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance by an oral administration of phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Itsuo; Mitsutake, Susumu; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Matsuda, Junko; Suzuki, Akemi; Shigyo, Tatsuro; Igarashi, Yasuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported that phytoceramide and phytosphingosine (PHS) stimulated the transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in cells. PPARγ is a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes. We found in this study that an oral administration of PHS improved diet-induced glucose intolerance in mice. Since PHS is highly expressed in yeast, PHS in fermented foods may improve diabetes.

  20. Diurnal Variation in Oral Glucose Tolerance: Blood Sugar and Plasma Insulin Levels Morning, Afternoon, and Evening

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, R. J.; Baker, I. A.; Keen, H.; Oakley, N. W.

    1972-01-01

    Twenty-four subjects received three oral glucose tolerance tests, in the morning, afternoon, and evening of separate days. The mean blood sugar levels in the afternoon and evening tests were similar, and they were both significantly higher than those in the morning test. Plasma immunoreactive insulin levels, however, were highest in the morning test. The pattern of insulin levels during the afternoon and evening tests resembled that described as typical of maturity-onset diabetes. PMID:5058728

  1. Modification of corporal weight, body fat distribution, blood lipids and glucose levels in oral contraceptive users.

    PubMed

    Carranza-Lira, S; Bueno Fontal, J P

    2000-01-01

    The association between oral contraceptives and the modification of corporal weight and body fat distribution is controversial. The characteristics of the menstrual cycle, lipids and glucose levels were also analyzed. Thirty women who received ethinylestradiol 0.035 mg and norethindrone 0.400 mg for one year were studied. The following variables were analyzed every 3 months: weight, body mass index (BMI), hip perimeter, waist perimeter, waist-hip ratio (WHR), duration of menstrual cycle, quantity of uterine bleeding, as well as blood levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose. Waist and hip perimeters increased during the third evaluation; as well as the BMI starting from the second evaluation. The triglycerides levels rose from the first evaluation. No modifications were found in the WHR, glucose and cholesterol levels and the duration of the menstrual cycle, but the quantity of uterine bleeding decreased from the third month. The oral contraceptive significantly increased BMI and triglycerides level, but no changes were detected in body fat distribution, cholesterol and glucose levels. Uterine bleeding decreased from the first evaluation.

  2. Serum high-molecular weight adiponectin decreases abruptly after an oral glucose load in subjects with normal glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose, but not those with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Noriyuki; Hara, Kenji; Yatsuka, Chikako; Nakano, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Sachiko; Suetsugu, Mariko; Nakamachi, Takafumi; Takebayashi, Kohzo; Inukai, Toshihiko; Haruki, Kohsuke; Aso, Yoshimasa

    2009-10-01

    Adiponectin exists in the blood as 3 forms, which are a trimer, a hexamer, and a high-molecular weight (HMW) form. We investigated whether circulating HMW adiponectin levels were altered by oral glucose or fat ingestion. Forty male subjects underwent a 75-g oral glucose loading test (OGTT), and 11 healthy subjects (5 women and 6 men) received a fat loading test. Serum levels of HMW and total adiponectin were measured during the OGTT and the fat loading test. The fat loading test was performed for at least 8 hours. Among the 40 male subjects, 11 had normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 9 had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), 11 had impaired glucose tolerance, and 9 had diabetes mellitus (DM). In all 40 subjects, the serum total adiponectin level did not change significantly, whereas serum HMW adiponectin decreased significantly after a glucose load and reached 92.2% of the basal level at 120 minutes after the OGTT (P < .01). The HMW to total adiponectin ratio decreased significantly from 0.47 +/- 0.15 at baseline to 0.43 +/- 0.13 at 120 minutes after a glucose load (P < .05). Serum HMW adiponectin measured at 120 minutes after the OGTT decreased significantly to 86.0% and 85.6% of the basal level in subjects with NGT or IFG, respectively (both P < .01). In subjects with impaired glucose tolerance or DM, however, serum HMW adiponectin did not change. The area under the curve for insulin at 30 minutes after a glucose load during the OGTT was significantly larger in subjects with NGT or IFG than in those with DM (P < .05). In addition, the insulinogenic index (DeltaI(0-30)/DeltaG(0-30)) was significantly higher in subjects with NGT or IFG than in those with DM (P < .001). Percentage changes in serum HMW adiponectin of the baseline at 120 minutes correlated negatively with those in serum insulin (r = -0.468, P = .0023), but not plasma glucose, of the baseline at 30 minutes in 40 subjects. On the other hand, serum triglycerides increased significantly after an oral fat load in

  3. Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Glucose Transporter Type 1 in Epithelial Dysplasia and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; Feitosa, Sthefane Gomes; Lima, Ana Thayssa Tomaz; Luna, Ealber Carvalho Macedo; Cavalcante, Roberta Barroso; de Lima, Kenio Costa; Chaves, Filipe Nobre; Costa, Fábio Wildson Gurgel

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignancy of the oral cavity and some of these have been documented in association or preceded by oral epithelial dysplasia (OED). Aggressive cancers with fast growth have demonstrated overexpression of some glucose transporters (GLUTs). Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze the immunohistochemical expression of the glucose transporter, GLUT-1, in OEDs and OSCCs, seeking to better elucidate the biological behavior of neoplasias. Fifteen cases were selected this research of both lesions. Five areas were analyzed from each case by counting the percentage of positive cells at 400x magnification. Immunoreactivity of GLUT-1 was observed in 100% of the samples ranging from 54.2% to 86.2% for the OSCC and 73.9% to 97.4% for the OED. Statistical test revealed that there was greater overexpression of GLUT-1 in OED than the OSCC (p=0.01). It is believed the high expression of GLUT-1 may reflect the involvement of GLUT-1 in early stages of oral carcinogenesis.

  4. Changes of the plasma metabolome during an oral glucose tolerance test: is there more than glucose to look at?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinjie; Peter, Andreas; Fritsche, Jens; Elcnerova, Michaela; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Schleicher, Erwin D; Xu, Guowang; Lehmann, Rainer

    2009-02-01

    The oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) is a common tool to provoke a metabolic challenge for scientific purposes, as well as for diagnostic reasons, to monitor the kinetics of glucose and insulin. Here, we aimed to follow the variety of physiological changes of the whole metabolic pattern in plasma during an oGTT in healthy subjects in a nontargeted reversed-phase ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometric metabolomics approach. We detected 11,500 metabolite ion masses/individual. Applying multivariate data analysis, four major groups of metabolites have been detected as the most discriminating oGTT biomarkers: free fatty acids (FFA), acylcarnitines, bile acids, and lysophosphatidylcholines. We found in detail 1) a strong decrease of all saturated and monounsaturated FFA studied during the oGTT; 2) a significant faster decline of palmitoleate (C16:1) and oleate (C18:1) FFA levels than their saturated counterparts; 3) a strong relative increase of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the fatty acid pattern at 120 min; and 4) a clear decrease in plasma C10:0, C12:0, and C14:1 acylcarnitine levels. These data reflect the switch from beta-oxidation to glycolysis and fat storage during the oGTT. Moreover, the bile acids glycocholic acid, glycochenodeoxycholic acid, and glycodeoxycholic acid were highly discriminative, showing a biphasic kinetic with a maximum of a 4.5- to 6-fold increase at 30 min after glucose ingestion, a significant decrease over the next 60 min followed by an increase until the end of the oGTT. Lysophosphatidylcholines were also increased significantly. The findings of our metabolomics study reveal detailed insights in the complex physiological regulation of the metabolism during an oGTT offering novel perspectives of this widely used procedure.

  5. Flavor change and food deprivation are not critical for post-oral glucose appetition in mice.

    PubMed

    Ackroff, Karen; Sclafani, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    When mice trained to consume a CS- flavored solution paired with intragastric (IG) water self-infusion are given a new CS+ flavor paired with IG glucose self-infusion, their intake is stimulated within minutes in the first CS+ test. They also display a preference for the CS+ over the CS- in two-bottle tests. These indicators of post-oral appetite stimulation (appetition) have been studied in food-restricted mice, with novel CS+ and CS- flavors. Two experiments tested whether deprivation and flavor novelty are needed for stimulation of intake. Exp. 1 compared food-restricted and ad libitum fed C57BL/6 mice trained for 1h/day: 3 sessions with CS- flavor and IG water followed by 3 sessions with a novel CS+ flavor and IG 16% glucose. Ad libitum (AL) fed mice licked less overall, but like the food-restricted (FR) group they increased licking in the first session. In the choice test, FR mice displayed a significant CS+ preference (73%) whereas AL mice had a weaker preference (64%). In Exp. 2, food-restricted mice were trained with a flavor and IG water, and then the Same or a New flavor paired with IG 8% glucose. The glucose infusion rapidly stimulated intakes in the first and subsequent sessions and to the same degree in the two groups. Both groups also showed similar reductions in licking in extinction tests with IG water infusions. These data show that mice need not be explicitly food deprived or given a novel flavor cue to increase ongoing ingestion in response to post-oral glucose stimulation.

  6. Lack of effect of tenoxicam on dynamic responses to concurrent oral doses of glucose and glibenclamide.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, D; Korn, A; Komjati, M; Heinz, G; Haefelfinger, P; Defoin, R; Waldhäusl, W K

    1990-01-01

    1. In a single-blind, placebo controlled study the influence of tenoxicam on responses of glucose, insulin and C-peptide to oral doses of glucose and glibenclamide was examined in 16 healthy male volunteers. 2. The subjects received once daily doses of 2.5 mg glibenclamide for 12 days. From day 5 through 12 eight subjects received concomitantly 20 mg tenoxicam once daily and the remaining eight subjects received placebo. 3. On days 1, 4, 5 and 12 glibenclamide was taken with 75 g glucose and blood glucose, serum insulin and C-peptide were measured over 5 h. Plasma levels of glibenclamide and tenoxicam (where appropriate) were followed over 10 h. 4. Characteristic parameters of blood glucose and insulin and C-peptide responses did not change significantly with time (day) and there was no difference between both treatment groups. 5. Baseline insulin increased from 11.7 mu l-1 on day 1 to 15.6 mu l-1 on day 4 (P = 0.009), likewise baseline C-peptide increased from 478 pmol l-1 to 530 pmol l-1 (P = 0.05), but there was no further change in the subsequent treatment period. 6. The AUC of the glibenclamide plasma concentration-time curve did not show changes with time or differences between treatment groups. The mean (s.d.) oral clearance of tenoxicam was 2.5 (1.5) ml min-1 and appeared slightly higher than in previous studies. 7. It was concluded that tenoxicam did not affect overall glycoregulation in healthy subjects under glibenclamide steady state conditions. PMID:2119677

  7. An oral lipid challenge and acute intake of caffeinated coffee additively decrease glucose tolerance in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Robinson, Lindsay E; Graham, Terry E

    2011-04-01

    Lipid-induced insulin resistance has been investigated primarily with i.v. infusions, and caffeine-induced insulin resistance, with alkaloid caffeine. The effects of orally consumed lipids and coffee have not been established and to our knowledge have never been simultaneously investigated. The goals of this study were to determine whether an oral lipid challenge and caffeinated coffee would disrupt glucose homeostasis and to characterize their respective incretin responses. It was hypothesized that oral ingestion of saturated lipids would impair glucose tolerance and that caffeinated coffee would further hinder glucose management. Ten young, healthy males participated in 5 trials in a randomized, cross-over design. At time 0 h, they underwent an oral fat tolerance test (OFTT: 1 g lipid/kg body weight) or consumed water, followed 5 h later by caffeinated (5 mg/kg) coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or water. At 6 h, volunteers underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Consumption of the OFTT increased glucose concentrations (P < 0.05) after a subsequent OGTT. At 7 h, caffeinated coffee produced the highest glucose concentrations (P < 0.05). Glucagon-like peptide-1 active (GLP-1a) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) were both increased for up to 6 h in all OFTT trials (P < 0.05). Compared to all other treatments, caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee produced higher GLP-1a response at 6.25 h (P < 0.05), whereas only caffeinated coffee increased GIP secretion (P < 0.05). These results show that oral consumption of lipids and caffeinated coffee can independently and additively decrease glucose tolerance. Incretin hormones could explain at least in part this impaired glucose homeostasis.

  8. Nitrogenous compounds stimulate glucose-derived acid production by oral Streptococcus and Actinomyces.

    PubMed

    Norimatsu, Yuka; Kawashima, Junko; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Both Streptococcus and Actinomyces can produce acids from dietary sugars and are frequently found in caries lesions. In the oral cavity, nitrogenous compounds, such as peptides and amino acids, are provided continuously by saliva and crevicular gingival fluid. Given that these bacteria can also utilize nitrogen compounds for their growth, it was hypothesized that nitrogenous compounds may influence their acid production; however, no previous studies have examined this topic. Therefore, the present study aimed to assess the effects of nitrogenous compounds (tryptone and glutamate) on glucose-derived acid production by Streptococcus and Actinomyces. Acid production was evaluated using a pH-stat method under anaerobic conditions, whereas the amounts of metabolic end-products were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography. Tryptone enhanced glucose-derived acid production by up to 2.68-fold, whereas glutamate enhanced Streptococcus species only. However, neither tryptone nor glutamate altered the end-product profiles, indicating that the nitrogenous compounds stimulate the whole metabolic pathways involving in acid production from glucose, but are not actively metabolized, nor do they alter metabolic pathways. These results suggest that nitrogenous compounds in the oral cavity promote acid production by Streptococcus and Actinomyces in vivo.

  9. Use of anesthesia dramatically alters the oral glucose tolerance and insulin secretion in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Windeløv, Johanne A; Pedersen, Jens; Holst, Jens J

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of the impact of anesthesia on oral glucose tolerance in mice. Anesthesia is often used when performing OGTT in mice to avoid the stress of gavage and blood sampling, although anesthesia may influence gastrointestinal motility, blood glucose, and plasma insulin dynamics. C57Bl/6 mice were anesthetized using the following commonly used regimens: (1) hypnorm/midazolam repetitive or single injection; (2) ketamine/xylazine; (3) isoflurane; (4) pentobarbital; and (5) A saline injected, nonanesthetized group. Oral glucose was administered at time 0 min and blood glucose measured in the time frame -15 to +150 min. Plasma insulin concentration was measured at time 0 and 20 min. All four anesthetic regimens resulted in impaired glucose tolerance compared to saline/no anesthesia. (1) hypnorm/midazolam increased insulin concentrations and caused an altered glucose tolerance; (2) ketamine/xylazine lowered insulin responses and resulted in severe hyperglycemia throughout the experiment; (3) isoflurane did not only alter the insulin secretion but also resulted in severe hyperglycemia; (4) pentobarbital resulted in both increased insulin secretion and impaired glucose tolerance. All four anesthetic regimens altered the oral glucose tolerance, and we conclude that anesthesia should not be used when performing metabolic studies in mice.

  10. Influence of Oral Antidiabetic Drugs on Hyperglycemic Response to Foods in Persons with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus as Assessed by Continuous Glucose Monitoring System: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Karolina, Peterson; Chlup, Rudolf; Jana, Zapletalova; Kohnert, Klaus Dieter; Kudlova, Pavla; Bartek, Josef; Nakladalova, Marie; Doubravova, Blanka; Seckar, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of this prospective open-label trial was (1) to assess the influence of oral antidiabetic drugs (OAD) on the glycemic index (GI), glucose response curves (GRCs), daily mean plasma glucose (MPG) and (2) to compare the GI of foods in persons with OAD-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with the respective GI in healthy persons (HP). Methods Tested foods containing 50 g of carbohydrates were eaten for breakfast and dinner after 10 and 4 h of fasting, respectively. Glycemic index, GRC, and MPG were obtained using the CGMS®System Gold™ (CGMS). In T2DM patients [n = 16; age (mean ± standard error) 56.0 ± 2.25 years], foods were tested four times: tests 1, 2, and 3 were performed within one week in which placebo was introduced on day 2, and test 4 was carried out five weeks after reintroduction of OAD. Glycemic indexes, GRC, and MPG from tests 1, 2, 3, and 4 were compared. In a control group of 20 HP (age 24.4 ± 0.71 years), the mean GIs were calculated as the mean from 20 subject-related GIs. Results In T2DM patients, subject-related assessment of GIs, GRC, and MPG distinguished persons with and without OAD effect. Nevertheless, the group-related GIs and the MPG on days 2, 8, and 39 showed no significant difference. There was no significant difference between the GIs in OAD-treated T2DM patients (test 4) versus HP (except in apple baby food). Glucose response curves were significantly larger in T2DM patients (test 4) versus HP. Conclusions Determination of GRC and subject-related GI using the CGMS appears to be a potential means for the evaluation of efficacy of OAD treatment. Further studies are underway. PMID:20663465

  11. Activation of the gut calcium-sensing receptor by peptide agonists reduces rapid elevation of plasma glucose in response to oral glucose load in rats.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Maya; Hira, Tohru; Mitsunaga, Arimi; Sato, Eri; Nakajima, Shingo; Kitahara, Yoshiro; Eto, Yuzuru; Hara, Hiroshi

    2014-06-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed in various tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract. To investigate the role of gut CaSR on glycemic control, we examined whether single oral administration of CaSR agonist peptides affected the glycemic response in rats. Glucose tolerance tests were performed under oral or duodenal administration of various CaSR agonist peptides (γGlu-Cys, protamine, and poly-d-lysine hydrobromide) in conscious rats. Involvement of CaSR was determined by using a CaSR antagonist. Signaling pathways underlying CaSR agonist-modified glycemia were investigated using gut hormone receptor antagonists. The gastric emptying rate after the administration of CaSR agonist peptides was measured by the phenol red recovery method. Oral and duodenal administration of CaSR agonist peptides attenuated glycemic responses under the oral glucose tolerance test, but the administration of casein did not. The promotive effect on glucose tolerance was weakened by luminal pretreatment with a CaSR antagonist. Treatment with a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist partially diminished the glucose-lowering effect of peptides. Furthermore, the gastric emptying rate was decreased by duodenal administration of CaSR agonist peptides. These results demonstrate that activation of the gut CaSR by peptide agonists promotes glucose tolerance in conscious rats. 5-HT3 receptor and the delayed gastric emptying rate appear to be involved in the glucose-lowering effect of CaSR agonist peptides. Thus, activation of gut CaSR by dietary peptides reduces glycemic responses so that gut CaSR may be a potential target for the improvement of postprandial glycemia.

  12. Amantadine reduces glucagon and enhances insulin secretion throughout the oral glucose tolerance test: central plus peripheral nervous system mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lechin, Fuad; van der Dijs, Bertha; Pardey-Maldonado, Betty; Rivera, Jairo E; Lechin, Marcel E; Baez, Scarlet

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the trial was to examine the effects of amantadine, a N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, on the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) plus insulin, glucagon and neurotransmitters circulating levels. Previous findings showed that hyperinsulinism and type 2 diabetes are positively associated with neural sympathetic and adrenal sympathetic activities, respectively. These peripheral sympathetic branches depend on the pontine (A5-noradrenergic) and the rostral ventrolateral (C1-adrenergic) medullary nuclei. They are excited by glutamate axons which act at NMDA postsynaptic receptors. Research design and methods One OGTT plus placebo and one OGTT plus oral amantadine test were carried out two weeks apart in 15 caucasic normal voluntary humans. Noradrenaline, adrenaline, dopamine, plasma-free serotonin, platelet serotonin, glucose, glucagon, and insulin were measured throughout the 180-minute testing period. Results Maximal reductions of plasma glucose and glucagon plus exacerbated insulin rises were significantly greater throughout the oral glucose plus amantadine test than those registered throughout the oral glucose plus placebo challenge. The above findings were paralleled by greater than normal noradrenaline/adrenaline plasma ratio increases. In addition, maximal reductions of the platelet serotonin and plasma serotonin circulating values contrasted with the normal rises of these parameters, always registered during the glucose load plus placebo challenge. Conclusion This study supports the theory that amantadine might be a powerful antidiabetic tool and could be added to the therapeutic arsenal against type 2 diabetes. PMID:21437134

  13. Oral salmon calcitonin enhances insulin action and glucose metabolism in diet-induced obese streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Feigh, Michael; Hjuler, Sara T; Andreassen, Kim V; Gydesen, Sofie; Ottosen, Ida; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Christiansen, Claus; Karsdal, Morten A; Henriksen, Kim

    2014-08-15

    We previously reported that oral delivery of salmon calcitonin (sCT) improved energy and glucose homeostasis and attenuated diabetic progression in animal models of diet-induced obesity (DIO) and type 2 diabetes, although the glucoregulatory mode of action was not fully elucidated. In the present study we hypothesized that oral sCT as pharmacological intervention 1) exerted anti-hyperglycemic efficacy, and 2) enhanced insulin action in DIO-streptozotocin (DIO-STZ) diabetic rats. Diabetic hyperglycemia was induced in male selectively bred DIO rats by a single low dose (30mg/kg) injection of STZ. Oral sCT by gavage was delivered as once-daily administration with lead-in (2mg/kg) and maintenance (0.5mg/kg) dose of oral sCT for a total of 21 days. Food intake, body weight, blood glucose, HbA1c, glucose and insulin tolerance test, and parameters of insulin sensitivity were investigated. Plasma glucoregulatory hormones and pancreatic insulin content were analyzed. Oral sCT treatment induced a pronounced anorectic action during the 7 days lead-in period and markedly reduced food intake and body weight in conjunction with improved glucose homeostasis. During the maintenance period, oral sCT normalized food intake and attenuated weight loss, albeit sustained glycemic control by reducing fasting blood glucose and HbA1c levels compared to those of vehicle-treated rats at the end of study. Notably, plasma levels of insulin, glucagon, leptin and adiponectin were unaltered, albeit insulin action was enhanced in conjunction with protection of pancreatic insulin content. The results of the present study indicate that oral sCT exerts a novel insulin-sensitizing effect to improve glucose metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  14. [Role of classical oral glucose-lowering medications in current treatment].

    PubMed

    Carramiñana Barrera, F C

    2014-07-01

    Classical oral glucose were discovered in the mid twentieth century. Despite the time elapsed since then and the lack of large studies to support the use of some of these drugs, they continue to be employed, are indicated in all clinical practice guidelines and consensus documents and, overall, remain among the most widely prescribed drugs in the national health system. The main arguments for their continued use are their widespread and prolonged prescription, their effectiveness, and cost. Their main disadvantages have always been and continue to be their adverse gastrointestinal effects, weight gain, the risk of hypoglycemia and other adverse effects, which have encouraged the development of new glucose-lowering drugs with an improved pharmacological profile that would cover the various mechanisms of hyperglycemia. Currently, deep knowledge of glucose-lowering drugs is required in the patient-centered management of diabetes. Furthermore, this knowledge should be adapted to each individual patient to acquire the experience necessary to achieve effective metabolic control, delay the development of chronic complications, and improve the quality of life and life expectancy of patients with diabetes.

  15. Impaired increase of plasma abscisic Acid in response to oral glucose load in type 2 diabetes and in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ameri, Pietro; Bruzzone, Santina; Mannino, Elena; Sociali, Giovanna; Andraghetti, Gabriella; Salis, Annalisa; Ponta, Monica Laura; Briatore, Lucia; Adami, Giovanni F; Ferraiolo, Antonella; Venturini, Pier Luigi; Maggi, Davide; Cordera, Renzo; Murialdo, Giovanni; Zocchi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is present and active in humans, regulating glucose homeostasis. In normal glucose tolerant (NGT) human subjects, plasma ABA (ABAp) increases 5-fold after an oral glucose load. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of an oral glucose load on ABAp in type 2 diabetes (T2D) subjects. We chose two sub-groups of patients who underwent an oral glucose load for diagnostic purposes: i) 9 treatment-naive T2D subjects, and ii) 9 pregnant women with gestational diabetes (GDM), who underwent the glucose load before and 8-12 weeks after childbirth. Each group was compared with matched NGT controls. The increase of ABAp in response to glucose was found to be abrogated in T2D patients compared to NGT controls. A similar result was observed in the women with GDM compared to pregnant NGT controls; 8-12 weeks after childbirth, however, fasting ABAp and ABAp response to glucose were restored to normal in the GDM subjects, along with glucose tolerance. We also retrospectively compared fasting ABAp before and after bilio-pancreatic diversion (BPD) in obese, but not diabetic subjects, and in obese T2D patients, in which BPD resulted in the resolution of diabetes. Compared to pre-BPD values, basal ABAp significantly increased 1 month after BPD in T2D as well as in NGT subjects, in parallel with a reduction of fasting plasma glucose. These results indicate an impaired hyperglycemia-induced ABAp increase in T2D and in GDM and suggest a beneficial effect of elevated ABAp on glycemic control.

  16. Evidence that the oral glucose-tolerance test does not provide a uniform stimulus to pancreatic islets in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    de Leacy, E A; Cowley, D M

    1989-07-01

    Fifty consecutive pregnant patients referred for a glucose-tolerance test were classified on the basis of increasing (n = 20) or decreasing (n = 28) hematocrit after an oral 75-g glucose load. (The hematocrit did not change in the other two patients.) Patients with increasing hematocrit, a response previously seen in patients with the dumping syndrome, showed significantly flatter increases in glucose concentrations in plasma after the load. The mean decrease in the concentration of phosphate in plasma, measured as an index of glucose uptake by cells, was significantly less (P less than 0.05) 2 h after the load in the group with flatter glucose responses, suggesting that the flat response is ascribable to poor glucose absorption rather than to an exaggerated insulin response. These results indicate that the oral glucose-tolerance test stresses the pancreatic islets differently in different pregnant subjects, owing to individual variations in the gastrointestinal handling of the glucose load. Consequently, patients may give a "normal" result who might otherwise become hyperglycemic after normal meals. We suggest that alternative screening procedures be investigated to assess pregnant patients postprandially.

  17. Milrinone efficiently potentiates insulin secretion induced by orally but not intravenously administered glucose in C57BL6J mice.

    PubMed

    Degerman, Eva; Manganiello, Vincent; Holst, Jens J; Ahrén, Bo

    2004-09-13

    To study the effect of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 inhibition on plasma insulin and glucose levels, the selective PDE 3 inhibitor milrinone (0.25, 1.0, and 2.5 mg/kg) was given orally to anesthetized CL57Bl/6J mice 10 min before a gastric glucose gavage (150 mg/mouse). It was found that milrinone augmented the glucose-mediated increase in plasma insulin at 1.0 and 2.5 mg/kg without, however, any improvement in glucose elimination. In contrast, when given 10 min before intravenous glucose (1 g/kg), milrinone (1 mg/kg) did not affect the insulin response to glucose. The increase in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels after gastric glucose was not altered by milrinone. However, the PDE3 inhibitor augmented the insulin response to intravenous GLP-1 (2.8 nmol/kg). We therefore conclude that PDE3 inhibition by milrinone augments insulin secretion in vivo in mice after oral but not after intravenous glucose, which may be explained by enhanced response to the cAMP-dependent insulinotropic action of endogenously released GLP-1.

  18. Exhaled breath condensate pH decreases following oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Bikov, Andras; Pako, Judit; Montvai, David; Kovacs, Dorottya; Koller, Zsofia; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Horvath, Ildiko

    2015-12-15

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH is a widely measured non-invasive marker of airway acidity. However, some methodological aspects have not been thoroughly investigated. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) on EBC pH in attempt to better standardize its measurement. Seventeen healthy subjects (24  ±  2 years, 6 men, 11 women) participated in the study. EBC collection and capillary blood glucose measurements were performed before as well as 0, 30, 60 and 120 min after a standardized OGTT test. The rate of respiratory droplet dilution and pH were evaluated in EBC. Blood glucose significantly increased at 30 min and maintained elevation after 60 and 120 min following OGTT. Compared to baseline (7.99  ±  0.25) EBC pH significantly decreased immediately after OGTT (7.41  ±  0.47); this drop sustained over 30 (7.44  ±  0.72) and 60 min (7.62  ±  0.44) without a significant difference at 120 min (7.78  ±  0.26). No change was observed in the rate of respiratory droplet dilution. There was no relationship between blood glucose and EBC pH values. Sugar intake may significantly decrease EBC pH. This effect needs to be considered when performing EBC pH studies. Further experiments are also warranted to investigate the effect of diet on other exhaled biomarkers.

  19. The effect of short-term dietary supplementation with glucose on gastric emptying of glucose and fructose and oral glucose tolerance in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, M; Cunningham, K M; Wishart, J M; Jones, K L; Read, N W

    1996-04-01

    Recent observations indicate that gastric emptying may be influenced by patterns of previous nutrient intake. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of a high glucose diet on gastric emptying of glucose and fructose, and the impact of any changes in gastric emptying on plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide in response to glucose and fructose loads. Gastric emptying of glucose and fructose (both 75 g dissolved in 350 ml water) were measured in seven normal volunteers on separate days while each was on a "standard' diet and an identical diet supplemented with 440 g/day of glucose for 4-7 days. Venous blood samples for measurement of plasma glucose, insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide levels were taken immediately before and for 180 min after ingestion of glucose and fructose loads. Dietary glucose supplementation accelerated gastric emptying of glucose (50% emptying time 82 +/- 8 vs 106 +/- 10 min, p = 0.004) and fructose (73 +/- 9 vs 106 +/- 9 min, p = 0.001). After ingestion of glucose, plasma concentrations of insulin (p < 0.05) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (p < 0.05) were higher during the glucose-supplemented diet. In contrast, plasma glucose concentrations at 60 min and 75 min were lower (p < 0.05) on the glucose-supplemented diet. We conclude that short-term supplementation of the diet with glucose accelerates gastric emptying of glucose and fructose, presumably as a result of reduced feedback inhibition of gastric emptying from small intestinal luminal receptors. More rapid gastric emptying of glucose has a significant impact on glucose tolerance.

  20. Opuntia ficus-indica ingestion stimulates peripheral disposal of oral glucose before and after exercise in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Van Proeyen, Karen; Ramaekers, Monique; Pischel, Ivo; Hespel, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI) cladode and fruit-skin extract on blood glucose and plasma insulin increments due to high-dose carbohydrate ingestion, before and after exercise. Healthy, physically active men (n = 6; 21.0 ± 1.6 years, 78.1 ± 6.0 kg) participated in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study involving 2 experimental sessions. In each session, the subjects successively underwent an oral glucose tolerance test at rest (OGTT(R)), a 30-min cycling bout at ~75% VO(2max), and another OGTT after exercise (OGTT(EX)). They received capsules containing either 1,000 mg OFI or placebo (PL) 30 min before and immediately after the OGTT(R). Blood samples were collected before (t₀) and at 30-min intervals after ingestion of 75 g glucose for determination of blood glucose and serum insulin. In OGTT(EX) an additional 75-g oral glucose bolus was administered at t₆₀. In OGTT(R), OFI administration reduced the area under the glucose curve (AUC(GLUC)) by 26%, mainly due to lower blood glucose levels at t₃₀ and t₆₀ (p < .05). Furthermore, a higher serum insulin concentration was noted after OFI intake at baseline and at t₃₀ (p < .05). In OGTT(EX), blood glucose at t₆₀ was ~10% lower in OFI than in PL, which resulted in a decreased AUC(GLUC) (-37%, p < .05). However, insulin values and AUC(INS) were not different between OFI and PL. In conclusion, the current study shows that OFI extract can increase plasma insulin and thereby facilitate the clearance of an oral glucose load from the circulation at rest and after endurance exercise in healthy men.

  1. A single dose of sodium nitrate does not improve oral glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cermak, Naomi M; Hansen, Dominique; Kouw, Imre W K; van Dijk, Jan-Willem; Blackwell, Jamie R; Jones, Andrew M; Gibala, Martin J; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-08-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO3(-)) supplementation has been proposed as an emerging treatment strategy for type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that ingestion of a single bolus of dietary NO3(-) ingestion improves oral glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Seventeen men with type 2 diabetes (glycated hemoglobin, 7.3% ± 0.2%) participated in a randomized crossover experiment. The subjects ingested a glucose beverage 2.5 hours after consumption of either sodium NO3(-) (0.15 mmol NaNO3(-) · kg(-1)) or a placebo solution. Venous blood samples were collected before ingestion of the glucose beverage and every 30 minutes thereafter during a 2-hour period to assess postprandial plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. The results show that plasma NO3(-) and nitrite levels were increased after NaNO3(-) as opposed to placebo ingestion (treatment-effect, P = .001). Despite the elevated plasma NO3(-) and nitrite levels, ingestion of NaNO3(-) did not attenuate the postprandial rise in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations (time × treatment interaction, P = .41 for glucose, P = .93 for insulin). Despite the lack of effect on oral glucose tolerance, basal plasma glucose concentrations measured 2.5 hours after NaNO3(-) ingestion were lower when compared with the placebo treatment (7.5 ± 0.4 vs 8.3 ± 0.4 mmol/L, respectively; P = .04). We conclude that ingestion of a single dose of dietary NO3(-) does not improve subsequent oral glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  2. Changes in plasma glucose in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats after oral administration of maple syrup.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Tanabe, Wataru; Ito, Yoshimasa; Kurabuchi, Satoshi; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether maple syrup is a suitable sweetener in the management of type 2 diabetes using the Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat. The enhancement in plasma glucose (PG) and glucose absorption in the small intestine were lower after the oral administration of maple syrup than after sucrose administration in OLETF rats, and no significant differences were observed in insulin levels. These data suggested that maple syrup might inhibit the absorption of glucose from the small intestine and preventing the enhancement of PG in OLETF rats. Therefore, maple syrup might help in the prevention of type 2 diabetes.

  3. Effects of oral glucose on exercise thermoregulation in men after water immersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dearborn, Alan S.; Ertl, Andrew C.; Greenleaf, John E.; Barnes, Paul R.; Jackson, Catherine G. R.; Breckler, Jennifer L.

    1994-01-01

    To test the hypothesis elevated blood glucose would attenuate the rise in exercise rectal temperature, six men age 35 plus or minus S.D. 7 years participated in each of three trials by 4-hr water immersion to the neck: (1) 2.0 g/kg body wt of oral glucose (33.8 percent wt./vol.) was consumed followed by 80 min controlled rest (Glu/Rest), and 70 min horizontal supine cycle exercise at 62.8 percent plus or minus S.E. 0.5 percent (1.97 plus or minus 0.02 L/min) of peak O2 uptake followed by 10 min recovery (2) with (Glu/Ex) and (3) without prior flucose (No Glu/Ex). Blood samples were taken at -25, 0, 15, 45, and 68 min of exercise and after plus 10 min of recovery for measurement of hemoglobin, hematocrit, and blood glucose. Both mean skin (T sub sk) (from six sites) and rectal temperatures (T sub re) were monitored continuously. Sweat rate was measured by resistanc hygrometry. The mean of delta PV for the exercise trials was -12.2 plus or minus 2.1 percent. Mean blood glucose for the Glu/Ex trial was higher than that of the No Glu/Ex trial was (108.4 equal or minus 3.9 and 85.6 plus or minus 1.6 mg/dl, respectively, P less than 0.05. At the end of exercise T(sub sk) for the Glu/Ex trial was lower than for No Glu/Ex(32.0 plus or minus 0.3 and 32.4 equals or minus 0.2 C, respectively, P less than 0.05); T(sub re) for the Glu/Ex trial was lower than for No Glu/Es (38.22 plus or minus 0.17 and 38.60 plus or minus 0.11 C, respectively, P less than 0.05); and forearm sweat rate for the Glu/Ex trial (0.34 plus or minus 0.04 and 0.43 plus or minus g/sq cm, respectively, P less than 0.05). These data suggest that elevation of blood glucose prior to horizontal exercise following hypohydration attenuates the increase in body temperature without altering heat production or exercise hypovolemia.

  4. Oral administration of corn zein hydrolysate stimulates GLP-1 and GIP secretion and improves glucose tolerance in male normal rats and Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Noriyuki; Hira, Tohru; Yamada, Nao; Hara, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that ileal administration of the dietary protein hydrolysate prepared from corn zein (ZeinH) stimulated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and attenuated hyperglycemia in rats. In this study, to examine whether oral administration of ZeinH improves glucose tolerance by stimulating GLP-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) secretion, glucose tolerance tests were performed in normal Sprague-Dawley male rats and diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) male rats. The test solution was gavaged before ip glucose injection in normal rats or gavaged together with glucose in GK rats. Blood samples were collected from the tail vein or by using the jugular catheter to measure glucose, insulin, GLP-1, and GIP levels. In the ip glucose tolerance test, oral administration of ZeinH (2 g/kg) significantly suppressed the glycemic response accompanied by an immediate increase in plasma GLP-1 and GIP levels in normal rats. In contrast, oral administration of another dietary peptide, meat hydrolysate, did not elicit a similar effect. The glucose-lowering effect of ZeinH was attenuated by a GLP-1 receptor antagonist or by a GIP receptor antagonist. Furthermore, oral ZeinH induced GLP-1 secretion and reduced glycemic response in GK rats under the oral glucose tolerance test. These results indicate that the oral administration of the dietary peptide ZeinH improves glucose tolerance in normal and diabetic rats by its incretin-releasing activity, namely, the incretinotropic effect.

  5. Effects of basswood honey, honey-comparable glucose-fructose solution, and oral glucose tolerance test solution on serum insulin, glucose, and C-peptide concentrations in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Münstedt, Karsten; Sheybani, Babak; Hauenschild, Annette; Brüggmann, Dörthe; Bretzel, Reinhard G; Winter, Daniel

    2008-09-01

    Studies suggest that honey has less influence on serum glucose concentrations than monosaccharides and disaccharides. This study aimed to confirm these findings conclusively by comparing directly the effects of honey, an identical sugar solution, and oral glucose tolerance (OGT) test solution on serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide values in healthy subjects. Twelve healthy men with a mean age of 27.7 years, a mean body mass index of 23.2 kg/m(2), and no history of metabolic disorders participated in the study. Subjects underwent OGT testing to establish values and exclude preclinical diabetes. One week later they were randomly assigned to basswood honey or a glucose-fructose solution (honey-comparable glucose-fructose solution). The following week subjects were given the other solution. All solutions contained 75 g of glucose. Serum glucose was measured before drinking test solutions and every 10 minutes for 120 minutes afterwards. C-peptide and insulin were measured at 60 and 120 minutes. Serum insulin and C-peptide values at 60 minutes were significantly lower for honey. The mean serum glucose concentration was also lower for honey, but direct comparisons at the various times showed no statistically significant differences between solutions. However, the area under the concentration-time profile for glucose response was lower for the honey than the honey-comparable glucose-fructose solution. Honey had less effect on serum glucose, C-peptide, and insulin values than the honey-comparable glucose-fructose solution. Further study to elucidate underlying mechanisms may be worthwhile, as may investigation of the implications of these findings for diabetic patients.

  6. Oral glucose tolerance test effects on endothelial inflammation markers in healthy subjects and diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Derosa, G; D'Angelo, A; Salvadeo, S A T; Ferrari, I; Fogari, E; Gravina, A; Mereu, R; Palumbo, I; Maffioli, P; Randazzo, S; Cicero, A F G

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) on the level of endothelial dysfunction and vascular inflammation markers in healthy subjects (H) and diabetic overweight patients (D). We enrolled 256 healthy subjects and 274 type 2 diabetic patients. We evaluated blood glucose (BG), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) at baseline and after OGTT. We observed that BG, sICAM-1, IL-6, hs-CRP, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin, and TNF-alpha values were higher in D group than in H group. In a large sample of adult healthy subjects and type 2 diabetics we observed that both answer to an OGTT with a significant increase in biomarkers of systemic low-grade inflammation and endothelial dysfunction such as hsCRP, IL-6, TNF-alpha, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, and sE-selectin. Type 2 diabetics experienced, however, a more significant increase in TNF-alpha, and sE-selectin.

  7. Cardiovascular disease and oral agent glucose-lowering therapies in the management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Home, Philip

    2012-06-01

    Although glucose-lowering oral agents have been available for clinical use for over 60 years, the formal evidence base supporting their advantage and safety in regard of cardiovascular (CV) outcomes remains less than optimal. However, a synthesis of the evidence results in a high probability of benefit. For metformin, the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) substudy is convincing for a definite effect in reducing myocardial infarction (MI), but the quantitative extent of that is uncertain. For sulfonylureas, support for reduction in MI comes from the UKPDS extension study, where the central estimate for risk reduction remains the same as in the original planned end to the study, but the greater number of events was statistically significant for the sulfonylurea/insulin arm. Other studies do not support the view that metformin and sulfonylureas differ with respect to MI or indeed CV outcomes more generally. The data available for acarbose, an α-glucosidase inhibitor, are weak but not of concern, although some positive substudy data are available for people with impaired glucose tolerance. For peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists the CV data are more controversial, but the purpose-designed randomized controlled trials are clear that pioglitazone is advantageous to placebo (except for heart failure [HF]), whereas rosiglitazone is indistinguishable from metformin/sulfonylureas (even when including HF data). Lower-quality data do, however, lead to significant concerns for MI with rosiglitazone. Early and somewhat low-quality data for the dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitors show they are safe and hold promise for cardiovascular advantage, with major randomized controlled trials being underway. Preliminary CV data are available for one sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor and look reassuring.

  8. New-onset diabetes after transplantation--role of oral glucose tolerance test for diagnosis and study of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Manisha; Sahay, Rakesh K; Narayan, Girish

    2013-09-01

    To determine the role of the oral glucose tolerance test in the early detection of new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) and to compare the various risk factors and insulin kinetics in the transplant patients, we studied 41 live-related renal allograft recipients who were not diabetic before transplantation. Immunosuppression included triple drug therapy (cyclosporine, azathioprine and steroids) and rejection episodes were treated with methyl prednisolone (30 mg/kg IV × 3 days). All the study patients were subjected to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at Day 90 post-transplant and classified as having normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and NODAT as per the World Health Organization guidelines. Insulin levels were also determined at 0, ½ hour, 1 hour and 2 hours during OGTT. NODAT was noted in 29.2% of the study patients, IFG in 4.8% of the study patients and NGT in 65.8% of the study patients. All the groups had normal fasting plasma glucose, but higher than normal insulin levels, suggesting insulin resistance. The patients with overt NODAT had, in addition, low fasting insulin (insulin secretory defect). OGTT may be used for the early detection of NODAT. Although insulin resistance is detected in the majority of post-transplant patients, NODAT also reveals also an insulin secretory defect.

  9. Factors associated with the glucose-lowering effect of vildagliptin identified from the results of the oral glucose tolerance test in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akinobu; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate the factors contributing to the glucose-lowering effect of vildagliptin, we analyzed the results of the oral glucose tolerance test together with several clinical parameters in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes before and after 24 weeks of treatment with vildagliptin. The data of the 13 patients who satisfactorily completed the follow-up examinations were included. After 24 weeks treatment with vildagliptin, the patients were classified into a responder group (69.2%) and a non-responder group (30.8%); the responders consisting of subjects whose HbA1c decreased following 24 weeks treatment with vildagliptin, and the non-responders consisting of subjects who did not show any significant decrease of HbA1c. There were no differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups before administration of vildagliptin. After 24 weeks of treatment, HbA1c was significantly reduced from 7.3 ± 0.5% to 6.7 ± 0.5% in the responder group (P = 0.0077), while it tended to rather increased from 7.1 ± 0.6% to 7.5 ± 0.7% in the non-responder group (P = 0.0679). Also, parameters reflecting the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, such as the insulinogenic index and oral disposition index, were significantly higher in the responder group than in the non-responder group, whereas insulin sensitivity was similar between the two groups. These results suggest that the difference in the degree of improvement of the glucose tolerance between the responder group and non-responder group in this study could be associated with the effect of vildagliptin on the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, but not on the insulin sensitivity.

  10. A comprehensive review of oral glucosamine use and effects on glucose metabolism in normal and diabetic individuals

    PubMed Central

    Simon, R R; Marks, V; Leeds, A R; Anderson, J W

    2011-01-01

    Glucosamine (GlcN) is a widely utilized dietary supplement that is used to promote joint health. Reports that oral GlcN supplementation at usual doses adversely affects glucose metabolism in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance have raised concerns that GlcN should be contraindicated in individuals with diabetes and those at risk for developing it. This review addresses its potential, when used at typical doses, to affect glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in healthy individuals and those with diabetes or ‘pre-diabetes’. Publicly available scientific information and data on GlcN were systematically compiled using the electronic search tool, Dialog®, and reviewed with special emphasis on human studies. In long-term clinical trials, including those containing subjects with type 2 diabetes or ‘pre-diabetes’, GlcN produced a non-significant lowering of fasting blood glucose concentrations in all groups of subjects treated for periods of up to 3 years. Owing to limitations in study design, conclusions based on studies that report adverse affects of GlcN on insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in pre-diabetic subjects are suspect. However, no definitive long-term studies of GlcN use for individuals with pre-diabetes are available. Nevertheless, based on available evidence, we conclude that GlcN has no effect on fasting blood glucose levels, glucose metabolism, or insulin sensitivity at any oral dose level in healthy subjects, individuals with diabetes, or those with impaired glucose tolerance. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21218504

  11. Effects of three day bed-rest on circulatory, metabolic and hormonal responses to oral glucose load in endurance trained athletes and untrained subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smorawinski, J.; Kubala, P.; Kaciuba-Uociako, H.; Nazar, K.; Titow-Stupnicka, E.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Endurance trained long distance runners and untrained individuals underwent three days of bed rest and oral glucose loading. Before and after bed rest, individuals were given glucose tolerance tests, and their heart rates, blood pressure, blood glucose levels, insulin levels, and catecholamine interactions were measured. Results indicated that glucose tolerance is more affected by bed rest-induced deconditioning in untrained individuals than in trained individuals.

  12. Correlation between Salivary Glucose and Blood Glucose and the Implications of Salivary Factors on the Oral Health Status in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puttaswamy, Kavitha A.; Puttabudhi, Jaishankar H.; Raju, Shashidara

    2017-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to estimate and assess any correlation between random capillary blood glucose (RCBG) and unstimulated whole salivary glucose (UWSG), as well as to estimate various salivary parameters, such as flow rate, pH, buffering capacity, and the influence of these factors on the oral health status in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Materials and Methods: Sixty individuals suffering from type 2 DM and 40 healthy individuals in the age group of 30–60 years were included in the study. RCBG was estimated using glucometer and UWSG was estimated using photocolorimeter. Salivary parameters such as flow rate, pH, and buffering capacity were assessed using GC® Saliva kit. Oral health status was recorded using the Russell's periodontal index (RPI) and the Decayed Missing Filled Teeth (DMFT) index. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Type 2 diabetics had higher mean values for RCBG levels and UWSG. Type 2 diabetics had low mean salivary flow rate, pH, and buffering capacity. Type 2 diabetics had higher mean values for RPI. Conclusion: Among the salivary factors studied, salivary glucose significantly influenced the periodontal status in Type 2 diabetics. PMID:28316946

  13. Pre-Type 1 Diabetes Dysmetabolism: Maximal sensitivity achieved with Both Oral and Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jennifer M.; McFann, Kim; Harrison, Leonard C.; Fourlanos, Spiros; Krischer, Jeffrey; Cuthbertson, David; Chase, H. Peter; Eisenbarth, George S.; Group, the DPT-1 Study

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship of intravenous (IVGTT) and oral (OGTT) glucose tolerance tests abnormalities to diabetes development in a high-risk pre-diabetic cohort and identify an optimal testing strategy for detecting pre-clinical diabetes. Study design Diabetes Prevention Trial Type 1 randomized subjects to oral (n=372) and parenteral (n=339) insulin prevention trials. Subjects were followed with IVGTTs and OGTTs. Factors associated with progression to diabetes were evaluated. Results Survival analysis revealed that higher quartiles of 2-hour glucose and lower quartiles of FPIR at baseline were associated with decreased diabetes-free survival. Cox proportional hazards modeling showed that baseline BMI, FPIR and 2-hour glucose levels were significantly associated with an increased hazard for diabetes. On testing performed within 6 months of diabetes diagnosis, 3% (1/32) had normal first phase insulin response (FPIR) and normal 2-hour glucose on OGTT. The sensitivities for impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and low FPIR performed within 6 months of diabetes diagnosis were equivalent (76% vs. 73%). Conclusions Most (97%) subjects had abnormal IVGTTs and/or OGTTs prior to the development of diabetes. The highest sensitivity is achieved using both tests. PMID:17188609

  14. An acute oral dose of caffeine does not alter glucose kinetics during prolonged dynamic exercise in trained endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Roy, B D; Bosman, M J; Tarnopolsky, M A

    2001-08-01

    This study investigated the possible influence of oral caffeine administration on endogenous glucose production and energy substrate metabolism during prolonged endurance exercise. Twelve trained endurance athletes [seven male, five female; peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) = 65.5 ml.kg-1.min-1] performed 60 min of cycle ergometry at 65% VO2peak twice, once after oral caffeine administration (6 mg.kg-1) (CAF) and once following consumption of a placebo (PLA). CAF and PLA were administered in a randomized double-blind manner 75 min prior to exercise. Plasma glucose kinetics were determined with a primed-continuous infusion of [6,6-2H]glucose. No differences in oxygen consumption (VO2), and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) were observed between CAF and PLA, at rest or during exercise. Blood glucose concentrations were similar between the two conditions at rest and also during exercise. Exercise did lead to an increase in serum free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations for both conditions; however, no differences were observed between CAF and PLA. Both the plasma glucose rate of appearance (Ra) and disappearance (Rd) increased at the onset of exercise (P < 0.05), but were not affected by CAF, as compared to PLA. CAF did lead to a higher plasma lactate concentration during exercise (P < 0.05). It was concluded that an acute oral dose of caffeine does not influence plasma glucose kinetics or energy substrate oxidation during prolonged exercise in trained endurance athletes. However, CAF did lead to elevated plasma lactate concentrations. The exact mechanism of the increase in plasma lactate concentrations remains to be determined.

  15. Lead, cadmium and aluminum in Canadian infant formulae, oral electrolytes and glucose solutions.

    PubMed

    Dabeka, Robert; Fouquet, Andre; Belisle, Stephane; Turcotte, Stephane

    2011-06-01

    Lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and aluminum (Al) were determined in 437 individual samples of infant formulae, oral electrolytes and 5% glucose solutions available in Canada. In the electrolytes, Cd and Pb concentrations were all below 0.01 and 0.041 ng g(-1), respectively. In the 5% glucose solutions, Pb and Cd levels averaged 0.01 and 0.09 ng g(-1), respectively. Reported on an as-consumed basis, Pb levels in milk- and soya-based formulae averaged 0.90 and 1.45 ng g(-1), respectively, while Cd levels averaged 0.23 and 1.18 ng g(-1), respectively Average Al levels on an as-consumed basis were 440 ng g(-1) (range 10-3400 ng g(-1)) in milk-based formulae and 730 ng g(-1) (range 230-1100 ng g(-1)) in soy-based formulae. Al concentrations increased in the following order: plain formula < low-iron formula < iron-supplemented formula < casein hydrolysate formula ≈ premature formula ≤ soy formula. For example, in the powdered formulae, average Al concentrations were 18 ng g(-1) for plain milk-based, 37 ng g(-1) for low-iron, 128 ng g(-1) for iron supplemented, 462 ng g(-1) for lactose-free, 518 ng g(-1) for hypoallergenic and 619 ng g(-1) for soy-based formula. Al concentrations, as-consumed, increased with decreasing levels of concentration: powder < concentrated liquid < ready-to-use. Formulae stored in glass bottles contained between 100 and 300 ng g(-1) more Al than the same formulae stored in cans. The source of the increased Al did not appear to be the glass itself, because most electrolytes and glucose solutions, also stored in glass, contained less than 8 ng g(-1) Al. Corresponding differences in Pb and Cd levels were not observed. Al concentrations varied substantially among manufacturers; however, all manufacturers were able to produce plain milk-based formulae containing less than 50 ng g(-1) Al, i.e. within the range of Al concentrations found in human milk. Next to soya-based and hypoallergenic formulae, premature formulae contained among the highest

  16. Lead, cadmium and aluminum in Canadian infant formulae, oral electrolytes and glucose solutions

    PubMed Central

    Dabeka, Robert; Fouquet, Andre; Belisle, Stephane; Turcotte, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    Lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and aluminum (Al) were determined in 437 individual samples of infant formulae, oral electrolytes and 5% glucose solutions available in Canada. In the electrolytes, Cd and Pb concentrations were all below 0.01 and 0.041 ng g−1, respectively. In the 5% glucose solutions, Pb and Cd levels averaged 0.01 and 0.09 ng g−1, respectively. Reported on an as-consumed basis, Pb levels in milk- and soya-based formulae averaged 0.90 and 1.45 ng g−1, respectively, while Cd levels averaged 0.23 and 1.18 ng g−1, respectively Average Al levels on an as-consumed basis were 440 ng g−1 (range 10–3400 ng g−1) in milk-based formulae and 730 ng g−1 (range 230–1100 ng g−1) in soy-based formulae. Al concentrations increased in the following order: plain formula < low-iron formula < iron-supplemented formula < casein hydrolysate formula ≈ premature formula ≤ soy formula. For example, in the powdered formulae, average Al concentrations were 18 ng g−1 for plain milk-based, 37 ng g−1 for low-iron, 128 ng g−1 for iron supplemented, 462 ng g−1 for lactose-free, 518 ng g−1 for hypoallergenic and 619 ng g−1 for soy-based formula. Al concentrations, as-consumed, increased with decreasing levels of concentration: powder < concentrated liquid < ready-to-use. Formulae stored in glass bottles contained between 100 and 300 ng g−1 more Al than the same formulae stored in cans. The source of the increased Al did not appear to be the glass itself, because most electrolytes and glucose solutions, also stored in glass, contained less than 8 ng g−1 Al. Corresponding differences in Pb and Cd levels were not observed. Al concentrations varied substantially among manufacturers; however, all manufacturers were able to produce plain milk-based formulae containing less than 50 ng g−1 Al, i.e. within the range of Al concentrations found in human milk. Next to soya-based and hypoallergenic formulae, premature formulae contained among the highest

  17. Insulin resistance and lipid profile during an oral glucose tolerance test in women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zx; Wu, Y; Zhu, Xy; Fang, Q; Chen, Dq

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to compare changes in insulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) during pregnancy and those with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Overall, 105 pregnant women between 24 and 28 weeks' gestation, 50 with NGT and 55 with GDM according to NDDG standard, were enrolled into the study. The levels of fasting blood glucose, insulin, triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) and the insulin levels, blood glucose levels at 1, 2 and 3 hours post oral glucose administration during an OGTT (5.8, 10.6, 9.2 and 8.1 mmol/L, respectively) were measured. Then, insulin resistance (IR) index was calculated. There was no significant difference in fasting, 3-h insulin levels and 3-h blood glucose levels between those with NGT and those with GDM (P > 0.05). However, 1-h and 2-h insulin levels, fasting and 1-h and 2-h blood glucose levels in women with GDM were significantly higher than those in the NGT group (P < 0.05). Fasting TC and TG levels in the GDM group were significantly higher than those with NGT (P = 0.031 and P = 0.025, respectively). Correlation analysis showed that TG and TC levels were positively correlated with homoeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR) (r = 0.67 and r = 0.78, respectively; P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that insulin sensitivity in women with GDM was significantly lower than that observed in those with NGT. Reducing IR and blood lipids in women with GDM could potentially improve maternal and foetal outcomes.

  18. Development and assessment of the disposition index based on the oral glucose tolerance test in subjects with different glycaemic status.

    PubMed

    Santos, J L; Yévenes, I; Cataldo, L R; Morales, M; Galgani, J; Arancibia, C; Vega, J; Olmos, P; Flores, M; Valderas, J P; Pollak, F

    2016-06-01

    Insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity indexes are related by hyperbolic functions, allowing the calculation of the disposition index (DI) as the product of the acute insulin response (AIR) and the insulin sensitivity index (Si) from intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). Our objective was to develop an oral-DI based on the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and to assess its association with glucose tolerance status. This research is structured in three studies. Study 1: OGTT were performed in 833 non-diabetic Chilean women (18-60 years) without family history of diabetes mellitus. Study 2: an independent group of n = 57 non-diabetic (18-46 years) without family history of diabetes mellitus carried out an OGTT and an abbreviated IVGTT. Study 3: a sample of 1674 Chilean adults (18-60 years) with different glycaemic status performed an OGTT. An adequate statistical fit for a rectangular hyperbola was found between the area under the curve of insulin-to-glucose ratio (AUCI/G-R) and the Matsuda ISI-COMP index (study 1). The oral-DI derived as AUCI/G-R × ISI-COMP was previously termed insulin-secretion-sensitivity index-2 (ISSI-2). ISSI-2 significantly correlated with DI from IVGTT (rho = 0.34; p = 0.009) (study 2). ISSI-2 shows important differences across groups of subjects with different glycaemic status (study 3). We have confirmed that ISSI-2 replicates the mathematical properties of DI, showing significant correlations with DI from the abbreviated MM-IVGTT. These results indicate that ISSI-2 constitutes a surrogate measure of insulin secretion relative to insulin sensitivity and emphasizes the pivotal role of impaired insulin secretion in the development of glucose homeostasis dysregulation.

  19. Periodontal Bacteria and Prediabetes Prevalence in ORIGINS: The Oral Infections, Glucose Intolerance, and Insulin Resistance Study.

    PubMed

    Demmer, R T; Jacobs, D R; Singh, R; Zuk, A; Rosenbaum, M; Papapanou, P N; Desvarieux, M

    2015-09-01

    Periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus are known to be associated. The relationship between periodontal microbiota and early diabetes risk has not been studied. We investigated the association between periodontal bacteria and prediabetes prevalence among diabetes-free adults. ORIGINS (the Oral Infections, Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Resistance Study) cross sectionally enrolled 300 diabetes-free adults aged 20 to 55 y (mean ± SD, 34 ± 10 y; 77% female). Prediabetes was defined as follows: 1) hemoglobin A1c values ranging from 5.7% to 6.4% or 2) fasting plasma glucose ranging from 100 to 125 mg/dL. In 1,188 subgingival plaque samples, 11 bacterial species were assessed at baseline, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Actinomyces naeslundii. Full-mouth clinical periodontal examinations were performed, and participants were defined as having no/mild periodontitis vs. moderate/severe periodontitis per the definition of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / American Academy of Periodontology. Modified Poisson regression evaluated prediabetes prevalence across bacterial tertiles. Prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for third vs. first tertiles are presented. All analyses were adjusted for cardiometabolic risk factors. All results presented currently arise from the baseline cross section. Prediabetes prevalence was 18%, and 58% of participants had moderate/severe periodontitis. Prevalence ratios (95% confidence intervals) summarizing associations between bacterial levels and prediabetes were as follows: A. actinomycetemcomitans, 2.48 (1.34, 4.58), P = 0.004; P. gingivalis, 3.41 (1.78, 6.58), P = 0.0003; T. denticola, 1.99 (0.992, 4.00), P = 0.052; T. forsythia, 1.95 (1.0, 3.84), P = 0.05; A. naeslundii, 0.46 (0.25, 0.85), P = 0.01. The prevalence ratio for prediabetes among participants with moderate/severe vs. no/mild periodontitis was 1.47 (0.78, 2.74), P

  20. Oral tungstate treatment improves only transiently alteration of glucose metabolism in a new rat model of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fierabracci, Vanna; De Tata, Vincenzo; Pocai, Alessandro; Novelli, Michela; Barberà, Albert; Masiello, Pellegrino

    2002-11-01

    It has been shown that tungstate is an effective hypoglycemic agent in several animal models of diabetes. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of oral tungstate treatment in a new experimental diabetic syndrome, induced by streptozotocin (STZ) and nicotinamide in adult rats, that shares several features with human type 2 diabetes. Sodium tungstate was administered in the drinking water (2 mg/mL) of control and diabetic rats for 15, 30, 60, and 90 d. Glucose metabolism was explored in vivo by intravenous glucose tolerance test. Insulin secretion and action were assessed in vitro in the isolated perfused pancreas and isolated adipocytes, respectively. Two weeks of tungstate treatment did not modify the moderate hyperglycemia of diabetic rats but reduced their intolerance to glucose, owing to an enhancement of postloading insulin secretion. However, this effect was transient, since it declined after 30 d and vanished after 60 and 90 d of tungstate administration, whereas a trend toward a reduction in basal hyperglycemia was observed on prolonged treatment. Oral tungstate was unable to modify glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the isolated perfused pancreas, as well as muscle glycogen levels, hepatic glucose metabolism, and insulin-stimulated lipogenesis in isolated adipocytes. Nevertheless, the decreased insulin content of pancreatic islets of diabetic rats was partially restored on prolonged tungstate treatment. In conclusion, in the STZ-nicotinamide model of diabetes, tungstate was unable to permanently correct the alterations in glucose metabolism, despite some indirect evidence of a trophic effect on beta-cells. The ineffectiveness of tungstate could be related to the absence, in this diabetic syndrome, of relevant metabolic alterations in the liver, which thus appear to constitute the major target of tungstate action.

  1. Improvement in glucose tolerance due to Momordica charantia (karela).

    PubMed Central

    Leatherdale, B A; Panesar, R K; Singh, G; Atkins, T W; Bailey, C J; Bignell, A H

    1981-01-01

    The effect of karela (Momordica charantia), a fruit indigenous to South America and Asia, on glucose and insulin concentrations was studied in nine non-insulin-dependent diabetics and six non-diabetic laboratory rats. A water-soluble extract of the fruits significantly reduced blood glucose concentrations during a 50 g oral glucose tolerance test in the diabetics and after force-feeding in the rats. Fried karela fruits consumed as a daily supplement to the diet produced a small but significant improvement in glucose tolerance. Improvement in glucose tolerance was not associated with an increase in serum insulin responses. These results show that karela improves glucose tolerance in diabetes. Doctors supervising Asian diabetics should be aware of the fruit's hypoglycaemic properties. PMID:6786635

  2. Oral glucose tolerance test for preoperative assessment of liver function in liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Rachapoodivenkata, Raghavendra Rao

    2017-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims We intended to determine the role of the Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), in addition to volumetry, in preoperative assessment of patients undergoing liver resection. Methods This was a prospective study conducted at a tertiary care hospital, between February 2009 and February 2011. OGTT curve (parabolic/linear), linearity index (LI) and Parenchymal Hepatic Resection Rate (PHRR) were correlated with postoperative outcomes in terms of postoperative liver failure (PLF), by 50-50 criteria, morbidity, mortality and hospital stay. Results Of the 33 patients included in the study, 23 (69.7%) patients underwent major liver resections. Hepatocellular carcinoma (30.3%) was the leading indication. The overall postoperative morbidity rate was 72.7%, but major complications occurred in 3 (9.1%) patients only. There was no 90-day mortality. The 50-50 criteria were met by 3 patients undergoing major resection. Significant correlation was noted between the linear OGTT curve and the overall hospital stay (12.1 days vs. 9.6 days in parabolic; p=0.04). Patients with linear OGTT met the 50-50 criteria more often (18%) than those having a parabolic curve (4.5%; p=0.25). Although the OGTT was more often linear with occurrence of morbidity (41.7% vs 11.1%), major morbidity (66.7% vs 30%) and PLF by 50-50 criteria (66.7% vs 30%), it was not statistically significant. The linearity index was marginally lower (0.9 vs 1.2) in the presence of major morbidity and PLF by 50-50 criteria. Conclusions Linear OGTT affects the PLF and major morbidity, therein impacting the hospital stay. OGTT LI and PHRR can help predict postoperative outcome for a given extent of liver resection. PMID:28317039

  3. Beyond glucose: metabolic shifts in responses to the effects of the oral glucose tolerance test and the high-fructose diet in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuhai; Yang, Zhu; Liu, Hongde; Tang, Leihan; Cai, Zongwei

    2011-05-01

    High-fructose diet-fed rats as one of the insulin resistant models was used widely for understanding the mechanisms of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Systems-level metabolic profiling of the rat model, however, has not been deciphered clearly. To address this issue, mass spectrometry-based metabolomics was employed to unlock the metabolic snapshots of the oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) effect in either healthy or diabetic rats, as well as to delineate the metabolic signatures in tissues of rats fed with high-fructose diet. Several differentiating metabolites were highlighted to reveal the metabolic perturbation of the oGTT effects in healthy and diabetic rats, which involved amino acid biosynthesis, polyunsaturated fatty acids, phospholipids and purine metabolism. Surprisingly, the patterns of relationships for the metabolic phenotypes by using data mining revealed that glucose ingestion might induce the healthy group to display its trajectory towards diabetic status, while only a very slight influence was observed on the high-fructose diet-fed rats 120 min after glucose ingestion. The data treatment for liver, skeletal muscle and brain tissues suggested that oxidative stress, such as lipid peroxidation and the declined antioxidant, the elevated amino acids and the perturbation of fatty acids, were caused by the high-fructose diet in liver and skeletal muscle tissues. On the other hand, the up-regulation in purine biosynthesis and the decreased concentrations for amino acids were observed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus tissues. Collectively, the obtained results might provide a new insight not only for the impairment of glucose tolerance but also for the dietary style in rats.

