Science.gov

Sample records for 50-ghz channel spacing

  1. Feasibility of an EHF (40/50 GHz) mobile satellite system using highly inclined orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falciasecca, G.; Paraboni, A.; Ruggieri, M.; Valdoni, F.; Vatalaro, F.

    1990-01-01

    The pan-European L-band terrestrial cellular system (GSM) is expected to provide service to more than 10 million users by the year 2000. Discussed here is the feasibility of a new satellite system at EHF (40/50 GHz) to complement, at the end of the decade, the GSM system or its decendants in order to provide additional services at 64 kbits/s, or so. The main system aspects, channel characteristics, technology issues, and both on-board and earth terminal architectures are highlighted. Based on the performed analyses, a proposal was addressed to the Italian Space Agency (ASI), aimed at the implementation of a national plan.

  2. AN ACCURATE FLUX DENSITY SCALE FROM 1 TO 50 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J. E-mail: BButler@nrao.edu

    2013-02-15

    We develop an absolute flux density scale for centimeter-wavelength astronomy by combining accurate flux density ratios determined by the Very Large Array between the planet Mars and a set of potential calibrators with the Rudy thermophysical emission model of Mars, adjusted to the absolute scale established by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The radio sources 3C123, 3C196, 3C286, and 3C295 are found to be varying at a level of less than {approx}5% per century at all frequencies between 1 and 50 GHz, and hence are suitable as flux density standards. We present polynomial expressions for their spectral flux densities, valid from 1 to 50 GHz, with absolute accuracy estimated at 1%-3% depending on frequency. Of the four sources, 3C286 is the most compact and has the flattest spectral index, making it the most suitable object on which to establish the spectral flux density scale. The sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, NGC 7027, NGC 6542, and MWC 349 show significant variability on various timescales. Polynomial coefficients for the spectral flux density are developed for 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 for each of the 17 observation dates, spanning 1983-2012. The planets Venus, Uranus, and Neptune are included in our observations, and we derive their brightness temperatures over the same frequency range.

  3. Microwave noise temperature and attenuation of clouds at frequencies below 50 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slobin, S. D.

    1981-01-01

    The microwave attenuation and noise temperature effects of clouds can result in serious degradation of telecommunications link performance, especially for low-noise systems presently used in deep-space communications. Although cloud effects are generally less than rain effects, the frequent presence of clouds will cause some amount of link degradation a large portion of the time. Cloud types, water particle densities, radiative transfer, attenuation and noise temperature calculations are reviewed and examples of basic link signal to noise ratio calculations are given. Calculations for twelve different cloud models are presented for frequencies of from 1 to 50 GHz and elevation angles of 30 degrees and 90 degrees. These case results may be used as a handbook to predict noise temperature and attenuation values for known or forecast cloud conditions.

  4. Microwave noise temperature and attenuation of clouds at frequencies below 50 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobin, S. D.

    1981-07-01

    The microwave attenuation and noise temperature effects of clouds can result in serious degradation of telecommunications link performance, especially for low-noise systems presently used in deep-space communications. Although cloud effects are generally less than rain effects, the frequent presence of clouds will cause some amount of link degradation a large portion of the time. Cloud types, water particle densities, radiative transfer, attenuation and noise temperature calculations are reviewed and examples of basic link signal to noise ratio calculations are given. Calculations for twelve different cloud models are presented for frequencies of from 1 to 50 GHz and elevation angles of 30 degrees and 90 degrees. These case results may be used as a handbook to predict noise temperature and attenuation values for known or forecast cloud conditions.

  5. A 50 GHz GaAs FET MIC transmitter/receiver using hermetic miniature probe transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Koichi; Ishizaki, Toshio; Hashimoto, Koji; Sakakura, Makoto; Uwano, Tomoki

    1989-09-01

    A very compact 50-GHz-band transmitter/receiver for a video link is described. The RF assemblies used in the system consist of 25/50-GHz frequency doublers, a 25-GHz dielectric-resonator oscillator, and a 25-GHz FM modulator. The circuits make extensive use of microwave IC technology with all GaAs FETs as active elements. The frequency doublers exhibit a minimum conversion loss of 2.6 dB and a maximum output power of 11 dBm. The modulator is highly frequency stabilized by the dielectric resonator. Recently developed miniature probe microstrip-to-waveguide transitions permit the IC assemblies to be installed compactly in hermetically sealed packages. Design considerations and experimental data for the transition are presented. Using these technologies a transmitting power of 10 dBm and a receiver noise figure of 13 dB have been obtained.

  6. A Study of Dielectric Properties of Proteinuria between 0.2 GHz and 50 GHz

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Peck Shen; Ting, Hua Nong; Ong, Teng Aik; Wong, Chew Ming; Ng, Kwan Hong; Chong, Yip Boon

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the dielectric properties of urine in normal subjects and subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD) at microwave frequency of between 0.2 GHz and 50 GHz. The measurements were conducted using an open-ended coaxial probe at room temperature (25°C), at 30°C and at human body temperature (37°C). There were statistically significant differences in the dielectric properties of the CKD subjects compared to those of the normal subjects. Statistically significant differences in dielectric properties were observed across the temperatures for normal subjects and CKD subjects. Pearson correlation test showed the significant correlation between proteinuria and dielectric properties. The experimental data closely matched the single-pole Debye model. The relaxation dispersion and relaxation time increased with the proteinuria level, while decreasing with the temperature. As for static conductivity, it increased with proteinuria level and temperature. PMID:26066351

  7. High-Temperature RF Probe Station For Device Characterization Through 500 deg C and 50 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Zachary D.; Downey, Alan N.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Ponchak, George E.; Williams, W. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A high-temperature measurement system capable of performing on-wafer microwave testing of semiconductor devices has been developed. This high temperature probe station can characterize active and passive devices and circuits at temperatures ranging from room temperature to above 500 C. The heating system uses a ceramic heater mounted on an insulating block of NASA shuttle tile material. The temperature is adjusted by a graphical computer interface and is controlled by the software-based feedback loop. The system is used with a Hewlett-Packard 8510C Network Analyzer to measure scattering parameters over a frequency range of 1 to 50 GHz. The microwave probes, cables, and inspection microscope are all shielded to protect from heat damage. The high temperature probe station has been successfully used to characterize gold transmission lines on silicon carbide at temperatures up to 540 C.

  8. Wideband characterization of printed circuit board materials up to 50 ghz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakov, Aleksei

    A traveling-wave technique developed a few years ago in the Missouri S&T EMC Laboratory has been employed until now for characterization of PCB materials over a broad frequency range up to 30 GHz. This technique includes measuring S-parameters of the specially designed PCB test vehicles. An extension of the frequency range of printed circuit board laminate dielectric and copper foil characterization is an important problem. In this work, a new PCB test vehicle design for operating up to 50 GHz has been proposed. As the frequency range of measurements increases, the analysis of errors and uncertainties in measuring dielectric properties becomes increasingly important. Formulas for quantification of two major groups of errors, repeatability (manufacturing variability) and reproducibility (systematic) errors, in extracting dielectric constant (DK) and dissipation factor (DK) have been derived, and computations for a number of cases are presented. Conductor (copper foil) surface roughness of PCB interconnects is an important factor, which affects accuracy of DK and DF measurements. This work describes a new algorithm for semi-automatic characterization of copper foil profiles on optical or scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures of signal traces. The collected statistics of numerous copper foil roughness profiles allows for introducing a new metric for roughness characterization of PCB interconnects. This is an important step to refining the measured DK and DF parameters from roughness contributions. The collected foil profile data and its analysis allow for developing "design curves", which could be used by SI engineers and electronics developers in their designs.

  9. Constrained coding for the deep-space optical channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, B. E.; Hamkins, J.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate methods of coding for a channel subject to a large dead-time constraint, i.e. a constraint on the minimum spacing between transmitted pulses, with the deep-space optical channel as the motivating example.

  10. Some characteristics of the international space channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noack, T. L.; Poland, W. B., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Some physical characteristics of radio transmission links and the technology of PCM modulation combine with the Radio Regulations of the International Telecommunications Union to define a communications channel having a determinable channel capacity, error rate, and sensitivity to interference. These characteristics and the corresponding limitations on EIRP, power flux density, and power spectral density for space service applications are described. The ITU regulations create a critical height of 1027 km where some parameters of the limitation rules change. The nature of restraints on power spectral density are discussed and an approach to a standardized representation of Necessary Bandwidth for the Space Services is described. It is shown that, given the PFD (power flux density) and PSD (power spectral density) limitations of radio regulations, the channel performance is determined by the ratio of effective receiving antenna aperture to system noise temperature. Based on this approach, the method for a quantitative trade-off between spectrum spreading and system performance is presented. Finally, the effects of radio frequency interference between standard systems is analyzed.

  11. Phase noise tolerant inter-carrier-interference cancellation for WDM superchannels with sub-Nyquist channel spacing.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shuchang; Fu, Songnian; Li, Jianqiang; Tang, Ming; Shum, Perry; Liu, Deming

    2013-09-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel multi-input multi-output (MIMO) equalization based inter-carrier-interference (ICI) cancellation approach employing constant modulus algorithm (CMA) for supperchanels with sub-Nyquist channel spacing, where optical combs are used as optical sources. Compared with the least mean square (LMS) algorithm based ICI canceller, the proposed approach has comparable capability to accomplish the ICI mitigation for 56 Gbaud dual-polarization quadrature phase shift keying (DP-QPSK) signals with tight channel spacing till 50 GHz. In particular, compared with the LMS-MIMO based ICI canceller, the optical linewidth tolerance of 6 MHz is relaxed to 20 MHz given a 1dB required optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) penalty for the CMA-MIMO based ICI canceller. Meanwhile, the CMA-MIMO based ICI canceller is ideal for real-time processing, since the number of parallel processing pipelines can be greater than 240 even in the presence of large linewidth.

  12. Design of a 40/50 GHz satellite ground station for fade mitigation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudelka, O.; Schmidt, M.; Ebert, J.

    2013-05-01

    Due to the increasing demand in satellite capacity, driven by applications such as high-definition television (HDTV), 3D-TV and interactive broadband services, higher frequency bands will have to be exploited. The capacity on Ku-band is already becoming scarce and Ka-band systems are more commonly used. It can be expected that 40 and 50 GHz (Q and V band) will have to be used in the future. At these frequencies the wave propagation effects have a significant impact on the performance. The traditional approach of implementing large fade margins in the system design is not suitable as it leads to expensive ground terminals. Fade mitigation by adaptive coding and modulation (ACM) is a cost-efficient method. To investigate the Q/V-band for future commercial exploitation, ESA's ALPHASAT satellite will provide experimental payloads for communications and wave propagation experiments. In Graz a Q/V-band ground station is currently under development. It will be equipped with a 3 m tracking antenna, a 50 W Klystron amplifier and a 290 K LNA. Fade mitigation experiments will be conducted, initially using DVB-S2 modems which allow to vary the modulation scheme, the Forward Error Correction code and the symbol rate under control of the ACM computer. In addition, uplink power control can be combined with the ACM methods. A specially developed signal analyser provides precise measurement of the signal/noise ratio. In addition, propagation data will be available from a beacon receiver, also developed by Joanneum Research. Important goals of the experiment are to investigate the reliability of links under realistic operating conditions using ACM and to develop efficient ACM and signal/noise ratio measurement algorithms which can be later implemented in optimised modems for Q/V-band. The paper describes the ground station design and addresses the planned fade mitigation experiments.

  13. Channel coding in the space station data system network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healy, T.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed discussion of the use of channel coding for error correction, privacy/secrecy, channel separation, and synchronization is presented. Channel coding, in one form or another, is an established and common element in data systems. No analysis and design of a major new system would fail to consider ways in which channel coding could make the system more effective. The presence of channel coding on TDRS, Shuttle, the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite Program system, the JSC-proposed Space Operations Center, and the proposed 30/20 GHz Satellite Communication System strongly support the requirement for the utilization of coding for the communications channel. The designers of the space station data system have to consider the use of channel coding.

  14. Non-intrusive OSNR measurement of polarization-multiplexed signals with spectral shaping and subject to fiber non-linearity with minimum channel spacing of 37.5GHz.

    PubMed

    Gariépy, Daniel; Searcy, Steven; He, Gang; Tibuleac, Sorin

    2016-09-01

    A non-intrusive OSNR measurement technique relying on the detailed spectral comparison of an optical signal with its "noise-free" spectrum is described, including mathematical basis, validity conditions and algorithmic steps. The technique's performance is experimentally demonstrated with 100G PM-QPSK and 200G PM-16QAM signals subject to fiber non-linearity induced by 100G PM-QPSK and 10G NRZ-OOK neighbors. The OSNR measurement performance is also demonstrated when root-raised cosine spectral shaping is applied to the signals, with channel spacings of 50GHz and 37.5GHz. Experimental results for OSNR levels up to 30dB and launch powers up to 3dB above the optimum BER launch conditions are shown for different system and signal configurations. PMID:27607623

  15. Some characterizations of quantum channel in infinite Hilbert spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiu-Hong; Li, Yuan

    2014-05-15

    We first show that for any quantum states ρ on H and σ on K there exists a quantum channel Φ such that Φ(ρ) = σ, where H and K are finite or infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces. Then we consider some conclusions for the quantum channel Φ such that Φ(ρ) = σ and Φ(I{sub H}) exists or Φ(I{sub H})=I{sub K}.

  16. Experimental Procedure for Determination of the Dielectric Properties of Biological Samples in the 2-50 GHz Range

    PubMed Central

    Odelstad, Elias; Raman, Sujith; Rydberg, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to test and evaluate an experimental procedure for providing data on the complex permittivity of different cell lines in the 2–50-GHz range at room temperature, for the purpose of future dosimetric studies. The complex permittivity measurements were performed on cells suspended in culture medium using an open-ended coaxial probe. Maxwell’s mixture equation then allows the calculation of the permittivity profiles of the cells from the difference in permittivity between the cell suspensions and pure culture medium. The open-ended coaxial probe turned out to be very sensitive to disturbances affecting the measurements, resulting in poor precision. Permittivity differences were not large in relation to the spread of the measurements and repeated measurements were performed to improve statistics. The 95% confidence intervals were computed for the arithmetic means of the measured permittivity differences in order to test the statistical significance. The results showed that for bone cells at the lowest tested concentration (33 500/ml), there were significance in the real part of the permittivity at frequencies above 30 GHz, and no significance in the imaginary part. For the second lowest concentration (67 000/ml) there was no significance at all. For a medium concentration of bone cells (135 000/ml) there was no significance in the real part, but there was significance in the imaginary part at frequencies below about 25 GHz. The cell suspension with a concentration of 1 350 000/ml had significance in the real part for both high (above 30 GHz) and low (below 15 GHz) frequencies. The imaginary part showed significance for frequencies below 25 GHz. In the case of an osteosarcoma cell line with a concentration of 2 700 000/ml, only the imaginary part showed significance, and only for frequencies below 15 GHz. For muscle cells at a concentration of 743 450/ml, there was only significance in the imaginary part for frequencies below 5 GHz

  17. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Conrath, M; Canfield, P J; Bronowicki, P M; Dreyer, M E; Weislogel, M M; Grah, A

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired. PMID:24483559

  18. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Conrath, M; Canfield, P J; Bronowicki, P M; Dreyer, M E; Weislogel, M M; Grah, A

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired.

  19. Natural convection within a vertical finite-length channel in free space

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.C.; Chang, K.P.; Hung, Y.H. )

    1994-04-01

    Natural convection within a vertical finite length channel in free space is studied in this article to remove assumptions that need to be made on velocity and temperature profiles at the channel entrance. For small channel aspect ratios and low Rayleigh numbers, significant deviations of the Nusselt number and temperature distributions exist due to the effects of vertical thermal diffusion and free space stratification in the channel. A new correlation was proposed on induced Reynolds number for vertical finite length channel. 8 refs.

  20. High channel count and high precision channel spacing multi-wavelength laser array for future PICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yuechun; Li, Simin; Chen, Xiangfei; Li, Lianyan; Li, Jingsi; Zhang, Tingting; Zheng, Jilin; Zhang, Yunshan; Tang, Song; Hou, Lianping; Marsh, John H.; Qiu, Bocang

    2014-12-01

    Multi-wavelength semiconductor laser arrays (MLAs) have wide applications in wavelength multiplexing division (WDM) networks. In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost. In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of +/-0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of +/-0.032 nm in the period pitch. As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%.

  1. Separable coupled-channels momentum space potentials for nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlophe, Linda; Eremenko, Vasily; Elster, Charlotte; Nunes, Filomena; Deltuva, Arbanas; Escher, Jutta; Thompson, Ian; Torus Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Many nuclei are deformed and their properties may be described using a rotational model. This involves defining a deformed surface of the nucleus and constructing the nuclear interaction as a function of distance to the surface. The resulting potential has non-zero matrix elements between different rotational states which are characterized by the nuclear spin-parity Iπ, leading to channel couplings. Our goal is to utilize these coupled-channels potentials in momentum space Faddeev calculations which take into account core excitations. For this purpose their separable representation in momentum space is necessary. We accomplish this by employing the separable representation scheme developed by Ernst, Shakin, and Thaler (EST). Since the potentials are complex, the multichannel EST scheme is generalized to non-Hermitian potentials. In the case of proton-nucleus interactions the EST scheme is further extended to include charged particles. The multichannel EST scheme is applied to scattering off 10Be and 12C. For 10Be only couplings to the first excited state (Iπ =2+) were included while for 12C the first two excited states (Iπ =2+ ,4+) were taken into account. Research for this project was supported in part by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science of Nuclear Physics contact.

  2. The 40 and 50 GHz propagation experiments at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, using the ITALSAT beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodroffe, J. M.; Davies, P. G.; Ladd, D. N.; Norbury, John R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the current experimental program and future plans for the reception of transmissions from the 18.7, 39.6, and 49.5 GHz beacons from the ITALSAT satellite by the Radio Communications Research Unit at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK. The Radio Communications Research Unit, which has had considerable experience in developing experimental millimetric equipment for propagation studies, has initiated the development of a single-channel receiver and a triple-channel receiver to measure propagation effects at 49.5 GHz and 39.6 GHz respectively. The initial location of the receivers will be at Chilbolton, Hampshire, UK.

  3. Free-space optical channel estimation for physical layer security.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Kitamura, Mitsuo; Ito, Toshiyuki; Toyoshima, Morio; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Takenaka, Hideki; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Laurenti, Nicola; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo; Aoki, Takao; Sasaki, Masahide

    2016-04-18

    We present experimental data on message transmission in a free-space optical (FSO) link at an eye-safe wavelength, using a testbed consisting of one sender and two receiver terminals, where the latter two are a legitimate receiver and an eavesdropper. The testbed allows us to emulate a typical scenario of physical-layer (PHY) security such as satellite-to-ground laser communications. We estimate information-theoretic metrics including secrecy rate, secrecy outage probability, and expected code lengths for given secrecy criteria based on observed channel statistics. We then discuss operation principles of secure message transmission under realistic fading conditions, and provide a guideline on a multi-layer security architecture by combining PHY security and upper-layer (algorithmic) security. PMID:27137325

  4. Free-space optical channel estimation for physical layer security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Kitamura, Mitsuo; Ito, Toshiyuki; Toyoshima, Morio; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Takenaka, Hideki; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Laurenti, Nicola; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo; Aoki, Takao; Sasaki, Masahide

    2016-04-01

    We present experimental data on message transmission in a free-space optical (FSO) link at an eye-safe wavelength, using a testbed consisting of one sender and two receiver terminals, where the latter two are a legitimate receiver and an eavesdropper. The testbed allows us to emulate a typical scenario of physical-layer (PHY) security such as satellite-to-ground laser communications. We estimate information-theoretic metrics including secrecy rate, secrecy outage probability, and expected code lengths for given secrecy criteria based on observed channel statistics. We then discuss operation principles of secure message transmission under realistic fading conditions, and provide a guideline on a multi-layer security architecture by combining PHY security and upper-layer (algorithmic) security.

  5. Free-space optical channel estimation for physical layer security.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Mikio; Kitamura, Mitsuo; Ito, Toshiyuki; Toyoshima, Morio; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Takenaka, Hideki; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Laurenti, Nicola; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo; Aoki, Takao; Sasaki, Masahide

    2016-04-18

    We present experimental data on message transmission in a free-space optical (FSO) link at an eye-safe wavelength, using a testbed consisting of one sender and two receiver terminals, where the latter two are a legitimate receiver and an eavesdropper. The testbed allows us to emulate a typical scenario of physical-layer (PHY) security such as satellite-to-ground laser communications. We estimate information-theoretic metrics including secrecy rate, secrecy outage probability, and expected code lengths for given secrecy criteria based on observed channel statistics. We then discuss operation principles of secure message transmission under realistic fading conditions, and provide a guideline on a multi-layer security architecture by combining PHY security and upper-layer (algorithmic) security.

  6. The performance of space shift keying for free-space optical communications over turbulent channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaza, Mohamed; Mesleh, Raed; Mansour, Ali; Aggoune, El-Hadi M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of space shift keying (SSK) free-space optical communication (FSO) over moderate and strong turbulent channels. It has been shown previously that repetition codes (RCs) using intensity modulation with direct detection techniques are superior to SSK system for a spectral efficiency of 1 bit/s/Hz. It is shown in this study that SSK outperforms RCs using M-ary pulse amplitude modulation for spectral efficiencies of 3 bits/s/Hz or larger. Analytical expressions for the bit error rate for the SSK system under study are derived and extensive simulation results corroborate the correctness of the conducted analysis.

  7. The nuclear starburst in Arp 299-A: from the 5.0 GHz VLBI radio light-curves to its core-collapse supernova rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondi, M.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Herrero-Illana, R.; Alberdi, A.

    2012-03-01

    Context. The nuclear region of the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) Arp 299-A hosts a recent ( ≃ 10 Myr) intense burst of massive star formation that is expected to lead to numerous core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). Previous VLBI observations, carried out with the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 5.0 GHz and with the VLBA at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz, resulted in the detection of many compact, bright, non-thermal sources in a region ≲ 150 pc in size. Aims: We aim to establish the nature of all non-thermal compact components in Arp 299-A, as well as to estimate its core-collapse supernova rate. While the majority of the compact components are expected to be young radio supernovae (RSNe) and supernova remnants (SNRs), a definitive classification is still lacking. Yet, this is very relevant for eventually establishing the CCSN rate, as well as the star formation rate, for this galaxy. Methods: We used multi-epoch EVN observations taken at 5.0 GHz to image the compact radio sources in the nuclear region of Arp 299-A with milliarcsecond resolution. We also used one single-epoch 5.0 GHz Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) observation to image the extended emission in which these compact radio sources are embedded. Results: We present the first 5.0 GHz radio light-curve (spanning ~2.5 yr) of all compact components in the nuclear starburst of Arp 299-A. Twenty-six compact sources are detected, eight of which are new objects. The properties of all detected objects are consistent with them being a mixed population of CCSNe and SNRs. We find clear evidence for at least two new CCSNe, implying a lower limit to the CCSN rate of νSN ≳ 0.80 SN/yr, indicating that the bulk of the current star formation in Arp 299-A is taking place in the innermost ~150 pc.A few more objects show variability consistent with them being recently exploded SNe, but only future observations will clarify this point. Our MERLIN observations trace a region of diffuse extended emission that is cospatial to the region where all compact sources are found. From this diffuse non-thermal radio emission traced by MERLIN we obtain an independent estimate for the CCSN rate, which is in the range νSN = 0.40-0.65 SN/yr, in agreement with previous estimates and our direct estimate of the CCSN rate from the compact radio emission. Conclusions: Our ~2.5 yr monitoring of Arp 299-A has allowed us to obtain for the first time a direct estimate of the CCSN rate of νSN ≳ 0.80 SN/yr for the innermost ~150 pc of Arp 299-A.

  8. Performance Analysis of Hybrid PON (WDM-TDM) with Equal and Unequal Channel Spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ramandeep; Dewra, Sanjeev; Rani, Aruna

    2016-06-01

    In this hybrid WDM-TDM PON has been evaluated and compared the downstream wavelengths with equal and unequal channel spacing at 5 Gbit/s per wavelength in the scenario of triple play services with 128 optical network units (ONUs). The triple play services: data, voice and video signals are transmitted up to 50 km distance having Q factor of 6.68 and BER of 3.64e-012 with unequal channel spacing and 45 km distance having Q factor of 6.33 and BER of 2.40e-011 with equal channel spacing in downstream direction. It has been observed that downstream wavelengths with unequal channel spacing provide better results than equal channel spacing.

  9. Planar Superconducting Millimeter-Wave/Terahertz Channelizing Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehsan, Negar; U-yen, Kongpop; Brown, Ari; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Wollack, Edward; Moseley, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    This innovation is a compact, superconducting, channelizing bandpass filter on a single-crystal (0.45 m thick) silicon substrate, which operates from 300 to 600 GHz. This device consists of four channels with center frequencies of 310, 380, 460, and 550 GHz, with approximately 50-GHz bandwidth per channel. The filter concept is inspired by the mammalian cochlea, which is a channelizing filter that covers three decades of bandwidth and 3,000 channels in a very small physical space. By using a simplified physical cochlear model, and its electrical analog of a channelizing filter covering multiple octaves bandwidth, a large number of output channels with high inter-channel isolation and high-order upper stopband response can be designed. A channelizing filter is a critical component used in spectrometer instruments that measure the intensity of light at various frequencies. This embodiment was designed for MicroSpec in order to increase the resolution of the instrument (with four channels, the resolution will be increased by a factor of four). MicroSpec is a revolutionary wafer-scale spectrometer that is intended for the SPICA (Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics) Mission. In addition to being a vital component of MicroSpec, the channelizing filter itself is a low-resolution spectrometer when integrated with only an antenna at its input, and a detector at each channel s output. During the design process for this filter, the available characteristic impedances, possible lumped element ranges, and fabrication tolerances were identified for design on a very thin silicon substrate. Iterations between full-wave and lumped-element circuit simulations were performed. Each channel s circuit was designed based on the availability of characteristic impedances and lumped element ranges. This design was based on a tabular type bandpass filter with no spurious harmonic response. Extensive electromagnetic modeling for each channel was performed. Four channels

  10. The Force of Habit: Channelling Young Bodies at Alternative Education Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This article develops a novel conceptual framework for examining the (re)formulation of habits in education spaces. It is based on the premise that education spaces are key sites for channelling and intervening in children's habits, to various ends. The article focuses on the ways educators at alternative education spaces in the United Kingdom…

  11. Deep space communication - A one billion mile noisy channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    Deep space exploration is concerned with the study of natural phenomena in the solar system with the aid of measurements made at spacecraft on deep space missions. Deep space communication refers to communication between earth and spacecraft in deep space. The Deep Space Network is an earth-based facility employed for deep space communication. It includes a network of large tracking antennas located at various positions around the earth. The goals and achievements of deep space exploration over the past 20 years are discussed along with the broad functional requirements of deep space missions. Attention is given to the differences in space loss between communication satellites and deep space vehicles, effects of the long round-trip light time on spacecraft autonomy, requirements for the use of massive nuclear power plants on spacecraft at large distances from the sun, and the kinds of scientific return provided by a deep space mission. Problems concerning a deep space link of one billion miles are also explored.

  12. Space charge induced beam instability in periodic focusing channel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chao Qin, Qing

    2015-02-15

    The transverse evolution of the envelope of an intense, unbunched ion beam in a linear periodic transport channel can be modeled for the approximation of linear self-fields by the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij envelope equation. The envelope mismatched modes, or the second order even mode [I. Hofmann, Phys. Rew. E 57, 4713 (1998)], are the lowest order of resonance leading to collective instability that the designer should avoid, which suggests that an accelerator system should be established in the parameter region where the zero beam current phase advance σ{sub 0} less than 90°. In this paper, we systemically studied the resonance mechanisms which result in confluent resonance in quadrupole Focusing-Defocusing (FD) channel and parametric resonance in solenoid channel. We propose that the mismatch modes cannot be exactly separated in FD channel; if one mode is excited, there is always some contribution of the other. To verify the influence of the confluent resonance and parametric resonance, the 2D Poissons solver in the self-consistent particle-in-cell simulation code TOPOPIC is adopted to study the beam evolution in both channels. Our simulations results show that the emittance show significant growth both in the confluent resonance stop band and parametric resonance stop band. The influences of the higher order of resonance are also discussed.

  13. Optimizing nutrient channel spacing and revisiting TGF-beta in large engineered cartilage constructs.

    PubMed

    Cigan, Alexander D; Nims, Robert J; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-07-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is a promising approach to treat osteoarthritis. However, current techniques produce tissues too small for clinical relevance. Increasingly close-packed channels have helped overcome nutrient transport limitations in centimeter-sized chondrocyte-agarose constructs, yet optimal channel spacings to recapitulate native cartilage compositional and mechanical properties in constructs this large have not been identified. Transient active TGF-β treatment consistently reproduces native compressive Young׳s modulus (EY) and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content in constructs, but standard dosages of 10ng/mL exacerbate matrix heterogeneity. To ultimately produce articular layer-sized constructs, we must first optimize channel spacing and investigate the role of TGF-β in the utility of channels. We cultured ∅10mm constructs with 0, 12, 19, or 27 nutrient channels (∅1mm) for 6-8 weeks with 0, 1, or 10ng/mL TGF-β; subsequently we analyzed them mechanically, biochemically, and histologically. Constructs with 12 or 19 channels grew the most favorably, reaching EY=344±113kPa and GAG and collagen contents of 10.8±1.2% and 2.2±0.2% of construct wet weight, respectively. Constructs with 27 channels had significantly less deposited GAG than other groups. Channeled constructs given 1 or 10ng/mL TGF-β developed similar properties. Without TGF-β, constructs with 0 or 12 channels exhibited properties that were indistinguishable, and lower than TGF-β-supplemented constructs. Taken together, these results emphasize that nutrient channels are effective only in the presence of TGF-β, and indicate that spacings equivalent to 12 channels in ∅10mm constructs can be employed in articular-layer-sized constructs with reduced dosages of TGF-β.

  14. Design of k-Space Channel Combination Kernels and Integration with Parallel Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Philip J.; Chang, Shaorong; Holmes, James H.; Wang, Kang; Brau, Anja C. S.; Reeder, Scott B.; Brittain, Jean H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this work, a new method is described for producing local k-space channel combination kernels using a small amount of low-resolution multichannel calibration data. Additionally, this work describes how these channel combination kernels can be combined with local k-space unaliasing kernels produced by the calibration phase of parallel imaging methods such as GRAPPA, PARS and ARC. Methods Experiments were conducted to evaluate both the image quality and computational efficiency of the proposed method compared to a channel-by-channel parallel imaging approach with image-space sum-of-squares channel combination. Results Results indicate comparable image quality overall, with some very minor differences seen in reduced field-of-view imaging. It was demonstrated that this method enables a speed up in computation time on the order of 3–16X for 32-channel data sets. Conclusion The proposed method enables high quality channel combination to occur earlier in the reconstruction pipeline, reducing computational and memory requirements for image reconstruction. PMID:23943602

  15. Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03693 Channel

    This channel is located south of Iani Chaos.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -10.9N, Longitude 345.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. First Taste of Hot Channel in Interplanetary Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. Q.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, X.; Li, G.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-04-01

    A hot channel (HC) is a high temperature (˜10 MK) structure in the inner corona first revealed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Eruptions of HCs are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results of previous studies have suggested that an HC is a good proxy for a magnetic flux rope (MFR) in the inner corona as well as another well known MFR candidate, the prominence-cavity structure, which has a normal coronal temperature (˜1-2 MK). In this paper, we report a high temperature structure (HTS, ˜1.5 MK) contained in an interplanetary CME induced by an HC eruption. According to the observations of bidirectional electrons, high temperature and density, strong magnetic field, and its association with the shock, sheath, and plasma pile-up region, we suggest that the HTS is the interplanetary counterpart of the HC. The scale of the measured HTS is around 14 R ⊙ , and it maintained a much higher temperature than the background solar wind even at 1 AU. It is significantly different from the typical magnetic clouds, which usually have a much lower temperature. Our study suggests that the existence of a corotating interaction region ahead of the HC formed a magnetic container to inhibit expansion of the HC and cool it down to a low temperature.

  17. First Taste of Hot Channel in Interplanetary Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. Q.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, X.; Li, G.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-04-01

    A hot channel (HC) is a high temperature (∼10 MK) structure in the inner corona first revealed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Eruptions of HCs are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results of previous studies have suggested that an HC is a good proxy for a magnetic flux rope (MFR) in the inner corona as well as another well known MFR candidate, the prominence-cavity structure, which has a normal coronal temperature (∼1–2 MK). In this paper, we report a high temperature structure (HTS, ∼1.5 MK) contained in an interplanetary CME induced by an HC eruption. According to the observations of bidirectional electrons, high temperature and density, strong magnetic field, and its association with the shock, sheath, and plasma pile-up region, we suggest that the HTS is the interplanetary counterpart of the HC. The scale of the measured HTS is around 14 R ȯ , and it maintained a much higher temperature than the background solar wind even at 1 AU. It is significantly different from the typical magnetic clouds, which usually have a much lower temperature. Our study suggests that the existence of a corotating interaction region ahead of the HC formed a magnetic container to inhibit expansion of the HC and cool it down to a low temperature.

  18. Free-space optical channel simulator for weak-turbulence conditions.

    PubMed

    Bykhovsky, Dima

    2015-11-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication may be severely influenced by the inevitable turbulence effect that results in channel gain fluctuations and fading. The objective of this paper is to provide a simple and effective simulator of the weak-turbulence FSO channel that emulates the influence of the temporal covariance effect. Specifically, the proposed model is based on lognormal distributed samples with a corresponding correlation time. The simulator is based on the solution of the first-order stochastic differential equation (SDE). The results of the provided SDE analysis reveal its efficacy for turbulent channel modeling.

  19. Microwave photonics for space-time compression of ultrabroadband signals through multipath wireless channels.

    PubMed

    Dezfooliyan, Amir; Weiner, Andrew M

    2013-12-01

    We employed photonic radio frequency (RF) arbitrary waveform generation to demonstrate space-time compression of ultrabroadband wireless signals through highly scattering multipath channels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental report that explores an RF-photonic transmitter to both characterize channel dispersions in real wireless environments and generate predistorted waveforms to achieve focusing through the multipath channels. Our experiments span a three octave frequency range of 2-18 GHz, nearly an order of magnitude beyond the ~2 GHz instantaneous bandwidth reported in previous spatiotemporal focusing experiments relying on electronic waveform generators.

  20. A synthetic aperture microwave radiometer to measure soil moisture and ocean salinity from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Hilliard, L. M.; Swift, C. T.; Ruf, C. S.; Garrett, L. B.

    1991-01-01

    A concept is presented for a microwave radiometer in space to measure soil moisture and ocean salinity as part of an 'Earth Probe' mission. The measurements could be made using an array of stick antennas. The L-band channel (1.4 GHz) would be the primary channel for determining soil moisture, with the S-band (2.65-GHz) and C-band (5.0-GHz) channels providing ancillary information to help correct for the effects of the vegetation canopy and possibly to estimate a moisture profile. A preliminary study indicates that an orbit at 450 km would provide coverage of better than 95 percent of the earth every 3 days. A 10-km resolution cell (at nadir) requires stick antennas about 9.5-m long at L-band. The S-band and C-band sticks would be substantially shorter (5 m and 2.7 m, respectively).

  1. Characterization of dual-polarization LTE radio over a free-space optical turbulence channel.

    PubMed

    Bohata, J; Zvanovec, S; Korinek, T; Mansour Abadi, M; Ghassemlooy, Z

    2015-08-10

    A dual polarization (DP) radio over a free-space optical (FSO) communication link using a long-term evolution (LTE) radio signal is proposed and analyzed under different turbulence channel conditions. Radio signal transmission over the DP FSO channel is experimentally verified by means of error vector magnitude (EVM) statistics. We demonstrate that such a system, employing a 64 quadrature amplitude modulation at the frequency bands of 800 MHz and 2.6 GHz, evinces reliability with <8% of EVM in a turbulent channel. Based on the results, we show that transmitting the LTE signal over the FSO channel is a potential solution for last-mile access or backbone networks, when using multiple-input multiple-output based DP signals.

  2. Analysis of atmosphere channel for space-to-ground optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaorui; Guo, Lei; Liu, Yejun; Zhang, Lincong

    2013-10-01

    Since atmosphere deeply influences the beams propagated in space-to-ground optical communications, it is important to study its effects on the beam transmission in the atmospheric channel. In this paper, we analyze the impacts of atmospheric channel with the theory of free space optical communication. First, we investigate the atmospheric attenuation of different beams through the mathematical models. Then, we analyze the effects of atmospheric turbulence on the signal transmission by the atmospheric refractive index structure constant. In addition, we simulate the atmospheric transmittance with different zenith angles, beams, heights and rainfall. The results show that the wavelength, atmospheric turbulence, zenith angle, height and rainfall have important impacts on the signal transmission of space-to-ground optical communications. This demonstrates much theoretical significance on the wavelength selection, height settings of the optical ground station as well as angle selection of transmitter.

  3. Critical role of blockage ratio for flame acceleration in channels with tightly spaced obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte, Orlando J.; Bychkov, Vitaly; Sadek, Jad; Valiev, Damir; Akkerman, V'yacheslav

    2016-09-01

    A conceptually laminar mechanism of extremely fast flame acceleration in obstructed channels, identified by Bychkov et al. ["Physical mechanism of ultrafast flame acceleration," Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 164501 (2008)], is further studied by means of analytical endeavors and computational simulations of compressible hydrodynamic and combustion equations. Specifically, it is shown how the obstacles length, distance between the obstacles, channel width, and thermal boundary conditions at the walls modify flame propagation through a comb-shaped array of parallel thin obstacles. Adiabatic and isothermal (cold and preheated) side walls are considered, obtaining minor difference between these cases, which opposes the unobstructed channel case, where adiabatic and isothermal walls provide qualitatively different regimes of flame propagation. Variations of the obstructed channel width also provide a minor influence on flame propagation, justifying a scale-invariant nature of this acceleration mechanism. In contrast, the spacing between obstacles has a significant role, although it is weaker than that of the blockage ratio (defined as the fraction of the channel blocked by obstacles), which is the key parameter of the problem. Evolution of the burning velocity and the dependence of the flame acceleration rate on the blockage ratio are quantified. The critical blockage ratio, providing the limitations for the acceleration mechanism in channels with comb-shaped obstacles array, is found analytically and numerically, with good agreement between both approaches. Additionally, this comb-shaped obstacles-driven acceleration is compared to finger flame acceleration and to that produced by wall friction.

  4. Recent Advances in Various Metal-Organic Channels for Photochemistry beyond Confined Spaces.

    PubMed

    Noh, Tae Hwan; Jung, Ok-Sang

    2016-09-20

    Tailor-made molecular channel architectures are a hot issue in the fields of nanotechnology, molecular sieves, ion sensors, recognition, confined space reactors, and fluidic transport systems. Carbon nanotubes have been a particular focus, though they cannot easily be synthesized to predefined structures and sizes. Rational design and construction of molecular channel structures based on coordination chemistry has been recognized as a useful approach. Metal-organic channel (MOC) structures can be generated by utilizing, at least in principle, molecular self-assembly of metal ions as angular units with designed ligands as spacers. Recent developments in molecular channel chemistry include exciting advances in photochemical applications and supramolecular material functionality, in addition to general applications such as transport, diffusion and exchange, separation, gas storage, catalysis, and simple encapsulation. In order to carry out the diverse channel functionalities, a large number of studies have been conducted on the synthesis of robust and stable 3D coordination polymers, which show permanent porosity without any guest molecules within the channels, in that the robustness of the channel structures after removal of the solvate/guest molecules is of interest because the structural integrity of the extended structures must be maintained during the reactions. These compounds can be regarded as analogous to zeolites. This Account highlights advances in the construction, from metal cations and multidentate pyridyl ligands, of various MOCs and useful molecular materials as photoreaction platforms. We begin by discussing the fact that detailed proof-of-concept construction of various systematic MOC structures has been introduced mainly in terms of the metal ions as angular components and the pyridyl ligands as spacers. This approach leads to structural complexity of assembled MOC motifs such as metallamacrocycles, helical and cylindrical coordination polymers

  5. Comparative Response of Microchannel Plate and Channel Electron Multiplier Detectors to Penetrating Radiation in Space

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Harper, Ronnie W.; Dors, Eric E.; Janzen, Paul A.; Larsen, Brian A.; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Poston, David I.; Ritzau, Stephen M.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2015-10-02

    Channel electron multiplier (CEM) and microchannel plate (MCP) detectors are routinely used in space instrumentation for measurement of space plasmas. Here, our goal is to understand the relative sensitivities of these detectors to penetrating radiation in space, which can generate background counts and shorten detector lifetime. We use 662 keV γ-rays as a proxy for penetrating radiation such as γ-rays, cosmic rays, and high-energy electrons and protons that are ubiquitous in the space environment. We find that MCP detectors are ~20 times more sensitive to 662 keV γ-rays than CEM detectors. This is attributed to the larger total area of multiplication channels in an MCP detector that is sensitive to electronic excitation and ionization resulting from the interaction of penetrating radiation with the detector material. In contrast to the CEM detector, whose quantum efficiency εγ for 662 keVγ -rays is found to be 0.00175 and largely independent of detector bias, the quantum efficiency of the MCP detector is strongly dependent on the detector bias, with a power law index of 5.5. Lastly, background counts in MCP detectors from penetrating radiation can be reduced using MCP geometries with higher pitch and smaller channel diameter.

  6. Comparative Response of Microchannel Plate and Channel Electron Multiplier Detectors to Penetrating Radiation in Space

    DOE PAGES

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Harper, Ronnie W.; Dors, Eric E.; Janzen, Paul A.; Larsen, Brian A.; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Poston, David I.; Ritzau, Stephen M.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2015-10-02

    Channel electron multiplier (CEM) and microchannel plate (MCP) detectors are routinely used in space instrumentation for measurement of space plasmas. Here, our goal is to understand the relative sensitivities of these detectors to penetrating radiation in space, which can generate background counts and shorten detector lifetime. We use 662 keV γ-rays as a proxy for penetrating radiation such as γ-rays, cosmic rays, and high-energy electrons and protons that are ubiquitous in the space environment. We find that MCP detectors are ~20 times more sensitive to 662 keV γ-rays than CEM detectors. This is attributed to the larger total area ofmore » multiplication channels in an MCP detector that is sensitive to electronic excitation and ionization resulting from the interaction of penetrating radiation with the detector material. In contrast to the CEM detector, whose quantum efficiency εγ for 662 keVγ -rays is found to be 0.00175 and largely independent of detector bias, the quantum efficiency of the MCP detector is strongly dependent on the detector bias, with a power law index of 5.5. Lastly, background counts in MCP detectors from penetrating radiation can be reduced using MCP geometries with higher pitch and smaller channel diameter.« less

  7. 500  Gb/s free-space optical transmission over strong atmospheric turbulence channels.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhen; Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2016-07-15

    We experimentally demonstrate a high-spectral-efficiency, large-capacity, featured free-space-optical (FSO) transmission system by using low-density, parity-check (LDPC) coded quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) combined with orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing. The strong atmospheric turbulence channel is emulated by two spatial light modulators on which four randomly generated azimuthal phase patterns yielding the Andrews spectrum are recorded. The validity of such an approach is verified by reproducing the intensity distribution and irradiance correlation function (ICF) from the full-scale simulator. Excellent agreement of experimental, numerical, and analytical results is found. To reduce the phase distortion induced by the turbulence emulator, the inexpensive wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (AO) is used. To deal with remaining channel impairments, a large-girth LDPC code is used. To further improve the aggregate data rate, the OAM multiplexing is combined with WDM, and 500 Gb/s optical transmission over the strong atmospheric turbulence channels is demonstrated.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of a new SWIR-channel measuring tropospheric CH 4 and CO from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongma, Rienk T.; Gloudemans, Annemieke M. S.; Hoogeveen, Ruud W. M.; Aben, Ilse; de Vries, Johan; Escudero-Sanz, Isabel; van den Oord, Gijsbertus; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2006-08-01

    In preparation for future atmospheric space missions a consortium of Dutch organizations is performing design studies on a nadir viewing grating-based imaging spectrometer using OMI and SCIAMACHY heritage. The spectrometer measures selected species (O 3, NO II, HCHO, H IIO, SO II, aerosols (optical depth, type and absorption index), CO and CH4) with sensitivity down to the Earth's surface, thus addressing science issues on air quality and climate. It includes 3 UV-VIS channels continuously covering the 270-490 nm range, a NIR-channel covering the 710-775 nm range, and a SWIR-channel covering the 2305-2385 nm range. This instrument concept is, named TROPOMI, part of the TRAQ-mission proposal to ESA in response to the Call for Earth Explorer Ideas 2005, and, named TROPI, part of the CAMEO-proposal prepared for the US NRC decadal study-call on Earth science and applications from space. The SWIR-channel is optional in the TROPOMI/TRAQ instrument and included as baseline in the TROPI/CAMEO instrument. This paper focuses on derivation of the instrument requirements of the SWIR-channel by presenting the results of retrieval studies. Synthetic detector spectra are generated by the combination of a forward model and an instrument simulator that includes the properties of state-of-the-art detector technology. The synthetic spectra are input to the CO and CH 4 IMLM retrieval algorithm originally developed for SCIAMACHY. The required accuracy of the Level-2 SWIR data products defines the main instrument parameters like spectral resolution and sampling, telescope aperture, detector temperature, and optical bench temperature. The impact of selected calibration and retrieval errors on the Level-2 products has been characterized. The current status of the SWIR-channel optical design with its demanding requirements on ground-pixel size, spectral resolution, and signal-to-noise ratio will be presented.