  4. Role of glucose transporters in the intestinal absorption of gastrodin, a highly water-soluble drug with good oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zheng; Huang, Juan; Luo, Hui; Lei, Xiaolu; Yang, Zhaoxiang; Mai, Yang; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2013-07-01

    Gastrodin, a sedative drug, is a highly water-soluble phenolic glucoside with poor liposolubility but exhibits good oral bioavailability. The current study aims to investigate whether glucose transporters (GLTs) are involved in the intestinal absorption of gastrodin. The intestinal absorption kinetics of gastrodin was determined using the rat everted gut sac model, the Caco-2 cell culture model and the perfused rat intestinal model. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies using diabetic rats with high GLT expression were performed. Saturable intestinal absorption of gastrodin was observed in rat everted gut sacs. The apparent permeability (Papp) of gastrodin from the apical (A) to basolateral (B) side in Caco-2 cells was two-fold higher than that from B to A. Glucose or phlorizin, a sodium-dependent GLT (SGLT) inhibitor, reduced the absorption rates of gastrodin from perfused rat intestines. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies showed that the time of maximum plasma gastrodin concentration (Tmax) was prolonged from 28 to 72 min when orally co-administered with four times higher dose of glucose. However, the Tmax of gastrodin in diabetic rats was significantly lowered to 20 min because of the high intestinal SGLT1 level. In conclusion, our findings indicate that SGLT1 can facilitate the intestinal absorption of gastrodin.

  5. Short-Term Regulation of Lipocalin-2 but not RBP-4 During Oral Lipid Tolerance Test and Oral Glucose Tolerance Test.

    PubMed

    Schmid, A; Leszczak, S; Ober, I; Schäffler, A; Karrasch, T

    2016-02-01

    The postprandial regulation of lipocalin-2 and retinol binding protein-4 (RBP-4) by oral uptake of lipids and carbohydrates in healthy individuals has not yet been investigated. The regulation of lipocalin-2 and RBP-4 in 2 large cohorts of healthy volunteers during oral lipid tolerance test (OLTT; n=100) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; n=100) was analyzed. One hundred healthy volunteers underwent OLTT and OGTT in an outpatient setting. Venous blood was drawn after 0, 2, 4, and 6 h in OLTT and after 0, 1, and 2 h in OGTT. In order to dissect carbohydrate-induced from lipid-induced effects, a novel OLTT solution completely free of carbohydrates and protein was applied. Subjects were characterized by anthropometric and laboratory parameters. Serum concentrations of lipocalin-2 and RBP-4 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Whereas RBP-4 levels remained unchanged during OGTT, lipocalin-2 concentrations significantly decreased during OGTT. During OLTT, RBP-4 levels were not influenced, whereas lipocalin-2 levels decreased significantly and stepwise. Fasting concentrations of RBP-4 were negatively correlated with BMI and waist-hip ratio, whereas lipocalin-2 levels were positively associated with BMI and waist-hip ratio. Female users of hormonal contraception had higher RBP-4 levels than females not on contraceptives. There is no significant short-term regulation of RBP-4 by orally ingested lipids or carbohydrates. Lipocalin-2 is downregulated after lipid and carbohydrate ingestion and this kind of regulation was not predicted by age, sex, triglycerides, glucose, or insulin levels.

  6. Oral glucose before venepuncture relieves neonates of pain, but stress is still evidenced by increase in oxygen consumption, energy expenditure, and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Karl; Ketteler, Jörg; Hellwig, Magdalena; Laurenz, Maren; Versmold, Hans

    2004-04-01

    Oral glucose was recommended as pain therapy during venepuncture in neonates. It is unclear whether this intervention reduces excess oxygen consumption (o(2)), energy loss, or cardiovascular destabilization associated with venepuncture, and whether <2 mL glucose solution is effective. We tested the hypothesis that oral glucose solution attenuates the increases in neonatal oxygen consumption, energy expenditure (EE), and heart rate associated with venepuncture for two different volumes of glucose solution (2 and 0.4 mL). In this prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind trial, 58 neonates (gestational age, 31-42 wk; postnatal age, 1-7 d) were randomized to 2 mL glucose 30%, 0.4 mL glucose 30%, or 2 mL water by mouth before venepuncture. The videotaped behavioral pain reactions were scored with the Premature Infant Pain Profile. Cry duration, o(2), EE (indirect calorimetry), and heart rate were measured. The 2 mL glucose solution reduced pain score and crying after venepuncture compared with controls [median pain score, 5.5 (interquartile range, 4-9) versus 11 (7-12), p = 0.01; median duration of first cry, 0 s (0-43 s) versus 13 s (2-47 s), p < 0.05, respectively]. The 0.4 mL glucose solution had no effect. The 2 mL glucose solution did not attenuate the o(2) increase during venepuncture (1.5 +/- 0.2 mL/kg min (water) versus 1.7 +/- 0.5 (0.4 mL glucose) versus 1.1 +/- 0.2 (2 mL glucose) (mean +/- SEM) nor EE nor heart rate. We conclude that oral administration of 2 mL glucose 30% before venepuncture reduced pain expression and crying, but did not prevent the rise in o(2), EE, or heart rate. Alternative therapies against the stress of nonpainful handling during venepuncture should be explored.

  7. Plasma glucose and insulin response to two oral nutrition supplements in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Huhmann, Maureen B; Smith, Kristen N; Schwartz, Sherwyn L; Haller, Stacie K; Irvin, Sarah; Cohen, Sarah S

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this clinical trial was to compare the glucose usage of two oral nutritional supplement (ONS) products and to assess whether a diabetes-specific formulation provides improved glucose stabilization and management compared with a standard formula. Research design and methods A total of 12 subjects with type 2 diabetes (7 males and 5 females) completed a randomized, cross-over design trial. Each subject consumed isocaloric amounts of either the standard ONS or the diabetes-specific formula ONS on different dates, 1 week apart. Glucose and insulin measures were recorded at baseline, and 10, 20, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210 and 240 min after the beverage was consumed and then used to calculate area under the curve (AUC) for each subject. Results The mean glucose AUC was lower in the diabetes-specific ONS group than in the standard group (p<0.0001), but there was not a significant difference observed for mean insulin AUC (p=0.068). A sensitivity analysis of the mean insulin AUC measures was performed by removing a potential outlier from the analysis, and this resulted in a significant difference between the groups (p=0.012). First-phase insulin measures and an insulinogenic index calculated for the beverages showed no significant differences. Conclusions On the basis of the results of this trial of 12 subjects, the diabetes-specific ONS appears to provide better glucose maintenance in persons with type 2 diabetes when compared to the standard formula ONS. Trial registration number NCT02612675. PMID:27648290

  8. Decrease of serum S100B during an oral glucose tolerance test correlates inversely with the insulin response.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Johann; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Schiltz, Kolja; Haase, Thekla; Meyer-Lotz, Gabriela; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Müller, Ulf J; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Borucki, Katrin; Schroeter, Matthias L; Isermann, Berend; Bogerts, Bernhard; Westphal, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Increased S100B serum levels have been considered as a marker of glial pathology, brain damage, and blood-brain-barrier impairment. However, S100B expression has also been detected outside the nervous system, suggesting that altered S100B serum levels may not exclusively reflect brain-specific pathologies. Notably, S100B secretion in adipocytes seems to be down-regulated by insulin, and up-regulated by stress and fasting. Therefore, we assumed that dynamic changes of S100B could be observed by challenging healthy subjects with an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). OGTT was performed in 17 healthy adult test persons (9 male and 8 female). Apart from S100B, glucose, free fatty acids, insulin, C-peptide, and cortisol were determined in all samples after an overnight fast (0 h), as well as 1h and 2h after ingestion of 75 g glucose. Mean S100B concentrations decreased about 20% during the first hour after glucose ingestion (P<0.001). This decrease of S100B levels was not related to the declining morning peak of cortisol. However, the decrease of serum-S100B 1h after glucose ingestion correlated inversely with the respective changes of serum-insulin (r = -0.484, P=0.049) and serum-C-peptide (r = -0.570, P = 0.017). Our study suggests an inverse correlation between insulin secretion and S100B release after a standardized OGTT. Additional experiments, including the administration of insulin and the measurement of other food intake-related factors are important to ascertain an insulin-regulated S100B release in vivo. To improve comparability between clinical studies assessing conditions with rather mild changes of serum S100B, blood should be taken in a more standardized way (e.g., after fasting overnight).

  9. Glucose screening tests during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Oral glucose tolerance test - pregnancy; OGTT - pregnancy; Glucose challenge test - pregnancy; Gestational diabetes - glucose screening ... first step, you will have a glucose screening test: You DO NOT need to prepare or change ...

  10. Insulin, catecholamines, glucose and antioxidant enzymes in oxidative damage during different loads in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Koska, J; Blazícek, P; Marko, M; Grna, J D; Kvetnanský, R; Vigas, M

    2000-01-01

    Exercise, insulin-induced hypoglycemia and oral glucose loads (50 g and 100 g) were used to compare the production of malondialdehyde and the activity of antioxidant enzymes in healthy subjects. Twenty male volunteers participated in the study. Exercise consisted of three consecutive work loads on a bicycle ergometer of graded intensity (1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 W/kg, 6 min each). Hypoglycemia was induced by insulin (Actrapid MC Novo, 0.1 IU/kg, i.v.). Oral administration of 50 g and 100 g of glucose was given to elevate plasma glucose. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was determined in red blood cells, whereas glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity was measured in whole blood. The concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) was determined by HPLC, catecholamines were assessed radioenzymatically and glucose was measured by the glucose-oxidase method. Exercise increased MDA concentrations, GSH-Px and SOD activities as well as plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline levels. Insulin hypoglycemia increased plasma adrenaline levels, but the concentrations of MDA and the activities of GSH-Px and SOD were decreased. Hyperglycemia increased plasma MDA concentrations, but the activities of GSH-Px and SOD were significantly higher after a larger dose of glucose only. Plasma catecholamines were unchanged. These results indicate that the transient increase of plasma catecholamine and insulin concentrations did not induce oxidative damage, while glucose already in the low dose was an important triggering factor for oxidative stress.

  11. Glucose tolerance factor extracted from yeast: oral insulin-mimetic and insulin-potentiating agent: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Weksler-Zangen, Sarah; Mizrahi, Tal; Raz, Itamar; Mirsky, Nitsa

    2012-09-01

    In search for an effective oral treatment for diabetes, we examined the capacity of glucose tolerance factor (GTF) extracted from yeast and administered orally to reduce hyperglycaemia in rat models exhibiting insulin deficiency. The cellular effect of GTF on the insulin signalling pathway was investigated in vitro. GTF (oral bolus), insulin (intraperitoneal) or their combination was administered to streptozotocin-diabetic (STZ) or hyperglycaemic Cohen diabetic-sensitive (hyp-CDs) rats. Blood glucose (BG) and insulin levels were measured in the postprandial (PP) state and during an oral glucose tolerance test. Deoxy-glucose transport and insulin signal transduction were assessed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and myoblasts incubated with the GTF. Low dose of insulin produced a 34 and 12·5 % reduction in the PP-BG levels of hyp-CDs and STZ rats, respectively. GTF induced a 33 and 17 % reduction in the PP-BG levels of hyp-CDs and STZ rats, respectively. When combined with insulin, a respective decrease (58 and 42 %) in BG levels was observed, suggesting a partially additive (hyp-CDs) or synergistic (STZ rats) effect of the GTF and insulin. GTF did not induce insulin secretion in hyp-CDs rats, yet it lowered their BG levels, proposing an effect on glucose clearance by peripheral tissues. GTF induced a dose-dependent increase in deoxy-glucose transport into myoblasts and fat cells similar to insulin, while the combined treatment resulted in augmented transport rate. GTF induced a dose- and time-dependent phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1, Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase independent of insulin receptor phosphorylation. GTF exerts remarkable insulin-mimetic and insulin-potentiating effects, both in vivo and in vitro. It produces an insulin-like effect by acting on cellular signals downstream of the insulin receptor. These results demonstrate a potential source for a novel oral medication for diabetes.

  12. Meal feeding improves oral glucose tolerance in male rats and causes adaptations in postprandial islet hormone secretion that are independent of plasma incretins or glycemia

    PubMed Central

    P., Torsten; Aulinger, Benedikt A.; Smith, Eric P.; Drazen, Deborah L.; Ulrich-Lai, Yve; Seeley, Randy J.; Woods, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Meal-fed (MF) rats with access to food for only 4 consecutive hours during the light cycle learn to eat large meals to maintain energy balance. MF animals develop behavioral and endocrine changes that permit glucose tolerance despite increased meal size. We hypothesized that enhanced activity of the enteroinsular axis mediates glucose homeostasis during MF. Cohorts of rats were allocated to MF or ad libitum (AL) regimens for 2–4 wk. Insulin secretion and glucose tolerance were determined after oral carbohydrate and intraperitoneal (ip) and intravenous (iv) glucose. MF rats ate less than AL in the first week but maintained a comparable weight trajectory thereafter. MF rats had decreased glucose excursions after a liquid mixed meal (AUC: MF 75 ± 7, AL 461 ± 28 mmol·l−1·min, P < 0.001), with left-shifted insulin secretion (AUC0–15: MF 31.0 ± 4.9, AL 9.6 ± 4.4 pM·min, P < 0.02), which peaked before a significant rise in blood glucose. Both groups had comparable fasting glucagon levels, but postprandial responses were lower with MF. However, neither intestinal expression of proGIP and proglucagon mRNA nor plasma incretin levels differed between MF and AL groups. There were no differences in the insulin response to ip or iv glucose between MF and AL rats. These findings demonstrate that MF improves oral glucose tolerance and is associated with significant changes in postprandial islet hormone secretion. Because MF enhanced β-cell function during oral but not parenteral carbohydrate administration, and was not accounted for by changes in circulating incretins, these results support a neural mechanism of adaptive insulin secretion. PMID:25159330

  13. Oral green tea catechins transiently lower plasma glucose concentrations in female db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Wein, Silvia; Schrader, Eva; Rimbach, Gerald; Wolffram, Siegfried

    2013-04-01

    Polyphenols, including green tea catechins, are secondary plant compounds often discussed in the context of health-promoting potential. Evidence for such effects is mainly derived from epidemiological and cell culture studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate antidiabetic, antiadipogenic, and anti-inflammatory effects at nonpharmacological doses in an obese diabetic mouse model that exerts early relevant clinical signs of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Female db/db mice received a flavonoid-poor diet either without additive, with rosiglitazone (RSG, 0.02 g/kg diet), or with green tea extract (low-dose green tea extract [LGTE] and high-dose green tea extract [HGTE], 0.1 and 1 g/kg diet). Food and water were freely available. The body weight was monitored weekly. Blood was sampled (12-h fasted) from the tail vein on day 28 and analyzed for glucose, cholesterol, triacylglycerol, nonesterified fatty acids, insulin, adiponectin, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1). Blood glucose was also analyzed on day 14. Furthermore, sICAM-1 release was investigated in tumor necrosis factor alpha-stimulated EAhy926 cells. After 14 days, fasting glycemia was improved by RSG or HGTE supplementation compared to controls. However, at the end of the study (day 28), only RSG exhibited glucose-lowering effects and induced plasma adiponectin concentrations, paralleled by higher body weight gain and reduced periuterine fat pads compared to controls. However, only GTE treatment reduced sICAM-1 release in vitro and in vivo. Nonpharmacological HGTE supplementation in db/db mice caused (1) no adiponectin-inducing or antiadipogenic effects, (2) reduced sICAM-1 release, thereby potentially exerting anti-inflammatory effects in the progressive diabetic state, and (3) a transient improvement in glycemia.

  14. Proglucagon Promoter Cre-Mediated AMPK Deletion in Mice Increases Circulating GLP-1 Levels and Oral Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, Sophie R.; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.; Parker, Helen; Zac-Varghese, Sagen; Bloom, Stephen R.; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Rutter, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Enteroendocrine L-cells synthesise and release the gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in response to food transit. Deletion of the tumour suppressor kinase LKB1 from proglucagon-expressing cells leads to the generation of intestinal polyps but no change in circulating GLP-1 levels. Here, we explore the role of the downstream kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in these cells. Method Loss of AMPK from proglucagon-expressing cells was achieved using a preproglucagon promoter-driven Cre (iGluCre) to catalyse recombination of floxed alleles of AMPKα1 and α2. Oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance were measured using standard protocols. L-cell mass was measured by immunocytochemistry. Hormone and peptide levels were measured by electrochemical-based luminescence detection or radioimmunoassay. Results Recombination with iGluCre led to efficient deletion of AMPK from intestinal L- and pancreatic alpha-cells. In contrast to mice rendered null for LKB1 using the same strategy, mice deleted for AMPK displayed an increase (WT: 0.05 ± 0.01, KO: 0.09±0.02%, p<0.01) in L-cell mass and elevated plasma fasting (WT: 5.62 ± 0.800 pg/ml, KO: 14.5 ± 1.870, p<0.01) and fed (WT: 15.7 ± 1.48pg/ml, KO: 22.0 ± 6.62, p<0.01) GLP-1 levels. Oral, but not intraperitoneal, glucose tolerance was significantly improved by AMPK deletion, whilst insulin and glucagon levels were unchanged despite an increase in alpha to beta cell ratio (WT: 0.23 ± 0.02, KO: 0.33 ± 0.03, p<0.01). Conclusion AMPK restricts L-cell growth and GLP-1 secretion to suppress glucose tolerance. Targeted inhibition of AMPK in L-cells may thus provide a new therapeutic strategy in some forms of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27010458

  15. Identification of the mechanism of action of a glucokinase activator from oral glucose tolerance test data in type 2 diabetic patients based on an integrated glucose-insulin model.

    PubMed

    Jauslin, Petra M; Karlsson, Mats O; Frey, Nicolas

    2012-12-01

    A mechanistic drug-disease model was developed on the basis of a previously published integrated glucose-insulin model by Jauslin et al. A glucokinase activator was used as a test compound to evaluate the model's ability to identify a drug's mechanism of action and estimate its effects on glucose and insulin profiles following oral glucose tolerance tests. A kinetic-pharmacodynamic approach was chosen to describe the drug's pharmacodynamic effects in a dose-response-time model. Four possible mechanisms of action of antidiabetic drugs were evaluated, and the corresponding affected model parameters were identified: insulin secretion, glucose production, insulin effect on glucose elimination, and insulin-independent glucose elimination. Inclusion of drug effects in the model at these sites of action was first tested one-by-one and then in combination. The results demonstrate the ability of this model to identify the dual mechanism of action of a glucokinase activator and describe and predict its effects: Estimating a stimulating drug effect on insulin secretion and an inhibiting effect on glucose output resulted in a significantly better model fit than any other combination of effect sites. The model may be used for dose finding in early clinical drug development and for gaining more insight into a drug candidate's mechanism of action.

  16. Delphinidin-Rich Maqui Berry Extract (Delphinol®) Lowers Fasting and Postprandial Glycemia and Insulinemia in Prediabetic Individuals during Oral Glucose Tolerance Tests

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Jorge L.; Salgado, Ana-María; Lyon, Carolina; Vigil, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Delphinidin anthocyanins have previously been associated with the inhibition of glucose absorption. Blood glucose lowering effects have been ascribed to maqui berry (Aristotelia chilensis) extracts in humans after boiled rice consumption. In this study, we aimed to explore whether a standardized delphinidin-rich extract from maqui berry (Delphinol) affects glucose metabolism in prediabetic humans based on glycemia and insulinemia curves obtained from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) after a challenge with pure glucose. Volunteers underwent four consecutive OGTTs with at least one week washout period, in which different doses of Delphinol were administered one hour before glucose intake. Delphinol significantly and dose-dependently lowered basal glycemia and insulinemia. Lower doses delayed postprandial glycemic and insulinemic peaks, while higher doses reversed this tendency. Glycemia peaks were dose-dependently lowered, while insulinemia peaks were higher for the lowest dose and lower for other doses. The total glucose available in blood was unaffected by treatments, while the total insulin availability was increased by low doses and decreased by the highest dose. Taken together, these open exploratory results suggest that Delphinol could be acting through three possible mechanisms: by inhibition of intestinal glucose transporters, by an incretin-mediated effect, or by improving insulin sensitivity. PMID:28025651

  17. Reduction of hepatic insulin clearance after oral glucose ingestion is not mediated by glucagon-like peptide 1 or gastric inhibitory polypeptide in humans.

    PubMed

    Meier, Juris J; Holst, Jens J; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Nauck, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    Changes in hepatic insulin clearance can occur after oral glucose or meal ingestion. This has been attributed to the secretion and action of gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1. Given the recent availability of drugs based on incretin hormones, such clearance effects may be important for the future treatment of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we determined insulin clearance in response to endogenously secreted and exogenously administered GIP and GLP-1. Insulin clearance was estimated from the molar C-peptide-to-insulin ratio calculated at basal conditions and from the respective areas under the curve after glucose, GIP, or GLP-1 administration. Oral glucose administration led to an approximately 60% reduction in the C-peptide-to-insulin ratio (P < 0.0001), whereas intravenous glucose administration had no effect (P = 0.09). The endogenous secretion of GIP or GLP-1 was unrelated to the changes in insulin clearance. The C-peptide-to-insulin ratio was unchanged after the intravenous administration of GIP or GLP-1 in the fasting state (P = 0.27 and P = 0.35, respectively). Likewise, infusing GLP-1 during a meal course did not alter insulin clearance (P = 0.87). An inverse nonlinear relationship was found between the C-peptide-to-insulin ratio and the integrated insulin levels after oral and during intravenous glucose administration. Insulin clearance is reduced by oral but not by intravenous glucose administration. Neither GIP nor GLP-1 has significant effects on insulin extraction. An inverse relationship between insulin concentrations and insulin clearance suggests that the secretion of insulin itself determines the rate of hepatic insulin clearance.

  18. The sweet taste of success: the presence of glucose in the oral cavity moderates the depletion of self-control resources.

    PubMed

    Hagger, Martin S; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L D

    2013-01-01

    According to the resource-depletion model, self-control is a limited resource that is depleted after a period of exertion. Evidence consistent with this model indicates that self-control relies on glucose metabolism and glucose supplementation to depleted individuals replenishes self-control resources. In five experiments, we tested an alternative hypothesis that glucose in the oral cavity counteracts the deleterious effects of self-control depletion. We predicted a glucose mouth rinse, as opposed to an artificially sweetened placebo rinse, would lead to better self-control after depletion. In Studies 1 to 3, participants engaging in a depleting task performed significantly better on a subsequent self-control task after receiving a glucose mouth rinse, as opposed to participants rinsing with a placebo. Studies 4 and 5 replicated these findings and demonstrated that the glucose mouth rinse had no effect on self-control in nondepleted participants. Results are consistent with a neural rather than metabolic mechanism for the effect of glucose supplementation on self-control.

  19. Opioid blockade effect on insulin beta-cells secretory patterns in polycystic ovary syndrome. Oral glucose load versus intravenous glucagon bolus.

    PubMed

    Ciampelli, M; Fulghesu, A M; Guido, M; Murgia, F; Muzj, G; Belosi, C; Fortini, A; Cento, R; Lanzone, A

    1998-01-01

    In order to evaluate the involvement of endogenous opiates in the insulin disorders of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOs) a total of 25 PCOs women and 11 normo-ovulatory controls were studied by comparing the effect of a chronic opioid blockade on beta-cells responsiveness to oral glucose load and to intravenous glucagon bolus. Each patient, studied on follicular phase, underwent to oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and, 2 days later, to a glucagon intravenous bolus (1 mg); these tests were then repeated after 6 weeks of naltrexone treatment (50 mg orally). Naltrexone treatment did not modify the insulin secretory patterns of control subjects, whereas the same therapy significantly reduced, in hyperinsulinemic PCOs women, the beta-cell hyperresponsiveness both to oral glucose load and to intravenous glucagon (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively), even if with different mean percent decrease (32% OGTT vs. 45% glucagon, p < 0.05). Moreover, normoinsulinemic PCOs patients showed a slight, but not significantly increase in the beta-cells response to OGTT after opioid blockade, whereas, in the same situation, the insulin release after glucagon bolus was significantly reduced (p < 0.01). Chronic opioid blockade did not modify gonadotropins, steroids and SHBG levels in either group. Our data show that naltrexone treatment is able to reduce the beta-cell response to a direct intravenous secretagogue stimulus in all PCOs patients, while only in hyperinsulinemic PCOs subjects the same treatment is effective in reducing the exaggerated insulin secretion after oral glucose load. The reason for such a discrepancy could be ascribed to a different effect of opioids on first- and second-phase insulin secretion, or, alternatively, to an involvement of other secretagogue factors, such as glucoincretins.

  20. Serum Galanin Levels in Young Healthy Lean and Obese Non-Diabetic Men during an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval-Alzate, Héctor Fabio; Agudelo-Zapata, Yessica; González-Clavijo, Angélica María; Poveda, Natalia E.; Espinel-Pachón, Cristian Felipe; Escamilla-Castro, Jorge Augusto; Márquez-Julio, Heidy Lorena; Alvarado-Quintero, Hernando; Rojas-Rodríguez, Fabián Guillermo; Arteaga-Díaz, Juan Manuel; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier Hernando; Garcés-Gutiérrez, Maria Fernanda; Vrontakis, Maria; Castaño, Justo P.; Luque, Raul M.; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; Caminos, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    Galanin (GAL) is a neuropeptide involved in the homeostasis of energy metabolism. The objective of this study was to investigate the serum levels of GAL during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in lean and obese young men. This cross-sectional study included 30 obese non-diabetic young men (median 22 years; mean BMI 37 kg/m2) and 30 healthy lean men (median 23 years; mean BMI 22 kg/m2). Serum GAL was determined during OGTT. The results of this study include that serum GAL levels showed a reduction during OGTT compared with basal levels in the lean subjects group. Conversely, serum GAL levels increased significantly during OGTT in obese subjects. Serum GAL levels were also higher in obese non-diabetic men compared with lean subjects during fasting and in every period of the OGTT (p < 0.001). Serum GAL levels were positively correlated with BMI, total fat, visceral fat, HOMA–IR, total cholesterol, triglycerides and Leptin. A multiple regression analysis revealed that serum insulin levels at 30, 60 and 120 minutes during the OGTT is the most predictive variable for serum GAL levels (p < 0.001). In conclusion, serum GAL levels are significantly higher in the obese group compared with lean subjects during an OGTT. PMID:27550417

  1. The effect of endurance training and subsequent physical inactivity on glycaemic control after oral glucose load and physical exercise in healthy men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radikova, Zofia; Ksinantova, Lucia; Kaciuba-Uscilko, Hanna; Nazar, Krystyna; Vigas, Milan; Koska, Juraj

    2007-02-01

    Physical inactivity during space flight has a profound effect on glucose metabolism. The aim of this study was to test whether endurance training (ET) may improve a negative effect of subsequent -6∘ head-down bed rest (HDBR) on glucose metabolism. Fourteen healthy males completed the study consisting of 6 weeks lasting ET followed by 6 days HDBR. Treadmill exercise at 80% of pre-training VO2max and 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were performed before and after ET as well as after HDBR. ET increased VO2max by 11%. ET significantly lowered while HDBR had no effect on fasting and OGTT plasma glucose levels. ET had no effect while HDBR was followed by an augmentation of insulin and C-peptide response to OGTT. Insulin sensitivity tended to increase after ET and to decrease during HDBR, however, mostly without statistical significance. Plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide response to exercise were elevated after HDBR only. Our study shows that antecedent physical training could ameliorate a negative effect of simulated microgravity on insulin-mediated glucose metabolism.

  2. Preserved glucagon-like peptide-1 responses to oral glucose, but reduced incretin effect, insulin secretion and sensitivity in young Asians with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yeow, Toh Peng; Pacini, Giovanni; Tura, Andrea; Lim, Shueh Lin; Tan, Florence Hui Sieng; Tong, Chin Voon; Hong, Janet Yeow Hua; Md Zain, Fuziah; Holst, Jens Juul; Wan Mohamud, Wan Nazaimoon

    2017-01-01

    Objective Youth onset type 2 diabetes mellitus (YT2DM) is a globally rising phenomenon with substantial Asians representation. The understanding of its pathophysiology is derived largely from studies in the obese African-American and Caucasian populations, while studies on incretin effect are scarce. We examined the insulin resistance, β-cell function (BC), glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 hormone and incretin effect in Asian YT2DM. Research design and methods This case–control study recruited 25 Asian YT2DM and 15 healthy controls, matched for gender, ethnicity and body mass index. Serum glucose, insulin, C peptide and GLP-1 were sampled during 2-hour oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) and 1-hour intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTs). Insulin sensitivity was derived from the Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI), Oral Glucose Insulin Sensitivity Index (OGIS) in OGTT and surrogate index of SI from the minimal model (calculated SI, CSI). Acute insulin response (AIR) was obtained from IVGTT. Total BC was computed as incremental area under the curve of insulin/incremental area under the curve of glucose, during OGTT (BCOG) and IVGTT (BCIV), respectively. Disposition index (DI) was calculated using the product of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion. GLP-1 response to oral glucose was calculated as incremental area under the curve of GLP-1 (ΔAUCGLP-1). Per cent incretin effect was estimated as 100×(BCOG−BCIV)/BCOG). Results The YT2DM had marked impairment in BC (>80% reduction in AIR and BCOG, p<0.001) and lower QUICKI (p<0.001), OGIS (p<0.001) and CSI (p=0.015) compared with controls. There was no difference in GLP-1 at all time points and ΔAUCGLP-1 but the per cent incretin effect was reduced in the YT2DM compared with controls (12.1±8.93 vs 70.0±4.03, p<0.001). Conclusions Asian YT2DM showed similar GLP-1 response to oral glucose as controls but reduced incretin effect, BC and insulin sensitivity. The lack of compensatory

  3. Effects of oral L-carnitine supplementation on insulin sensitivity indices in response to glucose feeding in lean and overweight/obese males.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Stuart D R; Craig, Thomas P; Cleland, Stephen J

    2011-07-01

    Infusion of carnitine has been observed to increase non-oxidative glucose disposal in several studies, but the effect of oral carnitine on glucose disposal in non-diabetic lean versus overweight/obese humans has not been examined. This study examined the effects of 14 days of L-carnitine L-tartrate oral supplementation (LC) on blood glucose, insulin, NEFA and GLP-1 responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Sixteen male participants were recruited [lean (n = 8) and overweight/obese (n = 8)]. After completing a submaximal predictive exercise test, participants were asked to attend three experimental sessions. These three visits were conducted in the morning to obtain fasting blood samples and to conduct 2 h OGTTs. The first visit was a familiarisation trial and the final two visits were conducted 2 weeks apart following 14 days of ingestion of placebo (PL, 3 g glucose/day) and then LC (3 g LC/day) ingested as two capsules 3×/day with meals. On each visit, blood was drawn at rest, at intervals during the OGTT for analysis of glucose, insulin, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and total glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Data obtained were used for determination of usual insulin sensitivity indices (HOMA-IR, AUC glucose, AUC insulin, 1st phase and 2nd phase β-cell function, estimated insulin sensitivity index and estimated metabolic clearance rate). Data were analysed using RMANOVA and post hoc comparisons where appropriate. There was a significant difference between groups for body mass, % fat and BMI with no significant difference in age and height. Mean (SEM) plasma glucose concentration at 30 min was significantly lower (p < 0.05) in the lean group on the LC trial compared with PL [8.71(0.70) PL; 7.32(0.36) LC; mmol/L]. Conversely, plasma glucose concentration was not different at 30 min, but was significantly higher at 90 min (p < 0.05) in the overweight/obese group on the LC trial [5.09(0.41) PL; 7.11(0.59) LC; mmol/L]. Estimated first phase and second

  4. [Evaluation of oral glucose tolerance test in the assessment of reserved function of liver for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Wen, T; Zheng, G; Meng, X; Chen, L

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate oral glucose tolerance test(OGTT)in the assessment of reserved function of liver for predicting the tolerability of patients to hepatectomy and hence provided a criteria for selecting the candidates for undergoing hepatectomy, since the majority of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients were associated with posthepatitis cirrhosis. The preoperative and postoperative OGTT and liver biopsy for pathological investigation were carried out in 62 cases of hepatecomized patients and 49 cases of unresected patients for comparison. The results revealed that the patients whose preoperative OGTT curve was of P type recovered uneventfully after hepatectomy, but those whose curve was of L type of tolerated poorly to hepatectomy and were liable to postoperative hepatic failure and complications. The severity of cirrbosis in those poor risk patients fell to C III or C IV histological degree. 29 patients with intermediate feature of OGTT curve between P type and L type, i.e. I type underwent regional vascular occlusion at hepatic hilus as hepatectomy, and infusion of Danshen extract solution before vascular occlusion to prevent hepatocytes from reperfusion injury. Of them, 20 recovered uneventfully, 8 suffered from complications such as ascites and/or juandice, and 1 died within 1 month after operation. The followup study showed that the survival time of patients with P type OGTT curve was longer than that of I type, and the latter was longer than that of L type. The pattern of OGTT curve could change from preoperative P type to postoperative L type, depending on the severity of vascular interruption of liver and the ischemic injury to hepatocytic mass in operation.

  5. Detection of glycemic abnormalities in adolescents with beta thalassemia using continuous glucose monitoring and oral glucose tolerance in adolescents and young adults with β-thalassemia major: Pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ashraf T.; Yasin, Mohamed; El-Awwa, Ahmed; De Sanctis, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Both insulin deficiency and resistance are reported in patients with β-thalassemia major (BTM). The use of continuous blood glucose monitoring (CGM), among the different methods for early detection of glycemic abnormalities, has not been studied thoroughly in these adolescents. Materials and Methods: To assess the oralglucose tolerance (OGT) and 72-h continuous glucose concentration by the continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) and calculate homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) was conducted in 16 adolescents with BTM who were receiving regular blood transfusions every 2-4 weeks and iron-chelation therapy since early childhood. Results: Sixteen adolescents with BTM (age: 19.75 ± 3 years) were investigated. Using OGTT, (25%) had impaired fasting blood (plasma) glucose concentration (BG) (>5.6 mmol/L). 2-h after the glucose load, one of them had BG = 16.2 mmol/L (diabetic) and two had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (BG > 7.8 and <11.1 mmol/L). Monitoring the maximum (postprandial) BG using CGMS,4 adolescents were diagnosed with diabetes (25%) (BG >11.1 mmol/L) and 9 with IGT (56%). HOMA and QUICKI revealed levels <2.6 (1.6 ± 0.8) and >0.33 (0.36 ± 0.03), respectively, ruling out significant insulin resistance in these adolescents. There was a significant negative correlation between the β-cell function (B%) on one hand and the fasting and the 2-h BG (r=−0.6, and − 0.48, P < 0.01, respectively) on the other hand. Neither fasting serum insulin nor c-peptide concentrations were correlated with fasting BG or ferritin levels. The average and maximum blood glucose levels during CGM were significantly correlated with the fasting BG (r = 0.68 and 0.39, respectively, with P < 0.01) and with the BG at 2-hour after oral glucose intake (r = 0.87 and 0.86 respectively, with P < 0.001). Ferritin concentrations were correlated with the fasting BG and the 2-h blood glucose levels in the OGTT (r

  6. Effect of glucose ingestion in plasma markers of inflammation and oxidative stress: analysis of 16 plasma markers from oral glucose tolerance test samples of normal and diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyung Jin; Jeon, Soon Young; Hong, Won Kyung; Jung, Seung Eun; Kang, Hyun Ju; Kim, Jun-Woo; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Han, Bok-Ghee

    2013-02-01

    Sixteen plasma markers of inflammation and oxidative stress were measured during OGTT in 54 subjects. Leptin, RBP4, CRP, OPN, ANG, MDC, and MCSF concentrations significantly decreased during OGTT (P<0.05). IL6, IL8, and MCP3 concentrations significantly increased during OGTT (P<0.05). These results provide evidence that glucose ingestion affects systemic inflammation and oxidative stress.

  7. Drug-drug interactions with sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, new oral glucose-lowering agents for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2014-04-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) reduce hyperglycaemia by decreasing renal glucose threshold and thereby increasing urinary glucose excretion. They are proposed as a novel approach for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. They have proven their efficacy in reducing glycated haemoglobin, without inducing hypoglycaemia, as monotherapy or in combination with various other glucose-lowering agents, with the add-on value of promoting some weight loss and lowering arterial blood pressure. As they may be used concomitantly with many other drugs, we review the potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) regarding the three leaders in the class (dapagliglozin, canagliflozin and empagliflozin). Most of the available studies were performed in healthy volunteers and have assessed the pharmacokinetic interferences with a single administration of the SGLT2 inhibitor. The exposure [assessed by peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)] to each SGLT2 inhibitor tested was not significantly influenced by the concomitant administration of other glucose-lowering agents or cardiovascular agents commonly used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Reciprocally, these medications did not influence the pharmacokinetic parameters of dapagliflozin, canagliflozin or empagliflozin. Some modest changes were not considered as clinically relevant. However, drugs that could specifically interfere with the metabolic pathways of SGLT2 inhibitors [rifampicin, inhibitors or inducers of uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)] may result in significant changes in the exposure of SGLT2 inhibitors, as shown for dapagliflozin and canagliflozin. Potential DDIs in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving chronic treatment with an SGLT2 inhibitor deserve further attention, especially in individuals treated with several medications or in more fragile patients with hepatic and/or renal impairment.

  8. Effect of fructose or sucrose feeding with different levels on oral glucose tolerance test in normal and type 2 diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sanghee; Kim, You Jin

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether acute fructose or sucrose administration at different levels (0.05 g/kg, 0.1 g/kg or 0.4 g/kg body weight) might affect oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in normal and type 2 diabetic rats. In OGTT, there were no significant differences in glucose responses between acute fructose- and sucrose-administered groups. However, in normal rats, the AUCs of the blood glucose response for the fructose-administered groups tended to be lower than those of the control and sucrose-administered groups. The AUCs of the lower levels fructoseor sucrose-administered groups tended to be smaller than those of higher levels fructose- or sucrose-administered groups. In type 2 diabetic rats, only the AUC of the lowest level of fructose-administered (0.05 g/kg body weight) group was slightly smaller than that of the control group. The AUCs of fructose-administered groups tended to be smaller than those of the sucrose-administered groups, and the AUCs of lower levels fructose-administered groups tended to be smaller than those fed higher levels of fructose. We concluded from this experiment that fructose has tendency to be more effective in blood glucose regulation than sucrose, and moreover, that smaller amount of fructose is preferred to larger amount. Specifically, our experiments indicated that the fructose level of 0.05 g/kg body weight as dietary supplement was the most effective amount for blood glucose regulation from the pool of 0.05 g/kg, 0.1 g/kg and 0.4 g/kg body weights. Therefore, our results suggest the use of fructose as the substitute sweetener for sucrose, which may be beneficial for blood glucose regulation. PMID:20016727

  9. Effectiveness of Medium-Chain Triglyceride Oil Therapy in Two Japanese Citrin-Deficient Siblings: Evaluation Using Oral Glucose Tolerance Tests.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hiroki; Sasai, Hideo; Abdelkreem, Elsayed; Kawamoto, Norio; Kawamoto, Minako; Kamiya, Toshiya; Tanimoto, Yasuo; Kikuchi, Atsuo; Kure, Shigeo; Numakura, Chikahiko; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Citrin deficiency, an inherited defect of the liver-type mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier isoform (citrin), may cause impairment of glycolysis because of an increase in the cytosolic NADH/NAD(+) ratio. We report a Japanese boy whose main complaint was recurrent hypoglycemic episodes. He was suspected as having citrin deficiency because of his peculiar preference for protein- and fat-rich food. His young sister also had a similar food preference. Both siblings were diagnosed with citrin deficiency by genetic analysis. The brother and sister underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at 10 and 7 yr of age, respectively. Blood glucose, ammonia, lactic acid, pyruvic acid, and insulin levels were monitored before starting the test, and then every 30 min. During this test, they maintained blood glucose levels until 180 min. At 210 min, they experienced vomiting, feeling ill, and decreased blood glucose levels (2.9 and 2.8 mmol/l in the brother and sister, respectively). The sister and brother recovered uneventfully by intravenous glucose injection. In a second OGTT, 4 months after medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil supplementation, they had no major symptoms and normal glucose levels were maintained, even after 240 min. Additionally, after MCT oil therapy, their food preference slightly changed as they started eating more carbohydrates. Our OGTT data suggest excess carbohydrate intake has adverse consequences in patients with citrin deficiency, including hypoglycemia after a few hours. MCT oil therapy may be effective in preventing such hypoglycemia and improving metabolic derangement, even during the so-called apparently healthy period.

  10. Quantitative analysis of methylglyoxal, glyoxal and free advanced glycation end-products in the plasma of Wistar rats during the oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si Jing; Aikawa, Chiwa; Matsui, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the production behavior of free adducts of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) in Wistar rats under acute hyperglycemic conditions. Five AGE-free adducts as well as their precursors (i.e., highly reactive carbonyl intermediates of methylglyoxal and glyoxal) in rat plasma were quantitatively determined at greater than nanomolar levels using the liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method coupled with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonate and 2,3-diaminonaphthalene derivatization techniques. An oral glucose (2 g/kg dose) tolerance test to 10-week-old Wistar rats provided evidence that the plasma levels of diabetes-related metabolites did not change acutely within 120 min, irrespective of increasing blood glucose levels.

  11. Glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant

    MedlinePlus

    Oral glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant; OGTT - non-pregnant; Diabetes - glucose tolerance test; Diabetic - glucose tolerance test ... The most common glucose tolerance test is the oral glucose ... the test begins, a sample of blood will be taken. You will then ...

  12. Effects of Oral Administration of Moringa oleifera Lam on Glucose Tolerance in Goto-Kakizaki and Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ndong, Moussa; Uehara, Mariko; Katsumata, Shin-ichi; Suzuki, Kazuharu

    2007-01-01

    Medicinal plants constitute an important source of potential therapeutic agents for diabetes. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Moringa oleifera (MO) Lam, Moringacea, on glucose tolerance in Wistar rats and Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, modeled type 2 diabetes. Major polyphenols in MO powder were quercetin glucosides, rutin, kaempferol glycosides and chlorogenic acids by HPLC analysis. As the results of glucose tolerance test, MO significantly decreased the blood glucose at 20, 30, 45and 60 min for GK rats and at 10, 30 and 45 min for Wistar rats (p<0.05) compared to the both controls after glucose administration. The area under the curve of changes in the blood glucose was significantly higher in the GK control group than in the GK plus MO group (p<0.05) in the periods 30–60 min and 60–120 min. Furthermore, MO significantly decreased stomach emptying in GK rats (p<0.05). The results indicated that MO has an ameliorating effect for glucose intolerance, and the effect might be mediated by quercetin-3-glucoside and fiber contents in MO leaf powder. The action of MO was greater in GK rats than in Wistar rats. PMID:18398501

  13. Anti-proliferative activity of oral anti-hyperglycemic agents on human vascular smooth muscle cells: thiazolidinediones (glitazones) have enhanced activity under high glucose conditions

    PubMed Central

    Little, Peter J; Osman, Narin; de Dios, Stephanie T; Cemerlang, Nelly; Ballinger, Mandy; Nigro, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Background Inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) proliferation by oral anti-hyperglycemic agents may have a role to play in the amelioration of vascular disease in diabetes. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) inhibit vSMC proliferation but it has been reported that they anomalously stimulate [3H]-thymidine incorporation. We investigated three TZDs, two biguanides and two sulfonylureas for their ability of inhibit vSMC proliferation. People with diabetes obviously have fluctuating blood glucose levels thus we determined the effect of media glucose concentration on the inhibitory activity of TZDs in a vSMC preparation that grew considerably more rapidly under high glucose conditions. We further explored the mechanisms by which TZDs increase [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Methods VSMC proliferation was investigated by [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA and cell counting. Activation and inhibition of thymidine kinase utilized short term [3H]-thymidine uptake. Cell cycle events were analyzed by FACS. Results VSMC cells grown for 3 days in DMEM with 5% fetal calf serum under low (5 mM glucose) and high (25 mM glucose) increased in number by 2.5 and 4.7 fold, respectively. Rosiglitazone and pioglitazone showed modest but statistically significantly greater inhibitory activity under high versus low glucose conditions (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). We confirmed an earlier report that troglitazone (at low concentrations) causes enhanced incorporation of [3H]-thymidine into DNA but did not increase cell numbers. Troglitazone inhibited serum mediated thymidine kinase induction in a concentration dependent manner. FACS analysis showed that troglitazone and rosiglitazone but not pioglitazone placed a slightly higher percentage of cells in the S phase of a growing culture. Of the biguanides, metformin had no effect on proliferation assessed as [3H]-thymidine incorporation or cell numbers whereas phenformin was inhibitory in both assays albeit at high concentrations

  14. Effect of Oral Glucose Administration on Rebound Growth Hormone Release in Normal and Obese Women: The Role of Adiposity, Insulin Sensitivity and Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Pena-Bello, Lara; Pertega-Diaz, Sonia; Outeiriño-Blanco, Elena; Garcia-Buela, Jesus; Tovar, Sulay; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Dieguez, Carlos; Cordido, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Context Metabolic substrates and nutritional status play a major role in growth hormone (GH) secretion. Uncovering the mechanisms involved in GH secretion following oral glucose (OG) administration in normal and obese patients is a pending issue. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate GH after OG in relation with adiposity, insulin secretion and action, and ghrelin secretion in obese and healthy women, to further elucidate the mechanism of GH secretion after OG and the altered GH secretion in obesity. Participants and Methods We included 64 healthy and obese women. After an overnight fast, 75 g of OG were administered; GH, glucose, insulin and ghrelin were obtained during 300 minutes. Insulin secretion and action indices and the area under the curve (AUC) were calculated for GH, glucose, insulin and ghrelin. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were employed. Results The AUC of GH (μg/L•min) was lower in obese (249.8±41.8) than in healthy women (490.4±74.6), P=0.001. The AUC of total ghrelin (pg/mL•min) was lower in obese (240995.5±11094.2) than in healthy women (340797.5±37757.5), P=0.042. There were significant correlations between GH secretion and the different adiposity, insulin secretion and action, and ghrelin secretion indices. After multivariate analysis only ghrelin AUC remained a significant predictor for fasting and peak GH. PMID:25782001

  15. Oral administration of soybean peptide Vglycin normalizes fasting glucose and restores impaired pancreatic function in Type 2 diabetic Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Feng, Jueping; Du, Zhongxia; Zhen, Hui; Lin, Mei; Jia, Shaohui; Li, Tao; Huang, Xinyuan; Ostenson, Claes-Goran; Chen, Zhengwang

    2014-09-01

    Vglycin, a natural 37-residue polypeptide isolated from pea seeds in which six half-cysteine residues are embedded in three pairs of disulfide bonds, is resistant to digestive enzymes and has antidiabetic potential. To investigate the pharmacological activity of Vglycin in vivo and to examine the mechanisms involved, the therapeutic effect of Vglycin in diabetic rats was examined. Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by high-fat diet and multiple streptozotocin intraperitoneal injections. Diabetic rats were treated daily with Vglycin for 4 weeks. Body weight, food intake, fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels were assayed weekly. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were conducted on Day 29. Subsequently, levels of p-Akt in the liver and pancreas and cleaved PARP, Pdx-1 and insulin in the pancreas were detected by immunoblotting. The morphology of the pancreas and the insulin expression in the pancreas were analyzed by hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Furthermore, human liver-derived cell lines were used to explore the in vitro effects of Vglycin on insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake. Chronic treatment with Vglycin normalized fasting glucose levels in diabetic rats. The improvement in glucose homeostasis and the increased insulin sensitivity mediated by restored insulin signaling likely contributed to decreased food intake and reduced body weight. Vglycin protected pancreatic cells from damage by streptozotocin. Although insulin synthesis and secretion in impaired β-cell were not significantly elevated, islets morphology was improved in the Vglycin-treated groups. These results suggest that Vglycin could be useful in Type 2 diabetes for restoring impaired insulin signaling, glucose tolerance and pancreatic function.

  16. Reducing blood glucose levels in TIDM mice with an orally administered extract of sericin from hIGF-I-transgenic silkworm cocoons.

    PubMed

    Song, Zuowei; Zhang, Mengyao; Xue, Renyu; Cao, Guangli; Gong, Chengliang

    2014-05-01

    In previous studies, we reported that the blood glucose levels of mice with type I diabetes mellitus (TIDM) was reduced with orally administered silk gland powder from silkworms transgenic for human insulin-like growth factor-I (hIGF-I). However, potential safety hazards could not be eliminated because the transgenic silk gland powder contained heterologous DNA, including the green fluorescent protein (gfp) and neomycin resistance (neo) genes. These shortcomings might be overcome if the recombinant hIGF-I were secreted into the sericin layer of the cocoon. In this study, silkworm eggs were transfected with a novel piggyBac transposon vector, pigA3GFP-serHS-hIGF-I-neo, containing the neo, gfp, and hIGF-I genes controlled by the sericin-1 (ser-1) promoter with the signal peptide DNA sequence of the fibrin heavy chain (Fib-H) and a helper plasmid containing the piggyBac transposase sequence under the control of the Bombyx mori actin 3 (A3) promoter, using sperm-mediated gene transfer to generate the transformed silkworms. The hIGF-I content estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was approximately 162.7 ng/g. To estimate the biological activity of the expressed hIGF-I, streptozotocin-induced TIDM mice were orally administered sericin from the transgenic silkworm. The blood glucose levels of the mice were significantly reduced, suggesting that the extract from the transgenic hIGF-I silkworm cocoons can be used as an orally administered drug.

  17. Comparison of the enhancement of plasma glucose levels in type 2 diabetes Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats by oral administration of sucrose or maple syrup.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa; Taga, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Maple syrup is used as a premium natural sweeter, and is known for being good for human health. In the present study, we investigate whether maple syrup is suitable as a sweetener in the management of type 2 diabetes using Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, a model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. OLETF rats develop type 2 diabetes mellitus by 30 weeks of age, and 60-week-old OLETF rats show hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia via pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. The administration of sucrose or maple syrup following an OGT test increased plasma glucose (PG) levels in OLETF rats, but the enhancement in PG following the oral administration of maple syrup was lower than in the case of sucrose administration in both 30- and 60-week-old OLETF rats. Although, the insulin levels in 30-week-old OLETF rats also increased following the oral administration of sucrose or maple syrup, no increase in insulin levels was seen in 60-week-old OLETF rats following the oral administration of either sucrose or maple syrup. No significant differences were observed in insulin levels between sucrose- and maple syrup-administered OLETF rats at either 30 or 60 weeks of age. The present study strongly suggests that the maple syrup may have a lower glycemic index than sucrose, which may help in the prevention of type 2 diabetes.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA copy number augments performance of A1C and oral glucose tolerance testing in the prediction of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seong Beom; Koh, InSong; Nam, Hye-Young; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Lee, Hong Kyu; Han, Bok-Ghee

    2017-01-01

    Here, we tested the performance of the mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNA-CN) in predicting future type 2 diabetes (n = 1108). We used the baseline clinical data (age, sex, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, systolic and diastolic blood pressure) and the mtDNA-CN, hemoglobin A1c (A1C) levels and results of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) including fasting plasma glucose, 1-hour glucose, and 2-hour glucose levels, to predict future diabetes. We built a prediction model using the baseline data and the diabetes status at biannual follow-up of 8 years. The mean area under curve (AUC) for all follow-ups of the full model including all variables was 0.92 ± 0.04 (mean ± standard deviation), while that of the model excluding the mtDNA-CN was 0.90 ± 0.03. The sensitivity of the f4ull model was much greater than that of the model not including mtDNA-CN: the mean sensitivities of the model with and without mtDNA-CN were 0.60 ± 0.06 and 0.53 ± 0.04, respectively. We found that the mtDNA-CN of peripheral leukocytes is a biomarker that augments the predictive power for future diabetes of A1C and OGTT. We believe that these results could provide invaluable information for developing strategies for the management of diabetes. PMID:28251996

  19. Consumption of caffeinated coffee and a high carbohydrate meal affects postprandial metabolism of a subsequent oral glucose tolerance test in young, healthy males.

    PubMed

    Moisey, Lesley L; Robinson, Lindsay E; Graham, Terry E

    2010-03-01

    Caffeine and caffeinated coffee (CC) elicit acute insulin insensitivity when ingested before a carbohydrate load. The effects of CC on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity when co-ingested with a high carbohydrate meal and on postprandial metabolism of a subsequent (second) carbohydrate load have not been studied. In a randomised, crossover design, ten healthy males ingested either CC (5 mg caffeine/kg body weight), decaffeinated coffee (DC) or water (W; equal volume) co-ingested with a high glycaemic index cereal followed 3 h later by a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. After the initial meal, insulin area under the curve (AUC) and insulin sensitivity index did not differ between treatments, although glucose AUC for CC (107 (sem 18) mmol/l x 3 h) and DC (74 (sem 15) mmol/l x 3 h) was greater than W ( - 0.2 (sem 29) mmol/l x 3 h, P < 0.05). After the second carbohydrate load, insulin AUC for CC was 49 % and 57 % greater (P < 0.01) than for DC and W, respectively. Despite the greater insulin response, glucose AUC for CC (217 (sem 24) mmol/l x 2 h) was greater than both DC (126 (sem 11) mmol/l x 2 h, P = 0.01) and W (55 (sem 34) mmol/l x 2 h, P < 0.001). Insulin sensitivity index after the second meal was lower after CC (8.2 (sem 0.9)) compared with both DC (12.4 (sem 1.2), P < 0.01) and W (13.4 (sem 1.4), P < 0.001). Co-ingestion of CC with one meal resulted in insulin insensitivity during the postprandial phase of a second meal in the absence of further CC ingestion. Thus, CC may play a role in daily glycaemic management.

  20. Relationship between body weight and the increment in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor after oral glucose challenge in men with obesity and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I-Te; Wang, Jun-Sing; Fu, Chia-Po; Lin, Shih-Yi; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in energy homeostasis. However, the postprandial BDNF change has not been well investigated. We hypothesized that the BDNF increment after oral glucose challenge is associated with body weight. To address this possibility, man adults with obesity in conjunction with metabolic syndrome were compared with normal weight controls at baseline in the initial cross-sectional protocol. The obese subjects then underwent a 12-week program for body-weight reduction in the prospective protocol. The area under the curve (AUC) of serum BDNF was recorded during a 75 g oral glucose tolerant test and the BDNF AUC index was defined as [(AUC of BDNF) − (fasting BDNF∗2 hours)]/(fasting BDNF∗2 hours). A total of 25 controls and 36 obese subjects completed the study assessments. In the cross-sectional protocol, the BDNF AUC index was significantly higher in the obese subjects than in the controls (9.0 ± 16.5% vs. − 8.0 ± 22.5%, P = 0.001). After weight reduction (from 97.0 ± 12.5 kg to 88.6 ± 12.9 kg, P < 0.001), the percentage change of body weight was significantly associated with the BDNF AUC index after the study (95% CI between 0.21 and 1.82, P = 0.015). Using 6% weight reduction as a cut-off value, a larger weight reduction was able to reliably predict a negative BDNF AUC index. In conclusion, a high BDNF AUC index was observed for obese men in this study, whereas the index value significantly decreased after body-weight reduction. These findings suggest that postprandial BDNF increment may be associated with obesity. PMID:27787389

  1. Relationship between body weight and the increment in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor after oral glucose challenge in men with obesity and metabolic syndrome: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-Te; Wang, Jun-Sing; Fu, Chia-Po; Lin, Shih-Yi; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng

    2016-10-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in energy homeostasis. However, the postprandial BDNF change has not been well investigated. We hypothesized that the BDNF increment after oral glucose challenge is associated with body weight.To address this possibility, man adults with obesity in conjunction with metabolic syndrome were compared with normal weight controls at baseline in the initial cross-sectional protocol. The obese subjects then underwent a 12-week program for body-weight reduction in the prospective protocol. The area under the curve (AUC) of serum BDNF was recorded during a 75 g oral glucose tolerant test and the BDNF AUC index was defined as [(AUC of BDNF) - (fasting BDNF2 hours)]/(fasting BDNF2 hours).A total of 25 controls and 36 obese subjects completed the study assessments. In the cross-sectional protocol, the BDNF AUC index was significantly higher in the obese subjects than in the controls (9.0 ± 16.5% vs. - 8.0 ± 22.5%, P = 0.001). After weight reduction (from 97.0 ± 12.5 kg to 88.6 ± 12.9 kg, P < 0.001), the percentage change of body weight was significantly associated with the BDNF AUC index after the study (95% CI between 0.21 and 1.82, P = 0.015). Using 6% weight reduction as a cut-off value, a larger weight reduction was able to reliably predict a negative BDNF AUC index.In conclusion, a high BDNF AUC index was observed for obese men in this study, whereas the index value significantly decreased after body-weight reduction. These findings suggest that postprandial BDNF increment may be associated with obesity.

  2. Blood levels of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines during an oral glucose tolerance test in patients with symptoms suggesting reactive hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Eik, W.; Marcon, S.S.; Krupek, T.; Previdelli, I.T.S.; Pereira, O.C.N.; Silva, M.A.R.C.P.; Bazotte, R.B.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of postprandial glycemia on blood levels of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines during an oral glucose tolerance test in non-diabetic patients with symptoms suggesting reactive hypoglycemia. Eleven patients with clinical symptoms suggesting reactive hypoglycemia received an oral glucose solution (75 g) Blood was collected at 0 (baseline), 30, 60, 120 and 180 min after glucose ingestion and the plasma concentrations of interferon-α (IFN-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), interleukin 2 (IL-2), interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R), interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), interleukin 10 (IL-10), interleukin-12 (IL-12), interleukin 13 (IL-13), interleukin 15 (IL-15), interleukin 17 (IL-17), IFN-γ inducible protein 10 (IP-10), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1), monokine induced by IFN-γ (MIG), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-basic), eotaxin, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), epidermal growth factor (EGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), and 1β (MIP-1β) were evaluated. Overall, glycemic levels increased, reached its maximum at 30 min (phase 1), returned to baseline levels at 120 min (phase 2), followed by a mild hypoglycemia at 180 min (phase 3). During phase 1, cytokine blood levels were maintained. However, we observed a synchronous fall (P<0.05) in the concentrations of pro-inflammatory (IL-15, IL-17, MCP-1) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (FGF-basic, IL-13, IL-1RA) during phase 2. Furthermore, a simultaneous rise (P<0.05) of pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IL-5, IL-17) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-1RA, IL-2R, IL-13, FGF-basic) occurred during phase 3. Thus, mild acute hypoglycemia but not a physiological increase of glycemia

  3. The Birth Weight Lowering C-Allele of rs900400 Near LEKR1 and CCNL1 Associates with Elevated Insulin Release following an Oral Glucose Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ehm A.; Harder, Marie N.; Pilgaard, Kasper; Pisinger, Charlotta; Stančáková, Alena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Grarup, Niels; Færch, Kristine; Poulsen, Pernille; Witte, Daniel R.; Jørgensen, Torben; Vaag, Allan; Laakso, Markku; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim The first genome-wide association study on birth weight was recently published and the most significant associated birth weight lowering variant was the rs900400 C-allele located near LEKR1 and CCNL1. We aimed to replicate the association with birth weight in the Danish Inter99 study and furthermore to evaluate associations between rs900400 and indices of insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity obtained by oral glucose tolerance tests in adults from the Danish Inter99 study and the Finnish, Metabolic Syndrome in Men (METSIM) sample. Methods For 4,744 of 6,784 Inter99 participants, midwife journals were traced through the Danish State Archives and association of rs900400 with birth weight was examined. Associations between rs900400 and fasting serum insulin, fasting plasma glucose, insulinogenic index, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and disposition index were studied in 5,484 Danish and 6,915 Finnish non-diabetic individuals and combined in meta-analyses. Results The C-allele of rs900400 was associated with a 22.1 g lower birth weight ([−41.3;−3.0], P = 0.024) per allele. Moreover, in combined analyses of the Danish Inter99 study and the Finnish METSIM study we found that the birth weight lowering allele was associated with increased insulin release measured by the insulinogenic index (β = 2.25% [0.59; 3.91], P = 0.008) and with an increased disposition index (β = 1.76% [0.04; 3.49], P = 0.05). Conclusion The birth weight lowering effect of the C-allele of rs900400 located near LEKR1 and CCNL1 was replicated in the Danish population. Furthermore the C-allele was associated with increased insulin response following oral glucose stimulation in a meta-analysis based on Danish and Finnish non-diabetic individuals. PMID:22073261

  4. Biokinetics of (13)C in the human body after oral administration of (13)C-labeled glucose as an index for the biokinetics of (14)C.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Tako, Yasuhiro; Matsushita, Kensaku; Takeda, Hiroshi; Endo, Masahiro; Nakamura, Yuji; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2016-09-01

    The retention of (13)C in the human body after oral administration of (13)C-labeled glucose was studied in three healthy volunteer subjects to estimate the 50 year cumulative body burden for (13)C as an index of the committed dose of the radioisotope (14)C. After administration of (13)C-labeled glucose, the volunteers ingested controlled diets with a fixed number of calories for 112 d. Samples of breath and urine were collected up to 112 d after administration. Samples of feces were collected up to 14 d after administration. Hair samples were obtained at 119 d after administration and analyzed as a representative index of the rate of excretion of organic (13)C via pathways such as skin cell exfoliation and mucus secretion. All samples were analyzed for (13)C/(12)C atomic ratio to determine the rate of excretion via each pathway. We then constructed a metabolic model with a total of four pathways (breath, urine, feces, and other) comprising seven compartments. We determined the values of the biokinetic parameters in the model by using the obtained excretion data. From 74% to 94% of the (13)C administered was excreted in breath, whereas  <2% was excreted in urine and feces. In the other pathway, the excretion rate constant in the compartment with the longest residence time stretched to hundreds of days but the rate constant for each subject was not statistically significant (P value  >  0.1). In addition, the dataset for one of the three subjects was markedly different from those of the other two. When we estimated the 50 year cumulative body burden for (13)C by using our model and we included non-statistically significant parameters, a considerable cumulative body burden was found in the compartments excreting to the other pathway. Although our results on the cumulative body burden of (13)C from orally administered carbon as glucose were inconclusive, we found that the compartments excreting to the other pathway had a markedly long residence time and

  5. Oral delivery of bioencapsulated exendin-4 expressed in chloroplasts lowers blood glucose level in mice and stimulates insulin secretion in beta-TC6 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Nityanandam, Ramya; New, James Stewart; Daniell, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Summary Glucagon like peptide (GLP-1) increases insulin secretion but is rapidly degraded (half-life: 2 min in circulation). GLP-1 analog, Exenatide (Byetta) has a longer half life (3.3–4 hrs) with potent insulinotropic effects but requires cold storage, daily abdominal injections with short shelf life. Because diabetic patients take >60,000 injections in their life time, alternative delivery methods are highly desired. Exenatide is ideal for oral delivery because insulinotropism is glucose dependent, with reduced risk of hypoglycemia even at higher doses. Therefore, exendin-4 (EX4) was expressed as a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-fusion protein in tobacco chloroplasts to facilitate bioencapsulation within plant cells and transmucosal delivery in the gut via GM1 receptors present in the intestinal epithelium. The transgene integration was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Expression level of CTB-EX4 reached up to 14.3% of total leaf protein (TLP). Lyophilization of leaf material increased therapeutic protein concentration by 12–24 fold, extended their shelf life up to 15 months when stored at room temperature and eliminated microbes present in fresh leaves. The pentameric structure, disulfide bonds and functionality of CTB-EX4 were well preserved in lyophilized materials. Chloroplast derived CTB-EX4 showed increased insulin secretion similar to the commercial EX4 in beta-TC6, a mouse pancreatic cell line. Even when 5,000-fold excess dose of CTB-EX4 was orally delivered, it stimulated insulin secretion similar to the intraperitoneal injection of commercial EX4 but didn’t cause hypoglycemia in mice. Oral delivery of the bioencapsulated EX4 should eliminate injections, increase patient compliance/convenience and significantly lower their cost. PMID:23078126

  6. Increased luminal mucin does not disturb glucose or ovalbumin absorption in rats fed insoluble dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya; Tanabe, Hiroki; Ito, Hiroyuki; Yuto, Shunsuke; Matsubara, Takeshi; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Sugiyama, Kimio; Kiriyama, Shuhachi

    2006-10-01

    We tested whether increased mucin secretion due to ingestion of insoluble dietary fiber (IDF) affects small intestinal nutrient absorption in rats. Polystyrene foam (PSF) with a true expansion ratio of 54.9 was used as a model for IDF with high bulk-forming properties. In Expt. 1, rats were fed a control diet or diet containing 50 g PSF/kg for 1, 3, 5, or 7 d. Small intestinal mucin fractions were isolated, and O-linked oligosaccharide chains were measured. The luminal mucin content reached a maximum within 5 d after PSF ingestion. In Expt. 2, rats were fed a control diet or diet containing 50 g PSF/kg for 7 d, and then all rats were switched to the control diet for 1, 3, or 5 d. The increased capacity for luminal mucin secretion disappeared within 5 d after ceasing PSF ingestion. In Expt. 3, rats were fed a control diet or diet containing 70 g PSF/kg for 7 d. Glucose (1g/kg) was administered orally after 12 h of food deprivation. The blood glucose concentrations did not differ between the groups. In Expt. 4, rats were fed a control diet or diet containing 90 g PSF/kg for 14 d. At d 7, portal cannulae were installed. A mixed solution of glucose (1g/kg) and ovalbumin (OVA, 250 mg/kg) was orally administered after 12 h of food deprivation, and responses of portal glucose and OVA concentrations were monitored for 120 min. Although luminal mucin contents were almost doubled in the 9% PSF group compared with the control group, neither portal glucose nor OVA concentration differed at any time point. The results suggest that the short-term ingestion of IDF significantly increases the luminal mucin content, but that this does not disturb nutrient absorption.