  9. Experimental quantum teleportation over a high-loss free-space channel.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-song; Kropatschek, Sebastian; Naylor, William; Scheidl, Thomas; Kofler, Johannes; Herbst, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton; Ursin, Rupert

    2012-10-01

    We present a high-fidelity quantum teleportation experiment over a high-loss free-space channel between two laboratories. We teleported six states of three mutually unbiased bases and obtained an average state fidelity of 0.82(1), well beyond the classical limit of 2/3. With the obtained data, we tomographically reconstructed the process matrices of quantum teleportation. The free-space channel attenuation of 31 dB corresponds to the estimated attenuation regime for a down-link from a low-earth-orbit satellite to a ground station. We also discussed various important technical issues for future experiments, including the dark counts of single-photon detectors, coincidence-window width etc. Our experiment tested the limit of performing quantum teleportation with state-of-the-art resources. It is an important step towards future satellite-based quantum teleportation and paves the way for establishing a worldwide quantum communication network. PMID:23188277

  10. Experimental quantum teleportation over a high-loss free-space channel.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-song; Kropatschek, Sebastian; Naylor, William; Scheidl, Thomas; Kofler, Johannes; Herbst, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton; Ursin, Rupert

    2012-10-01

    We present a high-fidelity quantum teleportation experiment over a high-loss free-space channel between two laboratories. We teleported six states of three mutually unbiased bases and obtained an average state fidelity of 0.82(1), well beyond the classical limit of 2/3. With the obtained data, we tomographically reconstructed the process matrices of quantum teleportation. The free-space channel attenuation of 31 dB corresponds to the estimated attenuation regime for a down-link from a low-earth-orbit satellite to a ground station. We also discussed various important technical issues for future experiments, including the dark counts of single-photon detectors, coincidence-window width etc. Our experiment tested the limit of performing quantum teleportation with state-of-the-art resources. It is an important step towards future satellite-based quantum teleportation and paves the way for establishing a worldwide quantum communication network.

  11. Suppression of Space Charge Induced Beam Halo in Nonlinear Focusing Channel

    DOE PAGES

    Batygin, Yuri Konstantinovich; Scheinker, Alexander; Kurennoy, Sergey; Li, Chao

    2016-01-29

    An intense non-uniform particle beam exhibits strong emittance growth and halo formation in focusing channels due to nonlinear space charge forces of the beam. This phenomenon limits beam brightness and results in particle losses. The problem is connected with irreversible distortion of phase space volume of the beam in conventional focusing structures due to filamentation in phase space. Emittance growth is accompanied by halo formation in real space, which results in inevitable particle losses. We discuss a new approach for solving a self-consistent problem for a matched non-uniform beam in two-dimensional geometry. The resulting solution is applied to the problemmore » of beam transport, while avoiding emittance growth and halo formation by the use of nonlinear focusing field. Conservation of a beam distribution function is demonstrated analytically and by particle-in-cell simulation for a beam with a realistic beam distribution.« less

  12. Suppression of space charge induced beam halo in nonlinear focusing channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Yuri K.; Scheinker, Alexander; Kurennoy, Sergey; Li, Chao

    2016-04-01

    An intense non-uniform particle beam exhibits strong emittance growth and halo formation in focusing channels due to nonlinear space charge forces of the beam. This phenomenon limits beam brightness and results in particle losses. The problem is connected with irreversible distortion of phase space volume of the beam in conventional focusing structures due to filamentation in phase space. Emittance growth is accompanied by halo formation in real space, which results in inevitable particle losses. A new approach for solving a self-consistent problem for a matched non-uniform beam in two-dimensional geometry is discussed. The resulting solution is applied to the problem of beam transport, while avoiding emittance growth and halo formation by the use of nonlinear focusing field. Conservation of a beam distribution function is demonstrated analytically and by particle-in-cell simulation for a beam with a realistic beam distribution.

  13. Integrated source and channel encoded digital communication system design study. [for space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.

    1976-01-01

    The results of several studies Space Shuttle communication system are summarized. These tasks can be divided into the following categories: (1) phase multiplexing for two- and three-channel data transmission, (2) effects of phase noise on the performance of coherent communication links, (3) analysis of command system performance, (4) error correcting code tradeoffs, (5) signal detection and angular search procedure for the shuttle Ku-band communication system, and (6) false lock performance of Costas loop receivers.

  14. Controls on the Mean Spacing of Channels on Incised Alluvial Terraces in the Western U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, L.; Pelletier, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Incised alluvial terraces with a relatively uniform channel spacing are commonly found throughout the western United States. The characteristic spacing of low-order channels on these surfaces generally increases as the height of the surface increases with respect to base level. We measure the characteristic spacing of channels in parallel drainage networks on incised alluvial terraces and unconsolidated fill deposits in several locations throughout the western U.S. where incision is the result of a quantifiable change in base-level elevation. Mean channel spacing on terraces subjected to small amounts of base-level drop (e.g 20 m) can be more than three times smaller than that typically observed on terraces subjected to larger amounts (e.g. 100 m) of base-level drop. The relationship between the magnitude of base-level drop and mean channel spacing is further examined by using a numerical model. Numerical experiments suggest that the observed relationship between relief and channel spacing is the result of feedbacks between the depth of channel incision, mass wasting, and nonlinear increases in the rate of colluvial sediment transport on steep hillslopes that lead to valley widening. In extremely high relief cases, valley side slopes may lengthen sufficiently to support the formation of first order, tributary valleys, leading to the development of a trellis-like drainage system. The rapid widening of valley side-slopes can prevent the growth of adjacent, ephemeral channels and promote a greater mean channel spacing. Model results offer additional insight into the response of landscapes to rapid base-level fall and provide a preliminary basis for understanding how various amounts of base-level drop influence channel network morphology.

  15. Energy efficient rateless codes for high speed data transfer over free space optical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Geetha; Kulkarni, Muralidhar; Acharya, U. S.

    2015-03-01

    Terrestrial Free Space Optical (FSO) links transmit information by using the atmosphere (free space) as a medium. In this paper, we have investigated the use of Luby Transform (LT) codes as a means to mitigate the effects of data corruption induced by imperfect channel which usually takes the form of lost or corrupted packets. LT codes, which are a class of Fountain codes, can be used independent of the channel rate and as many code words as required can be generated to recover all the message bits irrespective of the channel performance. Achieving error free high data rates with limited energy resources is possible with FSO systems if error correction codes with minimal overheads on the power can be used. We also employ a combination of Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) with provision for modification of threshold and optimized LT codes with belief propagation for decoding. These techniques provide additional protection even under strong turbulence regimes. Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) is another method of improving link reliability. Performance of ARQ is limited by the number of retransmissions and the corresponding time delay. We prove through theoretical computations and simulations that LT codes consume less energy per bit. We validate the feasibility of using energy efficient LT codes over ARQ for FSO links to be used in optical wireless sensor networks within the eye safety limits.

  16. Flame acceleration and DDT in channels with obstacles: Effect of obstacle spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Gamezo, Vadim N.; Oran, Elaine S.; Ogawa, Takanobu

    2008-10-15

    We study flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in obstructed channels using 2D reactive Navier-Stokes numerical simulations. The energy release rate for the stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixture is modeled by one-step Arrhenius kinetics. Computations performed for channels with symmetrical and staggered obstacle configurations show two main effects of obstacle spacing S. First, more obstacles per unit length create more perturbations that increase the flame surface area more quickly, and therefore the flame speed grows faster. Second, DDT occurs more easily when the obstacle spacing is large enough for Mach stems to form between obstacles. These two effects are responsible for three different regimes of flame acceleration and DDT observed in simulations: (1) Detonation is ignited when a Mach stem formed by the diffracting shock reflecting from the side wall collides with an obstacle, (2) Mach stems do not form, and the detonation is not ignited, and (3) Mach stems do not form, but the leading shock becomes strong enough to ignite a detonation by direct collision with the top of an obstacle. Regime 3 is observed for small S and involves multiple isolated detonations that appear between obstacles and play a key role in final stages of flame and shock acceleration. For Regime 1 and staggered obstacle configurations, we observe resonance phenomena that significantly reduce the DDT time when S/2 is comparable to the channel width. Effects of imposed symmetry and stochasticity on DDT phenomena are also considered. (author)

  17. Space-Time Coded MC-CDMA: Blind Channel Estimation, Identifiability, and Receiver Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Li, Hongbin

    2003-12-01

    Integrating the strengths of multicarrier (MC) modulation and code division multiple access (CDMA), MC-CDMA systems are of great interest for future broadband transmissions. This paper considers the problem of channel identification and signal combining/detection schemes for MC-CDMA systems equipped with multiple transmit antennas and space-time (ST) coding. In particular, a subspace based blind channel identification algorithm is presented. Identifiability conditions are examined and specified which guarantee unique and perfect (up to a scalar) channel estimation when knowledge of the noise subspace is available. Several popular single-user based signal combining schemes, namely the maximum ratio combining (MRC) and the equal gain combining (EGC), which are often utilized in conventional single-transmit-antenna based MC-CDMA systems, are extended to the current ST-coded MC-CDMA (STC-MC-CDMA) system to perform joint combining and decoding. In addition, a linear multiuser minimum mean-squared error (MMSE) detection scheme is also presented, which is shown to outperform the MRC and EGC at some increased computational complexity. Numerical examples are presented to evaluate and compare the proposed channel identification and signal detection/combining techniques.

  18. Quantum teleportation and entanglement distribution over 100-kilometre free-space channels.

    PubMed

    Yin, Juan; Ren, Ji-Gang; Lu, He; Cao, Yuan; Yong, Hai-Lin; Wu, Yu-Ping; Liu, Chang; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Zhou, Fei; Jiang, Yan; Cai, Xin-Dong; Xu, Ping; Pan, Ge-Sheng; Jia, Jian-Jun; Huang, Yong-Mei; Yin, Hao; Wang, Jian-Yu; Chen, Yu-Ao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2012-08-01

    Transferring an unknown quantum state over arbitrary distances is essential for large-scale quantum communication and distributed quantum networks. It can be achieved with the help of long-distance quantum teleportation and entanglement distribution. The latter is also important for fundamental tests of the laws of quantum mechanics. Although quantum teleportation and entanglement distribution over moderate distances have been realized using optical fibre links, the huge photon loss and decoherence in fibres necessitate the use of quantum repeaters for larger distances. However, the practical realization of quantum repeaters remains experimentally challenging. Free-space channels, first used for quantum key distribution, offer a more promising approach because photon loss and decoherence are almost negligible in the atmosphere. Furthermore, by using satellites, ultra-long-distance quantum communication and tests of quantum foundations could be achieved on a global scale. Previous experiments have achieved free-space distribution of entangled photon pairs over distances of 600 metres (ref. 14) and 13 kilometres (ref. 15), and transfer of triggered single photons over a 144-kilometre one-link free-space channel. Most recently, following a modified scheme, free-space quantum teleportation over 16 kilometres was demonstrated with a single pair of entangled photons. Here we report quantum teleportation of independent qubits over a 97-kilometre one-link free-space channel with multi-photon entanglement. An average fidelity of 80.4 ± 0.9 per cent is achieved for six distinct states. Furthermore, we demonstrate entanglement distribution over a two-link channel, in which the entangled photons are separated by 101.8 kilometres. Violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality is observed without the locality loophole. Besides being of fundamental interest, our results represent an important step towards a global quantum network. Moreover, the high

  19. Quantum teleportation and entanglement distribution over 100-kilometre free-space channels.

    PubMed

    Yin, Juan; Ren, Ji-Gang; Lu, He; Cao, Yuan; Yong, Hai-Lin; Wu, Yu-Ping; Liu, Chang; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Zhou, Fei; Jiang, Yan; Cai, Xin-Dong; Xu, Ping; Pan, Ge-Sheng; Jia, Jian-Jun; Huang, Yong-Mei; Yin, Hao; Wang, Jian-Yu; Chen, Yu-Ao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2012-08-01

    Transferring an unknown quantum state over arbitrary distances is essential for large-scale quantum communication and distributed quantum networks. It can be achieved with the help of long-distance quantum teleportation and entanglement distribution. The latter is also important for fundamental tests of the laws of quantum mechanics. Although quantum teleportation and entanglement distribution over moderate distances have been realized using optical fibre links, the huge photon loss and decoherence in fibres necessitate the use of quantum repeaters for larger distances. However, the practical realization of quantum repeaters remains experimentally challenging. Free-space channels, first used for quantum key distribution, offer a more promising approach because photon loss and decoherence are almost negligible in the atmosphere. Furthermore, by using satellites, ultra-long-distance quantum communication and tests of quantum foundations could be achieved on a global scale. Previous experiments have achieved free-space distribution of entangled photon pairs over distances of 600 metres (ref. 14) and 13 kilometres (ref. 15), and transfer of triggered single photons over a 144-kilometre one-link free-space channel. Most recently, following a modified scheme, free-space quantum teleportation over 16 kilometres was demonstrated with a single pair of entangled photons. Here we report quantum teleportation of independent qubits over a 97-kilometre one-link free-space channel with multi-photon entanglement. An average fidelity of 80.4 ± 0.9 per cent is achieved for six distinct states. Furthermore, we demonstrate entanglement distribution over a two-link channel, in which the entangled photons are separated by 101.8 kilometres. Violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality is observed without the locality loophole. Besides being of fundamental interest, our results represent an important step towards a global quantum network. Moreover, the high

  20. Space station architecture, module, berthing hub, shell assembly, berthing mechanism and utility connection channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Marc M. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A space station (20) includes a plurality of modules (24) and berthing hubs (22), joined by interconnections (26) which are sideways connectable. The modules (24) and hubs (22) are fastened together in a triangular configuration in three dimensions. The interconnections (26) include a pair of opposed, axially aligned, flanged ports (50) and a clamp latch (52) formed from a plurality of sections (54, 56 and 58) hinged along their length and extending circumferentially around the flanged ports (50). A hermetic seal (63) is formed between the ports (50). A utilities connection channel (68) extends between the ports (50). The channel (68) has a shell (70) with utilities connectors (74) movable between an extended position to mating connectors in the modules (24) and a withdrawn position. Assembly sequence and common module shell structure is detailed.

  1. Twelve Channel Optical Fiber Connector Assembly: From Commercial Off the Shelf to Space Flight Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melaine N.

    1998-01-01

    The commercial off the shelf (COTS) twelve channel optical fiber MTP array connector and ribbon cable assembly is being validated for space flight use and the results of this study to date are presented here. The interconnection system implemented for the Parallel Fiber Optic Data Bus (PFODB) physical layer will include a 100/140 micron diameter optical fiber in the cable configuration among other enhancements. As part of this investigation, the COTS 62.5/125 microns optical fiber cable assembly has been characterized for space environment performance as a baseline for improving the performance of the 100/140 micron diameter ribbon cable for the Parallel FODB application. Presented here are the testing and results of random vibration and thermal environmental characterization of this commercial off the shelf (COTS) MTP twelve channel ribbon cable assembly. This paper is the first in a series of papers which will characterize and document the performance of Parallel FODB's physical layer from COTS to space flight worthy.

  2. Space communication system for compressed data with a concatenated Reed-Solomon-Viterbi coding channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.; Hilbert, E. E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A space communication system incorporating a concatenated Reed Solomon Viterbi coding channel is discussed for transmitting compressed and uncompressed data from a spacecraft to a data processing center on Earth. Imaging (and other) data are first compressed into source blocks which are then coded by a Reed Solomon coder and interleaver, followed by a convolutional encoder. The received data is first decoded by a Viterbi decoder, followed by a Reed Solomon decoder and deinterleaver. The output of the latter is then decompressed, based on the compression criteria used in compressing the data in the spacecraft. The decompressed data is processed to reconstruct an approximation of the original data-producing condition or images.

  3. Fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanofluidic chips with controllable channel size and spacing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ran; Li, Dongqing

    2016-10-01

    The ability to create reproducible and inexpensive nanofluidic chips is essential to the fundamental research and applications of nanofluidics. This paper presents a novel and cost-effective method for fabricating a single nanochannel or multiple nanochannels in PDMS chips with controllable channel size and spacing. Single nanocracks or nanocrack arrays, positioned by artificial defects, are first generated on a polystyrene surface with controllable size and spacing by a solvent-induced method. Two sets of optimal working parameters are developed to replicate the nanocracks onto the polymer layers to form the nanochannel molds. The nanochannel molds are used to make the bi-layer PDMS microchannel-nanochannel chips by simple soft lithography. An alignment system is developed for bonding the nanofluidic chips under an optical microscope. Using this method, high quality PDMS nanofluidic chips with a single nanochannel or multiple nanochannels of sub-100 nm width and height and centimeter length can be obtained with high repeatability. PMID:27539019

  4. Fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanofluidic chips with controllable channel size and spacing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ran; Li, Dongqing

    2016-10-01

    The ability to create reproducible and inexpensive nanofluidic chips is essential to the fundamental research and applications of nanofluidics. This paper presents a novel and cost-effective method for fabricating a single nanochannel or multiple nanochannels in PDMS chips with controllable channel size and spacing. Single nanocracks or nanocrack arrays, positioned by artificial defects, are first generated on a polystyrene surface with controllable size and spacing by a solvent-induced method. Two sets of optimal working parameters are developed to replicate the nanocracks onto the polymer layers to form the nanochannel molds. The nanochannel molds are used to make the bi-layer PDMS microchannel-nanochannel chips by simple soft lithography. An alignment system is developed for bonding the nanofluidic chips under an optical microscope. Using this method, high quality PDMS nanofluidic chips with a single nanochannel or multiple nanochannels of sub-100 nm width and height and centimeter length can be obtained with high repeatability.

  5. 500  Gb/s free-space optical transmission over strong atmospheric turbulence channels.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhen; Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2016-07-15

    We experimentally demonstrate a high-spectral-efficiency, large-capacity, featured free-space-optical (FSO) transmission system by using low-density, parity-check (LDPC) coded quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) combined with orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing. The strong atmospheric turbulence channel is emulated by two spatial light modulators on which four randomly generated azimuthal phase patterns yielding the Andrews spectrum are recorded. The validity of such an approach is verified by reproducing the intensity distribution and irradiance correlation function (ICF) from the full-scale simulator. Excellent agreement of experimental, numerical, and analytical results is found. To reduce the phase distortion induced by the turbulence emulator, the inexpensive wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (AO) is used. To deal with remaining channel impairments, a large-girth LDPC code is used. To further improve the aggregate data rate, the OAM multiplexing is combined with WDM, and 500 Gb/s optical transmission over the strong atmospheric turbulence channels is demonstrated. PMID:27420516

  6. Propagation velocity and space-time correlation of perturbations in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, John; Hussain, Fazle

    1992-01-01

    A database obtained from direct numerical simulation of a turbulent channel flow is analyzed to extract the propagation velocity V of velocity, vorticity, and pressure fluctuations from their space-time correlations. A surprising result is that V is approximately the same as the local mean velocity for most of the channel, except for the near-wall region. For y(+) is less than or equal to 15, V is virtually constant, implying that perturbations of all flow variables propagate like waves near the wall. In this region V is 55 percent of the centerline velocity U(sub c) for velocity and vorticity perturbations and 75 percent of U(sub c) for pressure perturbations. Scale-dependence of V is also examined by analyzing the bandpass filtered flow fields. Comprehensive documentation of the propagation velocities and space-time correlation data, which should prove useful in the evaluation of Taylor's hypothesis is presented. An attempt was made to explain some of the data in terms of our current understanding of organized structures, although not all of the data can be explained this way.

  7. Effects of Pin Detached Space on Heat Transfer in a Rib Roughened Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Siw, Sin Chien; Chyu, Minking K.; Alvin, Mary Anne

    2012-11-08

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the heat transfer characteristics and frictional losses in a rib roughened channel combined with detached pin-fins. The overall channel geometry (W=76.2 mm, E=25.4 mm) simulates an internal cooling passage of wide aspect ratio (3:1) in a gas turbine airfoil. With a given pin diameter, D=6.35 mm=[1/4]E, three different pin-fin height-to-diameter ratios, H/D=4, 3, and 2, were examined. Each of these three cases corresponds to a specific pin array geometry of detachment spacing (C) between the pin-tip and one of the endwalls, i.e., C/O=0, 1, 2, respectively. The rib height-to-channel height ratio is 0.0625. Two newly proposed cross ribs, namely the broken rib and full rib are evaluated in this effort. The broken ribs are positioned in between two consecutive rows of pin-fins, while the full ribs are fully extended adjacent to the pin-fins. The Reynolds number, based on the hydraulic diameter of the unobstructed cross section and the mean bulk velocity, ranges from 10,000 to 25,000. The experiment employs a hybrid technique based on transient liquid crystal imaging to obtain distributions of the local heat transfer coefficient over all of the participating surfaces, including the endwalls and all pin elements. The presence of ribs enhances local heat transfer coefficient on the endwall substantially by approximately 20% to 50% as compared to the neighboring endwall. In addition, affected by the rib geometry, which is a relatively low profile as compared to the overall height of the channel, the pressure loss seems to be insensitive to the presence of the ribs. However, from the overall heat transfer enhancement standpoint, the baseline cases (without ribs) outperform cases with broken ribs or full ribs.

  8. Equalization enhanced phase noise in Nyquist-spaced superchannel transmission systems using multi-channel digital back-propagation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tianhua; Liga, Gabriele; Lavery, Domaniç; Thomsen, Benn C; Savory, Seb J; Killey, Robert I; Bayvel, Polina

    2015-09-14

    Superchannel transmission spaced at the symbol rate, known as Nyquist spacing, has been demonstrated for effectively maximizing the optical communication channel capacity and spectral efficiency. However, the achievable capacity and reach of transmission systems using advanced modulation formats are affected by fibre nonlinearities and equalization enhanced phase noise (EEPN). Fibre nonlinearities can be effectively compensated using digital back-propagation (DBP). However EEPN which arises from the interaction between laser phase noise and dispersion cannot be efficiently mitigated, and can significantly degrade the performance of transmission systems. Here we report the first investigation of the origin and the impact of EEPN in Nyquist-spaced superchannel system, employing electronic dispersion compensation (EDC) and multi-channel DBP (MC-DBP). Analysis was carried out in a Nyquist-spaced 9-channel 32-Gbaud DP-64QAM transmission system. Results confirm that EEPN significantly degrades the performance of all sub-channels of the superchannel system and that the distortions are more severe for the outer sub-channels, both using EDC and MC-DBP. It is also found that the origin of EEPN depends on the relative position between the carrier phase recovery module and the EDC (or MC-DBP) module. Considering EEPN, diverse coding techniques and modulation formats have to be applied for optimizing different sub-channels in superchannel systems.

  9. Equalization enhanced phase noise in Nyquist-spaced superchannel transmission systems using multi-channel digital back-propagation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tianhua; Liga, Gabriele; Lavery, Domaniç; Thomsen, Benn C.; Savory, Seb J.; Killey, Robert I.; Bayvel, Polina

    2015-01-01

    Superchannel transmission spaced at the symbol rate, known as Nyquist spacing, has been demonstrated for effectively maximizing the optical communication channel capacity and spectral efficiency. However, the achievable capacity and reach of transmission systems using advanced modulation formats are affected by fibre nonlinearities and equalization enhanced phase noise (EEPN). Fibre nonlinearities can be effectively compensated using digital back-propagation (DBP). However EEPN which arises from the interaction between laser phase noise and dispersion cannot be efficiently mitigated, and can significantly degrade the performance of transmission systems. Here we report the first investigation of the origin and the impact of EEPN in Nyquist-spaced superchannel system, employing electronic dispersion compensation (EDC) and multi-channel DBP (MC-DBP). Analysis was carried out in a Nyquist-spaced 9-channel 32-Gbaud DP-64QAM transmission system. Results confirm that EEPN significantly degrades the performance of all sub-channels of the superchannel system and that the distortions are more severe for the outer sub-channels, both using EDC and MC-DBP. It is also found that the origin of EEPN depends on the relative position between the carrier phase recovery module and the EDC (or MC-DBP) module. Considering EEPN, diverse coding techniques and modulation formats have to be applied for optimizing different sub-channels in superchannel systems. PMID:26365422

  10. Design Study of a Multi-channel Array Particle Spectrometer for Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, Andreia; Assis, P.; Brogueira, P.; Gonçalves, P.; Keating, A.; Pimenta, M.; Rodrigues, P.; Trindade, A.

    In this work, a novel particle spectrometer is proposed to fulfil the need to map the space radiation environment for future space missions and to provide more accurate scientific data. The concept of the instrument brings together new radiation-hard technologies, for the photo-sensors and scintillating materials that will improve the quality of the data, while taking into account the limited resources such as mass, power and accommodation, allocated for space radiation monitors. The Multi-channel Array Particle Spectrometer (MAPS), can measure fluxes and energy dis-tributions of protons, ions, electrons and gammas in a wide energy range based on the 3D reconstruction of the particle track through the detector and its deposited energy in the active volume. It consists on a 8 x 8 segmented scintillator block built from 3.2 x 3.2 x 20 mm3 indi-vidual LYSO:Ce rods that are readout at both ends by two 64 pixel Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPMs) matrices, a new generation of high gain (105-106) avalanche photodiodes working in controlled Geiger mode, that collect the scintillating light produced by the interactions of the charged particles in the crystals. Each SiPM matrix is readout by a 64 channel mixed sig-nal analog-digital ASIC, offering both particle identification and particle counting capabilities. Power cycling design of the ASIC allows to activate the particle identification block only during a pre-determined time slice, keeping the total power budget of less than 1 mW/channel. An on-board FPGA sorts the serialized data from the two ASICs and computes the trigger primitives in real-time and in an event-by-event basis. Whenever a charged particle crosses the segmented volume of the detector, the XY coordinates, given by the pixelized crystal positions, and the deposited energy in each crystal is recorded. The double readout scheme allows to compute the light collection asymmetry between both ends of the crystal and to use that information to record the

  11. MIMO Free-Space Optical Communication Employing Subcarrier Intensity Modulation in Atmospheric Turbulence Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Popoola, Wasiu O.; Ahmadi, Vahid; Leitgeb, Erich

    In this paper, we analyse the error performance of transmitter/receiver array free-space optical (FSO) communication system employing binary phase shift keying (BPSK) subcarrier intensity modulation (SIM) in clear but turbulent atmospheric channel. Subcarrier modulation is employed to eliminate the need for adaptive threshold detector. Direct detection is employed at the receiver and each subcarrier is subsequently demodulated coherently. The effect of irradiance fading is mitigated with an array of lasers and photodetectors. The received signals are linearly combined using the optimal maximum ratio combining (MRC), the equal gain combining (EGC) and the selection combining (SelC). The bit error rate (BER) equations are derived considering additive white Gaussian noise and log normal intensity fluctuations. This work is part of the EU COST actions and EU projects.

  12. Optical Performance of Breadboard Amon-Ra Imaging Channel Instrument for Deep Space Albedo Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Won Hyun; Kim, Seonghui; Lee, Hanshin; Yi, Hyun-Su; Lee, Jae-Min; Ham, Sun-Jung; Yoon, Jeeyeon; Kim, Sug-Whan; Yang, Ho Soon; Choi, Ki-Hyuk; Kim, Zeen Chul; Lockwood, Mike; Morris, Nigel; Tosh, Ian

    2007-03-01

    The AmonRa instrument, the primary payload of the international EARTHSHINE mission, is designed for measurement of deep space albedo from L1 halo orbit. We report the optical design, tolerance analysis and the optical performance of the breadborad AmonRa imaging channel instrument optimized for the mission science requirements. In particular, an advanced wavefront feedback process control technique was used for the instrumentation process including part fabrication, system alignment and integration. The measured performances for the complete breadboard system are the RMS 0.091 wave(test wavelength: 632.8 nm) in wavefront error, the ensquared energy of 61.7%(in 14 μ m) and the MTF of 35.3%(Nyquist frequency: 35.7 mm^{-1}) at the center field. These resulting optical system performances prove that the breadboard AmonRa instrument, as built, satisfies the science requirements of the EARTHSHINE mission.

  13. Spot detection accuracy analysis in turbulent channel for free space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan-Fei; Dai, Yong-Hong; Yu, Sheng-Lin; Xin, Shan; Chen, Jing; Ai, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Increasingly importance has been taken seriously for high frame rate CMOS camera to optical communication acquisition pointing and tacking (APT) system, with its compact structure, easy to developed and adapted to beacon light spot detection in atmospheric channel. As spot position accuracy directly determines the performance of space optical communication, it is very important to design a high precision spot center algorithm. Usually spot location algorithm uses gravity algorithm, shape center capturing algorithm or self-adaption threshold algorithm. In experiments we analyzed the characteristics of the spots which transmitted through atmospheric turbulence and studied light transmission characteristics in turbulent channel. We carried out a beacon light detection experiments in a distance of 3.4km, collected the beacon spots on CMOS camera and signal light power. We calculated spot position with two different algorithm and compared the calculation accuracy between field dispersive spot and ideal Gaussian laser spot. Experiment research show that, gravity center algorithm should be more suitable for beacon beam spot which accuracy can be improved about 1.3 pixels for a Gaussian spot. But the shape center algorithm has higher precision. The reasons were analyzed which made an important preparation for subsequent testing.

  14. Capillary Channel Flow (CCF) EU2-02 on the International Space Station (ISS): An Experimental Investigation of Passive Bubble Separations in an Open Capillary Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M.; Wollman, Andrew P.; Jenson, Ryan M.; Geile, John T.; Tucker, John F.; Wiles, Brentley M.; Trattner, Andy L.; DeVoe, Claire; Sharp, Lauren M.; Canfield, Peter J.; Klatte, Joerg; Dreyer, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    It would be signicantly easier to design fluid systems for spacecraft if the fluid phases behaved similarly to those on earth. In this research an open 15:8 degree wedge-sectioned channel is employed to separate bubbles from a two-phase flow in a microgravity environment. The bubbles appear to rise in the channel and coalesce with the free surface in much the same way as would bubbles in a terrestrial environment, only the combined effects of surface tension, wetting, and conduit geometry replace the role of buoyancy. The host liquid is drawn along the channel by a pump and noncondensible gas bubbles are injected into it near the channel vertex at the channel inlet. Control parameters include bubble volume, bubble frequency, liquid volumetric flow rate, and channel length. The asymmetrically confined bubbles are driven in the cross-flow direction by capillary forces until they at least become inscribed within the section or until they come in contact with the free surface, whereupon they usually coalesce and leave the flow. The merging of bubbles enhances, but does not guarantee, the latter. The experiments are performed aboard the International Space Station as a subset of the Capillary Channel Flow experiments. The flight hardware is commanded remotely and continuously from ground stations during the tests and an extensive array of experiments is conducted identifying numerous bubble flow regimes and regime transitions depending on the ratio and magnitude of the gas and liquid volumetric flow rates. The breadth of the publicly available experiments is conveyed herein primarily by narrative and by regime maps, where transitions are approximated by simple expressions immediately useful for the purposes of design and deeper analysis.

  15. Intercellular channels in the pars tuberalis of the rat hypophysis and their relationship to the subarachnoid space.

    PubMed

    Aguado, L I; Schoebitz, K; Rodríguez, E M

    1981-01-01

    A system of intercellular channels is described in the pars tuberalis (PT) of the female rat. These spaces are lined by all types of cells found in the PT and are not sealed off by tight junctions. Ventrally and dorsally, the intercellular spaces open toward the basement membranes separating the PT from (i) the subarachnoid space, and (ii) the perivascular space of the portal capillaries, respectively. These intercellular channels differ from the follicles, which are also found in the PT, being lined by a particular type of cell. In a second group of female rats an epoxy mixture was injected into the third ventricle; 10 min thereafter horseradish peroxidase was infused into the cisterna magna. After processing the brain for the demonstration of exogenous peroxidase, it was found that the tracer had reached the subarachnoid space adjacent to the hypothalamus and entered into all ventricular cavities with the exception of the infundibular recess. Under these experimental conditions it was found that the tracer fills all intercullular channels of the PT, thus indicating that there is no barrier between the subarachnoid space and the PT. It is suggested that the subarachnoid space should be regarded as a probable route for the transport of trophic factor(s) and/or secretory product(s) of the PT.

  16. Turbulence-induced channel crosstalk in an orbital angular momentum-multiplexed free-space optical link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguita, Jaime A.; Neifeld, Mark A.; Vasic, Bane V.

    2008-05-01

    A multichannel free-space optical (FSO) communication system based on orbital angular momentum (OAM)-carrying beams is studied. We numerically analyze the effects of atmospheric turbulence on the system and find that turbulence induces attenuation and crosstalk among channels. Based on a model in which the constituent channels are binary symmetric and crosstalk is a Gaussian noise source, we find optimal sets of OAM states at each turbulence condition studied and determine the aggregate capacity of the multichannel system at those conditions. OAM-multiplexed FSO systems that operate in the weak turbulence regime are found to offer good performance. We verify that the aggregate capacity decreases as the turbulence increases. A per-channel bit-error rate evaluation is presented to show the uneven effects of crosstalk on the constituent channels.

  17. Investigation of the phase fluctuation effect on the BER performance of DPSK space downlink optical communication system on fluctuation channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mi; Li, Bowen; Zhang, Xuping; Song, Yuejiang; Chang, Lingqian; Chen, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    Phase fluctuation effect is an important phenomenon on bit error rate (BER) performance on fluctuation channel in space downlink optical communication system. During research process, both intensity scintillation and phase fluctuation caused by atmospheric turbulence have been considered on fluctuation channel. Through the analysis of simulation results, the influence of phase fluctuation is not sensitive for wavelength and APD gain factor at high data rate. Besides, receiving diameter and divergence angle can be adjusted properly in order to obtain optimal BER performance. This work is helpful to the research of phase fluctuation and the design of practical system.

  18. Optimal Performance Monitoring of Hybrid Mid-Infrared Wavelength MIMO Free Space Optical and RF Wireless Networks in Fading Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Barnet Michael

    An optimal performance monitoring metric for a hybrid free space optical and radio-frequency (RF) wireless network, the Outage Capacity Objective Function, is analytically developed and studied. Current and traditional methods of performance monitoring of both optical and RF wireless networks are centered on measurement of physical layer parameters, the most common being signal-to-noise ratio, error rate, Q factor, and eye diagrams, occasionally combined with link-layer measurements such as data throughput, retransmission rate, and/or lost packet rate. Network management systems frequently attempt to predict or forestall network failures by observing degradations of these parameters and to attempt mitigation (such as offloading traffic, increasing transmitter power, reducing the data rate, or combinations thereof) prior to the failure. These methods are limited by the frequent low sensitivity of the physical layer parameters to the atmospheric optical conditions (measured by optical signal-to-noise ratio) and the radio frequency fading channel conditions (measured by signal-to-interference ratio). As a result of low sensitivity, measurements of this type frequently are unable to predict impending failures sufficiently in advance for the network management system to take corrective action prior to the failure. We derive and apply an optimal measure of hybrid network performance based on the outage capacity of the hybrid optical and RF channel, the outage capacity objective function. The objective function provides high sensitivity and reliable failure prediction, and considers both the effects of atmospheric optical impairments on the performance of the free space optical segment as well as the effect of RF channel impairments on the radio frequency segment. The radio frequency segment analysis considers the three most common RF channel fading statistics: Rayleigh, Ricean, and Nakagami-m. The novel application of information theory to the underlying physics of the

  19. Performance of heterodyne differential phase-shift keying system over double Weibull free-space optical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa Hasan, Omar

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the bit error rate (BER), outage probability, and outage rate analysis of the heterodyne differential phase-shift keying system over double Weibull-distributed free-space optical channel (FSO) are proposed. The channel statistics are modeled based on the scintillation theory and derived as the product of two independent Weibull random variables. Novel closed-form expressions for evaluating BER, outage probability, and outage rate are derived taking into account the effect of turbulence strength and inner-scale turbulent cell size. Numerical results are provided to evaluate the FSO system performance for weak to strong turbulence channel conditions and inner-scale turbulent cell size. The BER, outage probability, and outage rate performance are displayed for different values of turbulence strength conditions, inner-scale values and signal-to-noise ratios.

  20. More than 100 channel supercontinuum CW optical source with precise 25GHz spacing for 10Gbit/s DWDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianping; Nan, Yinbo; Zhou, Xianwei

    2006-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the generation of supercontinuum (SC) with a 12.5GHz DFB/EAM ultrashort optical pulse broadened in the high nonlinear fiber (HNLF). Through longitudinal mode-carving of the SC spectrum, a novel multiwavelength continuous wave (CW) optical source with precise 25GHz channel spacing is realized. The bit error rate (BER) curve and eye diagram show that the multiwavelength CW optical source is promising for dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) systems.

  1. STEM characterization on silica nanowires with new mesopore structures by space-confined self-assembly within nano-scale channels

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Peng; Hu, Michael Z.; Shi, Donglu; Blom, Douglas Allen

    2008-01-01

    Critical channel diameters were found (below which space confinement takes effect, leading to more uniform and ordered mesopore structures) in the study of evaporation-induced coassembly of triblock-copolymer (P123) and silica molecular precursors (TEOS, tetraethyl orthosilicate) by employing channels in anodized aluminum oxide (AAO, 13 200 nm channel diameter) and in track-etched polycarbonate (EPC, 10 80 nm channel diameter) and for the first time we have observed a new mesopore structure (i.e., packed hollow spheres) in silica nanowires formed in AAO channels with diameters from 30 to 80 nm.

  2. Pool spacing, channel morphology, and the restoration of tidal forested wetlands of the Columbia River, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Montgomery, David R.

    2008-10-09

    Tidal forested wetlands have sustained substantial areal losses, and restoration practitioners lack a description of many ecosystem structures associated with these late-successional systems in which surface water is a significant controlling factor on the flora and fauna. The roles of large woody debris in terrestrial and riverine ecosystems have been well described compared to functions in tidal areas. This study documents the role of large wood in forcing channel morphology in Picea-sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated freshwater tidal wetlands in the floodplain of the Columbia River, U.S.A. near the Pacific coast. The average pool spacing documented in channel surveys of three freshwater tidal forested wetlands near Grays Bay were 2.2 ± 1.3, 2.3 ± 1.2, and 2.5 ± 1.5. There were significantly greater numbers of pools on tidal forested wetland channels than on a nearby restoration site. On the basis of pool spacing and the observed sequences of log jams and pools, the tidal forested wetland channels were classified consistent with a forced step-pool class. Tidal systems, with bidirectional flow, have not previously been classified in this way. The classification provides a useful basis for restoration project design and planning in historically forested tidal freshwater areas, particularly in regard to the use of large wood in restoration actions and the development of pool habitats for aquatic species. Significant modifications by beaver on these sites warrant further investigation to explore the interactions between these animals and restoration actions affecting hydraulics and channel structure in tidal areas.

  3. Parallel Multistage Decision Feedback Equalizer for Single-Carrier Layered Space-Time Systems in Frequency-Selective Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Wang, Haifeng; Cheng, Shixin; Chen, Ming

    2004-12-01

    Space-time transmission techniques can greatly increase the spectral efficiency. In this paper, a parallel multistage decision feedback equalizer (PMDFE) is proposed for single-carrier layered space-time systems with a fixed cyclic prefix over frequency-selective channels. It is composed of a parallel interference canceller, a multiple-input single-output decision feedback equalizer (MISO-DFE), and a linear combiner. The soft output of the MISO-DFE is linearly combined with the previous tentative soft decision. In addition, an algorithm is proposed to obtain tentative soft and hard decisions for initializing the equalizer. The initializing complexity of the PMDFE is lower than that of MIMO-OFDM. Simulation results show that the PMDFE outperforms MIMO-OFDM and previously existing equalizers for single-carrier layered space-time systems.

  4. An experimental study of the concatenated Reed-Solomon/Viterbi channel coding system performance and its impact on space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K. Y.; Lee, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    The need for efficient space communication at very low bit error probabilities to the specification and implementation of a concatenated coding system using an interleaved Reed-Solomon code as the outer code and a Viterbi-decoded convolutional code as the inner code. Experimental results of this channel coding system are presented under an emulated S-band uplink and X-band downlink two-way space communication channel, where both uplink and downlink have strong carrier power. This work was performed under the NASA End-to-End Data Systems program at JPL. Test results verify that at a bit error probability of 10 to the -6 power or less, this concatenated coding system does provide a coding gain of 2.5 dB or more over the Viterbi-decoded convolutional-only coding system. These tests also show that a desirable interleaving depth for the Reed-Solomon outer code is 8 or more. The impact of this "virtually" error-free space communication link on the transmission of images is discussed and examples of simulation results are given.

  5. Flow tests of a single fuel element coolant channel for a compact fast reactor for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springborn, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    Water flow tests were conducted on a single-fuel-element cooling channel for a nuclear concept to be used for space power. The tests established a method for measuring coolant flow rate which is applicable to water flow testing of a complete mockup of the reference reactor. The inlet plenum-to-outlet plenum pressure drop, which approximates the overall core pressure drop, was measured and correlated with flow rate. This information can be used for reactor coolant flow and heat transfer calculations. An analytical study of the flow characteristics was also conducted.

  6. Long reach DWDM-PON with 12.5 GHz channel spacing based on comb source seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhao; Nie, Hai-tao; Wang, Yao-jun

    2016-07-01

    A long reach dense wavelength division multiplexing passive optical network (DWDM-PON) with 12.5 GHz channel spacing is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. An optical frequency comb source is used to provide the multiwavelength seeding light, while reflective semiconductor optical amplifiers (RSOAs) are installed in both optical line terminal (OLT) and optical network units (ONUs) as colorless transmitter. The experimental results show that the bidirectional transmission for 1.2 Gbit/s data rate is achieved over 80 km single mode fiber (SMF).

  7. Monolithically integrated 20-channel optical add/drop multiplexer subsystem with hybrid-integrated 40-channel photodetector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Andreas B.; Krabe, Detlef; Dieckroeger, Jens; Spott, Thorsten; Kraeker, Tobias; Martins, Evely; Zavrsnik, Miha; Schneider, Hartmut W.; Baumann, Ingo

    2003-03-01

    We built a 20 channel, 200 GHz, fully reconfigurable optical add-/drop multiplexer with integrated variable optical attenuators and power monitor diodes. A single planar lightwave circuit chip contains demultiplexer, switch array, attenuators and multiplexers. It also serves as an "optical motherboard" for a hybrid, flip-chip assembly containing four 10-channel photo detector arrays. A thermal management concept which considers both microscopic and macroscopic aspects of the device was developed. The final device exhibits an insertion loss of 9 dB from "in"- to "through"-port, a 1 dB bandwidth of >50 GHz and switch extinction ratios in excess of 40 dB.

  8. Kinetic equilibrium of space charge dominated beams in a misaligned quadrupole focusing channel

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V. S.

    2013-07-15

    The dynamics of intense beam propagation through the misaligned quadrupole focusing channel has been studied in a self-consistent manner using nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The equations of motion of the beam centroid have been developed and found to be independent of any specific beam distribution. A Vlasov equilibrium distribution and beam envelope equations have been obtained, which provide us a theoretical tool to investigate the dynamics of intense beam propagating in a misaligned quadrupole focusing channel. It is shown that the displaced quadrupoles only cause the centroid of the beam to wander off axis. The beam envelope around the centroid obeys the familiar Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij envelope equation that is independent of the centroid motion. However, the rotation of the quadrupole about its optical axis affects the beam envelope and causes an increase in the projected emittances in the two transverse planes due to the inter-plane coupling.

  9. A Vlasov equilibrium for space charge dominated beam in a misaligned solenoidal channel

    SciTech Connect

    Sing Babu, P.; Goswami, A.; Pandit, V. S.

    2012-08-15

    The effect of displacement and rotational misalignments of solenoid magnets with respect to the ideal beam propagation axis on the dynamics of intense charged particle beams have been studied. The equation of motion of the beam centroid has been obtained and found to be independent of any specific beam distribution. A Vlasov equilibrium distribution for the intense beam propagation through misaligned focussing channel has been obtained. Self-consistent simulation confirms the analytical result.

  10. Space-for-time substitution and the evolution of a submarine canyon-channel system in a passive progradational margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micallef, Aaron; Ribó, Marta; Canals, Miquel; Puig, Pere; Lastras, Galderic; Tubau, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    Space-for-time substitution is a concept that has been widely applied, but not thoroughly tested, in some fields of geomorphology. The objective of this study is to test whether the concept of space-for-time substitution is valid in reconstructing the evolution of a submarine canyon-channel system in a passive progradational margin. We use multibeam echosounder data and in situ measurements from the south Ebro Margin to analyse the morphology and morphometry of a sequence of submarine valleys ordered in terms of increasing valley thalweg length. The morphological model of submarine valley evolution that we can propose from this analysis is very similar to established models in the literature, which leads us to conclude that time can be substituted by space when reconstructing the evolution of submarine canyon and channel systems in the south Ebro Margin. By extracting morphometric information from the application of the space-for-time substitution model to our data, we identify a series of morphological patterns as a submarine canyon evolves in a passive progradational margin. These include the geometric similarity of canyon planform shape, an increase in canyon draining efficiency and in the influence of flank slope failures, and an evolution towards equilibrium between canyon form and imposed water and sediment load without net erosion or deposition taking place. We also observe that canyon elongation is higher downslope and that the canyon undergoes an early stage of rapid incision similar to the process of "erosion narrowing" reported in terrestrial rivers. We demonstrate that the conclusions of our study are not limited to submarine valleys in the south Ebro Margin but are applicable to other margins around the world.