  7. A study of the interactive effects of oral contraceptive use and dietary fat intake on blood pressure, cardiovascular reactivity and glucose tolerance in normotensive women.

    PubMed

    Straznicky, N E; Barrington, V E; Branley, P; Louis, W J

    1998-03-01

    The interactive effects of combined oral contraceptive (OC) use and dietary fat intake on cardiovascular hemodynamics and metabolic parameters were investigated in a comparative study of 16 normotensive OC users from Australia and 16 age- and weight-matched nonuser controls. The 6-week study's crossover design allocated women to consume either a high- or low-fat diet for 2-week periods. Analyses were performed at the end of each diet during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Plasma triglyceride levels were significantly higher in OC users than nonusers in both diet groups; however, responses of lipoprotein levels to the 2 diets did not differ between study groups. Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels decreased by 15% and 17%, respectively, in OC users, and by 14% each in non-OC users on the low-fat, compared to the high-fat, diet. Fasting plasma insulin levels, the insulin production response to administration of glucose, and resting clinic and night-time systolic blood pressures were all significantly reduced on the low-fat diet, but only in nonusers. In OC users, blood pressure responses to noradrenaline and maximal heart rate response to cold were significantly attenuated by the low-fat diet. During the low-fat diet, resting systolic, 24-hour systolic, and diastolic blood pressures and areas under the curve were significantly higher in the OC group. OC users also demonstrated a greater systolic sensitivity to administration of both noradrenaline and angiotensin II, and had a higher plasma renin activity, regardless of diet. Overall, these findings confirm that OCs can cause adverse effects on blood pressure, cardiovascular reactivity, and the insulin production response to glucose administration, and negate some of the beneficial effects of a low-fat diet.

  8. Amino Acid and Biogenic Amine Profile Deviations in an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test: A Comparison between Healthy and Hyperlipidaemia Individuals Based on Targeted Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Gu, Wenbo; Ma, Xuan; Liu, Yuxin; Jiang, Lidan; Feng, Rennan; Liu, Liyan

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia (HLP) is characterized by a disturbance in lipid metabolism and is a primary risk factor for the development of insulin resistance (IR) and a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. The aim of this work was to investigate the changes in postprandial amino acid and biogenic amine profiles provoked by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in HLP patients using targeted metabolomics. We used ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry to analyze the serum amino acid and biogenic amine profiles of 35 control and 35 HLP subjects during an OGTT. The amino acid and biogenic amine profiles from 30 HLP subjects were detected as independent samples to validate the changes in the metabolites. There were differences in the amino acid and biogenic amine profiles between the HLP individuals and the healthy controls at baseline and after the OGTT. The per cent changes of 13 metabolites from fasting to the 2 h samples during the OGTT in the HLP patients were significantly different from those of the healthy controls. The lipid parameters were associated with the changes in valine, isoleucine, creatine, creatinine, dimethylglycine, asparagine, serine, and tyrosine (all p < 0.05) during the OGTT in the HLP group. The postprandial changes in isoleucine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during the OGTT were positively associated with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; all p < 0.05) in the HLP group. Elevated oxidative stress and disordered energy metabolism during OGTTs are important characteristics of metabolic perturbations in HLP. Our findings offer new insights into the complex physiological regulation of metabolism during the OGTT in HLP. PMID:27338465

  9. Screening of gestational diabetes mellitus in early pregnancy by oral glucose tolerance test and glycosylated fibronectin: study protocol for an international, prospective, multicentre cohort trial

    PubMed Central

    Huhn, E A; Fischer, T; Göbl, C S; Todesco Bernasconi, M; Kreft, M; Kunze, M; Schoetzau, A; Dölzlmüller, E; Eppel, W; Husslein, P; Ochsenbein-Koelble, N; Zimmermann, R; Bäz, E; Prömpeler, H; Bruder, E; Hahn, S; Hoesli, I

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As the accurate diagnosis and treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is of increasing importance; new diagnostic approaches for the assessment of GDM in early pregnancy were recently suggested. We evaluate the diagnostic power of an ‘early’ oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) 75 g and glycosylated fibronectin (glyFn) for GDM screening in a normal cohort. Methods and analysis In a prospective cohort study, 748 singleton pregnancies are recruited in 6 centres in Switzerland, Austria and Germany. Women are screened for pre-existing diabetes mellitus and GDM by an ‘early’ OGTT 75 g and/or the new biomarker, glyFn, at 12–15 weeks of gestation. Different screening strategies are compared to evaluate the impact on detection of GDM by an OGTT 75 g at 24–28 weeks of gestation as recommended by the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG). A new screening algorithm is created by using multivariable risk estimation based on ‘early’ OGTT 75 g and/or glyFn results, incorporating maternal risk factors. Recruitment began in May 2014. Ethics and dissemination This study received ethical approval from the ethics committees in Basel, Zurich, Vienna, Salzburg and Freiburg. It was registered under http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02035059) on 12 January 2014. Data will be presented at international conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number NCT02035059. PMID:27733413

  10. Rapid infusions of human normal immunoglobulin 50g/l are safe and well tolerated in immunodeficiencies and immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Giuseppe; Vultaggio, Alessandra; Alberto Bosi, A; Reichert, Dietmar; Janssen, Jan; Lamacchia, Donatella; Nappi, Liliana; Pecoraro, Antonio; Milito, Cinzia; Ferraro, Andrea; Matucci, Andrea; Bacchiarri, Francesca; Carrai, Valentina; Hibbeler, Azra; Speckman, Elisabet; Guarnieri, Chiara; Bongiovanni, Serena; Quinti, Isabella

    2017-03-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is accepted as an effective and well-tolerated treatment for primary and secondary immunodeficiencies (ID) and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Adverse reactions of IVIg are usually mild, comprising transient flu-like symptoms, change in blood pressure and tachycardia. However IVIg therapy can be burdensome for both patients and healthcare facilities, since the infusion may take up to 4h to administer. The objective of our multicentre, prospective, open-label phase III trial was to evaluate the tolerability and safety of human normal immunoglobulin 50g/l (Ig VENA) at high intravenous infusion rates in adult patients with ID and ITP who had previously tolerated IVIg treatment, by progressively increasing infusion rate up to 8ml/kg/hr. 39 ID patients received three infusions, 5 ITP patients received up to a maximum of 5 infusions for a maximum of 5days. Overall 55 adverse events were reported in 18 patients, and all were mild and self-limiting. Two serious adverse events occurred in ID patients and 1 in an ITP patient; none was fatal or treatment-related. No clinically significant changes or abnormalities were observed in vital signs, laboratory results and HRQoL. In summary, in this study, more rapid IVIg infusions were well tolerated by ID and ITP patients, while maintaining their quality of life, helping to minimise the time spent in outpatient hospital visiting to potentially optimise adherence to treatment.

  11. Oral administration of SR-110, a peroxynitrite decomposing catalyst, enhances glucose homeostasis, insulin signaling, and islet architecture in B6D2F1 mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Johns, Michael; Esmaeili Mohsen Abadi, Sakineh; Malik, Nehal; Lee, Joshua; Neumann, William L; Rausaria, Smita; Imani-Nejad, Maryam; McPherson, Timothy; Schober, Joseph; Kwon, Guim

    2016-04-15

    Peroxynitrite has been implicated in type 2 diabetes and diabetic complications. As a follow-up study to our previous work on SR-135 (Arch Biochem Biophys 577-578: 49-59, 2015), we provide evidence that this series of compounds are effective when administered orally, and their mechanisms of actions extend to the peripheral tissues. A more soluble analogue of SR-135, SR-110 (from a new class of Mn(III) bis(hydroxyphenyl)-dipyrromethene complexes) was orally administered for 2 weeks to B6D2F1 mice fed a high fat-diet (HFD). Mice fed a HFD for 4 months gained significantly higher body weights compared to lean diet-fed mice (52 ± 1.5 g vs 34 ± 1.3 g). SR-110 (10 mg/kg daily) treatment significantly reduced fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, and enhanced glucose tolerance as compared to HFD control or vehicle (peanut butter) group. SR-110 treatment enhanced insulin signaling in the peripheral organs, liver, heart, and skeletal muscle, and reduced lipid accumulation in the liver. Furthermore, SR-110 increased insulin content, restored islet architecture, decreased islet size, and reduced tyrosine nitration. These results suggest that a peroxynitrite decomposing catalyst is effective in improving glucose homeostasis and restoring islet morphology and β-cell insulin content under nutrient overload.

  12. Comparison between 2-(18) F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography and contrast-enhanced computed tomography for measuring gross tumor volume in cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hiroto; Randall, Elissa K; Kraft, Susan L; Larue, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most refractory feline malignancies. Most patients succumb due to failure in local tumor control. 2-(18) F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography ((18) F-FDG PET) is increasingly being used for veterinary oncology staging as it highlights areas with higher glucose metabolism. The goal of the current prospective study was to compare gross tumor volume measurements using (18) F-FDG PET vs. those using computed tomography (CT) for stereotactic radiation therapy planning in cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Twelve cats with confirmed oral squamous cell carcinoma underwent pretreatment (18) F-FDG PET/CT. Gross tumor volumes based on contrast-enhanced CT and (18) F-FDG PET were measured and compared among cats. Mean PET gross tumor volume was significantly smaller than mean CT gross tumor volume in the mandibular/maxillary squamous cell carcinoma group (n = 8, P = 0.002) and for the total number of patients (n = 12, P = 0.006), but not in the lingual/laryngeal group (n = 4, P = 0.57). Mismatch fraction analysis revealed that most of the lingual/laryngeal patients had a large region of high-(18) F-FDG activity outside of the CT gross tumor volume. This mismatch fraction was significantly greater in the lingual/laryngeal group than the mandibular/maxillary group (P = 0.028). The effect of poor spatial resolution of PET imaging was greater when the absolute tumor volume was small. Findings from this study indicated that (18) F-FDG PET warrants further investigation as a supplemental imaging modality in cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma because it detected regions of possible primary tumor that were not detected on CT images.

  13. Does an L-glutamine-containing, Glucose-free, Oral Rehydration Solution Reduce Stool Output and Time to Rehydrate in Children with Acute Diarrhoea? A Double-blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Claudia; Villa, Sofía; Mota, Felipe R.; Calva, Juan J.

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed whether an oral rehydration solution (ORS) in which glucose is replaced by L-glutamine (L-glutamine ORS) is more effective than the standard glucose-based rehydration solution recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO-ORS) in reducing the stool volume and time to rehydrate in acute diarrhoea. In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial in a Mexican hospital, 147 dehydrated children, aged 1–60 month(s), were assigned either to the WHO-ORS (74 children), or to the L-glutamine ORS (73 children) and followed until successful rehydration. There were no significant differences between the groups in stool output during the first four hours, time to successful rehydration, volume of ORS required for rehydration, urinary output, and vomiting. This was independent of rotavirus-associated infection. An L-glutamine-containing glucose-free ORS seems not to offer greater clinical benefit than the standard WHO-ORS in mildly-to-moderately-dehydrated children with acute non-cholera diarrhoea. PMID:18330060

  14. Glucose Variability

    PubMed Central

    Le Floch, Jean-Pierre; Kessler, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glucose variability has been suspected to be a major factor of diabetic complications. Several indices have been proposed for measuring glucose variability, but their interest remains discussed. Our aim was to compare different indices. Methods: Glucose variability was studied in 150 insulin-treated diabetic patients (46% men, 42% type 1 diabetes, age 52 ± 11 years) using a continuous glucose monitoring system (668 ± 564 glucose values; mean glucose value 173 ± 38 mg/dL). Results from the mean, the median, different indices (SD, MAGE, MAG, glucose fluctuation index (GFI), and percentages of low [<60 mg/dL] and high [>180 mg/dL] glucose values), and ratios (CV = SD/m, MAGE/m, MAG/m, and GCF = GFI/m) were compared using Pearson linear correlations and a multivariate principal component analysis (PCA). Results: CV, MAGE/m (ns), GCF and GFI (P < .05), MAG and MAG/m (P < .01) were not strongly correlated with the mean. The percentage of high glucose values was mainly correlated with indices. The percentage of low glucose values was mainly correlated with ratios. PCA showed 3 main axes; the first was associated with descriptive data (mean, SD, CV, MAGE, MAGE/m, and percentage of high glucose values); the second with ratios MAG/m and GCF and with the percentage of low glucose values; and the third with MAG, GFI, and the percentage of high glucose values. Conclusions: Indices and ratios provide complementary pieces of information associated with high and low glucose values, respectively. The pairs MAG+MAG/m and GFI+GCF appear to be the most reliable markers of glucose variability in diabetic patients. PMID:26880391

  15. Oral antidiabetic treatment in type-2 diabetes in the elderly: balancing the need for glucose control and the risk of hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We aimed at identifying variables predicting hypoglycemia in elderly type 2 diabetic patients and the relation to HbA1c values achieved. Design Prospective, observational registry in 3810 patients in primary care. Comparison of patients in different age tertiles: with an age < 60 (young, n=1,253), age 60 to < 70 (middle aged, n=1,184) to those ≥ 70 years (elderly, n=1,373). Odds Ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were determined from univariable and multivariable regression analyses. Results Elderly patients had a later diabetes diagnosis, a longer diabetes duration, better glucose control and more frequent co-morbid disease conditions. Overall 10.7% of patients experienced any severity hypoglycemia within the last 12 months prior to inclusion. Higher rates of hypoglycemia were observed in the elderly than in the young after adjusting for differences in HbA1c, fasting and post-prandial blood glucose (OR 1.68; 95%CI 1.16-2.45). This was particularly true for hypoglycemic episodes without specific symptoms (OR 1.74; 95%CI 1.05-2.89). In a multivariate model stroke / transitory ischemic attack, the presence of heart failure, clinically relevant depression, sulfonylurea use and blood glucose self-measurement were associated with hypoglycemic events. Conclusion Elderly patients are at an increased risk of hypoglycemia even at comparable glycemic control. Therefore identified variables associated with hypoglycemia in the elderly such as heart failure, clinically relevant depression, the use of sulfonylurea help to optimize the balance between glucose control and low levels of hypoglycemia. Asymptomatic hypoglycemia should not be disregarded as irrelevant but considered as a sign of possible hypoglycemia associated autonomic failure. PMID:23039216

  16. Hydrogen concentration in expired air analyzed with a new hydrogen sensor, plasma glucose rise, and symptoms of lactose intolerance after oral administration of 100 gram lactose.

    PubMed

    Berg, A; Eriksson, M; Bárány, F; Einarsson, K; Sundgren, H; Nylander, C; Lundström, I; Blomstrand, R

    1985-09-01

    A rapid breath hydrogen analyzer to detect lactose malabsorption is described. After ingestion of a lactose solution the patient expires into a mouthpiece attached to a hydrogen sensor at 30-min intervals for 3 1/2 h. The hydrogen of the expired air causes a voltage change that can be transformed into ppm from a calibration curve. A tolerance test with a load of 100 g lactose was performed in 43 consecutive patients with various gastrointestinal disturbances, referred to the laboratory for the commonly used lactose tolerance test based on plasma glucose measurements. Eleven patients developed symptoms of lactose intolerance during the test. Biopsy specimens from the distal duodenum or proximal jejunum showed partial villous atrophy in one, in whom celiac disease with lactose intolerance was diagnosed; the other 10 had normal specimens. In nine of them lactose intolerance was diagnosed and confirmed by observation for months on a lactose-poor diet. The 10th patient (H.P.L.) did not improve on such a diet. He also showed pronounced symptoms of intolerance during a test with monosaccharides (glucose + galactose). His intestinal disease remained undiagnosed. The 11 patients with symptoms of intolerance and 3 patients without symptoms during the lactose load showed a flat plasma glucose curve after drinking the lactose solution--that is, a maximum rise of the glucose concentration of 1.5 mmol/l. One of the symptom-free patients dropped out and could not be observed, another did not improve on a lactose-poor diet, and the third noticed a favorable effect of the diet on stool consistency but not on other abdominal symptoms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Coconut-derived D-xylose affects postprandial glucose and insulin responses in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Yun Jung; Bak, Youn-Kyung; Kim, Bumsik; Kim, Min-Sun; Lee, Jin-Hee

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic alterations including postprandial hyperglycemia have been implicated in the development of obesity-related diseases. Xylose is a sucrase inhibitor suggested to suppress the postprandial glucose surge. The objectives of this study were to assess the inhibitory effects of two different concentrations of xylose on postprandial glucose and insulin responses and to evaluate its efficacy in the presence of other macronutrients. Randomized double-blind cross-over studies were conducted to examine the effect of D-xylose on postprandial glucose and insulin response following the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). In study 1, the overnight-fasted study subjects (n = 49) consumed a test sucrose solution (50 g sucrose in 130 ml water) containing 0, 5, or 7.5 g D-xylose powder. In study 2, the overnight-fasted study subjects (n = 50) consumed a test meal (50 g sucrose in a 60 g muffin and 200 ml sucrose-containing solution). The control meal provided 64.5 g of carbohydrates, 4.5 g of fat, and 10 g of protein. The xylose meal was identical to the control meal except 5 g of xylose was added to the muffin mix. In study 1, the 5 g xylose-containing solutions exhibited significantly lower area under the glucose curve (AUCg) and area under the insulin curve (AUCi) values for 0-15 min (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001), 0-30 min (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001), 0-45 min (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001), 0-60 min (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001), 0-90 min (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001) and 0-120 min (P = 0.0071, P = 0.0016). In study 2, the test meal exhibited significantly lower AUCg and AUCi values for 0-15 min (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001), 0-30 min (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001), 0-45 min (P < 0.0001, P = 0.0005), 0-60 min (P = 0.0002, P = 0.0025), and 0-90 min (P = 0.0396, P = 0.0246). In conclusion, xylose showed an acute suppressive effect on the postprandial glucose and insulin surges. PMID:22259678

  18. Urinary recovery of orally administered chromium 51-labeled EDTA, lactulose, rhamnose, d-xylose, 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and sucrose in healthy adult male Beagles.

    PubMed

    Frias, Rafael; Steiner, Jörg M; Williams, David A; Sankari, Satu; Westermarck, Elias

    2012-05-01

    Objective-To provide values for gastrointestinal permeability and absorptive function tests (GIPFTs) with chromium 51 ((51)Cr)-labeled EDTA, lactulose, rhamnose, d-xylose, 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and sucrose in Beagles and to evaluate potential correlations between markers. Animals-19 healthy adult male Beagles. Procedures-A test solution containing 3.7 MBq of (51)Cr-labeled EDTA, 2 g of lactulose, 2 g of rhamnose, 2 g of d-xylose, 1 g of 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and 8 g of sucrose was administered intragastrically to each dog. Urinary recovery of each probe was determined 6 hours after administration. Results-Mean ± SD (range) percentage urinary recovery was 6.3 ± 1.6% (4.3% to 9.7%) for (51)Cr-labeled EDTA, 3.3 ± 1.1% (1.7% to 5.3%) for lactulose, 25.5 ± 5.0% (16.7% to 36.9%) for rhamnose, and 58.8% ± 11.0% (40.1% to 87.8%) for 3-O-methyl-d-glucose. Mean (range) recovery ratio was 0.25 ± 0.06 (0.17 to 0.37) for (51)Cr-labeled EDTA to rhamnose, 0.13 ± 0.04 (0.08 to 0.23) for lactulose to rhamnose, and 0.73 ± 0.09 (0.60 to 0.90) for d-xylose to 3-O-methyl-d-glucose. Median (range) percentage urinary recovery was 40.3% (31.6% to 62.7%) for d-xylose and 0% (0% to 0.8%) for sucrose. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Reference values in healthy adult male Beagles for 6 of the most commonly used GIPFT markers were determined. The correlation between results for (51)Cr-labeled EDTA and lactulose was not as prominent as that reported for humans and cats; thus, investigators should be cautious in the use and interpretation of GIPFTs performed with sugar probes in dogs with suspected intestinal dysbiosis.

  19. Effect of Weight Loss by Gastric Bypass Surgery Versus Hypocaloric Diet on Glucose and Incretin Levels in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Laferrère, Blandine; Teixeira, Julio; McGinty, James; Tran, Hao; Egger, Joseph R.; Colarusso, Antonia; Kovack, Betty; Bawa, Baani; Koshy, Ninan; Lee, Hongchan; Yapp, Kimberly; Olivan, Blanca

    2008-01-01

    Context: Gastric bypass surgery (GBP) results in rapid weight loss, improvement of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and increase in incretins levels. Diet-induced weight loss also improves T2DM and may increase incretin levels. Objective: Our objective was to determine whether the magnitude of the change of the incretin levels and effect is greater after GBP compared with a low caloric diet, after equivalent weight loss. Design and Methods: Obese women with T2DM studied before and 1 month after GBP (n = 9), or after a diet-induced equivalent weight loss (n = 10), were included in the study. Patients from both groups were matched for age, body weight, body mass index, diabetes duration and control, and amount of weight loss. Setting: This outpatient study was conducted at the General Clinical Research Center. Main Outcome Measures: Glucose, insulin, proinsulin, glucagon, gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 levels were measured after 50-g oral glucose. The incretin effect was measured as the difference in insulin levels in response to oral and to an isoglycemic iv glucose load. Results: At baseline, none of the outcome variables (fasting and stimulated values) were different between the GBP and diet groups. Total GLP-1 levels after oral glucose markedly increased six times (peak:17 ± 6 to 112 ± 54 pmol/liter; P < 0.001), and the incretin effect increased five times (9.4 ± 27.5 to 44.8 ± 12.7%; P < 0.001) after GBP, but not after diet. Postprandial glucose levels (P = 0.001) decreased more after GBP. Conclusions: These data suggest that early after GBP, the greater GLP-1 and GIP release and improvement of incretin effect are related not to weight loss but rather to the surgical procedure. This could be responsible for better diabetes outcome after GBP. PMID:18430778

  20. Food-based solutions are a viable alternative to glucose-electrolyte solutions for oral hydration in acute diarrhoea--studies in a rat model of secretory diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Rolston, D D; Mathew, P; Mathan, V I

    1990-01-01

    A survey of acute diarrhoea and its treatment, in 3 groups of villages in south India, revealed that use of the World Health Organization oral rehydration solution (WHO-ORS) was poor or virtually non-existent and that several liquid foods were given to children during acute diarrhoea. The effects of the most commonly used, boiled and cooled supernatants of these liquid foods [rice (Oryza sativa)-water, ragi (Eleusine coracana)-water, arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea)-water], and tender coconut-water, and of the bicarbonate- and citrate-WHO-ORS on intestinal water transport were evaluated using a rat model of secretory diarrhoea. All solutions either decreased cholera toxin-induced net water secretion (arrowroot-water) or reversed it to net absorption. Ragi-water produced maximum net water absorption, significantly greater than the WHO oral rehydration solutions. WHO-ORS utilization is poor in some developing countries, and locally used food-based solutions could be used for maintaining hydration or correcting the dehydration due to acute diarrhoea once their effectiveness has been proved by clinical trials.

  1. Cytoprotective effect of hydroxytyrosyl alkyl ether derivatives after oral administration to rats in a model of glucose-oxygen deprivation in brain slices.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Marín, Javier; De La Cruz, José Pedro; Guerrero, Ana; López-Leiva, Inmaculada; López-Villodres, Juan Antonio; Reyes, José Julio; Espartero, José Luis; Madrona, Andrés; Labajos, María Teresa; González-Correa, José Antonio

    2012-08-08

    This study was designed to determine whether the oral administration of hydroxytyrosol (HT) alkyl ether derivatives has a neuroprotective effect in rats. The animals were treated for 7 days with HT or ethyl, butyl, hexyl, octyl, and dodecyl HT ether. A method of in vitro hypoxia-reoxygenation in brain slices was used. Hexyl, octyl, and dodecyl HT derivatives reduced brain cell death (LDH efflux). Lipid peroxidation and nitrite concentrations were inhibited most by hexyl, octyl, and dodecyl derivatives. Concentrations of 3-nitrotyrosine were reduced by HT butyl, hexyl, octyl, and dodecyl ether derivatives. Interleukin-1β was significantly reduced in brain slices from rats treated with all HT ether derivatives. LDH efflux showed a linear correlation with brain concentrations of lipid peroxides, nitrites plus nitrates, and interleukin 1β. The reduction in oxidative and nitrosative stress and decreased production of pro-inflammatory interleukins may be the basis for the observed neuroprotective effects.

  2. Dexamethasone increases glucose cycling, but not glucose production, in healthy subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wajngot, A.; Khan, A.; Giacca, A.; Vranic, M.; Efendic, S. )

    1990-11-01

    We established that measurement of glucose fluxes through glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase; hepatic total glucose output, HTGO), glucose cycling (GC), and glucose production (HGP), reveals early diabetogenic changes in liver metabolism. To elucidate the mechanism of the diabetogenic effect of glucocorticoids, we treated eight healthy subjects with oral dexamethasone (DEX; 15 mg over 48 h) and measured HTGO with (2-3H)glucose and HGP with (6-3H)glucose postabsorptively and during a 2-h glucose infusion (11.1 mumol.kg-1.min-1). (2-3H)- minus (6-3H)glucose equals GC. DEX significantly increased plasma glucose, insulin, C peptide, and HTGO, while HGP was unchanged. In controls and DEX, glucose infusion suppressed HTGO (82 vs. 78%) and HGP (87 vs. 91%). DEX increased GC postabsorptively (three-fold) P less than 0.005 and during glucose infusion (P less than 0.05) but decreased metabolic clearance and glucose uptake (Rd), which eventually normalized, however. Because DEX increased HTGO (G-6-Pase) and not HGP (glycogenolysis + gluconeogenesis), we assume that DEX increases HTGO and GC in humans by activating G-6-Pase directly, rather than by expanding the glucose 6-phosphate pool. Hyperglycemia caused by peripheral effects of DEX can also contribute to an increase in GC by activating glucokinase. Therefore, measurement of glucose fluxes through G-6-Pase and GC revealed significant early effects of DEX on hepatic glucose metabolism, which are not yet reflected in HGP.

  3. Enhanced anti-diabetic activity of a combination of chromium(III) malate complex and propolis and its acute oral toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang-Yang; Li, Fang; Zhao, Ting; Mao, Guang-Hua; Li, Jing; Qu, Hong-Yuan; Ren, Yue-Na; Yang, Liu-Qing

    2012-07-01

    In order to obtain the additional benefit of anti-diabetic activity and protective effects of liver injury for diabetes, the anti-diabetic effect and acute oral toxicity of a combination of chromium(III) malate complex (Cr(2)(LMA)(3)) and propolis were assessed. The anti-diabetic activity of the combination of the Cr(2)LMA(3) and propolis was compared with Cr(2)(LMA)(3) and propolis alone in alloxan-induced diabetic mice by daily oral gavage for a period of 2 weeks. Acute oral toxicity of the combination of the Cr(2)LMA(3) and propolis was tested using ICR mice at the dose of 1.0-5.0 g/kg body mass by a single oral gavage and observed for a period of 2 weeks. The results of the anti-diabetic activity of the combination from the aspects of blood glucose level, liver glycogen level, and the activities of aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase indicated that the increased anti-diabetic activity and the protective efficacy of liver injury for diabetes were observed. In acute toxicity study, LD(50) (median lethal dose) value for the combination was greater than 5.0 g/kg body mass. The combination of Cr(2)LMA(3) and propolis might represent the nutritional supplement with potential therapeutic value to control blood glucose and exhibit protective efficacy of liver injury for diabetes and non-toxicity in acute toxicity.

  4. Breath hydrogen concentrations after oral lactose and lactulose in tropical malabsorption and adult hypolactasia.

    PubMed

    Cook, G C

    1978-01-01

    Thirty-six hospital in-patients in London had breath-hydrogen concentrations measured after 50 g lactose were given orally; in 23 or them serial blood glucose concentrations were also estimated. Eight had tropical malabsorption (TM), 14 were Europeans with no detectable disease (normal group) and 14 who also had no detectable disease, were from ethnic groups known to have a very high incidence of genetically determined adult hypolactasia (hl). In 21 of them breath-hydrogen concentrations were also measured after 33.5 g of lactulose were given orally. There was a good inverse correlation between breath-hydrogen production and blood-glucose rise after lactose. Correlations between the first appearance of hydrogen (T) and the area under the hydrogen curve between 0 and 120 min (A) were inversely significant both for lactose and lactulose. Mean T was earlier and mean A greater for lactose compared with lactulose. Correlation between individual values for A after lactase and after lactulose was significant. Indirect measurements of lactase are of no value in either detecting or assessing the severity of TM; that is largely due to the very high incidence of HL in individuals exposed to that disease.

  5. Lifestyle, glucose regulation and the cognitive effects of glucose load in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Riby, Leigh M; McLaughlin, Jennifer; Riby, Deborah M; Graham, Cheryl

    2008-11-01

    Interventions aimed at improving glucose regulatory mechanisms have been suggested as a possible source of cognitive enhancement in the elderly. In particular, previous research has identified episodic memory as a target for facilitation after either moderate increases in glycaemia (after a glucose drink) or after improvements in glucose regulation. The present study aimed to extend this research by examining the joint effects of glucose ingestion and glucose regulation on cognition. In addition, risk factors associated with the development of poor glucose regulation in middle-aged adults were considered. In a repeated measures design, thirty-three middle-aged adults (aged 35-55 years) performed a battery of memory and non-memory tasks after either 25 g or 50 g glucose or a sweetness matched placebo drink. To assess the impact of individual differences in glucose regulation, blood glucose measurements were taken on four occasions during testing. A lifestyle and diet questionnaire was also administered. Consistent with previous research, episodic memory ability benefited from glucose ingestion when task demands were high. Blood glucose concentration was also found to predict performance across a number of cognitive domains. Interestingly, the risk factors associated with poor glucose regulation were linked to dietary impacts traditionally associated with poor health, e.g. the consumption of high-sugar sweets and drinks. The research replicates earlier work suggesting that task demands are critical to the glucose facilitation effect. Importantly, the data demonstrate clear associations between elevated glycaemia and relatively poor cognitive performance, which may be partly due to the effect of dietary and lifestyle factors.

  6. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glucose/glycine/electrolyte. 520.550 Section 520...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.550 Glucose/glycine..., potassium citrate 0.12 gram, aminoacetic acid (glycine) 6.36 grams, and glucose 44.0 grams. (b) Sponsor....

  7. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glucose/glycine/electrolyte. 520.550 Section 520...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.550 Glucose/glycine..., potassium citrate 0.12 gram, aminoacetic acid (glycine) 6.36 grams, and glucose 44.0 grams. (b) Sponsor....

  8. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glucose/glycine/electrolyte. 520.550 Section 520...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.550 Glucose/glycine..., potassium citrate 0.12 gram, aminoacetic acid (glycine) 6.36 grams, and glucose 44.0 grams. (b) Sponsor....

  9. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glucose/glycine/electrolyte. 520.550 Section 520...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.550 Glucose/glycine..., potassium citrate 0.12 gram, aminoacetic acid (glycine) 6.36 grams, and glucose 44.0 grams. (b) Sponsor....

  10. Simulation on how to customize glucose adjustment method for non-invasive blood glucose sensing by NIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Xiaolin; Jiang, Jingying; Zou, Da; Liu, Rong; Xu, Kexin

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies have shown the limitations of taking OGTT (Oral Glucose Tolerance Test) as the glucose adjustment protocol for non-invasive blood glucose sensing. Previous studies built a mathematical model of glucose metabolism system-IMM (the Integrated Minimal Model) to probe other available adjustment methods. In this talk, a further study would be focused on more detailed combination options of different glucose input types for glucose adjustment projects in non-invasive blood glucose sensing. And predictive models of blood glucose concentration have been established by means of partial least squares (PLS) method, which could be used to evaluate the quality of different glucose adjustment options. Results of PLS modeling suggested that predictive models under combined glucose input types, compared with OGTT, show a great enhancement in the stability. This would finally improve the precision of non-invasive blood glucose sensing.

  11. Comparing anti-hyperglycemic activity and acute oral toxicity of three different trivalent chromium complexes in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Wu, Xiangyang; Zou, Yanmin; Zhao, Ting; Zhang, Min; Feng, Weiwei; Yang, Liuqing

    2012-05-01

    Three different ligands (rutin, folate and stachyose) of chromium(III) complexes were compared to examine whether they have similar effect on anti-hyperglycemic activity as well as the acute toxicity status. Anti-hyperglycemic activities of chromium rutin complex (CrRC), chromium folate complex (CrFC) and chromium stachyose complex (CrSC) were examined in alloxan-induced diabetic mice with daily oral gavage for a period of 2 weeks at the dose of 0.5-3.0 mg Cr/kg. Acute toxicities of CrRC and CrFC were tested using ICR mice at the dose of 1.0-5.0 g/kg with a single oral gavage and observed for a period of 2 weeks. Biological activities results indicated that only CrRC and CrFC could decrease blood glucose level, reduce the activities of aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, and increase liver glycogen level. In acute toxicity study, LD(50) values for both CrRC and CrFC were above 5.0 g/kg. The minimum lethal dose for CrFC was above 5.0 g/kg, while that for CrRC was 1.0 g/kg. Anti-diabetic activity of those chromium complexes was not similar and their acute toxicities were also different. CrFC represent an optimal chromium supplement among those chromium complexes with potential therapeutic value to control blood glucose in diabetes and non-toxicity in acute toxicity.

  12. Differential associations of oral glucose tolerance test-derived measures of insulin sensitivity and pancreatic β-cell function with coronary artery calcification and microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mulvey, Claire K; McNeill, Ann M; Girman, Cynthia J; Churchill, Timothy W; Terembula, Karen; Ferguson, Jane F; Shah, Rachana; Mehta, Nehal N; Qasim, Atif N; Rickels, Michael R; Reilly, Muredach P

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We evaluated relationships of oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT)-derived measures of insulin sensitivity and pancreatic β-cell function with indices of diabetes complications in a cross-sectional study of patients with type 2 diabetes who are free of overt cardiovascular or renal disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A subset of participants from the Penn Diabetes Heart Study (n = 672; mean age 59 ± 8 years; 67% male; 60% Caucasian) underwent a standard 2-h, 75-g OGTT. Insulin sensitivity was estimated using the Matsuda Insulin Sensitivity Index (ISI), and β-cell function was estimated using the Insulinogenic Index. Multivariable modeling was used to analyze associations between quartiles of each index with coronary artery calcification (CAC) and microalbuminuria. RESULTS The Insulinogenic Index and Matsuda ISI had distinct associations with cardiometabolic risk factors. The top quartile of the Matsuda ISI had a negative association with CAC that remained significant after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors (Tobit ratio -0.78 [95% CI -1.51 to -0.05]; P = 0.035), but the Insulinogenic Index was not associated with CAC. Conversely, the highest quartile of the Insulinogenic Index, but not the Matsuda ISI, was associated with lower odds of microalbuminuria (OR 0.52 [95% CI 0.30-0.91]; P = 0.022); however, this association was attenuated in models that included duration of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Lower β-cell function is associated with microalbuminuria, a microvascular complication, while impaired insulin sensitivity is associated with higher CAC, a predictor of macrovascular complications. Despite these pathophysiological insights, the Matsuda ISI and Insulinogenic Index are unlikely to be translated into clinical use in type 2 diabetes beyond established clinical variables, such as obesity or duration of diabetes.

  13. Clinical features and natural course of acromegaly in patients with discordance in the nadir GH level on the oral glucose test and the IGF-1 value at 3 months after adenomectomy.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yasuyuki; Tominaga, Atsushi; Usui, Satoshi; Arita, Kazunori; Sakoguchi, Tetsuhiko; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2016-04-01

    Discordant GH and IGF-1 levels after adenomectomy are well recognized in acromegalics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and natural course of postoperative acromegaly associated with discordant GH and IGF-1 levels over a postoperative period. A total of 69 acromegalics underwent surgery with at least 1 year of follow-up and received 75-g oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) at 3 months postoperatively. The patients were categorized into four groups according to the postoperative nadir GH levels and IGF-1 levels: controlled group (normal GH and normal IGF-1), high-IGF-1 group (normal GH and high IGF-1), high-GH group (high GH and normal IGF-1), and uncontrolled group (high GH and high IGF-1). The incidence of discordant GH and IGF-1 levels was 27.5%: high-IGF-1 group = 10.1% (n = 7) and high-GH group = 17.4% (n = 12). All patients in the high-IGF-1 group exhibited a decline in the IGF-1 level after surgery, with normalization observed in 71.4% of the patients without additional treatment (median 23 months). These subjects had preoperatively high IGF-1 levels despite not demonstrating higher GH levels than the patients in the controlled group. On the other hand, four patients in the high-GH group exhibited an elevated nadir GH level higher than 1.0 μg/L on repeated OGTTs after 3 months, and one patient experienced a recurrence of acromegaly. Patients in the high-IGF-1 group require no additional treatments, and their IGF-1 levels are likely to normalize within a few years. However, patients in the high-GH group should be carefully followed due to the possibility of recurrence.

  14. Blood glucose prediction using neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Chit Siang; Zhang, Xiqin; Chen, Jianhong; Raveendran, P.; Soh, Phey Hong; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2008-02-01

    We used neural network for blood glucose level determination in this study. The data set used in this study was collected using a non-invasive blood glucose monitoring system with six laser diodes, each laser diode operating at distinct near infrared wavelength between 1500nm and 1800nm. The neural network is specifically used to determine blood glucose level of one individual who participated in an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) session. Partial least squares regression is also used for blood glucose level determination for the purpose of comparison with the neural network model. The neural network model performs better in the prediction of blood glucose level as compared with the partial least squares model.

  15. Mathematical modeling on experimental protocol of glucose adjustment for non-invasive blood glucose sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingying; Min, Xiaolin; Zou, Da; Xu, Kexin

    2012-03-01

    Currently, blood glucose concentration levels from OGTT(Oral Glucose Tolerance Test) results are used to build PLS model in noninvasive blood glucose sensing by Near-Infrared(NIR) Spectroscopy. However, the univocal dynamic change trend of blood glucose concentration based on OGTT results is not various enough to provide comprehensive data to make PLS model robust and accurate. In this talk, with the final purpose of improving the stability and accuracy of the PLS model, we introduced an integrated minimal model(IMM) of glucose metabolism system. First, by adjusting parameters, which represent different metabolism characteristics and individual differences, comparatively ideal mediation programs to different groups of people, even individuals were customized. Second, with different glucose input types(oral method, intravenous injection, or intravenous drip), we got various changes of blood glucose concentration. And by studying the adjustment methods of blood glucose concentration, we would thus customize corresponding experimental protocols of glucose adjustment to different people for noninvasive blood glucose concentration and supply comprehensive data for PLS model.

  16. Glucose uptake saturation explains glucose kinetics profiles measured by different tests.

    PubMed

    Bizzotto, Roberto; Natali, Andrea; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Muscelli, Elza; Krssak, Martin; Brehm, Attila; Roden, Michael; Ferrannini, Ele; Mari, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    It is known that for a given insulin level glucose clearance depends on glucose concentration. However, a quantitative representation of the concomitant effects of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia on glucose clearance, necessary to describe heterogeneous tests such as euglycemic and hyperglycemic clamps and oral tests, is lacking. Data from five studies (123 subjects) using a glucose tracer and including all the above tests in normal and diabetic subjects were collected. A mathematical model was developed in which glucose utilization was represented as a Michaelis-Menten function of glucose with constant Km and insulin-controlled Vmax, consistently with the basic notions of glucose transport. Individual values for the model parameters were estimated using a population approach. Tracer data were accurately fitted in all tests. The estimated Km was 3.88 (2.83-5.32) mmol/l [median (interquartile range)]. Median model-derived glucose clearance at 600 pmol/l insulin was reduced from 246 to 158 ml·min(-1)·m(-2) when glucose was raised from 5 to 10 mmol/l. The model reproduced the characteristic lack of increase in glucose clearance when moderate hyperinsulinemia was accompanied by hyperglycemia. In all tests, insulin sensitivity was inversely correlated with BMI, as expected (R(2) = 0.234, P = 0.0001). In conclusion, glucose clearance in euglycemic and hyperglycemic clamps and oral tests can be described with a unifying model, consistent with the notions of glucose transport and able to reproduce the suppression of glucose clearance due to hyperglycemia observed in previous studies. The model may be important for the design of reliable glucose homeostasis simulators.

  17. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral Cancer Basic description Cancer can affect any part of the oral cavity, including the lips, tongue, mouth, and throat. There are 2 kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most ...

  18. Myo-inositol inhibits intestinal glucose absorption and promotes muscle glucose uptake: a dual approach study.

    PubMed

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2016-12-01

    The present study investigated the effects of myo-inositol on muscle glucose uptake and intestinal glucose absorption ex vivo as well as in normal and type 2 diabetes model of rats. In ex vivo study, both intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake were studied in isolated rat jejunum and psoas muscle respectively in the presence of increasing concentrations (2.5 % to 20 %) of myo-inositol. In the in vivo study, the effect of a single bolus dose (1 g/kg bw) of oral myo-inositol on intestinal glucose absorption, blood glucose, gastric emptying and digesta transit was investigated in normal and type 2 diabetic rats after 1 h of co-administration with 2 g/kg bw glucose, when phenol red was used as a recovery marker. Myo-inositol inhibited intestinal glucose absorption (IC50 = 28.23 ± 6.01 %) and increased muscle glucose uptake, with (GU50 = 2.68 ± 0.75 %) or without (GU50 = 8.61 ± 0.55 %) insulin. Additionally, oral myo-inositol not only inhibited duodenal glucose absorption and reduced blood glucose increase, but also delayed gastric emptying and accelerated digesta transit in both normal and diabetic animals. Results of this study suggest that dietary myo-inositol inhibits intestinal glucose absorption both in ex vivo and in normal or diabetic rats and also promotes muscle glucose uptake in ex vivo condition. Hence, myo-inositol may be further investigated as a possible anti-hyperglycaemic dietary supplement for diabetic foods and food products.

  19. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide directly induces glucose transport in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Snook, Laelie A; Nelson, Emery M; Dyck, David J; Wright, David C; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-08-01

    Several gastrointestinal proteins have been identified to have insulinotropic effects, including glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP); however, the direct effects of incretins on skeletal muscle glucose transport remain largely unknown. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to examine the role of GIP on skeletal muscle glucose transport and insulin signaling in rats. Relative to a glucose challenge, a mixed glucose+lipid oral challenge increased circulating GIP concentrations, skeletal muscle Akt phosphorylation, and improved glucose clearance by ∼35% (P < 0.05). These responses occurred without alterations in serum insulin concentrations. In an incubated soleus muscle preparation, GIP directly stimulated glucose transport and increased GLUT4 accumulation on the plasma membrane in the absence of insulin. Moreover, the ability of GIP to stimulate glucose transport was mitigated by the addition of the PI 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor wortmannin, suggesting that signaling through PI3K is required for these responses. We also provide evidence that the combined stimulatory effects of GIP and insulin on soleus muscle glucose transport are additive. However, the specific GIP receptor antagonist (Pro(3))GIP did not attenuate GIP-stimulated glucose transport, suggesting that GIP is not signaling through its classical receptor. Together, the current data provide evidence that GIP regulates skeletal muscle glucose transport; however, the exact signaling mechanism(s) remain unknown.

  20. Neuroscience of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    La Fleur, S E; Fliers, E; Kalsbeek, A

    2014-01-01

    Plasma glucose concentrations are homeostatically regulated and maintained within strict boundaries. Several mechanisms are in place to increase glucose output when glucose levels in the circulation drop as a result of glucose utilization, or to decrease glucose output and increase tissue glucose uptake to prevent hyperglycemia. Although the term homeostasis mostly refers to stable levels, the blood glucose concentrations fluctuate over the day/night cycle, with the highest concentrations occurring just prior to the activity period in anticipation of increased caloric need. In this chapter we describe how the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, is involved in both the daily rhythm of plasma glucose concentrations and acute glucose challenges.

  1. Diurnal Variation in Response to Intravenous Glucose*

    PubMed Central

    Whichelow, Margaret J.; Sturge, R. A.; Keen, H.; Jarrett, R. J.; Stimmler, L.; Grainger, Susan

    1974-01-01

    Intravenous glucose tolerance tests (25 g) were performed in the morning and afternoon on 13 apparently normal persons. The individual K values (rate of decline of blood sugar) were all higher in the morning tests, and the mean values were significantly higher in the morning. Fasting blood sugar levels were slightly lower in the afternoon. There was no difference between the fasting morning and afternoon plasma insulin levels, but the levels after glucose were lower in the afternoon. Growth hormone levels were low at all times in non-apprehensive subjects and unaffected by glucose. The results suggest that the impaired afternoon intravenous glucose tolerance, like oral glucose tolerance, is associated with impaired insulin release and insulin resistance. PMID:4817160

  2. Difference between 2 h and 3 h 75 g glucose tolerance test in the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM): results from a national survey on prevalence of GDM.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue-Lian; Wei, Yu-Mei; Yang, Hui-Xia; Xu, Xian-Ming; Fan, Ling; He, Jing; Liu, Ning; Zhao, San-Cun; Hu, Ya-Li; Yang, Zi; Zhang, Yun-Ping; Liu, Xing-Hui; Chen, Xu; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Gou, Wen-Li; Xiao, Mei; Wu, Hai-Rong; Zhang, Mei-Hua

    2010-09-01

    The possibility of the 2 h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as an alternative to the 3 h OGTT was investigated based on data from a national survey on pregnancy-associated diabetes. Data were retrieved from 4179 pregnant women who had OGTT performed after an abnormal 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT). All of the 4 glucose levels during their OGTT were collected and analyzed. According to American Diabetes Association (ADA) gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) diagnostic criteria, among the 4179 pregnant women who required OGTT, 3429 (82.1%) were normal and 750 (17.9%) were diagnosed as GDM. If the 3rd h glucose levels were omitted from OGTT, 79 cases of GDM (10.5%) would be overlooked. No trend was shown where women with more risk factors were more likely to be overlooked if the 3rd h test was omitted (χ2 for trend=0.038, P>0.05). No significant differences were found in the rate of cesarean section (CS), preterm births or macrosomia between the 79 cases and those with normal OGTT results and in the gestational weeks when OGTT was performed. It shows that in order to diagnose one woman with GDM, another 52 pregnant women would have an innocent 3rd h glucose test. Omission of the 3rd h glucose test in OGTT might be reasonable due to its convenience, better compliance and a small number of possibly miss-diagnosed cases, and their pregnancy outcomes have no significant difference from those of normal pregnant women.

  3. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  4. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are the Signs & Symptoms? Should You Have an Oral Cancer Exam? U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health About Oral Cancer Oral cancer includes cancers of the mouth and ...

  5. Oral Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Oral Medication The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood ... new — even over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money ...

  6. CSF glucose test

    MedlinePlus

    Glucose test - CSF; Cerebrospinal fluid glucose test ... The glucose level in the CSF should be 50 to 80 mg/100 mL (or greater than 2/3 ... Abnormal results include higher and lower glucose levels. Abnormal ... or fungus) Inflammation of the central nervous system Tumor

  7. Blood Test: Glucose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Blood Test: Glucose KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Glucose A A A What's in this article? What ... de sangre: glucosa What It Is A blood glucose test measures the amount of glucose (the main ...

  8. Exenatide Regulates Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Brain Areas Associated With Glucose Homeostasis and Reward System.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Giuseppe; Iozzo, Patricia; Molina-Carrion, Marjorie; Lancaster, Jack; Ciociaro, Demetrio; Cersosimo, Eugenio; Tripathy, Devjit; Triplitt, Curtis; Fox, Peter; Musi, Nicolas; DeFronzo, Ralph; Gastaldelli, Amalia

    2015-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) have been found in the brain, but whether GLP-1R agonists (GLP-1RAs) influence brain glucose metabolism is currently unknown. The study aim was to evaluate the effects of a single injection of the GLP-1RA exenatide on cerebral and peripheral glucose metabolism in response to a glucose load. In 15 male subjects with HbA1c of 5.7 ± 0.1%, fasting glucose of 114 ± 3 mg/dL, and 2-h glucose of 177 ± 11 mg/dL, exenatide (5 μg) or placebo was injected in double-blind, randomized fashion subcutaneously 30 min before an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The cerebral glucose metabolic rate (CMRglu) was measured by positron emission tomography after an injection of [(18)F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose before the OGTT, and the rate of glucose absorption (RaO) and disposal was assessed using stable isotope tracers. Exenatide reduced RaO0-60 min (4.6 ± 1.4 vs. 13.1 ± 1.7 μmol/min ⋅ kg) and decreased the rise in mean glucose0-60 min (107 ± 6 vs. 138 ± 8 mg/dL) and insulin0-60 min (17.3 ± 3.1 vs. 24.7 ± 3.8 mU/L). Exenatide increased CMRglu in areas of the brain related to glucose homeostasis, appetite, and food reward, despite lower plasma insulin concentrations, but reduced glucose uptake in the hypothalamus. Decreased RaO0-60 min after exenatide was inversely correlated to CMRglu. In conclusion, these results demonstrate, for the first time in man, a major effect of a GLP-1RA on regulation of brain glucose metabolism in the absorptive state.

  9. Lag time changes between capillary blood glucose and in-vivo interstitial glucose levels by HATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikje, Natalja Skrebova

    2011-03-01

    Method of the lag/latency time (LT) measurement, calculation and interpretation can be simultaneously applied to study in vivo glucose diffusion from the capillary to the skin tissue, to calibrate spectroscopically measured glucose levels during real-time glucose monitoring of dynamic processes in the skin tissue and to study glucose optical properties in the living skin tissue. Based on previous reports on determining interstitial glucose levels and their LT's by HATR-FTIR spectroscopy, here the LT was calculated for each glucose absorbance level at about 1030-41, 1080, 1118 and 1153 cm-1 during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with different doses (5g, 20g, 75g). The LT showed dose-dependency and described intra-/inter-subject changes of skin glucose dynamics in healthy and diabetes subjects. The time required for glucose to diffuse from the capillary to the skin tissue was shorter in a diabetes subject, than in a healthy subject, independently on intaken dose of glucose. Nevertheless, in both subjects the LT changes ranged within 0-50 minutes. Measurement of the LT demonstrated a potential to provide insight to healthy and diabetic glucose dynamics between the blood and interstitial fluid compartments in the upper layer of the skin tissue. Also, the LT might be regarded as a method to calibrate dynamic measurements of glucose in vivo by this spectroscopy method and to characterize living skin tissue glucose optical properties.

  10. Acute effects of nicorandil on glucose tolerance in subjects with borderline fasting blood glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Boes, U; Wallner, S; Wascher, T C

    2001-02-15

    The acute effect of the anti-ischemic potassium channel opener nicorandil on glucose tolerance and post-challenge insulin levels was investigated in 11 subjects (6 males and 5 females, age 59 +/- 2 years) with borderline fasting blood glucose in a single blinded randomised study. All participants were submitted to two oral glucose tolerance tests in randomised order, once without any premedication and once 30 minutes after oral administration of 20 mg nicorandil. This single dose of nicorandil significantly increased blood glucose levels at 120 minutes (173 +/- 16 vs. 150 +/- 11 mg/dl, p < 0.05 by ANOVA) and 180 minutes (106 +/- 11 vs. 88 +/- 7 mg/dl, p < 0.05 by ANOVA) after ingestion of 75 mg of glucose. Serum insulin levels were not significantly altered. In conclusion we suggest that controlled studies in patients with coronary artery disease should be performed to investigate whether long term treatment with nicorandil increases progression rates from impaired glucose tolerance to type-II diabetes and/or from normal to impaired glucose tolerance with a possibly negative impact on the course of cardiovascular disease in comparison to conventional anti-anginal drugs.

  11. Evidence that humans can taste glucose polymers.

    PubMed

    Lapis, Trina J; Penner, Michael H; Lim, Juyun

    2014-11-01

    The sense of taste is essential for identifying potential nutrients and poisons. Accordingly, specialized taste receptor cells are activated by food-derived chemicals. Because of its importance in the human diet, oral detection of starch, or its degradation products, would presumably be highly beneficial. Yet, it has long been assumed that simple sugars are the only class of carbohydrates that humans can taste. There is, however, considerable evidence that rodents can taste starch degradation products (i.e., glucose polymers composed of maltooligosaccharides with 3-10 glucose units and maltopolysaccharides with >10 glucose units) and that their detection is independent of the sweet taste receptor, T1R2/T1R3. The present study was designed 1) to measure individual differences in human taste perception of glucose polymers, 2) to understand individual differences in the activity of salivary α-amylase, and 3) to investigate the role that salivary α-amylase may play in the taste perception of glucose polymers. In the first experiment, subjects rated taste intensity of glucose, sucrose, NaCl, and glucose polymers of various chain lengths, while their noses were clamped. Saliva samples from the subjects were also collected and their salivary α-amylase activity was assayed. Results showed that the perceived intensities of glucose, sucrose, and NaCl were significantly correlated (r = 0.75-0.85, P < 0.001), but not with the longer chain glucose polymers, whereas intensity ratings of all glucose polymers were highly correlated with one another (r = 0.69-0.82, P < 0.001). Importantly, despite large individual differences in α-amylase activity among subjects, responsiveness to glucose polymers did not significantly differ between individuals with high and low α-amylase activity. A follow up experiment was conducted to quantify the concentrations of glucose and maltose that were inherently present in the glucose polymer stimuli and to determine whether the amounts were

  12. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology.

  13. Effect of Helicteres isora root extracts on glucose tolerance in glucose-induced hyperglycemic rats.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Sama; Dayanand Reddy, G; Reddy, Y S R; Sathyavathy, D; Madhava Reddy, B

    2004-06-01

    The ethanol, ethyl acetate and butanol extracts of Helicteres isora root showed significant oral hypoglycemic activity on glucose loaded rats at a dose of 250 mg/kg. The butanol extract showed maximum antihyperglycemic activity and effect being comparable to that of glibenclamide.

  14. Effect of glucose concentration on the rate of fructose consumption in native strains isolated from the fermentation of Agave duranguensis.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Campillo, M; Urtíz, N; Soto, O; Barrio, E; Rutiaga, M; Páez, J

    2012-12-01

    Studies on hexose consumption by Saccharomyces cerevisiae show that glucose is consumed faster than fructose when both are present (9:1 fructose to glucose) in the medium during the fermentation of Agave. The objective of this work was to select strains of S. cerevisiae that consume fructose equal to or faster than glucose at high fructose concentrations by analyzing the influence of different glucose concentrations on the fructose consumption rate. The optimal growth conditions were determined by a kinetics assay using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using 50 g of glucose and 50 g of fructose per liter of synthetic medium containing peptone and yeast extract. Using the same substrate concentrations, strain ITD-00185 was shown to have a higher reaction rate for fructose over glucose. At 75 g of fructose and 25 g of glucose per liter, strain ITD-00185 had a productivity of 1.02 gL(-1) h(-1) after 40 h and a fructose rate constant of 0.071 h(-1). It was observed that glucose concentration positively influences fructose consumption when present in a 3:1 ratio of fructose to glucose. Therefore, adapted strains at high fructose concentrations could be used as an alternative to traditional fermentation processes.

  15. Ceylon cinnamon does not affect postprandial plasma glucose or insulin in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wickenberg, Jennie; Lindstedt, Sandra; Berntorp, Kerstin; Nilsson, Jan; Hlebowicz, Joanna

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies on healthy subjects have shown that the intake of 6 g Cinnamomum cassia reduces postprandial glucose and that the intake of 3 g C. cassia reduces insulin response, without affecting postprandial glucose concentrations. Coumarin, which may damage the liver, is present in C. cassia, but not in Cinnamomum zeylanicum. The aim of the present study was to study the effect of C. zeylanicum on postprandial concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, glycaemic index (GI) and insulinaemic index (GII) in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). A total of ten subjects with IGT were assessed in a crossover trial. A standard 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was administered together with placebo or C. zeylanicum capsules. Finger-prick capillary blood samples were taken for glucose measurements and venous blood for insulin measurements, before and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min after the start of the OGTT. The ingestion of 6 g C. zeylanicum had no significant effect on glucose level, insulin response, GI or GII. Ingestion of C. zeylanicum does not affect postprandial plasma glucose or insulin levels in human subjects. The Federal Institute for Risk Assessment in Europe has suggested the replacement of C. cassia by C. zeylanicum or the use of aqueous extracts of C. cassia to lower coumarin exposure. However, the positive effects seen with C. cassia in subjects with poor glycaemic control would then be lost.

  16. Glucose test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... person with diabetes constantly manages their blood's sugar (glucose) levels. After a blood sample is taken and tested, it is determined whether the glucose levels are low or high. Following your health ...

  17. Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Bar for Blood Glucose Meter Performance Recalls & Alerts Shasta Technologies GenStrip Blood Glucose Test Strips May ... Latest Recalls Report an Adverse Event MedWatch Safety Alerts News Releases Consumer Updates About FDA Contact FDA ...

  18. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  19. Oral candidosis.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, G T

    2001-04-01

    Oral candidoses are frequently encountered in the practice of dentistry. Although most oral candidoses are symptomless, the can indicate the presence of an underlying systemic disease, and the persistence of oral candidosis following appropriate conventional management may be one of the first signs of undiagnosed immunosuppression. The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans is the most commonly isolated species from oral candidal lesions; however, the non-albicans Candida spp. are also implicated in the aetiology of oral candidoses. The effective management of oral candidosis is dependent on an accurate diagnosis, identification and elimination of any predisposing factors (where possible), and the prescription of either topical or systemic antifungal agents. Oral candidosis may have significant implications for the general health of immunosuppressed patients, particularly when caused by the non-albicans spp. and, in cases of severe immunosuppression, systemic candidosis can be life-threatening. This article outlines the clinical presentation and appropriate management for the commonly presenting oral candidal conditions.

  20. Canagliflozin Lowers Postprandial Glucose and Insulin by Delaying Intestinal Glucose Absorption in Addition to Increasing Urinary Glucose Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Polidori, David; Sha, Sue; Mudaliar, Sunder; Ciaraldi, Theodore P.; Ghosh, Atalanta; Vaccaro, Nicole; Farrell, Kristin; Rothenberg, Paul; Henry, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Canagliflozin, a sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitor, is also a low-potency SGLT1 inhibitor. This study tested the hypothesis that intestinal canagliflozin levels postdose are sufficiently high to transiently inhibit intestinal SGLT1, thereby delaying intestinal glucose absorption. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This two-period, crossover study evaluated effects of canagliflozin on intestinal glucose absorption in 20 healthy subjects using a dual-tracer method. Placebo or canagliflozin 300 mg was given 20 min before a 600-kcal mixed-meal tolerance test. Plasma glucose, 3H-glucose, 14C-glucose, and insulin were measured frequently for 6 h to calculate rates of appearance of oral glucose (RaO) in plasma, endogenous glucose production, and glucose disposal. RESULTS Compared with placebo, canagliflozin treatment reduced postprandial plasma glucose and insulin excursions (incremental 0- to 2-h area under the curve [AUC0–2h] reductions of 35% and 43%, respectively; P < 0.001 for both), increased 0- to 6-h urinary glucose excretion (UGE0–6h, 18.2 ± 5.6 vs. <0.2 g; P < 0.001), and delayed RaO. Canagliflozin reduced AUC RaO by 31% over 0 to 1 h (geometric means, 264 vs. 381 mg/kg; P < 0.001) and by 20% over 0 to 2 h (576 vs. 723 mg/kg; P = 0.002). Over 2 to 6 h, canagliflozin increased RaO such that total AUC RaO over 0 to 6 h was <6% lower versus placebo (960 vs. 1,018 mg/kg; P = 0.003). A modest (∼10%) reduction in acetaminophen absorption was observed over the first 2 h, but this difference was not sufficient to explain the reduction in RaO. Total glucose disposal over 0 to 6 h was similar across groups. CONCLUSIONS Canagliflozin reduces postprandial plasma glucose and insulin by increasing UGE (via renal SGLT2 inhibition) and delaying RaO, likely due to intestinal SGLT1 inhibition. PMID:23412078

  1. All about Blood Glucose

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 15 All About Blood Glucose Keeping your blood glucose (sugar)in your target range can prevent or delay the health problems ... Diabetes Association, Inc. 1/15 Toolkit No.15: All About Blood Glucose continued team about when and ...

  2. Ambulatory glucose profile: Flash glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2015-12-01

    Ambulatory glucose profile (AGP) is a novel way of assessing glycaemic levels on a 24 hour basis, through a minimally invasive method, known as flash glucose monitoring. This review describes the unique features of AGP, differentiates it from existing methods of glucose monitoring, and explains how it helps pursue the glycaemic pentad. The review suggests pragmatic usage of this technology, including pre-test, intra-test, and post-test counselling, and lists specific clinical scenarios where the investigation seems to be of immense benefit.

  3. Enhanced glucose tolerance by intravascularly administered piceatannol in freely moving healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Oritani, Yukihiro; Okitsu, Teru; Nishimura, Eisaku; Sai, Masahiko; Ito, Tatsuhiko; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-02-12

    Piceatannol is a phytochemical in the seeds of passion fruit that has a hypoglycemic effect when orally administered. To elucidate the contribution of intact and metabolites of piceatannol after gastro-intestinal absorption to hypoglycemic effect, we examined the influence of piceatannol and isorhapontigenin on blood glucose concentrations during fasting and glucose tolerance tests by administering them intravascularly to freely moving healthy rats. We found that intravascularly administered piceatannol reduced the blood glucose concentrations during both fasting and glucose tolerance tests, but isorhapontigenin did not during either of them. Furthermore, we found that piceatannol increased the insulinogenic index during glucose tolerance tests and that piceatannol had no influence on insulin sensitivity by performing hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamping tests. These results suggest that piceatannol orally intaken may enhance glucose tolerance by the effect of intact piceatannol through enhanced early-phase secretion of insulin. Therefore, oral intake of piceatannol might contribute to proper control of postprandial glycemic excursions in healthy subjects.

  4. Cereal based oral rehydration solutions.

    PubMed

    Kenya, P R; Odongo, H W; Oundo, G; Waswa, K; Muttunga, J; Molla, A M; Nath, S K; Molla, A; Greenough, W B; Juma, R

    1989-07-01

    A total of 257 boys (age range 4-55 months), who had acute diarrhoea with moderate to severe dehydration, were randomly assigned to treatment with either the World Health Organisation/United Nations Childrens Fund (WHO/Unicef) recommended oral rehydration solution or cereal based oral rehydration solution made either of maize, millet, sorghum, or rice. After the initial rehydration was achieved patients were offered traditional weaning foods. Treatment with oral rehydration solution continued until diarrhoea stopped. Accurate intake and output was maintained throughout the study period. Efficacy of the treatment was compared between the different treatment groups in terms of intake of the solution, stool output, duration of diarrhoea after admission, and weight gain after 24, 48, and 72 hours, and after resolution of diarrhoea. Results suggest that all the cereal based solutions were as effective as glucose based standard oral rehydration solution in the treatment of diarrhoea.

  5. Oral contraceptives: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Derman, R

    1989-09-01

    Cardiovascular risks attributable to oral contraceptive use may now be subdivided into those that appear to be secondary to the estrogen component, i.e., venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and those linked to the progestin component, i.e., small vessel disease including myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident. It appears that venous risk is attributable to subtle changes in clotting factors, while arterial risk may be secondary to changes in glucose and lipid metabolism. In order to determine which women are at greatest risk from oral contraceptive use, Spellacy et al. has developed a risk scoring form that aids in the screening process. After excluding women with an absolute contraindication to pill use, women at greatest risk for cardiovascular disease related to oral contraceptive use are those with a family history of hyperlipidemia, gestational or overt diabetics, hypertensives, and smokers over the age of 35. The gradual reduction by manufacturers of the steroid content of oral contraceptives appears to have lessened the incidence of adverse effects. Our current knowledge of risk factors permits the clinician to reduce exposure to oral contraceptive-related mortality by as much as 86 per cent. As we continue to search for ways to reduce risk among oral contraceptive users, it is important to note that more than 25 per cent of women are still taking formulations containing 50 micrograms of estrogen. It becomes the responsibility of the practicing physician to "step-down" these patients to lower-dose preparations such as the multiphasics. Such preparations also represent optimal therapy for first-time pill users.

  6. Glucose tolerance and insulin response to glucose load in body builders.

    PubMed

    Szczypaczewska, M; Nazar, K; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H

    1989-02-01

    To find out to what extent body composition affects glucose tolerance, blood glucose (BG) and insulin (IRI) responses to a 100-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were compared in 10 male body builders, 11 untrained lean control subjects, and 11 mildly obese men, all of similar age (19-35 years). In comparison with the remaining two groups, the body builders had the lowest percentage of fat, although their lean body mass (LBM) in absolute terms did not differ from that in obese subjects. Both BG and IRI concentrations during the OGTT were the lowest in body builders, medium in controls, and the highest in obese men. The differences in glucose tolerance between the groups were also demonstrated by comparison of the subjects' BG levels during the OGTT with the respective mean BG values obtained in a reference group of 42 healthy nonobese men aged from 20 to 55 years. The data indicate that body builders show better glucose tolerance and improved insulin action in comparison with untrained, nonobese subjects of similar age and body weight. Lean body mass in absolute terms cannot, however, be considered as a sole determinant of the insulin action in the body since in mildly obese subjects glucose tolerance was considerably reduced in spite of the fact that their LBM was similar to that in body builders. Either muscle hypertrophy or reduced adiposity may account for the beneficial effects of body building on glucose metabolism.

  7. Interaction of Peptide Transporter 1 With D-Glucose and L-Glutamic Acid; Possible Involvement of Taste Receptors.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ohmachi, Taichi; Ichiba, Kiko; Kamioka, Hiroki; Tomono, Takumi; Kanagawa, Masahiko; Idota, Yoko; Hatano, Yasuko; Yano, Kentaro; Morimoto, Kaori; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of sweet and umami (savory) tastants on the intestinal absorption of cephalexin (CEX), a substrate of peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1, SLC15A1) in rats. After oral administration of glucose or mannitol to rats, CEX was administered together with a second dose of glucose or mannitol. Western blot analysis indicated that expression of PEPT1 in rat jejunum membrane was decreased by glucose, compared to mannitol. Furthermore, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of orally administered CEX was reduced by glucose compared to mannitol. The effect of glucose was diminished by nifedipine, a L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker. We also found that Cmax of orally administered CEX was reduced by treatment with L-glutamic acid, compared to D-glutamic acid. Thus, excessive intake of glucose and L-glutamic acid may impair oral absorption of PEPT1 substrates.

  8. GLUT2, glucose sensing and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thorens, Bernard

    2015-02-01

    The glucose transporter isoform GLUT2 is expressed in liver, intestine, kidney and pancreatic islet beta cells, as well as in the central nervous system, in neurons, astrocytes and tanycytes. Physiological studies of genetically modified mice have revealed a role for GLUT2 in several regulatory mechanisms. In pancreatic beta cells, GLUT2 is required for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In hepatocytes, suppression of GLUT2 expression revealed the existence of an unsuspected glucose output pathway that may depend on a membrane traffic-dependent mechanism. GLUT2 expression is nevertheless required for the physiological control of glucose-sensitive genes, and its inactivation in the liver leads to impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, revealing a liver-beta cell axis, which is likely to be dependent on bile acids controlling beta cell secretion capacity. In the nervous system, GLUT2-dependent glucose sensing controls feeding, thermoregulation and pancreatic islet cell mass and function, as well as sympathetic and parasympathetic activities. Electrophysiological and optogenetic techniques established that Glut2 (also known as Slc2a2)-expressing neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius can be activated by hypoglycaemia to stimulate glucagon secretion. In humans, inactivating mutations in GLUT2 cause Fanconi-Bickel syndrome, which is characterised by hepatomegaly and kidney disease; defects in insulin secretion are rare in adult patients, but GLUT2 mutations cause transient neonatal diabetes. Genome-wide association studies have reported that GLUT2 variants increase the risks of fasting hyperglycaemia, transition to type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia and cardiovascular diseases. Individuals with a missense mutation in GLUT2 show preference for sugar-containing foods. We will discuss how studies in mice help interpret the role of GLUT2 in human physiology.

  9. The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose has served as a very specific, sensitive, and repeatable assay for detection of glucose in biological samples. It has been used successfully for analysis of glucose in samples from blood and urine, to analysis of glucose released from starch or glycog...

  10. Noninvasive blood glucose monitoring with laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Chen, Jianhong; Ooi, Ean Tat; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2006-02-01

    The non-invasive measurement of blood sugar level was studied by use of near infrared laser diodes. The in vitro and in vivo experiments were carried out using six laser diodes having wavelengths range from 1550 nm to 1750nm. Several volunteers were tested for OGTT (Oral Glucose Tolerance Test) experiment. We took blood from a fingertip and measured its concentration with a glucose meter while taking signal voltage from laser diodes system. The data of signal voltage were processed to do calibration and prediction; in this paper PLS (Partial Least Square) method was used to do modeling. For in vitro experiment, good linear relationship between predicted glucose concentration and real glucose concentration was obtained. For in vivo experiments, we got the blood sugar level distributions in Clarke error grid that is a reference for doctors to do diagnosis and treatment. In the Clarke error grid, 75% of all data was in area A and 25 % was in area B. From the in vitro and in vivo results we know that multiple laser diodes are suitable for non-invasive blood glucose monitoring.

  11. Effect of D-glucose feeding on mortality induced by sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Su; Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Ryeong; Sharma, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the life-threatening response to infection which can lead to tissue damage, organ failure, and death. In the current study, the effect of orally administered D-glucose on the mortality and the blood glucose level induced by D-Galactosamine (GaLN)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis was examined in ICR mice. After various amounts of D-glucose (from 1 to 8 g/kg) were orally fed, sepsis was induced by injecting intraperitoneally (i.p.) the mixture of GaLN /LPS. Oral pre-treatment with D-glucose dose-dependently increased the blood glucose level and caused a reduction of sepsis-induced mortality. The oral post-treatment with D-glucose (8 g/kg) up to 3 h caused an elevation of the blood glucose level and protected the mortality observed in sepsis model. However, D-glucose post-treated at 6, 9, or 12 h after sepsis induction did not affect the mortality and the blood glucose level induced by sepsis. Furthermore, the intrathecal (i.t.) pretreatment once with pertussis toxin (PTX; 0.1 µg/5 ml) for 6 days caused a reduction of D-glucose-induced protection of mortality and hyperglycemia. Furthermore, once the hypoglycemic state is continued up to 6 h after sepsis initiated, sepsis-induced mortality could not be reversed by D-glucose fed orally. Based on these findings, it is assumed that the hypoglycemic duration between 3 and 6 h after the sepsis induction may be a critical time of period for the survival. D-glucose-induced protective effect against sepsis-induced mortality appears to be mediated via activating PTX-sensitive G-proteins in the spinal cord. Finally, the production of hyperglycemic state may be critical for the survival against the sepsis-induced mortality. PMID:26807027

  12. Glucose: detection and analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucose is an aldosic monosaccharide that is centrally entrenched in the processes of photosynthesis and respiration, serving as an energy reserve and metabolic fuel in most organisms. As both a monomer and as part of more complex structures such as polysaccharides and glucosides, glucose also pla...

  13. Modification by glucose of the flocculent phenotype of a Kloeckera apiculata wine strain.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Oscar A; de Nadra, María C Manca; Farías, Marta E

    2008-08-01

    We have evaluated the induction of the flocculent phenotype of Kloeckera apiculata by glucose mc1 and propose a pathway involved in carbohydrate flocculation induction. Pulses of glucose were given to cells growing in glucose-poor medium (2 g l(-1)) and the flocculation percentage was measured. To elucidate the mechanism involved in flocculation induction, cycloheximide was injected into the cultures 120 min before the glucose pulse. 2,4-Dinitrophenol or cAMP was added to the media instead, or simultaneously with glucose, while a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor was added 30 min before the glucose pulse. With 20 and 50 g l(-1) glucose pulse, the yeast flocculation percentage arises to 55 and 65%, respectively. The quantity of proteins and the reflocculating capacity of a lectinic protein extract from the yeast cell wall increase as the concentration of glucose pulse was higher. Cycloheximide prevented the glucose-induced flocculation, while cAMP or 2,4-dinitrophenol increased it 4- and 5-fold, respectively. PKA inhibitor completely prevented the glucose induction flocculation. The flocculent phenotype of K. apiculata mc1 was induced by glucose and the mechanism seems to imply de novo protein (lectin) synthesis via the PKA transduction pathway. This work contributes to the elucidation of the mechanism involved in flocculation induction by glucose of a non-Saccharomyces wine yeast, K. apiculata, which has not been reported. The induction of flocculation by glucose could be a biotechnological tool for the early removal of the indigenous microorganisms from the grape must before the inoculation of a selected starter strain to conduct the alcohol fermentation.

  14. Oral Histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Folk, Gillian A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2017-02-20

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the disseminated form of histoplasmosis and may present as a fungating or ulcerative lesion of the oral mucosa. The histologic findings and differential diagnosis for oral histoplasmosis are discussed.

  15. Effects of xylitol on carbohydrate digesting enzymes activity, intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake: a multi-mode study.

    PubMed

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated the possible mechanism(s) behind the effects of xylitol on carbohydrate digesting enzymes activity, muscle glucose uptake and intestinal glucose absorption using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experimental models. The effects of increasing concentrations of xylitol (2.5%-40% or 164.31 mM-2628.99 mM) on alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase activity in vitro and intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake were investigated under ex vivo conditions. Additionally, the effects of an oral bolus dose of xylitol (1 g per kg BW) on gastric emptying and intestinal glucose absorption and digesta transit in the different segments of the intestinal tract were investigated in normal and type 2 diabetic rats at 1 hour after dose administration, when phenol red was used as a recovery marker. Xylitol exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of alpha amylase (IC₅₀ = 1364.04 mM) and alpha glucosidase (IC₅₀ = 1127.52 mM) activity in vitro and small intestinal glucose absorption under ex vivo condition. Xylitol also increased dose dependent muscle glucose uptake with and without insulin, although the uptake was not significantly affected by the addition of insulin. Oral single bolus dose of xylitol significantly delayed gastric emptying, inhibited intestinal glucose absorption but increased the intestinal digesta transit rate in both normal and diabetic rats compared to their respective controls. The data of this study suggest that xylitol reduces intestinal glucose absorption via inhibiting major carbohydrate digesting enzymes, slowing gastric emptying and fastening the intestinal transit rate, but increases muscle glucose uptake in normal and type 2 diabetic rats.

  16. Influence of the presence of Zymomonas anaerobia on the conversion of cellobiose, glucose, and xylose to ethanol by Clostridium saccharolyticum

    SciTech Connect

    Asther, M.; Khan, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    To convert sugar mixtures containing cellobiose, glucose, and xylose to ethanol in a single step, the possibility of using a coculture consisting of Clostridium saccharolyticum and Zymomonas anaerobia was studied. In monoculture, C. saccharolyticum utilized all three sugars; however, it preferentially utilized glucose and produced acetic acid in addition to ethanol. The formation of acetic acid from the metabolism of glucose inhibited the growth of C. saccharolyticum and, consequently, the utilization of cellobiose and xylose. In monoculture, Z. anaerobia utilized glucose at a rate of 50 g/L day, but it did not ferment cellobiose or xylose. In coculture, Z. anaerobia converted most of the glucose to ethanol during the lag phase of growth of C. saccharolyticum, which then converted cellobiose and xylose to ethanol. The use of this coculture increased both the rate and the efficiency of the conversion of these three sugars to ethanol, and produced relatively small amounts of acetic acid.

  17. Oral pathology.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  18. Improvements in glucose tolerance with Bikram Yoga in older obese adults: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Stacy D; Dhindsa, Mandeep; Cunningham, Emily; Tarumi, Takashi; Alkatan, Mohammed; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2013-10-01

    Bikram yoga is an exotic form of physical activity combining hatha yoga and thermal therapy that could positively impact metabolic health. Although this increasingly popular alternative exercise may be ideal for obese adults due to its low impact nature, few studies have elucidated the health benefits associated with it. As an initial step, we determined the effect of Bikram yoga on glucose tolerance. Fourteen young lean and 15 older obese subjects completed an 8-week Bikram yoga intervention in which classes were completed 3 times per week. Glucose tolerance was assessed using a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. The area under the glucose curve following the oral glucose tolerance test was significantly reduced as a result of the Bikram Yoga intervention in older obese (P < 0.05) but not in young lean subjects. We concluded that a short-term Bikram yoga intervention improved glucose tolerance in older obese, but not in young lean adults.

  19. Semimechanistic model describing gastric emptying and glucose absorption in healthy subjects and patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Alskär, Oskar; Bagger, Jonatan I; Røge, Rikke M; Knop, Filip K; Karlsson, Mats O; Vilsbøll, Tina; Kjellsson, Maria C

    2016-03-01

    The integrated glucose-insulin (IGI) model is a previously published semimechanistic model that describes plasma glucose and insulin concentrations after glucose challenges. The aim of this work was to use knowledge of physiology to improve the IGI model's description of glucose absorption and gastric emptying after tests with varying glucose doses. The developed model's performance was compared to empirical models. To develop our model, data from oral and intravenous glucose challenges in patients with type 2 diabetes and healthy control subjects were used together with present knowledge of small intestinal transit time, glucose inhibition of gastric emptying, and saturable absorption of glucose over the epithelium to improve the description of gastric emptying and glucose absorption in the IGI model. Duodenal glucose was found to inhibit gastric emptying. The performance of the saturable glucose absorption was superior to linear absorption regardless of the gastric emptying model applied. The semiphysiological model developed performed better than previously published empirical models and allows better understanding of the mechanisms underlying glucose absorption. In conclusion, our new model provides a better description and improves the understanding of dynamic glucose tests involving oral glucose.

  20. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  1. Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... la salud en español Health Statistics Healthy Moments Radio Broadcast Clinical Trials For Health Care Professionals Community ... A transmitter sends information about glucose levels via radio waves from the sensor to a pagerlike wireless ...

  2. Vascular Glucose Sensor Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jeffrey I; Torjman, Marc C.; Strasma, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability have been associated with increased morbidity, mortality, length of stay, and cost in a variety of critical care and non–critical care patient populations in the hospital. The results from prospective randomized clinical trials designed to determine the risks and benefits of intensive insulin therapy and tight glycemic control have been confusing; and at times conflicting. The limitations of point-of-care blood glucose (BG) monitoring in the hospital highlight the great clinical need for an automated real-time continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) that can accurately measure the concentration of glucose every few minutes. Automation and standardization of the glucose measurement process have the potential to significantly improve BG control, clinical outcome, safety and cost. PMID:26078254

  3. Glucose: Detection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Galant, A L; Kaufman, R C; Wilson, J D

    2015-12-01

    Glucose is an aldosic monosaccharide that is centrally entrenched in the processes of photosynthesis and respiration, serving as an energy reserve and metabolic fuel in most organisms. As both a monomer and as part of more complex structures such as polysaccharides and glucosides, glucose also plays a major role in modern food products, particularly where flavor and or structure are concerned. Over the years, many diverse methods for detecting and quantifying glucose have been developed; this review presents an overview of the most widely employed and historically significant, including copper iodometry, HPLC, GC, CZE, and enzyme based systems such as glucose meters. The relative strengths and limitations of each method are evaluated, and examples of their recent application in the realm of food chemistry are discussed.

  4. Glucose urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Urine sugar test; Urine glucose test; Glucosuria test; Glycosuria test ... After you provide a urine sample, it is tested right away. The health care provider uses a dipstick made with a color-sensitive pad. The ...

  5. Glucose metabolism and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, Dario; Ceriello, Antonio; Esposito, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Islet dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance are both present in type 2 diabetes and are both necessary for the development of hyperglycemia. In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, large, prospective clinical studies have shown a strong relation between time-averaged mean values of glycemia, measured as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and vascular diabetic complications. These studies are the basis for the American Diabetes Association's current recommended treatment goal that HbA1c should be <7%. The measurement of the HbA1c concentration is considered the gold standard for assessing long-term glycemia; however, it does not reveal any information on the extent or frequency of blood glucose excursions, but provides an overall mean value only. Postprandial hyperglycemia occurs frequently in patients with diabetes receiving active treatment and can occur even when metabolic control is apparently good. Interventional studies indicate that reducing postmeal glucose excursions is as important as controlling fasting plasma glucose in persons with diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance. Evidence exists for a causal relation between postmeal glucose increases and microvascular and macrovascular outcomes; therefore, it is not surprising that treatment with different compounds that have specific effects on postprandial glucose regulation is accompanied by a significant improvement of many pathways supposed to be involved in diabetic complications, including oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and nuclear factor-kappaB activation. The goal of therapy should be to achieve glycemic status as near to normal as safely possible in all 3 components of glycemic control: HbA1c, fasting glucose, and postmeal glucose peak.

  6. An acoustic glucose sensor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruifen; Stevenson, Adrian C; Lowe, Christopher R

    2012-05-15

    In vivo glucose monitoring is required for tighter glycaemic control. This report describes a new approach to construct a miniature implantable device based on a magnetic acoustic resonance sensor (MARS). A ≈ 600-800 nm thick glucose-responsive poly(acrylamide-co-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid) (poly(acrylamide-co-3-APB)) film was polymerised on the quartz disc (12 mm in diameter and 0.25 mm thick) of the MARS. The swelling/shrinking of the polymer film induced by the glucose binding to the phenylboronate caused changes in the resonance amplitude of the quartz disc in the MARS. A linear relationship between the response of the MARS and the glucose concentration in the range ≈ 0-15 mM was observed, with the optimum response of the MARS sensor being obtained when the polymer films contained ≈ 20 mol% 3-APB. The MARS glucose sensor also functioned under flow conditions (9 μl/min) with a response almost identical to the sensor under static or non-flow conditions. The results suggest that the MARS could offer a promising strategy for developing a small subcutaneously implanted continuous glucose monitor.

  7. Carob pulp preparation rich in insoluble dietary fibre and polyphenols increases plasma glucose and serum insulin responses in combination with a glucose load in humans.

    PubMed

    Gruendel, Sindy; Otto, Baerbel; Garcia, Ada L; Wagner, Karen; Mueller, Corinna; Weickert, Martin O; Heldwein, Walter; Koebnick, Corinna

    2007-07-01

    Dietary fibre consumption is associated with improved glucose homeostasis. In contrast, dietary polyphenols have been suggested to exert both beneficial and detrimental effects on glucose and insulin metabolism. Recently, we reported that a polyphenol-rich insoluble dietary fibre preparation from carob pulp (carob fibre) resulted in lower postprandial acylated ghrelin levels after a liquid meal challenge test compared with a control meal without supplementation. The effects may, however, differ when a different food matrix is used. Thus, we investigated the effects of carob fibre on glucose, insulin and ghrelin responses in healthy humans in combination with a glucose load. In a randomized single-blind cross-over study involving twenty healthy subjects (aged 22-62 years), plasma glucose, total and acylated ghrelin, and serum insulin were repeatedly assessed before and after the ingestion of 200 ml water with 50 g glucose and 0, 5, 10 or 20 g carob fibre over a period of 180 min. The intake of 5 and 10 g carob fibre increased the plasma glucose by 47 % and 64 % (P < 0.001), and serum insulin by 19.9 and 24.8 % (P < 0.001), compared with the control. Plasma acylated ghrelin concentrations did not change significantly after the consumption of carob-enriched glucose solution. Total ghrelin decreased only after 10 g carob fibre (P < 0.001) compared with control. In conclusion, we showed that polyphenol-rich carob fibre, administered within a water-glucose solution, increases postprandial glucose and insulin responses, suggesting a deterioration in glycaemic control.

  8. Impaired glucose tolerance in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pradat, Pierre-Francois; Bruneteau, Gaelle; Gordon, Paul H; Dupuis, Luc; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Simon, Dominique; Salachas, Francois; Corcia, Philippe; Frochot, Vincent; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Jardel, Claude; Coussieu, Christiane; Le Forestier, Nadine; Lacomblez, Lucette; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Meininger, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Our objectives were to analyse carbohydrate metabolism in a series of ALS patients and to examine potential association with parameters of lipid metabolism and clinical features. Glucose tolerance was assessed by the oral glucose tolerance test in 21 non-diabetic ALS patients and compared with 21 age- and sex-matched normal subjects. Lipids and lactate/pyruvate ratio, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6) and adipocytokines (leptin and adiponectin) were also measured in ALS patients. Mann-Whitney U-tests analysed continuous data and Fisher's exact tests assessed categorical data. Blood glucose determined 120 min after the glucose bolus was significantly higher in patients with ALS (7.41 mmol/l+/-1.68) compared to controls (6.05+/-1.44, p=0.006). ALS patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) according to WHO criteria (n=7, 33%) were more likely to have elevated free fatty acids (FFA) levels compared to patients with normal glucose tolerance (0.77 nmol/l+/-0.30 vs. 0.57+/-0.19, p=0.04). IGT was not associated with disease duration or severity. In conclusion, patients with ALS show abnormal glucose tolerance that could be associated with increased FFA levels, a key determinant of insulin resistance. The origin of glucose homeostasis abnormalities in ALS may be multifactorial and deserves further investigation.

  9. Effect of ground cinnamon on postprandial blood glucose concentration in normal-weight and obese adults.

    PubMed

    Magistrelli, Ashley; Chezem, Jo Carol

    2012-11-01

    In healthy normal-weight adults, cinnamon reduces blood glucose concentration and enhances insulin sensitivity. Insulin resistance, resulting in increased fasting and postprandial blood glucose and insulin levels, is commonly observed in obese individuals. The objective of the study was to compare declines in postprandial glycemic response in normal-weight and obese subjects with ingestion of 6 g ground cinnamon. In a crossover study, subjects consumed 50 g available carbohydrate in instant farina cereal, served plain or with 6 g ground cinnamon. Blood glucose concentration, the main outcome measure, was assessed at minutes 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120. Repeated-measures analysis of variance evaluated the effects of body mass index (BMI) group, dietary condition, and time on blood glucose. Paired t-test assessed blood glucose at individual time points and glucose area under the curve (AUC) between dietary conditions. Thirty subjects between the ages of 18 and 30 years, 15 with BMIs between 18.5 and 24.9 and 15 with BMIs of 30.0 or more, completed the study. There was no significant difference in blood glucose between the two BMI groups at any time point. However, in a combined analysis of all subjects, the addition of cinnamon to the cereal significantly reduced 120-minute glucose AUC (P=0.008) and blood glucose at 15 (P=0.001), 30 (P<0.001), 45 (P<0.001), and 60 (P=0.001) minutes. At 120 minutes, blood glucose was significantly higher with cinnamon consumption (P<0.001). These results suggest cinnamon may be effective in moderating postprandial glucose response in normal weight and obese adults.

  10. Normal Oral Flora and the Oral Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, Lakshman; Matsubara, Victor H

    2017-04-01

    The oral ecosystem comprises the oral flora, so-called oral microbiome, the different anatomic microniches of the oral cavity, and its bathing fluid, saliva. The oral microbiome comprises a group of organisms and includes bacteria, archaea, fungi, protozoa, and viruses. The oral microbiome exists suspended in saliva as planktonic phase organisms or attached to oral surfaces as a plaque biofilm. Homeostasis of the plaque biofilm and its symbiotic relationship with the host is critical for oral health. Disequilibrium or dysbiosis within the plaque biofilms is the initiating event that leads to major oral diseases, such as caries and periodontal disease.

  11. Intestinal micropatches for oral insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amrita; Wong, Jessica; Gogoi, Rohan; Brown, Tyler; Mitragotri, Samir

    2017-03-19

    Diabetes mellitus has become a major public health issue that has almost reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Injectable insulin has been typically utilized for the management of this chronic disease. However, lack of patient compliance with injectable formulations has spurred the development of oral insulin formulations, which although appealing, face several delivery challenges. We have developed novel mucoadhesive intestinal patches, several hundred micrometers in dimension (micropatches) that address the challenges of oral insulin delivery. The micropatches adhere to the intestinal mucosa, release their drug load rapidly within 30 min and are effective in lowering blood glucose levels in vivo. When insulin-loaded micropatches were administered with a permeation enhancer and protease inhibitor, a peak efficacy of 34% drop in blood glucose levels was observed within 3 h. Efficacy further improved to 41% when micropatches were administered in multiple doses. Here, we describe the design of micropatches as an oral insulin formulation and report their in vivo efficacy.

  12. Oral myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Treville; Tamgadge, Avinash P.; Chande, Mayura S.; Bhalerao, Sudhir; Tamgadge, Sandhya

    2010-01-01

    Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency. PMID:22114438

  13. Effects of D-allulose on glucose metabolism after the administration of sugar or food in healthy dogs

    PubMed Central

    NISHII, Naohito; NOMIZO, Toru; TAKASHIMA, Satoshi; MATSUBARA, Tatsuya; TOKUDA, Masaaki; KITAGAWA, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    D-allulose is a C-3 epimer of D-fructose and has recently been investigated for its hypoglycemic effects. In the present study, the effects of D-allulose on glucose metabolism were evaluated in healthy dogs administrated sugar or food. The oral administrations of D-allulose decreased plasma glucose concentrations after oral glucose or maltose administration, with a diminished plasma insulin rise. The glucose suppressive effect of D-allulose was also observed after intravenous glucose administrations without increase in plasma insulin concentration. In contrast, D-allulose showed no effect on plasma glucose and insulin concentrations after feeding. The present results suggest that D-allulose administration may be beneficial in dogs with impaired glucose tolerance. Further studies investigating the therapeutic efficacy of D-allulose in diabetic dogs are required. PMID:27452736

  14. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Screening with fasting plasma glucose

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Mukesh M

    2016-01-01

    Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) as a screening test for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has had a checkered history. During the last three decades, a few initial anecdotal reports have given way to the recent well-conducted studies. This review: (1) traces the history; (2) weighs the advantages and disadvantages; (3) addresses the significance in early pregnancy; (4) underscores the benefits after delivery; and (5) emphasizes the cost savings of using the FPG in the screening of GDM. It also highlights the utility of fasting capillary glucose and stresses the value of the FPG in circumventing the cumbersome oral glucose tolerance test. An understanding of all the caveats is crucial to be able to use the FPG for investigating glucose intolerance in pregnancy. Thus, all health professionals can use the patient-friendly FPG to simplify the onerous algorithms available for the screening and diagnosis of GDM - thereby helping each and every pregnant woman. PMID:27525055

  15. A glucose sensor protein for continuous glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Veetil, Jithesh V; Jin, Sha; Ye, Kaiming

    2010-12-15

    In vivo continuous glucose monitoring has posed a significant challenge to glucose sensor development due to the lack of reliable techniques that are non- or at least minimally-invasive. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrated the development of a new glucose sensor protein, AcGFP1-GBPcys-mCherry, and an optical sensor assembly, capable of generating quantifiable FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) signals for glucose monitoring. Our experimental data showed that the engineered glucose sensor protein can generate measurable FRET signals in response to glucose concentrations varying from 25 to 800 μM. The sensor developed based on this protein had a shelf-life of up to 3 weeks. The sensor response was devoid of interference from compounds like galactose, fructose, lactose, mannose, and mannitol when tested at physiologically significant concentrations of these compounds. This new glucose sensor protein can potentially be used to develop implantable glucose sensors for continuous glucose monitoring.

  16. Contribution of abnormal muscle and liver glucose metabolism to postprandial hyperglycemia in NIDDM

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrakou, A.; Kelley, D.; Veneman, T.; Jenssen, T.; Pangburn, T.; Reilly, J.; Gerich, J. )

    1990-11-01

    To assess the role of muscle and liver in the pathogenesis of postprandial hyperglycemia in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), we administered an oral glucose load enriched with (14C)glucose to 10 NIDDM subjects and 10 age- and weight-matched nondiabetic volunteers and compared muscle glucose disposal by measuring forearm balance of glucose, lactate, alanine, O2, and CO2. In addition, we used the dual-lable isotope method to compare overall rates of glucose appearance (Ra) and disappearance (Rd), suppression of endogenous glucose output, and splanchnic glucose sequestration. During the initial 1-1.5 h after glucose ingestion, plasma glucose increased by approximately 8 mM in NIDDM vs. approximately 3 mM in nondiabetic subjects (P less than 0.01); overall glucose Ra was nearly 11 g greater in NIDDM than nondiabetic subjects, but glucose Rd was not significantly different in NIDDM and nondiabetic subjects. The greater overall glucose Ra of NIDDM subjects was due to 6.8 g greater endogenous glucose output (13.7 +/- 1.1 vs. 6.8 +/- 1.0 g, P less than 0.01) and 3.8 g less oral glucose splanchnic sequestration of the oral load (31.4 +/- 1.5 vs. 27.5 +/- 0.9 g, P less than 0.05). Although glucose taken up by muscle was not significantly different in NIDDM and nondiabetic subjects (39.3 +/- 3.5 vs. 41.0 +/- 2.5 g/5 h), a greater amount of the glucose taken up by muscle in NIDDM was released as lactate and alanine (11.7 +/- 1.0 vs. 5.2 +/- 0.3 g in nondiabetic subjects, P less than 0.01), and less was stored (11.7 +/- 1.3 vs. 16.9 +/- 1.5 g, P less than 0.05). We conclude that increased systemic glucose delivery, due primarily to reduced suppression of endogenous hepatic glucose output and, to a lesser extent, reduced splanchnic glucose sequestration, is the predominant factor responsible for postprandial hyperglycemia in NIDDM.

  17. Oral medications.

    PubMed

    Albretsen, Jay C

    2002-03-01

    Many medications are available today by prescription or in over-the-counter preparations. This article reviews the pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, toxicity, clinical signs, and management procedures necessary for some oral medications. The medications reviewed include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, benzodiazepines, amphetamines or amphetamine like drugs, carprofen, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, pseudoephedrine, calcium channel blockers, and baclofen.

  18. Oral Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lecavalier, D.R.; Main, J.H.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors of this article review briefly the anatomy of the oral soft tissues and describe the more common benign and malignant tumours of the mouth, giving emphasis to their clinical features. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:21253197

  19. Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Fritschi, Cynthia; Quinn, Laurie; Penckofer, Sue; Surdyk, Patricia M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this descriptive study was to document the experience of wearing a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device in women with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The availability of CGM has provided patients and clinicians with the opportunity to describe the immediate effects of diet, exercise, and medications on blood glucose levels; however, there are few data examining patients’ experiences and acceptability of using CGM. Methods Thirty-five women with T2DM wore a CGM for 3 days. Semistructured interviews were conducted to capture the self-described experience of wearing a CGM. Three open-ended questions were used to guide the participants’ self-reflection. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed. Results The women verbalized both positive and negative aspects of needing to check their blood glucose more frequently and wearing the monitor. After viewing the results, most women were surprised by the magnitude and frequency of blood glucose excursions. They immediately examined their behaviors during the time they wore the CGM. Independent problem-solving skills became apparent as they attempted to identify reasons for hyperglycemia by retracing food intake, physical activity, and stress experiences during the period of CGM. Most important, the majority of women stated they were interested in changing their diabetes-related self-care behaviors, especially eating and exercise behaviors, after reviewing their CGM results. Conclusions CGM is generally acceptable to women with T2DM and offers patients and their health care practitioners a possible alternative to routine glucose monitoring for assessing the effects of real-life events on blood glucose levels. PMID:20016057

  20. Sodium-glucose cotransport

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Søren Brandt; Fenton, Robert A.; Rieg, Timo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Sodium-glucose cotransporters (SGLTs) are important mediators of glucose uptake across apical cell membranes. SGLT1 mediates almost all sodium-dependent glucose uptake in the small intestine, while in the kidney SGLT2, and to a lesser extent SGLT1, account for more than 90% and nearly 3%, respectively, of glucose reabsorption from the glomerular ultrafiltrate. Although the recent availability of SGLT2 inhibitors for the treatment of diabetes mellitus has increased the number of clinical studies, this review has a focus on mechanisms contributing to the cellular regulation of SGLTs. Recent findings Studies have focused on the regulation of SGLT expression under different physiological/pathophysiological conditions, for example diet, age or diabetes mellitus. Several studies provide evidence of SGLT regulation via cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A, protein kinase C, glucagon-like peptide 2, insulin, leptin, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), with-no-K[Lys] kinases/STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (Wnk/SPAK) and regulatory solute carrier protein 1 (RS1) pathways. Summary SGLT inhibitors are important drugs for glycemic control in diabetes mellitus. Although the contribution of SGLT1 for absorption of glucose from the intestine as well as SGLT2/SGLT1 for renal glucose reabsorption has been comprehensively defined, this review provides an up-to-date outline for the mechanistic regulation of SGLT1/SGLT2. PMID:26125647

  1. Glucose tolerance during pregnancy in Asian women.

    PubMed

    Samanta, A; Burden, M L; Burden, A C; Jones, G R

    1989-08-01

    The present study was aimed at examining differences in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) between two ethnic populations (immigrant Asians and indigenous White Caucasians) residing in Leicester, U.K. The study was divided into two parts: to determine the prevalence of GDM and to determine the level at which glycaemia may impose a risk to the mother and the foetus. Of a total of 12,005 pregnancies (4561 Asian and 7444 White Caucasian), over a 3-year period, 314 (6.8%) Asian and 504 (6.7%) White Caucasian were given a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at 28-32 weeks for indications of 'large for date' pregnancies, hydramnios, glycosuria, a history of previous abortions, stillbirths, congenital abnormalities or glucose intolerance, and family history of diabetes. Abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT) was taken as a 2-h venous plasma glucose greater than or equal to 7.8 mmol/l which reverted to normal when formally tested during the puerperium (WHO criteria, 1985). AGT was found in 1.38% Asian and 0.87% White Caucasian pregnancies (P less than 0.01). This was further divided into impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (2-h value 7.8-11.1 mmol/l) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (2-h value greater than or equal to 11.1 mmol/l). IGT was found in 1.2% Asian and 0.84% White Caucasian pregnancies (P less than 0.01), and GDM in 0.18% and 0.02% respectively (P less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Frequency of diabetes, impaired fasting glucose, and glucose intolerance in high-risk groups identified by a FINDRISC survey in Puebla City, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    García-Alcalá, Hector; Genestier-Tamborero, Christelle Nathalie; Hirales-Tamez, Omara; Salinas-Palma, Jorge; Soto-Vega, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Background As a first step in the prevention of diabetes, the International Diabetes Federation recommends identification of persons at risk using the Finnish type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment (FINDRISC) survey. The frequency of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, and glucose intolerance in high-risk groups identified by FINDRISC is unknown in our country. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, and glucose intolerance in higher-risk groups using a FINDRISC survey in an urban population. Methods We used a television program to invite interested adults to fill out a survey at a television station. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed in all persons with a FINDRISC score ≥ 15 points (high-risk and very high-risk groups). Patients were classified as normal (fasting glucose < 100 mg/dL and 2-hour glucose < 140 mg/dL), or having impaired fasting glucose (fasting glucose 100–125 mg/dL and 2-hour glucose < 140 mg/dL), glucose intolerance (fasting glucose < 126 mg/dL and 2-hour glucose 140–199 mg/dL), and diabetes mellitus (fasting glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL or 2-hour glucose ≥ 200 mg/dL). We describe the frequency of each diagnostic category in this selected population according to gender and age. Results A total of 186 patients had a score ≥ 15. The frequencies of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, glucose intolerance, and normal glucose levels were 28.6%, 25.9%, 29.2%, and 16.2%, respectively. We found a higher frequency of diabetes mellitus and impaired fasting glucose in men than in women (33% versus 27% and 40% versus 21%, respectively) and more glucose intolerance in women than in men (34% versus 16%, P < 0.05). Patients with diabetes mellitus (52.55 ± 9.2 years) were older than those with impaired fasting glucose (46.19 ± 8.89 years), glucose intolerance (46.15 ± 10.9 years), and normal levels (41.9 ± 10.45 years, P < 0.05). We found a higher frequency of diabetes

  3. Redundancy in Glucose Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Amin; Varsavsky, Andrea; Ulloa, Johanna; Horsburgh, Jodie C.; McAuley, Sybil A.; Krishnamurthy, Balasubramanian; Jenkins, Alicia J.; Colman, Peter G.; Ward, Glenn M.; MacIsaac, Richard J.; Shah, Rajiv; O’Neal, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current electrochemical glucose sensors use a single electrode. Multiple electrodes (redundancy) may enhance sensor performance. We evaluated an electrochemical redundant sensor (ERS) incorporating two working electrodes (WE1 and WE2) onto a single subcutaneous insertion platform with a processing algorithm providing a single real-time continuous glucose measure. Methods: Twenty-three adults with type 1 diabetes each wore two ERSs concurrently for 168 hours. Post-insertion a frequent sampling test (FST) was performed with ERS benchmarked against a glucose meter (Bayer Contour Link). Day 4 and 7 FSTs were performed with a standard meal and venous blood collected for reference glucose measurements (YSI and meter). Between visits, ERS was worn with capillary blood glucose testing ≥8 times/day. Sensor glucose data were processed prospectively. Results: Mean absolute relative deviation (MARD) for ERS day 1-7 (3,297 paired points with glucose meter) was (mean [SD]) 10.1 [11.5]% versus 11.4 [11.9]% for WE1 and 12.0 [11.9]% for WE2; P < .0001. ERS Clarke A and A+B were 90.2% and 99.8%, respectively. ERS day 4 plus day 7 MARD (1,237 pairs with YSI) was 9.4 [9.5]% versus 9.6 [9.7]% for WE1 and 9.9 [9.7]% for WE2; P = ns. ERS day 1-7 precision absolute relative deviation (PARD) was 9.9 [3.6]% versus 11.5 [6.2]% for WE1 and 10.1 [4.4]% for WE2; P = ns. ERS sensor display time was 97.8 [6.0]% versus 91.0 [22.3]% for WE1 and 94.1 [14.3]% for WE2; P < .05. Conclusions: Electrochemical redundancy enhances glucose sensor accuracy and display time compared with each individual sensing element alone. ERS performance compares favorably with ‘best-in-class’ of non-redundant sensors. PMID:26499476

  4. Oral Health and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Jerrold ... they may need. Read More "Oral Health and Aging" Articles Oral Health and Aging / 4 Myths About ...

  5. A mechanistic study to increase understanding of titanium dioxide nanoparticles-increased plasma glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hailong; Li, Li; Guo, Qian; Jin, Sanli; Zhou, Ying; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong; Gu, Ning

    2016-09-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO2 NP) is an authorized food additive. Previous studies determined oral administration of TiO2 NPs increases plasma glucose in mice via inducing insulin resistance. An increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been considered the possible mechanism of increasing plasma glucose. However, persistently high plasma glucose is also a mechanism of increasing ROS. This study aims to explore whether TiO2 NPs increase plasma glucose via ROS. We found after oral administration of TiO2 NPs, an increase in ROS preceded an increase in plasma glucose. Subsequently, mice were treated with two antioxidants (resveratrol and vitamin E) at the same time as oral administration of TiO2 NPs. Results showed resveratrol and vitamin E reduced TiO2 NPs-increased ROS. An increase in plasma glucose was also inhibited. Further research showed resveratrol and vitamin E inhibited the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6, and the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK, resulting in improved insulin resistance. These results suggest TiO2 NPs increased ROS levels, and then ROS activated inflammatory cytokines and phosphokinases, and thus induced insulin resistance, resulting in an increase in plasma glucose. Resveratrol and vitamin E can reduce TiO2 NPs-increased ROS and thereby inhibit an increase in plasma glucose in mice.

  6. Effect of Cinnamon Tea on Postprandial Glucose Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Maria Alexandra; Silva, Maria Leonor; Santos, Elisabeth; Moncada, Margarida Maria; Brito, José; Proença, Luis; Singh, Jaipaul; de Mesquita, Maria Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Glycaemic control, in particular at postprandial period, has a key role in prevention of different diseases, including diabetes and cardiovascular events. Previous studies suggest that postprandial high blood glucose levels (BGL) can lead to an oxidative stress status, which is associated with metabolic alterations. Cinnamon powder has demonstrated a beneficial effect on postprandial glucose homeostasis in animals and human models. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of cinnamon tea (C. burmannii) on postprandial capillary blood glucose level on nondiabetic adults. Participants were given oral glucose tolerance test either with or without cinnamon tea in a randomized clinical trial. The data revealed that cinnamon tea administration slightly decreased postprandial BGL. Cinnamon tea ingestion also results in a significantly lower postprandial maximum glucose concentration and variation of maximum glucose concentration (p < 0.05). Chemical analysis showed that cinnamon tea has a high antioxidant capacity, which may be due to its polyphenol content. The present study provides evidence that cinnamon tea, obtained from C. burmannii, could be beneficial for controlling glucose metabolism in nondiabetic adults during postprandial period. PMID:26258147

  7. Mathematical model of glucose-insulin homeostasis in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Lombarte, Mercedes; Lupo, Maela; Campetelli, German; Basualdo, Marta; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2013-10-01

    According to the World Health Organization there are over 220 million people in the world with diabetes and 3.4 million people died in 2004 as a consequence of this pathology. Development of an artificial pancreas would allow to restore control of blood glucose by coupling an infusion pump to a continuous glucose sensor in the blood. The design of such a device requires the development and application of mathematical models which represent the gluco-regulatory system. Models developed by other research groups describe very well the gluco-regulatory system but have a large number of mathematical equations and require complex methodologies for the estimation of its parameters. In this work we propose a mathematical model to study the homeostasis of glucose and insulin in healthy rats. The proposed model consists of three differential equations and 8 parameters that describe the variation of: blood glucose concentration, blood insulin concentration and amount of glucose in the intestine. All parameters were obtained by setting functions to the values of glucose and insulin in blood obtained after oral glucose administration. In vivo and in silico validations were performed. Additionally, a qualitative analysis has been done to verify the aforementioned model. We have shown that this model has a single, biologically consistent equilibrium point. This model is a first step in the development of a mathematical model for the type I diabetic rat.

  8. Effect and potential mechanism of action of sea cucumber saponins on postprandial blood glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xueyuan; Wen, Min; Han, Xiuqing; Yanagita, Teruyoshi; Xue, Yong; Wang, Jingfeng; Xue, Changhu; Wang, Yuming

    2016-06-01

    Postprandial blood glucose control is the major goal in the treatment of diabetes. Here, we investigated the effect of sea cucumber saponins (SCSs) on postprandial blood glucose levels. SCS inhibited yeast as well as rat intestinal α-glucosidase activity in a dose-dependent manner and showed better inhibition of yeast α-glucosidases compared to the positive control. Further studies were performed using ICR mice treated with SCS and starch or SCS alone by oral gavage. Unexpectedly, SCS increased postprandial blood glucose levels a short time (1 h) after oral gavage. The serum corticosterone (CORT) level showed a consistent correlation with glucose levels. In vitro experiments confirmed that SCS treatment increased the secretion of CORT in the Y1 adrenal cell line. Overall, these studies demonstrated that SCS gavage could inhibit α-glucosidase activity but cannot attenuate postprandial blood glucose level within short time periods. The underlying mechanisms are probably related to increased serum CORT levels.

  9. Prediabetes Phenotype Influences Improvements in Glucose Homeostasis with Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Eikenberg, Joshua D.; Savla, Jyoti; Marinik, Elaina L.; Davy, Kevin P.; Pownall, John; Baugh, Mary E.; Flack, Kyle D.; Boshra, Soheir; Winett, Richard A.; Davy, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine if prediabetes phenotype influences improvements in glucose homeostasis with resistance training (RT). Methods Older, overweight individuals with prediabetes (n = 159; aged 60±5 yrs; BMI 33±4 kg/m2) completed a supervised RT program twice per week for 12 weeks. Body weight and composition, strength, fasting plasma glucose, 2-hr oral glucose tolerance, and Matsuda-Defronza estimated insulin sensitivity index (ISI) were assessed before and after the intervention. Participants were categorized according to their baseline prediabetes phenotype as impaired fasting glucose only (IFG) (n = 73), impaired glucose tolerance only (IGT) (n = 21), or combined IFG and IGT (IFG/IGT) (n = 65). Results Chest press and leg press strength increased 27% and 18%, respectively, following the 12-week RT program (both p<0.05). Waist circumference (-1.0%; pre 109.3±10.3 cm, post 108.2±10.6 cm) and body fat (-0.6%; pre 43.7±6.8%, post 43.1±6.8%) declined, and lean body mass (+1.3%; pre 52.0±10.4 kg, post 52.7±10.7 kg) increased following the intervention. Fasting glucose concentrations did not change (p>0.05) following the intervention. However, 2-hr oral glucose tolerance improved in those with IGT (pre 8.94±0.72 mmol/l, post 7.83±1.11 mmol/l, p<0.05) and IFG/IGT (pre 9.66±1.11mmol/l, post 8.60±2.00 mmol/l) but not in those with IFG (pre 6.27±1.28mmol/l, post 6.33± 1.55 mmol/l). There were no significant changes in ISI or glucose area under the curve following the RT program. Conclusions RT without dietary intervention improves 2-hr oral glucose tolerance in individuals with prediabetes. However, the improvements in glucose homeostasis with RT appear limited to those with IGT or combined IFG and IGT. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01112709 PMID:26840904

  10. Influence of fluid intake on endurance running performance. A comparison between water, glucose and fructose solutions.

    PubMed

    Williams, C; Nute, M G; Broadbank, L; Vinall, S

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the influence of drinking water, a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution, containing additional free glucose (Glucose) or the same carbohydrate-electrolyte solution containing additional fructose (Fructose), on running performance. Twelve endurance-trained recreational runners volunteered to take part in this study; 9 completed the three and all 12 completed two trials. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of the three trials: Water, Glucose or Fructose. In each trial the subjects were required to run 30 km as fast as possible on a motorized treadmill, instrumented so that they could control its speed. The carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions contained a total of 50 g carbohydrate, 20 g as a glucose polymer. The Glucose solution contained an additional 20 g free glucose and the Fructose solution contained an additional 20 g fructose rather than glucose. The osmolality of the Glucose and Fructose solutions was approximately 300-320 mosmol and the energy equivalent of both solutions was 794 kJ.l-1. The subjects ingested 1 l fluid throughout each run. The running times were not significantly different, being 129.3 (+/- 17.7) min, 124.8 (+/- 14.9) min and 125.9 (+/- 17.9) min for Water, Glucose and Fructose respectively. There was a decrease (P less than 0.05) in running speed over the last 10 km of the Water trial from 4.14 (+/- 0.55) to 3.75 (+/- 0.86) m.s-1, which did not occur in the carbohydrate trials. Blood glucose concentrations during the Water trial decreased from 15 km onwards and at the end of the run they were significantly (P less than 0.05) lower than the value recorded at 15 km.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Chronic renin inhibition with aliskiren improves glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and skeletal muscle glucose transport activity in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Marchionne, Elizabeth M; Diamond-Stanic, Maggie K; Prasonnarong, Mujalin; Henriksen, Erik J

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that overactivity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is associated with whole body and skeletal muscle insulin resistance in obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats. Moreover, this obesity-associated insulin resistance is reduced by treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor (type 1) blockers. However, it is currently unknown whether specific inhibition of renin itself, the rate-limiting step in RAS functionality, improves insulin action in obesity-associated insulin resistance. Therefore, the present study assessed the effect of chronic, selective renin inhibition using aliskiren on glucose tolerance, whole body insulin sensitivity, and insulin action on the glucose transport system in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats. Obese Zucker rats were treated for 21 days with either vehicle or aliskiren (50 mg/kg body wt ip). Renin inhibition was associated with a significant lowering (10%, P < 0.05) of resting systolic blood pressure and induced reductions in fasting plasma glucose (11%) and free fatty acids (46%) and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (13%). Glucose tolerance (glucose area under the curve) and whole body insulin sensitivity (inverse of the glucose-insulin index) during an oral glucose tolerance test were improved by 15% and 16%, respectively, following chronic renin inhibition. Moreover, insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity in isolated soleus muscle of renin inhibitor-treated animals was increased by 36% and was associated with a 2.2-fold greater Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation. These data provide evidence that chronic selective inhibition of renin activity leads to improvements in glucose tolerance and whole body insulin sensitivity in the insulin-resistant obese Zucker rat. Importantly, chronic renin inhibition is associated with upregulation of insulin action on skeletal muscle glucose transport, and it may involve improved Akt signaling. These data support the

  12. Fabrication and characterization of spiral interdigitated electrodes based biosensor for salivary glucose detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelyn, P. Y. P.; Hashim, U.; Arshad, M. K. Md; Voon, C. H.; Liu, Wei-Wen; Kahar, S. M.; Huda, A. R. N.; Lee, H. Cheun

    2017-03-01

    This work introduces the non-invasive glucose monitoring technique by using the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technologically fabricated spiral Interdigitated Electrodes (IDE) based biosensor. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) image explores the morphology of spiral IDE while Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) determines the elements induced in spiral IDE. Oral saliva of two patients are collected and tested on the spiral IDE sensor with electrical characterization as glucose detection results. However, both patients exhibit their glucose level characteristics inconsistently. Therefore, this work could be extended and enhanced by adding Glutaraldehyde in between 3-Aminoproply)triethoxysilane (APTES) modified and glucose oxidase (GOD) enzyme immobilized layer with FTIR validation for bonding attachment.

  13. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 42. Read More Enzyme Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Hemoglobin Review Date 2/11/2016 Updated by: ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics G6PD Deficiency Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  14. Glucose Tolerance and Hyperkinesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langseth, Lillian; Dowd, Judith

    Examined were medical records of 265 hyperkinetic children (7-9 years old). Clinical blood chemistries, hematology, and 5-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) results indicated that hematocrit levels were low in 27% of the Ss, eosinophil levels were abnormally high in 86% of the Ss, and GTT results were abnormal in a maority of Ss. (CL)

  15. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Oesterheld, Jessica R; Cozza, Kelly; Sandson, Neil B

    2008-01-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, the introduction of Enovid (norethynodrel 10 microg and mestranol 150 microg), which provided convenient and reliable contraception, revolutionized birth control. Reports of interactions between oral contraceptives (OCs) and other drugs began to trickle into the literature. At first, these drug interactions appeared to be random and unrelated. Increased understanding of P450 enzymes and phase II reactions of sulfation and glucuronidation has permitted preliminary categorization and assessment of the clinical relevance of these drug interactions.

  16. Control of Hepatic Glucose Metabolism by the Oral Hypoglycemic Sulfonylureas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-11

    another In vitro study, Vignerl, et al. (1982) were unable to detect any effect on Insulin binding to MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, IM-9 human cultured...according to the method of Huljlng (1970). Aspirgillus niger amyloglucosidase (1,4 a- glucan glucohy- drolase; E.C. 3.2.1.3), (0.5 U) and 0.38 U of porcine...pancreatic a-amylase (1,6 a- glucan glucohydrolase; E.C. 3.2.1.1), in 1.0 ml of 100 mM sodium acetate buffer (pH 4.8) were added to the glycogen 34

  17. Mouthguard biosensor with telemetry system for monitoring of saliva glucose: A novel cavitas sensor.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Takahiro; Kuroki, Yusuke; Nitta, Hiroki; Chouhan, Prem; Toma, Koji; Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Takeuchi, Shuhei; Sekita, Toshiaki; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2016-10-15

    We develop detachable "Cavitas sensors" to apply to the human oral cavity for non-invasive monitoring of saliva glucose. A salivary biosensor incorporating Pt and Ag/AgCl electrodes on a mouthguard support with an enzyme membrane is developed and tested. Electrodes are formed on the polyethylene terephthalate glycol (PETG) surface of the mouthguard. The Pt working electrode is coated with a glucose oxidase (GOD) membrane. The biosensor seamlessly is integrated with a glucose sensor and a wireless measurement system. When investigating in-vitro performance, the biosensor exhibits a robust relationship between output current and glucose concentration. In artificial saliva composed of salts and proteins, the glucose sensor is capable of highly sensitive detection over a range of 5-1000µmol/L of glucose, which encompasses the range of glucose concentrations found in human saliva. We demonstrate the ability of the sensor and wireless communication module to monitor saliva glucose in a phantom jaw imitating the structure of the human oral cavity. Stable and long-term real-time monitoring (exceeding 5h) with the telemetry system is achieved. The mouthguard biosensor will be useful as a novel method for real-time non-invasive saliva glucose monitoring for better management of dental patients.

  18. Hypoglycemia following intravenous insulin plus glucose for hyperkalemia in patients with impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Ana Lucia; Bustamante, Jesus; Mendiluce, Alicia; Floege, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Background Hypoglycemia is a serious complication following the administration of insulin for hyperkalemia. We determined the incidence of hypoglycemia and severe hypoglycemia (blood glucose <70 or ≤40 mg/dl, respectively) in a cohort of AKI and non-dialysis dependent CKD patients who received an intravenous infusion of insulin plus glucose to treat hyperkalemia. Methods We retrospectively reviewed charts of all AKI and non-dialysis dependent CKD patients who received 10 U of insulin plus 50 g glucose to treat hyperkalemia from December 1, 2013 to May 31, 2015 at our Department. Results One hundred sixty four episodes of hyperkalemia were treated with insulin plus glucose and were eligible for analysis. Serum potassium levels dropped by 1.18 ± 1.01 mmol/l. Eleven treatments (6.1%) resulted in hypoglycemia and two (1.2%) in severe hypoglycemia. A lower pretreatment blood glucose tended to associate with a higher subsequent risk of hypoglycemia. Age, sex, renal function, an established diagnosis of diabetes or previous treatment were not associated with the development of this complication. We did not register any significant adverse events. Conclusion Our intravenous regimen combining an infusion of insulin plus glucose effectively reduced serum potassium levels compared to previous studies and associated a low risk of symptomatic hypoglycemia and other complications. PMID:28245289

  19. Effect of insulin on in vivo glucose utilization in individual tissues of anesthetized lactating rats

    SciTech Connect

    Burnol, A.F.; Ferre, P.; Leturque, A.; Girard, J.

    1987-02-01

    Glucose utilization rate has been measured in skeletal muscles, white adipose tissue, and mammary gland of anesthetized nonlactating and lactating rats. During lactation, basal (1-TH) glucose utilization is decreased by 40% in periovarian white adipose tissue and by 65% in epitrochlearis and extensor digitorum longus but not in soleus muscle. This may be related to the lower blood glucose and plasma insulin concentrations observed during lactation. Basal glucose utilization rate in the mammary gland was, respectively, 18 +/- 2 and 350 +/- 50 g/min in nonlactating and lactating rats. During the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, a physiological increment in plasma insulin concentration induces a similar increase in glucose utilization rate in skeletal muscles and white adipose tissue in the two groups of rats. Furthermore this low increase in plasma insulin concentration does not alter mammary glucose utilization rate in nonlactating rats but induces the same increase as a maximal insulin concentration in lactating rats. These data show that the active mammary gland is the most insulin-sensitive tissue of the lactating rat that has been tested. The overall increase in insulin sensitivity and responsiveness that has been described in lactating rats can then mainly be attributed to the presence of the active mammary gland. Plasma insulin was determined by radioimmunoassay.

  20. Acute and Chronic Kudzu Improves Plasma Glucose Tolerance in Non-Diabetic CD-1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Scott; Prasain, Jeevan K; Peng, Ning; Dai, Yanying; Wyss, J Michael

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that kudzu root extract and its major isoflavone (puerarin) improve glucose metabolism in animal models of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; however, these beneficial effects have not been investigated in normal glycemic mice. The present study investigates the effect of acute and chronic kudzu root extract supplementation on glucose tolerance in normoglycemic CD-1 mice. Male, adult CD-1 mice were fed a phytoestrogen-free diet containing 0.2% or 0.0% kudzu root extract for 6 weeks. Thereafter, they were acutely administered kudzu root extract (75 mg/kg BW; oral) or vehicle followed by a glucose challenge (2 g/kg BW; oral). In control fed mice, the acute glucose challenge increased blood glucose ~300% after 30 minutes, and acute kudzu root extract administration significantly blunted this response by ~50%. In mice chronically fed a kudzu-supplemented diet, glucose tolerance was improved, and acute treatment caused no additional improvement. Irrespective of treatment, all mice were normoglycemic at the start of each glucose challenge. Administration of insulin resulted in a larger decrease in blood glucose in chronic kudzu-supplemented compared to control mice. Co-administration of phloridzin (a specific inhibitor of SGLT-mediated glucose uptake), improved glucose tolerance in acutely kudzu-treated mice but had no significant effect on glucose tolerance in chronically treated mice. These results indicate that both acute and chronic administration of kudzu root extract improves glucose tolerance in a normal glycemic mouse strain and that the effects of chronic kudzu feeding may be mediated, in part, by enhanced insulin sensitivity (chronic) and inhibition of sodium dependent glucose transport.

  1. Acute and Chronic Kudzu Improves Plasma Glucose Tolerance in Non-Diabetic CD-1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Scott; Prasain, Jeevan K.; Peng, Ning; Dai, Yanying; Wyss, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that kudzu root extract and its major isoflavone (puerarin) improve glucose metabolism in animal models of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; however, these beneficial effects have not been investigated in normal glycemic mice. The present study investigates the effect of acute and chronic kudzu root extract supplementation on glucose tolerance in normoglycemic CD-1 mice. Male, adult CD-1 mice were fed a phytoestrogen-free diet containing 0.2% or 0.0% kudzu root extract for 6 weeks. Thereafter, they were acutely administered kudzu root extract (75 mg/kg BW; oral) or vehicle followed by a glucose challenge (2 g/kg BW; oral). In control fed mice, the acute glucose challenge increased blood glucose ~300% after 30 minutes, and acute kudzu root extract administration significantly blunted this response by ~50%. In mice chronically fed a kudzu-supplemented diet, glucose tolerance was improved, and acute treatment caused no additional improvement. Irrespective of treatment, all mice were normoglycemic at the start of each glucose challenge. Administration of insulin resulted in a larger decrease in blood glucose in chronic kudzu-supplemented compared to control mice. Co-administration of phloridzin (a specific inhibitor of SGLT-mediated glucose uptake), improved glucose tolerance in acutely kudzu-treated mice but had no significant effect on glucose tolerance in chronically treated mice. These results indicate that both acute and chronic administration of kudzu root extract improves glucose tolerance in a normal glycemic mouse strain and that the effects of chronic kudzu feeding may be mediated, in part, by enhanced insulin sensitivity (chronic) and inhibition of sodium dependent glucose transport.