  11. Refinement of the Spitzer Space Telescope Pointing History Based on Image Registration Corrections from Multiple Data Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCallon, Howard L.; Fowler, John W.; Laher, Russ R.; Masci, Frank J.; Moshir, Mehrdad

    2007-11-01

    Position reconstruction for images acquired by the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), one of the science instruments onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, is a multistep procedure that is part of the routine processing done at the Spitzer Science Center (SSC). The IRAC instrument simultaneously images two different sky footprints, each with two independent infrared passbands (channels). The accuracy of the initial Spitzer pointing reconstruction is typically slightly better than 1". The well-known technique of position matching imaged point sources to even more accurate star catalogs to refine the pointing further is implemented for SSC processing of IRAC data as well. Beyond that, the optimal processing of redundant pointing information from multiple instrument channels to yield an even better solution is also performed at the SSC. Our multichannel data processing approach is particularly beneficial when the star-catalog matches are sparse in one channel but copious in others. A thorough review of the algorithm as implemented for the Spitzer mission reveals that the mathematical formalism can be fairly easily generalized for application to other astronomy missions. The computation of pointing uncertainties, the interpolation of pointing corrections and their uncertainties between measurements, and the estimation of random-walk deviations from linearity are special areas of importance when implementing the method. After performing the operations described in this paper on the initial Spitzer pointing, the uncertainty in the observatory pointing history file is reduced 10-15 fold.

  12. Space-time trellis coding with transmit laser selection for FSO links over strong atmospheric turbulence channels.

    PubMed

    García-Zambrana, Antonio; Castillo-Vázquez, Carmen; Castillo-Vázquez, Beatriz

    2010-03-15

    Atmospheric turbulence produces fluctuations in the irradiance of the transmitted optical beam, which is known as atmospheric scintillation, severely degrading the link performance. In this paper, a scheme combining transmit laser selection (TLS) and space-time trellis code (STTC) for multiple-input-single-output (MISO) free-space optical (FSO) communication systems with intensity modulation and direct detection (IM/DD) over strong atmospheric turbulence channels is analyzed. Assuming channel state information at the transmitter and receiver, we propose the transmit diversity technique based on the selection of two out of the available L lasers corresponding to the optical paths with greater values of scintillation to transmit the baseline STTCs designed for two transmit antennas. Based on a pairwise error probability (PEP) analysis, results in terms of bit error rate are presented when the scintillation follows negative exponential and K distributions, which cover a wide range of strong atmospheric turbulence conditions. Obtained results show a diversity order of 2L-1 when L transmit lasers are available and a simple two-state STTC with rate 1 bit/(s .Hz) is used. Simulation results are further demonstrated to confirm the analytical results.

  13. Design space exploration of high throughput finite field multipliers for channel coding on Xilinx FPGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Schryver, C.; Weithoffer, S.; Wasenmüller, U.; Wehn, N.

    2012-09-01

    Channel coding is a standard technique in all wireless communication systems. In addition to the typically employed methods like convolutional coding, turbo coding or low density parity check (LDPC) coding, algebraic codes are used in many cases. For example, outer BCH coding is applied in the DVB-S2 standard for satellite TV broadcasting. A key operation for BCH and the related Reed-Solomon codes are multiplications in finite fields (Galois Fields), where extension fields of prime fields are used. A lot of architectures for multiplications in finite fields have been published over the last decades. This paper examines four different multiplier architectures in detail that offer the potential for very high throughputs. We investigate the implementation performance of these multipliers on FPGA technology in the context of channel coding. We study the efficiency of the multipliers with respect to area, frequency and throughput, as well as configurability and scalability. The implementation data of the fully verified circuits are provided for a Xilinx Virtex-4 device after place and route.

  14. Channel characterization for air-to-ground free-space optical communication links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shortt, Kevin; Giggenbach, Dirk; Mata-Calvo, Ramon; Moll, Florian; Fuchs, Christian; Schmidt, Christopher; Horwath, Joachim; Yeh, Jack; Selvaraj, Vevek; Banerjee, Ranjoy

    2014-03-01

    The next five to ten years will see more and more free-space optical communication systems being put into practical use as technologies and techniques continue to mature, particularly in the area of mobile and satellite-to-ground communications. To meet the increasing demand of these types of systems, it is necessary to gain a deeper understanding of the various atmospheric effects at play in a free-space optical link in an effort to mitigate their impact on operational systems. In that context, the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has conducted a number of field trials between a Dornier 228 aircraft and its ground station in Oberpfaffenhofen, just south of Munich, Germany. These field trials have involved the concurrent measurement of atmospheric turbulence using three different techniques: pupil plane imaging, focus spot imaging and Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensing. To ensure the accurate synchronization of measurements between the three techniques, a concerted effort was made in the selection of computer hardware and the development of image acquisition software. Furthermore, power measurements in up- and downlink have been taken to be further correlated with the 3 primary instruments. It is envisioned that the resulting analysis of these measurements shall contribute to the implementation of new adaptive optics techniques to facilitate various air and space communication links. This paper shall describe the overall experiment design as well as some of the design decisions that led to the final experiment configuration.

  15. Analysis of effective capacity for free-space optical communication systems over gamma-gamma turbulence channels with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, You-quan; Chi, Xue-fen; Shi, Jia-lin; Zhao, Lin-lin

    2015-05-01

    To facilitate the efficient support of quality-of-service (QoS) for promising free-space optical (FSO) communication systems, it is essential to model and analyze FSO channels in terms of delay QoS. However, most existing works focus on the average capacity and outage capacity for FSO, which are not enough to characterize the effective transmission data rate when delay-sensitive service is applied. In this paper, the effective capacity of FSO communication systems under statistical QoS provisioning constraints is investigated to meet heterogeneous traffic demands. A novel closed-form expression for effective capacity is derived under the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence conditions, pointing errors, beam widths, detector sizes and QoS exponents. The obtained results reveal the effects of some significant parameters on effective capacity, which can be used for the design of FSO systems carrying a wide range of services with diverse QoS requirements.

  16. MIMO free-space optical communication employing coherent BPOLSK modulation in atmospheric optical turbulence channel with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabu, K.; Kumar, D. Sriram

    2015-05-01

    An optical wireless communication system is an alternative to radio frequency communication, but atmospheric turbulence induced fading and misalignment fading are the main impairments affecting an optical signal when propagating through the turbulence channel. The resultant of misalignment fading is the pointing errors, it degrades the bit error rate (BER) performance of the free space optics (FSO) system. In this paper, we study the BER performance of the multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) FSO system employing coherent binary polarization shift keying (BPOLSK) in gamma-gamma (G-G) channel with pointing errors. The BER performance of the BPOLSK based MIMO FSO system is compared with the single-input single-output (SISO) system. Also, the average BER performance of the systems is analyzed and compared with and without pointing errors. A novel closed form expressions of BER are derived for MIMO FSO system with maximal ratio combining (MRC) and equal gain combining (EGC) diversity techniques. The analytical results show that the pointing errors can severely degrade the performance of the system.

  17. Unsolved problems: Mesoscale polar cap flow channels' structure, propagation, and effects on space weather disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Nishimura, Y.; Zou, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the magnetosphere-ionosphere system is frequently driven by dynamic mesoscale flow structures that are first seen near the dayside cusps, move across the open field line regions of the polar caps, and then enter the plasma sheet where they lead to a large variety of space weather disturbances. It will be important to uncover the features of these flow enhancements, including their structure, how they propagate across the polar cap, and what controls their dynamic effects after reaching the nightside plasma sheet.

  18. Large eddy simulation study of spanwise spacing effects on secondary flows in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliakbarimiyanmahaleh, Mohammad; Anderson, William

    2015-11-01

    The structure of turbulent flow over a complex topography composed of streamwise-aligned rows of cones with varying spanwise spacing, s is studied with large-eddy simulation (LES). Similar to the experimental study of Vanderwel and Ganapathisubramani, 2015: J. Fluid Mech., we investigate the relationship between secondary flow and s, for 0 . 25 <= s / δ <= 5 . For cases with s / δ > 2 , domain-scale rollers freely exist. These had previously been called ``turbulent secondary flows'' (Willingham et al., 2014: Phys. Fluids; Barros and Christensen, 2014: J. Fluid Mech.; Anderson et al., 2015: J. Fluid Mech.), but closer inspection of the statistics indicates these are a turbulent tertiary flow: they only remain ``anchored'' to the conical roughness elements for s / δ > 2 . For s / δ < 2 , turbulent tertiary flows are prevented from occupying the domain by virtue of proximity to adjacent, counter-rotating tertiary flows. Turbulent secondary flows are associated with the conical roughness elements. These turbulent secondary flows emanate from individual conical topographic elements and set the roughness sublayer depth. The turbulent secondary flows remain intact for large and small spacing. For s / δ < 1 , a mean tertiary flow is not present. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Sci. Research, Young Inv. Program (PM: Dr. R. Ponnoppan and Ms. E. Montomery) under Grant # FA9550-14-1-0394. Computational resources were provided by the Texas Adv. Comp. Center at the Univ. of Texas.

  19. Average BER of subcarrier intensity modulated free space optical systems over the exponentiated Weibull fading channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Zhang, Lu; Guo, Lixin; Huang, Feng; Shang, Tao; Wang, Ranran; Yang, Yintang

    2014-08-25

    The average bit error rate (BER) for binary phase-shift keying (BPSK) modulation in free-space optical (FSO) links over turbulence atmosphere modeled by the exponentiated Weibull (EW) distribution is investigated in detail. The effects of aperture averaging on the average BERs for BPSK modulation under weak-to-strong turbulence conditions are studied. The average BERs of EW distribution are compared with Lognormal (LN) and Gamma-Gamma (GG) distributions in weak and strong turbulence atmosphere, respectively. The outage probability is also obtained for different turbulence strengths and receiver aperture sizes. The analytical results deduced by the generalized Gauss-Laguerre quadrature rule are verified by the Monte Carlo simulation. This work is helpful for the design of receivers for FSO communication systems.

  20. Performance analysis of wideband data and television channels. [space shuttle communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geist, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Several aspects are discussed of space shuttle communications, including the return link (shuttle-to-ground) relayed through a satellite repeater (TDRS). The repeater exhibits nonlinear amplification and an amplitude-dependent phase shift. Models were developed for various link configurations, and computer simulation programs based on these models are described. Certain analytical results on system performance were also obtained. For the system parameters assumed, the results indicate approximately 1 db degradation relative to a link employing a linear repeater. While this degradation is dependent upon the repeater, filter bandwidths, and modulation parameters used, the programs can accommodate changes to any of these quantities. Thus the programs can be applied to determine the performance with any given set of parameters, or used as an aid in link design.

  1. Polypeptide Transport-Associated Domains of the Toc75 Channel Protein Are Located in the Intermembrane Space of Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yih-Lin; Chen, Lih-Jen; Li, Hsou-Min

    2016-09-01

    Toc75 is the channel for protein translocation across the chloroplast outer envelope membrane. Toc75 belongs to the Omp85 protein family and consists of three N-terminal polypeptide transport-associated (POTRA) domains that are essential for the functions of Toc75, followed by a membrane-spanning β-barrel domain. In bacteria, POTRA domains of Omp85 family members are located in the periplasm, where they interact with other partner proteins to accomplish protein secretion and outer membrane protein assembly. However, the orientation and therefore the molecular function of chloroplast Toc75 POTRA domains remain a matter of debate. We investigated the topology of Toc75 using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and immunogold electron microscopy. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses showed that in stably transformed plants, Toc75 N terminus is located on the intermembrane space side, not the cytosolic side, of the outer membrane. Immunogold labeling of endogenous Toc75 POTRA domains in pea (Pisum sativum) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) confirmed that POTRA domains are located in the intermembrane space of the chloroplast envelope. PMID:27388682

  2. Growing White Dwarfs to the Chandrasekhar Limit: The Parameter Space of the Single Degenerate SNIa Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Y.; Prialnik, D.; Kovetz, A.; Shara, M. M.

    2016-03-01

    Can a white dwarf (WD), accreting hydrogen-rich matter from a non-degenerate companion star, ever exceed the Chandrasekhar mass and explode as a SN Ia? We explore the range of accretion rates that allow a WD to secularly grow in mass, and derive limits on the accretion rate and on the initial mass that will allow it to reach 1.4M⊙—the Chandrasekhar mass. We follow the evolution through a long series of hydrogen flashes, during which a thick helium shell accumulates. This determines the effective helium mass accretion rate for long-term, self-consistent evolutionary runs with helium flashes. We find that net mass accumulation always occurs despite helium flashes. Although the amount of mass lost during the first few helium shell flashes is a significant fraction of that accumulated prior to the flash, that fraction decreases with repeated helium shell flashes. Eventually no mass is ejected at all during subsequent flashes. This unexpected result occurs because of continual heating of the WD interior by the helium shell flashes near its surface. The effect of heating is to lower the electron degeneracy throughout the WD, especially in the outer layers. This key result yields helium burning that is quasi-steady state, instead of explosive. We thus find a remarkably large parameter space within which long-term, self-consistent simulations show that a WD can grow in mass and reach the Chandrasekhar limit, despite its helium flashes.

  3. Adaptive selective relaying in cooperative free-space optical systems over atmospheric turbulence and misalignment fading channels.

    PubMed

    Boluda-Ruiz, Rubén; García-Zambrana, Antonio; Castillo-Vázquez, Carmen; Castillo-Vázquez, Beatriz

    2014-06-30

    In this paper, a novel adaptive cooperative protocol with multiple relays using detect-and-forward (DF) over atmospheric turbulence channels with pointing errors is proposed. The adaptive DF cooperative protocol here analyzed is based on the selection of the optical path, source-destination or different source-relay links, with a greater value of fading gain or irradiance, maintaining a high diversity order. Closed-form asymptotic bit error-rate (BER) expressions are obtained for a cooperative free-space optical (FSO) communication system with Nr relays, when the irradiance of the transmitted optical beam is susceptible to either a wide range of turbulence conditions, following a gamma-gamma distribution of parameters α and β, or pointing errors, following a misalignment fading model where the effect of beam width, detector size and jitter variance is considered. A greater robustness for different link distances and pointing errors is corroborated by the obtained results if compared with similar cooperative schemes or equivalent multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems. Simulation results are further demonstrated to confirm the accuracy and usefulness of the derived results. PMID:24977911

  4. Adaptive selective relaying in cooperative free-space optical systems over atmospheric turbulence and misalignment fading channels.

    PubMed

    Boluda-Ruiz, Rubén; García-Zambrana, Antonio; Castillo-Vázquez, Carmen; Castillo-Vázquez, Beatriz

    2014-06-30

    In this paper, a novel adaptive cooperative protocol with multiple relays using detect-and-forward (DF) over atmospheric turbulence channels with pointing errors is proposed. The adaptive DF cooperative protocol here analyzed is based on the selection of the optical path, source-destination or different source-relay links, with a greater value of fading gain or irradiance, maintaining a high diversity order. Closed-form asymptotic bit error-rate (BER) expressions are obtained for a cooperative free-space optical (FSO) communication system with Nr relays, when the irradiance of the transmitted optical beam is susceptible to either a wide range of turbulence conditions, following a gamma-gamma distribution of parameters α and β, or pointing errors, following a misalignment fading model where the effect of beam width, detector size and jitter variance is considered. A greater robustness for different link distances and pointing errors is corroborated by the obtained results if compared with similar cooperative schemes or equivalent multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems. Simulation results are further demonstrated to confirm the accuracy and usefulness of the derived results.

  5. Double quadriphase modulation/demodulation technique for three-channel communication link. [Space Shuttle-to-TDRS link example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alem, W. K.

    1977-01-01

    A modulation technique for a three-channel communication link is introduced. The structure of the modulator is such as to form an unbalanced quadriphase signal wherein the high rate data stream is bi-phase modulated on the in-phase carrier component, while the sum of the two lower rate signals is bi-phase modulated on the quadrature component of the same carrier. The sum of the two lower signals is, in turn, formed by modulating with the respective data streams the in-phase and the quadrature components of a square wave subcarrier. At the demodulator, the tracking of the carrier and the subcarrier is performed by two independent Costas loops. The demodulation of the high data rate signal is carried out after establishing the carrier reference signal, while the lower rate signals are demodulated after the subcarrier loop recovers the subcarrier. In this paper, the performance of the two loops is analyzed and the expressions for the tracking errors are derived. Finally, a numerical example pertaining to the Space Shuttle-to-TDRS Ku-band link is presented for illustration.

  6. Performance analysis of relay-aided free-space optical communication system over gamma-gamma fading channels with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hui-hua; Wang, Ping; Wang, Ran-ran; Liu, Xiao-xia; Guo, Li-xin; Yang, Yin-tang

    2016-07-01

    The average bit error rate ( ABER) performance of a decode-and-forward (DF) based relay-assisted free-space optical (FSO) communication system over gamma-gamma distribution channels considering the pointing errors is studied. With the help of Meijer's G-function, the probability density function (PDF) and cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the aggregated channel model are derived on the basis of the best path selection scheme. The analytical ABER expression is achieved and the system performance is then investigated with the influence of pointing errors, turbulence strengths and structure parameters. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is also provided to confirm the analytical ABER expression.

  7. Hot-electron real-space transfer and longitudinal transport in dual AlGaN/AlN/{AlGaN/GaN} channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šermukšnis, E.; Liberis, J.; Matulionis, A.; Avrutin, V.; Ferreyra, R.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.

    2015-03-01

    Real-space transfer of hot electrons is studied in dual-channel GaN-based heterostructure operated at or near plasmon-optical phonon resonance in order to attain a high electron drift velocity at high current densities. For this study, pulsed electric field is applied in the channel plane of a nominally undoped Al0.3Ga0.7N/AlN/{Al0.15Ga0.85N/GaN} structure with a composite channel of Al0.15Ga0.85N/GaN, where the electrons with a sheet density of 1.4 × 1013 cm-2, estimated from the Hall effect measurements, are confined. The equilibrium electrons are situated predominantly in the Al0.15Ga0.85N layer as confirmed by capacitance-voltage experiment and Schrödinger-Poisson modelling. The main peak of the electron density per unit volume decreases as more electrons occupy the GaN layer at high electric fields. The associated decrease in the plasma frequency induces the plasmon-assisted decay of non-equilibrium optical phonons (hot phonons) confirmed by the decrease in the measured hot-phonon lifetime from 0.95 ps at low electric fields down below 200 fs at fields of E \\gt 4 kV cm-1 as the plasmon-optical phonon resonance is approached. The onset of real-space transfer is resolved from microwave noise measurements: this source of noise dominates for E \\gt 8 kV cm-1. In this range of fields, the longitudinal current exceeds the values measured for a mono channel reference Al0.3Ga0.7N/AlN/GaN structure. The results are explained in terms of the ultrafast decay of hot phonons and reduced alloy scattering caused by the real-space transfer in the composite channel.

  8. Comparison of rate one-half, equivalent constraint length 24, binary convolutional codes for use with sequential decoding on the deep-space channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Virtually all previously-suggested rate 1/2 binary convolutional codes with KE = 24 are compared. Their distance properties are given; and their performance, both in computation and in error probability, with sequential decoding on the deep-space channel is determined by simulation. Recommendations are made both for the choice of a specific KE = 24 code as well as for codes to be included in future coding standards for the deep-space channel. A new result given in this report is a method for determining the statistical significance of error probability data when the error probability is so small that it is not feasible to perform enough decoding simulations to obtain more than a very small number of decoding errors.

  9. Rapid, single-molecule assays in nano/micro-fluidic chips with arrays of closely spaced parallel channels fabricated by femtosecond laser machining.

    PubMed

    Canfield, Brian K; King, Jason K; Robinson, William N; Hofmeister, William H; Davis, Lloyd M

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective pharmaceutical drug discovery depends on increasing assay throughput while reducing reagent needs. To this end, we are developing an ultrasensitive, fluorescence-based platform that incorporates a nano/micro-fluidic chip with an array of closely spaced channels for parallelized optical readout of single-molecule assays. Here we describe the use of direct femtosecond laser machining to fabricate several hundred closely spaced channels on the surfaces of fused silica substrates. The channels are sealed by bonding to a microscope cover slip spin-coated with a thin film of poly(dimethylsiloxane). Single-molecule detection experiments are conducted using a custom-built, wide-field microscope. The array of channels is epi-illuminated by a line-generating red diode laser, resulting in a line focus just a few microns thick across a 500 micron field of view. A dilute aqueous solution of fluorescently labeled biomolecules is loaded into the device and fluorescence is detected with an electron-multiplying CCD camera, allowing acquisition rates up to 7 kHz for each microchannel. Matched digital filtering based on experimental parameters is used to perform an initial, rapid assessment of detected fluorescence. More detailed analysis is obtained through fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Simulated fluorescence data is shown to agree well with experimental values. PMID:25140634

  10. Rapid, single-molecule assays in nano/micro-fluidic chips with arrays of closely spaced parallel channels fabricated by femtosecond laser machining.

    PubMed

    Canfield, Brian K; King, Jason K; Robinson, William N; Hofmeister, William H; Davis, Lloyd M

    2014-08-20

    Cost-effective pharmaceutical drug discovery depends on increasing assay throughput while reducing reagent needs. To this end, we are developing an ultrasensitive, fluorescence-based platform that incorporates a nano/micro-fluidic chip with an array of closely spaced channels for parallelized optical readout of single-molecule assays. Here we describe the use of direct femtosecond laser machining to fabricate several hundred closely spaced channels on the surfaces of fused silica substrates. The channels are sealed by bonding to a microscope cover slip spin-coated with a thin film of poly(dimethylsiloxane). Single-molecule detection experiments are conducted using a custom-built, wide-field microscope. The array of channels is epi-illuminated by a line-generating red diode laser, resulting in a line focus just a few microns thick across a 500 micron field of view. A dilute aqueous solution of fluorescently labeled biomolecules is loaded into the device and fluorescence is detected with an electron-multiplying CCD camera, allowing acquisition rates up to 7 kHz for each microchannel. Matched digital filtering based on experimental parameters is used to perform an initial, rapid assessment of detected fluorescence. More detailed analysis is obtained through fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Simulated fluorescence data is shown to agree well with experimental values.

  11. 80-Channel Multiplexer-Demultiplexer Module for DWDM Communications using Hybrid AWG -- Interleaver Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rablau, Corneliu; Bredthauer, Lance

    2007-10-01

    Aside from the more traditional data, voice and e-mail communications, new bandwidth intensive applications in the larger consumer markets, such as music, digital pictures and movies, have led to an explosive increase in the demand for transmission capacity for optical communications networks. This has resulted in a widespread deployment of Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) as a means of increasing the communications capacity by multiplexing and transmitting signals of different wavelengths (establishing multiple communication channels) through a single strand of fiber. We report on the design, assembly and characterization of a 50-GHz, 80-channel Mux-Demux module for DWDM systems. The module has been assembled from two commercially available 100 GHz, 40-channel Array Waveguide Grating (AWG) modules and a 50-GHz to 100-GHz interleaver. Relevant performance parameters such as insertion loss, channel uniformity, next-channel isolation (crosstalk) and integrated cross-talk are presented and discussed in contrast with the performance of other competing technologies such as Thin-Film-Filter-based Mux-Demux devices.

  12. Nano-Structured Mesoporous Silica Wires with Intra-Wire Lamellae via Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly in Space-Confined Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Michael Z.; Shi, Donglu; Blom, Douglas Allen

    2014-04-06

    Evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) of silica sol-gel ethanol-water solution mixtures with block-copolymer were studied inside uniform micro/nano channels. Nano-structured mesoporous silica wires, with various intra-wire self-assembly structures including lamellae, were prepared via EISA process but in space-confined channels with the diameter ranging from 50 nm to 200 nm. Membranes made of anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) and track-etched polycarbonate (EPC) were utilized as the arrays of space-confined channels (i.e., 50, 100, and 200-nm EPC and 200-nm AAO) for infiltration and drying of mixture solutions; these substrate membranes were submerged in mixture solutions consisting of a silica precursor, a structure-directing agent, ethanol, and water. After the substrate channels were filled with the solution under vacuum impregnation, the membrane was removed from the solution and dried in air. The silica precursor used was tetra-ethyl othosilicate (TEOS), and the structure-directing agent employed was triblock copolymer Pluronic-123 (P123). It was found that the formation of the mesoporous nanostructures in silica wires within uniform channels were significantly affected by the synthesis conditions including (1) pre-assemble TEOS aging time, (2) the evaporation rate during the vacuum impregnation, and (3) the air-dry temperature. The obtained intra-wire structures, including 2D-hexagonal rods and lamellae, were studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A steric hindrance effect seems to explain well the observed polymer-silica mesophase formation tailored by TEOS aging time. The evaporation effect, air-drying effect, and AAO-vs-EPC substrate effect on the mesoporous structure of the formed silica wires were also presented and discussed.

  13. Channel-reuse bidirectional transmission at 10 Gb/s/λ in long-reach DWDM-PON employing self wavelength managed tunable laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Wang, Jiahe; Jiang, Xu; Chen, Xue; Wang, Liqian

    2015-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a channel-reuse, bidirectional, 10 Gb/s/λ, long-reach dense wavelength-division-multiplexing passive optical network (DWDM-PON) and an optical beat noise-based automatic wavelength control method for a tunable laser used in a colorless optical network unit (ONU). A 42 km reach, channel-reuse, full-duplex, 10 Gb/s transmission on a 50 GHz DWDM grid is achieved. Transmission performance is also measured with different optical-signal-to-Rayleigh-backscattering-noise ratios (OSRBNRs) and different central wavelength shifts (WSs) between upstream signal and downstream signal in the channel-reuse system.

  14. Development of high-performance cooling devices for space application by using flow boiling in narrow channels.

    PubMed

    Miura, Shinichi; Inada, Yukihiro; Shinmoto, Yasuhisa; Ohta, Haruhiko

    2009-04-01

    Heat generation density from semiconductor devices has been increasing with the rapid development of electronic technology. The cooling system using boiling two-phase phenomena has attracted much attention because of its high heat removal potential. To develop compact and high-performance cooling systems, we conducted experiments on the increase of critical heat flux (CHF) for flow boiling in narrow channels by improved liquid supply. A large surface of 150 mm in heated length and 30 mm in width with grooves of an apex angle of 90 degrees , 0.5-mm depth, and 1 mm in pitch was employed. A structure of narrow heated channel between parallel plates with an unheated auxiliary channel was devised and tested by using water for different combinations of gap sizes and volumetric flow rates, where inlet of the main heated channel and the outlet of auxiliary unheated channel were closed to prevent the flow instability observed frequently at low flow rate for parallel two channels. For the total volumetric flow rate more than 4.5 x 10(-5) m(3)/s, higher values of CHF large than 2 x 10(6) W/m(2) were obtained for gap size of 2 mm. For gap sizes of 2 mm and 5 mm at high volumetric flow rate larger than 6.0 x 10(-5) m(3)/s, or mass velocity based on the cross section are of main heated channel 958.1 kg/m(2)s and 383.2 kg/m(2) s, respectively, the extension of dry patches was observed at the upstream location of the main heated channel resulting in burnout not at the downstream but at the upstream. By the increase in total volumetric flow rate, the pressure drop increased because of increasing in the flow rate passing through the sintered metal porous plates connecting both channels. The values of pressure drop for gap size of 2 mm were higher than that for gap size of 5 mm. When the performance of the cooling system was evaluated on the basis of pump power, ignoring its variation in the efficiency with volumetric flow rate, that is, the power defined as the product of the

  15. Sub-Nyquist field trial using time frequency packed DP-QPSK super-channel within fixed ITU-T grid.

    PubMed

    Potì, L; Meloni, G; Berrettini, G; Fresi, F; Foggi, T; Secondini, M; Giorgi, L; Cavaliere, F; Hackett, S; Petronio, A; Nibbs, P; Forgan, R; Leong, A; Masciulli, R; Pfander, C

    2015-06-15

    Sub-Nyquist time frequency packing technique was demonstrated for the first time in a super-channel field trial transmission over long-haul distances. The technique allows a limited spectral occupancy even with low order modulation formats. The transmission was successfully performed on a deployed Australian link between Sydney and Melbourne which included 995 km of uncompensated SMF with coexistent traffic. 40 and 100 Gb/s co-propagating channels were transmitted together with the super-channel in a 50 GHz ITU-T grid without additional penalty. The super-channel consisted of eight sub-channels with low-level modulation format, i.e. DP-QPSK, guaranteeing better OSNR robustness and reduced complexity with respect to higher order formats. At the receiver side, coherent detection was used together with iterative maximum-a-posteriori (MAP) detection and decoding. A 975 Gb/s DP-QPSK super-channel was successfully transmitted between Sydney and Melbourne within four 50GHz WSS channels (200 GHz). A maximum potential SE of 5.58 bit/s/Hz was achieved with an OSNR = 15.8 dB, comparable to the OSNR of the installed 100 Gb/s channels. The system reliability was proven through long term measurements. In addition, by closing the link in a loop back configuration, a potential SE∙d product of 9254 bit/s/Hz·km was achieved.

  16. On the quantum-channel capacity for orbital angular momentum-based free-space optical communications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yequn; Djordjevic, Ivan B; Gao, Xin

    2012-08-01

    Inspired by recent demonstrations of orbital angular momentum-(OAM)-based single-photon communications, we propose two quantum-channel models: (i) the multidimensional quantum-key distribution model and (ii) the quantum teleportation model. Both models employ operator-sum representation for Kraus operators derived from OAM eigenkets transition probabilities. These models are highly important for future development of quantum-error correction schemes to extend the transmission distance and improve date rates of OAM quantum communications. By using these models, we calculate corresponding quantum-channel capacities in the presence of atmospheric turbulence.

  17. On the quantum-channel capacity for orbital angular momentum-based free-space optical communications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yequn; Djordjevic, Ivan B; Gao, Xin

    2012-08-01

    Inspired by recent demonstrations of orbital angular momentum-(OAM)-based single-photon communications, we propose two quantum-channel models: (i) the multidimensional quantum-key distribution model and (ii) the quantum teleportation model. Both models employ operator-sum representation for Kraus operators derived from OAM eigenkets transition probabilities. These models are highly important for future development of quantum-error correction schemes to extend the transmission distance and improve date rates of OAM quantum communications. By using these models, we calculate corresponding quantum-channel capacities in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. PMID:22859154

  18. An Eight-Channel 400 GHz-Spacing Etched Diffraction Grating Multi/Demultiplexer on a Nanophotonic Silicon-on-Insulator Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ao; Qiu, Chen; Hu, Ting; Xu, Chao; Jiang, Xiao-Qing; Li, Yu-Bo; Yang, Jian-Yi

    2013-08-01

    An eight-channel 400 GHz-spacing planar waveguide multi/demultiplexer employing etched diffraction grating is designed and fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator platform with a 220 nm thick top layer. The design parameters are optimized by scalar diffraction simulation to obtain optimal performance with a small footprint of only 0.75 mm2. A bi-level adiabatic taper is used to connect the input/output waveguide and the slab waveguide so as to reduce the insertion loss and the broadening of the diffraction angle of the propagating light. The device is fabricated in a two-step process with E-beam lithography and dry etching, and the alignment accuracy is 10 nm or even better. Measurements show that the insertion loss is 7.35 dB and the crosstalk between adjacent channels is about -15 dB. Ways to improve the performance are also investigated in detail.

  19. English Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The cloud covered earthscape of Northern Europe demonstrates the difficulty of photographing this elusive subject from space. The English Channel (51.0N, 1.5E) separating the British Islands from Europe is in the center of the scene. The white cliffs of Dover on the SE coast of the UK, the Thames River estuary and a partial view of the city of London can be seen on the north side of the Channel while the Normandy coast of France is to the south.

  20. Chip-interleaved optical code division multiple access relying on a photon-counting iterative successive interference canceller for free-space optical channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Zheng, Xiaowei; Zhang, Rong; Hanzo, Lajos

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we design a novel Poisson photon-counting based iterative successive interference cancellation (SIC) scheme for transmission over free-space optical (FSO) channels in the presence of both multiple access interference (MAI) as well as Gamma-Gamma atmospheric turbulence fading, shot-noise and background light. Our simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme exhibits a strong MAI suppression capability. Importantly, an order of magnitude of BER improvements may be achieved compared to the conventional chip-level optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) photon-counting detector.

  1. Optical reading of field-effect transistors by phase-space absorption quenching in a single InGaAs quantum well conducting channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemla, D. S.; Bar-Joseph, I.; Klingshirn, C.; Miller, D. A. B.; Kuo, J. M.

    1987-03-01

    Absorption switching in a semiconductor quantum well by electrically varying the charge density in the quantum well conducting channel of a selectively doped heterostructure transistor is reported for the first time. The phase-space absorption quenching (PAQ) is observed at room temperature in an InGaAs/InAlAs grown on InP FET, and it shows large absorption coefficient changes with relatively broad spectral bandwidth. This PAQ is large enough to be used for direct optical determination of the logic state of the FET.

  2. Four-Channel, 8 x 8 Bit, Two-Dimensional Parallel Transmission by use of Space-Code-Division Multiple-Access Encoder and Decoder Modules.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, M; Kitayama, K; Igasaki, Y; Kaneda, K

    1998-07-10

    We experimentally demonstrate four-channel multiplexing of 64-bit (8 x 8) two-dimensional (2-D) parallel data links on the basis of optical space-code-division multiple access (CDMA) by using new modules of optical spatial encoders and a decoder with a new high-contrast 9-m-long image fiber with 3 x 10(4) cores. Each 8 x 8 bit plane (64-bit parallel data) is optically encoded with an 8 x 8, 2-D optical orthogonal signature pattern. The encoded bit planes are spatially multiplexed and transmitted through an image fiber. A receiver can recover the intended input bit plane by means of an optical decoding process. This result should encourage the application of optical space-CDMA to future high-throughput 2-D parallel data links connecting massively parallel processors.

  3. Effect of radiation and magnetic field on peristaltic transport of nanofluids through a porous space in a tapered asymmetric channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothandapani, M.; Prakash, J.

    2015-03-01

    Theoretical analyses on the effect of radiation and MHD on the peristaltic flow of a nanofluid through a porous medium in a two dimensional tapered asymmetric channel has been made. The nanofluid is assumed to be electrically conducting in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. The transport equation accounts the both Brownian motion and thermophoresis along with the radiation reaction. The problem has been further simplified with the authentic assumptions of long wavelength and small Reynolds number. The analytical expressions obtained for the axial velocity, stream function, temperature field, nanoparticle fraction field and pressure gradient provide satisfactory explanation. Influence of various parameters on the flow characteristics have been discussed with the help of graphical results. The trapping phenomenon has also been discussed in detail.

  4. Biogenesis of the protein import channel Tom40 of the mitochondrial outer membrane: intermembrane space components are involved in an early stage of the assembly pathway.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Nils; Truscott, Kaye N; Pfannschmidt, Sylvia; Guiard, Bernard; Meisinger, Chris; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2004-04-30

    Tom40 forms the central channel of the preprotein translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM complex). The precursor of Tom40 is encoded in the nucleus, synthesized in the cytosol, and imported into mitochondria via a multi-step assembly pathway that involves the mature TOM complex and the sorting and assembly machinery of the outer membrane (SAM complex). We report that opening of the mitochondrial intermembrane space by swelling blocks the assembly pathway of the beta-barrel protein Tom40. Mitochondria with defects in small Tim proteins of the intermembrane space are impaired in the Tom40 assembly pathway. Swelling as well as defects in the small Tim proteins inhibit an early stage of the Tom40 import pathway that is needed for formation of a Tom40-SAM intermediate. We propose that the biogenesis pathway of beta-barrel proteins of the outer mitochondrial membrane not only requires TOM and SAM components, but also involves components of the intermembrane space.

  5. Bit error rate analysis of free-space optical system with spatial diversity over strong atmospheric turbulence channel with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Prabu; Sriram Kumar, D.

    2014-12-01

    Free-space optical communication (FSO) is emerging as a captivating alternative to work out the hindrances in the connectivity problems. It can be used for transmitting signals over common lands and properties that the sender or receiver may not own. The performance of an FSO system depends on the random environmental conditions. The bit error rate (BER) performance of differential phase shift keying FSO system is investigated. A distributed strong atmospheric turbulence channel with pointing error is considered for the BER analysis. Here, the system models are developed for single-input, single-output-FSO (SISO-FSO) and single-input, multiple-output-FSO (SIMO-FSO) systems. The closed-form mathematical expressions are derived for the average BER with various combining schemes in terms of the Meijer's G function.

  6. Outage performance of multihop free-space optical communication system over exponentiated Weibull fading channels with nonzero boresight pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-xia; Wang, Ping; Cao, Tian

    2016-09-01

    The outage performance of the multihop free-space optical (FSO) communication system with decode-and-forward (DF) protocol is studied by considering the joint effects of nonzero boresight pointing errors and atmospheric turbulence modeled by exponentiated Weibull (EW) distribution. The closed-form analytical expression of outage probability is derived, and the results are validated through Monte Carlo simulation. Furthermore, the detailed analysis is provided to evaluate the impacts of turbulence strength, receiver aperture size, boresight displacement, beamwidth and number of relays on the outage performance for the studied system.

  7. Polypeptide Transport-Associated Domains of the Toc75 Channel Protein Are Located in the Intermembrane Space of Chloroplasts1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lih-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Toc75 is the channel for protein translocation across the chloroplast outer envelope membrane. Toc75 belongs to the Omp85 protein family and consists of three N-terminal polypeptide transport-associated (POTRA) domains that are essential for the functions of Toc75, followed by a membrane-spanning β-barrel domain. In bacteria, POTRA domains of Omp85 family members are located in the periplasm, where they interact with other partner proteins to accomplish protein secretion and outer membrane protein assembly. However, the orientation and therefore the molecular function of chloroplast Toc75 POTRA domains remain a matter of debate. We investigated the topology of Toc75 using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and immunogold electron microscopy. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses showed that in stably transformed plants, Toc75 N terminus is located on the intermembrane space side, not the cytosolic side, of the outer membrane. Immunogold labeling of endogenous Toc75 POTRA domains in pea (Pisum sativum) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) confirmed that POTRA domains are located in the intermembrane space of the chloroplast envelope. PMID:27388682

  8. The Atmospheric Channels of GLAS: Near Real-Time Global Lidar Remote Sensing of Clouds and Aerosols from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, Bill; Welton, E. Judd; Spinhirne, James

    2000-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) will be placed into orbit in 2001 aboard the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). From its nearly polar orbit (94 degree inclination), GLAS will provide continuous global measurements of the vertical distribution of clouds and aerosols while simultaneously providing high accuracy topographic profiling of surface features. During the mission, which is slated to last 3 to 5 years, the data collected by GLAS will be in near-real time to produce level 1 and 2 data products at the NASA GLAS Science Computing Facility (SCF) at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The atmospheric products include cloud and aerosol layer heights, planetary boundary layer depth, polar stratospheric clouds and thin cloud and aerosol optical depth. These products will be made available to the science community within days of their creation. The processing algorithms must be robust, adaptive, efficient, and clever enough to run autonomously for the widely varying atmospheric conditions that will be encountered. This paper presents an overview of the GLAS atmospheric data products and briefly discusses the design of the processing algorithms.

  9. Performance evaluation of receive-diversity free-space optical communications over correlated Gamma-Gamma fading channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guowei; Khalighi, Mohammad-Ali; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Bourennane, Salah

    2013-08-20

    The efficacy of spatial diversity in practical free-space optical communication systems is impaired by the fading correlation among the underlying subchannels. We consider in this paper the generation of correlated Gamma-Gamma random variables in view of evaluating the system outage probability and bit-error-rate under the condition of correlated fading. Considering the case of receive-diversity systems with intensity modulation and direct detection, we propose a set of criteria for setting the correlation coefficients on the small- and large-scale fading components based on scintillation theory. We verify these criteria using wave-optics simulations and further show through Monte Carlo simulations that we can effectively neglect the correlation corresponding to the small-scale turbulence in most practical systems, irrespective of the specific turbulence conditions. This has not been clarified before, to the best of our knowledge. We then present some numerical results to illustrate the effect of fading correlation on the system performance. Our conclusions can be generalized to the cases of multiple-beam and multiple-beam multiple-aperture systems.

  10. Discrete-state representation of ion permeation coupled to fast gating in a model of ClC chloride channels: comparison to multi-ion continuous space Brownian dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Coalson, Rob D; Cheng, Mary Hongying

    2010-01-28

    A discrete-state model of chloride ion motion in a ClC chloride channel is constructed, following a previously developed multi-ion continuous space model of the same system (Cheng, M. H.; Mamonov, A. B.; Dukes, J. W.; Coalson, R. D. J. Phys. Chem. B 2007, 111, 5956) that included a simplistic representation of the fast gate in this channel. The reducibility of the many-body continuous space to the eight discrete-state model considered in the present work is examined in detail by performing three-dimensional Brownian dynamics simulations of each allowed state-to-state transition in order to extract the appropriate rate constant for this process, and then inserting the pairwise rate constants thereby obtained into an appropriate set of kinetic master equations. Experimental properties of interest, including the rate of Cl(-) ion permeation through the open channel and the average rate of closing of the fast gate as a function of bulk Cl(-) ion concentrations in the intracellular and extracellular electrolyte reservoirs are computed. Good agreement is found between the results obtained via the eight discrete-state model versus the multi-ion continuous space model, thereby encouraging continued development of the discrete-state model to include more complex behaviors observed experimentally in these channels.

  11. Generalized channeled polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Alenin, Andrey S; Tyo, J Scott

    2014-05-01

    Channeled polarimeters measure polarization by modulating the measured intensity in order to create polarization-dependent channels that can be demodulated to reveal the desired polarization information. A number of channeled systems have been described in the past, but their proposed designs often unintentionally sacrifice optimality for ease of algebraic reconstruction. To obtain more optimal systems, a generalized treatment of channeled polarimeters is required. This paper describes methods that enable handling of multi-domain modulations and reconstruction of polarization information using linear algebra. We make practical choices regarding use of either Fourier or direct channels to make these methods more immediately useful. Employing the introduced concepts to optimize existing systems often results in superficial system changes, like changing the order, orientation, thickness, or spacing of polarization elements. For the two examples we consider, we were able to reduce noise in the reconstruction to 34.1% and 57.9% of the original design values. PMID:24979633

  12. Channel Identification Machines

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Aurel A.; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B.

    2012-01-01

    We present a formal methodology for identifying a channel in a system consisting of a communication channel in cascade with an asynchronous sampler. The channel is modeled as a multidimensional filter, while models of asynchronous samplers are taken from neuroscience and communications and include integrate-and-fire neurons, asynchronous sigma/delta modulators and general oscillators in cascade with zero-crossing detectors. We devise channel identification algorithms that recover a projection of the filter(s) onto a space of input signals loss-free for both scalar and vector-valued test signals. The test signals are modeled as elements of a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) with a Dirichlet kernel. Under appropriate limiting conditions on the bandwidth and the order of the test signal space, the filter projection converges to the impulse response of the filter. We show that our results hold for a wide class of RKHSs, including the space of finite-energy bandlimited signals. We also extend our channel identification results to noisy circuits. PMID:23227035

  13. Optical Communications Channel Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Quirk, Kevin J.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    NASA has identified deep-space optical communications links as an integral part of a unified space communication network in order to provide data rates in excess of 100 Mb/s. The distances and limited power inherent in a deep-space optical downlink necessitate the use of photon-counting detectors and a power-efficient modulation such as pulse position modulation (PPM). For the output of each photodetector, whether from a separate telescope or a portion of the detection area, a communication receiver estimates a log-likelihood ratio for each PPM slot. To realize the full effective aperture of these receivers, their outputs must be combined prior to information decoding. A channel combiner was developed to synchronize the log-likelihood ratio (LLR) sequences of multiple receivers, and then combines these into a single LLR sequence for information decoding. The channel combiner synchronizes the LLR sequences of up to three receivers and then combines these into a single LLR sequence for output. The channel combiner has three channel inputs, each of which takes as input a sequence of four-bit LLRs for each PPM slot in a codeword via a XAUI 10 Gb/s quad optical fiber interface. The cross-correlation between the channels LLR time series are calculated and used to synchronize the sequences prior to combining. The output of the channel combiner is a sequence of four-bit LLRs for each PPM slot in a codeword via a XAUI 10 Gb/s quad optical fiber interface. The unit is controlled through a 1 Gb/s Ethernet UDP/IP interface. A deep-space optical communication link has not yet been demonstrated. This ground-station channel combiner was developed to demonstrate this capability and is unique in its ability to process such a signal.

  14. Space America's commercial space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macleod, N. H.

    1984-01-01

    Space America prepared a private sector land observing space system which includes a sensor system with eight spectral channels configured for stereoscopic data acquisition of four stereo pairs, a spacecraft bus with active three-axis stabilization, a ground station for data acquisition, preprocessing and retransmission. The land observing system is a component of Space America's end-to-end system for Earth resources management, monitoring and exploration. In the context of the Federal Government's program of commercialization of the US land remote sensing program, Space America's space system is characteristic of US industry's use of advanced technology and of commercial, entrepreneurial management. Well before the issuance of the Request for Proposals for Transfer of the United States Land Remote Sensing Program to the Private Sector by the US Department of Commerce, Space Services, Inc., the managing venturer of Space America, used private funds to develop and manage its sub-orbital launch of its Conestoga launch vehicle.

  15. Characterization of the Twelve Channel 100/140 Micron Optical Fiber, Ribbon Cable and MTP Array Connector Assembly for Space Flight Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Macmurphy, Shawn; Friedberg, Patricia; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Presented here is the second set of testing conducted by the Technology Validation Laboratory for Photonics at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on the 12 optical fiber ribbon cable with MTP array connector for space flight environments. In the first set of testing the commercial 62.5/125 cable assembly was characterized using space flight parameters. The testing showed that the cable assembly would survive a typical space flight mission with the exception of a vacuum environment. Two enhancements were conducted to the existing technology to better suit the vacuum environment as well as the existing optoelectronics and increase the reliability of the assembly during vibration. The MTP assembly characterized here has a 100/140 optical commercial fiber and non outgassing connector and cable components. The characterization for this enhanced fiber optic cable assembly involved vibration, thermal and radiation testing. The data and results of this characterization study are presented which include optical in-situ testing.