  2. GLUT-1 immunoexpression in oral epithelial dysplasia, oral squamous cell carcinoma, and verrucous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Angadi, Vidya C; Angadi, Punnya V

    2015-06-01

    Glucose transporters, such as GLUT-1, mediate the important mechanisms involved in cellular glucose influx, allowing cells to proliferate and survive. The significance of GLUT-1 expression in oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been less explored, and no study has investigated it in relation to verrucous carcinoma (VC). We evaluated 30 cases each of OED, OSCC, and VC, graded further on the basis of their differentiation, immunohistochemically for GLUT-1 expression, along with 10 specimens of normal oral mucosa (NOM) as controls. In OSCC, GLUT-1 expression increased with the degree of dysplasia and increasing grade (P < 0.001). The expression in VC was predominantly membranous and intense, resembling well differentiated OSCC. This increase of GLUT-1 expression in OSCC along with the degree of dysplasia and the histologic grade reflects the expanding glycolytic response to hypoxia. This is the first study to have revealed prominent GLUT-1 expression in VC, highlighting its inherent metabolic capacity.

  3. Glucose and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2008-04-01

    When a human's enzymes attach glucose to proteins they do so at specific sites on a specific molecule for a specific purpose that also can include ascorbic acid (AA) at a high level such as 1 gram per hour during exposure. In an AA synthesizing animal the manifold increase of AA produced in response to illness is automatic. In contrast, the human non-enzymatic process adds glucose haphazardly to any number of sites along available peptide chains. As Cerami clarified decades ago, extensive crosslinking of proteins contributes to loss of elasticity in aging tissues. Ascorbic acid reduces the random non-enyzmatic glycation of proteins. Moreover, AA is a cofactor for hydroxylase enzymes that are necessary for the production and replacement of collagen and other structural proteins. We will discuss the relevance of ``aging is scurvy'' to the biochemistry of human aging.

  4. Loss of Sugar Detection by GLUT2 Affects Glucose Homeostasis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stolarczyk, Emilie; Le Gall, Maude; Even, Patrick; Houllier, Anne; Serradas, Patricia; Brot-Laroche, Edith; Leturque, Armelle

    2007-01-01

    Background Mammals must sense the amount of sugar available to them and respond appropriately. For many years attention has focused on intracellular glucose sensing derived from glucose metabolism. Here, we studied the detection of extracellular glucose concentrations in vivo by invalidating the transduction pathway downstream from the transporter-detector GLUT2 and measured the physiological impact of this pathway. Methodology/Principal Findings We produced mice that ubiquitously express the largest cytoplasmic loop of GLUT2, blocking glucose-mediated gene expression in vitro without affecting glucose metabolism. Impairment of GLUT2-mediated sugar detection transiently protected transgenic mice against starvation and streptozotocin-induced diabetes, suggesting that both low- and high-glucose concentrations were not detected. Transgenic mice favored lipid oxidation, and oral glucose was slowly cleared from blood due to low insulin production, despite massive urinary glucose excretion. Kidney adaptation was characterized by a lower rate of glucose reabsorption, whereas pancreatic adaptation was associated with a larger number of small islets. Conclusions/Significance Molecular invalidation of sugar sensing in GLUT2-loop transgenic mice changed multiple aspects of glucose homeostasis, highlighting by a top-down approach, the role of membrane glucose receptors as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:18074013

  5. Experience with the high-intensity sweetener saccharin impairs glucose homeostasis and GLP-1 release in rats.

    PubMed

    Swithers, Susan E; Laboy, Alycia F; Clark, Kiely; Cooper, Stephanie; Davidson, T L

    2012-07-15

    Previous work from our lab has demonstrated that experience with high-intensity sweeteners in rats leads to increased food intake, body weight gain and adiposity, along with diminished caloric compensation and decreased thermic effect of food. These changes may occur as a result of interfering with learned relations between the sweet taste of food and the caloric or nutritive consequences of consuming those foods. The present experiments determined whether experience with the high-intensity sweetener saccharin versus the caloric sweetener glucose affected blood glucose homeostasis. The results demonstrated that during oral glucose tolerance tests, blood glucose levels were more elevated in animals that had previously consumed the saccharin-sweetened supplements. In contrast, during glucose tolerance tests when a glucose solution was delivered directly into the stomach, no differences in blood glucose levels between the groups were observed. Differences in oral glucose tolerance responses were not accompanied by differences in insulin release; insulin release was similar in animals previously exposed to saccharin and those previously exposed to glucose. However, release of GLP-1 in response to an oral glucose tolerance test, but not to glucose tolerance tests delivered by gavage, was significantly lower in saccharin-exposed animals compared to glucose-exposed animals. Differences in both blood glucose and GLP-1 release in saccharin animals were rapid and transient, and suggest that one mechanism by which exposure to high-intensity sweeteners that interfere with a predictive relation between sweet tastes and calories may impair energy balance is by suppressing GLP-1 release, which could alter glucose homeostasis and reduce satiety.

  6. Effect of acacia polyphenol on glucose homeostasis in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: A randomized multicenter feeding trial

    PubMed Central

    OGAWA, SOSUKE; MATSUMAE, TOMOYUKI; KATAOKA, TAKESHI; YAZAKI, YOSHIKAZU; YAMAGUCHI, HIDEYO

    2013-01-01

    Numerous in vitro and animal studies, as well as clinical trials have indicated that plant-derived polyphenols exert beneficial effects on glucose intolerance or type 2 diabetes. This clinical study aimed to investigate the effects of acacia polyphenol (AP) on glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in non-diabetic subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in a total of 34 enrolled subjects. The subjects were randomly assigned to the AP-containing dietary supplement (AP supplement; in a daily dose of 250 mg as AP; n=17) or placebo (n=17) and the intervention was continued for 8 weeks. Prior to the start of the intervention (baseline) and after 4 and 8 weeks of intervention, plasma glucose and insulin were measured during a two-hour OGTT. Compared with the baseline, plasma glucose and insulin levels at 90 and/or 120 min, as well as the total area under the curve values during the OGTT (AUC0→2h) for glucose and insulin, were significantly reduced in the AP group, but not in the placebo group after intervention for 8 weeks. The decline from baseline in plasma glucose and insulin at 90 or 120 min of the OGTT for the AP group was significantly greater compared with that of the placebo group after 8 weeks of intervention. No AP supplement-related adverse side-effects nor any abnormal changes in routine laboratory tests and anthropometric parameters were observed throughout the study period. The AP supplement may have the potential to improve glucose homeostasis in subjects with IGT. PMID:23837032

  7. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, A J; Leversee, J H

    1990-09-01

    Management of oral contraception requires an understanding of the relationships between the method's effectiveness, noncontraceptive benefits, and hormonal adverse effects. The new multiphasic combinations or OCs containing 35 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol and 0.5-1.0 mg of norethindrone or equivalent result in a maximum combination of efficacy and safety for the patient with minimal annoying problems for the patient and the prescriber. Patient education regarding early warning symptoms of adverse effects, breakthrough bleeding, and lack of withdrawal bleeding adds an additional margin of safety and reduces patient questions and uncertainties.

  8. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Maclennan, A H

    1987-12-01

    Over 60 million women use highly efficient and safe modern combined oral contraceptives (OCs) every day. A women who takes the oral contraceptive for 5 years before the age of 30 will actually live 12 days longer, although a woman taking the pill for the 1st time for 5 years after the age of 30 will have her life span reduced on the average by 80 days. OC related morbidity and mortality mostly occur in women over 35 who smoke. Combined low dose OCs are safe for women who do not smoke, at least to 45 years of age and probably to the menopause. The prescription of OCs is also safe to the young adolescent. The pill does not interfere with maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary ovarian axis and does not increase the incidence of amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea or infertility in later life. Patients with contraindications to estrogen therapy are excluded from OC use (history of thromboembolism, major heart disease, liver disease, breast cancer). Low-dose (30-35 mcg estrogen-containing monophasic or triphasic) pills are recommended. Combined oral contraceptives contain either ethinyl estradiol (1.7 to 2 times more potent) or mestranol. After absorption the progestagens, norethisterone acetate, ethynodiol diacetate and lynoestrenol are all metabolized to norethisterone. The progestagen-only pill has about a 2% failure rate and poorer cycle control than the combined pill, but it lacks estrogenic, progestagenic and androgenic side effects. This pill is suitable for the lactating mother, for smokers over 35, for hypertensive patients, and for those with a history of thrombosis. The efficacy of the progestagen-only pill is restored in 3 days of pill taking. Postcoital contraception is an alternative: treatment can be given for at least 72 hours after intercourse. The Yuzpe method calls for the patient to take 2 combined oral contraceptive tablets containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol (Eugynon or Ovral) followed by a further 2 tablets 12 hours later. This regimen

  9. Liver glucose metabolism in humans

    PubMed Central

    Adeva-Andany, María M.; Pérez-Felpete, Noemi; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Donapetry-García, Cristóbal; Pazos-García, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Information about normal hepatic glucose metabolism may help to understand pathogenic mechanisms underlying obesity and diabetes mellitus. In addition, liver glucose metabolism is involved in glycosylation reactions and connected with fatty acid metabolism. The liver receives dietary carbohydrates directly from the intestine via the portal vein. Glucokinase phosphorylates glucose to glucose 6-phosphate inside the hepatocyte, ensuring that an adequate flow of glucose enters the cell to be metabolized. Glucose 6-phosphate may proceed to several metabolic pathways. During the post-prandial period, most glucose 6-phosphate is used to synthesize glycogen via the formation of glucose 1-phosphate and UDP–glucose. Minor amounts of UDP–glucose are used to form UDP–glucuronate and UDP–galactose, which are donors of monosaccharide units used in glycosylation. A second pathway of glucose 6-phosphate metabolism is the formation of fructose 6-phosphate, which may either start the hexosamine pathway to produce UDP-N-acetylglucosamine or follow the glycolytic pathway to generate pyruvate and then acetyl-CoA. Acetyl-CoA may enter the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to be oxidized or may be exported to the cytosol to synthesize fatty acids, when excess glucose is present within the hepatocyte. Finally, glucose 6-phosphate may produce NADPH and ribose 5-phosphate through the pentose phosphate pathway. Glucose metabolism supplies intermediates for glycosylation, a post-translational modification of proteins and lipids that modulates their activity. Congenital deficiency of phosphoglucomutase (PGM)-1 and PGM-3 is associated with impaired glycosylation. In addition to metabolize carbohydrates, the liver produces glucose to be used by other tissues, from glycogen breakdown or from de novo synthesis using primarily lactate and alanine (gluconeogenesis). PMID:27707936

  10. Comparison of the effect of sorbitol and glucose on calcium absorption in postmenopausal women

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, R.M.; Peacock, M.; Barkworth, S.A.; Marshall, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    It has been suggested that the oral administration of sorbitol promotes calcium absorption, while glucose has no effect. We have therefore compared the effect of oral sorbitol and glucose on the absorption of radiocalcium from low and high carrier loads in healthy postmenopausal women. In a control group of 20 women given neither sorbitol nor glucose, the mean +/- SEM fractional radiocalcium absorption rate from a low carrier load was 0.65 +/- 0.05 (fraction of dose/h). In a second group of 10 women the fractional absorption rate from the low carrier load was lower (p less than 0.05) with 10 g sorbitol (0.48 +/- 0.05) than with 10 g glucose (0.65 +/- 0.08). Fractional absorption of radiocalcium from a high carrier load measured in a third group of seven women using two isotopes (oral 45Ca, IV 47Ca) was also lower (p less than 0.001) with 10 g sorbitol (0.22 +/- 0.01, fraction/3 h) than with 10 g glucose (0.29 +/- 0.02). The results suggest that calcium absorption from a low carrier load is unaltered by glucose but that absorption of calcium from both low and high carrier loads is lower with sorbitol than with glucose.

  11. Application of transcutaneous diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the measurement of blood glucose concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenliang; Liu, Rong; Cui, Houxin; Xu, Kexin; Lv, Lina

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, the propagation characteristics of near-infrared (NIR) light in the palm tissue are analyzed, and the principle and feasibility of using transcutaneous diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for non-invasive blood glucose detection are presented. An optical probe suitable for measuring the diffuse reflectance spectrum of human palm and a non-invasive blood glucose detection system using NIR spectroscopy are designed. Based on this system, oral glucose tolerance tests are performed to measure the blood glucose concentrations of two young healthy volunteers. The partial least square calibration model is then constructed by all individual experimental data. The final result shows that correlation coefficients of the two experiments between the predicted blood glucose concentrations and the reference blood glucose concentrations are 0.9870 and 0.9854, respectively. The root mean square errors of prediction of full cross validation are 0.54 and 0.52 mmol/l, respectively.

  12. Pregnane X receptor agonists impair postprandial glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Rysä, J; Buler, M; Savolainen, M J; Ruskoaho, H; Hakkola, J; Hukkanen, J

    2013-06-01

    We conducted a randomized, open, placebo-controlled crossover trial to investigate the effects of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) agonist rifampin on an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 12 healthy volunteers. The subjects were administered 600 mg rifampin or placebo once daily for 7 days, and OGTT was performed on the eighth day. The mean incremental glucose and insulin areas under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUC(incr)) increased by 192% (P = 0.008) and 45% (P = 0.031), respectively. The fasting glucose, insulin, and C-peptide, and the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, were not affected. The glucose AUC(incr) during OGTT was significantly increased in rats after 4-day treatment with pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN), an agonist of the rat PXR. The hepatic level of glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) mRNA was downregulated by PCN. In conclusion, both human and rat PXR agonists elicited postprandial hyperglycemia, suggesting a detrimental role of PXR activation on glucose tolerance.

  13. Modulation of glucose transporters in rat diaphragm by sodium tungstate.

    PubMed

    Girón, M D; Caballero, J J; Vargas, A M; Suárez, M D; Guinovart, J J; Salto, R

    2003-05-08

    Oral administration of sodium tungstate is an effective treatment for diabetes in animal models. We examined the effects of 6 weeks of oral administration of tungstate on glucose transporters (GLUT) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat diaphragm. Diabetes decreased GLUT4 expression while tungstate treatment normalized not only GLUT4 protein but also GLUT4 mRNA in the diabetic rats. Furthermore, treatment increased GLUT4 protein in plasma and internal membranes, suggesting a stimulation of its translocation to the plasma membrane. Tungstate had no effect on healthy animals. There were no differences in the total amount of GLUT1 transporter in any group. We conclude that the normoglycemic effect of tungstate may be partly due to a normalization of the levels and subcellular localization of GLUT4, which should result in an increase in muscle glucose uptake.

  14. First Clinical Evaluation of a New Percutaneous Optical Fiber Glucose Sensor for Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Achim Josef; Knuth, Monika; Nikolaus, Katharina Sibylle; Krivánek, Roland; Küster, Frank; Hasslacher, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Background This article describes a new fiber-coupled, percutaneous fluorescent continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system that has shown 14 days of functionality in a human clinical trial. Method The new optical CGM system (FiberSense) consists of a transdermal polymer optical fiber containing a biochemical glucose sensor and a small fluorescence photometer optically coupled to the fiber. The glucose-sensitive optical fiber was implanted in abdominal and upper-arm subcutaneous tissue of six diabetes patients and remained there for up to 14 days. The performance of the system was monitored during six visits to the study center during the trial. Blood glucose changes were induced by oral carbohydrate intake and insulin injections, and capillary blood glucose samples were obtained from the finger tip. The data were analyzed using linear regression and the consensus error grid analysis. Results The FiberSense worn at the upper arm exhibited excellent results during 14 wearing days, with an overall mean absolute relative difference (MARD) of 8.3% and 94.6% of the data in zone A of the consensus error grid. At the abdominal application site, FiberSense resulted in a MARD of 11.4 %, with 93.8% of the data in zone A. Conclusions The FiberSense CGM system provided consistent, reliable measurements of subcutaneous glucose levels in human clinical trial patients with diabetes for up to 14 days. PMID:23439156

  15. Glyceollins, soy isoflavone phytoalexins, improve oral glucose disposal by stimulating glucose uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyceollins (glyceollin I, II, and III), isoflavone phytoalexins synthesized by soy in response to environmental stresses such as microbial infections. Glyceollins exhibited anti-cancer and anti-diabetes effects: previously we showed that glyceollins inhibited cancer cell growth in vitro and in viv...

  16. Contrasting effects of puerarin and daidzin on glucose homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Meezan, Elias; Meezan, Elisabeth M; Jones, Kenneth; Moore, Ray; Barnes, Stephen; Prasain, Jeevan K

    2005-11-02

    Puerarin and daidzin are the major isoflavone glucosides found in kudzu dietary supplements. In this study, we demonstrated that puerarin significantly improves glucose tolerance in C57BL/6J-ob/ob mice, an animal model of type 2 diabetes mellitus, blunting the rise in blood glucose levels after i.p. administration of glucose. In contrast, daidzin, the O-glucoside, had a significant but opposite effect, impairing glucose tolerance as compared to saline-treated controls. When they were administered i.p. with (14)C-glucose to C57BL/6J lean mice, puerarin inhibited glucose uptake into tissues and incorporation into glycogen, while daidzin stimulated glucose uptake, showing an opposite effect to puerarin. Puerarin also antagonized the stimulatory effect of decyl-beta-D-thiomaltoside, an artificial primer of glycogen synthesis, which increases (14)C-glucose uptake and incorporation into glycogen in mouse liver and heart. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry procedure was used to investigate the metabolism and bioavailability of puerarin and daidzin. The blood puerarin concentration-time curve by i.p. and oral administration indicated that puerarin was four times more bioavailable via i.p. injection than via the oral route of administration. This may account for the increased hypoglycemic effect seen in the i.p. glucose tolerance test vs that seen orally. Our results suggest that puerarin is rapidly absorbed from the intestine without metabolism, while daidzin is hydrolyzed to the aglycone daidzein. The opposing effects of puerarin and daidzin on glucose homeostasis may have implications for the activity of dietary supplements that contain both of these isoflavonoids.

  17. Glucose elicits cephalic-phase insulin release in mice by activating KATP channels in taste cells.

    PubMed

    Glendinning, John I; Frim, Yonina G; Hochman, Ayelet; Lubitz, Gabrielle S; Basile, Anthony J; Sclafani, Anthony

    2017-04-01

    The taste of sugar elicits cephalic-phase insulin release (CPIR), which limits the rise in blood glucose associated with meals. Little is known, however, about the gustatory mechanisms that trigger CPIR. We asked whether oral stimulation with any of the following taste stimuli elicited CPIR in mice: glucose, sucrose, maltose, fructose, Polycose, saccharin, sucralose, AceK, SC45647, or a nonmetabolizable sugar analog. The only taste stimuli that elicited CPIR were glucose and the glucose-containing saccharides (sucrose, maltose, Polycose). When we mixed an α-glucosidase inhibitor (acarbose) with the latter three saccharides, the mice no longer exhibited CPIR. This revealed that the carbohydrates were hydrolyzed in the mouth, and that the liberated glucose triggered CPIR. We also found that increasing the intensity or duration of oral glucose stimulation caused a corresponding increase in CPIR magnitude. To identify the components of the glucose-specific taste-signaling pathway, we examined the necessity of Calhm1, P2X2+P2X3, SGLT1, and Sur1. Among these proteins, only Sur1 was necessary for CPIR. Sur1 was not necessary, however, for taste-mediated attraction to sugars. Given that Sur1 is a subunit of the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (KATP) channel and that this channel functions as a part of a glucose-sensing pathway in pancreatic β-cells, we asked whether the KATP channel serves an analogous role in taste cells. We discovered that oral stimulation with drugs known to increase (glyburide) or decrease (diazoxide) KATP signaling produced corresponding changes in glucose-stimulated CPIR. We propose that the KATP channel is part of a novel signaling pathway in taste cells that mediates glucose-induced CPIR.

  18. Robert K. Crane—Na+-glucose cotransporter to cure?

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Kirk L.

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Robert K. Crane made major contributions to our understanding of carbohydrate metabolism and transport of the intestine over a very long and productive career. This Perspective examines, briefly, his early life and academic positions, but more importantly, this Perspective highlights his contributions to the understanding of coupled Na+-glucose absorption by the small intestine. I discuss how his early hypothesis of a “cotransport” of sodium and glucose ushered in and provided the physiological explanation for the clinical treatment of acute diarrhea and cholera when using oral rehydration therapy (ORT). ORT saves millions of lives each year. Certainly, humankind is better off because of Crane's hypothesis of the Na+-glucose cotransporter that he put forth over 50 years ago? PMID:23525627

  19. Assessment of the safety of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin: reverse mutation assay, acute and 90-day subchronic repeated oral toxicity in rats, and acute no-effect level for diarrhea in humans.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Yuko; Kishimoto, Yuka; Tagami, Hiroyuki; Kanahori, Sumiko

    2013-01-01

    A series of safety assessments were performed on hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin prepared by converting the reducing terminal glucose of resistant maltodextrin into sorbitol. The reverse mutation assay did not show mutagenicity. Acute and 90-day subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats showed no death was observed in any groups, including the group receiving the highest single dose of 10 g/kg body weight or the highest dose of 5 g/kg body weight per day for 90 days. Mucous or watery stools were observed in the hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin treatment group on the acute study, which were transient and were associated with the osmotic pressure caused by intake of the high concentrations. Subchronic study showed dose-dependent increases in the weights of cecum alone, cecal contents alone, and cecum with cecal contents as well as hypertrophy of the cecal mucosal epithelium, which are considered to be common physiological responses after intake of indigestible carbohydrates. These results indicated that the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin was 10 g/kg body weight or more on the acute oral toxicity study and 5.0 g/kg body weight/day or more on the 90-day subchronic repeated oral toxicity study in rats. Further study performed in healthy adult humans showed that the acute no-effect level of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin for diarrhea was 0.8 g/kg body weight for men and more than 1.0 g/kg body weight for women. The results of the current safety assessment studies suggest that hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin is safe for human consumption.

  20. Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Healthy Men Treated with St. John's Wort.

    PubMed

    Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Damkier, Per; Christensen, Mette Marie Hougaard; Nielsen, Lene Buch-Krogh; Højlund, Kurt; Brøsen, Kim

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the over-the-counter herbal medicinal plant St. John's wort affects glucose tolerance in healthy men. To do this, we included 10 healthy men who were examined by a 2-hr oral glucose tolerance test on three occasions: A: baseline; B: after 21 days of treatment with St. John's wort; and C: at least 6 weeks after the last capsule of St. John's wort was ingested. Plasma glucose, serum insulin and C-peptide levels were measured during an oral glucose tolerance test and used for estimation of area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) as well as indices of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion. We found that treatment with St. John's wort increased total and incremental glucose AUC and 2-hr plasma glucose levels. Surprisingly, this effect was sustained and even further increased 6 weeks after the last capsule of St. John's wort was taken. No effect on indices of insulin sensitivity was seen, but indices of insulin secretion were reduced even after adjustment for insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, this study indicates that long-term treatment with St. John's wort may impair glucose tolerance by reducing insulin secretion in young, healthy men. The unregulated use of this over-the-counter drug might be a risk factor for impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes.

  1. Exogenous thyroxine improves glucose intolerance in insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Anaya, Guillermo; Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Nakano, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2017-03-01

    Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are associated with glucose intolerance, calling into question the contribution of thyroid hormones (TH) on glucose regulation. TH analogues and derivatives may be effective treatment options for glucose intolerance and insulin resistance (IR), but their potential glucoregulatory effects during conditions of impaired metabolism are not well described. To assess the effects of thyroxine (T4) on glucose intolerance in a model of insulin resistance, an oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) was performed on three groups of rats (n = 8): (1) lean, Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO), (2) obese, Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) and (3) OLETF + T4 (8.0 µg/100 g BM/day × 5 weeks). T4 attenuated glucose intolerance by 15% and decreased IR index (IRI) by 34% in T4-treated OLETF compared to untreated OLETF despite a 31% decrease in muscle Glut4 mRNA expression. T4 increased the mRNA expressions of muscle monocarboxylate transporter 10 (Mct10), deiodinase type 2 (Di2), sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and uncoupling protein 2 (Ucp2) by 1.8-, 2.2-, 2.7- and 1.4-fold, respectively, compared to OLETF. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and insulin receptor were not significantly altered suggesting that the improvements in glucose intolerance and IR were independent of enhanced insulin-mediated signaling. The results suggest that T4 treatment increased the influx of T4 in skeletal muscle and, with an increase of DI2, increased the availability of the biologically active T3 to upregulate key factors such SIRT1 and UCP2 involved in cellular metabolism and glucose homeostasis.

  2. Oral Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Today! Limited Edition T-Shirt Buy Today! The Oral Cancer Foundation The Oral Cancer Foundation is a national ... trustworthy health information: verify here. Social Networks The Oral Cancer Foundation 3419 Via Lido #205 Newport Beach Ca ...

  3. Oral Lichen Planus

    MedlinePlus

    Oral lichen planus Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Oral lichen planus (LIE-kun PLAY-nus) is an ongoing (chronic) ... that affects mucous membranes inside your mouth. Oral lichen planus may appear as white, lacy patches; red, ...

  4. Differential cognitive effects of energy drink ingredients: caffeine, taurine, and glucose.

    PubMed

    Giles, Grace E; Mahoney, Caroline R; Brunyé, Tad T; Gardony, Aaron L; Taylor, Holly A; Kanarek, Robin B

    2012-10-01

    Energy drinks containing caffeine, taurine, and glucose may improve mood and cognitive performance. However, there are no studies assessing the individual and interactive effects of these ingredients. We evaluated the effects of caffeine, taurine, and glucose alone and in combination on cognitive performance and mood in 24-hour caffeine-abstained habitual caffeine consumers. Using a randomized, double-blind, mixed design, 48 habitual caffeine consumers (18 male, 30 female) who were 24-hour caffeine deprived received one of four treatments (200 mg caffeine/0 mg taurine, 0 mg caffeine/2000 mg taurine, 200 mg caffeine/2000 mg taurine, 0 mg caffeine/0 mg taurine), on each of four separate days, separated by a 3-day wash-out period. Between-participants treatment was a glucose drink (50 g glucose, placebo). Salivary cortisol, mood and heart rate were measured. An attention task was administered 30-minutes post-treatment, followed by a working memory and reaction time task 60-minutes post-treatment. Caffeine enhanced executive control and working memory, and reduced simple and choice reaction time. Taurine increased choice reaction time but reduced reaction time in the working memory tasks. Glucose alone slowed choice reaction time. Glucose in combination with caffeine, enhanced object working memory and in combination with taurine, enhanced orienting attention. Limited glucose effects may reflect low task difficulty relative to subjects' cognitive ability. Caffeine reduced feelings of fatigue and increased tension and vigor. Taurine reversed the effects of caffeine on vigor and caffeine-withdrawal symptoms. No effects were found for salivary cortisol or heart rate. Caffeine, not taurine or glucose, is likely responsible for reported changes in cognitive performance following consumption of energy drinks, especially in caffeine-withdrawn habitual caffeine consumers.

  5. Optical coherence tomography technique for noninvasive blood glucose monitoring: phantom, animal, and human studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Kirill V.; Ashitkov, Taras V.; Larina, Irina V.; Petrova, Irina Y.; Eledrisi, Mohsen S.; Motamedi, Massoud; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2002-06-01

    Continuous noninvasive monitoring of blood glucose concentration can improve management of Diabetes Mellitus, reduce mortality, and considerably improve quality of life of diabetic patients. Recently, we proposed to use the OCT technique for noninvasive glucose monitoring. In this paper, we tested noninvasive blood glucose monitoring with the OCT technique in phantoms, animals, and human subjects. An OCT system with the wavelength of 1300 nm was used in our experiments. Phantom studies performed on aqueous suspensions of polystyrene microspheres and milk showed 3.2% decrease of exponential slope of OCT signals when glucose concentration increased from 0 to 100 mM. Theoretical calculations based on the Mie theory of scattering support the results obtained in phantoms. Bolus glucose injections and glucose clamping experiments were performed in animals (New Zealand rabbits and Yucatan micropigs). Good correlation between changes in the OCT signal slope and actual blood glucose concentration were observed in these experiments. First studies were performed in healthy human subjects (using oral glucose tolerance tests). Dependence of the slope of the OCT signals on the actual blood glucose concentration was similar to that obtained in animal studies. Our studies suggest that the OCT technique can potentially be used for noninvasive blood glucose monitoring.

  6. Validation of Point-of-Care Glucose Testing for Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vučić Lovrenčić, Marijana; Radišić Biljak, Vanja; Božičević, Sandra; Pape-Medvidović, Edita; Ljubić, Spomenka

    2013-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) glucose technology is currently considered to be insufficiently accurate for the diagnosis of diabetes. The objective of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of an innovative, interference-resistant POC glucose meter (StatStrip glucose hospital meter, Nova Biomedical, USA) in subjects with a previous history of dysglycaemia, undergoing a 75 g diagnostic oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT). Venous and capillary blood sampling for the reference laboratory procedure (RLP) and POC-glucose measurement was carried out at fasting and 2 h oGTT, and categories of glucose tolerance were classified according to 2006 WHO diagnostic criteria for the respective sample type. We found an excellent between-method correlation at fasting (r = 0.9681, P < 0.0001) and 2 h oGTT (r = 0.9768, P < 0.0001) and an almost perfect diagnostic agreement (weighted Kappa = 0.858). Within a total of 237 study subjects, 137 were diagnosed with diabetes with RLP, and only 6 of them were reclassified as having glucose intolerance with POC. The diagnostic performance of POC-fasting glucose in discriminating between the normal and any category of disturbed glucose tolerance did not differ from the RLP (P = 0.081). Results of this study indicate that StatStrip POC glucose meter could serve as a reliable tool for the diabetes diagnosis, particularly in primary healthcare facilities with dispersed blood sampling services.

  7. Hepatic overexpression of a constitutively active form of liver glycogen synthase improves glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ros, Susana; Zafra, Delia; Valles-Ortega, Jordi; García-Rocha, Mar; Forrow, Stephen; Domínguez, Jorge; Calbó, Joaquim; Guinovart, Joan J

    2010-11-26

    In this study, we tested the efficacy of increasing liver glycogen synthase to improve blood glucose homeostasis. The overexpression of wild-type liver glycogen synthase in rats had no effect on blood glucose homeostasis in either the fed or the fasted state. In contrast, the expression of a constitutively active mutant form of the enzyme caused a significant lowering of blood glucose in the former but not the latter state. Moreover, it markedly enhanced the clearance of blood glucose when fasted rats were challenged with a glucose load. Hepatic glycogen stores in rats overexpressing the activated mutant form of liver glycogen synthase were enhanced in the fed state and in response to an oral glucose load but showed a net decline during fasting. In order to test whether these effects were maintained during long term activation of liver glycogen synthase, we generated liver-specific transgenic mice expressing the constitutively active LGS form. These mice also showed an enhanced capacity to store glycogen in the fed state and an improved glucose tolerance when challenged with a glucose load. Thus, we conclude that the activation of liver glycogen synthase improves glucose tolerance in the fed state without compromising glycogenolysis in the postabsorptive state. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the activation of liver glycogen synthase may provide a potential strategy for improvement of glucose tolerance in the postprandial state.

  8. The salivary microbiome is altered in the presence of a high salivary glucose concentration

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Mor-Li; Shi, Ping; Hasturk, Hatice; Yaskell, Tina; Vargas, Jorel; Song, Xiaoqing; Cugini, Maryann; Barake, Roula; Alsmadi, Osama; Al-Mutawa, Sabiha; Ariga, Jitendra; Soparkar, Pramod; Behbehani, Jawad; Behbehani, Kazem

    2017-01-01

    Background Type II diabetes (T2D) has been associated with changes in oral bacterial diversity and frequency. It is not known whether these changes are part of the etiology of T2D, or one of its effects. Methods We measured the glucose concentration, bacterial counts, and relative frequencies of 42 bacterial species in whole saliva samples from 8,173 Kuwaiti adolescents (mean age 10.00 ± 0.67 years) using DNA probe analysis. In addition, clinical data related to obesity, dental caries, and gingivitis were collected. Data were compared between adolescents with high salivary glucose (HSG; glucose concentration ≥ 1.0 mg/d, n = 175) and those with low salivary glucose (LSG, glucose concentration < 0.1 mg/dL n = 2,537). Results HSG was associated with dental caries and gingivitis in the study population. The overall salivary bacterial load in saliva decreased with increasing salivary glucose concentration. Under HSG conditions, the bacterial count for 35 (83%) of 42 species was significantly reduced, and relative bacterial frequencies in 27 species (64%) were altered, as compared with LSG conditions. These alterations were stronger predictors of high salivary glucose than measures of oral disease, obesity, sleep or fitness. Conclusions HSG was associated with a reduction in overall bacterial load and alterations to many relative bacterial frequencies in saliva when compared with LSG in samples from adolescents. We propose that hyperglycemia due to obesity and/or T2D results in HSG and subsequent acidification of the oral environment, leading to a generalized perturbation in the oral microbiome. This suggests a basis for the observation that hyperglycemia is associated with an increased risk of dental erosion, dental caries, and gingivitis. We conclude that HSG in adolescents may be predicted from salivary microbial diversity or frequency, and that the changes in the oral microbial composition seen in adolescents with developing metabolic disease may the consequence

  9. [The determination of glucose, sucrose and fructose by the method of capillary electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Yakuba, Yu F; Markovsky, M G

    2015-01-01

    The possibilities of different regimes of micellar capillary electrophoresis using negative polarity and alkaline electrolyte for determination of glucose, sucrose, fructose in extracts of vegetative organs of plants and products of fruits and grapes processing have been studied. A comparative evaluation of the limits of detection of glucose, sucrose, fructose for developed electrolytes have been performed, the advantages and disadvantages of techniques have been discussed. It is recommended to use an aqueous electrolyte containing 0.5% potassium sorbate, 0.62% cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, and 0.02% potassium hydroxide. The analyzed components were detected at 254 nm. The sample was dosed hydrodynamically (30 mbar, 5 sec). Negative voltage 16 kV is recommended, current--54 ± 4 µA, capillary thermostating at 24 °C is applied, the analysis time--15 min. The detection limits for fructose and glucose is 0.03 g/dm3 to 0.07 g of sucrose/dm3. Linearity is stored for each component to 5.0 g/dm 3 inclusive. Electrophoretic mobility of carbohydrates was (10(-4) sm2V(-1)sec(-1)): fructose--3.12, glucose--3.03, sucrose--2.74. Approximate time of release: glucose--13 min, sucrose--13.5 min, fructose--12.5 min. The developed options for mass concentration determining of mono- and disaccharides provide complete separation of the components. Anions, glycerol, ethylene glycol, propylene glycol and butylene isomers do not affect the analysis results.

  10. Effects of the intake of Undaria pinnatifida (Wakame) and its sporophylls (Mekabu) on postprandial glucose and insulin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tanemura, Yoko; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Sakuma, Masae; Nii, Yoshitaka; Taketani, Yutaka; Takeda, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Long-term suppression of postprandial glucose concentration is an important dietary strategy for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. Because previous reports have suggested that seaweed may exert anti-diabetic effects in animals, the effects of Wakame or Mekabu intake with 200 g white rice, 50 g boiled soybeans, 60 g potatoes, and 40 g broccoli on postprandial glucose, insulin and free fatty acid levels were investigated in healthy subjects. Plasma glucose levels at 30 min and glucose area under the curve (AUC) at 0-30 min after the Mekabu meal were significantly lower than that after the control meal. Plasma glucose and glucose AUC were not different between the Wakame and control meals. Postprandial serum insulin and its AUC and free fatty acid concentration were not different among the three meals. In addition, fullness, satisfaction, and wellness scores were not different among the three meals. Thus, consumption of 70 g Mekabu with a white rice-based breakfast reduces postprandial glucose concentration.

  11. Ethanol Production from Glucose and Xylose by Immobilized Zymomonas mobilis CP4(pZB5)

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, M.; Davison, B.H.; Krishnan, M.S.; Nghiem, n.P.; Shattuck, C.K.

    1999-05-02

    Fermentation of glucose-xylose mixtures to ethanol was investigated in batch and continuous experiments using immobilized recombinant Zymomonas mobilis CP4(pZB5). This microorganism was immobilized by entrapment in k-carrageenan beads having a diameter of 1.5-2.5 mm. Batch experiments showed that the immobilized cells co-fermented glucose and xylose to ethanol and that the presence of glucose improved the xylose utilization rate. Batch fermentation of rice straw hydrolyzate containing 76 g/L glucose and 33.8 g/L xylose gave an ethanol concentration of 44.3 g/L after 24 hours, corresponding to a yeild of 0.46 g ethanol/g sugars. Comparable results were achieved with a synthetic sugar control. Continuous fermentation runs were performed in a laboratory scale fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBR). Glucose-xylose feed mixtures were run through the FBR at residence times of 2 to 4 hours. Glucose conversion to ethanol was maintained above 98% in all continuous runs. Xylose conversion to ethanol was highest at 91.5% for a feed containing 50 g/L glucose-13 g/L xylose at a dilution rate of 0.24 h-1. The xylose conversion to ethanol decreased with increasing feed xylose concentration, dilution rate and age of the immobilized cells. Volumetric ethanol productivities in the range of 6.5 to 15.3 g/L-h were obtained.

  12. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. PMID:26205245

  13. Optoelectronic Apparatus Measures Glucose Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Rovati, Luigi L.

    2003-01-01

    An optoelectronic apparatus has been invented as a noninvasive means of measuring the concentration of glucose in the human body. The apparatus performs polarimetric and interferometric measurements of the human eye to acquire data from which the concentration of glucose in the aqueous humor can be computed. Because of the importance of the concentration of glucose in human health, there could be a large potential market for instruments based on this apparatus.

  14. Cellulose production from glucose using a glucose dehydrogenase gene (gdh)-deficient mutant of Gluconacetobacter xylinus and its use for bioconversion of sweet potato pulp.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Toru; Takamine, Kazunori; Kitazato, Masaya; Morita, Tetsuya; Naritomi, Takaaki; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2005-04-01

    A gene fragment encoding a putative pyrroloquinoline quinone glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ GDH) was cloned from a bacterial cellulose (BC)-forming acetic acid bacterium, Gluconacetobacter xylinus (=Acetobacter xylinum) strain BPR 2001, which was isolated as a high BC producer when using fructose as the carbon source. A GDH-deficient mutant of strain BPR 2001, namely GD-I, was then generated via gene disruption using the cloned gene fragment. Strain GD-I produced no gluconic acid but produced 4.1 g.l(-1) of BC aerobically in medium containing glucose as the carbon source. The ability of strain GD-I to convert glucose to BC was approximately 1.7-fold higher than that of the wild type. Strain GD-I was also able to produce 5.0 g.l(-1) of BC from a saccharified solution, which was derived from sweet potato pulp by enzymatic saccharification. Supplementation of ethanol during aerobic cultivation further increased the concentration of BC produced by strain GD-I to 7.0 g.l(-1). The rate of conversion from glucose to BC under these cultivation conditions was equivalent to that of strain BPR 2001 cultivated with fructose as the carbon source.

  15. Direct ethanol production from glucose, xylose and sugarcane bagasse by the corn endophytic fungi Fusarium verticillioides and Acremonium zeae.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Maíra N; Guimarães, Valéria M; Falkoski, Daniel L; Visser, Evan M; Siqueira, Germano A; Milagres, Adriane M F; de Rezende, Sebastião T

    2013-10-10

    Production of ethanol with two corn endophytic fungi, Fusarium verticillioides and Acremonium zeae, was studied. The yield of ethanol from glucose, xylose and a mixture of both sugars were 0.47, 0.46 and 0.50g/g ethanol/sugar for F. verticillioides and 0.37, 0.39 and 0.48g/g ethanol/sugar for A. zeae. Both fungi were able to co-ferment glucose and xylose. Ethanol production from 40g/L of pre-treated sugarcane bagasse was 4.6 and 3.9g/L for F. verticillioides and A. zeae, respectively, yielding 0.31g/g of ethanol per consumed sugar. Both fungi studied were capable of co-fermenting glucose and xylose at high yields. Moreover, they were able to produce ethanol directly from lignocellulosic biomass, demonstrating to be suitable microorganisms for consolidated bioprocessing.

  16. Effects of sleep restriction on glucose control and insulin secretion during diet-induced weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Nedeltcheva, A. V.; Imperial, J. G.; Penev, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Insufficient sleep is associated with changes in glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and insulin action. Despite widespread use of weight-loss diets for metabolic risk reduction, the effects of insufficient sleep on glucose regulation in overweight dieters are not known. To examine the consequences of recurrent sleep restriction on 24-hour blood glucose control during diet-induced weight loss, 10 overweight and obese adults (3F/7M; mean [SD] age 41 [5] y; BMI 27.4 [2.0] kg/m2) completed two 14-day treatments with hypocaloric diet and 8.5 or 5.5-h nighttime sleep opportunity in random order 7 [3] months apart. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) data, fasting lipids and free-fatty acids (FFA), and 24-hour blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and counter-regulatory hormone measurements were collected after each treatment. Participants had comparable weight loss (1.0 [0.3] BMI units) during each treatment. Bedtime restriction reduced sleep by 131 [30] min/day. Recurrent sleep curtailment decreased 24-hour serum insulin concentrations (i.e. enhanced 24-hour insulin economy) without changes in oral glucose tolerance and 24-hour glucose control. This was accompanied by a decline in fasting blood glucose, increased fasting FFA which suppressed normally following glucose ingestion, and lower total and LDL cholesterol concentrations. Sleep-loss-related changes in counter-regulatory hormone secretion during the IVGTT limited the utility of the test in this study. In conclusion, sleep restriction enhanced 24-hour insulin economy without compromising glucose homeostasis in overweight individuals placed on a balanced hypocaloric diet. The changes in fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipid and FFA concentrations in sleep-restricted dieters resembled the pattern of human metabolic adaptation to reduced carbohydrate availability. PMID:22513492

  17. [Glucose homeostasis in children. I. Regulation of blood glucose].

    PubMed

    Otto Buczkowska, E; Szirer, G; Jarosz-Chobot, P

    2001-01-01

    The amount of glucose in the circulation depends on its absorption from the intestine, uptake by and release from the liver and uptake by peripheral tissues. Insulin and glucagon together control the metabolities required by peripheral tissues and both are involved in maintaining glucose homeostasis. Insulin is considered to be an anabolic hormone in that it promotes the synthesis of protein, lipid and glycogen. The key target tissues for insulin are liver, muscles and adipose tissue. Glucagon acts largely to increase catabolic processes. Between meals or during fast, the most tightly regulated process is the release of glucose from the liver. During fasting glucose is produced from glycogen and is formed by enzymes on the gluconeogenic pathway. Fetal metabolism is directed to ensure anabolism with formation of glycogen, fat and protein. Glucogen is stored in the liver and serves as the immediate source of new glucose during first few hours after birth. Glucose is the most important substrate for brain metabolism. Due to the large size of neonatal brain in relation to body weight cerebral glucose consumption is particularly high. Postnatal hormonal changes have a central role in regulating glucose mobilization through glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The initial glucagon surge is the key adaptive change which triggers the switch to glucose production. The control of insulin and glucagon secretion is of fundamental importance during first hours after birth. Children have a decreased tolerance to starvation when compared with adults, they are more prone to develop hypoglycaemia after short fasting. The faster rate in the fall of blood glucose and gluconeogenic substrates and rapid rate of ketogenesis are characteristic features of fasting adaptation in children.

  18. Preoperative octreotide therapy and surgery in acromegaly: associations between glucose homeostasis and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Helseth, R; Carlsen, S M; Bollerslev, J; Svartberg, J; Øksnes, M; Skeie, S; Fougner, S L

    2016-02-01

    In acromegaly, high GH/IGF-1 levels associate with abnormal glucose metabolism. Somatostatin analogs (SSAs) reduce GH and IGF-1 but inhibit insulin secretion. We studied glucose homeostasis in de novo patients with acromegaly and changes in glucose metabolism after treatment with SSA and surgery. In this post hoc analysis from a randomized controlled trial, 55 de novo patients with acromegaly, not using antidiabetic medication, were included. Before surgery, 26 patients received SSAs for 6 months. HbA1c, fasting glucose, and oral glucose tolerance test were performed at baseline, after SSA pretreatment and at 3 months postoperative. Area under curve of glucose (AUC-G) was calculated. Glucose homeostasis was compared to baseline levels of GH and IGF-1, change after SSA pretreatment, and remission both after SSA pretreatment and 3 months postoperative. In de novo patients, IGF-1/GH levels did not associate with baseline glucose parameters. After SSA pretreatment, changes in GH/IGF-1 correlated positively to change in HbA1c levels (both p < 0.03). HbA1c, fasting glucose, and AUC-G increased significantly during SSA pretreatment in patients not achieving hormonal control (all p < 0.05) but did not change significantly in patients with normalized hormone levels. At 3 months postoperative, HbA1c, fasting glucose, and AUC-G were significantly reduced in both cured and not cured patients (all p < 0.05). To conclude, in de novo patients with acromegaly, disease activity did not correlate with glucose homeostasis. Surgical treatment of acromegaly improved glucose metabolism in both cured and not cured patients, while SSA pretreatment led to deterioration in glucose homeostasis in patients not achieving biochemical control.

  19. Sex-related differences in peripheral glucose metabolism in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Paula, F J; Pimenta, W P; Saad, M J; Paccola, G M; Piccinato, C E; Foss, M C

    1990-01-01

    The metabolic response of muscle tissue to glucose ingestion was studied in 10 normal men (M) and women (F) by using the forearm balance technique and indirect calorimetry simultaneously. During the 3 hours after a 75 g--oral glucose load, glucose uptake per unit muscle mass was significantly higher in women than in men, F = 187.3 +/- 26.9 vs M = 116.7 +/- 9.5 mg/100 g forearm muscle (P less than 0.05). A significant difference in muscle glucose fate was also observed since the amount of glucose utilized through a nonoxidative pathway was significantly higher in women, F = 84.5 +/- 2.6% (161.8 +/- 27.3 mg/100 g forearm muscle) vs M = 75.3 +/- 2.2% (87.2 +/- 8.6 mg/100 g forearm muscle) (P less than 0.05), whereas the amount of glucose oxidized in relation to glucose uptake was significantly higher in men, M = 24.7 +/- 2.2% (28.2 +/- 3.2 mg/100 g forearm muscle) vs F = 15.5 +/- 2.6% (27.8 +/- 5.4 mg/100 g forearm muscle) (P less than 0.05). No significant differences in insulin response to glucose ingestion were detected between groups. The women showed greater suppression of serum free fatty acids (FFA) levels in relation to basal levels than men. We conclude that: 1) after ingesting 75 g glucose, normal women showed greater glucose uptake per unit muscle mass than normal men, 2) for 3 hours after the ingestion of 75 g glucose, the predominant tendency toward utilizing glucose by a nonoxidative pathway is more marked in normal women than in normal men, and 3) the higher glucose uptake per unit muscle mass in the female group in the presence of an insulin response not significantly different from that of the male group suggests that muscle insulin sensitivity is greater in normal women.

  20. Glucose Absorption by the Bacillary Band of Trichuris muris

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Michael; Nejsum, Peter; Mejer, Helena; Denwood, Matthew; Thamsborg, Stig M.

    2016-01-01

    Background A common characteristic of Trichuris spp. infections in humans and animals is the variable but low efficacy of single-dose benzimidazoles currently used in mass drug administration programmes against human trichuriasis. The bacillary band, a specialised morphological structure of Trichuris spp., as well as the unique partly intracellular habitat of adult Trichuris spp. may affect drug absorption and perhaps contribute to the low drug accumulation in the worm. However, the exact function of the bacillary band is still unknown. Methodology We studied the dependency of adult Trichuris muris on glucose and/or amino acids for survival in vitro and the absorptive function of the bacillary band. The viability of the worms was evaluated using a motility scale from 0 to 3, and the colorimetric assay Alamar Blue was utilised to measure the metabolic activity. The absorptive function of the bacillary band in living worms was explored using a fluorescent glucose analogue (6-NBDG) and confocal microscopy. To study the absorptive function of the bacillary band in relation to 6-NBDG, the oral uptake was minimised or excluded by sealing the oral cavity with glue and agarose. Principal Findings Glucose had a positive effect on both the motility (p < 0.001) and metabolic activity (p < 0.001) of T. muris in vitro, whereas this was not the case for amino acids. The 6-NBDG was observed in the pores of the bacillary band and within the stichocytes of the living worms, independent of oral sealing. Conclusions/Significance Trichuris muris is dependent on glucose for viability in vitro, and the bacillary band has an absorptive function in relation to 6-NBDG, which accumulates within the stichocytes. The absorptive function of the bacillary band calls for an exploration of its possible role in the uptake of anthelmintics, and as a potential anthelmintic target relevant for future drug development. PMID:27588682

  1. Dopaminergic drugs in type 2 diabetes and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lopez Vicchi, Felicitas; Luque, Guillermina Maria; Brie, Belen; Nogueira, Juan Patricio; Garcia Tornadu, Isabel; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia

    2016-07-01

    The importance of dopamine in central nervous system function is well known, but its effects on glucose homeostasis and pancreatic β cell function are beginning to be unraveled. Mutant mice lacking dopamine type 2 receptors (D2R) are glucose intolerant and have abnormal insulin secretion. In humans, administration of neuroleptic drugs, which block dopamine receptors, may cause hyperinsulinemia, increased weight gain and glucose intolerance. Conversely, treatment with the dopamine precursor l-DOPA in patients with Parkinson's disease reduces insulin secretion upon oral glucose tolerance test, and bromocriptine improves glycemic control and glucose tolerance in obese type 2 diabetic patients as well as in non diabetic obese animals and humans. The actions of dopamine on glucose homeostasis and food intake impact both the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. Different central actions of the dopamine system may mediate its metabolic effects such as: (i) regulation of hypothalamic noradrenaline output, (ii) participation in appetite control, and (iii) maintenance of the biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. On the other hand, dopamine inhibits prolactin, which has metabolic functions; and, at the pancreatic beta cell dopamine D2 receptors inhibit insulin secretion. We review the evidence obtained in animal models and clinical studies that posited dopamine receptors as key elements in glucose homeostasis and ultimately led to the FDA approval of bromocriptine in adults with type 2 diabetes to improve glycemic control. Furthermore, we discuss the metabolic consequences of treatment with neuroleptics which target the D2R, that should be monitored in psychiatric patients to prevent the development in diabetes, weight gain, and hypertriglyceridemia.

  2. Ambivalent role of gallated catechins in glucose tolerance in humans: a novel insight into non-absorbable gallated catechin-derived inhibitors of glucose absorption.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Jin, J Y; Baek, W K; Park, S H; Sung, H Y; Kim, Y K; Lee, J; Song, D K

    2009-12-01

    Prolonged postprandial hyperglycemia is a detrimental factor for type 2 diabetes and obesity. The benefit of green tea extract (GTE) consumption still requires confirmation. We report the effects of circulating green tea catechins on blood glucose and insulin levels. Oral glucose loading 1 h after GTE ingestion in humans led to higher blood glucose and insulin levels than in control subjects. Gallated catechins were required for these effects, although within the intestinal lumen they have been known to decrease glucose and cholesterol absorption. Treatment with epigallocatechin-3-gallate hindered 2-deoxyglucose uptake into liver, fat, pancreatic beta-cell, and skeletal muscle cell lines. The glucose intolerance was ameliorated by gallated catechin-deficient GTE or GTE mixed with polyethylene glycol, which was used as an inhibitor of intestinal absorption of gallated catechins. These findings may suggest that the gallated catechin when it is in the circulation elevates blood glucose level by blocking normal glucose uptake into the tissues, resulting in secondary hyperinsulinemia, whereas it decreases glucose entry into the circulation when they are inside the intestinal lumen. These findings encourage the development of non-absorbable derivatives of gallated catechins for preventative treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity, which would specifically induce only the positive luminal effect.

  3. [Prevention of oral diseases].

    PubMed

    Vodanović, Marin

    2013-06-01

    Oral health is essential to general health and quality of life. Ever more people are affected with oral diseases. Dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis are the most common oral diseases and they can be prevented. Oral health promotion and oral disease prevention programs should be incorporated in national health strategies. Inability to understand health information can be a profound disadvantage to patients when asked to take responsibility for their health. Increasing the level of oral health literacy and improvement of communication between patients and dentists by avoiding the usage of professional dental terminology should be included in each oral prevention program.

  4. Distribution of fasting plasma glucose and prevalence of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes in the Mexican paediatric population.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Romero, Fernando; Violante, Rafael; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha

    2009-07-01

    Published data on the distribution of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in children are scarce. We therefore set out to examine the distribution of FPG and determine the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes (T2-DM) in Mexican children aged 6-18 years in a community-based cross-sectional study. A total of 1534 apparently healthy children were randomly enrolled and underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. IFG was defined by an FPG value between >or=100 and <126 mg/dL, IGT by glucose concentration 2-h post-load between >or=140 and <200 mg/dL, and T2-DM by glucose concentration 2-h post-load >or=200 mg/dL. The FPG level at the 75(th) percentile of distribution was 98.0, 100.0 and 99.0 mg/dL for children aged 6-9, 10-14 and 15-18 years, respectively; the 95(th) percentile of FPG was greater than 100 mg/dL for all the age strata. In the population overall, the prevalences of IFG, IGT, and T2-DM were 18.3%, 5.2% and 0.6%, respectively. Among obese children and adolescents, the prevalences of IFG, IGT, IFG + IGT and T2-DM were 19.1%, 5.7%, 2.5% and 1.3%. Our study shows a high prevalence of prediabetes and is the first that reports the distribution of FPG in Mexican children and adolescents.

  5. Alginate cryogel based glucose biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatoni, Amin; Windy Dwiasi, Dian; Hermawan, Dadan

    2016-02-01

    Cryogel is macroporous structure provides a large surface area for biomolecule immobilization. In this work, an alginate cryogel based biosensor was developed to detect glucose. The cryogel was prepared using alginate cross-linked by calcium chloride under sub-zero temperature. This porous structure was growth in a 100 μL micropipette tip with a glucose oxidase enzyme entrapped inside the cryogel. The glucose detection was based on the colour change of redox indicator, potassium permanganate, by the hydrogen peroxide resulted from the conversion of glucose. The result showed a porous structure of alginate cryogel with pores diameter of 20-50 μm. The developed glucose biosensor was showed a linear response in the glucose detection from 1.0 to 5.0 mM with a regression of y = 0.01x+0.02 and R2 of 0.994. Furthermore, the glucose biosensor was showed a high operational stability up to 10 times of uninterrupted glucose detections.

  6. Antihypertensive drugs and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rizos, Christos V; Elisaf, Moses S

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension plays a major role in the development and progression of micro- and macrovascular disease. Moreover, increased blood pressure often coexists with additional cardiovascular risk factors such as insulin resistance. As a result the need for a comprehensive management of hypertensive patients is critical. However, the various antihypertensive drug categories have different effects on glucose metabolism. Indeed, angiotensin receptor blockers as well as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors have been associated with beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have an overall neutral effect on glucose metabolism. However, some members of the CCBs class such as azelnidipine and manidipine have been shown to have advantageous effects on glucose homeostasis. On the other hand, diuretics and β-blockers have an overall disadvantageous effect on glucose metabolism. Of note, carvedilol as well as nebivolol seem to differentiate themselves from the rest of the β-blockers class, being more attractive options regarding their effect on glucose homeostasis. The adverse effects of some blood pressure lowering drugs on glucose metabolism may, to an extent, compromise their cardiovascular protective role. As a result the effects on glucose homeostasis of the various blood pressure lowering drugs should be taken into account when selecting an antihypertensive treatment, especially in patients which are at high risk for developing diabetes. PMID:25068013

  7. Non-nutritive sweeteners: no class effect on the glycemic or appetite responses to ingested glucose

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Charlotte E.; Wasse, Lucy K.; Astbury, Nerys; Nandra, Gurinder; McLaughlin, John T.

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable interest in whether non-nutritive sweeteners are sensed in the gastrointestinal tract to modulate appetitive or absorptive responses to ingested carbohydrate. We determined the effect of a panel of non-nutritive sweeteners, aspartame, saccharin and acesulfame-K, delivered in doses that would be consumed in normal usage. Each was given in combination with glucose, assessing their effect on glycemic responses and appetite in ten healthy human subjects. There was no additional effect of aspartame or saccharin on the blood glucose response to oral glucose at any time point, although acesulfame-K exerted a small effect. However, none had an effect on perceptions of hunger or fullness. We conclude that there is no consistent evidence that non-nutrient sweeteners, when acutely consumed with glucose in dietetically relevant doses, have a class effect in modulating blood glucose in healthy human subjects. However, acesulfame-K may require further exploration. PMID:24595225

  8. Acute elevation of endogenous prolactin does not influence glucose homeostasis in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Klimes, I; Jurcovicová, J; Jezová, D

    1993-01-01

    The diabetogenic effect of prolactin observed in patients with pathological hyperprolactinaemia was verified in healthy subjects. Plasma prolactin elevation was induced by administration of a dopamine antagonist drug domperidone (Motilium 10 mg orally, 9 subjects) and 2 h later the oral glucose tolerance test was performed. The influence of dopamine receptor stimulation on glucose homeostasis was tested by dopamine infusion (0.3 mg in saline or 20% glucose, 1 g/min for 60 min, 11 subjects). After the blockade of dopamine receptors, a significant and prolonged increase of prolactin concentration was found. However, the levels of glucose, insulin, and C-peptide either before or after the glucose load were not different from control ones. The decreased number of insulin receptors (1.97 +/- 0.41 vs 0.51 +/- 0.14 pmol per 2.10(9) red blood cells) was compensated by increased affinity (0.51 +/- 0.17 vs 1.00 +/- 0.22 Ke 10(8) mol.-1 per l]) of insulin receptors. The stimulation of dopamine receptors showed a negligible effect on glucose regulation. It may be suggested that an endogenous increase of prolactin concentration in the physiological range does not participate in the regulation of glucose homeostasis in healthy subjects.

  9. Influence of temperature on the precision of noninvasive glucose sensing by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Chen, Wenliang; Chen, Yun; Xu, Kexin

    2008-02-01

    The use of near-infrared spectroscopy for the monitoring of blood glucose concentration is limited by many ambiguous factors, which leads to the prediction precision is not satisfied. Due to the weak interested signal and the difficulty to quantify the physiological noise directly, the absorbance induced by glucose concentration and temperature was analyzed based on Beer-Lambert Law and displacement between glucose and water. Then the transmittance of glucose aqueous solution in different temperatures was measured by spectrometer to investigate the influence of glucose concentration and temperature. As it's difficult to distinguish the influence of temperature from the diffuse reflectance, the Monte Carlo simulation was used to compute the light intensity induced by the change in glucose concentration and physiological temperature. Finally, the influence of actual physiological temperature on the prediction model of glucose concentration was estimated based on the oral glucose tolerance tests of two diabetics. The result showed that, near the normal physiological temperature, the intensity of diffuse reflectance caused by -0.1 °C change in temperature was equivalent to that caused by 2.7 mmol/L change in glucose concentration. Moreover, the proportion of prediction error induced by temperature to the total error was more than 50%.

  10. Monitoring of tissue optical properties using OCT: application for blood glucose analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Kirill V.; Eledrisi, Mohsen S.; Ashitkov, Taras V.; Motamedi, Massoud; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2002-07-01

    Noninvasive monitoring of tissue optical properties in real time could significantly improve diagnostics and management of various diseases. Recently we proposed to use high- resolution Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) technique for measurement of tissue scattering coefficient at the depth of up to 1mm. Our pilot studies performed in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that measurement of tissue scattering with this technique can potentially be applied for noninvasive monitoring of blood glucose concentration. High resolution and coherent photon detection of the OCT technique allowed detection of glucose-induced changes in the scattering coefficient. In this paper we report results of in vivo studies performed in dog, New Zealand rabbits, and first human subjects. OCT system with the wavelength of 1300 nm was used in our experiments. OCT signal slope was measured and compared with actual blood glucose concentration. Bolus glucose injections and glucose clamping administrations were used in animal studies. OCT signals were recorded form human subjects during oral glucose tolerance test. Results obtained form both animal and human studies show good correlation between slope of the OCT signals and actual blood glucose concentration measured using standard glucometesr. Sensitivity and accuracy of blood glucose concentrations monitoring with the OCT is discussed. Obtained result suggest that OCT is a promising technique for noninvasive monitoring of tissue analytes including glucose.

  11. Fermentable dietary fiber increases GLP-1 secretion and improves glucose homeostasis despite increased intestinal glucose transport capacity in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Massimino, S P; McBurney, M I; Field, C J; Thomson, A B; Keelan, M; Hayek, M G; Sunvold, G D

    1998-10-01

    Ileal proglucagon gene expression and postprandial plasma concentrations of proglucagon-derived peptides are reported to change with the type and quantity of dietary fiber ingested by rats. Within the intestine, proglucagon encodes several proglucagon-derived peptides known to modulate intestinal absorption capacity and pancreatic insulin secretion. To determine whether the chronic ingestion of fermentable dietary fiber regulates the expression and synthesis of proglucagon-derived peptides in the distal intestine to modulate glucose homeostasis, the following study was conducted: 16 adult dogs (23 +/- 2 kg) were fed isoenergetic, isonitrogenous diets containing a mixture of high fermentable dietary fibers (HFF) or low fermentable (LFF) wood cellulose for 14 d in a randomized cross-over design. Food was withheld for 16 h before an oral glucose tolerance test was conducted supplying 2 g of glucose/kg body wt, and peripheral blood was collected via a hind-leg catheter at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min for plasma glucose, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)NH2 (GLP-1) analyses. Intestinal samples were collected after the second dietary treatment. Ileal proglucagon mRNA, intestinal (GLP-1) concentrations and the integrated area under the curves (AUC) for plasma GLP-1 and insulin were greater and plasma glucose AUC was reduced when dogs were fed the HFF diet compared to the LFF diet (P < 0.05). Intestinal villi heights, brush border and basolateral glucose transporter protein abundance and jejunal transport capacities were significantly greater when dogs were fed the HFF diet than when fed the LFF diet. In conclusion, improvements in glucose homeostasis are observed in healthy dogs when they ingest fermentable fibers.

  12. Identifying glucose thresholds for incident diabetes by physiological analysis: a mathematical solution.

    PubMed

    Ferrannini, Ele; Manca, Maria Laura

    2015-04-01

    Plasma glucose thresholds for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes are currently based on outcome data (risk of retinopathy), an inherently ill-conditioned approach. A radically different approach is to consider the mechanisms that control plasma glucose, rather than its relation to an outcome. We developed a constraint optimization algorithm to find the minimal glucose levels associated with the maximized combination of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function, the two main mechanisms of glucose homeostasis. We used a training cohort of 1,474 subjects (22% prediabetic, 7.7% diabetic) in whom insulin sensitivity was measured by the clamp technique and β-cell function was determined by mathematical modeling of an oral glucose tolerance test. Optimized fasting glucose levels were ≤ 87 and ≤ 89 mg/dl in ≤ 45-yr-old women and men, respectively, and ≤ 92 and ≤ 95 mg/dl in >45-yr-old women and men, respectively; the corresponding optimized 2-h glucose levels were ≤ 96, ≤ 98, ≤ 103, and ≤ 105 mg/dl. These thresholds were validated in three prospective cohorts of nondiabetic subjects (Relationship Between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease Study, Botnia Study, and Mexico City Diabetes Study) with baseline and follow-up oral glucose tolerance tests. Of 5,593 participants, 452 progressed to diabetes. Similarly, in the three cohorts, subjects with glucose levels above the estimated thresholds had an odds ratio of 3.74 (95% confidence interval = 2.64-5.48) of progressing, substantially higher than the risk carried by baseline conventionally defined prediabetes [odds ratio = 2.32 (95% confidence interval = 1.91-2.81)]. The concept that optimization of glucose concentrations by direct measures of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function identifies gender- and age-specific thresholds that bear on disease progression is proven in a physiologically sound, quantifiable manner.

  13. Blood glucose clearance after feeding and exercise in polysaccharide storage myopathy.

    PubMed

    De La Corte, F D; Valberg, S J; Mickelson, J R; Hower-Moritz, M

    1999-07-01

    Polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) in Quarter Horses (QH) and QH crosses is a glycogen storage disorder in which blood glucose clearance and insulin sensitivity, following an i.v. or oral glucose challenge, are enhanced. Exercise is known also to enhance glucose uptake into skeletal muscle in many animal species. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the effect of exercise on glucose clearance in PSSM and control horses when an oral carbohydrate meal (8 Mcal sweet feed) was fed following either 12 h fasting alone (NEX protocol) or following fasting and a standard exercise protocol (EX protocol). In the NEX protocol, horses fasted 12 h and then were fed 8 megacalories (Mcal) of sweet feed (2.3 kg). In the EX protocol, horses were fed sweet feed 2 h after an exercise test (SET). Blood glucose was analysed for < 480 min after feeding. Muscle biopsies were taken before and after the EX protocol. With the NEX protocol, the mean of all blood glucose and insulin concentrations were significantly lower in fed-PSSM horses than controls (P < 0.013). The EX protocol in control horses caused a less pronounced percentage change in glucose concentration from baseline following feeding compared to the NEX protocol (mean peak EX 26.5% vs. NEX 70.2%, respectively) (P < 0.0003). In PSSM horses, the EX protocol also resulted in a lower percent change in glucose concentration following feeding compared to the NEX protocol (44.7 vs. 67.5%, respectively) (P = 0.021). The magnitude of the difference in percentage change of blood glucose concentration with the EX protocol was less in PSSM than that seen for controls (mean peak PSSM-EX 44.7% vs. 26.5% for controls, respectively) (P < 0.006). No significant differences in the insulin:glucose ratios were found for control horses between NEX and EX. In PSSM horses, the insulin:glucose ratio was significantly increased in the EX vs. NEX. In conclusion, exercise in normal horses results in enhanced glucose clearance following

  14. Effect of acipimox on plasma lipids and glucose/insulin in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vera, I; Bonet, B; Viana, M; Herrera, E; Indart, A

    2002-01-01

    To determine how a reduction in maternal hypertriglyceridemia during late pregnancy may affect glucose/insulin relationships, pregnant and virgin rats were orally treated with acipimox, a potent antilipolytic agent. In 20-day pregnant rats receiving 80 mg of acipimox, plasma triglycerides (TG), free fatty acids (FFA), and glycerol decreased more than in virgin rats shortly after the drug (up to 7 hours), when compared with animals treated with distilled water, whereas plasma glucose level was unaffected by the treatment in either group of rats. When acipimox was given every 12 hours from day 17 to day 20 of pregnancy, plasma TG, FFA, and glycerol levels progressively increased, whereas they either decreased or did not change in virgin rats receiving the same treatment, with no effect in plasma glucose levels in either group. Fetal body weight was lower than in controls in 20-day pregnant rats that received acipimox for 3 days. On day 20 of pregnancy, 3 hours after receiving acipimox or distilled water, rats received a 2 g glucose/kg oral load and it was found that the change in plasma glucose was similar in both groups, whereas the increase in plasma insulin was greater in pregnant rats treated with acipimox. However, no difference was found in either variable after the oral glucose load in virgin rats receiving acipimox or distilled water. No differences in plasma glucose levels were found after intravenous (i.v.) administration of insulin in pregnant rats treated or not treated with acipimox. In conclusion, present results show that administration of acipimox during the last days of gestation inhibited lipolysis and decreased fetal weight. Over a short period of time, in pregnant rats, reductions of plasma FFA and TG after acipimox treatment improved the glucose-induced insulin release, but did not seem to have any effect in peripheral insulin resistance.

  15. Sweet delusion. Glucose drinks fail to counteract ego depletion.

    PubMed

    Lange, Florian; Eggert, Frank

    2014-04-01

    Initial acts of self-control have repeatedly been shown to reduce individuals' performance on a consecutive self-control task. In addition, sugar containing drinks have been demonstrated to counteract this so-called ego-depletion effect, both when being ingested and when merely being sensed in the oral cavity. However, since the underlying evidence is less compelling than suggested, replications are crucially required. In Experiment 1, 70 participants consumed a drink containing either sugar or a non-caloric sweetener between two administrations of delay-discounting tasks. Experiment 2 (N=115) was designed to unravel the psychological function of oral glucose sensing by manipulating the temporal delay between a glucose mouth rinse and the administration of the consecutive self-control task. Despite applying powerful research designs, no effect of sugar sensing or ingestion on ego depletion could be detected. These findings add to previous challenges of the glucose model of self-control and highlight the need for independent replications.

  16. Involvement of pregnane X receptor in the impaired glucose utilization induced by atorvastatin in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zhaoli; Shu, Nan; Xu, Ping; Wang, Fan; Zhong, Zeyu; Sun, Binbin; Li, Feng; Zhang, Mian; Zhao, Kaijing; Tang, Xiange; Wang, Zhongjian; Zhu, Liang; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong

    2016-01-15

    Accumulating evidences demonstrated that statins impaired glucose utilization. This study was aimed to investigate whether PXR was involved in the atorvastatin-impaired glucose utilization. Rifampicin/PCN served as PXR activator control. Glucose utilization, glucose uptake, protein levels of GLUT2, GCK, PDK2, PEPCK1 and G6Pase in HepG2 cells were measured. PXR inhibitors, PXR overexpression and PXR siRNA were applied to verify the role of PXR in atorvastatin-impaired glucose utilization in cells. Hypercholesterolemia rats induced by high fat diet feeding, orally received atorvastatin (5 and 10 mg/kg), pravastatin (10 mg/kg) for 14 days, or intraperitoneally received PCN (35 mg/kg) for 4 days. Results showed that glucose utilization was markedly inhibited by atorvastatin, simvastatin, pitavastatin, lovastatin and rifampicin. Neither rosuvastatin nor pravastatin showed the similar effect. Atorvastatin and pravastatin were selected for the following study. Atorvastatin and rifampicin significantly inhibited glucose uptake and down-regulated GLUT2 and GCK expressions. Similarly, overexpressed PXR significantly down-regulated GLUT2 and GCK expressions and impaired glucose utilization. Ketoconazole and resveratrol attenuated the impaired glucose utilization by atorvastatin and rifampicin in both parental and overexpressed PXR cells. PXR knockdown significantly up-regulated GLUT2 and GCK proteins and abolished the decreased glucose consumption and uptake by atorvastatin and rifampicin. Animal experiments showed that atorvastatin and PCN significantly elicited postprandial hyperglycemia, leading to increase in glucose AUC. Expressions of GLUT2 and GCK in rat livers were markedly down-regulated by atorvastatin and PCN. In conclusion, atorvastatin impaired glucose utilization in hepatocytes via repressing GLUT2 and GCK expressions, which may be partly due to PXR activation.

  17. The glucose-6-phosphatase system.

    PubMed Central

    van Schaftingen, Emile; Gerin, Isabelle

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), an enzyme found mainly in the liver and the kidneys, plays the important role of providing glucose during starvation. Unlike most phosphatases acting on water-soluble compounds, it is a membrane-bound enzyme, being associated with the endoplasmic reticulum. In 1975, W. Arion and co-workers proposed a model according to which G6Pase was thought to be a rather unspecific phosphatase, with its catalytic site oriented towards the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum [Arion, Wallin, Lange and Ballas (1975) Mol. Cell. Biochem. 6, 75--83]. Substrate would be provided to this enzyme by a translocase that is specific for glucose 6-phosphate, thereby accounting for the specificity of the phosphatase for glucose 6-phosphate in intact microsomes. Distinct transporters would allow inorganic phosphate and glucose to leave the vesicles. At variance with this substrate-transport model, other models propose that conformational changes play an important role in the properties of G6Pase. The last 10 years have witnessed important progress in our knowledge of the glucose 6-phosphate hydrolysis system. The genes encoding G6Pase and the glucose 6-phosphate translocase have been cloned and shown to be mutated in glycogen storage disease type Ia and type Ib respectively. The gene encoding a G6Pase-related protein, expressed specifically in pancreatic islets, has also been cloned. Specific potent inhibitors of G6Pase and of the glucose 6-phosphate translocase have been synthesized or isolated from micro-organisms. These as well as other findings support the model initially proposed by Arion. Much progress has also been made with regard to the regulation of the expression of G6Pase by insulin, glucocorticoids, cAMP and glucose. PMID:11879177

  18. Effects of oral contraceptive agents and sex steroids on carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kalkhoff, R K

    1972-01-01

    The article offers a general interpretation of the influence of oral contraceptive agents on glucose tolerance, emphasizing comparisons of synthetic sex hormones. Although there are conflicting reports on steroid-induced diabetes in normal women, their glucose curves are often higher when under oral contraceptive treatment, suggesting that oral contraceptives may induce a form of subclinical diabetes melitus that is reversible. Evidence from diabetic women suggests definite deliterious effects from contraceptive administration. Estradiol, estriol, and estrone may improve glucose tolerance in nondiabetic women and reduce insulin requirements in diabetics. Progesterone has little effect on carbohydrate tolerance, as did synthetic progestin. Conjugated equine estrogens (equilenine or Premarin) may provoke mild to moderate deterioration of carbohydrate tolerance. Parenterally administered natural estrogens and orally administered synthetic derivatives appear to differ sharply in their effects. Sex hormones' effects on carbohydrate metabolism likely involve interactions with insulin and endogenous glucocorticoids.

  19. KDT501, a Derivative from Hops, Normalizes Glucose Metabolism and Body Weight in Rodent Models of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Konda, Veera R.; Desai, Anuradha; Darland, Gary; Grayson, Neile; Bland, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis We developed KDT501, a novel substituted 1,3-cyclopentadione chemically derived from hop extracts, and evaluated it in various in vitro and in vivo models of diabetes and insulin sensitivity. Methods KDT501 was evaluated for anti-inflammatory effects in monocyte/macrophage cells; agonistic activity for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR); lipogenesis and gene expression profile in human subcutaneous adipocytes. Body composition, glucose, insulin sensitivity, and lipids were assessed in diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice and Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats after oral administration. Results KDT501 mediated lipogenesis in 3T3L1 and human subcutaneous adipocytes; however, the gene expression profile of KDT501 differed from that of the full PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that KDT501 has pleiotropic biological activities. In addition, KDT501 showed only modest, partial PPARγ agonist activity and exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in monocytes/macrophages that were not observed with rosiglitazone. In a DIO mouse model, oral administration of KDT501 significantly reduced fed blood glucose, glucose/insulin AUC following an oral glucose bolus, and body fat. In ZDF rats, oral administration of KDT501 significantly reduced fed glucose, fasting plasma glucose, and glucose AUC after an oral glucose bolus. Significant, dose-dependent reductions of plasma hemoglobin A1c, weight gain, total cholesterol, and triglycerides were also observed in animals receiving KDT501. Conclusion These results indicate that KDT501 produces a unique anti-diabetic profile that is distinct in its spectrum of pharmacological effects and biological mechanism from both metformin and pioglitazone. KDT501 may thus constitute a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes and associated conditions. PMID:24498211

  20. Conversion of glucose to sorbose

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Mark E.; Gounder, Rajamani

    2016-02-09

    The present invention is directed to methods for preparing sorbose from glucose, said method comprising: (a) contacting the glucose with a silica-containing structure comprising a zeolite having a topology of a 12 membered-ring or larger, an ordered mesoporous silica material, or an amorphous silica, said structure containing Lewis acidic Ti.sup.4+ or Zr.sup.4+ or both Ti.sup.4+ and Zr.sup.4+ framework centers, said contacting conducted under reaction conditions sufficient to isomerize the glucose to sorbose. The sorbose may be (b) separated or isolated; or (c) converted to ascorbic acid.

  1. Glucose-responsive hydrogel electrode for biocompatible glucose transistor.

    PubMed

    Kajisa, Taira; Sakata, Toshiya

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a highly sensitive and biocompatible glucose sensor using a semiconductor-based field effect transistor (FET) with a functionalized hydrogel. The principle of the FET device contributes to the easy detection of ionic charges with high sensitivity, and the hydrogel coated on the electrode enables the specific detection of glucose with biocompatibility. The copolymerized hydrogel on the Au gate electrode of the FET device is optimized by controlling the mixture ratio of biocompatible 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) as the main monomer and vinylphenylboronic acid (VPBA) as a glucose-responsive monomer. The gate surface potential of the hydrogel FETs shifts in the negative direction with increasing glucose concentration from 10 μM to 40 mM, which results from the increase in the negative charges on the basis of the diol-binding of PBA derivatives with glucose molecules in the hydrogel. Moreover, the hydrogel coated on the gate suppresses the signal noise caused by the nonspecific adsorption of proteins such as albumin. The hydrogel FET can serve as a highly sensitive and biocompatible glucose sensor in in vivo or ex vivo applications such as eye contact lenses and sheets adhering to the skin.

  2. Glucose-responsive hydrogel electrode for biocompatible glucose transistor

    PubMed Central

    Kajisa, Taira; Sakata, Toshiya

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, we propose a highly sensitive and biocompatible glucose sensor using a semiconductor-based field effect transistor (FET) with a functionalized hydrogel. The principle of the FET device contributes to the easy detection of ionic charges with high sensitivity, and the hydrogel coated on the electrode enables the specific detection of glucose with biocompatibility. The copolymerized hydrogel on the Au gate electrode of the FET device is optimized by controlling the mixture ratio of biocompatible 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) as the main monomer and vinylphenylboronic acid (VPBA) as a glucose-responsive monomer. The gate surface potential of the hydrogel FETs shifts in the negative direction with increasing glucose concentration from 10 μM to 40 mM, which results from the increase in the negative charges on the basis of the diol-binding of PBA derivatives with glucose molecules in the hydrogel. Moreover, the hydrogel coated on the gate suppresses the signal noise caused by the nonspecific adsorption of proteins such as albumin. The hydrogel FET can serve as a highly sensitive and biocompatible glucose sensor in in vivo or ex vivo applications such as eye contact lenses and sheets adhering to the skin. PMID:28179956

  3. U. S. Army Aviation Epidemiology Data Registry: Army Aviators with Diabetes Mellitus and Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    glucose tolerance (IGT), diabetes mellitus (DM), use of oral hypoglycemic agents, or use of insulin for the period 1988 to 1992. The paper reviewed the...incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Army aviators. The study tabulated the incidence and age-specific annual rates of diabetes mellitus and

  4. Voluntary Oral Administration of Losartan in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, Lucília N; Faustino, Inês V; Afonso, Ricardo A; Pereira, Sofia A; Monteiro, Emília C; Santos, Ana I

    2015-01-01

    Gavage is a widely performed technique for daily dosing in laboratory rodents. Although effective, gavage comprises a sequence of potentially stressful procedures for laboratory animals that may introduce bias into experimental results, especially when the drugs to be tested interfere with stress-dependent parameters. We aimed to test vehicles suitable for drug delivery by voluntary ingestion in rats. Specifically, Male Wistar rats (age, 2 to 3 mo) were used to test nut paste (NUT), peanut butter (PB), and sugar paste (SUG) as vehicles for long-term voluntary oral administration of losartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker. Vehicles were administered for 28 d without drug to assess effects on the glucose level and serum lipid profile. Losartan was mixed with vehicles and either offered to the rats or administered by gavage (14 d) for subsequent quantification of losartan plasma levels by HPLC. After a 2-d acclimation period, all rats voluntarily ate the vehicles, either alone or mixed with losartan. NUT administration reduced blood glucose levels. The SUG group had higher concentrations of losartan than did the gavage group, without changes in lipid and glucose profiles. Our results showed that NUT, PB, and SUG all are viable for daily single-dose voluntary ingestion of losartan and that SUG was the best alternative overall. Drug bioavailability was not reduced after voluntary ingestion, suggesting that this method is highly effective for chronic oral administration of losartan to laboratory rodents. PMID:26424254

  5. Voluntary Oral Administration of Losartan in Rats.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Lucília N; Faustino, Inês V; Afonso, Ricardo A; Pereira, Sofia A; Monteiro, Emília C; Santos, Ana I

    2015-09-01

    Gavage is a widely performed technique for daily dosing in laboratory rodents. Although effective, gavage comprises a sequence of potentially stressful procedures for laboratory animals that may introduce bias into experimental results, especially when the drugs to be tested interfere with stress-dependent parameters. We aimed to test vehicles suitable for drug delivery by voluntary ingestion in rats. Specifically, Male Wistar rats (age, 2 to 3 mo) were used to test nut paste (NUT), peanut butter (PB), and sugar paste (SUG) as vehicles for long-term voluntary oral administration of losartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker. Vehicles were administered for 28 d without drug to assess effects on the glucose level and serum lipid profile. Losartan was mixed with vehicles and either offered to the rats or administered by gavage (14 d) for subsequent quantification of losartan plasma levels by HPLC. After a 2-d acclimation period, all rats voluntarily ate the vehicles, either alone or mixed with losartan. NUT administration reduced blood glucose levels. The SUG group had higher concentrations of losartan than did the gavage group, without changes in lipid and glucose profiles. Our results showed that NUT, PB, and SUG all are viable for daily single-dose voluntary ingestion of losartan and that SUG was the best alternative overall. Drug bioavailability was not reduced after voluntary ingestion, suggesting that this method is highly effective for chronic oral administration of losartan to laboratory rodents.

  6. Beta-cell function, incretin effect, and incretin hormones in obese youth along the span of glucose tolerance from normal to prediabetes to Type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using the hyperglycemic and euglycemic clamp, we demonstrated impaired Beta-cell function in obese youth with increasing dysglycemia. Herein we describe oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-modeled Beta-cell function and incretin effect in obese adolescents spanning the range of glucose tolerance. Bet...

  7. Improved tolerance to sequential glucose loading (Staub-Traugott effect): size and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bonuccelli, Sandra; Muscelli, Elza; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Barsotti, Elisabetta; Astiarraga, Brenno D; Holst, Jens J; Mari, Andrea; Ferrannini, Ele

    2009-08-01

    Improved glucose tolerance to sequential glucose loading (Staub-Traugott effect) is an important determinant of day-to-day glycemic exposure. Its mechanisms have not been clearly established. We recruited 17 healthy volunteers to receive two sequential oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs), at time 0 min and 180 min (Study I). The protocol was repeated on a separate day (Study II) except that plasma glucose was clamped at 8.3 mmol/l between 60 and 180 min. beta-Cell function was analyzed by mathematical modeling of C-peptide concentrations. In a subgroup, glucose kinetics were measured by a triple-tracer technique (infusion of [6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose and labeling of the 2 glucose loads with [1-(2)H]glucose and [U-(13)C]glucose). In both Studies I and II, the plasma glucose response to the second OGTT equaled 84 +/- 2% (P = 0.003) of the response to the first OGTT. Absolute insulin secretion was lower (37.8 +/- 4.3 vs. 42.8 +/- 5.1 nmol/m(2), P = 0.02), but glucose potentiation (i.e., higher secretion at the same glycemia) was stronger (1.08 +/- 0.02- vs. 0.92 +/- 0.02-fold, P = 0.006), the increment being higher in Study II (+36 +/- 5%) than Study I (+19 +/- 6%, P < 0.05). In pooled data, a higher glucose area during the first OGTT was associated with a higher potentiation during the second OGTT (rho=0.60, P = 0.002). Neither insulin clearance nor glucose clearance differed between loads, and appearance of glucose over 3 h totalled 60 +/- 6 g for the first load and 52 +/- 5 g for the second load (P = not significant). Fasting endogenous glucose production [13.3 +/- 0.6 micromol x min(-1) x kg fat-free mass (FFM)(-1)] averaged 6.0 +/- 3.8 micromol x min(-1) x kg FFM(-1) between 0 and 180 min and 1.7 +/- 2.6 between 180 and 360 min (P < 0.03). Glucose potentiation and stronger suppression of endogenous glucose release are the main mechanisms underlying the Staub-Traugott effect.

  8. Chickens from lines artificially selected for juvenile low and high body weight differ in glucose homeostasis and pancreas physiology.

    PubMed

    Sumners, L H; Zhang, W; Zhao, X; Honaker, C F; Zhang, S; Cline, M A; Siegel, P B; Gilbert, E R

    2014-06-01

    Artificial selection of White Plymouth Rock chickens for juvenile (day 56) body weight resulted in two divergent genetic lines: hypophagic low weight (LWS) chickens and hyperphagic obese high weight (HWS) chickens, with the latter more than 10-fold heavier than the former at selection age. A study was designed to investigate glucose regulation and pancreas physiology at selection age in LWS chickens and HWS chickens. Oral glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity tests revealed differences in threshold sensitivity to insulin and glucose clearance rate between the lines. Results from real-time PCR showed greater pancreatic mRNA expression of four glucose regulatory genes (preproinsulin, PPI; preproglucagon, PPG; glucose transporter 2, GLUT2; and pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1, Pdx1) in LWS chickens, than HWS chickens. Histological analysis of the pancreas revealed that HWS chickens have larger pancreatic islets, less pancreatic islet mass, and more pancreatic inflammation than LWS chickens, all of which presumably contribute to impaired glucose metabolism.

  9. Serum uromodulin is associated with impaired glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Leiherer, Andreas; Muendlein, Axel; Saely, Christoph H.; Kinz, Elena; Brandtner, Eva M.; Fraunberger, Peter; Drexel, Heinz

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Uromodulin is the most abundant urine protein under physiological conditions. It has recently been described as a serum and plasma marker for kidney disease. Whether uromodulin is associated with impaired glucose metabolism is unknown. We therefore measured serum uromodulin and glucose traits in a cohort of 529 consecutively recruited patients. Serum uromodulin was significantly and inversely correlated with fasting plasma glucose (r = −0.161; P < 0.001), with plasma glucose 2 hours after an oral 75 g glucose challenge (r = −0.158; P = 0.001), and with HbA1c (r = −0.103; P = 0.018). A total of 146 (27.6%) of our patients had type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Analysis of covariance confirmed that T2DM was an independent determinant of serum uromodulin (F = 5.5, P = 0.020) after multivariate adjustment including hypertension and glomerular filtration rate. Prospectively, uromodulin was lowest in patients with T2DM at baseline, higher in initially nondiabetic subjects who developed diabetes during follow-up (FU) and highest among nondiabetic patients (147.7 ± 69.9 vs 164 ± 67 vs 179.9 ± 82.2 ng/mL, Ptrend < 0.001). Similar results were seen with respect to prediabetes (168.0 ± 81.2 vs 172.8 ± 66.3 vs 188.2 ± 74.0 ng/mL, P = 0.011). We conclude that serum uromodulin is significantly associated with impaired glucose metabolism and the development of prediabetes and diabetes. PMID:28151855

  10. Fat Distribution and Glucose Intolerance Among Greenland Inuit

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Stolk, Ronald; Bjerregaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A high amount of subcutaneous fat is suggested to explain the observation of lower obesity-associated metabolic risk among Inuit than among Europeans. We examined the association between measures of obesity (visceral adipose tissue [VAT], subcutaneous adipose tissue [SAT], BMI, waist circumference [WC], and percentage of body fat) and the indices of glucose metabolism (fasting and 2-h glucose levels, insulin resistance per homeostasis model assessment [HOMA-IR], and the insulin sensitivity index [ISI0,120]) among Greenland Inuit. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 3,108 adult Inuit participated in a population-based study. The examination included a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test and anthropometric measurements. VAT and SAT were measured by ultrasound according to a validated protocol. Information on sociodemographic characteristics and health behaviors was obtained by interview. RESULTS Mean SATs were 1.8 and 3.5 cm in men and women, respectively. Mean VATs were 7.0 and 6.3 cm in men and women, respectively. The total prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 9%. Percentage of body fat generally was most strongly associated with all outcomes. Both SAT and VAT were significantly associated with glucose intolerance, fasting and 2-h plasma glucose levels, HOMA-IR, and ISI0,120. VAT was more strongly associated with all outcomes than was SAT. After further adjustment for BMI or WC, VAT was associated with glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, whereas there was a trend toward a negative or no association with SAT. CONCLUSIONS High mean values of SAT may to a large extent explain the high WC in Inuit populations, and this is suggested to contribute to the lower observed metabolic risk for a given level of obesity. PMID:23656981

  11. Finger temperature controller for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Ting, Choon Meng; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2010-11-01

    Blood glucose level is an important parameter for doctors to diagnose and treat diabetes. The Near-Infra-Red (NIR) spectroscopy method is the most promising approach and this involves measurement on the body skin. However it is noted that the skin temperature does fluctuate with the environmental and physiological conditions and we found that temperature has important influences on the glucose measurement. In-vitro and in-vivo investigations on the temperature influence on blood glucose measurement have been carried out. The in-vitro results show that water temperature has significant influence on water absorption. Since 90% of blood components are water, skin temperature of measurement site has significant influence on blood glucose measurement. Also the skin temperature is related to the blood volume, blood volume inside capillary vessels changes with skin temperature. In this paper the relationship of skin temperature and signal from the skin and inside tissue was studied at different finger temperatures. Our OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) trials results show the laser signals follow the skin temperature trend and the correlation of signal and skin temperature is much stronger than the correlation of signal and glucose concentration. A finger heater device is designed to heat and maintain the skin temperature of measurement site. The heater is controlled by an electronic circuit according to the skin temperature sensed by a thermocouple that is put close to the measurement site. In vivo trials were carried out and the results show that the skin temperature significantly influences the signal fluctuations caused by pulsate blood and the average signal value.

  12. Oral candidiasis mimicking an oral squamous cell carcinoma: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Hélder Antônio Rebelo; Paiva, Helena Borges; de Freitas Silva, Brunno Santos; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; da Silva, Fernanda Bragança Monteiro; Pontes, Flávia Sirotheau Corrêa; Dos Santos Pinto, Décio

    2012-03-01

    Oral candidiasis is a significant problem in immune-compromised patients. The most common forms of mucosal candidiasis are oropharyngeal, oesophageal and vaginal, and more than 90% of HIV positive persons will manifest at least one episode of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Local and systemic factors such as uninterrupted daily use of a prosthesis by patients, smoking habit, as well as high glucose intake may contribute to the development of the lesion. The aim of this article is to report an uncommon case of oral candidiasis presenting an aggressive clinical behaviour in a 64-year-old male patient, with a significant smoking habit and a medical history of non-controlled diabetes. The lesion affected the hard and soft palate of the right side, revealing erythematous and ulcerated areas, elevated borders and central portions resembling necrosis, mimicking the clinical features of oral squamous cell carcinoma. However, the correct diagnosis of oral candidiasis was obtained after histopathological and cytological examinations and the patient was easily treated with traditional antifungal drugs and correction of his glucose levels.

  13. [Contribution of the kidney to glucose homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Segura, Julián; Ruilope, Luis Miguel

    2013-09-01

    The kidney is involved in glucose homeostasis through three major mechanisms: renal gluconeogenesis, renal glucose consumption, and glucose reabsorption in the proximal tubule. Glucose reabsorption is one of the most important physiological functions of the kidney, allowing full recovery of filtered glucose, elimination of glucose from the urine, and prevention of calorie loss. Approximately 90% of the glucose is reabsorbed in the S1 segment of the proximal tubule, where glucose transporter-2 (GLUT2) and sodium-glucose transporter-2 (SGLT2) are located, while the remaining 10% is reabsorbed in the S3 segment by SGLT1 and GLUT1 transporters. In patients with hyperglycemia, the kidney continues to reabsorb glucose, thus maintaining hyperglycemia. Most of the renal glucose reabsorption is mediated by SGLT2. Several experimental and clinical studies suggest that pharmacological blockade of this transporter might be beneficial in the management of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  14. Peptides in oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alberta; Guida, Agostino; Petruzzi, Massimo; Capone, Giovanni; Laino, Luigi; Serpico, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The oral cavity is home to numerous viruses and micro-organisms recognized as having a role in various oral diseases as well as in infections in other parts of the body. Indeed, in general a microbial infection underlies or is believed to underlie the ample spectrum of oral diseases, from tooth enamel decay to periodontal lesions, from candidiasis to virus-induced oral squamous cell carcinomas, and bullous autoimmune oral disorders. This clinico-pathological context stresses the need of targeted therapies to specifically kill infectious agents in a complex environment such as the oral cavity, and explains the current interest in exploring peptide-based therapeutic approaches in oral and dental research. Here, we review the therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, beta defensins, adrenomedullin, histatins, and of various peptides modulating gene expression and immuno-biological interaction(s) in oral diseases.

  15. Safety evaluation of glucose oxidase from Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Tetsuya; Aoshima, Takuya; Mizuhashi, Fukutaro; Choi, Sharon S H; Roberts, Ashley

    2013-06-01

    Glucose oxidase (β-d-glucose:oxygen 1-oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.2.3.4) is used in the food and beverage industry as a preservative and stabilizer and is commonly derived from the fungus Aspergillus niger. Although the safety of glucose oxidase preparations from A. niger is well-established, the use of preparations derived from other fungal species is of interest; however, an assessment of their safety is warranted. Here, we report on the safety of a glucose oxidase preparation derived from the fungus Penicillium chrysogenum (designated as PGO) for commercial use in food processing, as well as an ingredient in food. In a repeated dose 90-day oral toxicity study conducted in rats, PGO was without compound-related adverse effects at doses of up to 15,600U/kg body weight/day, equivalent to 193mg total organic solids/kg body weight/day. In addition, PGO was non-genotoxic in a series of genotoxicity tests, including a bacterial reverse mutation test, an in vitro mammalian chromosomal aberration test, and a combined in vivo mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus test and comet assay. The results of these studies support the safe use of PGO in food for human consumption.

  16. Perinatal exercise improves glucose homeostasis in adult offspring

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lindsay G.; Lewis, Kaitlyn N.; Wilkerson, Donald C.; Tobia, Christine M.; Ngo Tenlep, Sara Y.; Shridas, Preetha; Garcia-Cazarin, Mary L.; Wolff, Gretchen; Andrade, Francisco H.; Charnigo, Richard J.; Esser, Karyn A.; Egan, Josephine M.; de Cabo, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Emerging research has shown that subtle factors during pregnancy and gestation can influence long-term health in offspring. In an attempt to be proactive, we set out to explore whether a nonpharmacological intervention, perinatal exercise, might improve offspring health. Female mice were separated into sedentary or exercise cohorts, with the exercise cohort having voluntary access to a running wheel prior to mating and during pregnancy and nursing. Offspring were weaned, and analyses were performed on the mature offspring that did not have access to running wheels during any portion of their lives. Perinatal exercise caused improved glucose disposal following an oral glucose challenge in both female and male adult offspring (P < 0.05 for both). Blood glucose concentrations were reduced to lower values in response to an intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test for both female and male adult offspring of parents with access to running wheels (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Male offspring from exercised dams showed increased percent lean mass and decreased fat mass percent compared with male offspring from sedentary dams (P < 0.01 for both), but these parameters were unchanged in female offspring. These data suggest that short-term maternal voluntary exercise prior to and during healthy pregnancy and nursing can enhance long-term glucose homeostasis in offspring. PMID:22932781

  17. Perinatal exercise improves glucose homeostasis in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Carter, Lindsay G; Lewis, Kaitlyn N; Wilkerson, Donald C; Tobia, Christine M; Ngo Tenlep, Sara Y; Shridas, Preetha; Garcia-Cazarin, Mary L; Wolff, Gretchen; Andrade, Francisco H; Charnigo, Richard J; Esser, Karyn A; Egan, Josephine M; de Cabo, Rafael; Pearson, Kevin J

    2012-10-15

    Emerging research has shown that subtle factors during pregnancy and gestation can influence long-term health in offspring. In an attempt to be proactive, we set out to explore whether a nonpharmacological intervention, perinatal exercise, might improve offspring health. Female mice were separated into sedentary or exercise cohorts, with the exercise cohort having voluntary access to a running wheel prior to mating and during pregnancy and nursing. Offspring were weaned, and analyses were performed on the mature offspring that did not have access to running wheels during any portion of their lives. Perinatal exercise caused improved glucose disposal following an oral glucose challenge in both female and male adult offspring (P < 0.05 for both). Blood glucose concentrations were reduced to lower values in response to an intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test for both female and male adult offspring of parents with access to running wheels (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Male offspring from exercised dams showed increased percent lean mass and decreased fat mass percent compared with male offspring from sedentary dams (P < 0.01 for both), but these parameters were unchanged in female offspring. These data suggest that short-term maternal voluntary exercise prior to and during healthy pregnancy and nursing can enhance long-term glucose homeostasis in offspring.

  18. Elevated Fasting Plasma Glucose before Liver Transplantation is Associated with Lower Post-Transplant Survival

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Emi; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Taura, Naota; Miyaaki, Hisamitsu; Miuma, Satoshi; Shibata, Hidetaka; Honda, Takuya; Hidaka, Masaaki; Soyama, Akihiko; Takeshima, Fuminao; Eguchi, Susumu; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of liver cirrhosis is higher among individuals with diabetes mellitus, and a cirrhotic patient with diabetes may have a poorer prognosis after liver transplantation compared to a patient without diabetes. Thus, we evaluated whether fasting plasma glucose prior to receiving a liver transplant was a prognostic factor for post-transplant survival. Material/Methods Ninety-one patients received a living donor liver transplant between November 2005 and December 2012. Patients were considered diabetic if they were prescribed diabetes medications or had impaired glucose tolerance as measured by an oral glucose tolerance test. Each patient was monitored through December 31, 2013, to evaluate prognosis. Results Fasting plasma glucose of at least 100 mg/dL significantly decreased survival following transplant (52% in the high FPG group compared to 78% in the control group, p=0.04), while postprandial hyperglycemia had no effect on survival. Additionally, overall mortality and the incidence of vascular disease were significantly higher among patients with uncontrolled plasma glucose. Impaired fasting plasma glucose was significantly and inversely associated with overall survival in the univariate and multivariate analyses, while creatinine (at least 1 mg/dL) was inversely associated with survival in the univariate analysis. Conclusions Elevated fasting plasma glucose prior to liver transplantation was inversely associated with post-transplant survival. This effect may be due to underlying microangiopathy as a result of uncontrolled diabetes before transplantation. Our data demonstrated the importance of controlled blood glucose prior to liver transplantation. PMID:27909287

  19. Glucose substitution prolongs maintenance of energy homeostasis and lifespan of telomere dysfunctional mice

    PubMed Central

    Missios, Pavlos; Zhou, Yuan; Guachalla, Luis Miguel; von Figura, Guido; Wegner, Andre; Chakkarappan, Sundaram Reddy; Binz, Tina; Gompf, Anne; Hartleben, Götz; Burkhalter, Martin D.; Wulff, Veronika; Günes, Cagatay; Sattler, Rui Wang; Song, Zhangfa; Illig, Thomas; Klaus, Susanne; Böhm, Bernhard O.; Wenz, Tina; Hiller, Karsten; Rudolph, K. Lenhard

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage and telomere dysfunction shorten organismal lifespan. Here we show that oral glucose administration at advanced age increases health and lifespan of telomere dysfunctional mice. The study reveals that energy consumption increases in telomere dysfunctional cells resulting in enhanced glucose metabolism both in glycolysis and in the tricarboxylic acid cycle at organismal level. In ageing telomere dysfunctional mice, normal diet provides insufficient amounts of glucose thus leading to impaired energy homeostasis, catabolism, suppression of IGF-1/mTOR signalling, suppression of mitochondrial biogenesis and tissue atrophy. A glucose-enriched diet reverts these defects by activating glycolysis, mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative glucose metabolism. The beneficial effects of glucose substitution on mitochondrial function and glucose metabolism are blocked by mTOR inhibition but mimicked by IGF-1 application. Together, these results provide the first experimental evidence that telomere dysfunction enhances the requirement of glucose substitution for the maintenance of energy homeostasis and IGF-1/mTOR-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis in ageing tissues. PMID:25233189

  20. First Clinical Evaluation of a New Long-Term Subconjunctival Glucose Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Achim Josef; Knuth, Monika; Nikolaus, Katharina Sibylle; Herbrechtsmeier, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the feasibility of an implantable subconjunctival glucose monitoring system (SGMS) for glucose monitoring in humans, we investigated the in vivo performance of the sensor in a clinical trial with five patients. Methods The new SGMS consists of an implantable ocular mini implant (OMI) and a hand-held fluorescence photometer. The implantable subconjunctival glucose sensor is composed of a fluorescence resonance energy transfer system based on Concanavalin A chemistry, embedded in a nelfilcon polymer hydrogel disk. Blood glucose changes in humans were induced by oral glucose intake and insulin injections. Results The in vivo response of the new SGMS was tested in a first human clinical study with five diabetes patients. The OMI was well tolerated in the eyes of the patients. The SGMS exhibited high correlation coefficients (>0.88) with blood glucose changes and a good stability of the sensor response to glucose for the study period of 2 weeks. Lag times were in the range of 5–10 min. A total of 98% of all data pairs was in the clinical acceptable ranges A and B of the consensus error grid. Conclusions For the first time, the possibility to measure glucose in vivo in the subconjunctival interstitial fluid for a period of 2 weeks was demonstrated in a human clinical trial. PMID:22920814

  1. Orienteering performance and ingestion of glucose and glucose polymers.

    PubMed

    Kujala, U M; Heinonen, O J; Kvist, M; Kärkkäinen, O P; Marniemi, J; Niittymäki, K; Havas, E

    1989-06-01

    The benefit of glucose polymer ingestion in addition to 2.5 per cent glucose before and during a prolonged orienteering competition was studied. The final time in the competition in the group ingesting 2.5 per cent glucose (group G, n = 10) was 113 min 37 s +/- 8 min 11 s, and in the group which had additionally ingested glucose polymer (group G + GP, n = 8) 107 min 18s +/- 4 min 41 s (NS). One fifth (21 per cent) of the time difference between the two groups was due to difference in orienteering errors. Group G + GP orienteered the last third of the competition faster than group G (p less than 0.05). The time ratio between the last third of the competition and the first third of the competition was lower in group G + GP than in group G (p less than 0.05). After the competition, there was statistically insignificant tendency to higher serum glucose and lower serum free fatty acid concentrations in group G + GP, and serum insulin concentration was higher in group G + GP than in group G (p less than 0.05). Three subjects reported that they exhausted during the competition. These same three subjects had the lowest serum glucose concentrations after the competition (2.9 mmol.1(-1), 2.9 mmol.1(-1), 3.5 mmol.1(-1] and all of them were from group G. It is concluded that glucose polymer syrup ingestion is beneficial for prolonged psychophysical performance.

  2. The role of carbonic anhydrase in hepatic glucose production.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ibrahim Salihu

    2016-12-14

    Considerable efforts are being made daily to discover novel therapeutic targets to better understand the mechanism for designing drugs in treating diabetes. Inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis by metformin remains the first line of oral therapy for managing type 2 diabetes. The link between rise in blood lactate level and reduction of hepatic glucose production with metformin usage remains to be determined. Carbonic anhydrase is proposed to be the link connecting blood lactate accumulation and inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis and thus could serve as a new therapeutic target for reducing hepatic glucose production. Understanding the link between rise in blood lactate level and the role of carbonic anhydrase in lactate uptake will be essential towards the development of a promising new antidiabetic medication.

  3. HAD Oral History Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Jarita

    2014-01-01

    The Historical Astronomy Division is the recipient of an American Institute of Physics Neils Bohr Library Grant for Oral History. HAD has assembled a team of volunteers to conduct oral history interviews since May 2013. Each oral history interview varies in length between two and six hours. This presentation is an introduction to the HAD Oral History Project and the activities of the team during the first six months of the grant.

  4. Oral Steroids for Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew D; Clarke, Jesse; Williams, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Contact/allergic dermatitis is frequently treated inappropriately with lower-than-recommended doses or inadequate duration of treatment with oral and intramuscular glucocorticoids. This article highlights a case of dermatitis in a Ranger Assessment and Selection Program student who was improperly treated over 2 weeks with oral steroids after being bit by Cimex lectularius, commonly known as bed bugs. The article also highlights the pitfalls of improper oral steroid dosing and provides reasoning for longer-duration oral steroid treatment.

  5. Comparison of Intradialytic Parenteral Nutrition with Glucose or Amino Acid Mixtures in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Xiao, Xiao; Qin, Dan-Ping; Tan, Rong-Shao; Zhong, Xiao-Shi; Zhou, Dao-Yuan; Liu, Yun; Xiong, Xuan; Zheng, Yuan-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Many long-term maintenance hemodialysis patients have symptoms of protein-energy wasting caused by malnutrition. Each session of hemodialysis removes about 10 to 12 g of amino acids and 200 to 480 kcal of energy. Patients receiving hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease may be undernourished for energy, protein consumption, or both. Non-diabetic hemodialysis patients were randomized to three treatment groups: oral supplementation, oral supplementation plus high-concentration glucose solution (250 mL containing 50% glucose) and these two interventions plus 8.5% amino acids solution. The post-treatment energy status of the glucose group was significantly higher than its baseline level, whereas the control group’s status was significantly lower. The glucose group had significantly higher concentrations of asparagine, glutamine, glycine, alanine, and lysine after treatment. All treatment groups had significantly increased hemoglobin levels but significantly decreased transferrin levels after treatment compared to baseline. After treatment, the amino acid group had significantly higher albumin level compared to the glucose group (p = 0.001) and significantly higher prealbumin level compared to the control group (p = 0.017). In conclusion, long-term intervention with high-concentration glucose solution at each hemodialysis session is a simple and cheap method that replenished energy stores lost during hemodialysis of non-diabetic patients. PMID:27271658

  6. Comparison of Intradialytic Parenteral Nutrition with Glucose or Amino Acid Mixtures in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Xiao, Xiao; Qin, Dan-Ping; Tan, Rong-Shao; Zhong, Xiao-Shi; Zhou, Dao-Yuan; Liu, Yun; Xiong, Xuan; Zheng, Yuan-Yuan

    2016-06-02

    Many long-term maintenance hemodialysis patients have symptoms of protein-energy wasting caused by malnutrition. Each session of hemodialysis removes about 10 to 12 g of amino acids and 200 to 480 kcal of energy. Patients receiving hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease may be undernourished for energy, protein consumption, or both. Non-diabetic hemodialysis patients were randomized to three treatment groups: oral supplementation, oral supplementation plus high-concentration glucose solution (250 mL containing 50% glucose) and these two interventions plus 8.5% amino acids solution. The post-treatment energy status of the glucose group was significantly higher than its baseline level, whereas the control group's status was significantly lower. The glucose group had significantly higher concentrations of asparagine, glutamine, glycine, alanine, and lysine after treatment. All treatment groups had significantly increased hemoglobin levels but significantly decreased transferrin levels after treatment compared to baseline. After treatment, the amino acid group had significantly higher albumin level compared to the glucose group (p = 0.001) and significantly higher prealbumin level compared to the control group (p = 0.017). In conclusion, long-term intervention with high-concentration glucose solution at each hemodialysis session is a simple and cheap method that replenished energy stores lost during hemodialysis of non-diabetic patients.

  7. Protective effect of berberine on serum glucose levels in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Chueh, Wei-Han; Lin, Jin-Yuarn

    2012-03-01

    Among the active components in traditional anti-diabetic herbal plants, berberine which is an isoquinoline alkaloid exhibits promising potential for its potent anti-inflammatory and hypoglycemic effects. However, the berberine effect on serum glucose levels in type 1 diabetes (T1D) subjects still remains unknown. This study investigated berberine's effects on serum glucose levels using non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice that spontaneously develop T1D. The NOD mice were randomly divided into four groups, administered water with 50, 150, and 500 mg berberine/kg bw, respectively, through 14 weeks. ICR mice were also selected as a species control group to compare with the NOD mice. Changes in body weight, oral glucose challenge, and serum glucose levels were determined to identify the protective effect of berberine on T1D. After the 14-week oral supplementation, berberine decreased fasting serum glucose levels in NOD mice close to the levels in normal ICR mice in a dose dependent manner. Serum berberine levels showed a significantly (P<0.05) negative and non-linear correlation with fasting glucose levels in berberine-administered NOD mice. Our results suggested that berberine supplemented at appropriate doses for 14 weeks did not cause toxic side effects, but improved hyperglycemia in NOD mice.

  8. Defective insulin secretion by chronic glucagon receptor activation in glucose intolerant mice.

    PubMed

    Ahlkvist, Linda; Omar, Bilal; Valeur, Anders; Fosgerau, Keld; Ahrén, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Stimulation of insulin secretion by short-term glucagon receptor (GCGR) activation is well characterized; however, the effect of long-term GCGR activation on β-cell function is not known, but of interest, since hyperglucagonemia occurs early during development of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we examined whether chronic GCGR activation affects insulin secretion in glucose intolerant mice. To induce chronic GCGR activation, high-fat diet fed mice were continuously (2 weeks) infused with the stable glucagon analog ZP-GA-1 and challenged with oral glucose and intravenous glucose±glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1). Islets were isolated to evaluate the insulin secretory response to glucose±GLP1 and their pancreas were collected for immunohistochemical analysis. Two weeks of ZP-GA-1 infusion reduced insulin secretion both after oral and intravenous glucose challenges in vivo and in isolated islets. These inhibitory effects were corrected for by GLP1. Also, we observed increased β-cell area and islet size. We conclude that induction of chronic ZP-GA-1 levels in glucose intolerant mice markedly reduces insulin secretion, and thus, we suggest that chronic activation of the GCGR may contribute to the failure of β-cell function during development of type 2 diabetes.

  9. [HbA1c is not enough in screening for impaired glucose metabolism. Glucose tolerance tests are also needed, as shown in Swedish prospective epidemiological study].

    PubMed

    Hellgren, Margareta; Daka, Bledar; Larsson, Charlotte

    2015-09-29

    An HbA1c threshold of ≥ 42 mmol/mol has been proposed to diagnose prediabetes. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of the proposed threshold for detection of individuals with prediabetes was examined in a study of 573 randomly selected individuals from Vara and Skövde. In addition, the utility of the FINDRISC questionnaire and of a fasting glucose test in combination with three short questions concerning BMI, heredity for type 2 diabetes and known hypertension was examined. Results from an oral glucose tolerance test were used as reference. The sensitivity of HbA1c and FINDRISC to detect individuals with IGT was 16 and 26 per cent respectively. Questions regarding BMI, heredity and hypertension together with a fasting glucose test yielded a sensitivity of 50%, but a lower specificity and positive predictive value. We conclude that HbA1c inefficiently detected individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and that oral glucose tolerance tests can still preferably be recommended.

  10. Oral Communication K-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottrell, June, Ed.

    This speech communication curriculum guide is designed to provide a comprehensive oral language curriculum, to suggest ways for integrating oral activities into other curriculum areas, and to stimulate ideas for using oral language in a holistic rather than a fragmentary learning environment. Following an introductory chapter on "creating the…

  11. Understanding Oral Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, W. Jay

    2012-01-01

    A five-year research project of seminary students from various cultural backgrounds revealed that the slight majority of contemporary seminary students studied are oral learners. Oral learners learn best and have their lives most transformed when professors utilize oral teaching and assessment methods. After explaining several preferences of oral…

  12. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... find out more. Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ... find out more. Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ...

  13. Biomarkers in Fasting Serum to Estimate Glucose Tolerance, Insulin Sensitivity, and Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Goldfine, Allison B.; Gerwien, Robert W.; Kolberg, Janice A.; O’Shea, Sheila; Hamren, Sarah; Hein, Glenn P.; Xu, Xiaomei M.; Patti, Mary Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Biomarkers for estimating reduced glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, or impaired insulin secretion would be clinically useful, since these physiologic measures are important in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional study in which 94 individuals, of whom 84 had 1 or more risk factors and 10 had no known risk factors for diabetes, underwent oral glucose tolerance testing. We measured 34 protein biomarkers associated with diabetes risk in 250-μL fasting serum samples. We applied multiple regression selection techniques to identify the most informative biomarkers and develop multivariate models to estimate glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion. The ability of the glucose tolerance model to discriminate between diabetic individuals and those with impaired or normal glucose tolerance was evaluated by area under the ROC curve (AUC) analysis. RESULTS Of the at-risk participants, 25 (30%) were found to have impaired glucose tolerance, and 11 (13%) diabetes. Using molecular counting technology, we assessed multiple biomarkers with high accuracy in small volume samples. Multivariate biomarker models derived from fasting samples correlated strongly with 2-h postload glucose tolerance (R2 = 0.45, P < 0.0001), composite insulin sensitivity index (R2 = 0.91, P < 0.0001), and insulin secretion (R2 = 0.45, P < 0.0001). Additionally, the glucose tolerance model provided strong discrimination between diabetes vs impaired or normal glucose tolerance (AUC 0.89) and between diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance vs normal tolerance (AUC 0.78). CONCLUSIONS Biomarkers in fasting blood samples may be useful in estimating glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion. PMID:21149503

  14. The effect of gastric inhibitory polypeptide on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Eiichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Fujita, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Yamada, Yuichiro; Seino, Yutaka; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway. {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility. {yields} The GIP-receptor-mediated action in intestine does not involve in GLP-1-mediated pathway. -- Abstract: Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is released from the small intestine upon meal ingestion and increases insulin secretion from pancreatic {beta} cells. Although the GIP receptor is known to be expressed in small intestine, the effects of GIP in small intestine are not fully understood. This study was designed to clarify the effect of GIP on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility. Intestinal glucose absorption in vivo was measured by single-pass perfusion method. Incorporation of [{sup 14}C]-glucose into everted jejunal rings in vitro was used to evaluate the effect of GIP on sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT). Motility of small intestine was measured by intestinal transit after oral administration of a non-absorbed marker. Intraperitoneal administration of GIP inhibited glucose absorption in wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximum decrease at the dosage of 50 nmol/kg body weight. In glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor-deficient mice, GIP inhibited glucose absorption as in wild-type mice. In vitro examination of [{sup 14}C]-glucose uptake revealed that 100 nM GIP did not change SGLT-dependent glucose uptake in wild-type mice. After intraperitoneal administration of GIP (50 nmol/kg body weight), small intestinal transit was inhibited to 40% in both wild-type and GLP-1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, a somatostatin receptor antagonist, cyclosomatostatin, reduced the inhibitory effect of GIP on both intestinal transit and glucose absorption in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility through a somatostatin

  15. Is Type 2 Diabetes Really Resolved after Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy? Glucose Variability Studied by Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Capoccia, D.; Coccia, F.; Guida, A.; Rizzello, M.; De Angelis, F.; Silecchia, G.; Leonetti, F.

    2015-01-01

    The study was carried out on type 2 diabetic obese patients who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Patients underwent regular glycemic controls throughout 3 years and all patients were defined cured from diabetes according to conventional criteria defined as normalization of fasting glucose levels and glycated hemoglobin in absence of antidiabetic therapy. After 3 years of follow-up, Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) was performed in each patient to better clarify the remission of diabetes. In this study, we found that the diabetes resolution after LSG occurred in 40% of patients; in the other 60%, even if they showed a normal fasting glycemia and A1c, patients spent a lot of time in hyperglycemia. During the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), we found that 2 h postload glucose determinations revealed overt diabetes only in a small group of patients and might be insufficient to exclude the diagnosis of diabetes in the other patients who spent a lot of time in hyperglycemia, even if they showed a normal glycemia (<140 mg/dL) at 120 minutes OGTT. These interesting data could help clinicians to better individualize patients in which diabetes is not resolved and who could need more attention in order to prevent chronic complications of diabetes. PMID:25954762

  16. Development of a Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rat Model for Studies on the Effects of Cinnamon on Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Secretion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A streptozotocin (STZ) dose response protocol using graded doses of STZ was utilized to develop a diabetic rat model. In addition to the presence of severe basal hyperglycemia, insulin responses to oral glucose showed no change from basal in rats given more than 45 mg of STZ/kg body wt. Oral gluc...

  17. Consumption of meat is associated with higher fasting glucose and insulin concentrations regardless of glucose and insulin genetic risk scores: a meta-analysis of 50,345 Caucasians12

    PubMed Central

    Fretts, Amanda M; Follis, Jack L; Nettleton, Jennifer A; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Ngwa, Julius S; Wojczynski, Mary K; Kalafati, Ioanna Panagiota; Varga, Tibor V; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Houston, Denise K; Lahti, Jari; Ericson, Ulrika; van den Hooven, Edith H; Mikkilä, Vera; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Rice, Kenneth; Renström, Frida; North, Kari E; McKeown, Nicola M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kanoni, Stavroula; Smith, Caren E; Garcia, Melissa E; Tiainen, Anna-Maija; Sonestedt, Emily; Manichaikul, Ani; van Rooij, Frank JA; Dimitriou, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Pankow, James S; Djoussé, Luc; Province, Michael A; Hu, Frank B; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Keller, Margaux F; Perälä, Mia-Maria; Rotter, Jerome I; Hofman, Albert; Graff, Misa; Kähönen, Mika; Mukamal, Kenneth; Johansson, Ingegerd; Ordovas, Jose M; Liu, Yongmei; Männistö, Satu; Uitterlinden, André G; Deloukas, Panos; Seppälä, Ilkka; Psaty, Bruce M; Cupples, L Adrienne; Borecki, Ingrid B; Franks, Paul W; Arnett, Donna K; Nalls, Mike A; Eriksson, Johan G; Orho-Melander, Marju; Franco, Oscar H; Lehtimäki, Terho; Dedoussis, George V; Meigs, James B; Siscovick, David S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent studies suggest that meat intake is associated with diabetes-related phenotypes. However, whether the associations of meat intake and glucose and insulin homeostasis are modified by genes related to glucose and insulin is unknown. Objective: We investigated the associations of meat intake and the interaction of meat with genotype on fasting glucose and insulin concentrations in Caucasians free of diabetes mellitus. Design: Fourteen studies that are part of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium participated in the analysis. Data were provided for up to 50,345 participants. Using linear regression within studies and a fixed-effects meta-analysis across studies, we examined 1) the associations of processed meat and unprocessed red meat intake with fasting glucose and insulin concentrations; and 2) the interactions of processed meat and unprocessed red meat with genetic risk score related to fasting glucose or insulin resistance on fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Results: Processed meat was associated with higher fasting glucose, and unprocessed red meat was associated with both higher fasting glucose and fasting insulin concentrations after adjustment for potential confounders [not including body mass index (BMI)]. For every additional 50-g serving of processed meat per day, fasting glucose was 0.021 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.011, 0.030 mmol/L) higher. Every additional 100-g serving of unprocessed red meat per day was associated with a 0.037-mmol/L (95% CI: 0.023, 0.051-mmol/L) higher fasting glucose concentration and a 0.049–ln-pmol/L (95% CI: 0.035, 0.063–ln-pmol/L) higher fasting insulin concentration. After additional adjustment for BMI, observed associations were attenuated and no longer statistically significant. The association of processed meat and fasting insulin did not reach statistical significance after correction for multiple comparisons. Observed associations were not modified by genetic

  18. Glucose tolerance, blood lipid, insulin and glucagon concentration after single or continuous administration of aspartame in diabetics.

    PubMed

    Okuno, G; Kawakami, F; Tako, H; Kashihara, T; Shibamoto, S; Yamazaki, T; Yamamoto, K; Saeki, M

    1986-04-01

    A nutritive sweetener, aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methylester) was administered orally to normal controls and diabetic patients in order to evaluate effects on blood glucose, lipids and pancreatic hormone secretion. An oral glucose tolerance test was also performed in the same subjects as a control study of aspartame administration. In 7 normal controls and 22 untreated diabetics, a single dose of 500 mg aspartame, equivalent to 100 g glucose in sweetness, induced no increase in blood glucose concentration. Rather, a small but significant decrease in blood glucose was noticed 2 or 3 h after administration. The decrease in blood glucose was found to be smallest in the control and became greater as the diabetes increased in severity. No significant change in blood insulin or glucagon concentration during a 3-h period was observed in either the controls or the diabetics. The second study was designed to determine the effects of 2 weeks' continuous administration of 125 mg aspartame, equal in sweetness to the mean daily consumption of sugar (20-30 g) in Japan, to 9 hospitalized diabetics with steady-state glycemic control. The glucose tolerance showed no significant change after 2 weeks' administration. Fasting, 1 h and 2 h postprandial blood glucose, blood cholesterol, triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol were also unaffected. From these and other published results, aspartame would seem to be a useful alternative nutrient sweetener for patients with diabetes mellitus.

  19. Oral steroid contraception.

    PubMed

    Sech, Laura A; Mishell, Daniel R

    2015-11-01

    Oral steroid contraception is a popular method of family planning worldwide. Over the past several decades, this method of contraception has changed significantly by decreasing the estrogen dose, changing the progestin component, and reducing the hormone free interval. Despite the popularity of oral steroid contraception, there has been much criticism regarding the associated risks of venous thromboembolism and stroke. Despite these established, yet uncommon risks, oral steroid contraception has many important health benefits. This review highlights the available formulations of oral contraceptives along with their evidence-based associated risks and benefits. Highlights regarding future directions for development of novel oral contraceptives are also addressed.

  20. Essentials of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators.

  1. Essentials of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators. PMID:26617944

  2. A study of the effect of diet on glycosylated haemoglobin and albumin levels and glucose tolerance in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Ryle, A J; Davie, S; Gould, B J; Yudkin, J S

    1990-12-01

    As factors other than the degree of glucose tolerance or ambient blood glucose may determine glycosylated haemoglobin levels, we have investigated the effects of dietary glucose and soluble fibre supplementation on glucose tolerance, glycosylated haemoglobin and glycosylated albumin in non-diabetic subjects. Eleven non-diabetic subjects (7 M, 4 F; age 26.5 +/- 6.5 (+/- SD) yr; BMI 21.6 +/- 3.1 kg m-2) followed a high-soluble-fibre (5 g guar gum thrice daily)/low-glucose diet, or a low-soluble-fibre/high-glucose (500 ml glucose drink providing 100 g glucose per day) diet, each for 6 weeks, in randomized order. A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test was performed at recruitment and after each diet period, and fasting blood was assayed for glycosylated albumin by affinity chromatography, and glycosylated haemoglobin by four different methods. Adherence to guar and glucose supplementation was assessed at 89.5 +/- 7.5% and 97.1 +/- 3.5%, respectively. There was no significant effect of either diet on mean fasting, 1-h or 2-h plasma glucose concentration, or glycosylated haemoglobin levels by any assay. Glycosylated albumin was 1.71 +/- 0.35% at entry, fell to 1.33 +/- 0.30% (p less than 0.01) with high-fibre and rose to 1.95 +/- 0.23% (p less than 0.02) after a high-glucose diet. Insulin, total- and HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels were unaffected by either diet. A high-glucose diet increases, and a high-soluble-fibre diet decreases, levels of glycosylated albumin without effects on glucose tolerance or glycosylated haemoglobin.

  3. Glucose metabolism and cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Tian, Rong

    2011-01-01

    The most notable change in the metabolic profile of hypertrophied hearts is an increased reliance on glucose with an overall reduced oxidative metabolism, i.e. a reappearance of the foetal metabolic pattern. In animal models, this change is attributed to the down-regulation of the transcriptional cascades promoting gene expression for fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in adult hearts. Impaired myocardial energetics in cardiac hypertrophy also triggers AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to increased glucose uptake and glycolysis. Aside from increased reliance on glucose as an energy source, changes in other glucose metabolism pathways, e.g. the pentose phosphate pathway, the glucosamine biosynthesis pathway, and anaplerosis, are also noted in the hypertrophied hearts. Studies using transgenic mouse models and pharmacological compounds to mimic or counter the switch of substrate preference in cardiac hypertrophy have demonstrated that increased glucose metabolism in adult heart is not harmful and can be beneficial when it provides sufficient fuel for oxidative metabolism. However, improvement in the oxidative capacity and efficiency rather than the selection of the substrate is likely the ultimate goal for metabolic therapies. PMID:21502371

  4. Ketones suppress brain glucose consumption.

    PubMed

    LaManna, Joseph C; Salem, Nicolas; Puchowicz, Michelle; Erokwu, Bernadette; Koppaka, Smruta; Flask, Chris; Lee, Zhenghong

    2009-01-01

    The brain is dependent on glucose as a primary energy substrate, but is capable of utilizing ketones such as beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta HB) and acetoacetate (AcAc), as occurs with fasting, prolonged starvation or chronic feeding of a high fat/low carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet). In this study, the local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose consumption (CMRglu; microM/min/100g) was calculated in the cortex and cerebellum of control and ketotic rats using Patlak analysis. Rats were imaged on a rodent PET scanner and MRI was performed on a 7-Tesla Bruker scanner for registration with the PET images. Plasma glucose and beta HB concentrations were measured and 90-minute dynamic PET scans were started simultaneously with bolus injection of 2-Deoxy-2[18F]Fluoro-D-Glucose (FDG). The blood radioactivity concentration was automatically sampled from the tail vein for 3 min following injection and manual periodic blood samples were taken. The calculated local CMRGlu decreased with increasing plasma BHB concentration in the cerebellum (CMRGlu = -4.07*[BHB] + 61.4, r2 = 0.3) and in the frontal cortex (CMRGlu = -3.93*[BHB] + 42.7, r2 = 0.5). These data indicate that, under conditions of ketosis, glucose consumption is decreased in the cortex and cerebellum by about 10% per each mM of plasma ketone bodies.

  5. Glucose Intolerance and Hyperlipidemia Prior to Diabetes Onset in Female Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) Rats

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Toshihiro; Sato, Kahei; Kanazawa, Yasunori

    2004-01-01

    The Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) rat, a newly established animal model for diabetes mellitus, presents nonobese type 2 diabetes with ocular complications. In the present study, oral glucose tolerance tests and biochemical and histopathological examinations were performed in female SDT rats at 16 and/or 25 weeks of age, before the onset of diabetes. At 25 weeks of age, glucose tolerance was significantly impaired, and plasma immunoreactive insulin levels at 120 min after glucose loading were significantly higher (P < 0.05). Body weight and fasting levels of plasma triglycerides and nonesterified fatty acids were significantly higher than those in control animals. Histopathologically, inflammatory cell infiltration and fibrosis were observed in and around the pancreatic islets. These results strongly suggest that female SDT rats are useful as a model to investigate impairment of glucose tolerance and hyperlipidemia prior to the onset of diabetes. PMID:15763939

  6. Sex-specific effects of prenatal stress on glucose homoeostasis and peripheral metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Brunton, Paula J; Sullivan, Katie M; Kerrigan, David; Russell, John A; Seckl, Jonathan R; Drake, Amanda J

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoid overexposure during pregnancy programmes offspring physiology and predisposes to later disease. However, any impact of ethologically relevant maternal stress is less clear, yet of physiological importance. Here, we investigated in rats the short- and long-term effects in adult offspring of repeated social stress (exposure to an aggressive lactating female) during late pregnancy on glucose regulation following stress, glucose-insulin homoeostasis and peripheral expression of genes important in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism and glucocorticoid action. Prenatal stress (PNS) was associated with reduced birth weight in female, but not male, offspring. The increase in blood glucose with restraint was exaggerated in adult PNS males compared with controls, but not in females. Oral glucose tolerance testing showed no effects on plasma glucose or insulin concentrations in either sex at 3 months; however, at 6 months, PNS females were hyperinsulinaemic following an oral glucose load. In PNS males, plasma triglyceride concentrations were increased, with reduced hepatic mRNA expression of 5α-reductase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (Pparα (Ppara)) and a strong trend towards reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α (Pgc1α (Ppargc1a)) and Pparγ (Pparg) expression, whereas only Pgc1α mRNA was affected in PNS females. Conversely, in subcutaneous fat, PNS reduced mRNA expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βhsd1), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pepck (Pck1)), adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) and diglyceride acyltransferase 2 (Dgat2) in females, but only Pepck mRNA expression was reduced in PNS males. Thus, prenatal social stress differentially programmes glucose homoeostasis and peripheral metabolism in male and female offspring. These long-term alterations in physiology may increase susceptibility to metabolic disease.