  16. TRP Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voets, Thomas; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Nilius, Bernd

    The TRP superfamily represents a highly diverse group of cation-permeable ion channels related to the product of the Drosophila trp (transient receptor potential) gene. The cloning and characterization of members of this cation channel family has experienced a remarkable growth during the last decade, uncovering a wealth of information concerning the role of TRP channels in a variety of cell types, tissues, and species. Initially, TRP channels were mainly considered as phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent and/or store-operated Ca2+-permeable cation channels. More recent research has highlighted the sensitivity of TRP channels to a broad array of chemical and physical stimuli, allowing them to function as dedicated biological sensors involved in processes ranging from vision to taste, tactile sensation, and hearing. Moreover, the tailored selectivity of certain TRP channels enables them to play key roles in the cellular uptake and/or transepithelial transport of Ca2+, Mg2+, and trace metal ions. In this chapter we give a brief overview of the TRP channel superfamily followed by a survey of current knowledge concerning their structure and activation mechanisms.

  17. Flag flapping in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alben, Silas; Shoele, Kourosh; Mittal, Rajat; Jha, Sourabh; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    We study the flapping of a flag in an inviscid channel flow. We focus especially on how quantities vary with channel spacing. As the channel walls move inwards towards the flag, heavier flags become more unstable, while light flags' stability is less affected. We use a vortex sheet model to compute large-amplitude flapping, and find that the flag undergoes a series of jumps to higher flapping modes as the channel walls are moved towards the flag. Meanwhile, the drag on the flag and the energy lost to the wake first rise as the walls become closer, then drop sharply as the flag moves to a higher flapping mode.

  18. Preliminary optical design of a varied line-space spectrograph for the multi-channel detection of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra in the 280-550 eV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, B.S.; McKinney, W.R.; Hussain, Z.; Padmore, H.

    1996-07-01

    The optical design of a varied line-space spectrograph for the multi-channel recording of NEXAFS spectra in a single {open_quotes}snapshot{close_quotes} is proposed. The spectrograph is to be used with a bending magnet source on beamline 7.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Approximately 20 volts of spectra are simultaneously imaged across a small square of material sample at each respective K absorption edge of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Photoelectrons emitted from the material sample will be collected by an electron imaging microscope, the view field of which determines the sampling size. The sample also forms the exit slit of the optical system. This dispersive method of NEXAFS data acquisition is three to four orders of magnitude faster than the conventional method of taking data point-to-point using scanning of the grating. The proposed design is presented along with the design method and supporting SHADOW raytrace analysis.

  19. Impact of nonzero boresight pointing errors on the performance of a relay-assisted free-space optical communication system over exponentiated Weibull fading channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Xiaoxia; Cao, Tian; Fu, Huihua; Wang, Ranran; Guo, Lixin

    2016-09-20

    The impact of nonzero boresight pointing errors on the system performance of decode-and-forward protocol-based multihop parallel optical wireless communication systems is studied. For the aggregated fading channel, the atmospheric turbulence is simulated by an exponentiated Weibull model, and pointing errors are described by one recently proposed statistical model including both boresight and jitter. The binary phase-shift keying subcarrier intensity modulation-based analytical average bit error rate (ABER) and outage probability expressions are achieved for a nonidentically and independently distributed system. The ABER and outage probability are then analyzed with different turbulence strengths, receiving aperture sizes, structure parameters (P and Q), jitter variances, and boresight displacements. The results show that aperture averaging offers almost the same system performance improvement with boresight included or not, despite the values of P and Q. The performance enhancement owing to the increase of cooperative path (P) is more evident with nonzero boresight than that with zero boresight (jitter only), whereas the performance deterioration because of the increasing hops (Q) with nonzero boresight is almost the same as that with zero boresight. Monte Carlo simulation is offered to verify the validity of ABER and outage probability expressions.

  20. Impact of nonzero boresight pointing errors on the performance of a relay-assisted free-space optical communication system over exponentiated Weibull fading channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Xiaoxia; Cao, Tian; Fu, Huihua; Wang, Ranran; Guo, Lixin

    2016-09-20

    The impact of nonzero boresight pointing errors on the system performance of decode-and-forward protocol-based multihop parallel optical wireless communication systems is studied. For the aggregated fading channel, the atmospheric turbulence is simulated by an exponentiated Weibull model, and pointing errors are described by one recently proposed statistical model including both boresight and jitter. The binary phase-shift keying subcarrier intensity modulation-based analytical average bit error rate (ABER) and outage probability expressions are achieved for a nonidentically and independently distributed system. The ABER and outage probability are then analyzed with different turbulence strengths, receiving aperture sizes, structure parameters (P and Q), jitter variances, and boresight displacements. The results show that aperture averaging offers almost the same system performance improvement with boresight included or not, despite the values of P and Q. The performance enhancement owing to the increase of cooperative path (P) is more evident with nonzero boresight than that with zero boresight (jitter only), whereas the performance deterioration because of the increasing hops (Q) with nonzero boresight is almost the same as that with zero boresight. Monte Carlo simulation is offered to verify the validity of ABER and outage probability expressions. PMID:27661587

  1. Thermosyphon boiling in vertical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, A.; Schweitzer, H.

    The thermal characteristics of ebullient cooling systems for VHSIC and VLSI microelectronic component thermal control are studied by experimentally and analytically investigating boiling heat transfer from a pair of flat, closely spaced, isoflux plates immersed in saturated water. A theoretical model for liquid flow rate through the channel is developed and used as a basis for correlating the rate of heat transfer from the channel walls. Experimental results for wall temperature as a function of axial location, heat flux, and plate spacing are presented. The finding that the wall superheat at constant imposed heat flux decreases as the channel is narrowed is explained with the aid of a boiling thermosiphon analysis which yields the mass flux through the channel.

  2. Performance of free-space optical communication system using differential phase-shift keying subcarrier-intensity modulated over the exponentiated Weibull channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhengguang; Liu, Hongzhan; Liao, Renbo; Ma, Xiaoping

    2015-10-01

    A differential phase-shift keying modulation for free-space optical (FSO) communication is considered in atmospheric turbulence modeled by the exponentiated Weibull distribution. The selection combining (SelC) spatial diversity is used to mitigate the effects of atmospheric turbulence. We analyze the average bit error rate (BER) of the system using SelC spatial diversity by Gauss-Laguerre approximation. The effect of aperture averaging and spatial diversity on the outage probability is also studied. The numerical results show that it requires a smaller level of signal-to-noise ratio to reach the same BER when large aperture and SelC spatial diversity are deployed in the FSO system. Moreover, it is proved that aperture averaging and SelC spatial diversity are effective for improving the performance of the system's outage probability.

  3. Study of a MHEMT heterostructure with an In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As channel MBE-grown on a GaAs substrate using reciprocal space mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Aleshin, A. N. Bugaev, A. S.; Ermakova, M. A.; Ruban, O. A.

    2015-08-15

    The crystallographic characteristics of the design elements of a metamorphic high-electron-mobility (MHEMT) heterostructure with an In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As channel are determined based on reciprocal space mapping. The heterostructure is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on the vicinal surface of a GaAs substrate with a deviation angle from the (001) plane of 2° and consists of a stepped metamorphic buffer containing six layers including an inverse step, a high-temperature buffer layer with constant composition, and active HEMT layers. The InAs content in the layers of the metamorphic buffer is varied from 0.1 to 0.48. Reciprocal space maps are constructed for the (004) symmetric reflection and (224)+ asymmetric reflection. It is found that the heterostructure layers are characterized both by a tilt angle relative to the plane of the (001) substrate and a rotation angle around the [001] axis. The tilt angle of the layer increases as the InAs concentration in the layer increases. It is shown that a high-temperature buffer layer of constant composition has the largest degree of relaxation compared with all other layers of the heterostructure.

  4. The alpha channeling effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  5. The channels of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Victor R.

    1988-01-01

    The geomorphology of Mars is discussed, focusing on the Martian channels. The great flood channels of Mars, the processes of channel erosion, and dendritic channel networks, are examined. The topography of the Channeled Scabland region of the northwestern U.S. is described and compared to the Martian channels. The importance of water in the evolution of the channel systems is considered.

  6. Nonlinear channelizer.

    PubMed

    In, Visarath; Longhini, Patrick; Kho, Andy; Neff, Joseph D; Leung, Daniel; Liu, Norman; Meadows, Brian K; Gordon, Frank; Bulsara, Adi R; Palacios, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The nonlinear channelizer is an integrated circuit made up of large parallel arrays of analog nonlinear oscillators, which, collectively, serve as a broad-spectrum analyzer with the ability to receive complex signals containing multiple frequencies and instantaneously lock-on or respond to a received signal in a few oscillation cycles. The concept is based on the generation of internal oscillations in coupled nonlinear systems that do not normally oscillate in the absence of coupling. In particular, the system consists of unidirectionally coupled bistable nonlinear elements, where the frequency and other dynamical characteristics of the emergent oscillations depend on the system's internal parameters and the received signal. These properties and characteristics are being employed to develop a system capable of locking onto any arbitrary input radio frequency signal. The system is efficient by eliminating the need for high-speed, high-accuracy analog-to-digital converters, and compact by making use of nonlinear coupled systems to act as a channelizer (frequency binning and channeling), a low noise amplifier, and a frequency down-converter in a single step which, in turn, will reduce the size, weight, power, and cost of the entire communication system. This paper covers the theory, numerical simulations, and some engineering details that validate the concept at the frequency band of 1-4 GHz.

  7. 5.0 GHz Continuum MERLIN Observations of the Type Ia SN 2013dy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Torres, M.; Argo, M.; Lundqvist, P.; Anderson, G.; Beswick, R.; Bjornsson, C. I.; Fender, R.; Rushton, A.; Ryder, S.; Staley, T.

    2013-12-01

    We report MERLIN radio observations of the Type Ia supernova 2013dy, which was discovered on 10.45 July 2013, shortly after its explosion, in the nearby (D=13.5 Mpc) galaxy NGC 7250 (cf. CBET #3588). Our observations were carried out during 4 - 6 August 2013, one week after the SN reached its B-band maximum (Zheng et al. 2013). The radio telescopes that participated in the observations included five eMERLIN antennas (Jodrell Mk2, Pickmere, Darnhall, Knockin, and Defford).

  8. Channeling through Bent Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Stephanie; /Ottawa U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07

    Bent crystals have demonstrated potential for use in beam collimation. A process called channeling is when accelerated particle beams are trapped by the nuclear potentials in the atomic planes within a crystal lattice. If the crystal is bent then the particles can follow the bending angle of the crystal. There are several different effects that are observed when particles travel through a bent crystal including dechanneling, volume capture, volume reflection and channeling. With a crystal placed at the edge of a particle beam, part of the fringe of the beam can be deflected away towards a detector or beam dump, thus helping collimate the beam. There is currently FORTRAN code by Igor Yazynin that has been used to model the passage of particles through a bent crystal. Using this code, the effects mentioned were explored for beam energy that would be seen at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at a range of crystal orientations with respect to the incoming beam. After propagating 5 meters in vacuum space past the crystal the channeled particles were observed to separate from most of the beam with some noise due to dechanneled particles. Progressively smaller bending radii, with corresponding shorter crystal lengths, were compared and it was seen that multiple scattering decreases with the length of the crystal therefore allowing for cleaner detection of the channeled particles. The input beam was then modified and only a portion of the beam sent through the crystal. With the majority of the beam not affected by the crystal, most particles were not deflected and after propagation the channeled particles were seen to be deflected approximately 5mm. After a portion of the beam travels through the crystal, the entire beam was then sent through a quadrupole magnet, which increased the separation of the channeled particles from the remainder of the beam to a distance of around 20mm. A different code, which was developed at SLAC, was used to

  9. Channeled spectropolarimetry using iterative reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dennis J.; LaCasse, Charles F.; Craven, Julia M.

    2016-05-01

    Channeled spectropolarimeters (CSP) measure the polarization state of light as a function of wavelength. Conventional Fourier reconstruction suffers from noise, assumes the channels are band-limited, and requires uniformly spaced samples. To address these problems, we propose an iterative reconstruction algorithm. We develop a mathematical model of CSP measurements and minimize a cost function based on this model. We simulate a measured spectrum using example Stokes parameters, from which we compare conventional Fourier reconstruction and iterative reconstruction. Importantly, our iterative approach can reconstruct signals that contain more bandwidth, an advancement over Fourier reconstruction. Our results also show that iterative reconstruction mitigates noise effects, processes non-uniformly spaced samples without interpolation, and more faithfully recovers the ground truth Stokes parameters. This work offers a significant improvement to Fourier reconstruction for channeled spectropolarimetry.

  10. THz-TDS Characterization of the Digital Communication Channels of the Atmosphere and the Enabled Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yihong; Mandehgar, Mahboubeh; Grischkowsky, D.

    2015-02-01

    Our measurements and complete linear dispersion theory calculations of amplitude and phase show that it is possible to have seven high performance point-to-point, 10.7 Gb/s to 28.4 Gb/s, digital THz ground links in the atmosphere. At a RH 58% (10g/m3) and 20 °C including O2 absorption, and for an absorption loss of 10 dB, the seven links are: Channel 1: at 96 GHz, Bandwidth (BW) 30 GHz, 10.7 Gb/s for 17.5 km, Channel 2: at 144 GHz, BW 30 GHz, 12.0 Gb/s for 7.4 km, Channel 3: at 252 GHz, BW 50 GHz, 25.2 Gb/s for 2.5 km, Channel 4: at 342 GHz, BW 24 GHz, 11.4 Gb/s for 840 m, Channel 5: at 408 GHz, BW 30 GHz, 13.6 Gb/s for 440 m, Channel 6: at 672 GHz, BW 60 GHz, 22.6 Gb/s for 140 m, and Channel 7: at 852 GHz, BW 60 GHz, 28.4 Gb/s for 120 m. The enabled long-path THz links are discussed. Two applications are presented in detail, namely, a long-path 17.5 km THz ground-link operating at 96 GHz, BW 30 GHz, 10.7 Gb/s, and a GEO satellite link at 252 GHz, BW 50 GHz, 25.2 Gb/s. In addition, Channel 7 at 852 GHz is studied by calculated pulse propagation to understand the relationships between high bit-rates and propagation distance. It is shown that good digital transmission could be obtained with 852 GHz, BW 108 GHz, 56.8 Gb/s for a 160 m propagation distance in the atmosphere with RH 58% (10g/m3) and 20 °C. Good digital transmission could also be obtained with 852 GHz, BW 108 GHz, 71.0 Gb/s for 80 m. These results are discussed with respect to high bit-rate, short-path applications. These digital THz communication channels were determined together with a new measurement of the water vapor continuum absorption from 0.35 to 1 THz. The THz pulses propagate though a 137 m long humidity-controlled chamber and are measured by THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The average relative humidity along the entire THz path is precisely obtained by measuring the difference between transit times of the sample and reference THz pulses to an accuracy of 0.1 ps. Using the measured

  11. Channels and Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 20 June 2003

    The dissected and eroded channel observed in this THEMIS image taken of plains materials southwest of the volcano Elysium Mons shows typical erosional islands and depositional features. The interesting thing about this channel is that it appears to start out of nowhere. The MOLA context image shows that the channel originates from a fissure within the ground, whose origin is likely volcanic, but may also be related to volatile processes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 19.5, Longitude 126.8 East (233.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Channel Wall Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Minio Vallis Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This VIS image is of the southern reach of Minio Vallis, a small fluvial channel located near the larger Mangala Vallis. Both channels are in the Tharsis region, in the area west of Arsia Mons and southeast of Medusae Fossae.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 208.1 East (151.9 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. Stochastic Wireless Channel Modeling, Estimation and Identification from Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Olama, Mohammed M; Djouadi, Seddik M; Li, Yanyan

    2008-07-01

    This paper is concerned with stochastic modeling of wireless fading channels, parameter estimation, and system identification from measurement data. Wireless channels are represented by stochastic state-space form, whose parameters and state variables are estimated using the expectation maximization algorithm and Kalman filtering, respectively. The latter are carried out solely from received signal measurements. These algorithms estimate the channel inphase and quadrature components and identify the channel parameters recursively. The proposed algorithm is tested using measurement data, and the results are presented.

  15. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager Polarimetric (GMI-P); 10 - 183 GHz with Polarimetric channels including digital and analog back-ends: Ardeshir Art Azarbarzin, Sergey Krimchansky Jeff Piepmeir NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarbarzin, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager Polarimetric (GMI-P) will be an instrument covering 10, 18, 23, 36, 89, 166 and 183 GHz with polarimetric channels on 10, 18 and 36 GHz channels. The GMI-P (or VWPIR) will have 13 analog channels and 12 digital channels. This instrument builds upon the success of GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) flying on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) launched in Feb 2014. And with GMI-P for the first time we can compare performance of digital and analog channels for 10, 18 and 36 channels. The GMI-P is recently renamed "Vector Wind Precipitation Imaging Radiometer (VWPIR). The instrument is a passive microwave with 1.2 m diameter reflector with 4-point hot/cold calibration capability in orbit. GMI-P (VWPIR) will provides measurements of precipitation intensity and distribution in addition to wind vector and speed. The Receivers, and multiple feedhorn tray rotate with the reflector at 32 RPM. The GMI-P will have capabilities as good as Windsat with added cyclone intensity and snow/ice measurement capability. This instrument will have a 2-Look capability (front and back) as well which will reduce uncertainty of reducing calibration accuracy further.

  16. Equalization in redundant channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulpule, Bhalchandra R. (Inventor); Collins, Robert E. (Inventor); Cominelli, Donald F. (Inventor); O'Neill, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A miscomparison between a channel's configuration data base and a voted system configuration data base in a redundant channel system having identically operating, frame synchronous channels triggers autoequalization of the channel's historical signal data bases in a hierarchical, chronological manner with that of a correctly operating channel. After equalization, symmetrization of the channel's configuration data base with that of the system permits upgrading of the previously degraded channel to full redundancy. An externally provided equalization command, e.g., manually actuated, can also trigger equalization.

  17. Channel nut tool

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Marvin

    2016-01-12

    A method, system, and apparatus for installing channel nuts includes a shank, a handle formed on a first end of a shank, and an end piece with a threaded shaft configured to receive a channel nut formed on the second end of the shaft. The tool can be used to insert or remove a channel nut in a channel framing system and then removed from the channel nut.

  18. Age of Martian channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.

    1976-01-01

    The ages of large Martian channels have been studied by determining the relative abundances of craters superimposed on channels and adjacent terrains and by examining superposition relationships between channels and plains and mantle materials. The channels are extremely old, are spatially confined and temporally related to the ancient cratered terrain, and in many cases are related to the as yet poorly understood genetic processes of fretting and chaos formation. No evidence is found for recent channel activity.

  19. Microfluidic channel fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Don W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    A new channel structure for microfluidic systems and process for fabricating this structure. In contrast to the conventional practice of fabricating fluid channels as trenches or grooves in a substrate, fluid channels are fabricated as thin walled raised structures on a substrate. Microfluidic devices produced in accordance with the invention are a hybrid assembly generally consisting of three layers: 1) a substrate that can or cannot be an electrical insulator; 2) a middle layer, that is an electrically conducting material and preferably silicon, forms the channel walls whose height defines the channel height, joined to and extending from the substrate; and 3) a top layer, joined to the top of the channels, that forms a cover for the channels. The channels can be defined by photolithographic techniques and are produced by etching away the material around the channel walls.

  20. Gramicidin Channels: Versatile Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Olaf S.; Koeppe, Roger E., II; Roux, Benoît

    Gramicidin channels are miniproteins in which two tryptophan-rich subunits associate by means of transbilayer dimerization to form the conducting channels. That is, in contrast to other ion channels, gramicidin channels do not open and close; they appear and disappear. Each subunit in the bilayer-spanning channel is tied to the bilayer/solution interface through hydrogen bonds that involve the indole NH groups as donors andwater or the phospholipid backbone as acceptors. The channel's permeability characteristics are well-defined: gramicidin channels are selective for monovalent cations, with no measurable permeability to anions or polyvalent cations; ions and water move through a pore whose wall is formed by the peptide backbone; and the single-channel conductance and cation selectivity vary when the amino acid sequence is varied, even though the permeating ions make no contact with the amino acid side chains. Given the plethora of available experimental information—for not only the wild-type channels but also for channels formed by amino acid-substituted gramicidin analogues—gramicidin channels continue to provide important insights into the microphysics of ion permeation through bilayer-spanning channels. For similar reasons, gramicidin channels constitute a system of choice for evaluating computational strategies for obtaining mechanistic insights into ion permeation through the more complex channels formed by integral membrane proteins.

  1. Cholesterol and Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena; Fang, Yun; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia; Romanenko, Victor

    2010-01-01

    A variety of ion channels, including members of all major ion channel families, have been shown to be regulated by changes in the level of membrane cholesterol and partition into cholesterol-rich membrane domains. In general, several types of cholesterol effects have been described. The most common effect is suppression of channel activity by an increase in membrane cholesterol, an effect that was described for several types of inwardly-rectifying K+ channels, voltage-gated K+ channels, Ca+2 sensitive K+ channels, voltage-gated Na+ channels, N-type voltage-gated Ca+2 channels and volume-regulated anion channels. In contrast, several types of ion channels, such as epithelial amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels and Transient Receptor Potential channels, as well as some of the types of inwardly-rectifying and voltage-gated K+ channels were shown to be inhibited by cholesterol depletion. Cholesterol was also shown to alter the kinetic properties and current-voltage dependence of several voltage-gated channels. Finally, maintaining membrane cholesterol level is required for coupling ion channels to signalling cascades. In terms of the mechanisms, three general mechanisms have been proposed: (i) specific interactions between cholesterol and the channel protein, (ii) changes in the physical properties of the membrane bilayer and (iii) maintaining the scaffolds for protein-protein interactions. The goal of this review is to describe systematically the role of cholesterol in regulation of the major types of ion channels and to discuss these effects in the context of the models proposed. PMID:20213557

  2. Fading channel simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1991-12-31

    This invention relates to high frequency (HF) radio signal propagation through fading channels and, more particularly, to simulation of fading channels in order to characterize HF radio system performance in transmitting and receiving signals through such fading channels. Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  3. Vascular potassium channels in NVC.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K

    2016-01-01

    It has long been proposed that the external potassium ion ([K(+)]0) works as a potent vasodilator in the dynamic regulation of local cerebral blood flow. Astrocytes may play a central role for producing K(+) outflow possibly through calcium-activated potassium channels on the end feet, responding to a rise in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, which might well reflect local neuronal activity. A mild elevation of [K(+)]0 in the end feet/vascular smooth muscle space could activate Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase concomitant with inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells, leading to a hyperpolarization of vascular smooth muscle and relaxation of smooth muscle actin-positive vessels. Also proposed notion is endothelial calcium-activated potassium channels and/or inwardly rectifying potassium channel-mediated hyperpolarization of vascular smooth muscle. A larger elevation of [K(+)]0, which may occur pathophysiologically in such as spreading depression or stroke, can trigger a depolarization of vascular smooth muscle cells and vasoconstriction instead. PMID:27130411

  4. Channel Floor Yardangs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 19 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    The yardangs in this image are forming in channel floor deposits. The channel itself is funneling the wind to cause the erosion.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 4.5, Longitude 229.7 East (133.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are

  5. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    available surface micromachinable materials. For many potential applications, the hot filament CVD method demonstrated in this work is quite enabling, since it provides a much less expensive method than microwave CVD based alternatives for depositing doped CVD diamond over large wafers (e.g., 8") for batch fabrication. The first three methods described so far focus on a single vibrating disk resonator and improve its electrical equivalent modeling, C x/Co, and Q. Once we craft the resonator that meets the challenging design requirements of RF channel-select filters, the last method presents a design hierarchy that achieves the desired filter response with a specific center frequency, bandwidth, and filter termination resistance. The design procedure culminates in specific values for all mechanical geometry variables necessary for the filter layout, such as disk radii, and beam widths; and process design variables such as resonator material thickness and capacitive actuation gap spacing. Finally, the experimental results introduce a 39nm-gap capacitive transducer, voltage-controlled frequency tuning, and a stress relieving coupled array design that enable a 0.09% bandwidth 223.4 MHz channel-select filter with only 2.7dB of in-band insertion loss and 50dB rejection of out-of-band interferers. This amount of rejection is more than 23dB better than previous capacitive-gap transduced filter designs that did not benefit from sub-50nm gaps. It also comes in tandem with a 20dB shape factor of 2.7 realized by a hierarchical mechanical circuit design utilizing 206 micromechanical circuit elements, all contained in an area footprint of only 600mumx420mum. The key to such low insertion loss for this tiny percent bandwidth is Q's>8,800 supplied by polysilicon disk resonators employing for the first time capacitive transducer gaps small enough to generate coupling strengths of C x/Co ˜0.1%, which is a 6.1x improvement over previous efforts. The filter structure utilizes electrical

  6. Optimal channels for channelized quadratic estimators.

    PubMed

    Kupinski, Meredith K; Clarkson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    We present a new method for computing optimized channels for estimation tasks that is feasible for high-dimensional image data. Maximum-likelihood (ML) parameter estimates are challenging to compute from high-dimensional likelihoods. The dimensionality reduction from M measurements to L channels is a critical advantage of channelized quadratic estimators (CQEs), since estimating likelihood moments from channelized data requires smaller sample sizes and inverting a smaller covariance matrix is easier. The channelized likelihood is then used to form ML estimates of the parameter(s). In this work we choose an imaging example in which the second-order statistics of the image data depend upon the parameter of interest: the correlation length. Correlation lengths are used to approximate background textures in many imaging applications, and in these cases an estimate of the correlation length is useful for pre-whitening. In a simulation study we compare the estimation performance, as measured by the root-mean-squared error (RMSE), of correlation length estimates from CQE and power spectral density (PSD) distribution fitting. To abide by the assumptions of the PSD method we simulate an ergodic, isotropic, stationary, and zero-mean random process. These assumptions are not part of the CQE formalism. The CQE method assumes a Gaussian channelized likelihood that can be a valid for non-Gaussian image data, since the channel outputs are formed from weighted sums of the image elements. We have shown that, for three or more channels, the RMSE of CQE estimates of correlation length is lower than conventional PSD estimates. We also show that computing CQE by using a standard nonlinear optimization method produces channels that yield RMSE within 2% of the analytic optimum. CQE estimates of anisotropic correlation length estimation are reported to demonstrate this technique on a two-parameter estimation problem. PMID:27409452

  7. Ion channels and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kunzelmann, Karl

    2005-06-01

    Membrane ion channels are essential for cell proliferation and appear to have a role in the development of cancer. This has initially been demonstrated for potassium channels and is meanwhile also suggested for other cation channels and Cl- channels. For some of these channels, like voltage-gated ether à go-go and Ca2+-dependent potassium channels as well as calcium and chloride channels, a cell cycle-dependent function has been demonstrated. Along with other membrane conductances, these channels control the membrane voltage and Ca2+ signaling in proliferating cells. Homeostatic parameters, such as the intracellular ion concentration, cytosolic pH and cell volume, are also governed by the activity of ion channels. Thus it will be an essential task for future studies to unravel cell cycle-specific effects of ion channels and non-specific homeostatic functions. When studying the role of ion channels in cancer cells, it is indispensable to choose experimental conditions that come close to the in vivo situation. Thus, environmental parameters, such as low oxygen pressure, acidosis and exposure to serum proteins, have to be taken into account. In order to achieve clinical application, more studies on the original cancer tissue are required, and improved animal models. Finally, it will be essential to generate more potent and specific inhibitors of ion channels to overcome the shortcomings of some of the current approaches.

  8. Ion channels in plants

    PubMed Central

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In his recent opus magnum review paper published in the October issue of Physiology Reviews, Rainer Hedrich summarized the field of plant ion channels.1 He started from the earliest electric recordings initiated by Charles Darwin of carnivorous Dionaea muscipula,1,2 known as Venus flytrap, and covered the topic extensively up to the most recent discoveries on Shaker-type potassium channels, anion channels of SLAC/SLAH families, and ligand-activated channels of glutamate receptor-like type (GLR) and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGC).1 PMID:23221742

  9. Cardiac ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Birgit T; McDermott, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are critical for all aspects of cardiac function, including rhythmicity and contractility. Consequently, ion channels are key targets for therapeutics aimed at cardiac pathophysiologies such as atrial fibrillation or angina. At the same time, off-target interactions of drugs with cardiac ion channels can be the cause of unwanted side effects. This manuscript aims to review the physiology and pharmacology of key cardiac ion channels. The intent is to highlight recent developments for therapeutic development, as well as elucidate potential mechanisms for drug-induced cardiac side effects, rather than present an in-depth review of each channel subtype. PMID:26556552

  10. C. elegans TRP channels.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rui; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2011-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels represent a superfamily of cation channels found in all eukaryotes. The C. elegans genome encodes seventeen TRP channels covering all of the seven TRP subfamilies. Genetic analyses in C. elegans have implicated TRP channels in a wide spectrum of behavioral and physiological processes, ranging from sensory transduction (e.g. chemosensation, touch sensation, proprioception and osmosensation) to fertilization, drug dependence, organelle biogenesis, apoptosis, gene expression, and neurotransmitter/hormone release. Many C. elegans TRP channels share similar activation and regulatory mechanisms with their vertebrate counterparts. Studies in C. elegans have also revealed some previously unrecognized functions and regulatory mechanisms of TRP channels. C. elegans represents an excellent genetic model organism for the study of function and regulation of TRP channels in vivo. PMID:21290304

  11. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Sanjeev S.; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is an essential component of numerous physiological processes including not only conscious senses of touch and hearing, but also unconscious senses such as blood pressure regulation. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  12. C. elegans TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Rui; Xu, X.Z. Shawn

    2010-01-01

    TRP (transient receptor potential) channels represent a superfamily of cation channels found in all eukaryotes. The C. elegans genome encodes seventeen TRP channels covering all of the seven TRP subfamilies. Genetic analyses in C. elegans have implicated TRP channels in a wide spectrum of behavioral and physiological processes, ranging from sensory transduction (e.g. chemosensation, touch sensation, proprioception and osmosensation) to fertilization, drug dependence, organelle biogenesis, apoptosis, gene expression, and neurotransmitter/hormone release. Many C. elegans TRP channels share similar activation and regulatory mechanisms with their vertebrate counterparts. Studies in C. elegans have also revealed some previously unrecognized functions and regulatory mechanisms of TRP channels. C. elegans represents an excellent genetic model organism for the study of function and regulation of TRP channels in vivo. PMID:21290304

  13. Curvilinear grids for sinuous river channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatom, F. B.; Waldrop, W. R.; Smith, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    In order to effectively analyze the flow in sinuous river channels, a curvilinear grid system was developed for use in the appropriate hydrodynamic code. The CENTERLINE program was designed to generate a two dimensional grid for this purpose. The Cartesian coordinates of a series of points along the boundaries of the sinuous channel represent the primary input to CENTERLINE. The program calculates the location of the river centerline, the distance downstream along the centerline, and both radius of curvature and channel width as a function of such distance downstream. These parameters form the basis for the generation of the curvilinear grid. Based on input values for longitudinal and lateral grid spacing, the corresponding grid system is generated and a file is created containing the appropriate parameters for use in the associated explicit finite difference hydrodynamic programs. Because of the option for a nonuniform grid, grid spacing can be concentrated in areas containing the largest flow gradients.

  14. Electrophysiological channel interactions using focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Shefin S.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Wise, Andrew K.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fallon, James B.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Speech intelligibility with existing multichannel cochlear implants (CIs) is thought to be limited by poor spatial selectivity and interactions between CI channels caused by overlapping activation with monopolar (MP) stimulation. Our previous studies have shown that focused multipolar (FMP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation produce more restricted neural activation in the inferior colliculus (IC), compared to MP stimulation. Approach. This study explored interactions in the IC produced by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels. We recorded multi-unit neural activity in the IC of anaesthetized cats with normal and severely degenerated spiral ganglion neuron populations in response to FMP, TP and MP stimulation from a 14 channel CI. Stimuli were applied to a ‘fixed’ CI channel, chosen toward the middle of the cochlear electrode array, and the effects of simultaneously stimulating a more apical ‘test’ CI channel were measured as a function of spatial separation between the two stimulation channels and stimulus level of the fixed channel. Channel interactions were quantified by changes in neural responses and IC threshold (i.e., threshold shift) elicited by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels, compared to stimulation of the test channel alone. Main results. Channel interactions were significantly lower for FMP and TP than for MP stimulation (p < 0.001), whereas no significant difference was observed between FMP and TP stimulation. With MP stimulation, threshold shifts increased with decreased inter-electrode spacing and increased stimulus levels of the fixed channel. For FMP and TP stimulation, channel interactions were found to be similar for different inter-electrode spacing and stimulus levels of the fixed channel. Significance. The present study demonstrates how the degree of channel interactions in a CI can be controlled using stimulation configurations such as FMP and TP; such knowledge is essential in enhancing CI function in complex

  15. The Deep Space Network: A Radio Communications Instrument for Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renzetti, N. A.; Stelzried, C. T.; Noreen, G. K.; Slobin, S. D.; Petty, S. M.; Trowbridge, D. L.; Donnelly, H.; Kinman, P. W.; Armstrong, J. W.; Burow, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Deep Space Network (DSN) is to serve as a communications instrument for deep space exploration, providing communications between the spacecraft and the ground facilities. The uplink communications channel provides instructions or commands to the spacecraft. The downlink communications channel provides command verification and spacecraft engineering and science instrument payload data.

  16. Fading channel simulator

    DOEpatents

    Argo, Paul E.; Fitzgerald, T. Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  17. Young Channel, Old Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 18 March 2004

    The Odyssey spacecraft has completed a full Mars year of observations of the red planet. For the next several weeks the Image of the Day will look back over this first mars year. It will focus on four themes: 1) the poles - with the seasonal changes seen in the retreat and expansion of the caps; 2) craters - with a variety of morphologies relating to impact materials and later alteration, both infilling and exhumation; 3) channels - the clues to liquid surface flow; and 4) volcanic flow features. While some images have helped answer questions about the history of Mars, many have raised new questions that are still being investigated as Odyssey continues collecting data as it orbits Mars.

    Infrared images taken during the daytime exhibit both the morphological and thermophysical properties of the surface of Mars. Morphologic details are visible due to the effect of sun-facing slopes receiving more energy than antisun-facing slopes. This creates a warm (bright) slope and cool (dark) slope appearance that mimics the light and shadows of a visible wavelength image. Thermophysical properties are seen in that dust heats up more quickly than rocks. Thus dusty areas are bright and rocky areas are dark.

    This daytime IR image was collected on February 3, 2003 during the northern summer season. This image shows a younger channel cutting through an older crater.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 30.8, Longitude 19 East (341 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System

  18. 78. PIPING CHANNEL FOR FUEL LOADING, FUEL TOPPING, COMPRESSED AIR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. PIPING CHANNEL FOR FUEL LOADING, FUEL TOPPING, COMPRESSED AIR, GASEOUS NITROGEN, AND HELIUM - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Steel, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. Grain heights are less than their diameter so the grains resemble antacid tablets, coins, or poker chips. These grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by grain and channel sizes. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

  20. Mechanosensitive channels in microbes.

    PubMed

    Kung, Ching; Martinac, Boris; Sukharev, Sergei

    2010-01-01

    All cells, including microbes, detect and respond to mechanical forces, of which osmotic pressure is most ancient and universal. Channel proteins have evolved such that they can be directly stretched open when the membrane is under turgor pressure. Osmotic downshock, as in rain, opens bacterial mechanosensitive (MS) channels to jettison osmolytes, relieving pressure and preventing cell lysis. The ion flux through individual channel proteins can be observed directly with a patch clamp. MS channels of large and small conductance (MscL and MscS, respectively) have been cloned, crystallized, and subjected to biophysical and genetic analyses in depth. They are now models to scrutinize how membrane forces direct protein conformational changes. Eukaryotic microbes have homologs from animal sensory channels of the TRP superfamily. The MS channel in yeast is also directly sensitive to membrane stretch. This review examines the key concept that proteins embedded in the lipid bilayer can respond to the changes in the mechanical environment the lipid bilayer provides.

  1. Amyloid peptide channels.

    PubMed

    Kagan, B L; Azimov, R; Azimova, R

    2004-11-01

    At least 16 distinct clinical syndromes including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), rheumatoid arthritis, type II diabetes mellitus (DM), and spongiform encephelopathies (prion diseases), are characterized by the deposition of amorphous, Congo red-staining deposits known as amyloid. These "misfolded" proteins adopt beta-sheet structures and aggregate spontaneously into similar extended fibrils despite their widely divergent primary sequences. Many, if not all, of these peptides are capable of forming ion-permeable channels in vitro and possibly in vivo. Common channel properties include irreversible, spontaneous insertion into membranes, relatively large, heterogeneous single-channel conductances, inhibition of channel formation by Congo red, and blockade of inserted channels by Zn2+. Physiologic effects of amyloid, including Ca2+ dysregulation, membrane depolarization, mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP), and cytotoxicity, suggest that channel formation in plasma and intracellular membranes may play a key role in the pathophysiology of the amyloidoses. PMID:15702375

  2. HIPPI and Fibre Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmie, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    The High-Performance Parallel Interface (HIPPI) and Fibre Channel are near-gigabit per second data communications interfaces being developed in ANSI standards Task Group X3T9.3. HIPPI is the current interface of choice in the high-end and supercomputer arena, and Fibre Channel is a follow-on effort. HIPPI came from a local area network background, and Fibre Channel came from a mainframe to peripheral interface background.

  3. Symmetrization for redundant channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulplue, Bhalchandra R. (Inventor); Collins, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A plurality of redundant channels in a system each contain a global image of all the configuration data bases in each of the channels in the system. Each global image is updated periodically from each of the other channels via cross channel data links. The global images of the local configuration data bases in each channel are separately symmetrized using a voting process to generate a system signal configuration data base which is not written into by any other routine and is available for indicating the status of the system within each channel. Equalization may be imposed on a suspect signal and a number of chances for that signal to heal itself are provided before excluding it from future votes. Reconfiguration is accomplished upon detecting a channel which is deemed invalid. A reset function is provided which permits an externally generated reset signal to permit a previously excluded channel to be reincluded within the system. The updating of global images and/or the symmetrization process may be accomplished at substantially the same time within a synchronized time frame common to all channels.

  4. Phosphoinositides regulate ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Bertil; Dickson, Eamonn J.; Kruse, Martin; Vivas, Oscar; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositides serve as signature motifs for different cellular membranes and often are required for the function of membrane proteins. Here, we summarize clear evidence supporting the concept that many ion channels are regulated by membrane phosphoinositides. We describe tools used to test their dependence on phosphoinositides, especially phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and consider mechanisms and biological meanings of phosphoinositide regulation of ion channels. This lipid regulation can underlie changes of channel activity and electrical excitability in response to receptors. Since different intracellular membranes have different lipid compositions, the activity of ion channels still in transit towards their final destination membrane may be suppressed until they reach an optimal lipid environment. PMID:25241941

  5. IBEX channel formation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.E.; Frost, C.A.; Freeman, J.R.; Jojola, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Exploding wire experiments have been conducted to form a low-density channel for endoatmospheric channel-tracking experiments to be performed on the IBEX accelerator. Stainless steel and tungsten wires as small as six microns radius have been exploded using a 50 kJ, 200 kV fast capacitor bank designed and constructed for the purpose. Density channels have been produced. Preliminary results will be compared with a simple circuit model and hydrocode analysis. Efforts to diagnose the low-density channel are beginning. 5 refs.

  6. Enhancing the Radio Astronomy Capabilities at NASA's Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, Joseph; Teitelbaum, Lawrence; Franco, Manuel M.; Garcia-Miro, Cristina; Horiuchi, Shinji; Jacobs, Christopher; Kuiper, Thomas; Majid, Walid

    2015-08-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) is well known for its role in commanding and communicating with spacecraft across the solar system that produce a steady stream of new discoveries in Astrophysics, Heliophysics, and Planetary Science. Equipped with a number of large antennas distributed across the world, the DSN also has a history of contributing to a number of leading radio astronomical projects. This paper summarizes a number of enhancements that are being implemented currently and that are aimed at increasing its capabilities to engage in a wide range of science observations. These enhancements include* A dual-beam system operating between 18 and 27 GHz (~ 1 cm) capable of conducting a variety of molecular line observations, searches for pulsars in the Galactic center, and continuum flux density (photometry) of objects such as nearby protoplanetary disks* Enhanced spectroscopy and pulsar processing backends for use at 1.4--1.9 GHz (20 cm), 18--27 GHz (1 cm), and 38--50 GHz (0.7 cm)* The DSN Transient Observatory (DTN), an automated, non-invasive backend for transient searching* Larger bandwidths (>= 0.5 GHz) for pulsar searching and timing; and* Improved data rates (2048 Mbps) and better instrumental response for very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) observations with the new DSN VLBI processor (DVP), which is providing unprecedented sensitivity for maintenance of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) and development of future versions.One of the results of these improvements is that the 70~m Deep Space Station 43 (DSS-43, Tidbinbilla antenna) is now the most sensitive radio antenna in the southern hemisphere. Proposals to use these systems are accepted from the international community.Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics & Space Administration.

  7. A linearization of quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, Tanner

    2015-06-01

    Because the quantum channels form a compact, convex set, we can express any quantum channel as a convex combination of extremal channels. We give a Euclidean representation for the channels whose inverses are also valid channels; these are a subset of the extreme points. They form a compact, connected Lie group, and we calculate its Lie algebra. Lastly, we calculate a maximal torus for the group and provide a constructive approach to decomposing any invertible channel into a product of elementary channels.

  8. Basaltic Lava Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Griffiths, R. W.; Kerr, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    In Hawaii, the mode of lava transport - through open channels or through insulating lava tubes - determines the thermal, rheological, and emplacement history of a lava flow. Most Hawaiian lavas are erupted at near-liquidus temperatures and are therefore crystal-poor; lava transport through open channels allows rapid cooling and consequent rapid increases in lava crystallinity. Solidified aa flows resulting from channelized flow are typically fine-grained throughout their thickness, indicating cooling of the entire flow thickness during transport. In contrast, transport of lava through insulating tubes permits flow over long distances with little cooling. Flows emerging from such tubes typically have pahoehoe flow surfaces with glassy crusts. Groundmass textures that coarsen from the flow rind to the interior reflect rates of post-emplacement, rather than syn-emplacement, cooling. To distinguish eruption conditions that result in lava channels from those that allow formation of lava tubes, we have performed a series of laboratory experiments involving injection of PEG 600 (a wax with a Newtonian rheology and freezing temperature of 19ºC) into cold water through both uniform and non-uniform sloping channels. In uniform channels, tube formation can be distinguished from open channel flow using a dimensionless parameter based on a solidification time scale, an advection time scale, and a Rayleigh number that describes convection by heat loss from crust-free shear zones. Theoretical analysis predicts that in the open channel regime, the width of the crust (dc) will vary with the channel width (W) as dc = W5/3. Crustal coverage of non-uniform channels in both laboratory experiments and field examples from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, is consistent with this prediction. However, experiments in non-uniform channels illustrate additional controls on the surface coverage of lava channels. Most important is crustal extension resulting from flow acceleration through constrictions

  9. Ion selectivity in the ryanodine receptor and other calcium channels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Dirk

    2006-03-01

    Biological ion channels passively conduct ions across cell membranes, some with great specificity. Calcium channels are selective channels that range in their Ca^2+ affinity depending on the channel's physiological role. For example, the L-type calcium channel has micromolar affinity while the ryanodine receptor (RyR) has millimolar affinity. On the other hand, both of these channels have the chemically-similar EEEE and DDDD amino acid motifs in their selectivity filters. An electrodiffusion model of RyR that reproduces and predicts >50 data curves will be presented. In this model, ions are charged, hard spheres and the chemical potential is computed using density functional theory of fluids. Ion selectivity arises from a competition between the need for cations to screen the negative charges of the channel and the crowding of ions in the tiny space of the channel. Charge/space competition implies that selectivity increases as the channel volume decreases (thereby increasing the protein charge density), something that has recently been experimentally confirmed in mutant channels. Dielectric properties can also increase selectivity. In Monte Carlo simulations, Ca^2+ affinity is much higher when the channel protein has a low dielectric constant. This counterintuitive result occurs because calcium channel selectivity filters are lined with negatively-charged (acidic) amino acids (EEEE or DDDD). These permanent negative charges induce negative polarization charge at the protein/lumen interface. The total negative charge of the protein (polarization plus permanent) is increased, resulting in increased ion densities, increased charge/space competition, and there in increased Ca^2+ affinity. If no negative protein charges were present, cations would induce enough positive polarization charge to prevent flux.

  10. A theory for the emergence of channelized drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Terence R.

    2010-06-01

    A theory of channel formation is derived from mass balance equations for water and sediment, the St. Venant equation for water flowing down an energy surface gradient, and generalized representations of sediment transport. The theory covers transport- and detachment-limited erosion environments. Linearized analysis provides closed form stability criteria for the growth rates of channels in terms of aspect ratios, lateral spacings, and four mechanisms relating to water and sediment flows. Two mechanisms, a nonlinear advective transport of sediment that drives a channel-cutting instability and a free water surface that selectively neutralizes perturbations, act down the energy surface gradient. Two other mechanisms, advectively driven and slope-driven diffusion of sediment, act down the land surface gradient and selectively stabilize perturbations. Under subcritical and critical, but not supercritical, flow conditions, the first two mechanisms, together with arbitrary amounts of either diffusive mechanism, select strongly for aspect ratios and lateral spacings of the fastest-growing channels. Thresholds for channel spacing emerge without requiring critical thresholds for sediment entrainment. Advective sediment transport and a free water surface acting alone select strongly for aspect ratios but weakly for lateral spacings. Numerical solutions and analysis of the nonlinear equations, however, indicate strong selection for spacing through nonlinear amplification and coloring of noise. The aspect ratios and lateral spacings of fastest-growing channels are determined by six dimensionless ratios and parameters of the constitutive relations. The theory provides a scaling relation between increased lateral spacing of dominant channels and increasing discharge and predicts the emergence of Hack-type scaling laws with variable exponents for the fastest-growing channels.