  7. Effects of Exercise Intensity on Postprandial Improvement in Glucose Disposal and Insulin Sensitivity in Prediabetic Adults

    PubMed Central

    Rynders, Corey A.; Weltman, Judy Y.; Jiang, Boyi; Breton, Marc; Patrie, James; Barrett, Eugene J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: A single bout of exercise improves postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity in prediabetic patients; however, the impact of exercise intensity is not well understood. The present study compared the effects of acute isocaloric moderate (MIE) and high-intensity (HIE) exercise on glucose disposal and insulin sensitivity in prediabetic adults. Methods: Subjects (n = 18; age 49 ± 14 y; fasting glucose 105 ± 11 mg/dL; 2 h glucose 170 ± 32 mg/dL) completed a peak O2 consumption/lactate threshold (LT) protocol plus three randomly assigned conditions: 1) control, 1 hour of seated rest, 2) MIE (at LT), and 3) HIE (75% of difference between LT and peak O2 consumption). One hour after exercise, subjects received an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide concentrations were sampled at 5- to 10-minute intervals at baseline, during exercise, after exercise, and for 3 hours after glucose ingestion. Total, early-phase, and late-phase area under the glucose and insulin response curves were compared between conditions. Indices of insulin sensitivity (SI) were derived from OGTT data using the oral minimal model. Results: Compared with control, SI improved by 51% (P = .02) and 85% (P < .001) on the MIE and HIE days, respectively. No differences in SI were observed between the exercise conditions (P = .62). Improvements in SI corresponded to significant reductions in the glucose, insulin, and C-peptide area under the curve values during the late phase of the OGTT after HIE (P < .05), with only a trend for reductions after MIE. Conclusion: These results suggest that in prediabetic adults, acute exercise has an immediate and intensity-dependent effect on improving postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity. PMID:24243632

  8. A Physiology-Based Model Describing Heterogeneity in Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Anne H.; Rozendaal, Yvonne J. W.; van Pul, Carola; Hilbers, Peter A. J.; Cottaar, Ward J.; Haak, Harm R.; van Riel, Natal A. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current diabetes education methods are costly, time-consuming, and do not actively engage the patient. Here, we describe the development and verification of the physiological model for healthy subjects that forms the basis of the Eindhoven Diabetes Education Simulator (E-DES). E-DES shall provide diabetes patients with an individualized virtual practice environment incorporating the main factors that influence glycemic control: food, exercise, and medication. Method: The physiological model consists of 4 compartments for which the inflow and outflow of glucose and insulin are calculated using 6 nonlinear coupled differential equations and 14 parameters. These parameters are estimated on 12 sets of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) data (226 healthy subjects) obtained from literature. The resulting parameter set is verified on 8 separate literature OGTT data sets (229 subjects). The model is considered verified if 95% of the glucose data points lie within an acceptance range of ±20% of the corresponding model value. Results: All glucose data points of the verification data sets lie within the predefined acceptance range. Physiological processes represented in the model include insulin resistance and β-cell function. Adjusting the corresponding parameters allows to describe heterogeneity in the data and shows the capabilities of this model for individualization. Conclusion: We have verified the physiological model of the E-DES for healthy subjects. Heterogeneity of the data has successfully been modeled by adjusting the 4 parameters describing insulin resistance and β-cell function. Our model will form the basis of a simulator providing individualized education on glucose control. PMID:25526760

  9. Plasma Efavirenz Concentrations Are Associated With Lipid and Glucose Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Sinxadi, Phumla Zuleika; McIlleron, Helen Margaret; Dave, Joel Alex; Smith, Peter John; Levitt, Naomi Sharlene; Haas, David William; Maartens, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been associated with dyslipidemia and dysglycemia, risk factors for cardiovascular disease. However, the pathogenesis is not well understood. We characterized relationships between plasma efavirenz concentrations and lipid and glucose concentrations in HIV-infected South Africans. Participants on efavirenz-based ART were enrolled into a cross-sectional study. The oral glucose tolerance test was performed after an overnight fast, and plasma drawn for mid-dosing interval efavirenz, fasting total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides concentrations. Among 106 participants (77 women), median age was 38 years, median CD4 + T-cell count was 322 cells/μL, median duration on ART was 18 months, and median (interquartile range) efavirenz concentration was 2.23 (1.66 to 4.10) μg/mL. On multivariable analyses (adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and ART duration) doubling of efavirenz concentrations resulted in mean changes in mmol/L (95%CI) of: total cholesterol (0.40 [0.22 to 0.59]), LDL cholesterol (0.19 [0.04 to 0.30]), HDL cholesterol (0.14 [0.07 to 0.20]), triglycerides (0.17 [0.03 to 0.33]), fasting glucose (0.18 [0.03 to 0.33]), and 2-h glucose concentrations (0.33 [0.08 to 0.60]). Among 57 participants with CYP2B6 genotype data, associations between slow metabolizer genotypes and metabolic profiles were generally consistent with those for measured efavirenz concentrations. Higher plasma efavirenz concentrations are associated with higher plasma lipid and glucose concentrations. This may have implications for long-term cardiovascular complications of efavirenz-based ART, particularly among populations with high prevalence of CYP2B6 slow metabolizer genotypes. PMID:26765416

  10. Noninvasive blood glucose measurement using multiple laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, E. T.; Zhang, X. Q.; Chen, J. H.; Soh, P. H.; Ng, K.; Yeo, J. H.

    2007-02-01

    In the event of diabetes clinicians have advocated that frequent monitoring of a diabetic's blood glucose level is the key to avoid future complications (kidney failure, blindness, amputations, premature death, etc.,) associated with the disease. While the test-strip glucose meters available in current consumer markets allow for frequent monitoring, a more convenient technique that is accurate, painless and sample-free is preferable in a diabetic's daily routine. This paper presents a non-invasive blood glucose measurement technique using diffuse reflectance near infrared (NIR) signals. This technique uses a set of laser diodes, each operating at fixed wavelengths in the first overtone region. The NIR signals from the laser diodes are channeled to the measurement site viz., the nail-bed by means of optical fibers. A series of in vivo experiments have been performed on eight normal human subjects using a standard Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) protocol. The reflected NIR signals are inputs to a Partial Least Squares (PLS) algorithm for calibration and future predictions. The calibration models used are developed using in vivo datasets and are unique to a particular individual. The 1218 paired points collected from the eight test subjects plotted on the Clarke Error Grid, revealed that 87.3% of these points fall within the A zone while the remainder, within the B zone, both of which, are clinically accepted. The standard error of prediction was +/-13.14mg/dL for the best calibration model. A Bland-Altman analysis of the 1218 paired points yields a 76.3% confidence level for a measurement accuracy of +/-20mg/dL. These results demonstrate the initial potential of the technique for non-invasive blood glucose measurements in vivo.

  11. Glucose oxidation positively regulates glucose uptake and improves cardiac function recovery after myocardial reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Xu, Jie; Qin, Xinghua; Hou, Zuoxu; Guo, Yongzheng; Liu, Zhenhua; Wu, Jianjiang; Zheng, Hong; Zhang, Xing; Gao, Feng

    2017-03-21

    Myocardial reperfusion decreases glucose oxidation and uncouples glucose oxidation from glycolysis. Therapies that increase glucose oxidation lessen myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, the regulation of glucose uptake during reperfusion remains poorly understood. Here we found that glucose uptake was remarkably diminished in myocardium following reperfusion in Sprague-Dawley rats as detected by 18F-labeled and fluorescent-labeled glucose analogs, even though GLUT1 was upregulated by 3 folds and GLUT4 translocation remained unchanged compared with those of sham rats. The decreased glucose uptake was accompanied by suppressed glucose oxidation. Interestingly, stimulating glucose oxidation by inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4), a rate-limiting enzyme for glucose oxidation, increased glucose uptake and alleviated ischemia/reperfusion injury. In vitro data in neonatal myocytes showed that PDK4 overexpression decreased glucose uptake, while its knockdown increased glucose uptake, suggesting a role of PDK4 in regulating glucose uptake. Moreover, inhibition of PDK4 increased myocardial glucose uptake with concomitant enhancement of cardiac insulin sensitivity following myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. These results showed that the suppressed glucose oxidation mediated by PDK4 contributes to the reduced glucose uptake in myocardium following reperfusion, and enhancement of glucose uptake exerts cardioprotection. The findings suggest that stimulating glucose oxidation via PDK4 could be an efficient approach to improve recovery from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  12. Glucose, glycolysis and lymphocyte responses.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Raymond P; Finlay, David K

    2015-12-01

    Activated lymphocytes engage in robust growth and rapid proliferation. To achieve this, they tend to adopt a form of glucose metabolism termed aerobic glycolysis. This type of metabolism allows for the use of large amounts of glucose to generate energy, but also to support biosynthetic processes. This review article will discuss how aerobic glycolysis supports the biosynthetic demands of activated T cells, B cells and Natural Killer cells, and the emerging concept that glycolysis is integrally linked to the differentiation and function of these lymphocyte populations.

  13. Impaired glucose tolerance in rats fed low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets.

    PubMed

    Bielohuby, Maximilian; Sisley, Stephanie; Sandoval, Darleen; Herbach, Nadja; Zengin, Ayse; Fischereder, Michael; Menhofer, Dominik; Stoehr, Barbara J M; Stemmer, Kerstin; Wanke, Rüdiger; Tschöp, Matthias H; Seeley, Randy J; Bidlingmaier, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Moderate low-carbohydrate/high-fat (LC-HF) diets are widely used to induce weight loss in overweight subjects, whereas extreme ketogenic LC-HF diets are used to treat neurological disorders like pediatric epilepsy. Usage of LC-HF diets for improvement of glucose metabolism is highly controversial; some studies suggest that LC-HF diets ameliorate glucose tolerance, whereas other investigations could not identify positive effects of these diets or reported impaired insulin sensitivity. Here, we investigate the effects of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism in a well-characterized animal model. Male rats were fed isoenergetic or hypocaloric amounts of standard control diet, a high-protein "Atkins-style" LC-HF diet, or a low-protein, ketogenic, LC-HF diet. Both LC-HF diets induced lower fasting glucose and insulin levels associated with lower pancreatic β-cell volumes. However, dynamic challenge tests (oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests, insulin-tolerance tests, and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps) revealed that LC-HF pair-fed rats exhibited impaired glucose tolerance and impaired hepatic and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity, the latter potentially being mediated by elevated intramyocellular lipids. Adjusting visceral fat mass in LC-HF groups to that of controls by reducing the intake of LC-HF diets to 80% of the pair-fed groups did not prevent glucose intolerance. Taken together, these data show that lack of dietary carbohydrates leads to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in rats despite causing a reduction in fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Our results argue against a beneficial effect of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism, at least under physiological conditions. Therefore, use of LC-HF diets for weight loss or other therapeutic purposes should be balanced against potentially harmful metabolic side effects.

  14. Direct hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose using ultra-high temperature and pressure steam explosion.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Chizuru; Sumimoto, Keisuke; Asada, Chikako; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi

    2012-06-05

    Hydrolysis of two cellulosic materials, i.e. microcrystalline cellulose powder (MC) and cuprammonium rayon fiber (BEMCOT), to glucose was carried out by steam explosion treatment with ultra-high temperature and pressure steam aiming at an effective usage of unutilized cellulosic materials. 50 g of cellulosic materials were charged in a sealed reactor (2L) of the steam explosion apparatus kept at steam pressures of 50, 55, 60, and 62 atm for a steaming time of 1 min. The maximum yield of water soluble sugars, 52.8%, was obtained at a steam pressure of 62 atm and a steaming time of 1 min for MC. Furthermore, the maximum yield of water soluble sugars, 67.7%, was obtained at a steam pressure of 60 atm and a steaming time of 1 min for BEMCOT. This water soluble sugars contained 63.1% and 61.0% of glucose, respectively; they are corresponding to 33.3g and 41.0 g of glucose contained in 100g of dry steam-exploded cellulosic material.

  15. Influence of various carbohydrate sources on postprandial glucose, insulin and NEFA concentrations in obese cats.

    PubMed

    Mori, A; Ueda, K; Lee, P; Oda, H; Ishioka, K; Sako, T

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate is an important source of energy, which can significantly affect postprandial blood glucose and insulin levels in cats. In healthy animals, this is not a big concern; however, in obese and diabetic animals, this is an important detail. In the present study, the impact of four different carbohydrate sources (glucose, maltose, corn starch, and trehalose) on short-term post-prandial serum glucose, insulin, and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations was investigated with four obese cats. Each of the carbohydrate sources was added to a commercial wet food diet for feeding the animals. A significant difference was observed in postprandial glucose, insulin, and NEFA area under the curve (AUC) values between each carbohydrate source in obese cats. Furthermore, glucose and maltose induced the highest postprandial glucose and insulin AUC values, whereas trehalose induced the lowest postprandial glucose and insulin AUC value amongst all carbohydrate sources, respectively, in obese cats. However, trehalose has a higher risk of inducing side effects, such as diarrhea, as compared to other carbohydrate sources. As such, different carbohydrate sources appear to have a very significant impact on post-prandial glycemia and subsequent insulin requirement levels in obese cats. These results might be useful when selecting a prescription diet for obese or diabetic cats. In addition, maltose appears to be capable of inducing experimentally evoked postprandial hyperglycemia in obese cats, which may serve as a good tool for use to check the impact and effectiveness of newly developed oral hypoglycemic drugs or supplements for cats in future experiments.

  16. Lucica MI urinary myoinositol kit: a new diagnostic test for diabetes mellitus and glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, Masaru; Kawazu, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a growing healthcare problem internationally, and poses a major burden from both a individual and societal perspective. Diabetes causes potentially life-threatening complications that are preventable if the disease is detected early and appropriate interventions are put in place. Early detection is therefore imperative for preventing diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. Current methods of detection, including the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and measures of fasting plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), or glycated albumin, can be time-consuming and uncomfortable for patients. Myoinositol can be measured in urine and has been found to be elevated in patients with diabetes and glucose intolerance; it has thus proven useful as a marker for the early detection of these conditions. Lucica MI is a diagnostic kit for the measurement of urinary myoinositol; it is used to detect glucose intolerance and diabetes mellitus at an early stage in disease progression. The test is based on an enzymatic method that uses liquid reagents requiring no preparation. Clinical trial results demonstrate that the test could be used to detect not only diabetes mellitus, but also to distinguish impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance from normal glucose tolerance.

  17. Glucose tolerance in depressed inpatients, under treatment with mirtazapine and in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Hennings, J M; Ising, M; Grautoff, S; Himmerich, H; Pollmächer, T; Schaaf, L

    2010-02-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes have been associated with depression, and antidepressant treatment is assumed to improve impaired glucose tolerance. However, antidepressant treatment is also considered as a risk factor for the development of diabetes. Reports about glucose tolerance under antidepressant treatment frequently lack appropriate control groups. We conducted the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 10 healthy controls selected from an epidemiological sample with a negative lifetime history of mental Axis I disorder. Controls were carefully matched to a sample of inpatients with major depression that participated in an OGTT before and after antidepressant treatment with mirtazapine. All participants underwent a standard OGTT protocol. In patients, a second (after 2 weeks) and a third (after 4-6 weeks) OGTT was performed under treatment with mirtazapine. Compared to healthy controls, we observed significantly impaired glucose tolerance in acutely depressed patients. Effect size calculation indicated a moderate to large effects on glucose and insulin concentrations in response to an OGTT. Although glucose tolerance improved under mirtazapine treatment, insulin sensitivity was still impaired and remained significantly lower in patients compared to controls.

  18. Effects of stevioside on glucose transport activity in insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Lailerd, Narissara; Saengsirisuwan, Vitoon; Sloniger, Julie A; Toskulkao, Chaivat; Henriksen, Erik J

    2004-01-01

    Stevioside (SVS), a natural sweetener extracted from Stevia rebaudiana, has been used as an antihyperglycemic agent. However, little is known regarding its potential action on skeletal muscle, the major site of glucose disposal. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of SVS treatment on skeletal muscle glucose transport activity in both insulin-sensitive lean (Fa/-) and insulin-resistant obese (fa/fa) Zucker rats. SVS was administered (500 mg/kg body weight by gavage) 2 hours before an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Whereas the glucose incremental area under the curve (IAUC(glucose)) was not affected by SVS in lean Zucker rats, the insulin incremental area under the curve (IAUC(insulin)) and the glucose-insulin index (product of glucose and insulin IAUCs and inversely related to whole-body insulin sensitivity) were decreased (P<.05) by 42% and 45%, respectively. Interestingly, in the obese Zucker rat, SVS also reduced the IAUC(insulin) by 44%, and significantly decreased the IAUC(glucose) (30%) and the glucose-insulin index (57%). Muscle glucose transport was assessed following in vitro SVS treatment. In lean Zucker rats, basal glucose transport in type I soleus and type IIb epitrochlearis muscles was not altered by 0.01 to 0.1 mmol/L SVS. In contrast, 0.1 mmol/L SVS enhanced insulin-stimulated (2 mU/mL) glucose transport in both epitrochlearis (15%) and soleus (48%). At 0.5 mmol/L or higher, the SVS effect was reversed. Similarly, basal glucose transport in soleus and epitrochlearis muscles in obese Zucker rats was not changed by lower doses of SVS (0.01 to 0.1 mmol/L). However, these lower doses of SVS significantly increased insulin-stimulated glucose transport in both obese epitrochlearis and soleus (15% to 20%). In conclusion, acute oral SVS increased whole-body insulin sensitivity, and low concentrations of SVS (0.01 to 0.1 mmol/L) modestly improved in vitro insulin action on skeletal muscle glucose transport in both lean

  19. Vitamin D status and resistance exercise training independently affect glucose tolerance in older adults.

    PubMed

    Kobza, Vanessa M; Fleet, James C; Zhou, Jing; Conley, Travis B; Peacock, Munro; IglayReger, Heidi B; DePalma, Glen; Campbell, Wayne W

    2013-05-01

    We assessed the influence of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations on oral glucose tolerance, body composition, and muscle strength in older, nondiabetic adults who performed resistance exercise training (RT) while consuming diets with either 0.9 or 1.2 g protein kg(-1) d(-1). We hypothesized that individuals with insufficient 25(OH)D and/or high PTH would have less improvement in glucose tolerance after 12 weeks of RT compared with individuals with sufficient 25(OH)D and lower PTH. Sixteen men and 19 women (aged 61 ± 8 years; range, 50-80 years; body mass index, 26.3 ± 3.6 kg/m(2)) performed RT 3 times/wk for 12 weeks, with oral glucose tolerance tests done at baseline and postintervention. Protein intake did not influence the responses described below. Plasma glucose area under the curve (P = .02) and 2-hour plasma glucose concentration (P = .03) were higher for vitamin D-insufficient subjects (25[OH]D <50 nmol/L, n = 7) vs vitamin D-sufficient subjects (25[OH]D ≥50 nmol/L, n = 28). These differences remained significant after adjustment for age and body mass index. Resistance exercise training reduced fat mass (mean ± SD, -6% ± 7%; P < .001) and increased lean body mass (2% ± 3%, P < .001) and whole-body muscle strength (32% ± 17%, P < .001) in these weight-stable subjects but did not affect 25(OH)D or PTH concentrations. Oral glucose tolerance improved after RT (-10% ± 16% in glucose area under the curve and -21% ± 40% in 2-hour glucose, P = .001), but baseline 25(OH)D and PTH did not influence these RT-induced changes. These findings indicate that vitamin D status and RT independently affect glucose tolerance, and a training-induced improvement in glucose tolerance does not offset the negative effect of insufficient vitamin D status in older, nondiabetic adults.

  20. Inhibition of L-dopa induced growth hormone release in normal and diabetic subjects by glucose administration.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Klimes, I; Jurcovicova, J; Kolesar, P; Repcekova-Jezova, D

    1977-12-01

    Administration of L-dopa 1 g induced an increase of plasma growth hormone (GH) levels in seven of ten healthy volunteers and in six of ten hyperglycemic insulin-dependent diabetic subjects; the maximal GH response was higher in normal subjects. Addition of 100 g glucose orally to the L-dopa completely abolished the GH response of both groups. The difference between the effect of endogenous hyperglycemia and the effect of a sudden increase of blood sugar after glucose administration on L-dopa induced GH release in diabetic subjects may be explain by the resetting of the hypothalamic control for pituitary GH release to higher levels of blood glucose.

  1. Radiation Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    PS, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene PMID:20668585

  2. Comparison of quantitative and qualitative tests for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Nicole; Kahn, Maria; Murray, Marjorie; Leader, Brandon T; Bansil, Pooja; McGray, Sarah; Kalnoky, Michael; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Huiqiang; Jiang, Hui; Domingo, Gonzalo J

    2014-10-01

    A barrier to eliminating Plasmodium vivax malaria is inadequate treatment of infected patients. 8-Aminoquinoline-based drugs clear the parasite; however, people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are at risk for hemolysis from these drugs. Understanding the performance of G6PD deficiency tests is critical for patient safety. Two quantitative assays and two qualitative tests were evaluated. The comparison of quantitative assays gave a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.7585 with significant difference in mean G6PD activity, highlighting the need to adhere to a single reference assay. Both qualitative tests had high sensitivity and negative predictive value at a cutoff G6PD value of 40% of normal activity if interpreted conservatively and performed under laboratory conditions. The performance of both tests dropped at a cutoff level of 45%. Cytochemical staining of specimens confirmed that heterozygous females with > 50% G6PD-deficient cells can seem normal by phenotypic tests.

  3. Oral salmon calcitonin improves fasting and postprandial glycemic control in lean healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Feigh, M; Nielsen, R H; Hansen, C; Henriksen, K; Christiansen, C; Karsdal, M A

    2012-02-01

    A novel oral form of salmon calcitonin (sCT) was recently demonstrated to improve both fasting and postprandial glycemic control and induce weight loss in diet-induced obese and insulin-resistant rats. To further explore the glucoregulatory efficacy of oral sCT, irrespective of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, the present study investigated the effect of chronic oral sCT treatment on fasting and postprandial glycemic control in male lean healthy rats. 20 male rats were divided equally into a control group receiving oral vehicle or an oral sCT (2 mg/kg) group. All rats were treated twice daily for 5 weeks. Body weight and food intake were monitored during the study period and fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin and insulin sensitivity were determined and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) performed at study end. Compared with the vehicle group, rats receiving oral sCT had improved fasting glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance, as measured by homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), with no change in body weight or fasting plasma insulin. In addition, the rats receiving oral sCT had markedly reduced glycemia and insulinemia during OGTT. This is the first report showing that chronic oral sCT treatment exerts a glucoregulatory action in lean healthy rats, irrespective of influencing body weight. Importantly, oral sCT seems to exert a dual treatment effect by improving fasting and postprandial glycemic control and insulin sensitivity. This and previous studies suggest oral sCT is a promising agent for the treatment of obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

  4. The 13C-Glucose Breath Test for Insulin Resistance Assessment in Adolescents: Comparison with Fasting and Post-Glucose Stimulus Surrogate Markers of Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado-Hernández, Jorge; Martínez-Basila, Azucena; Salas-Fernández, Alejandra; Navarro-Betancourt, José R.; Piña-Aguero, Mónica I.; Bernabe-García, Mariela

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of the 13C-glucose breath test (13C-GBT) for insulin resistance (IR) detection in adolescents through comparison with fasting and post-glucose stimulus surrogates. Methods: One hundred thirty-three adolescents aged between 10 and 16 years received an oral glucose load of 1.75 g per kg of body weight dissolved in 150 mL of water followed by an oral dose of 1.5 mg/kg of U-13C-Glucose, without a specific maximum dose. Blood samples were drawn at baseline and 120 minutes, while breath samples were obtained at baseline and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 minutes. The 13C-GBT was compared to homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) IR (≥p95 adjusted by gender and age), fasting plasma insulin (≥p90 adjusted by gender and Tanner stage), results of 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), insulin levels (≥65 μU/mL) in order to determine the optimal cut-off point for IR diagnosis. Results: 13C-GBT data, expressed as adjusted cumulative percentage of oxidized dose (A% OD), correlated inversely with fasting and post-load IR surrogates. Sexual development alters A% OD results, therefore individuals were stratified into pubescent and post-pubescent. The optimal cut-off point for the 13C-GBT in pubescent individuals was 16.3% (sensitivity=82.8% & specificity=60.6%) and 13.0% in post-pubescents (sensitivity=87.5% & specificity=63.6%), when compared to fasting plasma insulin. Similar results were observed against HOMA and 2-h OGTT insulin. Conclusion: The 13C-GBT is a practical and non-invasive method to screen for IR in adolescents with reasonable sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27354200

  5. Hepatocytes: critical for glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Klover, Peter J; Mooney, Robert A

    2004-05-01

    Maintaining blood glucose levels within a narrow range is a critical physiological function requiring multiple metabolic pathways and involving several cell types, including a prominent role for hepatocytes. Under hormonal control, hepatocytes can respond to either feeding or fasting conditions by storing or producing glucose as necessary. In the fasting state, the effects of glucagon avoid hypoglycemia by stimulating glucogenesis and glycogenolysis and initiating hepatic glucose release. Postprandially, insulin prevents hyperglycemia, in part, by suppressing hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis and facilitating hepatic glycogen synthesis. Both transcriptional regulation of rate limiting enzymes and modulation of enzyme activity through phosphorylation and allosteric regulation are involved. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the most common serious metabolic condition in the world, and results from a subnormal response of tissues to insulin (insulin resistance) and a failure of the insulin-secreting beta cells to compensate. In type 2 diabetes, glucose is overproduced by the hepatocyte and is ineffectively metabolized by other organs. Impairments in the insulin signal transduction pathway appear to be critical lesions contributing to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

  6. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Revisited

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Jerome T.; Henderson, Alfred R.

    1984-01-01

    Hemolytic diseases associated with drugs have been recognized since antiquity. Many of these anemias have been associated with oxidizing agents and deficiencies in the intraerythrocytic enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This paper outlines the discovery, prevalence, and variants of this enzyme. Methods of diagnosis of associated anemias are offered. PMID:6502728

  7. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial comparing the effects of amiloride and hydrochlorothiazide on glucose tolerance in patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Stears, Anna J; Woods, Sarah H; Watts, Michaela M; Burton, Timothy J; Graggaber, Johann; Mir, Fraz A; Brown, Morris J

    2012-05-01

    Hypertension guidelines advise limiting the dose of thiazide diuretics and avoiding combination with β-blockade, because of increased risk of diabetes mellitus. We tested whether changes in the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test could be detected after 4 weeks of treatment with a thiazide and could be avoided by switching to amiloride. Two double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover studies were performed. In study 1 (41 patients), we found that changes in glucose during a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test could be detected after 4 weeks of treatment with bendroflumethiazide. In study 2, 37 patients with essential hypertension received, in random order, 4 weeks of once-daily treatment with hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) 25 to 50 mg, nebivolol 5 to 10 mg, combination (HCTZ 25-50 mg+nebivolol 5-10 mg), amiloride (10-20 mg), and placebo. Each drug was force titrated at 2 weeks and separated by a 4-week placebo washout. At each visit, we recorded blood pressure and performed a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Primary outcome was the difference in glucose (over the 2 hours of the oral glucose tolerance test) between 0 and 4 weeks, when HCTZ and amiloride were compared by repeated-measures analysis. For similar blood pressure reductions, there were opposite changes in glucose between the 2 diuretics (P<0.0001). Nebivolol did not impair glucose tolerance, either alone or in combination. There was a negative correlation between Δpotassium and Δ2-hour glucose (r=-0.28; P<0.0001). In 2 crossover studies, 4 weeks of treatment with a thiazide diuretic impaired glucose tolerance. No impairment was seen with K(+)-sparing diuretic or β(1)-selective blockade. Substitution or addition of amiloride may be the solution to preventing thiazide-induced diabetes mellitus.

  8. Direct Evidence of Acetaminophen Interference with Subcutaneous Glucose Sensing in Humans: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Ananda; Veettil, Sona; Dyer, Roy; Peyser, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Recent advances in accuracy and reliability of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices have focused renewed interest on the use of such technology for therapeutic dosing of insulin without the need for independent confirmatory blood glucose meter measurements. An important issue that remains is the susceptibility of CGM devices to erroneous readings in the presence of common pharmacologic interferences. We report on a new method of assessing CGM sensor error to pharmacologic interferences using the example of oral administration of acetaminophen. Materials and Methods: We examined the responses of several different Food and Drug Administration–approved and commercially available CGM systems (Dexcom [San Diego, CA] Seven® Plus™, Medtronic Diabetes [Northridge, CA] Guardian®, and Dexcom G4® Platinum) to oral acetaminophen in 10 healthy volunteers without diabetes. Microdialysis catheters were placed in the abdominal subcutaneous tissue. Blood and microdialysate samples were collected periodically and analyzed for glucose and acetaminophen concentrations before and after oral ingestion of 1 g of acetaminophen. We compared the response of CGM sensors with the measured acetaminophen concentrations in the blood and interstitial fluid. Results: Although plasma glucose concentrations remained constant at approximately 90 mg/dL (approximately 5 mM) throughout the study, CGM glucose measurements varied between approximately 85 to 400 mg/dL (from approximately 5 to 22 mM) due to interference from the acetaminophen. The temporal profile of CGM interference followed acetaminophen concentrations measured in interstitial fluid (ISF). Conclusions: This is the first direct measurement of ISF concentrations of putative CGM interferences with simultaneous measurements of CGM performance in the presence of the interferences. The observed interference with glucose measurements in the tested CGM devices coincided temporally with appearance of

  9. [Oral precancer and cancer].

    PubMed

    López-López, José; Omaña-Cepeda, Carlos; Jané-Salas, Enric

    2015-11-06

    We reviewed the concept of oral precancerous lesions, oral cancer, and the possibility of early diagnosis. With the keywords: premalignant oral lesions prevention, a search was performed over the past 10 years. Also clinical trials are searched from January 2011 until today with the keywords: oral cancer prevention AND dentistry. It is emphasized that there can be no significant changes related to the concept of precancerous lesions and cancer, and those relating to the early diagnosis. Despite the numerous described methods of screening, biopsy remains the most useful test, and therefore it is essential, mainly if we consider the new possibilities of molecular studies.

  10. Towards understanding oral health.

    PubMed

    Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term 'oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain microbial community stability in health. However, the oral ecosystem itself is not stable: throughout life an individual undergoes multiple physiological changes while progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Recent discussions on the definition of general health have led to the proposal that health is the ability of the individual to adapt to physiological changes, a condition known as allostasis. In this paper the allostasis principle is applied to the oral ecosystem. The multidimensionality of the host factors contributing to allostasis in the oral cavity is illustrated with an example on changes occurring in puberty. The complex phenomenon of oral health and the processes that prevent the ecosystem from collapsing during allostatic changes in the entire body are far from being understood. As yet individual components (e.g. hard tissues, microbiome, saliva, host response) have been investigated, while only by consolidating these and assessing their multidimensional interactions should we be able to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem, which in turn could serve to develop rational schemes to maintain health. Adapting such a 'system approach' comes with major practical challenges for the entire research field and will require vast resources and large-scale multidisciplinary collaborations.

  11. Cinnamic acid exerts anti-diabetic activity by improving glucose tolerance in vivo and by stimulating insulin secretion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hafizur, Rahman M; Hameed, Abdul; Shukrana, Mishkat; Raza, Sayed Ali; Chishti, Sidra; Kabir, Nurul; Siddiqui, Rehan A

    2015-02-15

    Although the anti-diabetic activity of cinnamic acid, a pure compound from cinnamon, has been reported but its mechanism(s) is not yet clear. The present study was designed to explore the possible mechanism(s) of anti-diabetic activity of cinnamic acid in in vitro and in vivo non-obese type 2 diabetic rats. Non-obese type 2 diabetes was developed by injecting 90 mg/kg streptozotocin in 2-day-old Wistar pups. Cinnamic acid and cinnamaldehyde were administered orally to diabetic rats for assessing acute blood glucose lowering effect and improvement of glucose tolerance. Additionally, insulin secretory activity of cinnamic acid and cinnamaldehyde was evaluated in isolated mice islets. Cinnamic acid, but not cinnamaldehyde, decreased blood glucose levels in diabetic rats in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Oral administration of cinnamic acid with 5 and 10 mg/kg doses to diabetic rats improved glucose tolerance in a dose-dependent manner. The improvement by 10 mg/kg cinnamic acid was comparable to that of standard drug glibenclamide (5 mg/kg). Further in vitro studies showed that cinnamaldehyde has little or no effect on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion; however, cinnamic acid significantly enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in isolated islets. In conclusion, it can be said that cinnamic acid exerts anti-diabetic activity by improving glucose tolerance in vivo and stimulating insulin secretion in vitro.

  12. Effect of an Acute Bout of Kettlebell Exercise on Glucose Tolerance in Sedentary Men: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    GREENWALD, SAMANTHA; SEGER, EDWARD; NICHOLS, DAVID; RAY, ANDREW D.; RIDEOUT, TODD C.; GOSSELIN, LUC E.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance can have significant health consequences. The purposes of this preliminary study were to examine whether a single session of kettlebell exercise improves acute post-exercise glucose tolerance in sedentary individuals, and whether it was as effective as high-intensity interval running. Six sedentary male subjects underwent a two-hour oral glucose tolerance test following three different conditions: 1) control (no exercise); 2) kettlebell exercise (2 sets of 7 exercises, 15 repetitions per exercise with 30 seconds rest between each exercise); or 3) high-intensity interval running (10 one-minute intervals at a workload corresponding to 90% VO2max interspersed with one-minute active recovery periods). Blood glucose and insulin levels were measured before (0 minutes), and 60 and 120 minutes after glucose ingestion. Both kettlebell and high-intensity interval running exercise significantly lowered blood glucose 60 minutes after glucose ingestion compared with control. However, there was no significant difference in blood glucose between the two exercise conditions at any time point. In addition, there were no significant differences in insulin concentration between high intensity interval running, kettlebell, and control conditions at all time points. Results indicate that an acute bout of kettlebell exercise is as effective as high intensity interval running at improving glucose tolerance in sedentary young men. PMID:27766136

  13. Effect of an Acute Bout of Kettlebell Exercise on Glucose Tolerance in Sedentary Men: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Samantha; Seger, Edward; Nichols, David; Ray, Andrew D; Rideout, Todd C; Gosselin, Luc E

    2016-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance can have significant health consequences. The purposes of this preliminary study were to examine whether a single session of kettlebell exercise improves acute post-exercise glucose tolerance in sedentary individuals, and whether it was as effective as high-intensity interval running. Six sedentary male subjects underwent a two-hour oral glucose tolerance test following three different conditions: 1) control (no exercise); 2) kettlebell exercise (2 sets of 7 exercises, 15 repetitions per exercise with 30 seconds rest between each exercise); or 3) high-intensity interval running (10 one-minute intervals at a workload corresponding to 90% VO2max interspersed with one-minute active recovery periods). Blood glucose and insulin levels were measured before (0 minutes), and 60 and 120 minutes after glucose ingestion. Both kettlebell and high-intensity interval running exercise significantly lowered blood glucose 60 minutes after glucose ingestion compared with control. However, there was no significant difference in blood glucose between the two exercise conditions at any time point. In addition, there were no significant differences in insulin concentration between high intensity interval running, kettlebell, and control conditions at all time points. Results indicate that an acute bout of kettlebell exercise is as effective as high intensity interval running at improving glucose tolerance in sedentary young men.

  14. Effects of endogenous GLP-1 and GIP on glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Svane, Maria S; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Nielsen, Signe; Jørgensen, Nils B; Dirksen, Carsten; Bendtsen, Flemming; Kristiansen, Viggo B; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens J; Madsbad, Sten

    2016-04-01

    Exaggerated secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is important for postprandial glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), whereas the role of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) remains to be resolved. We aimed to explore the relative importance of endogenously secreted GLP-1 and GIP on glucose tolerance and β-cell function after RYGB. We used DPP-4 inhibition to enhance concentrations of intact GIP and GLP-1 and the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) (Ex-9) for specific blockage of GLP-1 actions. Twelve glucose-tolerant patients were studied after RYGB in a randomized, placebo-controlled, 4-day crossover study with standard mixed-meal tests and concurrent administration of placebo, oral sitagliptin, Ex-9 infusion, or combined Ex-9-sitagliptin. GLP-1 receptor antagonism increased glucose excursions, clearly attenuated β-cell function, and aggravated postprandial hyperglucagonemia compared with placebo, whereas sitagliptin had no effect despite two- to threefold increased concentrations of intact GLP-1 and GIP. Similarly, sitagliptin did not affect glucose tolerance or β-cell function during GLP-1R blockage. This study confirms the importance of GLP-1 for glucose tolerance after RYGB via increased insulin and attenuated glucagon secretion in the postprandial state, whereas amplification of the GIP signal (or other DPP-4-sensitive glucose-lowering mechanisms) did not appear to contribute to the improved glucose tolerance seen after RYGB.

  15. Modeling the glucose sensor error.

    PubMed

    Facchinetti, Andrea; Del Favero, Simone; Sparacino, Giovanni; Castle, Jessica R; Ward, W Kenneth; Cobelli, Claudio

    2014-03-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors are portable devices, employed in the treatment of diabetes, able to measure glucose concentration in the interstitium almost continuously for several days. However, CGM sensors are not as accurate as standard blood glucose (BG) meters. Studies comparing CGM versus BG demonstrated that CGM is affected by distortion due to diffusion processes and by time-varying systematic under/overestimations due to calibrations and sensor drifts. In addition, measurement noise is also present in CGM data. A reliable model of the different components of CGM inaccuracy with respect to BG (briefly, "sensor error") is important in several applications, e.g., design of optimal digital filters for denoising of CGM data, real-time glucose prediction, insulin dosing, and artificial pancreas control algorithms. The aim of this paper is to propose an approach to describe CGM sensor error by exploiting n multiple simultaneous CGM recordings. The model of sensor error description includes a model of blood-to-interstitial glucose diffusion process, a linear time-varying model to account for calibration and sensor drift-in-time, and an autoregressive model to describe the additive measurement noise. Model orders and parameters are identified from the n simultaneous CGM sensor recordings and BG references. While the model is applicable to any CGM sensor, here, it is used on a database of 36 datasets of type 1 diabetic adults in which n = 4 Dexcom SEVEN Plus CGM time series and frequent BG references were available simultaneously. Results demonstrates that multiple simultaneous sensor data and proper modeling allow dissecting the sensor error into its different components, distinguishing those related to physiology from those related to technology.

  16. Effect of data pretreatment on the noninvasive blood glucose measurement by diffuse reflectance NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, Herbert M.; Marbach, Ralf

    1994-01-01

    Recent progress in spectroscopy and chemometrics have brought in-vitro blood glucose analysis into clinical reach. Parallel to these efforts noninvasive experiments by NIR- spectroscopy have also been proposed and carried out. A specially designed and optimized accessory for diffuse reflectance measurements in the spectral range of 9000 - 5000 cm-1 was used. The spectral data and reference concentration values were obtained using oral glucose tolerance tests. Calibration results are provided for log(1/R) and single beam spectra. In addition, the effects of smoothing and the use of derivative filtering were evaluated. The best results were achieved by multivariate PLS-modeling with raw data from single beam reflectance spectra.

  17. In vivo cardiac glucose metabolism in the high-fat fed mouse: Comparison of euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp derived measures of glucose uptake with a dynamic metabolomic flux profiling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Greg M.; De Souza, David P.; Risis, Steve; Burch, Micah L.; Hamley, Steven; Kloehn, Joachim; Selathurai, Ahrathy; Lee-Young, Robert S.; Tull, Dedreia; O'Callaghan, Sean; McConville, Malcolm J.; Bruce, Clinton R.

    2015-08-07

    Rationale: Cardiac metabolism is thought to be altered in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our understanding of the regulation of cardiac substrate metabolism and insulin sensitivity has largely been derived from ex vivo preparations which are not subject to the same metabolic regulation as in the intact heart in vivo. Studies are therefore required to examine in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism under physiologically relevant conditions. Objective: To determine the temporal pattern of the development of cardiac insulin resistance and to compare with dynamic approaches to interrogate cardiac glucose and intermediary metabolism in vivo. Methods and results: Studies were conducted to determine the evolution of cardiac insulin resistance in C57Bl/6 mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for between 1 and 16 weeks. Dynamic in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism was determined following oral administration of [U-{sup 13}C] glucose. Hearts were collected after 15 and 60 min and flux profiling was determined by measuring {sup 13}C mass isotopomers in glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Cardiac insulin resistance, determined by euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp, was evident after 3 weeks of HFD. Despite the presence of insulin resistance, in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism following oral glucose administration was not compromised in HFD mice. This contrasts our recent findings in skeletal muscle, where TCA cycle activity was reduced in mice fed a HFD. Similar to our report in muscle, glucose derived pyruvate entry into the TCA cycle in the heart was almost exclusively via pyruvate dehydrogenase, with pyruvate carboxylase mediated anaplerosis being negligible after oral glucose administration. Conclusions: Under experimental conditions which closely mimic the postprandial state, the insulin resistant mouse heart retains the ability to stimulate glucose metabolism. - Highlights: • Insulin clamp was used to determine the evolution of cardiac

  18. Genetics Home Reference: glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GPI deficiency glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is an inherited disorder that ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: glucose-galactose malabsorption

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sugars glucose and galactose, which prevents proper digestion of these molecules and larger molecules made from ... are broken down into these simple sugars during digestion. Sucrose is broken down into glucose and another ...

  20. Glucose sensing by means of silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockstaele, Ronny; Ryckeboer, Eva; Hattasan, Nannicha; De Koninck, Yannick; Muneeb, Muhammad; Verstuyft, Steven; Delbeke, Danaë; Bogaerts, Wim; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes is a fast growing metabolic disease, where the patients suffer from disordered glucose blood levels. Monitoring the blood glucose values in combination with extra insulin injection is currently the only therapy to keep the glucose concentration in diabetic patients under control, minimizing the long-term effects of elevated glucose concentrations and improving quality of life of the diabetic patients. Implantable sensors allow continuous glucose monitoring, offering the most reliable data to control the glucose levels. Infrared absorption spectrometers offer a non-chemical measurement method to determine the small glucose concentrations in blood serum. In this work, a spectrometer platform based on silicon photonics is presented, allowing the realization of very small glucose sensors suitable for building implantable sensors. A proof-of-concept of a spectrometer with integrated evanescent sample interface is presented, and the route towards a fully implantable spectrometer is discussed.

  1. Oral contraceptives in migraine.

    PubMed

    Allais, Gianni; Gabellari, Ilaria Castagnoli; De Lorenzo, Cristina; Mana, Ornella; Benedetto, Chiara

    2009-03-01

    Combined oral contraceptives are a safe and highly effective method of birth control, but they can also raise problems of clinical tolerability and/or safety in migraine patients. It is now commonly accepted that, in migraine with aura, the use of combined oral contraceptives is always contraindicated, and that their intake must also be suspended by patients suffering from migraine without aura if aura symptoms appear. The newest combined oral contraceptive formulations are generally well tolerated in migraine without aura, and the majority of migraine without aura sufferers do not show any problems with their use; nevertheless, the last International Classification of Headache Disorders identifies at least two entities evidently related to the use of combined oral contraceptives: exogenous hormone-induced headache and estrogen-withdrawal headache. As regards the safety, even if both migraine and combined oral contraceptive intake are associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke, migraine without aura per se is not a contraindication for combined oral contraceptive use. Other risk factors (tobacco use, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity and diabetes) must be carefully considered when prescribing combined oral contraceptives in migraine without aura patients, in particular in women aged over 35 years. Furthermore, the exclusion of a hereditary thrombophilia and of alterations of coagulative parameters should precede any decision of combined oral contraceptive prescription in migraine patients.

  2. Oral surgery. Basic techniques.

    PubMed

    Ross, D L; Goldstein, G S

    1986-09-01

    Some of the clinical problems most frequently seen in veterinary dentistry and their surgical solutions are discussed. Extraction of teeth, surgical repositioning of teeth, tooth transplant, oral abscesses of tooth origin, impaction of teeth, repair of maxillary canine oronasal fistula, and simple techniques for oral wiring are among the issues considered.

  3. Oral environment and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yasusei; Tada, Hidesuke; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Tada, Yoshiko; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Miyake, Yoichiro; Ishimaru, Naozumi

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is now the leading cause of death in Japan. A rapid increase in cancer mortality is expected as Japan is facing a super-aged society. Many causes of cancer are known to be closely linked to life style factors, such as smoking, drinking, and diet. The oral environment is known to be involved in the pathogenesis and development of various diseases such as bronchitis, pneumonia, diabetes, heart disease, and dementia. Because the oral cavity acts as the bodily entrance for air and food, it is constantly exposed to foreign substances, including bacteria and viruses. A large number of bacteria are endemic to the oral cavity, and indigenous oral flora act to prevent the settlement of foreign bacteria. The oral environment is influenced by local factors, including dental plaque, tartar, teeth alignment, occlusion, an incompatible prosthesis, and bad lifestyle habits, and systemic factors, including smoking, consumption of alcohol, irregular lifestyle and eating habits, obesity, stress, hormones, and heredity. It has recently been revealed that the oral environment is associated with cancer. In particular, commensal bacteria in the oral cavity are involved in the development of cancer. Moreover, Candida, human papilloma virus and Epstein-Barr virus as well as commensal bacteria have been reported to be associated with the pathogenesis of cancer. In this review, we introduce recent findings of the correlation between the oral environment and cancer.

  4. ORAL AMELANOTIC MELANOMA

    PubMed Central

    Adisa, A.O.; Olawole, W.O.; Sigbeku, O.F.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant melanomas of the mucosal regions of the head and neck are extremely rare neoplasms accounting for less than 1% of all melanomas. Approximately half of all head and neck melanomas occur in the oral cavity. Less than 2% of all melanomas lack pigmentation, in the oral mucosa however, up to 75% of cases are amelanotic. No etiologic factors or risk factors have been recognized for oral melanomas. Some authors have suggested that oral habits and selfmedication may be of etiological significance. Oral melanoma is rare but it is relatively frequent in countries like Japan, Uganda, and India. It is rarely identified under the age of 20 years. In Australia where cutaneous melanomas are relatively common primary melanoma of the oral mucosa is rare. The surface architecture of oral melanomas ranges from macular to ulcerated and nodular. The lesion is said to be asymptomatic in the early stages but may become ulcerated and painful in advanced lesions. The diagnosis of amelanotic melanoma is more difficult than that of pigmented lesions. The neoplasm consists of spindle-shaped cells with many mitotic figures and no cytoplasmic melanin pigmentation. Immunohistochemistry using S-100, HMB-45, Melan-A and MART-1 will help in establishing the correct diagnosis. Radical surgery with ample margins and adjuvant chemotherapy are appropriate management protocol for malignant melanoma. Oral melanoma is associated with poor prognosis but its amelanotic variant has even worse prognosis because it exhibits a more aggressive biology and because of difficulty in diagnosis which leads to delayed treatment. PMID:25161399

  5. Oral Transliterating. PEPNet Tipsheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troiano, Claire A.

    2010-01-01

    An oral transliterator provides communication access to a person who is deaf or hard of hearing and who uses speechreading and speaking as a means of communicating. The oral transliterator, positioned in front of the speechreader, inaudibly repeats the spoken message, making it as speechreadable as possible. This is called Expressive Oral…

  6. Epilepsy and oral care.

    PubMed

    Fiske, Janice; Boyle, Carole

    2002-05-01

    Epilepsy is a common symptom of an underlying neurological disorder. The seizures can take a variety of forms. Both the condition and its medical management can affect oral health. Prevention of oral disease and carefully planned dental treatment are essential to the well-being of people with epilepsy.

  7. Migraine and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Mousa, G Y

    1982-10-01

    Migraine is a common complaint in optometric practice. Three cases of migrainous patients taking oral contraceptives are presented in this report. The role of oral contraceptives in triggering a migraine attack and possibly elevating the risk of a stroke in a patient with migraine is discussed. The counseling an optometrist can provide in such cases in discussed.

  8. Apple pectin affects the efficacy of epigallocatechin gallate on oral sucrose tolerance test in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, M; Hori, S

    2011-11-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), a dietary polyphenol and a major tea catechin, is a known sucrase inhibitor. Since dietary pectin is known to modulate some of the functions of the gastrointestinal tract, we investigated whether it could specifically affect the efficacy of EGCg on an oral sucrose tolerance test in mice. Male Crj:CD-1 (ICR) mice (seven weeks old) were randomly divided into two groups and fed a 5 % apple pectin (PE) or 5 % cellulose (CE) diet (control diet) for 28 days. After the experimental diet period, all mice were fasted overnight. A volume of 0.2 mL EGCg (20 mg/mL) was orally administered to all the mice by stainless steel feeding needle via injection syringe and a sucrose tolerance test was performed. The blood glucose levels were measured in blood collected from the tail vein using the OneTouch® Ultra® blood glucose monitoring system. Blood glucose levels at 30 minutes and 60 minutes after sucrose loading in the PE group were significantly higher than initial blood glucose levels. However, blood glucose levels at 30 minutes, 60 minutes, and 120 minutes after sucrose loading in the CE group were not significantly higher than initial blood glucose levels. After laparotomy, plasma lipids were also measured. Plasma triglyceride concentrations were significantly greater in the PE group than in the CE (control) group. This demonstrates that dietary pectin can affect the efficacy of EGCg on the oral sucrose tolerance test in mice.

  9. A novel strategy for the treatment of diabetes mellitus - sodium glucose co-transport inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Niazi, Asfandyar Khan; Niazi, Saad Hameed

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases, affecting almost 3 million in Canada alone and is characterized by increased blood glucose levels. Treatment varies from lifestyle changes to oral anti-diabetics and/or insulin. Sodium glucose co-transport inhibitors may offer promising treatment for patients suffering from diabetes. The inhibitors act by increasing the loss of glucose in urine by decreasing the reabsorption of glucose from the proximal tubules of nephrons. Aims: The aim of this review was to assess the efficacy of sodium glucose co-transport inhibitors in the treatment of diabetes as well as any adverse effects. Materials and Methods: Databases such as MEDLINE, COCHRANE and EMBASE were systematically searched for literature on the efficacy of sodium glucose co-transport inhibitors in improving the glycemic control of patients with diabetes. Results: Research showed that sodium glucose co-transport inhibitors significantly decreased blood glucose levels by increasing glucosuria. Due to the diuretic effects of these inhibitors, diabetic patients who were suffering from hypertension showed a decrease in blood pressure. The caloric loss associated with these inhibitors resulted in weight loss as well. The most common adverse effect seen in patients on these medications was mycotic infection of the urinary or genital tract. Conclusion: Sodium glucose co-transport inhibitors may be an effective line of treatment for diabetes. Although short-term research has shown these drugs to be safe and well-tolerated, studies should be conducted to assess the long-term effects of these drugs. PMID:22558567

  10. [Oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral disbiosis].

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, O F; Abramova, E S

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of examination of oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral mucosa disbiosis was evaluated. Thirty-seven patients were included in complex clinical and laboratory studies. The patients were divided in two groups: main group (30 patients exhibiting various grades of oral mucosa disbiosis) and control group (7 patients with no signs of oral disbiosis). The oral fluid bacteriocidal activity was examined by means of laser flow cytometry. Study results proved oral fluid bacteriocidal activity increase to correlate with the grade of oral mucosa disbiosis thus confirming the usefulness of the method in complex diagnostics of oral disbiosis.

  11. Effects of olanzapine and ziprasidone on glucose tolerance in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sacher, Julia; Mossaheb, Nilufar; Spindelegger, Christoph; Klein, Nikolas; Geiss-Granadia, Thomas; Sauermann, Robert; Lackner, Edith; Joukhadar, Christian; Müller, Markus; Kasper, Siegfried

    2008-06-01

    Atypical antipsychotics have been linked to a higher risk for glucose intolerance, and consequentially the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). We have therefore set out to investigate the acute effects of oral administration of olanzapine and ziprasidone on whole body insulin sensitivity in healthy subjects. Using the standardized hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique we compared whole body insulin sensitivity of 29 healthy male volunteers after oral intake of either olanzapine 10 mg/day (n = 14) or ziprasidone 80 mg/day (n = 15) for 10 days. A significant decrease (p<0.001) in whole body insulin sensitivity from 5.7 ml/h/kg ( = mean, SM = 0.4 ml/h/kg) at baseline to 4.7 ml/h/kg ( = mean, SM = 0.3 ml/h/kg) after oral intake of olanzapine (10 mg/day) for 10 days was observed. The ziprasidone (80 mg/day) group did not show any significant difference (5.2+/-0.3 ml/h/kg baseline vs 5.1+/-0.3 ml/h/kg) after 10 days of oral intake. Our main finding demonstrates that oral administration of olanzapine but not ziprasidone leads to a decrease in whole body insulin sensitivity in response to a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic challenge. Our finding is suggestive that not all atypical antipsychotics cause acute direct effects on glucose disposal and that accurate determination of side effect profile should be performed when choosing an atypical antipsychotic.

  12. Glucose Transport Machinery Reconstituted in Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Jesper S.; Elbing, Karin; Thompson, James R.; Malmstadt, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the production of a functioning cell model by formation of giant vesicles reconstituted with the GLUT1 glucose transporter and a glucose oxidase and hydrogen peroxidase linked fluorescent reporter internally. Hence, a simplified artificial cell is formed that is able to take up glucose and process it. PMID:25562394

  13. Glucose transport machinery reconstituted in cell models.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jesper S; Elbing, Karin; Thompson, James R; Malmstadt, Noah; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2015-02-11

    Here we demonstrate the production of a functioning cell model by formation of giant vesicles reconstituted with the GLUT1 glucose transporter and a glucose oxidase and hydrogen peroxidase linked fluorescent reporter internally. Hence, a simplified artificial cell is formed that is able to take up glucose and process it.

  14. Blood Glucose Levels and Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdovinos, Maria G.; Weyand, David

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between varying blood glucose levels and problem behavior during daily scheduled activities was examined. The effects that varying blood glucose levels had on problem behavior during daily scheduled activities were examined. Prior research has shown that differing blood glucose levels can affect behavior and mood. Results of this…

  15. Oral contraceptives: current status.

    PubMed

    Burkman, R T

    2001-03-01

    During the past four decades, oral contraceptives have remained a safe and effective method of birth control. Reductions in the estrogen and progestin dosages have significantly decreased the incidence of cardiovascular complications. The association between oral contraceptives and breast cancer appears to be primarily because of detection bias or possibly a promotional effect. Despite the changes in formulation, the problems related to side effects have not been totally solved. Because compliance and successful use is strongly affected by side effects, improvement in this area is probably the biggest challenge faced by developers of oral contraceptives. It is also clear that there are a growing number of significant noncontraceptive benefits that accrue in oral contraceptive users. Unfortunately, many women do not know about these benefits. Thus, one of the issues that providers need to continue to address is how to provide better information about oral contraceptives and contraception in general to patients.

  16. Study on the mechanism of human blood glucose concentration measuring using mid-infrared spectral analysis technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang

    2016-10-01

    All forms of diabetes increase the risk of long-term complications. Blood glucose monitoring is of great importance for controlling diabetes procedure, preventing the complications and improving the patient's life quality. At present, the clinical blood glucose concentration measurement is invasive and could be replaced by noninvasive spectroscopy analytical techniques. The mid-infrared spectral region contains strong characteristic and well-defined absorption bands. Therefore, mid-infrared provides an opportunity for monitoring blood glucose invasively with only a few discrete bonds. Although the blood glucose concentration measurement using mid-infrared spectroscopy has a lot of advantages, the disadvantage is also obvious. The absorption in this infrared region is fundamental molecular group vibration. Absorption intensity is very strong, especially for biological molecules. In this paper, it figures out that the osmosis rate of glucose has a certain relationship with the blood glucose concentration. Therefore, blood glucose concentration could be measured indirectly by measuring the glucose exudate in epidermis layer. Human oral glucose tolerance tests were carried out to verify the correlation of glucose exudation in shallow layer of epidermis layer and blood glucose concentration. As it has been explained above, the mid-infrared spectral region contains well-defined absorption bands, the intensity of absorption peak around 1123 cm-1 was selected to measure the glucose and that around 1170 cm-1 was selected as reference. Ratio of absorption peak intensity was recorded for each set of measurement. The effect and importance of the cleaning the finger to be measured before spectrum measuring are discussed and also verified by experiment.

  17. Serum thyroid hormone, insulin, glucose, triglycerides and protein concentrations in normal horses: association with topical dexamethasone usage.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Getu; Allersmeier, Maren; Schusser, Gerald F; Ungemach, Fritz R

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if topical application of dexamethasone affected the serum concentrations of thyroid hormones (triiodothyronine T(3) and thyroxine T(4)), glucose, triglycerides, total protein and insulin in normal horses. Ten horses were treated twice daily for 10 days with 50 g dexamethasone using an ointment formulation. Thyroid hormones and insulin were assayed using standard radioimmunoassay methods, while glucose, triglycerides and total protein were determined using a standard enzymatic method and the Biuret reaction, respectively. An increase in serum glucose and triglyceride concentrations was accompanied by 2-6-fold increases in serum insulin concentrations, but there was no change in serum total protein concentration. Insulin secretion increased with concomitant hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia. A non-significant decline in T(4) secretion was noted. Serum T(3) and T(4) concentrations declined continuously below baseline values from 48 h. Glucose and insulin levels returned to baseline values 3 days after treatment withdrawal, whereas triglycerides reverted to baseline by 7 days. In contrast, baseline values of serum T(3) and T(4) were not reached by 20 days following drug withdrawal. The results indicated that topical administration of dexamethasone affected thyroid function and physiological metabolic functions, which may have implications for potential doping cases in racing horses.

  18. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health PCOS: The Oral Contraceptive Pill Posted under Health Guides . ... of oral contraceptive pills for young women with PCOS? Regular and Lighter Periods: Oral contraceptive pills can ...

  19. Modeling of relationship between glucose concentration in blood and glucose concentration in interstitial fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ting; Li, Dachao; Ji, Yongjie; Li, Guoqing; Xu, Kexin

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, using the detection of interstitial fluid glucose concentration to realize the real-time continuous monitoring of blood glucose concentration gets more and more attention, because for one person, the relationship between blood glucose concentration and interstitial fluid glucose concentration satisfies specific rules. However, the glucose concentration in interstitial fluid is not entirely equal to the glucose concentration in blood and has a physiological lag because of the physiological difference of cells in blood and interstitial fluid. Because the clinical diagnostic criteria of diabetes are still blood glucose concentration, the evaluation model of the physiological lag parameter between the glucose concentration in blood and the glucose concentration in interstitial fluid should be established. The physiological difference in glucose molecules uptake, utilization, and elimination by cells in blood and interstitial fluid and the diffusion velocity of glucose molecule from blood to interstitial fluid will be induced to the mass transfer model to express the physiological lag parameter. Based on the continuous monitoring of glucose concentration in interstitial fluid, the project had studied the mass transfer model to establish the evaluation model of the physiological lag parameter between the glucose concentration in blood and the glucose concentration in interstitial fluid. We have preliminary achieved to evaluate the physiological lag parameter exactly and predict the glucose concentration in blood through the glucose concentration in interstitial fluid accurately.

  20. Non-invasive glucose monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A non-invasive method for determining blood level of an analyte of interest, such as glucose, comprises: generating an excitation laser beam (e.g., at a wavelength of 700 to 900 nanometers); focusing the excitation laser beam into the anterior chamber of an eye of the subject so that aqueous humor in the anterior chamber is illuminated; detecting (preferably confocally detecting) a Raman spectrum from the illuminated aqueous humor; and then determining the blood glucose level (or the level of another analyte of interest) for the subject from the Raman spectrum. Preferably, the detecting step is followed by the step of subtracting a confounding fluorescence spectrum from the Raman spectrum to produce a difference spectrum; and determining the blood level of the analyte of interest for the subject from that difference spectrum, preferably using linear or nonlinear multivariate analysis such as partial least squares analysis. Apparatus for carrying out the foregoing method is also disclosed.

  1. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17…

  2. Measurement of tissue optical properties with optical coherence tomography: Implication for noninvasive blood glucose concentration monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Kirill V.