  11. Ion channels in microbes

    PubMed Central

    Martinac, Boris; Saimi, Yoshiro; Kung, Ching

    2008-01-01

    Summary Studies of ion channels have for long been dominated by the animalcentric, if not anthropocentric view of physiology. The structures and activities of ion channels had, however, evolved long before the appearance of complex multicellular organisms on Earth. The diversity of ion channels existing in cellular membranes of prokaryotes is a good example. Though at first it may appear as a paradox that most of what we know about the structure of eukaryotic ion channels is based on the structure of bacterial channels, this should not be surprising given the evolutionary relatedness of all living organisms and suitability of microbial cells for structural studies of biological macromolecules in a laboratory environment. Genome sequences of the human as well as various microbial, plant and animal organisms unambiguously established the evolutionary links, whereas crystallographic studies of the structures of major types of ion channels published over the last decade clearly demonstrated the advantage of using microbes as experimental organisms. The purpose of this review is not only to provide an account of acquired knowledge on microbial ion channels but also to show that the study of microbes and their ion channels may also hold a key to solving unresolved molecular mysteries in the future. PMID:18923187

  12. Athermalized channeled spectropolarimeter enhancement.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Julia Craven; Way, Brandyn Michael; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Hunt, Jeffery P.

    2013-09-01

    Channeled spectropolarimetry can measure the complete polarization state of light as a function of wavelength. Typically, a channeled spectropolarimeter uses high order retarders made of uniaxial crystal to amplitude modulate the measured spectrum with the spectrally-dependent Stokes polarization information. A primary limitation of conventional channeled spectropolarimeters is related to the thermal variability of the retarders. Thermal variation often forces frequent system recalibration, particularly for field deployed systems. However, implementing thermally stable retarders, made of biaxial crystal, results in an athermal channeled spectropolarimeter that relieves the need for frequent recalibration. This report presents experimental results for an anthermalized channeled spectropolarimeter prototype produced using potassium titanyl phosphate. The results of this prototype are compared to the current thermal stabilization state of the art. Finally, the application of the technique to the thermal infrared is studied, and the athermalization concept is applied to an infrared imaging spectropolarimeter design.

  13. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; McCausland, Jeffrey; Steel, Fiona

    2010-03-01

    We experimentally study jamming of cylindrical grains in a vertical channel. The grains have a low aspect-ratio (height/diameter < 1) so their shape is like antacid tablets or poker chips. They are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section. The channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. It is observed that grains sometimes jam in this apparatus. In a jam, grains form a stable structure from one side of the channel to the other with nothing beneath them. Jams may be strong enough to support additional grains above. The probability of a jam occurring is a function of the grain height and diameter. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  14. Distribution and seismic facies of Mississippi fan channels

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, P.; Buffler, R.T. )

    1988-10-01

    Analysis of a closely spaced grid of multifold seismic data across the upper Pliocene-Pleistocene Mississippi fan in the deep Gulf of Mexico allows for the first time a detailed description of a large part of the fan. Mapping of the 17 channel-levee systems show considerable variability in parameters such as size, location, geometry, lateral migration, aggradation, sinuosity, and downfan bifurcation, which suggests that multiple factors control channel evolution. The youngest channel, cored during Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 96, refects only style in channel evolution. Such complexity in large, mud-dominated, submarine fan systems must be considered in evaluating fan models and interpreting ancient fan systems.

  15. Intractable hyperkalemia due to nicorandil induced potassium channel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chowdhry, Vivek; Mohanty, B B

    2015-01-01

    Nicorandil is a commonly used antianginal agent, which has both nitrate-like and ATP-sensitive potassium (K ATP ) channel activator properties. Activation of potassium channels by nicorandil causes expulsion of potassium ions into the extracellular space leading to membrane hyperpolarization, closure of voltage-gated calcium channels and finally vasodilatation. However, on the other hand, being an activator of K ATP channel, it can expel K + ions out of the cells and can cause hyperkalemia. Here, we report a case of nicorandil induced hyperkalemia unresponsive to medical treatment in a patient with diabetic nephropathy.

  16. OCCIMA: Optical Channel Characterization in Maritime Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammel, Steve; Tsintikidis, Dimitri; deGrassie, John; Reinhardt, Colin; McBryde, Kevin; Hallenborg, Eric; Wayne, David; Gibson, Kristofor; Cauble, Galen; Ascencio, Ana; Rudiger, Joshua

    2015-05-01

    The Navy is actively developing diverse optical application areas, including high-energy laser weapons and free- space optical communications, which depend on an accurate and timely knowledge of the state of the atmospheric channel. The Optical Channel Characterization in Maritime Atmospheres (OCCIMA) project is a comprehensive program to coalesce and extend the current capability to characterize the maritime atmosphere for all optical and infrared wavelengths. The program goal is the development of a unified and validated analysis toolbox. The foundational design for this program coordinates the development of sensors, measurement protocols, analytical models, and basic physics necessary to fulfill this goal.

  17. Deep space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Srinivasan, Meera; Shaw, Matthew; Piazzolla, Sabino; Wright, Malcolm W.; Farr, William H.

    2016-03-01

    A number of laser communication link demonstrations from near Earth distances extending out to lunar ranges have been remarkably successful, demonstrating the augmented channel capacity that is accessible with the use of lasers for communications. The next hurdle on the path to extending laser communication and its benefits throughout the solar system and beyond is to demonstrate deep-space laser communication links. In this paper, concepts and technology development being advanced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in order to enable deep-space link demonstrations to ranges of approximately 3 AU in the next decade, will be discussed.

  18. Applying alpha-channeling to mirror machines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhmoginov, A. I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2012-05-15

    The {alpha}-channeling effect entails the use of radio-frequency waves to expel and cool high-energetic {alpha} particles born in a fusion reactor; the device reactivity can then be increased even further by redirecting the extracted energy to fuel ions. Originally proposed for tokamaks, this technique has also been shown to benefit open-ended fusion devices. Here, the fundamental theory and practical aspects of {alpha} channeling in mirror machines are reviewed, including the influence of magnetic field inhomogeneity and the effect of a finite wave region on the {alpha}-channeling mechanism. For practical implementation of the {alpha}-channeling effect in mirror geometry, suitable contained weakly damped modes are identified. In addition, the parameter space of candidate waves for implementing the {alpha}-channeling effect can be significantly extended through the introduction of a suitable minority ion species that has the catalytic effect of moderating the transfer of power from the {alpha}-channeling wave to the fuel ions.

  19. Applying alpha-channeling to mirror machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhmoginov, A. I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2012-05-01

    The α-channeling effect entails the use of radio-frequency waves to expel and cool high-energetic α particles born in a fusion reactor; the device reactivity can then be increased even further by redirecting the extracted energy to fuel ions. Originally proposed for tokamaks, this technique has also been shown to benefit open-ended fusion devices. Here, the fundamental theory and practical aspects of α channeling in mirror machines are reviewed, including the influence of magnetic field inhomogeneity and the effect of a finite wave region on the α-channeling mechanism. For practical implementation of the α-channeling effect in mirror geometry, suitable contained weakly damped modes are identified. In addition, the parameter space of candidate waves for implementing the α-channeling effect can be significantly extended through the introduction of a suitable minority ion species that has the catalytic effect of moderating the transfer of power from the α-channeling wave to the fuel ions.

  20. Submarine Channels In Rupert Inlet, British Columbia: I. Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Alex E.; Murray, J. W.; Burling, R. W.

    1983-11-01

    The evolution of submarine channel systems in a mine-tailing deposit is presented. Three successive phases of channel development were observed in time-series of seismic reflection, side-scan sonar and bathymetric surveys: (1) a meandering channel phase; (2) an "apron" phase, in which the channel was obliterated; and (3) a rechannelized phase. The meander phase consisted of a leveed channel with three morphologically distinct reaches: a left-hooking upper reach (axial slope decreasing from 9 to 2°); a middle meander reach (1° slope, 500-300 m and 100 m meander wavelength and average amplitude); and a straight lower reach (0.5° slope). The meanders are geometrically similar to those in rivers. Channel width and depth decreased down-channel suggesting continuous loss of solids by deposition and overspill. The morphology of the channel is compared to that of deep-sea fan valleys, particularly the Redondo, which exhibits a meandering-braided transition at an increase in slope from 1 to 2°. Braided-meandering and meandering-straight transitions in subaqueous channels are discussed in the context of the slope—discharge dependence of such transitions in subaerial rivers. Probable trajectories of the Rupert Inlet and Redondo systems in slope—discharge parameter space are proposed, and illustrate the importance to the occurrence of meanders in subaqueous channels of the entrainment of ambient fluid and of suspended sediment loss through deposition and channel overspill.

  1. Ultimate classical communication rates of quantum optical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannetti, V.; García-Patrón, R.; Cerf, N. J.; Holevo, A. S.

    2014-10-01

    Optical channels, such as fibres or free-space links, are ubiquitous in today's telecommunication networks. They rely on the electromagnetic field associated with photons to carry information from one point to another in space. A complete physical model of these channels must necessarily take quantum effects into account to determine their ultimate performances. Single-mode, phase-insensitive bosonic Gaussian channels have been extensively studied over past decades, given their importance for practical applications. In spite of this, a long-standing unsolved conjecture on the optimality of Gaussian encodings has prevented finding their classical communication capacity. Here, this conjecture is solved by proving that the vacuum state achieves the minimum output entropy of these channels. This establishes the ultimate achievable bit rate under an energy constraint, as well as the long awaited proof that the single-letter classical capacity of these channels is additive.

  2. Software-Defined Radio for Space-to-Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Ken; Jih, Cindy; Moore, Michael S.; Price, Jeremy C.; Abbott, Ben A.; Fritz, Justin A.

    2011-01-01

    A paper describes the Space- to-Space Communications System (SSCS) Software- Defined Radio (SDR) research project to determine the most appropriate method for creating flexible and reconfigurable radios to implement wireless communications channels for space vehicles so that fewer radios are required, and commonality in hardware and software architecture can be leveraged for future missions. The ability to reconfigure the SDR through software enables one radio platform to be reconfigured to interoperate with many different waveforms. This means a reduction in the number of physical radio platforms necessary to support a space mission s communication requirements, thus decreasing the total size, weight, and power needed for a mission.

  3. Fine Channel Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A color image of fine channel networks on Mars; north toward top. The scene shows heavily cratered highlands dissected by dendritic open channel networks that dissect steep slopes of impact crater walls. This image is a composite of Viking high-resolution images in black and white and low-resolution images in color. The image extends from latitude 9 degrees S. to 5 degrees S. and from longitude 312 degrees to 320 degrees; Mercator projection. The dendritic pattern of the fine channels and their location on steep slopes leads to the interpretation that these are runoff channels. The restriction of these types of channels to ancient highland rocks suggests that these channels are old and date from a time on Mars when conditions existed for precipitation to actively erode rocks. After the channels reach a low plain, they appear to end. Termination may have resulted from burial by younger deposits or perhaps the flows percolated into the surface materials and continued underground.

  4. Space Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes one teacher's experience taking Space Discovery courses that were sponsored by the United States Space Foundation (USSF). These courses examine the history of space science, theory of orbits and rocketry, the effects of living in outer space on humans, and space weather. (DDR)

  5. Why are Channels Sinuous?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantine, J. A.; Lazarus, E.

    2012-12-01

    Sinuosity is a ubiquitous property of channelized flow patterns on Earth and other planetary bodies. Sinuosity is typically discussed as an emergent consequence of migration processes in meandering rivers, but meandering rivers are only one type of sinuous channel: there are many examples that show little or no indication of meandering, such as bedrock river canyons, drainage channels in tidal mudflats, and volcanic rilles. In some of these patterns, sinuosity is described as "inherited" from a preexisting morphology, which elides an explanation for how the inherited sinuosity originated. Even in river meandering theory there is ongoing debate regarding how initial channel sinuosity arises. Comparing the results of a generalized flow-routing model to observations of natural flow patterns, we find that the ratio of floodplain resistance (R, representing topographic roughness, substrate erodibility, or vegetation density) relative to floodplain slope (m) produces a range of sinuous planforms with natural analogs. We offer a unifying theory for channel sinuosity in which this ratio of resistance to slope (R:m) exerts the primary landscape control on planform shape and predicts the range of sinuosity a floodplain may express. Resistance-dominated floodplains produce channels with higher sinuosity than those of slope-dominated floodplains because increased resistance impedes down-slope flow. Measurement of "relative resistance" (R:m) could inform how riparian restoration projects evaluate the floodplains of artificially straightened rivers. Our analysis suggests that if the sinuosity of a formerly natural channel derived from a high R:m, then even a channel redesigned to be sinuous will straighten if the relative resistance of its floodplain is suppressed or inherently low. (Alternatively, increasing floodplain resistance might foster a higher sinuosity than hydraulic geometry would forecast.) The explanation for sinuosity that we propose is universal enough to account

  6. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynscronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board.

  7. Channel Access in Erlang

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.

    2013-10-13

    We have developed an Erlang language implementation of the Channel Access protocol. Included are low-level functions for encoding and decoding Channel Access protocol network packets as well as higher level functions for monitoring or setting EPICS process variables. This provides access to EPICS process variables for the Fermilab Acnet control system via our Erlang-based front-end architecture without having to interface to C/C++ programs and libraries. Erlang is a functional programming language originally developed for real-time telecommunications applications. Its network programming features and list management functions make it particularly well-suited for the task of managing multiple Channel Access circuits and PV monitors.

  8. Multicarrier chaotic communications in multipath fading channels without channel estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shilian Zhang, Zhili

    2015-01-15

    A multi-carrier chaotic shift keying(MC-CSK) communication scheme with low probability of interception(LPI) is proposed in this article. We apply chaotic spreading sequences in the frequency domain, mapping a different chip of a chaotic sequence to an individual orthogonal frequency division multiplexing(OFDM) subcarrier. In each block size of $M$ OFDM symbols, we use one pilot OFDM symbol inserted time-spaced in all-frequency to transmit the reference chaotic signal and use the other M-1 OFDM symbols to transmit the information-bearing signals each spreaded by the reference chaotic signal. At the receiver, we construct a differential detector after DFT and recover the information bits from the correlations between the pilot OFDM symbol and the other M-1 OFDM symbols in each block size of M. Performance analysis and computer simulations show that the MC-CSK outperforms differential chaos shift keying(DCSK) in AWGN channels with high bandwidth efficiency for the block size of M=2 and that the MC-CSK exploits effectively the frequent diversity of the multipath channel.

  9. Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The space shuttle flight system and mission profile are briefly described. Emphasis is placed on the economic and social benefits of the space transportation system. The space shuttle vehicle is described in detail.

  10. Enzyme clustering can induce metabolic channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellana, Michele

    2015-03-01

    Direct channeling of intermediates via a physical tunnel between enzyme active sites is an established mechanism to improve metabolic efficiency. In this talk, I will present a theoretical model that demonstrates that coclustering multiple enzymes into proximity can yield the full efficiency benefits of direct channeling. The model predicts the separation and size of coclusters that maximize metabolic efficiency, and this prediction is in agreement with the spacing between coclusters in yeast and mammalian cells. The model also predicts that enzyme agglomerates can regulate steady-state flux division at metabolic branch points: we experimentally test this prediction for a fundamental branch point in Escherichia coli, and the results confirm that enzyme colocalization within an agglomerate can accelerate the processing of a shared intermediate by one branch. Our studies establish a quantitative framework to understand coclustering-mediated metabolic channeling and its application to both efficiency improvement and metabolic regulation.

  11. Calcium Channel Signaling Complexes with Receptors and Channels.

    PubMed

    Zamponi, Gerald W

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are not only mediators of cell signalling events, but also are recipients of signalling inputs from G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and their associated second messenger pathways. The coupling of GPCRs to calcium channels is optimized through the formation of receptor-channel complexes. In addition, this provides a mechanism for receptorchannel co-trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. On the other hand, voltage-gated calcium channel activity affects other types of ion channels such as voltage-and calcium-activated potassium channels. Coupling efficiency between these two families of channels is also enhanced through the formation of channel-channel complexes. This review provides a concise overview of the current state of knowledge on the physical interactions between voltage-gated calcium channels and members of the GPCR family, and with other types of ion channels.

  12. Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderton, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The official start of a bold new space program, essential to maintain the United States' leadership in space was signaled by a Presidential directive to move aggressively again into space by proceeding with the development of a space station. Development concepts for a permanently manned space station are discussed. Reasons for establishing an inhabited space station are given. Cost estimates and timetables are also cited.

  13. Channel in Kasei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 November 2004 The Kasei Valles are a suite of very large, ancient outflow channels. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the youngest channel system in the Kasei Valles. Torrents of mud, rocks, and water carved this channel as flow was constricted through a narrow portion of the valley. Layers exposed by the erosion that created the channel can be seen in its walls. This 1.4 meters (5 feet) per pixel image is located near 21.1oN, 72.6oW. The picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  14. Chondrocyte channel transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; May, Hannah; Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To date, a range of ion channels have been identified in chondrocytes using a number of different techniques, predominantly electrophysiological and/or biomolecular; each of these has its advantages and disadvantages. Here we aim to compare and contrast the data available from biophysical and microarray experiments. This letter analyses recent transcriptomics datasets from chondrocytes, accessible from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). We discuss whether such bioinformatic analysis of microarray datasets can potentially accelerate identification and discovery of ion channels in chondrocytes. The ion channels which appear most frequently across these microarray datasets are discussed, along with their possible functions. We discuss whether functional or protein data exist which support the microarray data. A microarray experiment comparing gene expression in osteoarthritis and healthy cartilage is also discussed and we verify the differential expression of 2 of these genes, namely the genes encoding large calcium-activated potassium (BK) and aquaporin channels. PMID:23995703

  15. Proton channel models

    PubMed Central

    Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Martínez, Agustín; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are integral membrane proteins with the capacity to permeate elementary particles in a voltage and pH dependent manner. These proteins have been found in several species and are involved in various physiological processes. Although their primary topology is known, lack of details regarding their structures in the open conformation has limited analyses toward a deeper understanding of the molecular determinants of their function and regulation. Consequently, the function-structure relationships have been inferred based on homology models. In the present work, we review the existing proton channel models, their assumptions, predictions and the experimental facts that support them. Modeling proton channels is not a trivial task due to the lack of a close homolog template. Hence, there are important differences between published models. This work attempts to critically review existing proton channel models toward the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the structural features of these proteins. PMID:24755912

  16. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Goldschlager N. Cardiovascular toxicology. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management ... SD. Calcium channel antagonists. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management ...

  17. TRP channels in disease.

    PubMed

    Jordt, S E; Ehrlich, B E

    2007-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are a large family of proteins with six main subfamilies termed the TRPC (canonical), TRPV (vanilloid), TRPM (melastatin), TRPP (polycystin), TRPML (mucolipin), and TRPA (ankyrin) groups. The sheer number of different TRPs with distinct functions supports the statement that these channels are involved in a wide range of processes ranging from sensing of thermal and chemical signals to reloading intracellular stores after responding to an extracellular stimulus. Mutations in TRPs are linked to pathophysiology and specific diseases. An understanding of the role of TRPs in normal physiology is just beginning; the progression from mutations in TRPs to pathophysiology and disease will follow. In this review, we focus on two distinct aspects of TRP channel physiology, the role of TRP channels in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, and their role in the transduction of painful stimuli in sensory neurons. PMID:18193640

  18. A Simple Water Channel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple water channel, for use with an overhead projector. It is run from a water tap and may be used for flow visualization experiments, including the effect of streamlining and elementary building aerodynamics. (MLH)

  19. Ion Channels in Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Lawrence G.

    Ion channels in epithelial cells serve to move ions, and in some cases fluid, between compartments of the body. This function of the transfer of material is fundamentally different from that of the transfer of information, which is the main job of most channels in excitable cells. Nevertheless the basic construction of the channels is similar in many respects in the two tissue types. This chapter reviews the nature of channels in epithelia and discusses how their functions have evolved to accomplish the basic tasks for which they are responsible. I will focus on three channel types: epithelial Na+ channels, inward-rectifier K+ channels, and CFTR Cl- channels.

  20. Channel-tunnels.

    PubMed

    Koronakis, V; Andersen, C; Hughes, C

    2001-08-01

    TolC and its many homologues comprise an alpha-helical transperiplasmic tunnel embedded in the bacterial outer membrane by a contiguous beta-barrel channel, providing a large exit duct for diverse substrates. The 'channel-tunnel' is closed at its periplasmic entrance, but can be opened by an 'iris-like' mechanism when recruited by substrate-engaged proteins in the cytosolic membrane.

  1. Morphodynamics of Floodplain Chute Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, S. R.; Edmonds, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Floodplain chute channel formation is a key process that can enable rivers to transition from single-thread to multi-thread planform geometries. Floodplain chute channels are usually incisional channels connecting topographic lows across point bars and in the floodplain. Surprisingly, it is still not clear what conditions promote chute channel formation and what governs their morphodynamic behavior. Towards this end we have initiated an empirical and theoretical study of floodplain chute channels in Indiana, USA. Using elevation models and satellite imagery we mapped 3064 km2 of floodplain in Indiana, and find that 37.3% of mapped floodplains in Indiana have extensive chute channel networks. These chute channel networks consist of two types of channel segments: meander cutoffs of the main channel and chute channels linking the cutoffs together. To understand how these chute channels link meander cutoffs together and eventually create floodplain channel networks we use Delft3D to explore floodplain morphodynamics. Our first modeling experiment starts from a generic floodplain prepopulated with meander cutoffs to test under what conditions chute channels form.We find that chute channel formation is optimized at an intermediate flood discharge. If the flood discharge is too large the meander cutoffs erosively diffuse, whereas if the floodwave is too small the cutoffs fill with sediment. A moderately sized floodwave reworks the sediment surrounding the topographic lows, enhancing the development of floodplain chute channels. Our second modeling experiments explore how floodplain chute channels evolve on the West Fork of the White River, Indiana, USA. We find that the floodplain chute channels are capable of conveying the entire 10 yr floodwave (Q=1330m3/s) leaving the inter-channel areas dry. Moreover, the chute channels can incise into the floodplain while the margins of channels are aggrading, creating levees. Our results suggest that under the right conditions

  2. Space Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Appropriate directions for the applied research and technology programs that will develop space power systems for U.S. future space missions beyond 1995 are explored. Spacecraft power supplies; space stations, space power reactors, solar arrays, thermoelectric generators, energy storage, and communication satellites are among the topics discussed.

  3. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables.

  4. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables. PMID:12506926

  5. Quantum steganography with noisy quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Bilal A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2011-02-01

    Steganography is the technique of hiding secret information by embedding it in a seemingly “innocent” message. We present protocols for hiding quantum information by disguising it as noise in a codeword of a quantum error-correcting code. The sender (Alice) swaps quantum information into the codeword and applies a random choice of unitary operation, drawing on a secret random key she shares with the receiver (Bob). Using the key, Bob can retrieve the information, but an eavesdropper (Eve) with the power to monitor the channel, but without the secret key, cannot distinguish the message from channel noise. We consider two types of protocols: one in which the hidden quantum information is stored locally in the codeword, and another in which it is embedded in the space of error syndromes. We analyze how difficult it is for Eve to detect the presence of secret messages, and estimate rates of steganographic communication and secret key consumption for specific protocols and examples of error channels. We consider both the case where there is no actual noise in the channel (so that all errors in the codeword result from the deliberate actions of Alice), and the case where the channel is noisy and not controlled by Alice and Bob.

  6. Quantum steganography with noisy quantum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Bilal A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2011-02-15

    Steganography is the technique of hiding secret information by embedding it in a seemingly ''innocent'' message. We present protocols for hiding quantum information by disguising it as noise in a codeword of a quantum error-correcting code. The sender (Alice) swaps quantum information into the codeword and applies a random choice of unitary operation, drawing on a secret random key she shares with the receiver (Bob). Using the key, Bob can retrieve the information, but an eavesdropper (Eve) with the power to monitor the channel, but without the secret key, cannot distinguish the message from channel noise. We consider two types of protocols: one in which the hidden quantum information is stored locally in the codeword, and another in which it is embedded in the space of error syndromes. We analyze how difficult it is for Eve to detect the presence of secret messages, and estimate rates of steganographic communication and secret key consumption for specific protocols and examples of error channels. We consider both the case where there is no actual noise in the channel (so that all errors in the codeword result from the deliberate actions of Alice), and the case where the channel is noisy and not controlled by Alice and Bob.

  7. Organellar Channels and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haoxing; Martinoia, Enrico; Szabo, Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Decades of intensive research has led to the discovery of most plasma membrane ion channels and transporters and the characterization of their physiological functions. In contrast, although over 80% of transport processes occur inside the cells, the ion flux mechanisms across intracellular membranes (the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, endosomes, lysosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts, and vacuoles) are difficult to investigate and remain poorly understood. Recent technical advances in super-resolution microscopy, organellar electrophysiology, organelle-targeted fluorescence imaging, and organelle proteomics have pushed a large step forward in the research of intracellular ion transport. Many new organellar channels are molecularly identified and electrophysiologically characterized. Additionally, molecular identification of many of these ion channels/transporters has made it possible to study their physiological functions by genetic and pharmacological means. For example, organellar channels have been shown to regulate important cellular processes such as programmed cell death and photosynthesis, and are involved in many different pathologies. This Special Issue (SI) on Organellar Channels and Transporters aims to provide a forum to discuss the recent advances and to define the standard and open questions in this exciting and rapidly-developing field. Along this line, a new Gordon Research Conference dedicated to the multidisciplinary study of intracellular membrane transport proteins will be launched this coming summer. PMID:25795199

  8. TRP Channels and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, Louis S.; Abooj, Mruvil

    2013-01-01

    Since cloning and characterizing the first nociceptive ion channel Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), other TRP channels involved in nociception have been cloned and characterized, which include TRP Vanilloid 2 (TRPV2), TRP Vanilloid 3 (TRPV3), TRP Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), TRP Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and TRP Melastatin 8 (TRPM8), more recently TRP Canonical 1, 5, 6 (TRPC1, 5, 6), TRP Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) and TRP Melastatin 3 (TRPM3). These channels are predominantly expressed in C and Aδ nociceptors and transmit noxious thermal, mechanical and chemical sensitivities. TRP channels are modulated by pro-inflammatory mediators, neuropeptides and cytokines. Significant advances have been made targeting these receptors either by antagonists or agonists to treat painful conditions. In this review, we will discuss TRP channels as targets for next generation analgesics and the side effects that may ensue as a result of blocking/activating these receptors, because they are also involved in physiological functions such as release of vasoactive neuropeptides and regulation of vascular tone, maintenance of the body temperature, gastrointestinal motility, urinary bladder control etc. PMID:22910182

  9. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  10. Radioanatomy of the retroperitoneal space.

    PubMed

    Coffin, A; Boulay-Coletta, I; Sebbag-Sfez, D; Zins, M

    2015-02-01

    The retroperitoneum is a space situated behind the parietal peritoneum and in front of the transversalis fascia. It contains further spaces that are separated by the fasciae, between which communication is possible with both the peritoneal cavity and the pelvis, according to the theory of interfascial spread. The perirenal space has the shape of an inverted cone and contains the kidneys, adrenal glands, and related vasculature. It is delineated by the anterior and posterior renal fasciae, which surround the ureter and allow communication towards the pelvis. At the upper right pole, the perirenal space connects to the retrohepatic space at the bare area of the liver. There is communication between these two spaces through the Kneeland channel. The anterior pararenal space contains the duodenum, pancreas, and the ascending and descending colon. There is free communication within this space, and towards the mesenteries along the vessels. The posterior pararenal space, which contains fat, communicates with the preperitoneal space at the anterior surface of the abdomen between the peritoneum and the transversalis fascia, and allows communication with the contralateral posterior pararenal space. This space follows the length of the ureter to the pelvis, which explains the communication between these areas and the length of the pelvic fasciae.

  11. Space prospects. [european space programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A strategy for keeping the Common Market's space effort independent of and competitive with NASA and the space shuttle is discussed. Limited financing is the chief obstacle to this. Proposals include an outer space materials processing project and further development of the Ariane rocket. A manned space program is excluded for the foreseeable future.

  12. Dequantization Via Quantum Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    For a unital completely positive map {Φ} ("quantum channel") governing the time propagation of a quantum system, the Stinespring representation gives an enlarged system evolving unitarily. We argue that the Stinespring representations of each power {Φ^m} of the single map together encode the structure of the original quantum channel and provide an interaction-dependent model for the bath. The same bath model gives a "classical limit" at infinite time {mto∞} in the form of a noncommutative "manifold" determined by the channel. In this way, a simplified analysis of the system can be performed by making the large-m approximation. These constructions are based on a noncommutative generalization of Berezin quantization. The latter is shown to involve very fundamental aspects of quantum-information theory, which are thereby put in a completely new light.

  13. Chaos in quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosur, Pavan; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Roberts, Daniel A.; Yoshida, Beni

    2016-02-01

    We study chaos and scrambling in unitary channels by considering their entanglement properties as states. Using out-of-time-order correlation functions to diagnose chaos, we characterize the ability of a channel to process quantum information. We show that the generic decay of such correlators implies that any input subsystem must have near vanishing mutual information with almost all partitions of the output. Additionally, we propose the negativity of the tripartite information of the channel as a general diagnostic of scrambling. This measures the delocalization of information and is closely related to the decay of out-of-time-order correlators. We back up our results with numerics in two non-integrable models and analytic results in a perfect tensor network model of chaotic time evolution. These results show that the butterfly effect in quantum systems implies the information-theoretic definition of scrambling.

  14. Chaos in quantum channels

    DOE PAGES

    Hosur, Pavan; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Roberts, Daniel A.; Yoshida, Beni

    2016-02-01

    For this research, we study chaos and scrambling in unitary channels by considering their entanglement properties as states. Using out-of-time-order correlation functions to diagnose chaos, we characterize the ability of a channel to process quantum information. We show that the generic decay of such correlators implies that any input subsystem must have near vanishing mutual information with almost all partitions of the output. Additionally, we propose the negativity of the tripartite information of the channel as a general diagnostic of scrambling. This measures the delocalization of information and is closely related to the decay of out-of-time-order correlators. We back upmore » our results with numerics in two non-integrable models and analytic results in a perfect tensor network model of chaotic time evolution. In conclusion, these results show that the butterfly effect in quantum systems implies the information-theoretic definition of scrambling.« less

  15. Dequantization Via Quantum Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    For a unital completely positive map {Φ} ("quantum channel") governing the time propagation of a quantum system, the Stinespring representation gives an enlarged system evolving unitarily. We argue that the Stinespring representations of each power {Φ^m} of the single map together encode the structure of the original quantum channel and provide an interaction-dependent model for the bath. The same bath model gives a "classical limit" at infinite time {mto∞} in the form of a noncommutative "manifold" determined by the channel. In this way, a simplified analysis of the system can be performed by making the large- m approximation. These constructions are based on a noncommutative generalization of Berezin quantization. The latter is shown to involve very fundamental aspects of quantum-information theory, which are thereby put in a completely new light.

  16. Entanglement-saving channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lami, L.; Giovannetti, V.

    2016-03-01

    The set of Entanglement Saving (ES) quantum channels is introduced and characterized. These are completely positive, trace preserving transformations which when acting locally on a bipartite quantum system initially prepared into a maximally entangled configuration, preserve its entanglement even when applied an arbitrary number of times. In other words, a quantum channel ψ is said to be ES if its powers ψn are not entanglement-breaking for all integers n. We also characterize the properties of the Asymptotic Entanglement Saving (AES) maps. These form a proper subset of the ES channels that is constituted by those maps that not only preserve entanglement for all finite n but which also sustain an explicitly not null level of entanglement in the asymptotic limit n → ∞. Structure theorems are provided for ES and for AES maps which yield an almost complete characterization of the former and a full characterization of the latter.

  17. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, R.J.; Crowell, S.L.

    1998-01-13

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface. 15 figs.

  18. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, Richard J.; Crowell, Shannon L.

    1998-01-01

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface.

  19. Sodium channels and pain.

    PubMed

    Habib, Abdella M; Wood, John N; Cox, James J

    2015-01-01

    Human and mouse genetic studies have led to significant advances in our understanding of the role of voltage-gated sodium channels in pain pathways. In this chapter, we focus on Nav1.7, Nav1.8, Nav1.9 and Nav1.3 and describe the insights gained from the detailed analyses of global and conditional transgenic Nav knockout mice in terms of pain behaviour. The spectrum of human disorders caused by mutations in these channels is also outlined, concluding with a summary of recent progress in the development of selective Nav1.7 inhibitors for the treatment of pain. PMID:25846613

  20. Zeolites: Exploring Molecular Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, Ilke; Derewinski, Mirek

    2015-05-22

    Synthetic zeolites contain microscopic channels, sort of like a sponge. They have many uses, such as helping laundry detergent lather, absorbing liquid in kitty litter, and as catalysts to produce fuel. Of the hundreds of types of zeolites, only about 15 are used for catalysis. PNNL catalysis scientists Ilke Arslan and Mirek Derewinksi are studying these zeolites to understand what make them special. By exploring the mystery of these microscopic channels, their fundamental findings will help design better catalysts for applications such as biofuel production.

  1. Large Array Channel Capacity in the Presence of Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V.; Srinivasan, M.

    2006-01-01

    We develop a model for a large array ground receiver system for use in deep-space communications, and analyze the resulting array channel capacity. The model includes effects of array geometry, time-dependent spacecraft orbital trajectory, point and extended interference sources, and elevation-dependent noise and tropospheric channel variations. Channel capacity is expressed as the ratio of determinants of covariance matrices characterizing source, interference, and additive noise, and then reduced to a simpler quadratic form more amenable to analysis and numerical computation. This formulation facilitates inclusion of array and channel characteristics into the model, as well as comparison of optimal, suboptimal, and equivalent single antenna configurations on achievable throughput. Realistic examples of ground array channel capacity calculations are presented, demonstrating the impact of array geometry, planetary interference sources, and array combining algorithm design upon the achievable data throughput.

  2. Space Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The plans for utilizing reusable space shuttles which could replace almost all present expendable launch vehicles are briefly described. Many illustrations are included showing the artists' concepts of various configurations proposed for space shuttles. (PR)

  3. Space basic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, Dexter

    1991-01-01

    In this education video series, 'Liftoff to Learning', astronauts (Bruce Melnick, Thomas Akers, William Shepherd, Robert Cabana, and Richard Richards) describe the historical beginnings of space exploration from the time of Robert H. Goddard (considered the Father of Rocketry), who, in 1929, invented the first propellant rocket, the prototype of modern liquid propellant rockets, up to the modern Space Shuttles. The questions - where is space, what is space, and how do astronauts get to, stay in, and come back from space are answered through historical footage, computer graphics, and animation. The space environment effects, temperature effects, and gravitational effects on the launching, orbiting, and descent of the Shuttles are discussed. Included is historical still photos and film footage of past space programs and space vehicles.

  4. Channels of Propaganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sproule, J. Michael

    Defining propaganda as "efforts by special interests to win over the public covertly by infiltrating messages into various channels of public expression ordinarily viewed as politically neutral," this book argues that propaganda has become pervasive in American life. Pointing out that the 1990s society is inundated with propaganda from numerous…

  5. Learning in Tactile Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gescheider, George A.; Wright, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrotactile intensity-discrimination thresholds for sinusoidal stimuli applied to the thenar eminence of the hand declined as a function of practice. However, improvement was confined to the tactile information-processing channel in which learning had occurred. Specifically, improvements in performance with training within the Pacinian-corpuscle…

  6. SK channels and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Adelman, John P

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ions are Nature's most widely used signaling mechanism, mediating communication between pathways at virtually every physiological level. Ion channels are no exception, as the activities of a wide range of ion channels are intricately shaped by fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Mirroring the importance and the breadth of Ca(2+) signaling, free Ca(2+) levels are tightly controlled, and a myriad of Ca(2+) binding proteins transduce Ca(2+) signals, each with its own nuance, comprising a constantly changing symphony of metabolic activity. The founding member of Ca(2+) binding proteins is calmodulin (CaM), a small, acidic, modular protein endowed with gymnastic-like flexibility and E-F hand motifs that chelate Ca(2+) ions. In this review, I will trace the history that led to the realization that CaM serves as the Ca(2+)-gating cue for SK channels, the experiments that revealed that CaM is an intrinsic subunit of SK channels, and itself a target of regulation. PMID:25942650

  7. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  8. Developments in relativistic channeling

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    The possibility of using channeling as a tool for high energy accelerator applications and particle physics has now been extensively investigated. Bent crystals have been used for accelerator extraction and for particle deflection. Applications as accelerating devices have been discussed but have not yet been tried. 61 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Space medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The medical aspects of space flight are briefly discussed. The problems of space adaptation syndrome, commonly known as space sickness, are described, and its cause is shown. The adaptation of the cardiovascular system to weightlessness, the problems of radiation in space, atrophy of bones and muscles, and loss of blood volume are addressed. The difficulties associated with the reexperience of gravity on return to earth are briefly considered.

  10. Base norms and discrimination of generalized quantum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Jenčová, A.

    2014-02-15

    We introduce and study norms in the space of hermitian matrices, obtained from base norms in positively generated subspaces. These norms are closely related to discrimination of so-called generalized quantum channels, including quantum states, channels, and networks. We further introduce generalized quantum decision problems and show that the maximal average payoffs of decision procedures are again given by these norms. We also study optimality of decision procedures, in particular, we obtain a necessary and sufficient condition under which an optimal 1-tester for discrimination of quantum channels exists, such that the input state is maximally entangled.

  11. Optimum ion channel properties in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Adair, Robert K

    2004-04-01

    Evolutionary pressures are presumed to act so as to maximize the efficiency of biological systems. However, the utility of that premise is marred by the difficulties in defining and evaluating both the efficiency of systems and the character of the available variation space. Following Hodgkin and Adrian, we examine the character of voltage gated ion channels in the nonmyelinated giant axons of the squid and find that both the channel densities and channel transition rates have values that nearly optimize signal sensitivity as well as signal velocity.

  12. Optimum ion channel properties in the squid giant axon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adair, Robert K.

    2004-04-01

    Evolutionary pressures are presumed to act so as to maximize the efficiency of biological systems. However, the utility of that premise is marred by the difficulties in defining and evaluating both the efficiency of systems and the character of the available variation space. Following Hodgkin and Adrian, we examine the character of voltage gated ion channels in the nonmyelinated giant axons of the squid and find that both the channel densities and channel transition rates have values that nearly optimize signal sensitivity as well as signal velocity.

  13. Compact 4-channel AWGs for CWDM and LAN WDM in data center monolithic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Pan; An, Junming; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Jiashun; Wang, Liangliang; Qi, Ying; Han, Qin; Hu, Xiongwei

    2015-12-01

    InP-based 4-channel AWGs for Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexing (CWDM) with channel spacing of 20 nm and Local Area Network (LAN) WDM with channel spacing of 800 GHz are designed and fabricated. The deep-ridge waveguide is used to make the chip compact, chip size of AWG for CWDM is 0.55×3.9 mm2 and for LAN WDM is 1.6×3 mm2. The measured results indicate that, the insertion losses are -5 dB and -7 dB, crosstalk levels are below -25 dB and -24 dB for AWG with 20 nm channel spacing and 800 GHz channel spacing, respectively. These AWGs can be integrated with lasers and detectors array monolithically for data center applications.

  14. Multipurpose Spaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan

    This paper examines the emerging trend of multipurpose class spaces, including educational trends influencing multipurpose classroom use, and key issues when using these spaces. Issues discussed include room location, technology integration, food services, acoustics, lighting, outdoor space, capacity, and storage. Design principles emphasized…

  15. Space Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermida, Julian

    2006-01-01

    This chapter examines the salient characteristics of Space Law. It analyzes the origins and evolution of Space Law, its main international principles, and some current topics of interest to the scientific community: the delimitation of airspace and outer space, intellectual property, and criminal responsibility.

  16. Multipurpose Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    The concept of multipurpose spaces in schools is certainly not new. Especially in elementary schools, the combination of cafeteria and auditorium (and sometimes indoor physical activity space as well) is a well-established approach to maximizing the use of school space and a school district's budget. Nonetheless, there continue to be refinements…

  17. Trellis coded modulation for transmission over fading mobile satellite channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin K. (Inventor); Divasalar, Dariush (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The combination of trellis coding and multiple phase-shift keyed (MPSK) signaling with asymmetry (nonuniform spacing) to the signal set is disclosed with regard to its suitability for a fading mobile satellite communication channel. For MPSK signaling, introducing nonuniformity in the phase spacing between signal points provides an improvement in performance over that achievable with trellis codes symmetric MPSK signaling, all this without increasing the average or peak power, or changing the bandwidth constraints imposed on the system. Block interleaving may be used to reduce error and pilot tone(s) may be used for improving the error correction performance of the trellis decoder in the presence of channel fading.

  18. Fermi Liquid Instabilities in the Spin Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Congjun; Sun, Kai; Fradkin, Eduardo; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-16

    We study the Fermi surface instabilities of the Pomeranchuk type in the spin triplet channel with high orbital partial waves (F{sub l}{sup a} (l > 0)). The ordered phases are classified into two classes, dubbed the {alpha} and {beta}-phases by analogy to the superfluid {sup 3}He-A and B-phases. The Fermi surfaces in the {alpha}-phases exhibit spontaneous anisotropic distortions, while those in the {beta}-phases remain circular or spherical with topologically non-trivial spin configurations in momentum space. In the {alpha}-phase, the Goldstone modes in the density channel exhibit anisotropic overdamping. The Goldstone modes in the spin channel have nearly isotropic underdamped dispersion relation at small propagating wavevectors. Due to the coupling to the Goldstone modes, the spin wave spectrum develops resonance peaks in both the {alpha} and {beta}-phases, which can be detected in inelastic neutron scattering experiments. In the p-wave channel {beta}-phase, a chiral ground state inhomogeneity is spontaneously generated due to a Lifshitz-like instability in the originally nonchiral systems. Possible experiments to detect these phases are discussed.

  19. Vortex matter driven through mesoscopic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kes, P. H.; Kokubo, N.; Besseling, R.

    2004-08-01

    The dynamics of vortex matter confined to mesoscopic channels has been investigated by means of mode locking experiments. When vortices are coherently driven through the potential provided by static vortices pinned in the channel edges, interference between the washboard frequency of the moving vortex lattice and the frequency of the superimposed rf-drive causes (Shapiro-like) steps in the dc- I- V curves. The position of the voltage steps uniquely determines the number of moving rows in each channel. It also shows how the frustration between row spacing and channel width behaves as a function of magnetic field. Maxima in flow stress (∼ Ic) occur at mismatch conditions. They are related to the traffic-jam-like flow impedance caused by the disorder in the edges. At higher fields, near the 2D-melting line Bm( T), the mode-locking interference characteristic for crystalline motion, strongly depends on the velocity, i.e. the applied frequency at which the vortex motion is probed. The minimum velocity at which coherent motion could be observed, diverges when the melting line is approached from below. Above the melting line interference is absent for any frequency. These observations give the first direct evidence for a dynamic phase transition of vortex matter driven through a disorder potential as predicted by Koshelev and Vinokur.

  20. Poiseuille flow in curved spaces.

    PubMed

    Debus, J-D; Mendoza, M; Succi, S; Herrmann, H J

    2016-04-01

    We investigate Poiseuille channel flow through intrinsically curved media, equipped with localized metric perturbations. To this end, we study the flux of a fluid driven through the curved channel in dependence of the spatial deformation, characterized by the parameters of the metric perturbations (amplitude, range, and density). We find that the flux depends only on a specific combination of parameters, which we identify as the average metric perturbation, and derive a universal flux law for the Poiseuille flow. For the purpose of this study, we have improved and validated our recently developed lattice Boltzmann model in curved space by considerably reducing discrete lattice effects.

  1. Learning Channels and Verbal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Fan-Yu; Kubina, Richard M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the basics of learning channels and how specification of stimuli can help enhance verbal behavior. This article will define learning channels and the role of the ability matrix in training verbal behavior.

  2. Fluid channeling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald Y. (Inventor); Hitch, Bradley D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fluid channeling system includes a fluid ejector, a heat exchanger, and a fluid pump disposed in series flow communication The ejector includes a primary inlet for receiving a primary fluid, and a secondary inlet for receiving a secondary fluid which is mixed with the primary fluid and discharged therefrom as ejector discharge. Heat is removed from the ejector discharge in the heat exchanger, and the heat exchanger discharge is compressed in the fluid pump and channeled to the ejector secondary inlet as the secondary fluid In an exemplary embodiment, the temperature of the primary fluid is greater than the maximum operating temperature of a fluid motor powering the fluid pump using a portion of the ejector discharge, with the secondary fluid being mixed with the primary fluid so that the ejector discharge temperature is equal to about the maximum operating temperature of the fluid motor.

  3. Geysering in boiling channels

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomi, Masanori; Takemoto, Takatoshi; Chiang, Jing-Hsien

    1995-09-01

    A concept of natural circulation BWRs such as the SBWR has been proposed and seems to be promising in that the primary cooling system can be simplified. The authors have been investigating thermo-hydraulic instabilities which may appear during the start-up in natural circulation BWRs. In our previous works, geysering was investigated in parallel boiling channels for both natural and forced circulations, and its driving mechanism and the effect of system pressure on geysering occurrence were made clear. In this paper, geysering is investigated in a vertical column and a U-shaped vertical column heated in the lower parts. It is clarified from the results that the occurrence mechanism of geysering and the dependence of system pressure on geysering occurrence coincide between parallel boiling channels in circulation systems and vertical columns in non-circulation systems.

  4. Characteristic analysis on UAV-MIMO channel based on normalized correlation matrix.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xi jun; Chen, Zi li; Hu, Yong Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Based on the three-dimensional GBSBCM (geometrically based double bounce cylinder model) channel model of MIMO for unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), the simple form of UAV space-time-frequency channel correlation function which includes the LOS, SPE, and DIF components is presented. By the methods of channel matrix decomposition and coefficient normalization, the analytic formula of UAV-MIMO normalized correlation matrix is deduced. This formula can be used directly to analyze the condition number of UAV-MIMO channel matrix, the channel capacity, and other characteristic parameters. The simulation results show that this channel correlation matrix can be applied to describe the changes of UAV-MIMO channel characteristics under different parameter settings comprehensively. This analysis method provides a theoretical basis for improving the transmission performance of UAV-MIMO channel. The development of MIMO technology shows practical application value in the field of UAV communication.

  5. Space Commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    A robust and competitive commercial space sector is vital to continued progress in space. The United States is committed to encouraging and facilitating the growth of a U.S. commercial space sector that supports U.S. needs, is globally competitive, and advances U.S. leadership in the generation of new markets and innovation-driven entrepreneurship. Energize competitive domestic industries to participate in global markets and advance the development of: satellite manufacturing; satellite-based services; space launch; terrestrial applications; and increased entrepreneurship. Purchase and use commercial space capabilities and services to the maximum practical extent Actively explore the use of inventive, nontraditional arrangements for acquiring commercial space goods and services to meet United States Government requirements, including measures such as public-private partnerships, . Refrain from conducting United States Government space activities that preclude, discourage, or compete with U.S. commercial space activities. Pursue potential opportunities for transferring routine, operational space functions to the commercial space sector where beneficial and cost-effective.

  6. Athermal channeled spectropolarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Julia Craven

    2015-12-08

    A temperature insensitive (athermal) channeled spectropolarimeter (CSP) is described. The athermal CSP includes a crystal retarder formed of a biaxial crystal. The crystal retarder has three crystal axes, wherein each axis has its own distinct index of refraction. The axes are oriented in a particular manner, causing an amplitude modulating carrier frequency induced by the crystal retarder to be thermally invariant. Accordingly, a calibration beam technique can be used over a relatively wide range of ambient temperatures, with a common calibration data set.

  7. Aquaglyceroporins: generalized metalloid channels

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aquaporins (AQPs), members of a superfamily of transmembrane channel proteins, are ubiquitous in all domains of life. They fall into a number of branches that can be functionally categorized into two major sub-groups: i) orthodox aquaporins, which are water-specific channels, and ii) aquaglyceroporins, which allow the transport of water, non-polar solutes, such as urea or glycerol, the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide, and gases such as ammonia, carbon dioxide and nitric oxide and, as described in this review, metalloids. Scope of Review: This review summarizes the key findings that AQP channels conduct bidirectional movement of metalloids into and out of cells. Major Conclusions: As(OH)3 and Sb(OH)3 behave as inorganic molecular mimics of glycerol, a property that allows their passage through AQP channels. Plant AQPs also allow the passage of boron and silicon as their hydroxyacids, boric acid (B(OH)3) and orthosilicic acid (Si(OH)4), respectively. Genetic analysis suggests that germanic acid (GeO2) is also a substrate. While As(III), Sb(III) and Ge(IV) are toxic metalloids, borate (B(III)) and silicate (Si(IV)) are essential elements in higher plants. General Significance: The uptake of environmental metalloids by aquaporins provides an understanding of (i) how toxic elements such as arsenic enter the food chain; (ii) the delivery of arsenic and antimony containing drugs in the treatment of certain forms of leukemia and chemotherapy of diseases caused by pathogenic protozoa; and (iii) the possibility that food plants such as rice could be made safer by genetically modifying them to exclude arsenic while still accumulating boron and silicon. PMID:24291688

  8. Space law and space resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Nathan C.

    1992-01-01

    Space industrialization is confronting space law with problems that are changing old and shaping new legal principles. The return to the Moon, the next logical step beyond the space station, will establish a permanent human presence there. Science and engineering, manufacturing and mining will involve the astronauts in the settlement of the solar system. These pioneers, from many nations, will need a legal, political, and social framework to structure their lives and interactions. International and even domestic space law are only the beginning of this framework. Dispute resolution and simple experience will be needed in order to develop, over time, a new social system for the new regime of space.

  9. Radar channel balancing with commutation

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    When multiple channels are employed in a pulse-Doppler radar, achieving and maintaining balance between the channels is problematic. In some circumstances the channels may be commutated to achieve adequate balance. Commutation is the switching, trading, toggling, or multiplexing of the channels between signal paths. Commutation allows modulating the imbalance energy away from the balanced energy in Doppler, where it can be mitigated with filtering.

  10. Erosional channels on the shoreface of Nauset Beach, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Needell, S. W.; Dillon, William P.; Knebel, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    Many channels (1 to 3 m relief)_are located offshore of Nauset Beach, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, in water 4 to 18 m deep. The channels are oblique to the shoreline, are spaced approximately 260 m apart, and deepen seaward. The southern flank of each channel is rippled whereas the northern flank and interchannel areas are smooth. The origin of the channels is unknown. They probably formed by erosion of the shoreface, perhaps by rip-current circulation during storm conditions or by rip-current circulation under quiet conditions. The channels may control current flow and thereby maintain themselves even though formative conditions may no longer exist.

  11. Performance characteristics according to the channel length and magnetic fields of cylindrical Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jongsub; Seo, Mihui; Seon, Jongho; June Lee, Hae; Choe, Wonho

    2011-09-01

    Performance characteristics of low power cylindrical Hall thrusters are investigated in terms of the length of the discharge channel. Thrust, efficiency, discharge current, and propellant utilization are evaluated for different channel lengths of 19, 22, and 25 mm. It is found that the propellant utilization and ion energy distribution function are strongly associated with the channel length. Increase of thrust and efficiency are also found with increasing channel lengths. These characteristics of the thruster are interpreted with possible generation of multi-charged ions due to increased residing time within the extended space inside the channel.

  12. Ion channeling revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Corona, Aldo; Nguyen, Anh

    2014-09-01

    A MS Excel program has been written that calculates accidental, or unintentional, ion channeling in cubic bcc, fcc and diamond lattice crystals or polycrystalline materials. This becomes an important issue when simulating the creation by energetic neutrons of point displacement damage and extended defects using beams of ions. All of the tables and graphs in the three Ion Beam Analysis Handbooks that previously had to be manually looked up and read from were programed into Excel in handy lookup tables, or parameterized, for the case of the graphs, using rather simple exponential functions with different powers of the argument. The program then offers an extremely convenient way to calculate axial and planar half-angles and minimum yield or dechanneling probabilities, effects on half-angles of amorphous overlayers, accidental channeling probabilities for randomly oriented crystals or crystallites, and finally a way to automatically generate stereographic projections of axial and planar channeling half-angles. The program can generate these projections and calculate these probabilities for axes and [hkl] planes up to (555).

  13. Sodium channel inactivation in the crayfish giant axon. Must channels open before inactivating

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, B.P.

    1981-09-01

    Experiments on sodium channel inactivation kinetics were performed on voltage-clamped crayfish giant axons. The primary goals was to investigate whether channels must open before activating. Voltage-clamp artifacts were minimized by the use of low-sodium solutions and full series resistance compensation, and the spatial uniformity of the currents was checked with a closely spaced pair of electrodes used to measure local current densities. For membrane potentials between -40 and +40 mV, sodium currents decay to zero with a single exponential time-course. The time constant for decay is a steep function of membrane potential. The time-course of inactivation measured with the double-pulse method is very similar to the decay of current at the same potential. Steady-state inactivation curves measured with different test pulses are identical. The time-course of doubling pulse inactivation shows a lag that roughly correlates with the opening of sodium channels, but it is not strictly necessary for channels to open before inactivating. Measurements of the potential dependence of the integral of sodium conductance are also inconsistent with the simplest cases of models in which channels must open before activating.

  14. Micro-channel plate detector

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Lee, Seon W.; Wang, Hsien -Hau; Pellin, Michael J.; Byrum, Karen; Frisch, Henry J.

    2015-09-22

    A method and system for providing a micro-channel plate detector. An anodized aluminum oxide membrane is provided and includes a plurality of nanopores which have an Al coating and a thin layer of an emissive oxide material responsive to incident radiation, thereby providing a plurality of radiation sensitive channels for the micro-channel plate detector.

  15. Cascading blockages in channel bundles.

    PubMed

    Barré, C; Talbot, J

    2015-11-01

    Flow in channel networks may involve a redistribution of flux following the blockage or failure of an individual link. Here we consider a simplified model consisting of N(c) parallel channels conveying a particulate flux. Particles enter these channels according to a homogeneous Poisson process and an individual channel blocks if more than N particles are simultaneously present. The behavior of the composite system depends strongly on how the flux of entering particles is redistributed following a blockage. We consider two cases. In the first, the intensity on each open channel remains constant while in the second the total intensity is evenly redistributed over the open channels. We obtain exact results for arbitrary N(c) and N for a system of independent channels and for arbitrary N(c) and N=1 for coupled channels. For N>1 we present approximate analytical as well as numerical results. Independent channels block at a decreasing rate due to a simple combinatorial effect, while for coupled channels the interval between successive blockages remains constant for N=1 but decreases for N>1. This accelerating cascade is due to the nonlinear dependence of the mean blocking time of a single channel on the entering particle flux that more than compensates for the decrease in the number of active channels.

  16. Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark; Flanagan, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    Space telescopes have been a dominant force in astrophysics and astronomy over the last two decades. As Lyman Spitzer predicted in 1946, space telescopes have opened up much of the electromagnetic spectrum to astronomers, and provided the opportunity to exploit the optical performance of telescopes uncompromised by the turbulent atmosphere. This special section of Optical Engineering is devoted to space telescopes. It focuses on the design and implementation of major space observatories from the gamma-ray to far-infrared, and highlights the scientific and technical breakthroughs enabled by these telescopes. The papers accepted for publication include reviews of major space telescopes spanning the last two decades, in-depth discussions of the design considerations for visible and x-ray telescopes, and papers discussing concepts and technical challenges for future space telescopes.

  17. Development of a Crosslink Channel Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Chris; Smith, Carl; Burns, Rich

    2004-01-01

    Distributed Spacecraft missions are an integral part of current and future plans for NASA and other space agencies. Many of these multi-vehicle missions involve utilizing the array of spacecraft as a single, instrument requiring communication via crosslinks to achieve mission goals. NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing the Formation Flying Test Bed (FFTB) to provide a hardware-in-the-loop simulation environment to support mission concept development and system trades with a primary focus on Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) challenges associated with spacecraft flying. The goal of the FFTB is to reduce mission risk by assisting in mission planning and analysis, provide a technology development platform that allows algorithms to be developed for mission functions such as precision formation navigation and control and time synchronization. The FFTB will provide a medium in which the various crosslink transponders being used in multi-vehicle missions can be integrated for development and test; an integral part of the FFTB is the Crosslink Channel Simulator (CCS). The CCS is placed into the communications channel between the crosslinks under test, and is used to simulate on-mission effects to the communications channel such as vehicle maneuvers, relative vehicle motion, or antenna misalignment. The CCS is based on the Starlight software programmable platform developed at General Dynamics Decision Systems and provides the CCS with the ability to be modified on the fly to adapt to new crosslink formats or mission parameters. This paper briefly describes the Formation Flying Test Bed and its potential uses. It then provides details on the current and future development of the Crosslink Channel Simulator and its capabilities.

  18. Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, Melissa A.

    2007-01-01

    Space exploration is an endeavor that has universal appeal, is far reaching in its consequences, crossing borders and spanning intellectual disciplines from art to literature to mathematics, with a purpose and reach that can potentially unite. To enhance awareness and strengthen cooperation within the space community, and provide inspiration for new activities, Dr. McGrath will provide a brief glimpse into a few of the exciting space exploration activities currently being undertaken by NASA.

  19. Reconfigurable optical inter-channel interference mitigation for spectrally overlapped QPSK signals using nonlinear wave mixing in cascaded PPLN waveguides.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yinwen; Ziyadi, Morteza; Mohajerin-Ariaei, Amirhossein; Almaiman, Ahmed; Liao, Peicheng; Bao, Changjing; Alishahi, Fatemeh; Falahpour, Ahmad; Shamee, Bishara; Yang, Jeng-Yuan; Akasaka, Youichi; Sekiya, Motoyoshi; Tur, Moshe; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, Martin; Touch, Joseph; Willner, Alan E

    2016-07-15

    A reconfigurable all-optical inter-channel interference (ICI) mitigation method is proposed for an overlapped channel system that avoids the need for multi-channel detection and channel spacing estimation. The system exhibits a 0.5-dB implementation penalty compared to a single-channel baseline system. Experiments using a dual-carrier QPSK overlapped system with both 20G-baud and 25G-baud under different channel spacing conditions evaluate the performance of the method. Improved signal constellation and receiver sensitivity demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. This results in over 4-dB OSNR of benefit when the system Q-factor reaches a forward error correction (FEC) threshold of 8.5 dB under less-than-baudrate channel spacing conditions. PMID:27420503

  20. Reconfigurable optical inter-channel interference mitigation for spectrally overlapped QPSK signals using nonlinear wave mixing in cascaded PPLN waveguides.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yinwen; Ziyadi, Morteza; Mohajerin-Ariaei, Amirhossein; Almaiman, Ahmed; Liao, Peicheng; Bao, Changjing; Alishahi, Fatemeh; Falahpour, Ahmad; Shamee, Bishara; Yang, Jeng-Yuan; Akasaka, Youichi; Sekiya, Motoyoshi; Tur, Moshe; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, Martin; Touch, Joseph; Willner, Alan E

    2016-07-15

    A reconfigurable all-optical inter-channel interference (ICI) mitigation method is proposed for an overlapped channel system that avoids the need for multi-channel detection and channel spacing estimation. The system exhibits a 0.5-dB implementation penalty compared to a single-channel baseline system. Experiments using a dual-carrier QPSK overlapped system with both 20G-baud and 25G-baud under different channel spacing conditions evaluate the performance of the method. Improved signal constellation and receiver sensitivity demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. This results in over 4-dB OSNR of benefit when the system Q-factor reaches a forward error correction (FEC) threshold of 8.5 dB under less-than-baudrate channel spacing conditions.

  1. Development of channel organization and roughness following sediment pulses in single-thread, gravel bed rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madej, Mary Ann

    2001-01-01

    Large, episodic inputs of coarse sediment (sediment pulses) in forested, mountain streams may result in changes in the size and arrangement of bed forms and in channel roughness. A conceptual model of channel organization delineates trajectories of response to sediment pulses for many types of gravel bed channels. Channels exhibited self-organizing behavior to various degrees based on channel gradient, presence of large in-channel wood or other forcing elements, the size of the sediment pulse, and the number of bed-mobilizing flows since disturbance. Typical channel changes following a sediment pulse were initial decreases in water depth, in variability of bed elevations, and in the regularity of bed form spacing. Trajectories of change subsequently showed increased average water depth, more variable and complex bed topography, and increased uniformity of bed form spacing. Bed form spacing in streams with abundant forcing elements developed at a shorter spatial scale (two to five channel widths) than in streams without such forcing mechanisms (five to 10 channel widths). Channel roughness increased as bed forms developed.

  2. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  3. Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Sam L.

    2000-01-01

    The National Academy of Sciences Committee on Space Biology and Medicine points out that space medicine is unique among space sciences, because in addition to addressing questions of fundamental scientific interest, it must address clinical or human health and safety issues as well. Efforts to identify how microgravity affects human physiology began in earnest by the United States in 1960 with the establishment of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA's) Life Sciences program. Before the first human space missions, prediction about the physiological effects of microgravity in space ranged from extremely severe to none at all. The understanding that has developed from our experiences in space to date allows us to be guardedly optimistic about the ultimate accommodations of humans to space flight. Only by our travels into the microgravity environment of space have we begun to unravel the mysteries associated with gravity's role in shaping human physiology. Space medicine is still at its very earliest stages. Development of this field has been slow for several reasons, including the limited number of space flights, the small number of research subjects, and the competition within the life sciences community and other disciplines for flight opportunities. The physiological changes incurred during space flight may have a dramatic effect on the course of an injury or illness. These physiological changes present an exciting challenge for the field of space medicine: how to best preserve human health and safety while simultaneously deciphering the effects of microgravity on human performance. As the United States considers the future of humans in long-term space travel, it is essential that the many mysteries as to how microgravity affects human systems be addressed with vigor. Based on the current state of our knowledge, the justification is excellent indeed compelling- for NASA to develop a sophisticated capability in space medicine. Teams of physicians

  4. Space suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, L. F.; Durney, G. P.; Case, M. C.; Kenneway, A. J., III; Wise, R. C.; Rinehart, D.; Bessette, R. J.; Pulling, R. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A pressure suit for high altitude flights, particularly space missions is reported. The suit is designed for astronauts in the Apollo space program and may be worn both inside and outside a space vehicle, as well as on the lunar surface. It comprises an integrated assembly of inner comfort liner, intermediate pressure garment, and outer thermal protective garment with removable helmet, and gloves. The pressure garment comprises an inner convoluted sealing bladder and outer fabric restraint to which are attached a plurality of cable restraint assemblies. It provides versitility in combination with improved sealing and increased mobility for internal pressures suitable for life support in the near vacuum of outer space.

  5. Roughness characteristics of natural channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Harry Hawthorne

    1967-01-01

    Color photographs and descriptive data are presented for 50 stream channels for which roughness coefficients have been determined. All hydraulic computations involving flow in open channels require an evaluation of the roughness characteristics of the channel. In the absence of a satisfactory quantitative procedure this evaluation remains chiefly an art. The ability to evaluate roughness coefficients must be developed through experience. One means of gaining this experience is by examining and becoming acquainted with the appearance of some typical channels whose roughness coefficients are known. The photographs and data contained in this report represent a wide range of channel conditions. Familiarity with the appearance, geometry, and roughness characteristics of these channels will improve the engineer's ability to select roughness coefficients for other channels .

  6. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  7. High Resolution Millimeter Wave Inspecting of the Orbiter Acreage Heat Tiles of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, J. T.; Khakovsky, S.; Zoughi, r.; Hepburn, F.

    2007-01-01

    Presence of defects such as disbonds, delaminations, impact damage, in thermal protection systems can significantly reduce safety of the Space Shuttle and its crew. The physical cause of Space Shuttle Columbia's catastrophic failure was a breach in its thermal protection system, caused by a piece of external tank insulating foam separating from the external tank and striking the leading edge of the left wing of the orbiter. There is an urgent need for a rapid, robust and life-circle oriented nondestructive testing (NDT) technique capable of inspecting the external tank insulating foam as well as the orbiter's protective (acreage) heat tiles and its fuselage prior and subsequent to a launch. Such a comprehensive inspection technique enables NASA to perform life-cycle inspection on critical components of the orbiter and its supporting hardware. Consequently, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center initiated an investigation into several potentially viable NDT techniques for this purpose. Microwave and millimeter wave NDT methods have shown great potential to achieve these goals. These methods have been successfully used to produce images of the interior of various complex, thick and thin external tank insulating foam structures for real focused reflectometer at operating frequency from 50-100 GHz and for synthetic aperture techniques at Ku-band (12-18 GHz) and K-band (18-26 GHz). Preliminary results of inspecting heat tile specimens show that increasing resolution of the measurement system is an important issue. This paper presents recent results of an investigation for the purpose of detecting anomalies such as debonds and corrosion in metal substrate in complex multi-sectioned protective heat tile specimens using a real focused 150 GHz (D-band) reflectometer and wide-band millimeter wave holography at 33-50, GHz (Q-band).

  8. Space technology developments in Malaysia:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabirin, A.

    The venture of space is, by nature, a costly one. However, exploring space is not just an activity reserved for international superpowers. Smaller and emerging space nations, some with burgeoning space programs of their own, can play a role in space technology development and interplanetary exploration, sometimes simply by just being there. Over the past four decades, the range of services delivered by space technologies in Malaysia has grown enormously. For many business and public services, space based technologies have become the primary means of delivery of such services. Space technology development in Malaysia started with Malaysia's first microsatellite, TiungSAT-1. TiungSAT-1 has been successfully launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on the 26th of September 2000 on a Russian-Ukrainian Dnepr rocket. There have been wide imaging applications and information extraction using data from TiungSAT-1. Various techniques have been applied to the data for different applications in environmental assessment and monitoring as well as resource management. As a step forward, Malaysia has also initiated another space technology programme, RAZAKSAT. RAZAKSAT is a 180kg class satellite designed to provide 2.5meter ground sampling distance resolution imagery on a near equatorial orbit. Its mission objective is to demonstrate the capability of a medium high resolution remote sensing camera using a cost effective small satellite platform and a multi-channel linear push-broom electro-optical instrument. Realizing the immense benefits of space technology and its significant role in promoting sustainable development, Malaysia is committed to the continuous development and advancement of space technology within the scope of peaceful use of outer space and boosting its national economic growth through space related activities.

  9. Collaborative Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippman, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    When architects discuss the educational facilities of the next century and beyond, the conversation turns to collaborative spaces. They envision flexible and fluid spaces that will encourage creative and critical thinking, and free students to communicate clearly about the task at hand. While these are admirable ideals, there are some fundamental…

  10. Space Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Horneck, Gerda; Klaus, David M.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The responses of microorganisms (viruses, bacterial cells, bacterial and fungal spores, and lichens) to selected factors of space (microgravity, galactic cosmic radiation, solar UV radiation, and space vacuum) were determined in space and laboratory simulation experiments. In general, microorganisms tend to thrive in the space flight environment in terms of enhanced growth parameters and a demonstrated ability to proliferate in the presence of normally inhibitory levels of antibiotics. The mechanisms responsible for the observed biological responses, however, are not yet fully understood. A hypothesized interaction of microgravity with radiation-induced DNA repair processes was experimentally refuted. The survival of microorganisms in outer space was investigated to tackle questions on the upper boundary of the biosphere and on the likelihood of interplanetary transport of microorganisms. It was found that extraterrestrial solar UV radiation was the most deleterious factor of space. Among all organisms tested, only lichens (Rhizocarpon geographicum and Xanthoria elegans) maintained full viability after 2 weeks in outer space, whereas all other test systems were inactivated by orders of magnitude. Using optical filters and spores of Bacillus subtilis as a biological UV dosimeter, it was found that the current ozone layer reduces the biological effectiveness of solar UV by 3 orders of magnitude. If shielded against solar UV, spores of B. subtilis were capable of surviving in space for up to 6 years, especially if embedded in clay or meteorite powder (artificial meteorites). The data support the likelihood of interplanetary transfer of microorganisms within meteorites, the so-called lithopanspermia hypothesis. PMID:20197502

  11. Space psychology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parin, V. V.; Gorbov, F. D.; Kosmolinskiy, F. P.

    1974-01-01

    Psychological selection of astronauts considers mental responses and adaptation to the following space flight stress factors: (1) confinement in a small space; (2) changes in three dimensional orientation; (3) effects of altered gravity and weightlessness; (4) decrease in afferent nerve pulses; (5) a sensation of novelty and danger; and (6) a sense of separation from earth.

  12. Space microbiology.

    PubMed

    Horneck, Gerda; Klaus, David M; Mancinelli, Rocco L

    2010-03-01

    The responses of microorganisms (viruses, bacterial cells, bacterial and fungal spores, and lichens) to selected factors of space (microgravity, galactic cosmic radiation, solar UV radiation, and space vacuum) were determined in space and laboratory simulation experiments. In general, microorganisms tend to thrive in the space flight environment in terms of enhanced growth parameters and a demonstrated ability to proliferate in the presence of normally inhibitory levels of antibiotics. The mechanisms responsible for the observed biological responses, however, are not yet fully understood. A hypothesized interaction of microgravity with radiation-induced DNA repair processes was experimentally refuted. The survival of microorganisms in outer space was investigated to tackle questions on the upper boundary of the biosphere and on the likelihood of interplanetary transport of microorganisms. It was found that extraterrestrial solar UV radiation was the most deleterious factor of space. Among all organisms tested, only lichens (Rhizocarpon geographicum and Xanthoria elegans) maintained full viability after 2 weeks in outer space, whereas all other test systems were inactivated by orders of magnitude. Using optical filters and spores of Bacillus subtilis as a biological UV dosimeter, it was found that the current ozone layer reduces the biological effectiveness of solar UV by 3 orders of magnitude. If shielded against solar UV, spores of B. subtilis were capable of surviving in space for up to 6 years, especially if embedded in clay or meteorite powder (artificial meteorites). The data support the likelihood of interplanetary transfer of microorganisms within meteorites, the so-called lithopanspermia hypothesis.

  13. Space Telescope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

    This pamphlet describes the Space Telescope, an unmanned multi-purpose telescope observatory planned for launch into orbit by the Space Shuttle in the 1980s. The unique capabilities of this telescope are detailed, the major elements of the telescope are described, and its proposed mission operations are outlined. (CS)

  14. Quasi-isochronous Muon Collection Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, C.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Neuffer, D.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Intense muon beams have many potential applications, including neutrino factories and muon colliders. However, muons are produced as tertiary beams, resulting in diffuse phase space distributions. To make useful beams, the muons must be rapidly cooled before they decay. An idea conceived recently for the collection and cooling of muon beams, namely, the use of a Quasi-Isochronous Helical Channel (QIHC) to facilitate capture of muons into RF buckets, has been developed further. The resulting distribution could be cooled quickly and coalesced into a single bunch to optimize the luminosity of a muon collider. After a brief elaboration of the QIHC concept, recent developments are described.

  15. Alpha Channeling in a Rotating Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2008-09-23

    The wave-particle α-channeling effect is generalized to include rotating plasma. Specifically, radio frequency waves can resonate with α particles in a mirror machine with E × B rotation to diffuse the α particles along constrained paths in phase space. Of major interest is that the α-particle energy, in addition to amplifying the RF waves, can directly enhance the rotation energy which in turn provides additional plasma confinement in centrifugal fusion reactors. An ancillary benefit is the rapid removal of alpha particles, which increases the fusion reactivity.

  16. Turbulent supersonic channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Richard; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Friedrich, Rainer

    2001-01-01

    The effects of compressibility are studied in low Reynolds number turbulent supersonic channel flow via a direct numerical simulation. A pressure-velocity-entropy formulation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations which is cast in a characteristic, non-conservative form and allows one to specify exact wall boundary conditions, consistent with the field equations, is integrated using a fifth-order compact upwind scheme for the Euler part, a fourth-order Padé scheme for the viscous terms and a third-order low-storage Runge-Kutta time integration method. Coleman et al fully developed supersonic channel flow at M?=?1.5 and Re?=?3000 is used to test the method. The nature of fluctuating variables is investigated in detail for the wall layer and the core region based on scatter plots. Fluctuations conditioned on sweeps and ejections in the wall layer are especially instructive, showing that positive temperature, entropy and total temperature fluctuations are mainly due to sweep events in this specific situation of wall cooling. The effect of compressibility on the turbulence structure is in many respects similar to that found in homogeneous shear turbulence and in mixing layers. The normal components of the Reynolds stress anisotropy tensor are increased due to compressibility, while the shear stress component is slightly reduced. Characteristic of the Reynolds stress transport is a suppression of the production of the longitudinal and the shear stress component, a suppression of all velocity-pressure-gradient correlations and most of the dissipation rates. Comparison with incompressible channel flow data reveals that compressibility effects manifest themselves in the wall layer only.

  17. Space engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Harold L.

    1991-01-01

    Human productivity was studied for extravehicular tasks performed in microgravity, particularly including in-space assembly of truss structures and other large objects. Human factors research probed the anthropometric constraints imposed on microgravity task performance and the associated workstation design requirements. Anthropometric experiments included reach envelope tests conducted using the 3-D Acoustic Positioning System (3DAPS), which permitted measuring the range of reach possible for persons using foot restraints in neutral buoyancy, both with and without space suits. Much neutral buoyancy research was conducted using the support of water to simulate the weightlessness environment of space. It became clear over time that the anticipated EVA requirement associated with the Space Station and with in-space construction of interplanetary probes would heavily burden astronauts, and remotely operated robots (teleoperators) were increasingly considered to absorb the workload. Experience in human EVA productivity led naturally to teleoperation research into the remote performance of tasks through human controlled robots.

  18. Permeation in potassium channels: implications for channel structure.

    PubMed

    Yellen, G

    1987-01-01

    The SR K+ channel is a single-ion channel with a tunnel that is not very selective, while the DR and CaK channels are both more selective, multi-ion channels. The permeation mechanisms of the three channels are probably most systematically distinguished by the length of their tunnels; the SR has the shortest and the DR the longest. Although different in their mechanisms of activation, the DR and CaK channels have very similar permeation characteristics, down to the details of selectivity and blockade. The longer tunnel and reduced conductance (perhaps a result of the extra tunnel length) of the DR K+ channel are the main differences. The selectivity of the rate-limiting barriers and the binding sites within the channels, however, are strikingly similar. A successful potassium channel must satisfy two criteria: It must let potassium ions through and not much else, and it must let many potassium ions through. To be selective the channel must have a narrow selectivity filter, so that an ion must shed some of its waters of hydration to pass through. Sodium ions are excluded because they are more reluctant to lose their water, and they are not adequately compensated for this loss by interaction with the selectivity filter. To carry a large current the narrow region must be short, with wide antechambers to reduce the diffusional access resistance (48). Energetically, the channel must strike a balance. There must be enough binding energy to compensate the ions for their lost hydration energy, so that the energy barrier to permeation is small. If the channel binds the ion too tightly, however, the ion will not be able to exit, and the current will be small. Some of the shared properties of different potassium channels are probably consequences of these requirements; others may be incidental to function, suggesting a common origin. Barium ions have almost exactly the same radius as potassium ions but twice the charge, so it is perhaps not surprising that barium can block

  19. 66. VIEW OF DELUGE CHANNEL; NORTH FACE OF THEODOLITE SHELTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. VIEW OF DELUGE CHANNEL; NORTH FACE OF THEODOLITE SHELTER (BLDG. 788); TELEVISION CAMERA TOWER; CAMERA TOWER FROM SOUTH END OF LAUNCH DECK - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  20. Helical channel design and technology for cooling of muon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K; Derbenev, Y.S.; Johnson, R.P.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2010-08-01

    Novel magnetic helical channel designs for capture and cooling of bright muon beams are being developed using numerical simulations based on new inventions such as helical solenoid (HS) magnets and hydrogen-pressurized RF (HPRF) cavities. We are close to the factor of a million six-dimensional phase space (6D) reduction needed for muon colliders. Recent experimental and simulation results are presented.

  1. Integrated source and channel encoded digital communication system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.; Trumpis, B. D.; Udalov, S.

    1975-01-01

    Various aspects of space shuttle communication systems were studied. The following major areas were investigated: burst error correction for shuttle command channels; performance optimization and design considerations for Costas receivers with and without bandpass limiting; experimental techniques for measuring low level spectral components of microwave signals; and potential modulation and coding techniques for the Ku-band return link. Results are presented.

  2. Wave-current interaction in evolution of rip channel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Y.; Miyazaki, D.; Kaida, H.

    2014-12-01

    Current effects on waves (CEW) have been recognized to play an essential role in attenuating offshore extent of rip currents (e.g., Haas et al., 1999; Yu and Slinn, 2003; Weir et al., 2011). This mechanism is presumed to be responsible for morphological processes of sandy beaches. The present study aims at analyzing influence of CEW on the evolution of rip channel system due to deformation of an alongshore-uniform barred topography. We exploit a phase-averaged barotropic numerical model based on ROMS with an Eulerian-averaged vortex force formalism (McWilliams et al., 2004) coupled with a refraction wave model (ROMS-WEC; Uchiyama et al., 2009; 2010). An empirical total sediment load model of Soulsby and Van Rijn (1997) with a diffusive downslope transport effect (e.g., Garnier et al., 2008) is implemented for evaluating sediment transport and associated morphological evolution. The coupled, wave-current-sediment model successfully reproduces development of the alongshore periodic rip channel topography with normal incident offshore waves. The initial alongshore-uniform barred topography evolves into a rhythmic rip channel system through intrinsic instability triggered by a small disturbance. We then exhibit the rip current reduction by CEW on an immobile single barred beach with equally spaced rip channels. Among the other CEW such as the Doppler shift and wave set-down/up, wave refraction on currents is found to be most important in modifying the wavenumber field and breaker dissipation, leading to a systematic modulation in the diagnostic momentum balance. We further demonstrate that CEW has the first-order effect on the morphological processes where the resultant rip channel spacing is elongated 25-50% as compared to the case without CEW. In particular, CEW is crucial in widening the rip channel spacing, shoaling the rip channel in the surfzone, and shrinking submerged crescent mounds in the offshore beneath rip heads.

  3. Apparatus for assembling space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. D.; Tuggle, R. H., Jr.; Burch, J. L.; Clark, K. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for producing a structure in outer space from rolls of prepunched ribbon or sheet material that are transported from the earth to the apparatus located in outer space is described. The apparatus spins the space structure similar to a spider spinning a web utilizing the prepunched ribbon material. The prepunched ribbon material is fed through the apparatus and is shaped into a predetermined channel-shaped configuration. Trusses are punched out of the ribbon and are bent downwardly and attached to a track which normally is a previously laid sheet of material. The size of the overall space structure may be increased by merely attaching an additional roll of sheet material to the apparatus.

  4. Cholesterol binding to ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena; Singh, Dev K.; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies demonstrated that membrane cholesterol is a major regulator of ion channel function. The goal of this review is to discuss significant advances that have been recently achieved in elucidating the mechanisms responsible for cholesterol regulation of ion channels. The first major insight that comes from growing number of studies that based on the sterol specificity of cholesterol effects, show that several types of ion channels (nAChR, Kir, BK, TRPV) are regulated by specific sterol-protein interactions. This conclusion is supported by demonstrating direct saturable binding of cholesterol to a bacterial Kir channel. The second major advance in the field is the identification of putative cholesterol binding sites in several types of ion channels. These include sites at locations associated with the well-known cholesterol binding motif CRAC and its reversed form CARC in nAChR, BK, and TRPV, as well as novel cholesterol binding regions in Kir channels. Notably, in the majority of these channels, cholesterol is suggested to interact mainly with hydrophobic residues in non-annular regions of the channels being embedded in between transmembrane protein helices. We also discuss how identification of putative cholesterol binding sites is an essential step to understand the mechanistic basis of cholesterol-induced channel regulation. Clearly, however, these are only the first few steps in obtaining a general understanding of cholesterol-ion channels interactions and their roles in cellular and organ functions. PMID:24616704

  5. Space making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    With discoveries from Mars, the Hubble Deep Field, and Ganymede reawakening Washington's interest in space, the U.S. federal government has started fine-tuning its stance on space flight and exploration. The attention comes as prelude to a proposed November meeting to discuss astronomical and planetary discoveries, and to a rumored space summit in December between Vice President Al Gore and congressional leaders.On September 17, the House of Representatives passed by voice vote H.R. 3936, the Space Commercialization Promotion Act. A measure with strong bipartisan support, the bill officially encourages private companies to participate in the space industry and requires NASA to find more ways to work with the private sector. Updating and amending several existing U.S. policies about commerce in space, H.R. 3936 gives the Department of Transportation the authority to provide and administer licenses for commercial spacecraft to reenter American airspace from orbit and outer space. It also prods NASA to purchase scientific data about the Earth and the solar system from the private sector, whenever possible.

  6. Space polypropulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellett, B. J.; Griffin, D. K.; Bingham, R.; Campbell, R. N.; Forbes, A.; Michaelis, M. M.

    2008-05-01

    Hybrid space propulsion has been a feature of most space missions. Only the very early rocket propulsion experiments like the V2, employed a single form of propulsion. By the late fifties multi-staging was routine and the Space Shuttle employs three different kinds of fuel and rocket engines. During the development of chemical rockets, other forms of propulsion were being slowly tested, both theoretically and, relatively slowly, in practice. Rail and gas guns, ion engines, "slingshot" gravity assist, nuclear and solar power, tethers, solar sails have all seen some real applications. Yet the earliest type of non-chemical space propulsion to be thought of has never been attempted in space: laser and photon propulsion. The ideas of Eugen Saenger, Georgii Marx, Arthur Kantrowitz, Leik Myrabo, Claude Phipps and Robert Forward remain Earth-bound. In this paper we summarize the various forms of nonchemical propulsion and their results. We point out that missions beyond Saturn would benefit from a change of attitude to laser-propulsion as well as consideration of hybrid "polypropulsion" - which is to say using all the rocket "tools" available rather than possibly not the most appropriate. We conclude with three practical examples, two for the next decades and one for the next century; disposal of nuclear waste in space; a grand tour of the Jovian and Saturnian moons - with Huygens or Lunoxod type, landers; and eventually mankind's greatest space dream: robotic exploration of neighbouring planetary systems.

  7. Acoustic MIMO communications in a very shallow water channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuehai; Cao, Xiuling; Tong, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Underwater acoustic channels pose significant difficulty for the development of high speed communication due to highly limited band-width as well as hostile multipath interference. Enlightened by rapid progress of multiple input multiple output (MIMO) technologies in wireless communication scenarios, MIMO systems offer a potential solution by enabling multiple spatially parallel communication channels to improve communication performance as well as capacity. For MIMO acoustic communications, deep sea channels offer substantial spatial diversity among multiple channels that can be exploited to address simultaneous multipath and co-channel interference. At the same time, there are increasing requirements for high speed underwater communication in very shallow water area (for example, a depth less than 10 m). In this paper, a space-time multichannel adaptive receiver consisting of multiple decision feedback equalizers (DFE) is adopted as the receiver for a very shallow water MIMO acoustic communication system. The performance of multichannel DFE receivers with relatively small number of receiving elements are analyzed and compared with that of the multichannel time reversal receiver to evaluate the impact of limited spatial diversity on multi-channel equalization and time reversal processing. The results of sea trials in a very shallow water channel are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of very shallow water MIMO acoustic communication.

  8. Light transmission channels in random scattering media (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Recently it has been shown that shaping the wavefront of an incident laser beam can significantly enhance the total transmission of light through strong scattering media [1]. This is done by coupling light to high transmission channels. However, optical absorption would modify such transmission channels. In a disordered system with uniform absorption, the maximal transmission channel changes from diffusive to ballistic-like transport [2]. This ballistic-like transport may enable new modes of imaging in absorbing media. If the absorption is distributed non-uniformly in space, the high transmission channels redirect the energy flows to circumvent the absorbing regions to minimize loss. Thus the attenuation of high transmission channels by inhomogeneous absorption becomes lower than that by homogeneous absorption [3]. Since the maximum transmission channel is the most efficient in bypassing the absorbing region, the ratio of its transmittance to the average transmittance increases with absorption, eventually exceeds the ratio without absorption. The finding that inhomogeneous absorption may have a weaker impact on open channels than homogeneous absorption is promising for practical applications. [1] S. M. Popoff, A. Goetschy, S. F. Liew, A. D. Stone, and H. Cao. Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 133903 (2014). [2] S. F. Liew, S. M. Popoff, A. P. Mosk, W. L. Vos, and H. Cao. Phys. Rev. B 89, 224202 (2014). [3] S. F. Liew and H. Cao. Opt. Express 23, 11043 (2015).

  9. Active Integrated Filters for RF-Photonic Channelizers

    PubMed Central

    Nagdi, Amr El; Liu, Ke; LaFave, Tim P.; Hunt, Louis R.; Ramakrishna, Viswanath; Dabkowski, Mieczyslaw; MacFarlane, Duncan L.; Christensen, Marc P.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical study of RF-photonic channelizers using four architectures formed by active integrated filters with tunable gains is presented. The integrated filters are enabled by two- and four-port nano-photonic couplers (NPCs). Lossless and three individual manufacturing cases with high transmission, high reflection, and symmetric couplers are assumed in the work. NPCs behavior is dependent upon the phenomenon of frustrated total internal reflection. Experimentally, photonic channelizers are fabricated in one single semiconductor chip on multi-quantum well epitaxial InP wafers using conventional microelectronics processing techniques. A state space modeling approach is used to derive the transfer functions and analyze the stability of these filters. The ability of adapting using the gains is demonstrated. Our simulation results indicate that the characteristic bandpass and notch filter responses of each structure are the basis of channelizer architectures, and optical gain may be used to adjust filter parameters to obtain a desired frequency magnitude response, especially in the range of 1–5 GHz for the chip with a coupler separation of ∼9 mm. Preliminarily, the measurement of spectral response shows enhancement of quality factor by using higher optical gains. The present compact active filters on an InP-based integrated photonic circuit hold the potential for a variety of channelizer applications. Compared to a pure RF channelizer, photonic channelizers may perform both channelization and down-conversion in an optical domain. PMID:22319352

  10. Controls on channel steering by tectonics in sedimentary basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paola, C.; Straub, K. M.; Kim, W.

    2009-04-01

    Channel steering refers to the ability of spatial variations in uplift or subsidence to influence the migration, spatial distribution, and/or path direction of channels. We report the results of three experiments on channel steering under conditions of average net deposition. The experiments were done in the University of Minnesota Experimental EarthScape basin, which via its programmable subsiding floor can be used to create a wide variety of patterns of space-time subsidence. Underpinning the experimental program is the idea that the first-order control on tectonic channel steering is a ratio of two fundamental time scales: the time needed for lateral tectonic tilting to produce a slope comparable to the mean streamwise slope of the channel system; and the time needed for the channel system to occupy a fixed, large fraction of the basin surface. The experiments cover a wide range of values of this time-scale ratio, and also include cases with pure deposition (subsidence only) as well as mixed erosion and deposition (relative uplift and subsidence). Lateral tectonic patterns included a simple trough and a more complex geometry patterned after a relay ramp system. Overall, we find that the time scale ratio exerts the expected control: steering is weakest, for either tectonic geometry, when the channels are ‘fast' relative to the tectonics. But steering effects are manifested in different ways, depending on the geometry and possibly the history of the system.

  11. Space Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Mary Fae (Editor); McKay, David S. (Editor); Duke, Michael S. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Space resources must be used to support life on the Moon and exploration of Mars. Just as the pioneers applied the tools they brought with them to resources they found along the way rather than trying to haul all their needs over a long supply line, so too must space travelers apply their high technology tools to local resources. The pioneers refilled their water barrels at each river they forded; moonbase inhabitants may use chemical reactors to combine hydrogen brought from Earth with oxygen found in lunar soil to make their water. The pioneers sought temporary shelter under trees or in the lee of a cliff and built sod houses as their first homes on the new land; settlers of the Moon may seek out lava tubes for their shelter or cover space station modules with lunar regolith for radiation protection. The pioneers moved further west from their first settlements, using wagons they had built from local wood and pack animals they had raised; space explorers may use propellant made at a lunar base to take them on to Mars. The concept for this report was developed at a NASA-sponsored summer study in 1984. The program was held on the Scripps campus of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). It was jointly managed under the California Space Inst. and the NASA Johnson Space Center, under the direction of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) at NASA Headquarters. The study participants (listed in the addendum) included a group of 18 university teachers and researchers (faculty fellows) who were present for the entire 10-week period and a larger group of attendees from universities, Government, and industry who came for a series of four 1-week workshops. The organization of this report follows that of the summer study. Space Resources consists of a brief overview and four detailed technical volumes: (1) Scenarios; (2) Energy, Power, and Transport; (3) Materials; (4

  12. Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A general description of the space shuttle program is presented, with emphasis on its application to the use of space for commercial, scientific, and defense needs. The following aspects of the program are discussed: description of the flight system (orbiter, external tank, solid rocket boosters) and mission profile, direct benefits related to life on earth (both present and expected), description of the space shuttle vehicle and its associated supporting systems, economic impacts (including indirect benefits such as lower inflation rates), listing of participating organizations.

  13. Space medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Sam L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper attempts to underscore the importance of continued studies on the effects of space on human physiology. With particular reference to the Space Station, it is pointed out that there are two aspects which are challenging to life scientists: first is the development of a research capability for the life sciences which will be used to conduct investigations necessary to extend the time humans can remain in space; second is the challenge to develop a medical capability to provide prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. A discussion of physiological changes that have been observed in spacecrews follows along the lines of the two aspects mentioned.

  14. An Efficient, Highly Flexible Multi-Channel Digital Downconverter Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodhart, Charles E.; Soriano, Melissa A.; Navarro, Robert; Trinh, Joseph T.; Sigman, Elliott H.

    2013-01-01

    sampling rates of up to 1,280 MHz. The current implementation takes a 1,280-MHz real input, and first breaks it up into seven 160-MHz complex channels, each spaced 80 MHz apart. The eighth channel at baseband was not required for this implementation, and led to more optimization. Afterwards, 16 second stage narrow band channels with independently tunable center frequencies and bandwidth settings are implemented A future implementation in a larger Xilinx FPGA will hold up to 32 independent second-stage channels.

  15. A Narrow-Linewidth Atomic Line Filter for Free Space Quantum Key Distribution under Daytime Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Justin; Woolf, David; Hensley, Joel

    2016-05-01

    Quantum key distribution can provide secure optical data links using the established BB84 protocol, though solar backgrounds severely limit the performance through free space. Several approaches to reduce the solar background include time-gating the photon signal, limiting the field of view through geometrical design of the optical system, and spectral rejection using interference filters. Despite optimization of these parameters, the solar background continues to dominate under daytime atmospheric conditions. We demonstrate an improved spectral filter by replacing the interference filter (Δν ~ 50 GHz) with an atomic line filter (Δν ~ 1 GHz) based on optical rotation of linearly polarized light through a warm Rb vapor. By controlling the magnetic field and the optical depth of the vapor, a spectrally narrow region can be transmitted between crossed polarizers. We find that the transmission is more complex than a single peak and evaluate peak transmission as well as a ratio of peak transmission to average transmission of the local spectrum. We compare filters containing a natural abundance of Rb with those containing isotopically pure 87 Rb and 85 Rb. A filter providing > 95 % transmission and Δν ~ 1.1 GHz is achieved.