    Approximately 14 million people in the USA and more than 140 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes mellitus. The current glucose sensing technique involves a finger puncture several times a day to obtain a droplet of blood for analysis. There have been enormous efforts by many scientific groups and companies to quantify glucose concentration noninvasively using different optical techniques. However, these techniques face limitations associated with low sensitivity, accuracy, and insufficient specificity of glucose concentrations over a physiological range. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a new technology, is being applied for noninvasive imaging in tissues with high resolution. OCT utilizes sensitive detection of photons coherently scattered from tissue. The high resolution of this technique allows for exceptionally accurate measurement of tissue scattering from a specific layer of skin compared with other optical techniques and, therefore, may provide noninvasive and continuous monitoring of blood glucose concentration with high accuracy. In this dissertation work I experimentally and theoretically investigate feasibility of noninvasive, real-time, sensitive, and specific monitoring of blood glucose concentration using an OCT-based biosensor. The studies were performed in scattering media with stable optical properties (aqueous suspensions of polystyrene microspheres and milk), animals (New Zealand white rabbits and Yucatan micropigs), and normal subjects (during oral glucose tolerance tests). The results of these studies demonstrated: (1) capability of the OCT technique to detect changes in scattering coefficient with the accuracy of about 1.5%; (2) a sharp and linear decrease of the OCT signal slope in the dermis with the increase of blood glucose concentration; (3) the change in the OCT signal slope measured during bolus glucose injection experiments (characterized by a sharp increase of blood glucose concentration) is higher than that measured in

  3. Reimbursement for Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    DeVries, J. Hans

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems have been available for more than 15 years by now. However, market uptake is relatively low in most countries; in other words, relatively few patients with diabetes use CGM systems regularly. One major reason for the reluctance of patients to use CGM systems is the costs associated (i.e., in most countries no reimbursement is provided by the health insurance companies). In case reimbursement is in place, like in the United States, only certain patient groups get reimbursement that fulfills strict indications. This situation is somewhat surprising in view of the mounting evidence for benefits of CGM usage from clinical trials: most meta-analyses of these trials consistently show a clinically relevant improvement of glucose control associated with a reduction in hypoglycemic events. More recent trials with CGM systems with an improved CGM technology showed even more impressive benefits, especially if CGM systems are used in different combinations with an insulin pump (e.g., with automated bolus calculators and low glucose suspend features). Nevertheless, sufficient evidence is not available for all patient groups, and more data on cost–efficacy are needed. In addition, good data from real-world studies/registers documenting the benefits of CGM usage under daily life conditions would be of help to convince healthcare systems to cover the costs of CGM systems. In view of the ongoing improvements in established needle-type CGM systems, the fact that new CGM technology will come to the market soon (e.g., implantable sensors), that CGM-like systems are quite successfully at least in certain markets (like the flash glucose monitoring systems), and that the first artificial pancreas systems will come to the market in the next few years, there is a need to make sure that this major improvement in diabetes therapy becomes more widely available for patients with diabetes, for which better reimbursement is essential. PMID

  4. Oxidative metabolism: glucose versus ketones.

    PubMed

    Prince, Allison; Zhang, Yifan; Croniger, Colleen; Puchowicz, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of upstream oxidative processes (glycolysis, beta-oxidation, CAC turnover) to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) under the driving conditions of energy demand by the cell results in the liberation of free energy as ATP. Perturbations in glycolytic CAC or OXPHOS can result in pathology or cell death. To better understand whole body energy expenditure during chronic ketosis, we used a diet-induced rat model of ketosis to determine if high-fat-carbohydrate-restricted "ketogenic" diet results in changes in total energy expenditure (TEE). Consistent with previous reports of increased energy expenditure in mice, we hypothesized that rats fed ketogenic diet for 3 weeks would result in increased resting energy expenditure due to alterations in metabolism associated with a "switch" in energy substrate from glucose to ketone bodies. The rationale is ketone bodies are a more efficient fuel than glucose. Indirect calorimetric analysis revealed a moderate increase in VO2 and decreased VCO2 and heat with ketosis. These results suggest ketosis induces a moderate uncoupling state and less oxidative efficiency compared to glucose oxidation.

  5. Non-Invasive Glucose Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakley, Daniel

    2010-10-01

    There are two little words, when taken together have great implications: ``What IF'' In the US alone, there are millions who are burdened with diabetes and who must maintain their glucose levels by taking blood samples and having it analyzed. Even though this procedure has improved over time, still it is very intrusive and is a burden to many that must live with it. What if it were not necessary? Although it is current practice to measure glucose levels invasively (using blood samples), it may be possible to measure glucose non-invasively. Although several companies around the world have invested millions of dollars to address this problem, none have been successful thus far. However, there are many methods that hold a potential and many approaches that have not yet been explored. We are working on a review of what has been approached thus far and are entertaining proposals for a combined interdisciplinary approach which combines expertise from bioengineering, physics, and biology. We hope to learn from the unsuccessful attempts of others whilst employing innovative new approaches to this problem.

  6. Effects of oral contraceptives on glucoregulatory responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Catherine M; Ben-Ezra, Vic; Gozansky, Wendolyn S; Scheaffer, Suzanne E

    2004-03-01

    Some of the effects of oral contraceptives (OCs) to alter glucoregulation may be ameliorated by exercise. To test this premise, the effects of acute aerobic exercise on postprandial glucose, insulin, and C-peptide responses (area under the curve [AUC]) were measured in 8 users of low-dose estrogen and progestin OCs (OC(+)) and 10 women not using OCs (OC(-)). They completed 2 randomly ordered intervention trials: (1) aerobic exercise on 3 consecutive days with a 2.5-hour, 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) on day 4, and (2) no exercise for 3 days prior to the OGTT (control trial). The exercise was 50 minutes of treadmill walking at 70% (.-)VO(2max). The groups were similar in age (27 +/- 3 years), waist-to-hip ratio (0.74 +/- 0.01), and cardiorespiratory fitness (32.5 +/- 1.6 mL x kg body mass(-1) x min(-1)). Fasting plasma glucose, C-peptide, and insulin levels were similar (P >.05) between groups in the control trial. In both trials, glucose(AUC) was significantly greater (13%, P <.05) in OC(+). Exercise resulted in a significant (P <.05) decrease in fasting plasma glucose and insulin, insulin(AUC), glucose(AUC) x insulin(AUC), and C-peptide(AUC) in both groups, suggesting enhanced insulin action and/or reduced pancreatic insulin secretion. Hepatic insulin extraction ([C-peptide(AUC) - insulin(AUC)())]/C-peptide(AUC)) was increased following exercise only in OC(+). Thus, insulin action was enhanced in response to exercise in young sedentary women independent of OC use. The mechanisms for the acute exercise effect on insulin action may be different in OC users compared with normally menstruating women.

  7. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    PubMed

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  8. Carbohydrate-induced secretion of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1.

    PubMed

    Seino, Yusuke; Maekawa, Ryuya; Ogata, Hidetada; Hayashi, Yoshitaka

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are the incretin hormones secreted from enteroendocrine K-cells and L-cells, respectively, by oral ingestion of various nutrients including glucose. K-cells, L-cells and pancreatic β-cells are glucose-responsive cells with similar glucose-sensing machinery including glucokinase and an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K(+) channel comprising KIR6.2 and sulfonylurea receptor 1. However, the physiological role of the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K(+) channel in GIP secretion in K-cells and GLP-1 secretion in L-cells is not elucidated. Recently, it was reported that GIP and GLP-1-producing cells are present also in pancreatic islets, and islet-derived GIP and GLP-1 contribute to glucose-induced insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. In this short review, we focus on GIP and GLP-1 secretion by monosaccharides, such as glucose or fructose, and the role of the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K(+) channel in GIP and GLP-1 secretion.

  9. Subjects with Impaired Fasting Glucose: Evolution in a Period of 6 Years

    PubMed Central

    Leiva, E.; Mujica, V.; Orrego, R.; Wehinger, S.; Soto, A.; Icaza, G.; Vásquez, M.; Díaz, L.; Andrews, M.; Arredondo, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To study the evolution of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), considering glucose and HbA1c levels and risk factors associated, in a period of 6 years. Methods. We studied 94 subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) that were diagnosed in 2005 and followed up to 2012. Glucose and HbA1c levels were determined. A descriptive analysis of contingence charts was performed in order to study the evolution in the development of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Results. Twenty-eight of ninety-four subjects became T2DM; 51/94 remained with IFG; and 20/94 presented normal fasting glucose. From the 28 diabetic subjects, 9 had already developed diabetes and were under treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents; 5 were diagnosed with plasma glucose < 126 mg/dL, but with HbA1c over 6.5%. In those who developed diabetes, 15/28 had a family history of T2DM in first relative degree. Also, diabetic subjects had a BMI significantly higher than nodiabetics (t test: P < 0.01). The individuals that in 2005 had the highest BMI are those who currently have diabetes. Conclusion. The IFG constitutes a condition of high risk of developing T2DM in a few years, especially over 110 mg/dL and in obesity patients. PMID:25215305

  10. Effect of Helicteres isora bark extract on blood glucose and hepatic enzymes in experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G; Murugesan, A G; Rajasekara Pandian, M

    2006-04-01

    The effect of oral administration of an aqueous extract of the bark of Helicteres isora was investigated on blood glucose and plasma antioxidant status in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. The study was also undertaken to evaluate the role of hepatic enzymes in experimental diabetes. Oral administration of a bark extract of Helicteres isora (100, 200 mg/kg) in STZ diabetic rats caused a significant increase in body weight, hepatic hexokinase activity and significant decrease in hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase, serum acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Based on these findings, we suggest that Helicteres isora possesses hypoglycemic and hepatoprotective activity and is able to ameliorate biochemical damage in STZ induced diabetic rats.

  11. Moderate amounts of fructose- or glucose-sweetened beverages do not differentially alter metabolic health in male and female adolescents123

    PubMed Central

    Heden, Timothy D; Liu, Ying; Park, Young-Min; Nyhoff, Lauryn M; Winn, Nathan C; Kanaley, Jill A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adolescents consume more sugar-sweetened beverages than do individuals in any other age group, but it is unknown how the type of sugar-sweetened beverage affects metabolic health in this population. Objective: The objective was to compare the metabolic health effects of short-term (2-wk) consumption of high-fructose (HF) and high-glucose (HG)–sweetened beverages in adolescents (15–20 y of age). Design: In a counterbalanced, single-blind fashion, 40 male and female adolescents completed two 2-wk trials that included 1) an HF trial in which they consumed 710 mL of a sugar-sweetened beverage/d (equivalent to 50 g fructose/d and 15 g glucose/d) for 2 wk and 2) an HG trial in which they consumed 710 mL of a sugar-sweetened beverage/d (equivalent to 50 g glucose/d and 15 g fructose/d) for 2 wk in addition to their normal ad libitum diet. In addition, the participants maintained similar physical activity levels during each trial. The day after each trial, insulin sensitivity and resistance [assessed via Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI) and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index] and fasting and postprandial glucose, lactate, lipid, cholesterol, insulin, C-peptide, insulin secretion, and clearance responses to HF or HG mixed meals were assessed. Results: Body weight, QUICKI (whole-body insulin sensitivity), HOMA-IR (hepatic insulin resistance), and fasting lipids, cholesterol, glucose, lactate, and insulin secretion or clearance were not different between trials. Fasting HDL- and HDL3-cholesterol concentrations were ∼10–31% greater (P < 0.05) in female adolescents than in male adolescents. Postprandial triacylglycerol, HDL-cholesterol, HDL3-cholesterol, and glucose concentrations were not different between HF and HG trials. The lactate incremental area under the curve was ∼3.7-fold greater during the HF trial (P < 0.05), whereas insulin secretion was 19% greater during the HG trial (P < 0

  12. The Role of Incretins in Glucose Homeostasis and Diabetes Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wook; Egan, Josephine M.

    2009-01-01

    Incretins are gut hormones that are secreted from enteroendocrine cells into the blood within minutes after eating. One of their many physiological roles is to regulate the amount of insulin that is secreted after eating. In this manner, as well as others to be described in this review, their final common raison d’être is to aid in disposal of the products of digestion. There are two incretins, known as glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), that share many common actions in the pancreas but have distinct actions outside of the pancreas. Both incretins are rapidly deactivated by an enzyme called dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). A lack of secretion of incretins or an increase in their clearance are not pathogenic factors in diabetes. However, in type 2 diabetes (T2DM), GIP no longer modulates glucose-dependent insulin secretion, even at supraphysiological (pharmacological) plasma levels, and therefore GIP incompetence is detrimental to β-cell function, especially after eating. GLP-1, on the other hand, is still insulinotropic in T2DM, and this has led to the development of compounds that activate the GLP-1 receptor with a view to improving insulin secretion. Since 2005, two new classes of drugs based on incretin action have been approved for lowering blood glucose levels in T2DM: an incretin mimetic (exenatide, which is a potent long-acting agonist of the GLP-1 receptor) and an incretin enhancer (sitagliptin, which is a DPP4 inhibitor). Exenatide is injected subcutaneously twice daily and its use leads to lower blood glucose and higher insulin levels, especially in the fed state. There is glucose-dependency to its insulin secretory capacity, making it unlikely to cause low blood sugars (hypoglycemia). DPP4 inhibitors are orally active and they increase endogenous blood levels of active incretins, thus leading to prolonged incretin action. The elevated levels of GLP-1 are thought to be the mechanism underlying their

  13. New Oral Hypoglycemic Agents and Cardiovascular Risk. Crossing the Metabolic Border.

    PubMed

    Dalama, Belén; Mesa, Jordi

    2016-11-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors are a novel pharmacological class of oral hypoglycemic agents that lower glucose levels by increasing renal glucose excretion in an insulin-independent manner. However, this seemingly simple mechanism has more complex indirect metabolic effects. The results of randomized clinical trials have shown that these inhibitors effectively lower blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia and, at the same time, also reduce bodyweight and systolic blood pressure. In this review, we describe the mechanism of action, efficacy, and safety of currently marketed drugs, as well as other risk factors besides glucose that can potentially be modulated positively. Recent data on empagliflozin showing a significant cardiovascular benefit have compelled us to update knowledge of this new therapeutic class for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Elgart, Jorge F.; González, Lorena; Rucci, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    Although test strips for self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) represent around 50% of diabetes treatment cost in Argentina, little is known about their current use and relationship with different types of treatment. We therefore aimed to estimate the current use of test strips and identify the major use drivers and the percentage they represent of total prescription costs in 2 entities of the social security system (SSS) of Argentina. Observational retrospective study measuring test strip prescriptions delivered by pharmacies from the province of Buenos Aires (8115 records collected during 3 months provided by the Colegio de Farmacéuticos de la Provincia de Buenos Aires) of affiliates with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) from 2 large entities of the SSS system. The average monthly test strips/patient used for SMBG was 97.5 ± 70.1. This number varied according to treatment: monotherapy with oral antidiabetic drugs (OAD) < combined OAD therapy < insulin treatment. Test strips represented a higher percentage of the total prescription cost in people under OAD monotherapy (84.6%) and lower in those with insulin analogs (46.9%). In our population, the type of hyperglycemia treatment was the main driver of test strip use for SMBG and its impact on the total prescription cost depends on the kind of such treatment. Since it has been shown that patients’ education and prescription audit can optimize test strip use and treatment outcomes, implementation of such strategies could appropriately support, optimize, and reduce ineffective test strip use in people with T2DM. PMID:25208965

  15. A model of type 2 diabetes in the guinea pig using sequential diet-induced glucose intolerance and streptozotocin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ackart, David F.; Richardson, Michael A.; DiLisio, James E.; Pulford, Bruce; Basaraba, Randall J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type 2 diabetes is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among noncommunicable diseases, and additional animal models that more closely replicate the pathogenesis of human type 2 diabetes are needed. The goal of this study was to develop a model of type 2 diabetes in guinea pigs, in which diet-induced glucose intolerance precedes β-cell cytotoxicity, two processes that are crucial to the development of human type 2 diabetes. Guinea pigs developed impaired glucose tolerance after 8 weeks of feeding on a high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, as determined by oral glucose challenge. Diet-induced glucose intolerance was accompanied by β-cell hyperplasia, compensatory hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia with hepatocellular steatosis. Streptozotocin (STZ) treatment alone was ineffective at inducing diabetic hyperglycemia in guinea pigs, which failed to develop sustained glucose intolerance or fasting hyperglycemia and returned to euglycemia within 21 days after treatment. However, when high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet-fed guinea pigs were treated with STZ, glucose intolerance and fasting hyperglycemia persisted beyond 21 days post-STZ treatment. Guinea pigs with diet-induced glucose intolerance subsequently treated with STZ demonstrated an insulin-secretory capacity consistent with insulin-independent diabetes. This insulin-independent state was confirmed by response to oral antihyperglycemic drugs, metformin and glipizide, which resolved glucose intolerance and extended survival compared with guinea pigs with uncontrolled diabetes. In this study, we have developed a model of sequential glucose intolerance and β-cell loss, through high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet and extensive optimization of STZ treatment in the guinea pig, which closely resembles human type 2 diabetes. This model will prove useful in the study of insulin-independent diabetes pathogenesis with or without comorbidities, where the guinea pig serves as a relevant model species. PMID:28093504

  16. Does oral experience terminate ingestion?

    PubMed

    Swithers, S E; Hall, W G

    1994-10-01

    Using data from studies of ingestive behavior in developing rat pups we demonstrate how oral experience can contribute to the termination of ingestion. In rat pups, repeated oral stimulation with sweet solutions causes a decline in oral responsiveness. The diminished responsiveness is specific to the flavor of the stimulus experienced orally and can persist for several hours. We suggest that this experience-based decrement in responsiveness is best considered "oral habituation" and that oral habituation largely accounts for the onset of satiety. Post-ingestive feedback signals may have their influence through the oral habituation process or act in the context of oral habituation. Oral habituation is also shown to depend on the pattern of stimulus presentation, a phenomenon that adds considerable complexity to assessing the contributions of oral experience to satiety. The concept of oral habituation may be useful in understanding the immediate control of ingestion and the moment-to-moment expression of ingestive behavior in adult animals.

  17. [Schizophrenia and oral health].

    PubMed

    Moullan, M; Denis, F

    2017-03-24

    Mental health is an essential component of general health. Schizophrenia is a severe and chronic mental illness that affects higher brain functions. It is characterized by the presence of a mental dissociation, dampened or inappropriate affects, hallucinations and delirium. Schizophrenia has also a negative impact on oral health. As schizophrenia affects 1% of the population, every practitioner concerned with oral sphere will be confronted one day or another with a patient suffering from this disease. It is therefore important to acquire essential notions. The aim of our work was to make an update about factors that may affect oral health in patients with schizophrenia.

  18. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  19. Etiology of oral habits.

    PubMed

    Bayardo, R E; Mejia, J J; Orozco, S; Montoya, K

    1996-01-01

    The pedodontic admission histories of 1600 Mexican children were analyzed, to determine general epidemiologic factors or oral habits, as well as their relationship with identifiable biopsychosociologic factors. Fifty-six percent of the children gave evidence of an oral habit, with significant predisposition among female patients, single children, subjects in poor physical health (particularly from allergies), as well as children with histories of chronic health problems. Oral habits should be considered a major health hazard because of their high incidence. Successful treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach to the basic cause of the problem.

  20. Probiotics and Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Haukioja, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The number of products containing probiotics, viable bacteria with proven health benefits, entering the market is increasing. Traditionally, probiotics have been associated with gut health, and most clinical interest has been focused on their use for prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal infections and diseases; however, during the last decade several investigators have also suggested the use of probiotics for oral health purposes. The aim of this review is to examine potential mechanisms of probiotic bacteria in the oral cavity and summarize observed effects of probiotics with respect to oral health. The review focuses on probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, genera that are most used in various probiotic products. PMID:20613927

  1. The influence of experiment design on the model precision in the noninvasive glucose sensing by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Chen, Wenliang; Xu, Kexin

    2007-11-01

    In the sensing of blood glucose by the near-infrared spectroscopy, building a robust and effective model is the precondition to obtain an accurate and reasonable prediction result of glucose concentration. In the chemometrics analysis, training set should be representative, reasonable distribution and cover the scope of prediction set. So the experiment designs became one of most difficult challenges for the noninvasive glucose sensing, especially for the in vivo experiments. In this paper, the oral glucose tolerance tests of two diabetics were carried out. The transcutaneous diffuse reflectance spectra were collected by a custom-build spectrometer and the glucose reference were measured by an invasive portable glucose meter. Then the influence of different experiment designs including the error in the references, the time delay between glucose in blood and interstitial fluid, the change in physiological temperature and different validation methods were analyzed. The result showed that, the error induced by the uncertainty in the reference was lower than that by the time delay, which could be up to 15.4%. And the proportion of error induced by temperature change is more than 50%, which is the most significant. Furthermore, the prediction error was restricted by the validation set selection and the way to change the blood glucose concentration.

  2. Distinguishing between persistent and transient impaired glucose tolerance using a prediction model.

    PubMed

    Bourn, D M; Williams, S M; Mann, J I

    1992-10-01

    Screening for impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and Type 2 (non-insulin dependent) diabetes was carried out in 777 people and those with high blood glucose levels completed three 2-h oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT). Blood lipid levels, fasting and 2-h insulin levels, body mass index, and blood pressure were also measured and family history of Type 2 diabetes recorded. Fifty people were identified with IGT and of these 21 were found to have persistent IGT and 29 transient IGT. A model including the variables body mass index, fasting and 2-h insulin levels, fasting triglycerides and family history of Type 2 diabetes was developed using the Speigelhalter-Knill-Jones weighting method to predict subjects with persistent IGT. This model could be useful in identifying people with persistent IGT and therefore eliminate the need for repeat OGTTs which are time consuming and expensive.

  3. Comparative absorption of [13C]glucose and [13C]lactose by premature infants.

    PubMed

    Murray, R D; Boutton, T W; Klein, P D; Gilbert, M; Paule, C L; MacLean, W C

    1990-01-01

    Oxidation of orally administered [13C]glucose and [13C]lactose and fecal recovery of malabsorbed substrates were determined in two groups of premature infants. Eighteen studies were performed with six infants at Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH); 24 studies were performed with nine infants at Columbus Children's Hospital (CCH). The two groups differed in that JHH infants had shorter gestations but were older when studied. Fecal 13C loss after [13C]glucose administration did not differ between the two groups. Compared with glucose, the metabolism of lactose appeared to involve more malabsorption and colonic fermentation in JHH infants than in CCH infants and resulted in higher fecal losses of substrate carbon. Maturation appeared to involve increased proximal intestinal absorption and greater retention of absorbed carbohydrate. Simultaneous absorption of substrate from the small and large intestine may limit the usefulness of breath tests for 13C in the premature infant.

  4. A review of biodegradable polymeric systems for oral insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yue Yuan; Xiong, Xiang Yuan; Tian, Yuan; Li, Zi Ling; Gong, Yan Chun; Li, Yu Ping

    2016-07-01

    Currently, repeated routine subcutaneous injections of insulin are the standard treatment for insulin-dependent diabetic patients. However, patients' poor compliance for injections often fails to achieve the stable concentration of blood glucose. As a protein drug, the oral bioavailability of insulin is low due to many physiological reasons. Several carriers, such as macromolecules and liposomes have been used to deliver drugs in vivo. In this review article, the gastrointestinal barriers of oral insulin administration are described. Strategies for increasing the bioavailability of oral insulin, such absorption enhancers, enzyme inhibitors, enteric coatings are also introduced. The potential absorption mechanisms of insulin-loaded nanoparticles across the intestinal epithelium, including intestinal lymphatic route, transcellular route and paracellular route are discussed in this review. Natural polymers, such as chitosan and its derivates, alginate derivatives, γ-PGA-based materials and starch-based nanoparticles have been exploited for oral insulin delivery; synthetic polymers, such as PLGA, PLA, PCL and PEA have also been developed for oral administration of insulin. This review focuses on recent advances in using biodegradable natural and synthetic polymers for oral insulin delivery along with their future prospects.

  5. Single oral dose safety of D-allulose in dogs

    PubMed Central

    NISHII, Naohito; NOMIZO, Toru; TAKASHIMA, Satoshi; MATSUBARA, Tatsuya; TOKUDA, Masaaki; KITAGAWA, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Healthy dogs were administered acute oral doses of D-allulose (also called D-psicose) to evaluate its toxicity. Six dogs received oral doses of either a placebo or D-allulose solution (1 and 4 g/kg) on three different study days. One dog experienced vomiting, and five dogs showed transient diarrhea when 4 g/kg of D-allulose was administered. All dogs were active and had a good appetite throughout the study period. Blood glucose concentration slightly decreased without a rise in plasma insulin concentration 2 hr after D-allulose administration. Plasma alkaline phosphatase activities showed a mild increase between 12 and 48 hr after D-allulose administration. These data suggested that a single oral dose of D-allulose does not show severe toxicity in dogs. PMID:26972334

  6. Long-term oral galactose treatment prevents cognitive deficits in male Wistar rats treated intracerebroventricularly with streptozotocin.

    PubMed

    Salkovic-Petrisic, Melita; Osmanovic-Barilar, Jelena; Knezovic, Ana; Hoyer, Siegfried; Mosetter, Kurt; Reutter, Werner

    2014-02-01

    Basic and clinical research has demonstrated that dementia of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (sAD) type is associated with dysfunction of the insulin-receptor (IR) system followed by decreased glucose transport via glucose transporter GLUT4 and decreased glucose metabolism in brain cells. An alternative source of energy is d-galactose (the C-4-epimer of d-glucose) which is transported into the brain by insulin-independent GLUT3 transporter where it might be metabolized to glucose via the Leloir pathway. Exclusively parenteral daily injections of galactose induce memory deterioration in rodents and are used to generate animal aging model, but the effects of oral galactose treatment on cognitive functions have never been tested. We have investigated the effects of continuous daily oral galactose (200 mg/kg/day) treatment on cognitive deficits in streptozotocin-induced (STZ-icv) rat model of sAD, tested by Morris Water Maze and Passive Avoidance test, respectively. One month of oral galactose treatment initiated immediately after the STZ-icv administration, successfully prevented development of the STZ-icv-induced cognitive deficits. Beneficial effect of oral galactose was independent of the rat age and of the galactose dose ranging from 100 to 300 mg/kg/day. Additionally, oral galactose administration led to the appearance of galactose in the blood. The increase of galactose concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid was several times lower after oral than after parenteral administration of the same galactose dose. Oral galactose exposure might have beneficial effects on learning and memory ability and could be worth investigating for improvement of cognitive deficits associated with glucose hypometabolism in AD.

  7. Dietary Fatty Acids Differentially Associate with Fasting Versus 2-Hour Glucose Homeostasis: Implications for The Management of Subtypes of Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guess, Nicola; Perreault, Leigh; Kerege, Anna; Strauss, Allison; Bergman, Bryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Over-nutrition has fuelled the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes, but the role of individual macronutrients to the diabetogenic process is not well delineated. We aimed to examine the impact of dietary fatty acid intake on fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose concentrations, as well as tissue-specific insulin action governing each. Normoglycemic controls (n = 15), athletes (n = 14), and obese (n = 23), as well as people with prediabetes (n = 10) and type 2 diabetes (n = 11), were queried about their habitual diet using a Food Frequency Questionnaire. All subjects were screened by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and studied using the hyperinsulinemic/euglycemic clamp with infusion of 6,62H2-glucose. Multiple regression was performed to examine relationships between dietary fat intake and 1) fasting plasma glucose, 2) % suppression of endogenous glucose production, 3) 2-hour post-OGTT plasma glucose, and 4) skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity (glucose rate of disappearance (Rd) and non-oxidative glucose disposal (NOGD)). The %kcal from saturated fat (SFA) was positively associated with fasting (β = 0.303, P = 0.018) and 2-hour plasma glucose (β = 0.415, P<0.001), and negatively related to % suppression of hepatic glucose production (β = -0.245, P = 0.049), clamp Rd (β = -0.256, P = 0.001) and NOGD (β = -0.257, P = 0.001). The %kcal from trans fat was also negatively related to clamp Rd (β = -0.209, P = 0.008) and NOGD (β = -0.210, P = 0.008). In contrast, the %kcal from polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) was negatively associated with 2-hour glucose levels (β = -0.383, P = 0.001), and positively related to Rd (β = 0.253, P = 0.007) and NOGD (β = 0.246, P = 0.008). Dietary advice to prevent diabetes should consider the underlying pathophysiology of the prediabetic state. PMID:26999667

  8. Budesonide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Budesonide is used to prevent difficulty breathing, chest tightness, wheezing, and coughing caused by asthma. Budesonide powder for oral inhalation (Pulmicort Flexhaler) is used in adults and children 6 ...

  9. Albuterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Albuterol is used to prevent and treat difficulty breathing, wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest tightness ... for oral inhalation is also used to prevent breathing difficulties during exercise. Albuterol inhalation aerosol (Proair HFA, ...

  10. Oral Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... the thin, flat cells that line the lips, oral cavity, and oropharynx. Cancer that forms in squamous cells is called squamous cell carcinoma . See the following PDQ summaries for more information ...

  11. Ipratropium Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Ipratropium oral inhalation is used to prevent wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest tightness in people ... damage to the air sacs in the lungs). Ipratropium is in a class of medications called bronchodilators. ...

  12. Beclomethasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... other medical conditions, such as asthma, arthritis, or eczema (a skin disease), they may worsen when your oral steroid dose is decreased. Tell your doctor if this happens or if you experience any ...

  13. Mometasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... other medical conditions, such as asthma, arthritis, or eczema (a skin disease), they may worsen when your oral steroid dose is decreased. Tell your doctor if this happens or if you experience any ...

  14. Oral compound nevus.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Lyzete Berriel; Consalaro, Alberto; da Silva Santos, Paulo Sérgio; da Silva Sampieri, Marcelo Bonifácio; Tinoco-Araújo, José Endrigo

    2014-02-18

    The melanocytic nevus is a benign and focal proliferation of nevus cells that can be congenital or acquired. Intraoral lesions are uncommon, and the etiology and pathogenesis are poorly understood. The occurrence rate of oral compound nevus is about 5.9% to 16.5% of all oral melanocytic nevi. A 22-year-old male patient presented with a dark brown macule on the buccal mucosa of the maxilla in the region of tooth 26. The lesion was elliptical, 0.7 x 0.5 cm, well circumscribed, asymptomatic, and the evolution time was unknown. An excisional biopsy was performed and microscopic analysis revealed nests of nevus cells in the epithelium and underlying connective tissue that were compatible with melanocytic compound nevus. Owing to the clinical similarity between oral melanocytic nevus and oral melanoma, a histopathological analysis is mandatory for definitive diagnosis.

  15. Inhibition of α-Glucosidase by Thiosulfinate as a Target for Glucose Modulation in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia is a predisposing factor for vascular dysfunction and organ damage. α-glucosidase is a hydrolytic enzyme that increases the glucose absorption rate and subsequently elevates blood glucose levels. Garlic (Allium sativum L.) is a rich source of several phytonutrients, including thiosulfinate (THIO). The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of THIO, a potent inhibitor of intestinal α-glucosidase, to reduce postprandial blood glucose. Male albino rats were randomly assigned to five different groups (n = 10/group). Group 1 served as the control group. Groups 2–5 were injected intraperitoneally with a single dose of streptozotocin (STZ) to induce diabetes. Group 2 comprised untreated diabetic rats. Groups 3 and 4 contained diabetic rats that were given THIO orally (20 mg/kg body weight/day and 40 mg/kg body weight/day, resp.). Group 5 was the positive control having diabetic rats treated orally with acarbose (10 mg/kg body weight/day; positive control). Diabetic rats treated with THIO displayed a significant blood glucose reduction (p < 0.001 and < 0.01 by analysis of variance, resp.) and a significant elevation in insulin compared with that of untreated rats. THIO is an effective noncompetitive intestinal α-glucosidase inhibitor that promotes hypoglycemic action (p < 0.001) in STZ-injected rats. THIO is a promising agent for the management of postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:27051452

  16. Impaired glucose tolerance in midlife and longitudinal changes in brain function during aging.

    PubMed

    Thambisetty, Madhav; Beason-Held, Lori L; An, Yang; Kraut, Michael; Metter, Jeffrey; Egan, Josephine; Ferrucci, Luigi; O'Brien, Richard; Resnick, Susan M

    2013-10-01

    We investigated whether individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in midlife subsequently show regionally specific longitudinal changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) relative to those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Sixty-four cognitively normal participants in the neuroimaging substudy of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging underwent serial (15)O-water positron emission tomography scans (age at first scan, 69.6 ± 7.5 years) and oral glucose tolerance tests 12 years earlier (age at first oral glucose tolerance test, 57.2 ± 11.1 years). Using voxel-based analysis, we compared changes in rCBF over an 8-year period between 15 participants with IGT in midlife and 49 with NGT. Significant differences were observed in longitudinal change in rCBF between the IGT and NGT groups. The predominant pattern was greater rCBF decline in the IGT group in the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortices. Some brain regions in the frontal and temporal cortices also showed greater longitudinal increments in rCBF in the IGT group. Our findings suggest that IGT in midlife is associated with subsequent longitudinal changes in brain function during aging even in cognitively normal older individuals.

  17. Risk of impaired glucose tolerance in normal weight hirsute women during four years observation.

    PubMed

    Andries, Magdalene; Glintborg, Dorte; Andersen, Marianne

    2010-08-01

    Hirsutism is a common disorder affecting 5-20% of women in reproductive age. Only limited follow-up data exist regarding the prognosis for glucose tolerance and metabolic risk factors in hirsutism. Sixty-nine Caucasian hirsute women underwent a clinical examination and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during 1997-2002 (baseline) and during 2003-2004 (re-evaluation). The observation period was (median; range) 4 (2-7) years. During re-evaluation, body mass index (BMI) was 24.9 (22.4-29.0) kg/m(2) and total Ferriman-Gallwey score was 10 (7-15) (median; 25-75% quartile). The women had unchanged BMI compared to baseline but increased fasting and 2 hour glucose levels. Impaired OGTT outcome during follow-up was seen in 14/66 (21.2%) women, 5/66 (7.6%) developed diabetes. Women who took oral contraceptives had a significantly decreased area under the curve (AUC) for insulin during follow-up, whereas AUC glucose levels increased. The present data supported a high risk of diabetes in only moderately overweight hirsute women.

  18. A MEMS differential viscometric sensor for affinity glucose detection in continuous glucose monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Leduc, Charles; Ravussin, Yann; Cai, Haogang; Song, Bing; Li, Dachao; Accili, Domenico; Leibel, Rudolph; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2013-05-01

    Micromachined viscometric affinity glucose sensors have been previously demonstrated using vibrational cantilever and diaphragm. These devices featured a single glucose detection module that determines glucose concentrations through viscosity changes of glucose-sensitive polymer solutions. However, fluctuations in temperature and other environmental parameters might potentially affect the stability and reliability of these devices, creating complexity in their applications in subcutaneously implanted continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). To address these issues, we present a MEMS differential sensor that can effectively reject environmental disturbances while allowing accurate glucose detection. The sensor consists of two magnetically driven vibrating diaphragms situated inside microchambers filled with a boronic-acid based glucose-sensing solution and a reference solution insensitive to glucose. Glucose concentrations can be accurately determined by characteristics of the diaphragm vibration through differential capacitive detection. Our in vitro and preliminary in vivo experimental data demonstrate the potential of this sensor for highly stable subcutaneous CGM applications.

  19. Oral and esophageal disorders.

    PubMed

    Noyer, C M; Simon, D

    1997-06-01

    This article focused on the approach to oral and esophageal disorders in patients with AIDS. Most of these disorders respond to various therapeutic regimens. Some of the oral complications can be prevented with dental prophylaxis, whereas recurrent esophageal disease in some patients may require long-term suppressive therapy. As patients with AIDS live longer with lower CD4 counts, gastroenterologists need to become familiar with the approach to and management of the more common lesions of the mouth and esophagus.

  20. Oral vs. salivary diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Joana; Corby, Patricia M.; Barber, Cheryl A.; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The field of "salivary diagnostics" includes studies utilizing samples obtained from a variety of sources within the oral cavity. These samples include; whole unstimulated saliva, stimulated whole saliva, duct saliva collected directly from the parotid, submandibular/sublingual glands or minor salivary glands, swabs of the buccal mucosa, tongue or tonsils, and gingival crevicular fluid. Many publications state "we collected saliva from subjects" without fully describing the process or source of the oral fluid. Factors that need to be documented in any study include the time of day of the collection, the method used to stimulate and collect the fluid, and how much fluid is being collected and for how long. The handling of the oral fluid during and post-collection is also critical and may include addition of protease or nuclease inhibitors, centrifugation, and cold or frozen storage prior to assay. In an effort to create a standard protocol for determining a biomarker's origin we carried out a pilot study collecting oral fluid from 5 different sites in the mouth and monitoring the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines detected using MesoScaleDiscovery (MSD) electrochemiluminesence assays. Our data suggested that 3 of the cytokines are primarily derived from the submandibular gland, while 7 of the cytokines come from a source other than the major salivary glands such as the minor salivary glands or cells in the oral mucosae. Here we review the literature on monitoring biomarkers in oral samples and stress the need for determining the blood/saliva ratio when a quantitative determination is needed and suggest that the term oral diagnostic be used if the source of an analyte in the oral cavity is unknown.

  1. Maintaining women's oral health.

    PubMed

    McCann, A L; Bonci, L

    2001-07-01

    Women must adopt health-promoting strategies for both general health and the oral cavity, because the health of a woman's body and oral cavity are bidirectional. For general health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should actively advise women to minimize alcohol use, abstain from or cease smoking, stay physically active, and choose the right foods to nourish both the body and mind. For oral health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should advise women on how to prevent or control oral infections, particularly dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specifically, women need to know how to remove plaque from the teeth mechanically, use appropriate chemotherapeutic agents and dentifrices, use oral irrigation, and control halitosis. Dental practitioners also need to stress the importance of regular maintenance visits for disease prevention. Adolescent women are more prone to gingivitis and aphthous ulcers when they begin their menstrual cycles and need advice about cessation of tobacco use, mouth protection during athletic activities, cleaning orthodontic appliances, developing good dietary habits, and avoiding eating disorders. Women in early to middle adulthood may be pregnant or using oral contraceptives with concomitant changes in oral tissues. Dental practitioners need to advise them how to take care of the oral cavity during these changes and how to promote the health of their infants, including good nutrition. Older women experience the onset of menopause and increased vulnerability to osteoporosis. They may also experience xerostomia and burning mouth syndrome. Dental practitioners need to help women alleviate these symptoms and encourage them to continue good infection control and diet practices.

  2. Oral pigmentation: A review.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, C; Ramakrishnan, K; Vijayalakshmi, D; Devi, M; Aesha, I; Vijayabanu, B

    2015-08-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations.

  3. Oral contraception and sexuality.

    PubMed

    Dennerstein, L; Burrows, G

    1976-05-22

    A search of the literature has been carried out to determined how oral contraceptives affect sexuality in women. Some studies featured a high incidence of loss of libido. This could perhaps be attributed to preparations containing progestational compounds. However, no adequate double-blind trial has confirmed this observation. Some psychological and pharmacological aspects of contraceptions are discussed. More research is needed to ascertain why women often lose their sexual interest when taking oral contraceptives.

  4. Oral pigmentation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  5. Influence of the interleukin-6 -174 G/C gene polymorphism on exercise training-induced changes in glucose tolerance indexes.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Jennifer A; Weiss, Edward P; Ghiu, Ioana A; Kulaputana, Onanong; Phares, Dana A; Ferrell, Robert E; Hagberg, James M

    2004-10-01

    A polymorphism in the IL-6 gene, a G-to-C substitution 176 bp upstream of the ATG translation initiation site, has been associated with diabetes prevalence and insulin resistance. Interventions including exercise training are frequently used to modify cardiovascular disease risk factors. Consequently, this project examined associations between the IL-6 -174 genotype and oral glucose tolerance test outcomes in 50- to 75-yr-old sedentary men and postmenopausal women before and after aerobic exercise training. Among the 87 individuals who started the study, 56 were retested after 6 mo of aerobic exercise training. Subject characteristics at baseline did not differ between the IL-6 genotype groups with the exception of fasting glucose, which was higher (P = 0.02, covariates age, gender, and ethnicity) in the CC genotype group. The training-induced change in glucose area under the curve during the oral glucose tolerance test varied between the IL-6 -174 genotype groups (P = 0.05, covariates age, gender, ethnicity, baseline glucose area under the curve, and percent body fat change) with a significant decrease occurring only in the GG genotype group. Insulin outcomes did not differ among the groups at baseline or after training. Training-induced changes in weight, percent body fat, maximal oxygen consumption, fasting glucose, and an insulin sensitivity index also changed similarly among the genotype groups. In conclusion, fasting glucose and the extent to which glucose tolerance changes with exercise training may be influenced by the IL-6 -174 gene polymorphism.

  6. Effect of Chinese Herbal Medicine Jinlida Granule in Treatment of Patients with Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ya-Lin; Liu, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Su, Wei-Juan; Chen, Ning-Ning; Lu, Shu-Hua; Wang, Li-Ying; Shi, Xiu-Lin; Li, Zhi-Bin; Yang, Shu-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major health problem worldwide. Several clinical trials have shown the superiority of the Traditional Chinese Medicine in delaying or reversing the development and progression of DM. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Jinlida (JLD) granule, a Chinese herbal recipe, in the treatment of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and its effect on the prevention of DM. Methods: Sixty-five IGT patients were randomized to receive one bag of JLD granules three times daily (JLD group, n = 34) or no drug intervention (control group, n = 31) for 12 weeks. Oral glucose tolerance test, glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), body mass index, blood lipids levels, fasting insulin, and insulin resistance calculated using homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) of all the patients were observed and compared before and after the treatment. Results: Sixty-one participants completed the trial (32 in JLD group and 29 in the control group). There were statistically significant decreases in HbA1c (P < 0.001), 2-h plasma glucose (P < 0.001), and HOMA-IR (P = 0.029) in JLD group compared with the control group after 12 weeks of treatment. After 12 weeks of treatment, two (6.9%) patients returned to normal blood glucose, and five (17.2%) patients turned into DM in control group, while in the JLD group, 14 (43.8%) returned to normal blood glucose and 2 (6.2%) turned into DM. There was a significant difference in the number of subjects who had normal glucose at the end of the study between two groups (P = 0.001). Conclusions: JLD granule effectively improved glucose control, increased the conversion of IGT to normal glucose, and improved the insulin resistance in patients with IGT. This Chinese herbal medicine may have a clinical value for IGT. PMID:27647185

  7. Dapagliflozin‐lowered blood glucose reduces respiratory Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Åstrand, Annika; Wingren, Cecilia; Benjamin, Audra; Tregoning, John S; Garnett, James P; Groves, Helen; Gill, Simren; Orogo‐Wenn, Maria; Lundqvist, Anders J; Walters, Dafydd; Smith, David M; Taylor, John D; Baker, Emma H

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyperglycaemia increases glucose concentrations in airway surface liquid and increases the risk of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. We determined whether reduction of blood and airway glucose concentrations by the anti‐diabetic drug dapagliflozin could reduce P. aeruginosa growth/survival in the lungs of diabetic mice. Experimental Approach The effect of dapagliflozin on blood and airway glucose concentration, the inflammatory response and infection were investigated in C57BL/6J (wild type, WT) or leptin receptor‐deficient (db/db) mice, treated orally with dapagliflozin prior to intranasal dosing with LPS or inoculation with P. aeruginosa. Pulmonary glucose transport and fluid absorption were investigated in Wistar rats using the perfused fluid‐filled lung technique. Key Results Fasting blood, airway glucose and lactate concentrations were elevated in the db/db mouse lung. LPS challenge increased inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from WT and db/db mice with and without dapagliflozin treatment. P. aeruginosa colony‐forming units (CFU) were increased in db/db lungs. Pretreatment with dapagliflozin reduced blood and bronchoalveolar lavage glucose concentrations and P. aeruginosa CFU in db/db mice towards those seen in WT. Dapagliflozin had no adverse effects on the inflammatory response in the mouse or pulmonary glucose transport or fluid absorption in the rat lung. Conclusion and Implications Pharmacological lowering of blood glucose with dapagliflozin effectively reduced P. aeruginosa infection in the lungs of diabetic mice and had no adverse pulmonary effects in the rat. Dapagliflozin has potential to reduce the use, or augment the effect, of antimicrobials in the prevention or treatment of pulmonary infection. PMID:28192604

  8. Glucose tolerance of 2- to 5-yr-old offspring of diabetic mothers.

    PubMed

    Buinauskiene, Jurate; Baliutaviciene, Dalia; Zalinkevicius, Rimas

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and some risk factors for impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in 2- to 5-yr-old offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM). The glucose tolerance of 51 offspring born to women with pregnancies complicated by diabetes (type 1) and of 109 children of the control group was analyzed. Our results showed that the fasting glycemia of ODM was similar, when compared to the controls, but 2 h after the glucose loading the glycemia of ODM was significantly higher than that in the control group (5.47 +/- 1.79 mmol/L vs. 4.86 +/- 1.13 mmol/L). Normal glucose tolerance was found in 68.6% of ODM and 86.2% of controls; IGT was found in 17.6% of ODM and 4.6% of controls. Children with macrosomia at birth or overweight at 2-5 yr had IGT at 2-5 yr more often than children with normal weight at birth or normal weight at 2-5 yr. A significant, though relatively low, positive correlation was found between the duration of breastfeeding and fasting glycemia (r=0.241, p <0.01), and positive correlation was found between the duration of breastfeeding and glycemia 2 h after glucose loading (r=0.458, p=0.002) in the offspring of diabetic mothers. In conclusion, the average glycemia of ODM after glucose loading was higher than that in the control group. Macrosomia after birth, overweight, and obesity in childhood had a significant influence on the glucose tolerance of the ODM. The results of the oral glucose tolerance test correlated with the length of breastfeeding.

  9. Amino acid mixture acutely improves the glucose tolerance of healthy overweight adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Kammer, Lynne M; Ding, Zhenping; Lassiter, David G; Hwang, Jungyun; Nelson, Jeffrey L; Ivy, John L

    2012-01-01

    Certain amino acids have been reported to influence carbohydrate metabolism and blood glucose clearance, as well as improve the glucose tolerance in animal models. We hypothesized that an amino acid mixture consisting of isoleucine and 4 additional amino acids would improve the glucose response of healthy overweight men and women to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Twenty-two overweight healthy subjects completed 2 OGTTs after consuming 2 different test beverages. The amino acid mixture beverage (CHO/AA) consisted of 0.088 g cystine 2HCl, 0.043 g methionine, 0.086 g valine, 12.094 g isoleucine, 0.084 g leucine, and 100 g dextrose. The control beverage (CHO) consisted of 100 g dextrose only. Venous blood samples were drawn 10 minutes before the start of ingesting the drinks and 15, 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after the completion of the drinks. During the OGTT, the plasma glucose response for the CHO/AA treatment was significantly lower than that of the CHO treatment (P < .01), as was the plasma glucose area under the curve (CHO/AA 806 ± 31 mmol/L·3 hours vs CHO 942 ± 40 mmol/L·3 hours). Differences in plasma glucose between treatments occurred at 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after supplement ingestion. Plasma glucagon during the CHO/AA treatment was significantly higher than during the CHO treatment. However, there were no significant differences in plasma insulin or C-peptide responses between treatments. These results suggest that the amino acid mixture lowers the glucose response to an OGTT in healthy overweight subjects in an insulin-independent manner.

  10. High incidence of abnormal glucose metabolism in acute coronary syndrome patients at a moderate altitude: A sub-Himalayan study

    PubMed Central

    Mokta, Jitender; Kumar, Subash; Ganju, Neeraj; Mokta, Kiran; Panda, Prashant Kumar; Gupta, Swatantra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Abnormal glucose metabolic status at admission is an important marker of future cardiovascular events and long-term mortality after acute coronary syndrome (ACS), whether or not they are known diabetics. Objective: The aims were to study the prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism in ACS patients and to compare the different methods of diagnosing diabetes in ACS patients. Methods: We did a prospective study. About 250 consecutive nondiabetic patients (200 men and 50 women) with ACS admitted to a tertiary care institute of Himachal Pradesh in 1 year were enrolled. Admission plasma glucose, next morning fasting plasma glucose (FPG), A1C, and a standardized 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) 72 h after admission were done. Glucose metabolism was categorized as normal glucose metabolism, impaired glucose metabolism (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance [IGT]), and diabetes. Diabetes was arbitrarily classified further as undiagnosed (HBA1c ≥6.5%) or possibly stress diabetes (HBA1c <6.5%). A repeat OGTT after 3 months in objects with IGT and stress hyperglycemia at a time of admission was done. Results: The mean age was 54 ± 12.46 years. The mean plasma glucose at admission was 124 ± 53.96 mg/dL, and the mean FPG was 102 ± 27.07 mg/dL. The mean 2-h postglucose load concentration was 159.5 ± 56.58 mg/dL. At baseline, 95 (38%) had normal glucose metabolism, 95 (38%) had impaired glucose metabolism (IGT and or IGT) and 60 (24%) had diabetes; 48 (19.2%) were undiagnosed diabetes and 12 (4.8%) had stress hyperglycemia. At follow up 58.66% and 55.55% of patients with impaired glucose tolerance and stress hyperglycemia continued to have impaired glucose tolerance respectively. About 75 gm OGTT has highest sensitivity and specificity to diagnose diabetes, whereas A1C most specific to rule out stress hyperglycemia. Conclusions: In this small hilly state of India, abnormal glucose metabolism (previously undiagnosed diabetes and IGT) is

  11. FRET-based glucose monitoring for bioprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolome, Amelita; Smalls-Mantey, Lauren; Lin, Debora; Rao, Govind; Tolosa, Leah

    2006-02-01

    The glucose-mediated conformational changes in the glucose binding protein (GBP) have been exploited in the development of fluorescence based glucose sensors. The fluorescence response is generated by a polarity sensitive dye attached to a specific site. Such fluorescent sensors respond to submicromolar glucose at diffusion-controlled rates mimicking the wild type. However, such sensors have been limited to in vitro glucose sensing because of the preliminary dye-labeling step. In the study described here, the dye-labeling step is omitted by genetically encoding the GBP with two green fluorescent mutants namely, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in the N- and C-terminal ends, respectively. These two GFP mutants comprise a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) donor and acceptor pair. Thus, when glucose binds with GBP, the conformational changes affect the FRET efficiency yielding a dose-dependent response. A potential application for this FRET-based glucose biosensor is online glucose sensing in bioprocessing and cell culture. This was demonstrated by the measurement of glucose consumption in yeast fermentation. Further development of this system should yield in vivo measurement of glucose in bioprocesses.

  12. Oral and systemic photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Andrew C; Damian, Diona L; Halliday, Gary M

    2014-01-01

    Photoprotection can be provided not only by ultraviolet (UV) blockers but also by oral substances. Epidemiologically identified associations between foods and skin cancer and interventional experiments have discovered mechanisms of UV skin damage. These approaches have identified oral substances that are photoprotective in humans. UV inhibits adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production causing an energy crisis, which prevents optimal skin immunity and DNA repair. Enhancing ATP production with oral nicotinamide protects from UV immunosuppression, enhances DNA repair and reduces skin cancer in humans. Reactive oxygen species also contribute to photodamage. Nontoxic substances consumed in the diet, or available as oral supplements, can protect the skin by multiple potential mechanisms. These substances include polyphenols in fruit, vegetables, wine, tea and caffeine-containing foods. UV-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) contributes to photodamage. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and food substances reduce production of this lipid mediator. Fish oils are photoprotective, at least partially by reducing PGE2 . Orally consumed substances, either in the diet or as supplements, can influence cutaneous responses to UV. A current research goal is to develop an oral supplement that could be used in conjunction with other sun protective strategies in order to provide improved protection from sunlight.

  13. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers. PMID:22792106

  14. Post-oral appetite stimulation by sugars and nonmetabolizable sugar analogs.

    PubMed

    Zukerman, Steven; Ackroff, Karen; Sclafani, Anthony

    2013-10-01

    Post-oral sugar actions enhance the intake of and preference for sugar-rich foods, a process referred to as appetition. Here, we investigated the role of intestinal sodium glucose cotransporters (SGLTs) in sugar appetition in C57BL/6J mice using sugars and nonmetabolizable sugar analogs that differ in their affinity for SGLT1 and SGLT3. In experiments 1 and 2, food-restricted mice were trained (1 h/day) to consume a flavored saccharin solution [conditioned stimulus (CS-)] paired with intragastric (IG) self-infusions of water and a different flavored solution (CS+) paired with infusions of 8 or 12% sugars (glucose, fructose, and galactose) or sugar analogs (α-methyl-D-glucopyranoside, MDG; 3-O-methyl-D-glucopyranoside, OMG). Subsequent two-bottle CS+ vs. CS- choice tests were conducted without coinfusions. Infusions of the SGLT1 ligands glucose, galactose, MDG, and OMG stimulated CS+ licking above CS- levels. However, only glucose, MDG, and galactose conditioned significant CS+ preferences, with the SGLT3 ligands (glucose, MDG) producing the strongest preferences. Fructose, which is not a ligand for SGLTs, failed to stimulate CS+ intake or preference. Experiment 3 revealed that IG infusion of MDG+phloridzin (an SGLT1/3 antagonist) blocked MDG appetition, whereas phloridzin had minimal effects on glucose-induced appetition. However, adding phloretin (a GLUT2 antagonist) to the glucose+phloridzin infusion blocked glucose appetition. Taken together, these findings suggest that humoral signals generated by intestinal SGLT1 and SGLT3, and to a lesser degree, GLUT2, mediate post-oral sugar appetition in mice. The MDG results indicate that sugar metabolism is not essential for the post-oral intake-stimulating and preference-conditioning actions of sugars in mice.

  15. Coping with an exogenous glucose overload: glucose kinetics of rainbow trout during graded swimming.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kevin; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2016-03-15

    This study examines how chronically hyperglycemic rainbow trout modulate glucose kinetics in response to graded exercise up to critical swimming speed (Ucrit), with or without exogenous glucose supply. Our goals were 1) to quantify the rates of hepatic glucose production (Ra glucose) and disposal (Rd glucose) during graded swimming, 2) to determine how exogenous glucose affects the changes in glucose fluxes caused by exercise, and 3) to establish whether exogenous glucose modifies Ucrit or the cost of transport. Results show that graded swimming causes no change in Ra and Rd glucose at speeds below 2.5 body lengths per second (BL/s), but that glucose fluxes may be stimulated at the highest speeds. Excellent glucoregulation is also achieved at all exercise intensities. When exogenous glucose is supplied during exercise, trout suppress hepatic production from 16.4 ± 1.6 to 4.1 ± 1.7 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) and boost glucose disposal to 40.1 ± 13 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1). These responses limit the effects of exogenous glucose to a 2.5-fold increase in glycemia, whereas fish showing no modulation of fluxes would reach dangerous levels of 114 mM of blood glucose. Exogenous glucose reduces metabolic rate by 16% and, therefore, causes total cost of transport to decrease accordingly. High glucose availability does not improve Ucrit because the fish are unable to take advantage of this extra fuel during maximal exercise and rely on tissue glycogen instead. In conclusion, trout have a remarkable ability to adjust glucose fluxes that allows them to cope with the cumulative stresses of a glucose overload and graded exercise.

  16. HPV-associated oral warts.

    PubMed

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Wood, N H; Marnewick, J C; Meyerov, R; Lemmer, J

    2011-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is strictly epitheliotropic, infecting stratified squamous cutaneous and mucosal epithelial cells. Oral HPV infection may be subclinical or putatively associated with benign or malignant oral neoplasms. The benign HPV-associated oral lesions, focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck disease), oral squamous cell papilloma, oral verruca vulgaris (common wart) and oral condyloma acuminatum, are collectively referred to as oral warts. Oral warts are usually asymptomatic, may be persistent or uncommonly, may regress spontaneously. HPV-associated oral warts have a prevalence of 0.5% in the general population, occur in up to 5% of HIV-seropositive subjects, and in up to 23% of HIV-seropositive subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy. This paper is a clinico-pathological review of HPV-associated oral warts.

  17. Repaglinide, but Not Nateglinide Administered Supraspinally and Spinally Exerts an Anti-Diabetic Action in D-Glucose Fed and Streptozotocin-Treated Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Kang, Yu-Jung; Kim, Sung-Su; Kim, Chea-Ha; Kim, Su-Jin; Lim, Su-Min; Jung, Jun-Sub; Ryu, Ohk-Hyun; Choi, Moon-Gi

    2013-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that some anti-diabetic drugs such as biguanide and thizolidinediones administered centrally modulate the blood glucose level, suggesting that orally administered anti-diabetic drugs may modulate the blood glucose level by acting on central nervous system. The present study was designed to explore the possible action of another class of anti-diabetic drugs, glinidies, administered centrally on the blood glucose level in ICR mice. Mice were administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or intrathecally (i.t.) with 5 to 30 µg of repaglinide or nateglinide in D-glucose-fed and streptozotocin (STZ)-treated models. We found that i.c.v. or i.t. injection with repaglinide dose-dependently attenuated the blood glucose level in D-glucose-fed model, whereas i.c.v. or i.t. injection with nateglinide showed no modulatory action on the blood glucose level in D-glucose-fed model. Furthermore, the effect of repaglinide administered i.c.v. or i.t. on the blood glucose level in STZ-treated model was studied. We found that repaglinide administered i.c.v. slightly enhanced the blood glucose level in STZ-treated model. On the other hand, i.t. injection with repaglinide attenuated the blood glucose level in STZ-treated model. The plasma insulin level was enhanced by repaglinide in D-glucose-fed model, but repaglinide did not affect the plasma insulin level in STZ-treated model. In addition, nateglinide did not alter the plasma insulin level in both D-glucose-fed and STZ-treated models. These results suggest that the anti-diabetic action of repaglinide appears to be, at least, mediated via the brain and the spinal cord as revealed in both D-glucose fed and STZ-treated models. PMID:24381497

  18. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in subjects with reduced glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes - the Tromsø OGTT-study.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Moira S; Figenschau, Yngve; Almås, Bjørg; Njølstad, Inger; Jorde, Rolf

    2011-09-01

    The relationships between vitamin D concentrations, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance remain uncertain. During 2008 - 2010, an oral glucose tolerance test was performed in 3520 subjects from Tromsø, Norway. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured in 1193 subjects with normal glucose tolerance, in 304 with isolated impaired fasting glucose, in 254 with isolated impaired glucose tolerance, in 139 with a combination of the two, and in 194 subjects with type 2 diabetes. Serum 25(OH)D did not differ between subjects with isolated impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance, but was lower in all groups of deranged glucose metabolism as compared with normal subjects. These differences could not be explained by differences in intakes of vitamin D from cod liver oil or other supplements and remained statistically significant after adjustment for gender, age, body mass index, physical activity score, and month of examination. When the cohort was divided according to serum 25(OH)D quartiles, there was an improvement in all measures of glucose metabolism (fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose, serum insulin, HbA(1c)) and estimates of insulin resistance (QUICKI , HOMA-IR, ISI(0.120)) with increasing serum 25(OH)D quartile. However, interventional studies are needed to prove a causal relationship between vitamin D and glucose metabolism.

  19. Rapid identification of Candida glabrata by using a dipstick to detect trehalase-generated glucose.

    PubMed

    Peltroche-Llacsahuanga, H; Schnitzler, N; Lütticken, R; Haase, G

    1999-01-01

    Candida glabrata is a yeast frequently isolated from human specimens. Based upon its well-known ability to rapidly hydrolyze trehalose, we have developed a novel and cost-effective test incubating one yeast colony emulsified in 50 microl of citrate buffer (0.1 M [pH 5. 0]) containing 4% (wt/vol) trehalose for 3 h at 37 degrees C. Trehalase-generated glucose is detected with a commercially available dipstick (range, 1.0 to 50 g/liter). For evaluation, consecutive clinical isolates and several reference strains of C. glabrata (n = 160), C. albicans (n = 120), and other yeast species with potential ability for utilization of trehalose (C. dubliniensis, n = 11; C. famata, n = 15; C. guilliermondii, n = 5; C. lusitaniae, n = 16; C. parapsilosis, n = 20; C. tropicalis, n = 34; C. viswanathii, n = 5; Pichia angusta, n = 2; C. zeylanoides, n = 2; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, n = 16; C. neoformans, n = 7) were tested. Identification of C. glabrata is achieved within 3 h, with a specificity of 99.1% and a sensitivity of 98.8% when grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar supplemented with 4% glucose.

  20. The postprandial glucose response to some varieties of commercially available gluten-free pasta: a comparison between healthy and celiac subjects.

    PubMed

    Bacchetti, T; Saturni, L; Turco, I; Ferretti, G

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the present paper is to evaluate the post-prandial response to some varieties of gluten free (GF) pasta that are commonly consumed in Italy. The glycaemic responses were compared with a glucose standard in healthy subjects and gluten-free diet celiac subjects. Subjects were served portions of the test foods and a standard food (glucose), on separate occasions, each containing 50 g available carbohydrates. Capillary blood glucose was measured from finger-prick samples in fasted subjects and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after the consumption of each test food. For each type of pasta, the glycaemic index (GI) was calculated by expressing the incremental area under the blood glucose curve as a percentage of each subject's average incremental area under the blood glucose curve (AUC) for the standard food. Gluten free pasta exhibited a range of GI values from 46 to 66. The glycaemic load (GL) and glycaemic profile (GP) were also calculated. A higher GI value was observed in pasta containing rice flour as the main ingredient. Lower values were observed in pasta obtained using corn or a mixture of corn and rice flour as the main ingredients. The results were confirmed in celiac subjects. The information presented in this paper may be useful in helping celiac people to select low-GI pasta.

  1. Regulation of Blood Glucose by Hypothalamic Pyruvate Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Tony K. T.; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Pocai, Alessandro; Rossetti, Luciano

    2005-08-01

    The brain keenly depends on glucose for energy, and mammalians have redundant systems to control glucose production. An increase in circulating glucose inhibits glucose production in the liver, but this negative feedback is impaired in type 2 diabetes. Here we report that a primary increase in hypothalamic glucose levels lowers blood glucose through inhibition of glucose production in rats. The effect of glucose requires its conversion to lactate followed by stimulation of pyruvate metabolism, which leads to activation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels. Thus, interventions designed to enhance the hypothalamic sensing of glucose may improve glucose homeostasis in diabetes.

  2. Why control blood glucose levels?

    PubMed

    Rossini, A A

    1976-03-01

    The controversy as to the relationship between the degree of control of diabetes and the progression of the complications of the disease has not been solved. However, in this review, various studies suggesting a relationship between the metabolic abnormality and the diabetic complications are examined. The disadvantages of the uncontrolled diabetes mellitus can be divided into two major categories-short-term and long-term. The short-term disadvantages of controlled diabetes mellitus include the following: (1) ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar coma; (2) intracellular dehydration; (3) electrolyte imbalance; (4) decreased phagocytosis; (5) immunologic and lymphocyte activity; (6) impairment of wound healing; and (7) abnormality of lipids. The long-term disadvantages of uncontrolled diabetes melitus include the following: (1) nephropathy; (2) neuropathy; (3) retinopathy; (4) cataract formation; (5) effect on perinatal mortality; (6) complications of vascular disease; and (7) the evaluation of various clinical studies suggesting the relationship of elevated blood glucose levels and complications of diabetes mellitus. It is suggested that until the question of control can absolutely be resolved, the recommendation is that the blood glucose levels should be controlled as close to the normal as possible.

  3. Circadian control of glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne; Fliers, Eric

    2014-07-01

    The incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has risen to epidemic proportions. The pathophysiology of T2DM is complex and involves insulin resistance, pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and visceral adiposity. It has been known for decades that a disruption of biological rhythms (which happens the most profoundly with shift work) increases the risk of developing obesity and T2DM. Recent evidence from basal studies has further sparked interest in the involvement of daily rhythms (and their disruption) in the development of obesity and T2DM. Most living organisms have molecular clocks in almost every tissue, which govern rhythmicity in many domains of physiology, such as rest/activity rhythms, feeding/fasting rhythms, and hormonal secretion. Here we present the latest research describing the specific role played by the molecular clock mechanism in the control of glucose metabolism and speculate on how disruption of these tissue clocks may lead to the disturbances in glucose homeostasis.

  4. Sex steroids and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Allan, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone levels are lower in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and also predict the onset of these adverse metabolic states. Body composition (body mass index, waist circumference) is an important mediator of this relationship. Sex hormone binding globulin is also inversely associated with insulin resistance and T2DM but the data regarding estrogen are inconsistent. Clinical models of androgen deficiency including Klinefelter's syndrome and androgen deprivation therapy in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer confirm the association between androgens and glucose status. Experimental manipulation of the insulin/glucose milieu and suppression of endogenous testicular function suggests the relationship between androgens and insulin sensitivity is bidirectional. Androgen therapy in men without diabetes is not able to differentiate the effect on insulin resistance from that on fat mass, in particular visceral adiposity. Similarly, several small clinical stu