  16. Epithelial sodium channel modulates platelet collagen activation.

    PubMed

    Cerecedo, Doris; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Alonso-Rangel, Lea; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia; Ortega, Arturo

    2014-03-01

    Activated platelets adhere to the exposed subendothelial extracellular matrix and undergo a rapid cytoskeletal rearrangement resulting in shape change and release of their intracellular dense and alpha granule contents to avoid hemorrhage. A central step in this process is the elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration through its release from intracellular stores and on throughout its influx from the extracellular space. The Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a highly selective Na(+) channel involved in mechanosensation, nociception, fluid volume homeostasis, and control of arterial blood pressure. The present study describes the expression, distribution, and participation of ENaC in platelet migration and granule secretion using pharmacological inhibition with amiloride. Our biochemical and confocal analysis in suspended and adhered platelets suggests that ENaC is associated with Intermediate filaments (IF) and with Dystrophin-associated proteins (DAP) via α-syntrophin and β-dystroglycan. Migration assays, quantification of soluble P-selectin, and serotonin release suggest that ENaC is dispensable for migration and alpha and dense granule secretion, whereas Na(+) influx through this channel is fundamental for platelet collagen activation.

  17. Ion channel therapeutics for pain

    PubMed Central

    Skerratt, Sarah E; West, Christopher W

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a complex disease which can progress into a debilitating condition. The effective treatment of pain remains a challenge as current therapies often lack the desired level of efficacy or tolerability. One therapeutic avenue, the modulation of ion channel signaling by small molecules, has shown the ability to treat pain. However, of the 215 ion channels that exist in the human genome, with 85 ion channels having a strong literature link to pain, only a small number of these channels have been successfully drugged for pain. The focus of future research will be to fully explore the possibilities surrounding these unexplored ion channels. Toward this end, a greater understanding of ion channel modulation will be the greatest tool we have in developing the next generation of drugs for the treatment of pain. PMID:26218246

  18. Phosphoinositide regulation of TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels are activated by stimuli as diverse as heat, cold, noxious chemicals, mechanical forces, hormones, neurotransmitters, spices, and voltage. Besides their presumably similar general architecture, probably the only common factor regulating them is phosphoinositides. The regulation of TRP channels by phosphoinositides is complex. There is a large number of TRP channels where phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2 or PIP2], acts as a positive cofactor, similarly to many other ion channels. In several cases however, PI(4,5)P2 inhibits TRP channel activity, sometimes even concurrently with the activating effect. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the literature on regulation of TRP channels by membrane phosphoinositides. PMID:24961984

  19. Molecular Mechanism of TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are cellular sensors for a wide spectrum of physical and chemical stimuli. They are involved in the formation of sight, hearing, touch, smell, taste, temperature, and pain sensation. TRP channels also play fundamental roles in cell signaling and allow the host cell to respond to benign or harmful environmental changes. As TRP channel activation is controlled by very diverse processes and, in many cases, exhibits complex polymodal properties, understanding how each TRP channel responds to its unique forms of activation energy is both crucial and challenging. The past two decades witnessed significant advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie TRP channels activation. This review focuses on our current understanding of the molecular determinants for TRP channel activation. PMID:23720286

  20. Peptide models for membrane channels.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, D

    1996-01-01

    Peptides may be synthesized with sequences corresponding to putative transmembrane domains and/or pore-lining regions that are deduced from the primary structures of ion channel proteins. These can then be incorporated into lipid bilayer membranes for structural and functional studies. In addition to the ability to invoke ion channel activity, critical issues are the secondary structures adopted and the mode of assembly of these short transmembrane peptides in the reconstituted systems. The present review concentrates on results obtained with peptides from ligand-gated and voltage-gated ion channels, as well as proton-conducting channels. These are considered within the context of current molecular models and the limited data available on the structure of native ion channels and natural channel-forming peptides. PMID:8615800

  1. Space Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierly, Ken; Dalheim, Mary

    1981-01-01

    Presents an elementary teaching unit on NASA's space program, including teacher background information, suggested student activities, and a list of resources. Appended is a transcript of an interview conducted by elementary children with astronaut candidate Sherwood (Woody) Spring. (SJL)

  2. Mitochondrial small conductance SK2 channels prevent glutamate-induced oxytosis and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Dolga, Amalia M; Netter, Michael F; Perocchi, Fabiana; Doti, Nunzianna; Meissner, Lilja; Tobaben, Svenja; Grohm, Julia; Zischka, Hans; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Decher, Niels; Culmsee, Carsten

    2013-04-12

    Small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK2/K(Ca)2.2) channels are known to be located in the neuronal plasma membrane where they provide feedback control of NMDA receptor activity. Here, we provide evidence that SK2 channels are also located in the inner mitochondrial membrane of neuronal mitochondria. Patch clamp recordings in isolated mitoplasts suggest insertion into the inner mitochondrial membrane with the C and N termini facing the intermembrane space. Activation of SK channels increased mitochondrial K(+) currents, whereas channel inhibition attenuated these currents. In a model of glutamate toxicity, activation of SK2 channels attenuated the loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, blocked mitochondrial fission, prevented the release of proapoptotic mitochondrial proteins, and reduced cell death. Neuroprotection was blocked by specific SK2 inhibitory peptides and siRNA targeting SK2 channels. Activation of mitochondrial SK2 channels may therefore represent promising targets for neuroprotective strategies in conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  3. Fuel cell plates with improved arrangement of process channels for enhanced pressure drop across the plates

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.; Pierce, Bill L.; Wright, Maynard K.

    1986-01-01

    A plate for a fuel cell has an arrangement of ribs defining an improved configuration of process gas channels and slots on a surface of the plate which provide a modified serpentine gas flow pattern across the plate surface. The channels are generally linear and arranged parallel to one another while the spaced slots allow cross channel flow of process gas in a staggered fashion which creates a plurality of generally mini-serpentine flow paths extending transverse to the longitudinal gas flow along the channels. Adjacent pairs of the channels are interconnected to one another in flow communication. Also, a bipolar plate has the aforementioned process gas channel configuration on one surface and another configuration on the opposite surface. In the other configuration, there are not slots and the gas flow channels have a generally serpentine configuration.

  4. The Channel Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Channel Tunnel is a 50.5 km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover. It connects Dover, Kent in England with Calais, northern France. The undersea section of the tunnel is unsurpassed in length in the world. A proposal for a Channel tunnel was first put forward by a French engineer in 1802. In 1881, a first attempt was made at boring a tunnel from the English side; the work was halted after 800 m. Again in 1922, English workers started boring a tunnel, and advanced 120 m before it too was halted for political reasons. The most recent attempt was begun in 1987, and the tunnel was officially opened in 1994. At completion it was estimated that the project cost around $18 billion. It has been operating at a significant loss since its opening, despite trips by over 7 million passengers per year on the Eurostar train, and over 3 million vehicles per year.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring

  5. Space Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Nikon's F3 35mm camera was specially modified for use by Space Shuttle astronauts. The modification work produced a spinoff lubricant. Because lubricants in space have a tendency to migrate within the camera, Nikon conducted extensive development to produce nonmigratory lubricants; variations of these lubricants are used in the commercial F3, giving it better performance than conventional lubricants. Another spinoff is the coreless motor which allows the F3 to shoot 140 rolls of film on one set of batteries.

  6. Space science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A fact sheet on the NASA space science program is presented. Some of the subjects considered include the following: (1) the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory, (2) the Orbiting Solar Observatory, (3) the Small Astronomy Satellite, (4) lunar programs, (5) planetary programs using the Mariner, Pioneer 10, and Viking space probes, and (6) the Scout, Thor-Delta, and Atlas-Centaur launch vehicles. For each program there is a description of the effort, the schedule, management, program officials, and funding aspects in outline form.

  7. Channel Acquisition for Massive MIMO-OFDM With Adjustable Phase Shift Pilots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Li; Gao, Xiqi; Swindlehurst, A. Lee; Zhong, Wen

    2016-03-01

    We propose adjustable phase shift pilots (APSPs) for channel acquisition in wideband massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems employing orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) to reduce the pilot overhead. Based on a physically motivated channel model, we first establish a relationship between channel space-frequency correlations and the channel power angle-delay spectrum in the massive antenna array regime, which reveals the channel sparsity in massive MIMO-OFDM. With this channel model, we then investigate channel acquisition, including channel estimation and channel prediction, for massive MIMO-OFDM with APSPs. We show that channel acquisition performance in terms of sum mean square error can be minimized if the user terminals' channel power distributions in the angle-delay domain can be made non-overlapping with proper phase shift scheduling. A simplified pilot phase shift scheduling algorithm is developed based on this optimal channel acquisition condition. The performance of APSPs is investigated for both one symbol and multiple symbol data models. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed APSP approach can provide substantial performance gains in terms of achievable spectral efficiency over the conventional phase shift orthogonal pilot approach in typical mobility scenarios.

  8. Single-channel kinetics of BK (Slo1) channels

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yanyan; Magleby, Karl L.

    2014-01-01

    Single-channel kinetics has proven a powerful tool to reveal information about the gating mechanisms that control the opening and closing of ion channels. This introductory review focuses on the gating of large conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK or Slo1) channels at the single-channel level. It starts with single-channel current records and progresses to presentation and analysis of single-channel data and the development of gating mechanisms in terms of discrete state Markov (DSM) models. The DSM models are formulated in terms of the tetrameric modular structure of BK channels, consisting of a central transmembrane pore-gate domain (PGD) attached to four surrounding transmembrane voltage sensing domains (VSD) and a large intracellular cytosolic domain (CTD), also referred to as the gating ring. The modular structure and data analysis shows that the Ca2+ and voltage dependent gating considered separately can each be approximated by 10-state two-tiered models with five closed states on the upper tier and five open states on the lower tier. The modular structure and joint Ca2+ and voltage dependent gating are consistent with a 50 state two-tiered model with 25 closed states on the upper tier and 25 open states on the lower tier. Adding an additional tier of brief closed (flicker states) to the 10-state or 50-state models improved the description of the gating. For fixed experimental conditions a channel would gate in only a subset of the potential number of states. The detected number of states and the correlations between adjacent interval durations are consistent with the tiered models. The examined models can account for the single-channel kinetics and the bursting behavior of gating. Ca2+ and voltage activate BK channels by predominantly increasing the effective opening rate of the channel with a smaller decrease in the effective closing rate. Ca2+ and depolarization thus activate by mainly destabilizing the closed states. PMID:25653620

  9. Space education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiodun, Adigun Ade

    An essential pre-requisite to a successful space technology applications programme is the building of various indigenous capacities, particularly human resources. Efforts to accomplish such a capacity-building must be devoted, at the local level, to the development of necessary high-level knowledge and expertise in space science and technology fields. Such a programme must also focus on long-term in-depth education and research opportunities in the developing countries, where the beneficiaries would gain an in-depth understanding and appreciation of not only the application potentials of a given technology but also an insight into why and how the technology works the way it does. In recognition of such a pre-requisite, it is universally acknowledged that if effective assimilation of space science and appropriate application of space technology are to succeed in the developing countries, and particularly if such a discipline as satellite remote sensing is to transcend its current image of being a technology-driven tool into a user-driven one, efforts must be devoted, at the local level, to the development of necessary high-level knowledge and expertise in requisite space science and technology fields. The justification for such an in-depth education is not far-fetched particularly as one reflects on the myriad of space science and technology activities that are both in progress and are planned. Aspects of these are reflected in this paper.

  10. Ultrasound modulates ion channel currents.

    PubMed

    Kubanek, Jan; Shi, Jingyi; Marsh, Jon; Chen, Di; Deng, Cheri; Cui, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (US) has been demonstrated to stimulate neurons in animals and humans, but the mechanism of this effect is unknown. It has been hypothesized that US, a mechanical stimulus, may mediate cellular discharge by activating mechanosensitive ion channels embedded within cellular membranes. To test this hypothesis, we expressed potassium and sodium mechanosensitive ion channels (channels of the two-pore-domain potassium family (K2P) including TREK-1, TREK-2, TRAAK; NaV1.5) in the Xenopus oocyte system. Focused US (10 MHz, 0.3-4.9 W/cm(2)) modulated the currents flowing through the ion channels on average by up to 23%, depending on channel and stimulus intensity. The effects were reversible upon repeated stimulation and were abolished when a channel blocker (ranolazine to block NaV1.5, BaCl2 to block K2P channels) was applied to the solution. These data reveal at the single cell level that focused US modulates the activity of specific ion channels to mediate transmembrane currents. These findings open doors to investigations of the effects of  US on ion channels expressed in neurons, retinal cells, or cardiac cells, which may lead to important medical applications. The findings may also pave the way to the development of sonogenetics: a non-invasive, US-based analogue of optogenetics. PMID:27112990

  11. Designed membrane channels and pores.

    PubMed

    Bayley, H

    1999-02-01

    Advances in the synthesis and assembly of designed membrane channels and pores include addressable template-assisted synthetic protein (TASP) syntheses of helix bundles, the production of a new class of nanotubes and the ability to purify hetero-oligomeric pores. Channels and pores with altered functional properties and with built-in triggers and switches have been prepared. Progress in applications has been greatest in sensor technology, where sensor elements based on ligand activation, channel selectivity and channel block have been made. Structural information about natural membrane proteins is emerging to inspire new designs.

  12. Ultrasound modulates ion channel currents

    PubMed Central

    Kubanek, Jan; Shi, Jingyi; Marsh, Jon; Chen, Di; Deng, Cheri; Cui, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (US) has been demonstrated to stimulate neurons in animals and humans, but the mechanism of this effect is unknown. It has been hypothesized that US, a mechanical stimulus, may mediate cellular discharge by activating mechanosensitive ion channels embedded within cellular membranes. To test this hypothesis, we expressed potassium and sodium mechanosensitive ion channels (channels of the two-pore-domain potassium family (K2P) including TREK-1, TREK-2, TRAAK; NaV1.5) in the Xenopus oocyte system. Focused US (10 MHz, 0.3–4.9 W/cm2) modulated the currents flowing through the ion channels on average by up to 23%, depending on channel and stimulus intensity. The effects were reversible upon repeated stimulation and were abolished when a channel blocker (ranolazine to block NaV1.5, BaCl2 to block K2P channels) was applied to the solution. These data reveal at the single cell level that focused US modulates the activity of specific ion channels to mediate transmembrane currents. These findings open doors to investigations of the effects of  US on ion channels expressed in neurons, retinal cells, or cardiac cells, which may lead to important medical applications. The findings may also pave the way to the development of sonogenetics: a non-invasive, US-based analogue of optogenetics. PMID:27112990

  13. Demystifying Mechanosensitive Piezo Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Xu, X Z Shawn

    2016-06-01

    Mechanosensitive channels mediate touch, hearing, proprioception, and blood pressure regulation. Piezo proteins, including Piezo1 and Piezo2, represent a new class of mechanosensitive channels that have been reported to play key roles in most, if not all, of these modalities. The structural architecture and molecular mechanisms by which Piezos act as mechanosensitive channels, however, remain mysterious. Two new studies have now provided critical insights into the atomic structure and molecular basis of the ion permeation and mechano-gating properties of the Piezo1 channel.

  14. The Discovery Channel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millis, R. L.; Dunham, E. W.; Sebring, T. A.; Smith, B. W.; de Kock, M.; Wiecha, O.

    2004-11-01

    The Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) is a 4.2-m telescope to be built at a new site near Happy Jack, Arizona. The DCT features a large prime focus mosaic CCD camera with a 2-degree-diameter field of view especially designed for surveys of KBOs, Centaurs, NEAs and other moving or time-variable targets. The telescope can be switched quickly to a Ritchey-Chretien configuration for optical/IR spectroscopy or near-IR imaging. This flexibility allows timely follow-up physical studies of high priority objects discovered in survey mode. The ULE (ultra-low-expansion) meniscus primary and secondary mirror blanks for the telescope are currently in fabrication by Corning Glass. Goodrich Aerospace, Vertex RSI, M3 Engineering and Technology Corp., and e2v Technologies have recently completed in-depth conceptual design studies of the optics, mount, enclosure, and mosaic focal plane, respectively. The results of these studies were subjected to a formal design review in July, 2004. Site testing at the 7760-ft altitude Happy Jack site began in 2001. Differential image motion observations from 117 nights since January 1, 2003 gave median seeing of 0.84 arcsec FWHM, and the average of the first quartile was 0.62 arcsec. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process for securing long-term access to this site on the Coconino National Forest is nearing completion and ground breaking is expected in the spring of 2005. The Discovery Channel Telescope is a project of the Lowell Observatory with major financial support from Discovery Communications, Inc. (DCI). DCI plans ongoing television programming featuring the construction of the telescope and the research ultimately undertaken with the DCT. An additional partner can be accommodated in the project. Interested parties should contact the lead author.

  15. Quantum Limits of Space-to-Ground Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.; Dolinar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum limiting factors contributed by the transmitter, the optical channel, and the receiver of a space-to-ground optical communications link are described. Approaches to move toward the ultimate quantum limit are discussed.

  16. Space Rescue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muratore, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Space Rescue has been a topic of speculation for a wide community of people for decades. Astronauts, aerospace engineers, diplomats, medical and rescue professionals, inventors and science fiction writers have all speculated on this problem. Martin Caidin's 1964 novel Marooned dealt with the problems of rescuing a crew stranded in low earth orbit. Legend at the Johnson Space Center says that Caidin's portrayal of a Russian attempt to save the American crew played a pivotal role in convincing the Russians to join the real joint Apollo-Soyuz mission. Space Rescue has been a staple in science fiction television and movies portrayed in programs such as Star Trek, Stargate-SG1 and Space 1999 and movies such as Mission To Mars and Red Planet. As dramatic and as difficult as rescue appears in fictional accounts, in the real world it has even greater drama and greater difficulty. Space rescue is still in its infancy as a discipline and the purpose of this chapter is to describe the issues associated with space rescue and the work done so far in this field. For the purposes of this chapter, the term space rescue will refer to any system which allows for rescue or escape of personnel from situations which endanger human life in a spaceflight operation. This will span the period from crew ingress prior to flight through crew egress postlanding. For the purposes of this chapter, the term primary system will refer to the spacecraft system that a crew is either attempting to escape from or from which an attempt is being made to rescue the crew.

  17. ECAP spread of excitation with virtual channels and physical electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michelle L; Stille, Lisa J; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L; Goehring, Jenny L

    2013-12-01

    The primary goal of this study was to evaluate physiological spatial excitation patterns for stimulation of adjacent physical electrodes and intermediate virtual channels. Two experiments were conducted that utilized electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) spread-of-excitation (SOE) functions obtained with the traditional forward-masking subtraction method. These two experiments examined spatial excitation patterns for virtual-channel maskers and probes, respectively. In Experiment 1, ECAP SOE patterns were obtained for maskers applied to physical electrodes and virtual channels to determine whether virtual-channel maskers yield SOE patterns similar to those predicted from physical electrodes. In Experiment 2, spatial separation of SOE functions was compared for two adjacent physical probe electrodes and the intermediate virtual channel to determine the extent to which ECAP SOE patterns for virtual-channel probes are spatially separate from those obtained with physical electrodes. Data were obtained for three electrode regions (basal, middle, apical) for 35 ears implanted with Cochlear (N = 16) or Advanced Bionics (N = 19) devices. Results from Experiment 1 showed no significant difference between predicted and measured ECAP amplitudes for Advanced Bionics subjects. Measured ECAP amplitudes for virtual-channel maskers were significantly larger than the predicted amplitudes for Cochlear subjects; however, the difference was <2 μV and thus is likely not clinically significant. Results from Experiment 2 showed that the probe set in the apical region demonstrated the least amount of spatial separation amongst SOE functions, which may be attributed to more uniform nerve survival patterns, closer electrode spacing, and/or the tapered geometry of the cochlea. As expected, adjacent physical probes demonstrated greater spatial separation than for comparisons between each physical probe and the intermediate virtual channel. Finally, the virtual-channel SOE

  18. Getting the GeoSTAR Instrument Concept Ready for a Space Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigtsen, B.; Gaier, T.; Kangaslahti, P.; Lim, B.; Tanner, A.; Ruf, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Array Radiometer - GeoSTAR - is a microwave sounder intended for geostationary satellites. First proposed for the EO-3 New Millennium mission in 1999, the technology has since been developed under the Instrument Incubator Program. Under IIP-03 a proof-of-concept demonstrator operating in the temperature sounding 50 GHz band was developed to show that the aperture synthesis concept results in a realizable, stable and accurate imaging-sounding radiometer. Some of the most challenging technology, such as miniature low-power 183- GHz receivers used for water vapor sounding, was developed under IIP-07. The first such receiver has recently been adapted for use in the High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR), which was previously developed under IIP-98. This receiver represents a new state of the art and outperforms the previous benchmark by an order of magnitude in radiometric sensitivity. It was first used in the GRIP hurricane field campaign in 2010, where HAMSR became the first microwave sounder to fly on the Global Hawk UAV. Now, under IIP-10, we will develop flight-like subsystems and a brassboard testing system, which will facilitate rapid implementation of a space mission. GeoSTAR is the baseline payload for the Precipitation and All-weather Temperature and Humidity (PATH) mission - one of NASA's 15 "decadal-survey" missions. Although PATH is currently in the third tier of those missions, the IIP efforts have advanced the required technology to a point where a space mission can be initiated in a time frame commensurate with second-tier missions. An even earlier Venture mission is also being considered.

  19. 47 CFR 73.213 - Grandfathered short-spaced stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... relocated with respect to such short-spaced stations, provided that (i) any area predicted to receive interference lies completely within any area currently predicted to receive co-channel or first-adjacent... application must include exhibits demonstrating that the total area and population subject to co-channel...

  20. Space Resources and Space Settlements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingham, J. (Editor); Gilbreath, W. P. (Editor); Oleary, B. (Editor); Gosset, B. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    The technical papers from the five tasks groups that took part in the 1977 Ames Summer Study on Space Settlements and Industrialization Using Nonterrestrial Materials are presented. The papers are presented under the following general topics: (1) research needs for regenerative life-support systems; (2) habitat design; (3) dynamics and design of electromagnetic mass drivers; (4) asteroids as resources for space manufacturing; and (5) processing of nonterrestrial materials.

  1. Littoral steering of deltaic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, Jaap H.; Ashton, Andrew D.; Giosan, Liviu

    2016-11-01

    The typically single-threaded channels on wave-influenced deltas show striking differences in their orientations, with some channels oriented into the incoming waves (e.g., Ombrone, Krishna), and others oriented away from the waves (e.g., Godavari, Sao Francisco). Understanding the controls on channel orientation is important as the channel location greatly influences deltaic morphology and sedimentology, both subaerially and subaqueously. Here, we explore channel orientation and consequent feedbacks with local shoreline dynamics using a plan-form numerical model of delta evolution. The model treats fluvial sediment delivery to a wave-dominated coast in two ways: 1) channels are assumed to prograde in a direction perpendicular to the local shoreline orientation and 2) a controlled fraction of littoral sediment transport can bypass the river mouth. Model results suggest that channels migrate downdrift when there is a significant net littoral transport and alongshore transport bypassing of the river mouth is limited. In contrast, river channels tend to orient themselves into the waves when fluvial sediment flux is relatively large, causing the shoreline of the downdrift delta flank to attain the orientation of maximum potential sediment transport for the incoming wave climate. Using model results, we develop a framework to estimate channel orientations for wave-influenced deltas that shows good agreement with natural examples. An increase in fluvial sediment input can cause a channel to reorient itself into incoming waves, behavior observed, for example, in the Ombrone delta in Italy. Our results can inform paleoclimate studies by linking channel orientation to fluvial sediment flux and wave energy. In particular, our approach provides a means to quantify past wave directions, which are notoriously difficult to constrain.

  2. Mobility of large woody debris (LWD) jams in a low gradient channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, Joanna C.

    2010-04-01

    channel. The locations of stable (or recurring) LWD jams were matched to model results where predicted LWD transport distances were equal to measured LWD jam spacing. Model results showed good agreement with the mean and median spacing of LWD jams when given input parameters specific to the channel and wood species. The ability to predict where LWD jams will persist over time in a low gradient channel has application in watershed management. Persistent LWD jams can exert a greater influence on channel morphology and may require active management.

  3. Seismic stochastic inversion identify river channel sand body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The technology of seismic inversion is regarded as one of the most important part of geophysics. By using the technology of seismic inversion and the theory of stochastic simulation, the concept of seismic stochastic inversion is proposed.Seismic stochastic inversion can play an significant role in the identifying river channel sand body. Accurate sand body description is a crucial parameter to measure oilfield development and oilfield stimulation during the middle and later periods. Besides, rational well spacing density is an essential condition for efficient production. Based on the geological knowledge of a certain oilfield, in line with the use of seismic stochastic inversion, the river channel sand body in the work area is identified. In this paper, firstly, the single river channel body from the composite river channel body is subdivided. Secondly, the distribution of river channel body is ascertained in order to ascertain the direction of rivers. Morever, the superimposed relationship among the sand body is analyzed, especially among the inter-well sand body. The last but not at the least, via the analysis of inversion results of first vacuating the wells and continuous infilling later, it is meeted the most needs well spacing density that can obtain the optimal inversion result. It would serve effective guidance for oilfield stimulation.

  4. Mirrored serpentine flow channels for fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, Jeffrey Allan

    2000-08-08

    A PEM fuel cell having serpentine flow field channels wherein the input/inlet legs of each channel border the input/inlet legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field, and the output/exit legs of each channel border the output/exit legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field. The serpentine fuel flow channels may be longer, and may contain more medial legs, than the serpentine oxidant flow channels.

  5. Space Mission : Y3K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-01-01

    ESA and the APME are hosting a contest for 10 - 15 year olds in nine European countries (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom). The contest is based on an interactive CD ROM, called Space Mission: Y3K, which explores space technology and shows some concrete uses of that technology in enhancing the quality of life on Earth. The CD ROM invites kids to join animated character Space Ranger Pete on an action-packed, colourful journey through space. Space Ranger Pete begins on Earth: the user navigates around a 'locker room' to learn about synthetic materials used in rocket boosters, heat shields, space suits and helmets, and how these materials have now become indispensable to everyday life. From Earth he flies into space and the user follows him from the control room in the spacecraft to a planet, satellites and finally to the International Space Station. Along the way, the user jots down clues that he or she discovers in this exploration, designing an imaginary space community and putting together a submission for the contest. The lucky winners will spend a weekend training as "junior astronauts" at the European Space Centre in Belgium (20-22 April 2001). They will be put through their astronaut paces, learning the art of space walking, running their own space mission, piloting a space capsule and re-entering the Earth's atmosphere. The competition features in various youth media channels across Europe. In the UK, popular BBC Saturday morning TV show, Live & Kicking, will be launching the competition and will invite viewers to submit their space community designs to win a weekend at ESC. In Germany, high circulation children's magazine Geolino will feature the competition in the January issue and on their internet site. And youth magazine ZoZitDat will feature the competition in the Netherlands throughout February. Space Mission: Y3K is part of an on-going partnership between the ESA's Technology Transfer

  6. Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, Jane R.

    2011-01-01

    The science of astronomy depends on modern-day temples called telescopes. Astronomers make pilgrimages to remote mountaintops where these large, intricate, precise machines gather light that rains down from the Universe. Bit, since Earth is a bright, turbulent planet, our finest telescopes are those that have been launched into the dark stillness of space. These space telescopes, named after heroes of astronomy (Hubble, Chandra, Spitzer, Herschel), are some of the best ideas our species has ever had. They show us, over 13 billion years of cosmic history, how galaxies and quasars evolve. They study planets orbiting other stars. They've helped us determine that 95% of the Universe is of unknown composition. In short, they tell us about our place in the Universe. The next step in this journey is the James Webb Space Telescope, being built by NASA, Europe, and Canada for a 2018 launch; Webb will reveal the first galaxies that ever formed.

  7. Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    This abstract covers a one hour presentation on Space Exploration. The audience is elementary students; therefore there are few words on the slides, mostly pictures of living and working in space. The presentation opens with a few slides describing a day in the life of a space explorer. It begins with a launch, discussions of day-night cycles, eating, exercising, housekeeping, EVA, relaxation, and sleeping. The next section of the presentation shows photos of astronauts performing experiments on the ISS. Yokomi Elementary School launched this fall with the most advanced educational technology tools available in schools today. The science and technology magnet school is equipped with interactive white boards, digital projectors, integrated sound systems and several computers for use by teachers and students. The only elementary school in Fresno Unified with a science focus also houses dedicated science classrooms equipped specifically for elementary students to experience hands-on science instruction in addition to the regular elementary curriculum.

  8. The EMBL-EBI channel.

    PubMed

    McEntyre, Jo; Birney, Ewan

    2016-01-01

    This editorial introduces the EMBL-EBI channel in F1000Research. The aims of the channel are to present EMBL-EBI outputs and collate research published on F1000Research contributed, in whole or in part, EMBL-EBI researchers. PMID:26913196

  9. A channel simulator design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devito, D. M.; Goutmann, M. M.; Harper, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    A propagation path simulator was designed for the channel between a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite in geostationary orbit and a user spacecraft orbiting the earth at an altitude between 200 and 4000 kilometers. The simulator is required to duplicate the time varying parameters of the propagation channel.

  10. Phenomics of Cardiac Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2014-01-01

    Forward genetic studies have identified several chloride (Cl−) channel genes, including CFTR, ClC-2, ClC-3, CLCA, Bestrophin, and Ano1, in the heart. Recent reverse genetic studies using gene targeting and transgenic techniques to delineate the functional role of cardiac Cl− channels have shown that Cl− channels may contribute to cardiac arrhythmogenesis, myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure, and cardioprotection against ischemia reperfusion. The study of physiological or pathophysiological phenotypes of cardiac Cl− channels, however, is complicated by the compensatory changes in the animals in response to the targeted genetic manipulation. Alternatively, tissue-specific conditional or inducible knockout or knockin animal models may be more valuable in the phenotypic studies of specific Cl− channels by limiting the effect of compensation on the phenotype. The integrated function of Cl− channels may involve multiprotein complexes of the Cl− channel subproteome. Similar phenotypes can be attained from alternative protein pathways within cellular networks, which are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. The phenomics approach, which characterizes phenotypes as a whole phenome and systematically studies the molecular changes that give rise to particular phenotypes achieved by modifying the genotype under the scope of genome/proteome/phenome, may provide more complete understanding of the integrated function of each cardiac Cl− channel in the context of health and disease. PMID:23720326

  11. Chloride Channels of Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John C.; Kahl, Christina R.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins implicated as intracellular chloride channels include the intracellular ClC proteins, the bestrophins, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the CLICs, and the recently described Golgi pH regulator. This paper examines current hypotheses regarding roles of intracellular chloride channels and reviews the evidence supporting a role in intracellular chloride transport for each of these proteins. PMID:20100480

  12. Entering Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubrin, Robert

    The authors is giving a classification of civilisations depending on the degree of colonisation of the Earth, Solar System and Our Galaxy. The problems of: History of geographic discoveries (The great geographical discoveries during the Middle Age, the concurence of Chinnese and Europeans in this Area); The Astrophysics, such as: Asteroids, Water and Atmosphere on outer planets, Planet Mars Planet, Agriculture on outer planets, Minerals on outer planets; Cosmic flights: Fuels, Robotics, Moon (as an intermediary basis for interplanetary flights), Mars colonisation; Interstellar flights, Space research costs, strategy and tactics of the space colonisation; Policy: War and Peace, International Collaboration are discussed.

  13. Space trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertachinidealmeidaprado, Antonio Fernando

    The objective of this study is to present a description of the models and methods used to calculate the optimum space trajectories, from the point of view of the smallest fuel consumption that could be used to transfer a space vehicle between two given orbits. Several options for the shaping of the dynamics, the actuators' action and optimal methods are described. Classic methods (Hohmann's transfer, bi-elliptical, etc.) and modern methods (involving gravitational capture and gravity assisted maneuvers) are stated briefly, and several references are mentioned to supply more detail.

  14. Lipid Regulation of Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    D'Avanzo, N

    2016-01-01

    The lipid landscapes of cellular membranes are complex and dynamic, are tissue dependent, and can change with the age and the development of a variety of diseases. Researchers are now gaining new appreciation for the regulation of ion channel proteins by the membrane lipids in which they are embedded. Thus, as membrane lipids change, for example, during the development of disease, it is likely that the ionic currents that conduct through the ion channels embedded in these membranes will also be altered. This chapter provides an overview of the complex regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic voltage-dependent sodium (Nav) channels by fatty acids, sterols, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and cannabinoids. The impact of lipid regulation on channel gating kinetics, voltage-dependence, trafficking, toxin binding, and structure are explored for Nav channels that have been examined in heterologous expression systems, native tissue, and reconstituted into artificial membranes. Putative mechanisms for Nav regulation by lipids are also discussed. PMID:27586290

  15. Targeting potassium channels in cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Potassium channels are pore-forming transmembrane proteins that regulate a multitude of biological processes by controlling potassium flow across cell membranes. Aberrant potassium channel functions contribute to diseases such as epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, and neuromuscular symptoms collectively known as channelopathies. Increasing evidence suggests that cancer constitutes another category of channelopathies associated with dysregulated channel expression. Indeed, potassium channel–modulating agents have demonstrated antitumor efficacy. Potassium channels regulate cancer cell behaviors such as proliferation and migration through both canonical ion permeation–dependent and noncanonical ion permeation–independent functions. Given their cell surface localization and well-known pharmacology, pharmacological strategies to target potassium channel could prove to be promising cancer therapeutics. PMID:25049269

  16. Requirements for signaling channel authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Tarman, T.D.

    1995-12-11

    This contribution addresses requirements for ATM signaling channel authentication. Signaling channel authentication is an ATM security service that binds an ATM signaling message to its source. By creating this binding, the message recipient, and even a third party, can confidently verify that the message originated from its claimed source. This provides a useful mechanism to mitigate a number of threats. For example, a denial of service attack which attempts to tear-down an active connection by surreptitiously injecting RELEASE or DROP PARTY messages could be easily thwarted when authenticity assurances are in place for the signaling channel. Signaling channel authentication could also be used to provide the required auditing information for accurate billing which is impervious to repudiation. Finally, depending on the signaling channel authentication mechanism, end-to-end integrity of the message (or at least part of it) can be provided. None of these capabilities exist in the current specifications.

  17. Ca2+ Imaging as a tool to assess TRP channel function in murine distal nephrons.

    PubMed

    Mamenko, Mykola; Zaika, Oleg; O'Neil, Roger G; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in almost every segment of renal nephron from the glomerulus to the inner medullary collecting duct. Serving as a route for Ca(2+) entry from the intratubular space into cells in response to external cues, TRP channels modulate water-electrolyte transport, thus determining functional properties of the renal tubule. In this chapter, we discuss technical aspects of using Ca(2+) imaging to monitor activity of TRP channels in situ, namely, in the freshly isolated distal nephrons, with a special emphasis on the mechanosensitive TRPV4 channel and its role in tubular flow sensing.

  18. Integrated source and channel encoded digital communications system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the digital communication system for the direct communication links from ground to space shuttle and the links involving the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS). Three main tasks were performed:(1) Channel encoding/decoding parameter optimization for forward and reverse TDRS links,(2)integration of command encoding/decoding and channel encoding/decoding; and (3) modulation coding interface study. The general communication environment is presented to provide the necessary background for the tasks and to provide an understanding of the implications of the results of the studies.

  19. Irreducible Decompositions and Stationary States of Quantum Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Raffaella; Pautrat, Yan

    2016-06-01

    For a quantum channel (completely positive, trace-preserving map), we prove a generalization to the infinite-dimensional case of a result by Baumgartner and Narnhofer [3]: this result is, in a probabilistic language, a decomposition of a general quantum channel into its irreducible recurrent components. More precisely, we prove that the positive recurrent subspace (i.e. the space supporting the invariant states) can be decomposed as the direct sum of supports of extremal invariant states; this decomposition is not unique, in general, but we can determine all the possible decompositions. This allows us to describe the full structure of invariant states.

  20. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  1. Voltage-gated proton channels.

    PubMed

    Decoursey, Thomas E

    2012-04-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely, the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance approximately 10(3) times smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn(2+) (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B-lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H(+) for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens.

  2. Integrated reconfigurable microring based silicon WDM receiver for on-chip optical interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ao; Qiu, Chen; Yang, Long-Zhi; Dai, Ting-Ge; Hao, Yin-Lei; Jiang, Xiao-Qing; Yang, Jian-Yi

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate an integrated reconfigurable wavelength division multiplexing receiver on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. The receiver is composed of a 1 × 8 thermally tunable microring resonator filter and Ge-Si photodetectors. With low thermal tuning powers the channel allocation of the receiver can be reconfigured with high accuracy and flexibility. The thermal tuning efficiency is approximately 8 mW nm-1. We show eight-channel configurations with channel spacing of 100 GHz and 50 GHz and a configuration in which all eight channels cover an entire free spectral range of the ring with uniform channel spacing of 1.2 nm. Each channel can receive high-quality signals with a data rate of up to 13.5 Gb s-1 thus an aggregate data rate higher than 100 Gb s-1 can be achieved.

  3. Methods of channeling simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, J.H.

    1989-06-01

    Many computer simulation programs have been used to interpret experiments almost since the first channeling measurements were made. Certain aspects of these programs are important in how accurately they simulate ions in crystals; among these are the manner in which the structure of the crystal is incorporated, how any quantity of interest is computed, what ion-atom potential is used, how deflections are computed from the potential, incorporation of thermal vibrations of the lattice atoms, correlations of thermal vibrations, and form of stopping power. Other aspects of the programs are included to improve the speed; among these are table lookup, importance sampling, and the multiparameter method. It is desirable for programs to facilitate incorporation of special features of interest in special situations; examples are relaxations and enhanced vibrations of surface atoms, easy substitution of an alternate potential for comparison, change of row directions from layer to layer in strained-layer lattices, and different vibration amplitudes for substitutional solute or impurity atoms. Ways of implementing all of these aspects and features and the consequences of them will be discussed. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Substrate Channel in Nitrogenase Revealed by a Molecular Dynamics Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle; Danyal, Karamatullah; Raugei, Simone; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2014-03-22

    Mo-dependent nitrogenase catalyzes the biological reduction of N2 to 2NH3 at the FeMo-cofactor buried deep inside the MoFe protein. Access of substrates, such as N2, to the active site is likely restricted by the surrounding protein, requiring substrate channels that lead from the surface to the active site. Earlier studies on crystallographic structures of the MoFe protein have suggested three putative substrate channels. Here, we have utilized sub-microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to allow the nitrogenase MoFe protein to explore its conformational space in an aqueous solution at physiological ionic strength, revealing a putative substrate channel not previously reported. The viability of the proposed channel was tested by examining the free energy of passage of N2 from the surface through the channel to FeMo-cofactor, with discovery of a very low energy barrier. These studies point to a viable substrate channel in nitrogenase that appears during thermal motions of the protein in an aqueous environment that approaches a face of FeMo-cofactor earlier implicated in substrate binding.

  5. An empirical conceptual gully evolution model for channelled sea cliffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyland, Julian; Darby, Stephen E.

    2008-12-01

    Incised coastal channels are a specific form of incised channel that are found in locations where stream channels flowing to cliffed coasts have the excess energy required to cut down through the cliff to reach the outlet water body. The southern coast of the Isle of Wight, southern England, comprises soft cliffs that vary in height between 15 and 100 m and which are retreating at rates ≤ 1.5 m a - 1 , due to a combination of wave erosion and landslides. In several locations, river channels have cut through the cliffs to create deeply (≤ 45 m) incised gullies, known locally as 'Chines'. The Chines are unusual in that their formation is associated with dynamic shoreline encroachment during a period of rising sea-level, whereas existing models of incised channel evolution emphasise the significance of base level lowering. This paper develops a conceptual model of Chine evolution by applying space for time substitution methods using empirical data gathered from Chine channel surveys and remotely sensed data. The model identifies a sequence of evolutionary stages, which are classified based on a suite of morphometric indices and associated processes. The extent to which individual Chines are in a state of growth or decay is estimated by determining the relative rates of shoreline retreat and knickpoint recession, the former via analysis of historical aerial images and the latter through the use of a stream power erosion model.

  6. Characterization of the spatial variability of channel morphology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Troutman, B.M.

    2002-01-01

    The spatial variability of two fundamental morphological variables is investigated for rivers having a wide range of discharge (five orders of magnitude). The variables, water-surface width and average depth, were measured at 58 to 888 equally spaced cross-sections in channel links (river reaches between major tributaries). These measurements provide data to characterize the two-dimensional structure of a channel link which is the fundamental unit of a channel network. The morphological variables have nearly log-normal probability distributions. A general relation was determined which relates the means of the log-transformed variables to the logarithm of discharge similar to previously published downstream hydraulic geometry relations. The spatial variability of the variables is described by two properties: (1) the coefficient of variation which was nearly constant (0.13-0.42) over a wide range of discharge; and (2) the integral length scale in the downstream direction which was approximately equal to one to two mean channel widths. The joint probability distribution of the morphological variables in the downstream direction was modelled as a first-order, bivariate autoregressive process. This model accounted for up to 76 per cent of the total variance. The two-dimensional morphological variables can be scaled such that the channel width-depth process is independent of discharge. The scaling properties will be valuable to modellers of both basin and channel dynamics. Published in 2002 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  7. Channel change on the Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, 1936-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    The Santa Cruz River, an ephemeral river that drains 8,581 square miles in southeastern Arizona, has a long history of channel instability. Since the late 19th century, lateral channel erosion has caused extensive property damage, particularly in Pima County. During the flood of 1983, about $100 million damage was caused in the Tucson area alone; most damage resulted from bank erosion on the Santa Cruz River and its tributaries. The nature, magni- tude, location, and frequency of channel change on the Santa Cruz River were highly variable in time and space from 1936 through 1986 along a 70-mile reach in Pima County, Arizona. Four mechanisms of lateral channel change--channel migration, avulsion and meander cutoff, channel widening, and arroyo widening--were identified on the Santa Cruz River. The dominant mechanism in a reach depends on channel morphology and flood magnitude. The dominant vertical change has been degradation. The timing and magnitude of channel change at a particular location are controlled primarily by hydroclimatic factors such as magnitude, duration, intensity, and frequency of precipitation and floods. The location of channel change and its magnitude in response to a given discharge are controlled largely by topographic, geologic, hydraulic, and artificial factors. Although much of the present morphology of the Santa Cruz River is the result of recent large floods, a direct link between hydroclimatic con- ditions and channel change is not always evident because resistance of the channel to erosion varies with time. (USGS)

  8. Double channel ADPCM terminal equipment for the Intersputnik global satellite network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papics, J.; Kaszavitz, I.; Kocsis, F.

    1991-01-01

    Digital Sungle Channel Per Carrier (SCPC) systems are widely used in global telecommunication networks for implementing four wire telephone grade voice transmission facilities between international telephone exchanges. The majority of these systems use seven bit PCM encoding and 64 kbit/s QPSK modulation. Results are presented on the development of an ADPCM channel unit, intended to substitute the standard seven bit PCM version used in the SCPC terminal equipment of the Intersputnik global satellite network. Two methods were considered to increase the number of the transmitted telephone channels in the 36 MHz transponder band. The first is to use 32 kbit/s ADPCM in a 30 kHz channel spacing, while the second one is to transmit two independent telephone signals via one carrier in the standard 45 kHz channel spacing. Apart from the higher system capacity the second version has several additional economic advantages.

  9. M channel enhancers and physiological M channel block.

    PubMed

    Linley, John E; Pettinger, Louisa; Huang, Dongyang; Gamper, Nikita

    2012-02-15

    M-type (Kv7, KCNQ) K(+) channels control the resting membrane potential of many neurons, including peripheral nociceptive sensory neurons. Several M channel enhancers were suggested as prospective analgesics, and targeting M channels specifically in peripheral nociceptors is a plausible strategy for peripheral analgesia. However, receptor-induced inhibition of M channels in nociceptors is often observed in inflammation and may contribute to inflammatory pain. Such inhibition is predominantly mediated by phospholipase C. We investigated four M channel enhancers (retigabine, flupirtine, zinc pyrithione and H(2)O(2)) for their ability to overcome M channel inhibition via two phospholipase C-mediated mechanisms, namely depletion of membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) and a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) (an action mediated by calmodulin). Data from overexpressed Kv7.2/Kv7.3 heteromers and native M currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons suggest the following conclusions. (i) All enhancers had a dual effect on M channel activity, a negative shift in voltage dependence and an increase of the maximal current at saturating voltages. The enhancers differed in their efficacy to produce these effects. (ii) Both PIP(2) depletion and Ca(2+)/calmodulin strongly reduced the M current amplitude; however, at voltages near the threshold for M channel activation (-60 mV) all enhancers were able to restore M channel activity to a control level or above, while at saturating voltages the effects were more variable. (iii) Receptor-mediated inhibition of M current in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons did not reduce the efficacy of retigabine or flupirtine to hyperpolarize the resting membrane potential. In conclusion, we show that all four M channel enhancers tested could overcome both PIP(2) and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-induced inhibition of Kv7.2/7.3 at voltages close to the threshold for action potential firing (-60 mV) but generally had reduced efficacy at a

  10. Single-Channel Recording of Ligand-Gated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Plested, Andrew J R

    2016-01-01

    Single-channel recordings reveal the microscopic properties of individual ligand-gated ion channels. Such recordings contain much more information than measurements of ensemble behavior and can yield structural and functional information about the receptors that participate in fast synaptic transmission in the brain. With a little care, a standard patch-clamp electrophysiology setup can be adapted for single-channel recording in a matter of hours. Thenceforth, it is a realistic aim to record single-molecule activity with microsecond resolution from arbitrary cell types, including cell lines and neurons. PMID:27480725

  11. Found Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haug, Ted; Ogurek, Douglas J.

    2006-01-01

    When education providers confront obstacles such as shrinking budgets and swelling enrollments, a multi-million-dollar new facility or major additions probably are not feasible. Converting vacant and underused buildings into school facilities enables administrators to acquire additional space quickly and cheaply. In this article, the authors…

  12. Friendly Spaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Elia, William

    1996-01-01

    The creation of usable space for gatherings and socializing is an important consideration in any campus planning program. The University of California-San Diego has a large outdoor assembly area. An addition at Cal Poly-San Luis Obispo encompasses an existing pedestrian path. A new building at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, is designed as a…

  13. Trading Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cort, Cliff

    2006-01-01

    Education administrators face the dual dilemma of crowded, aging facilities and tightening capital budgets. The challenge is to build the necessary classroom, laboratory and activity space while minimizing the length and expense of the construction process. One solution that offers an affordable alternative is modular construction, a method that…

  14. Space Gerontology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, J. (Editor); Economos, A. C. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Presentations are given which address the effects of space flght on the older person, the parallels between the physiological responses to weightlessness and the aging process, and experimental possibilities afforded by the weightless environment to fundamental research in gerontology and geriatrics.

  15. Training Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    Creating a balanced learning space for employees is about more than trying different types of seating. It is a challenge that an affect how well employees absorb the lessons and whether they will be able to product better results for the company. The possible solutions are as diverse as the learners. This article describes how three companies…

  16. Space Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutler, G.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Geodesy is the science studying the size and the figure of the Earth including the determination of the Earth's gravitational field. Geodetic astronomy is that part of astronomy dealing with the definition and realization of a terrestrial and a celestial reference frame (see TERRESTRIAL COORDINATE SYSTEMS AND FRAMES). By space geodesy we mean, then, those aspects of geodesy and geodetic astronomy...

  17. Space languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Dan

    1987-01-01

    Applications of linguistic principles to potential problems of human and machine communication in space settings are discussed. Variations in language among speakers of different backgrounds and change in language forms resulting from new experiences or reduced contact with other groups need to be considered in the design of intelligent machine systems.

  18. Inherit Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.; Jenks, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research was to begin development of a unique educational tool targeted at educating and inspiring young people 12-16 years old about NASA and the Space Program. Since these young people are the future engineers, scientists and space pioneers, the nurturing of their enthusiasm and interest is of critical importance to the Nation. This summer the basic infrastructure of the tool was developed in the context of an educational game paradigm. The game paradigm has achieved remarkable success in maintaining the interest of young people in a self-paced, student-directed learning environment. This type of environment encourages student exploration and curiosity which are exactly the traits that future space pioneers need to develop to prepare for the unexpected. The Inherit Space Educational Tool is an open-ended learning environment consisting of a finite-state machine classic adventure game paradigm. As the young person explores this world, different obstacles must be overcome. Rewards will be offered such as using the flight simulator to fly around and explore Titan. This simulator was modeled on conventional Earth flight simulators but has been considerably enhanced to add texture mapping of Titan's atmosphere utilizing the latest information from the NASA Galileo Space Probe. Additional scenery was added to provide color VGA graphics of a futuristic research station on Titan as well as an interesting story to keep the youngster's attention. This summer the game infrastructure has been developed as well as the Titan Flight Simulator. A number of other enhancements are planned.

  19. Second Symposium on Space Industrialization. [space commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jernigan, C. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The policy, legal, and economic aspects of space industrialization are considered along with satellite communications, material processing, remote sensing, and the role of space carriers and a space station in space industrialization.

  20. Characterisation of the LMS propagation channel at L- and S-bands: Narrowband experimental data and channel modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sforza, Mario; Buonomo, Sergio

    1993-01-01

    During the period 1983-1992 the European Space Agency (ESA) carried out several experimental campaigns to investigate the propagation impairments of the Land Mobile Satellite (LMS) communication channel. A substantial amount of data covering quite a large range of elevation angles, environments, and frequencies was obtained. Results from the data analyses are currently used for system planning and design applications within the framework of the future ESA LMS projects. This comprehensive experimental data base is presently utilized also for channel modeling purposes and preliminary results are given. Cumulative Distribution Functions (PDF) and Duration of Fades (DoF) statistics at different elevation angles and environments were also included.

  1. Information geometry of Gaussian channels

    SciTech Connect

    Monras, Alex; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2010-06-15

    We define a local Riemannian metric tensor in the manifold of Gaussian channels and the distance that it induces. We adopt an information-geometric approach and define a metric derived from the Bures-Fisher metric for quantum states. The resulting metric inherits several desirable properties from the Bures-Fisher metric and is operationally motivated by distinguishability considerations: It serves as an upper bound to the attainable quantum Fisher information for the channel parameters using Gaussian states, under generic constraints on the physically available resources. Our approach naturally includes the use of entangled Gaussian probe states. We prove that the metric enjoys some desirable properties like stability and covariance. As a by-product, we also obtain some general results in Gaussian channel estimation that are the continuous-variable analogs of previously known results in finite dimensions. We prove that optimal probe states are always pure and bounded in the number of ancillary modes, even in the presence of constraints on the reduced state input in the channel. This has experimental and computational implications. It limits the complexity of optimal experimental setups for channel estimation and reduces the computational requirements for the evaluation of the metric: Indeed, we construct a converging algorithm for its computation. We provide explicit formulas for computing the multiparametric quantum Fisher information for dissipative channels probed with arbitrary Gaussian states and provide the optimal observables for the estimation of the channel parameters (e.g., bath couplings, squeezing, and temperature).

  2. Ion Channels in Brain Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Lukas; Sezgin, Efe C.; Eckert, Franziska; Huber, Stephan M.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, lung cancer and melanoma exhibit a high metastatic tropism to the brain. Development of brain metastases severely worsens the prognosis of cancer patients and constrains curative treatment options. Metastasizing to the brain by cancer cells can be dissected in consecutive processes including epithelial–mesenchymal transition, evasion from the primary tumor, intravasation and circulation in the blood, extravasation across the blood–brain barrier, formation of metastatic niches, and colonization in the brain. Ion channels have been demonstrated to be aberrantly expressed in tumor cells where they regulate neoplastic transformation, malignant progression or therapy resistance. Moreover, many ion channel modulators are FDA-approved drugs and in clinical use proposing ion channels as druggable targets for future anti-cancer therapy. The present review article aims to summarize the current knowledge on the function of ion channels in the different processes of brain metastasis. The data suggest that certain channel types involving voltage-gated sodium channels, ATP-release channels, ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors and gap junction-generating connexins interfere with distinct processes of brain metastazation. PMID:27618016

  3. ATP release through pannexon channels.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Gerhard

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signal for diverse physiological functions, including spread of calcium waves between astrocytes, control of vascular oxygen supply and control of ciliary beat in the airways. ATP can be released from cells by various mechanisms. This review focuses on channel-mediated ATP release and its main enabler, Pannexin1 (Panx1). Six subunits of Panx1 form a plasma membrane channel termed 'pannexon'. Depending on the mode of stimulation, the pannexon has large conductance (500 pS) and unselective permeability to molecules less than 1.5 kD or is a small (50 pS), chloride-selective channel. Most physiological and pathological stimuli induce the large channel conformation, whereas the small conformation so far has only been observed with exclusive voltage activation of the channel. The interaction between pannexons and ATP is intimate. The pannexon is not only the conduit for ATP, permitting ATP efflux from cells down its concentration gradient, but the pannexon is also modulated by ATP. The channel can be activated by ATP through both ionotropic P2X as well as metabotropic P2Y purinergic receptors. In the absence of a control mechanism, this positive feedback loop would lead to cell death owing to the linkage of purinergic receptors with apoptotic processes. A control mechanism preventing excessive activation of the purinergic receptors is provided by ATP binding (with low affinity) to the Panx1 protein and gating the channel shut. PMID:26009770

  4. Ion Channels in Brain Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Lukas; Sezgin, Efe C; Eckert, Franziska; Huber, Stephan M

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, lung cancer and melanoma exhibit a high metastatic tropism to the brain. Development of brain metastases severely worsens the prognosis of cancer patients and constrains curative treatment options. Metastasizing to the brain by cancer cells can be dissected in consecutive processes including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, evasion from the primary tumor, intravasation and circulation in the blood, extravasation across the blood-brain barrier, formation of metastatic niches, and colonization in the brain. Ion channels have been demonstrated to be aberrantly expressed in tumor cells where they regulate neoplastic transformation, malignant progression or therapy resistance. Moreover, many ion channel modulators are FDA-approved drugs and in clinical use proposing ion channels as druggable targets for future anti-cancer therapy. The present review article aims to summarize the current knowledge on the function of ion channels in the different processes of brain metastasis. The data suggest that certain channel types involving voltage-gated sodium channels, ATP-release channels, ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors and gap junction-generating connexins interfere with distinct processes of brain metastazation. PMID:27618016

  5. Microbial Senses and Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Ching; Zhou, Xin-Liang; Su, Zhen-Wei; Haynes, W. John; Loukin, Sephan H.; Saimi, Yoshiro

    The complexity of animals and plants is due largely to cellular arrangement. The structures and activities of macromolecules had, however, evolved in early microbes long before the appearance of this complexity. Among such molecules are those that sense light, heat, force, water, and ligands. Though historically and didactically associated with the nervous system, ion channels also have deep evolutionary roots. For example, force sensing with channels, which likely began as water sensing through membrane stretch generated by osmotic pressure, must be ancient and is universal in extant species. Extant microbial species, such as the model bacterium Escherichia coli and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are equipped with stretch-activated channels. The ion channel proteins MscL and MscS show clearly that these bacterial channels receive stretch forces from the lipid bilayer. TRPY1, the mechanosensitive channel in yeast, is being developed towards a similar basic understanding of channels of the TRP (transientreceptor- potential) superfamily. TRPY1 resides in the vacuolar membrane and releases Ca2+ from the vacuole to the cytoplasm upon hyperosmotic shock. Unlike in most TRP preparations from animals, the mechanosensitivity of TRPY1 can be examined directly under patch clamp in either whole-vacuole mode or excised patch mode. The combination of direct biophysical examination in vitro with powerful microbial genetics in vivo should complement the study of mechanosensations of complex animals and plants.

  6. Substrate channeling in proline metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Arentson, Benjamin W.; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism is an important pathway that has relevance in several cellular functions such as redox balance, apoptosis, and cell survival. Results from different groups have indicated that substrate channeling of proline metabolic intermediates may be a critical mechanism. One intermediate is pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C), which upon hydrolysis opens to glutamic semialdehyde (GSA). Recent structural and kinetic evidence indicate substrate channeling of P5C/GSA occurs in the proline catabolic pathway between the proline dehydrogenase and P5C dehydrogenase active sites of bifunctional proline utilization A (PutA). Substrate channeling in PutA is proposed to facilitate the hydrolysis of P5C to GSA which is unfavorable at physiological pH. The second intermediate, gamma-glutamyl phosphate, is part of the proline biosynthetic pathway and is extremely labile. Substrate channeling of gamma-glutamyl phosphate is thought to be necessary to protect it from bulk solvent. Because of the unfavorable equilibrium of P5C/GSA and the reactivity of gamma-glutamyl phosphate, substrate channeling likely improves the efficiency of proline metabolism. Here, we outline general strategies for testing substrate channeling and review the evidence for channeling in proline metabolism. PMID:22201749

  7. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Frances L; Kirk, Matthew E; Rennie, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K(+) channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K(+) channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space. PMID:26082693

  8. Digital Channel Simulator Developed and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, Thomas P.

    2000-01-01

    The Digital Channel Simulator (DCS) is a real-time test set developed in-house by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field that simulates the characteristics of the modulator, demodulator, and transmission medium in a typical communications system to enable controlled laboratory testing of codec pairs. The DCS can support data rates up to 100 megasymbols per second (Msymbols/sec) with symbol sizes up to 10 bits and is compatible with both TTL (transistor transistor logic) and ECL (emitter coupled logic) interfaces. Because of its use of digital integrated circuits (IC's), the DCS offers the user accurate and repeatable testing while maintaining a simple reconfiguration of the modulation scheme and noise characteristics. The PC-based graphical user interface (GUI) assures user friendly operation for configuring, controlling, and monitoring the DCS and system during tests. In a typical communications system, the modulator places a symbol in constellation space and puts it on a carrier to be sent to the demodulator. Because of noise on the channel, the I and Q position in constellation space cannot be recovered exactly, and the received coordinates shift. To mimic this process in the laboratory, the DCS uses a mapper to place the symbol in constellation space. It simulates the shift in coordinates by digitally adding "noise" to the I and Q values. The mapper and noise source are implemented in lookup tables. Modulation schemes and noise characteristics are set by the values loaded in these tables. The mapper also has a pass-through mode to facilitate modulator testing, allowing noise to be added to 8-bit I and Q values of modulated data without a second mapping. To achieve high symbol rates, eight processing circuits are placed in parallel between an ECL demultiplexer and multiplexer. A graphical user interface was developed to calculate, load, and verify the values for the lookup tables. This interface can also be used to debug and verify proper operation of the

  9. Marine Toxins Targeting Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Hugo R.

    2006-01-01

    This introductory minireview points out the importance of ion channels for cell communication. The basic concepts on the structure and function of ion channels triggered by membrane voltage changes, the so-called voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs), as well as those activated by neurotransmitters, the so-called ligand-gated ion channel (LGICs), are introduced. Among the most important VGIC superfamiles, we can name the voltage-gated Na+ (NaV), Ca2+ (CaV), and K+ (KV) channels. Among the most important LGIC super families, we can include the Cys-loop or nicotinicoid, the glutamate-activated (GluR), and the ATP-activated (P2XnR) receptor superfamilies. Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that allow the passage of different ions in a specific or unspecific manner. For instance, the activation of NaV, CaV, or KV channels opens a pore that is specific for Na+, Ca2+, or K+, respectively. On the other hand, the activation of certain LGICs such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, GluRs, and P2XnRs allows the passage of cations (e.g., Na+, K+, and/or Ca2+), whereas the activation of other LGICs such as type A γ-butyric acid and glycine receptors allows the passage of anions (e.g., Cl− and/or HCO3−). In this regard, the activation of NaV and CaV as well as ligand-gated cation channels produce membrane depolarization, which finally leads to stimulatory effects in the cell, whereas the activation of KV as well as ligand-gated anion channels induce membrane hyperpolarization that finally leads to inhibitory effects in the cell. The importance of these ion channel superfamilies is emphasized by considering their physiological functions throughout the body as well as their pathophysiological implicance in several neuronal diseases. In this regard, natural molecules, and especially marine toxins, can be potentially used as modulators (e.g., inhibitors or prolongers) of ion channel functions to treat or to alleviate a specific ion channel-linked disease (e

  10. Differences between Formal and Informal Communicative Channels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, J. David; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compares formal and informal organizational communication structures within a large, technically oriented midwestern state governmental agency, specifically focusing on salience, channel factors, and channel usage. Suggests that informal channels in this organization were more highly evaluated in general. (SR)

  11. 33 CFR 117.966 - Galveston Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.966 Galveston Channel. Link to an... across Galveston Channel, mile 4.5 of the Galveston Channel, (GIWW mile 356.1) at Galveston, Texas,...

  12. Space Toxicology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Safe breathing air for space faring crews is essential whether they are inside an Extravehicular Mobility Suit (EMU), a small capsule such as Soyuz, or the expansive International Space Station (ISS). Sources of air pollution can include entry of propellants, excess offgassing from polymeric materials, leakage of systems compounds, escape of payload compounds, over-use of utility compounds, microbial metabolism, and human metabolism. The toxicological risk posed by a compound is comprised of the probability of escaping to cause air pollution and the magnitude of adverse effects on human health if escape occurs. The risk from highly toxic compounds is controlled by requiring multiple levels of containment to greatly reduce the probability of escape; whereas compounds that are virtually non-toxic may require little or no containment. The potential for toxicity is determined by the inherent toxicity of the compound and the amount that could potentially escape into the breathing air.

  13. [Space diet].

    PubMed

    Luigi, R

    1989-06-01

    Food prepared for astronauts meets various physical and biological requirements determined by living conditions in a space environment. Onboard systems, work programs, launch costs impose weight and volume limitations. For all investigated food items, the manufacturing technique must take into account all flight specific mechanical parameters. From a nutrition and sanitation standpoint, food packs must be designed to comply with certain specific effects of long term flights ans selected food items must be thoroughly safe, which requires very strict laboratory testing. The diet must also be varied, if possible it should match astronauts' personal preferences. Food preparations must be easy to use. Space food items are original applications of existing technologies: they are of very high quality.

  14. Interactive Visual Contextualization of Space Weather Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törnros, M.; Ynnerman, A.; Emmart, C.; Berrios, D.; Harberts, R.

    2012-12-01

    Linköping University, the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), and the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center are collaborating on a new open source visualization software for astrovisualization. The CCMC is providing real-time and historical space weather data from the Integrated Space Weather Analysis System (iSWA), including timely modeled coronal mass ejection events simulated by the Space Weather Research Center at NASA GSFC. Linköping University is developing a new modular visualization tool with multi-channel capabilities to support planetarium exhibits, displaying the real-time space weather data contextualized using fieldlines, volumetric visualization techniques, and planetary information. This collaboration aims to engage the public about space weather and real-time events at the AMNH. We present an overview of this collaboration and demo some of the capabilities.

  15. Marine governance in the English Channel (La Manche): Linking science and management.

    PubMed

    Glegg, G; Jefferson, R; Fletcher, S

    2015-06-30

    The English Channel is one of the world's busiest sea areas with intense shipping and port activity juxtaposed with recreation, communications and important conservation areas. Opportunities for marine renewable energy vie with existing activities for space. The current governance of the English Channel is reviewed and found to lack integration between countries, sectors, legislation and scientific research. Recent developments within the EU's marine management frameworks are significantly altering our approach to marine governance and this paper explores the implications of these new approaches to management of the English Channel. Existing mechanisms for cross-Channel science and potential benefits of an English Channel scale perspective are considered. In conclusion, current management practices are considered against the 12 Malawi Principles of the ecosystem approach resulting in proposals for enhancing governance of the region through science at the scale of the English Channel.

  16. Dense wavelength multiplexing of 1550 nm QKD with strong classical channels in reconfigurable networking environments

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Danna; Peterson, Charles G; Dallmann, Nicholas; Hughes, Richard J; Mccabe, Kevin P; Nordholt, Jane E; Tyagi, Hush T; Peters, Nicholas A; Toliver, Paul; Chapman, Thomas E; Runser, Robert J; Mcnown, Scott R

    2008-01-01

    To move beyond dedicated links and networks, quantum communications signals must be integrated into networks carrying classical optical channels at power levels many orders of magnitude higher than the quantum signals themselves. We demonstrate transmission of a 1550-nm quantum channel with up to two simultaneous 200-GHz spaced classical telecom channels, using ROADM (reconfigurable optical <1dd drop multiplexer) technology for multiplexing and routing quantum and classical signals. The quantum channel is used to perform quantum key distribution (QKD) in the presence of noise generated as a by-product of the co-propagation of classical channels. We demonstrate that the dominant noise mechanism can arise from either four-wave mixing or spontaneous Raman scattering, depending on the optical path characteristics as well <1S the classical channel parameters. We quantity these impairments and discuss mitigation strategies.

  17. Communication spaces

    PubMed Central

    Coiera, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Annotations to physical workspaces such as signs and notes are ubiquitous. When densely annotated, work areas become communication spaces. This study aims to characterize the types and purpose of such annotations. Methods A qualitative observational study was undertaken in two wards and the radiology department of a 440-bed metropolitan teaching hospital. Images were purposefully sampled; 39 were analyzed after excluding inferior images. Results Annotation functions included signaling identity, location, capability, status, availability, and operation. They encoded data, rules or procedural descriptions. Most aggregated into groups that either created a workflow by referencing each other, supported a common workflow without reference to each other, or were heterogeneous, referring to many workflows. Higher-level assemblies of such groupings were also observed. Discussion Annotations make visible the gap between work done and the capability of a space to support work. Annotations are repairs of an environment, improving fitness for purpose, fixing inadequacy in design, or meeting emergent needs. Annotations thus record the missing information needed to undertake tasks, typically added post-implemented. Measuring annotation levels post-implementation could help assess the fit of technology to task. Physical and digital spaces could meet broader user needs by formally supporting user customization, ‘programming through annotation’. Augmented reality systems could also directly support annotation, addressing existing information gaps, and enhancing work with context sensitive annotation. Conclusions Communication spaces offer a model of how work unfolds. Annotations make visible local adaptation that makes technology fit for purpose post-implementation and suggest an important role for annotatable information systems and digital augmentation of the physical environment. PMID:24005797

  18. Space Pens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Fisher's Space Pen was developed for use in gravity free environments. The cartridge, pressurized with nitrogen, seals out air preventing evaporation and oxidation of the ink. Internal pressures force ink outward toward the ball point. A thixotropic ink is used. The pen will operate from minus 50 to plus 45 degrees Fahrenheit, and will withstand atmospheric extremes. It was used both on the Apollo missions and by Soviet Cosmonauts.

  19. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Clyde F

    2003-12-01

    A series of workshops were sponsored by the Physical Science Division of NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research to address operational gravity-compliant in-situ resource utilization and life support techologies. Workshop participants explored a Mars simulation study on Devon Island, Canada; the processing of carbon dioxide in regenerative life support systems; space tourism; rocket technology; plant growth research for closed ecological systems; and propellant extraction of planetary regoliths.

  20. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Clyde F

    2003-12-01

    A series of workshops were sponsored by the Physical Science Division of NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research to address operational gravity-compliant in-situ resource utilization and life support techologies. Workshop participants explored a Mars simulation study on Devon Island, Canada; the processing of carbon dioxide in regenerative life support systems; space tourism; rocket technology; plant growth research for closed ecological systems; and propellant extraction of planetary regoliths. PMID:14696587

  1. Improved Iterative Decoding of Network-Channel Codes for Multiple-Access Relay Channel.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Saikat; Verma, Shrish

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative communication using relay nodes is one of the most effective means of exploiting space diversity for low cost nodes in wireless network. In cooperative communication, users, besides communicating their own information, also relay the information of other users. In this paper we investigate a scheme where cooperation is achieved using a common relay node which performs network coding to provide space diversity for two information nodes transmitting to a base station. We propose a scheme which uses Reed-Solomon error correcting code for encoding the information bit at the user nodes and convolutional code as network code, instead of XOR based network coding. Based on this encoder, we propose iterative soft decoding of joint network-channel code by treating it as a concatenated Reed-Solomon convolutional code. Simulation results show significant improvement in performance compared to existing scheme based on compound codes.

  2. Improved Iterative Decoding of Network-Channel Codes for Multiple-Access Relay Channel

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Saikat; Verma, Shrish

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative communication using relay nodes is one of the most effective means of exploiting space diversity for low cost nodes in wireless network. In cooperative communication, users, besides communicating their own information, also relay the information of other users. In this paper we investigate a scheme where cooperation is achieved using a common relay node which performs network coding to provide space diversity for two information nodes transmitting to a base station. We propose a scheme which uses Reed-Solomon error correcting code for encoding the information bit at the user nodes and convolutional code as network code, instead of XOR based network coding. Based on this encoder, we propose iterative soft decoding of joint network-channel code by treating it as a concatenated Reed-Solomon convolutional code. Simulation results show significant improvement in performance compared to existing scheme based on compound codes. PMID:27347526

  3. Space propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Lewis Research Center is developing broad-based new technologies for space chemical engines to satisfy long-term needs of ETO launch vehicles and other vehicles operating in and beyond Earth orbit. Specific objectives are focused on high performance LO2/LH2 engines providing moderate thrusts of 7,5-200 klb. This effort encompasses research related to design analysis and manufacturing processes needed to apply advanced materials to subcomponents, components, and subsystems of space-based systems and related ground-support equipment. High-performance space-based chemical engines face a number of technical challenges. Liquid hydrogen turbopump impellers are often so large that they cannot be machined from a single piece, yet high stress at the vane/shroud interface makes bonding extremely difficult. Tolerances on fillets are critical on large impellers. Advanced materials and fabricating techniques are needed to address these and other issues of interest. Turbopump bearings are needed which can provide reliable, long life operation at high speed and high load with low friction losses. Hydrostatic bearings provide good performance, but transients during pump starts and stops may be an issue because no pressurized fluid is available unless a separate bearing pressurization system is included. Durable materials and/or coatings are needed that can demonstrate low wear in the harsh LO2/LH2 environment. Advanced materials are also needed to improve the lifetime, reliability and performance of other propulsion system elements such as seals and chambers.

  4. Space propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazaroff, John M.

    1993-02-01

    Lewis Research Center is developing broad-based new technologies for space chemical engines to satisfy long-term needs of ETO launch vehicles and other vehicles operating in and beyond Earth orbit. Specific objectives are focused on high performance LO2/LH2 engines providing moderate thrusts of 7,5-200 klb. This effort encompasses research related to design analysis and manufacturing processes needed to apply advanced materials to subcomponents, components, and subsystems of space-based systems and related ground-support equipment. High-performance space-based chemical engines face a number of technical challenges. Liquid hydrogen turbopump impellers are often so large that they cannot be machined from a single piece, yet high stress at the vane/shroud interface makes bonding extremely difficult. Tolerances on fillets are critical on large impellers. Advanced materials and fabricating techniques are needed to address these and other issues of interest. Turbopump bearings are needed which can provide reliable, long life operation at high speed and high load with low friction losses. Hydrostatic bearings provide good performance, but transients during pump starts and stops may be an issue because no pressurized fluid is available unless a separate bearing pressurization system is included. Durable materials and/or coatings are needed that can demonstrate low wear in the harsh LO2/LH2 environment. Advanced materials are also needed to improve the lifetime, reliability and performance of other propulsion system elements such as seals and chambers.

  5. Space Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2009-01-01

    Optimal nutrition will be critical for crew members who embark on space exploration missions. Nutritional assessment provides an opportunity to ensure that crewmembers begin their missions in optimal nutritional status, to document changes during a mission and, if necessary, to provide intervention to maintain that status throughout the mission, and to assesses changes after landing in order to facilitate the return to their normal status as soon as possible after landing. We report here the findings from our nutritional assessment of astronauts who participated in the International Space Station (ISS) missions, along with flight and ground-based research findings. We also present ongoing and planned nutrition research activities. These studies provide evidence that bone loss, compromised vitamin status, and oxidative damage are the critical nutritional concerns for space travelers. Other nutrient issues exist, including concerns about the stability of nutrients in the food system, which are exposed to longterm storage and radiation during flight. Defining nutrient requirements, and being able to provide and maintain those nutrients on exploration missions, will be critical for maintaining crew member health.

  6. Infinitely many kinds of quantum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Matthew B

    2008-01-01

    We define the ability of a quantum channel to simulate another by means of suitable encoding and decoding operations. While classical channels have only two equivalence classes under simulation (channels with non-vanishing capacity and those with vanishing capacity), we show that there are an uncountable infinity of different equivalence classes of quantum channels using the example of the quantum erasure channel. Our results also imply a kind of 'Matthew principle' for error correction on certain channels.

  7. Evaluation of microfluidic channels with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, J.; Prykäri, T.; Alarousu, E.; Lauri, J.; Myllylä, R.

    2010-11-01

    Application of time domain, ultra high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) in evaluation of microfluidic channels is demonstrated. Presented study was done using experimental UHR-OCT device based on a Kerr-lens mode locked Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser, a photonic crystal fibre and modified, free-space Michelson interferometer. To show potential of the technique, microfluidic chip fabricated by VTT Center for Printed Intelligence (Oulu, Finland) was measured. Ability for full volumetric reconstruction in non-contact manner enabled complete characterization of closed entity of a microfluidic channel without contamination and harm for the sample. Measurement, occurring problems, and methods of postprocessing for raw data are described. Results present completely resolved physical structure of the channel, its spatial dimensions, draft angles and evaluation of lamination quality.

  8. Optical Channelizer Evaluation Using Empirical Data and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic,William D.

    1998-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation Division under NASA contract NAS3-25865 developed a proof-of-concept (POC) multichannel demultiplexer implemented as an acousto-optic radiofrequency (RF) with a spectrum analyzer. A detailed analysis of the experimental results indicate that the expected degradation caused by the acousto-optical channelizer is approximately 2.0 dB degradation at 10(exp -5) bit-error rate (BER) and 3.0 dB degradation at 10(exp -8) BER. This degradation may be quite acceptable when considering the excellent volume, mass, and power characteristics of acousto-optical channelizing relative to other technologies. In addition, system performance can be greatly improved by using digital pulse shaping in the modem and increasing the channel spacing from 40 to 45 kHz for 64 kbps quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) modulation.

  9. Channel coding and time-diversity for optical wireless links.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang; Khalighi, Ali; Caussé, Patrice; Bourennane, Salah

    2009-01-19

    Atmospheric turbulence can cause a significant performance degradation in free space optical communication systems. An efficient solution could be to exploit the temporal diversity to improve the performance of the transmission link. Depending on the tolerable delay latency, we can benefit from some degree of time diversity that we can exploit by employing channel coding and interleaving. In this paper, we investigate the efficiency of several channel coding techniques for different time diversity orders and turbulence conditions. We show that a simple convolutional code is a suitable choice in most cases as it makes a good compromise between decoding complexity and performance. We also study the receiver performance when the channel is estimated based on some training symbols.

  10. Channel by Day and Night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 17 June 2004 This pair of images shows part of a small channel.

    Day/Night Infrared Pairs

    The image pairs presented focus on a single surface feature as seen in both the daytime and nighttime by the infrared THEMIS camera. The nighttime image (right) has been rotated 180 degrees to place north at the top.

    Infrared image interpretation

    Daytime: Infrared images taken during the daytime exhibit both the morphological and thermophysical properties of the surface of Mars. Morphologic details are visible due to the effect of sun-facing slopes receiving more energy than antisun-facing slopes. This creates a warm (bright) slope and cool (dark) slope appearance that mimics the light and shadows of a visible wavelength image. Thermophysical properties are seen in that dust heats up more quickly than rocks. Thus dusty areas are bright and rocky areas are dark.

    Nighttime: Infrared images taken during the nighttime exhibit only the thermophysical properties of the surface of Mars. The effect of sun-facing versus non-sun-facing energy dissipates quickly at night. Thermophysical effects dominate as different surfaces cool at different rates through the nighttime hours. Rocks cool slowly, and are therefore relatively bright at night (remember that rocks are dark during the day). Dust and other fine grained materials cool very quickly and are dark in nighttime infrared images.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 19.8, Longitude 141.5 East (218.5 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through

  11. Structural Biology of TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hellmich, Ute A.; Gaudet, Rachelle

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins remain challenging targets for structural biologists, despite recent technical developments regarding sample preparation and structure determination. We review recent progress towards a structural understanding of TRP channels and the techniques used to that end. We discuss available low-resolution structures from electron microscopy (EM), X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and review the resulting insights into TRP channel function for various subfamily members. The recent high-resolution structure of TRPV1 is discussed in more detail in Chapter X. We also consider the opportunities and challenges of using the accumulating structural information on TRPs and homologous proteins for deducing full-length structures of different TRP channel subfamilies, such as building homology models. Finally, we close by summarizing the outlook of the “holy grail” of understanding in atomic detail the diverse functions of TRP channels. PMID:24961976

  12. Aquaglyceroporins: ancient channels for metalloids.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Thiyagarajan, Saravanamuthu; Rosen, Barry P

    2008-11-07

    The identification of aquaglyceroporins as uptake channels for arsenic and antimony shows how these toxic elements can enter the food chain, and suggests that food plants could be genetically modified to exclude arsenic while still accumulating boron and silicon.

  13. Ion Channels in Nerve Membranes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenstein, Gerald

    1976-01-01

    Discusses research that indicates that nerve membranes, which play a key role in the conduction of impulses, are traversed by protein channels with ion pathways opened and closed by the membrane electric field. (Author/MLH)

  14. FAITH Water Channel Flow Visualization

    NASA Video Gallery

    Water channel flow visualization experiments are performed on a three dimensional model of a small hill. This experiment was part of a series of measurements of the complex fluid flow around the hi...

  15. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    DOEpatents

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  16. Information transmission and recovery in neural communications channels

    SciTech Connect

    Eguia, M. C.; Rabinovich, M. I.; Abarbanel, H. D. I.

    2000-11-01

    behavior is strikingly different than the passive role communications channels usually play, and the ''data processing theorem'' of conventional communications theory is violated by these neural channels. Our calculations indicate that neurons can reinforce reliable transmission along a chain even when the synapses and the neurons are not completely reliable components. This phenomenon is generic in parameter space, robust in the presence of noise, and independent of the discretization process. Our results suggest a framework in which one might understand the apparent design complexity of neural information transduction networks. If networks with many dynamical neurons can recover information not apparent at various waystations in the communications channel, such networks may be more robust to noisy signals, may be more capable of communicating many types of encoded sensory neural information, and may be the appropriate design for components, neurons and synapses, which can be individually imprecise, inaccurate ''devices.''

  17. Information transmission and recovery in neural communications channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguia, M. C.; Rabinovich, M. I.; Abarbanel, H. D. I.

    2000-11-01

    behavior is strikingly different than the passive role communications channels usually play, and the ``data processing theorem'' of conventional communications theory is violated by these neural channels. Our calculations indicate that neurons can reinforce reliable transmission along a chain even when the synapses and the neurons are not completely reliable components. This phenomenon is generic in parameter space, robust in the presence of noise, and independent of the discretization process. Our results suggest a framework in which one might understand the apparent design complexity of neural information transduction networks. If networks with many dynamical neurons can recover information not apparent at various waystations in the communications channel, such networks may be more robust to noisy signals, may be more capable of communicating many types of encoded sensory neural information, and may be the appropriate design for components, neurons and synapses, which can be individually imprecise, inaccurate ``devices.''

  18. Ion channel screening technologies today.

    PubMed

    Terstappen, Georg C

    2005-01-01

    For every heartbeat, movement and thought, ion channels have to open and close, and thus, it is not surprising that malfunctioning of these membrane proteins leads to serious diseases. Today, only 7% of all marketed drugs act on ion channels but the systematic exploitation of this important target class has started mainly enabled by novel screening technologies. Thus, the discovery of selective and state-dependent drugs is on the horizon, hopefully leading to effective novel medicines.:

  19. Intracellular calcium channels in protozoa.

    PubMed

    Docampo, Roberto; Moreno, Silvia N J; Plattner, Helmut

    2014-09-15

    Ca(2+)-signaling pathways and intracellular Ca(2+) channels are present in protozoa. Ancient origin of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and other intracellular channels predates the divergence of animals and fungi as evidenced by their presence in the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis, the closest known relative to metazoans. The first protozoan IP3R cloned, from the ciliate Paramecium, displays strong sequence similarity to the rat type 3 IP3R. This ciliate has a large number of IP3- and ryanodine(Ry)-like receptors in six subfamilies suggesting the evolutionary adaptation to local requirements for an expanding diversification of vesicle trafficking. IP3Rs have also been functionally characterized in trypanosomatids, where they are essential for growth, differentiation, and establishment of infection. The presence of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) in a number of protozoa indicates that mitochondrial regulation of Ca(2+) signaling is also an early appearance in evolution, and contributed to the discovery of the molecular nature of this channel in mammalian cells. There is only sequence evidence for the occurrence of two-pore channels (TPCs), transient receptor potential Ca(2+) channels (TRPCs) and intracellular mechanosensitive Ca(2+)-channels in Paramecium and in parasitic protozoa.

  20. Channelized Optical Waveguides On Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickernell, F. S.; Seaton, C. T.

    1987-02-01

    Silicon provides a natural substrate base for the development of channel waveguides and their integration with optoelectronic components. Using epitaxial growth, selective doping, and plasma etching, channel waveguides can be fabricated using single crystal silicon alone. Oxide layers of low optical index are readily formed by thermal means on silicon to provide a base upon which low-loss film waveguides can be formed by ion exchange and implantation, chemical vapor deposition, and physical vapor deposition. Thermally oxidized and nitrided layers provide a simple means for developing waveguides. The channel shape for ridge waveguides can be delineated by chemical etching and ion milling techniques. The anisotropic etch characteristics of silicon provide a natural channel for imbedding waveguides using organic and inorganic materials. This paper will review common semiconductor processing techniques used for the formation of channel waveguides on silicon and the performance results obtained to date. The use of channel waveguides for specific device developments will be described and the most promising areas for future development will be addressed.

  1. Intracellular Calcium Channels in Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Docampo, Roberto; Moreno, Silvia N.J.; Plattner, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+-signaling pathways and intracellular Ca2+ channels are present in protozoa. Ancient origin of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and other intracellular channels predates the divergence of animals and fungi as evidenced by their presence in the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis, the closest known relative to metazoans. The first protozoan IP3R cloned, from the ciliate Paramecium, displays strong sequence similarity to the rat type 3 IP3R. This ciliate has a large number of IP3- and ryanodine(Ry)-like receptors in 6 subfamilies suggesting the evolutionary adaptation to local requirements for an expanding diversification of vesicle trafficking. IP3Rs have also been functionally characterized in trypanosomatids, where they are essential for growth, differentiation, and establishment of infection. The presence of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) in a number of protozoa indicates that mitochondrial regulation of Ca2+ signaling is also an early appearance in evolution, and contributed to the discovery of the molecular nature of this channel in mammalian cells. There is only sequence evidence for the occurrence of two-pore channels (TPCs), transient receptor potential Ca2+ channels (TRPCs) and intracellular mechanosensitive Ca2+-channels in Paramecium and in parasitic protozoa. PMID:24291099

  2. A three channel telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesho, Jeffery C.; Eaton, Harry A. C.

    1993-01-01

    A three channel telemetry system intended for biomedical applications is described. The transmitter is implemented in a single chip using a 2 micron BiCMOS processes. The operation of the system and the test results from the latest chip are discussed. One channel is always dedicated to temperature measurement while the other two channels are generic. The generic channels carry information from transducers that are interfaced to the system through on-chip general purpose operational amplifiers. The generic channels have different bandwidths: one from dc to 250 Hz and the other from dc to 1300 Hz. Each generic channel modulates a current controlled oscillator to produce a frequency modulated signal. The two frequency modulated signals are summed and used to amplitude modulate the temperature signal which acts as a carrier. A near-field inductive link telemeters the combined signals over a short distance. The chip operates on a supply voltage anywhere from 2.5 to 3.6 Volts and draws less than 1 mA when transmitting a signal. The chip can be incorporated into ingestible, implantable and other configurations. The device can free the patient from tethered data collection systems and reduces the possibility of infection from subcutaneous leads. Data telemetry can increase patient comfort leading to a greater acceptance of monitoring.

  3. America plans for space

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Contents include: pursuing a balanced space program; the space defense initiative; warfare in space; the lunar laboratory; the role of space in preserving the peace; living off the land - the use of resources in space for future civilian space operations; the military uses of space; C3I(command control communications and intelligence); aspects of space technology; arms control in space: preserving critical strategic space systems without weapons in space; space and arms control: a skeptical view; options for space arms control; space arms control.

  4. Cyclone Dera in the Mozambique Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS, flying aboard OrbView-2) saw Tropical Cyclone Dera shortly after it formed today (March 9, 2001) over the Mozambique Channel. Mozambique is visible to the left of the storm, and the island of Madagascar is partially visible on the right side of the storm. In the high-resolution image you can see the Zambeze River in Mozambique, which has been flooded in recent weeks. The signature brownish plumes of sediment discharge from the Zambeze into the channel are visible at several places along Mozambique's coastline. According to the U.S. Joint Typhoon Warning Center, Cyclone Dera now has sustained winds of 55 knots (about 63 mph or 102 km per hour), with gusts of up to 70 knots (81 mph or 130 km per hour). The storm is moving in a south-southeasterly direction at about 14 knots (16 mph or 26 km per hour). The storm is predicted to continue intensifying over the next 24 hours and should continue heading in a southerly direction. Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  5. Structure parameters in rotating Couette-Poiseuille channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, George H.; Sather, D.

    1986-01-01

    It is well-known that a number of steady state problems in fluid mechanics involving systems of nonlinear partial differential equations can be reduced to the problem of solving a single operator equation of the form: v + lambda Av + lambda B(v) = 0, v is the summation of H, lambda is the summation of one-dimensional Euclid space, where H is an appropriate (real or complex) Hilbert space. Here lambda is a typical load parameter, e.g., the Reynolds number, A is a linear operator, and B is a quadratic operator generated by a bilinear form. In this setting many bifurcation and stability results for problems were obtained. A rotating Couette-Poiseuille channel flow was studied, and it showed that, in general, the superposition of a Poiseuille flow on a rotating Couette channel flow is destabilizing.

  6. Structure parameters in rotating Couette-Poiseuille channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knightly, George H.; Sather, D.

    It is well-known that a number of steady state problems in fluid mechanics involving systems of nonlinear partial differential equations can be reduced to the problem of solving a single operator equation of the form: v + lambda Av + lambda B(v) = 0, v is the summation of H, lambda is the summation of one-dimensional Euclid space, where H is an appropriate (real or complex) Hilbert space. Here lambda is a typical load parameter, e.g., the Reynolds number, A is a linear operator, and B is a quadratic operator generated by a bilinear form. In this setting many bifurcation and stability results for problems were obtained. A rotating Couette-Poiseuille channel flow was studied, and it showed that, in general, the superposition of a Poiseuille flow on a rotating Couette channel flow is destabilizing.

  7. Humans in Space &Space Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legner, Klaus

    Inevitably, members of the human species will again walk on the face of the moon and ultimately establish a permanently occupied lunar base. Also, inevitably, humans will venture to the planets within the solar system, most likely beginning with Mars or the Martian satellite, Phobos. These missions will take place because the species that contemplates them is driven by an insatiable desire for knowledge and understanding and because the technical means to accomplish these objectives are possible. There is no question that humans will establish outposts on Earth's moon and make interplanetary journeys. The only uncertainties concern when and how these expeditions are to be made. Just as a 90- or 120-day tour onboard an international space station is fundamentally different from a brief space shuttle mission; a one-year lunar base tour or a two- or three-year mission to Mars will be unique. Despite superficial similarities to other space missions and analogues, the extended durations and astronomical distances involved in lunar and Martian missions will make these activities far more difficult and dangerous. Crowded conditions, language and cultural differences, logistics problems, radiation concerns, communications lag times, workloads, and a variety of additional issues will conspire to impair the performance and affect the behaviour of long duration crew personnel. Above all stressors, however, the durations of the missions will impose the greatest burdens and extract the most severe tolls on the humans involved. On long-duration space missions, time will be the factor that can compound all issues, however trivial, into serious problems.

  8. Boundary Layer Protuberance Simulations in Channel Nozzle Arc Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larin, M. E.; Campbell, C. H.; Pulsonetti, M. V.

    2009-01-01

    Various protuberance heights and shapes were modeled in the channel nozzle of the NASA Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Strictures Facility with the Data- Parallel Line Relaxation computational fluid dynamics code. The heating on the protuberance was compared to baseline (no protuberance) heating at a single fixed arc jet condition in order to obtain heating augmentation factors that will be used for flight traceability in the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment on Space Shuttle Orbiter flights STS-119 (completed) and STS-128 (future flight). The arc jet simulations were performed in conjunction with the actual ground tests performed on the flight version (selected height and shape) of the protuberance. Thearc jet simulations for the final (flight version) protuberance included non-uniform inflow conditions beginning at the channel nozzle throat. The 2D inflow condition was modeled based on the current best practices methodology and used variable enthalpy and mass flow rate across the throat. Channel walls were modeled as fully catalytic isothermal surfaces, while the test section (consisting of Reaction Cured Glass tiles) was modeled as a partially catalytic radiative equilibrium wall. The results of the protuberance and baseline simulations were compared to the applicable ground test results. In addition, the obtained heating augmentation factors were compared to the factors derived from the STS-119 flight data. The effects of the protuberance shock on the opposite channel wall were also investigated.

  9. How human sleep in space — investigations during space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoilova, I. M.; Zdravev, T. K.; Yanev, T. K.

    Sleep problems have been observed during many of the space flights. The existence of poor quality of sleep, fatigue, insomnia or different alterations in sleep structure, organization and sleep cyclicity have been established. Nevertheless results obtained from investigations of human sleep on board manned space vehicles show that it is possible to keep sleep patterns related to the restorative and adaptive processes. For the first time in the frame of the "Intercosmos" program a multi-channel system for recording and analysis of sleep in space was constructed by scientists of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and was installed on board the manned Mir orbiting station. In 1988 during the joint Bulgarian-Russian space flight continues recording of electro-physiological parameters necessary to estimate the sleep stages and sleep organization was made. These investigations were continued in next space flights of different prolongation. The results were compared with the findings obtained under the conditions during the pre- and post-flight periods.

  10. General rules for the arrangements and gating motions of pore-lining helices in homomeric ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jian; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The pore-lining helix (PLH) bundles are central to the function of all ion channels, as their conformational rearrangements dictate channel gating. Here, we explore all plausible oligomeric arrangements of the PLH bundles within homomeric ion channels by building models using generic restraints. In particular, the distance between two neighboring PLHs was bounded both below and above in order to avoid steric clash and allow proper packing. The resulting models provide a theoretical representation of the accessible space for oligomeric arrangements. While the represented space is confined, it encompasses nearly all the ion channel PLH bundles for which the structures are currently known. For a multitude of channels, gating models suggested by paths within the confined accessible space are in qualitative agreement with those established in previous structural and computational studies. PMID:25105557

  11. Space Technospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.; Steklov, A. F.; Primak, N. V.

    2000-01-01

    Two main tendencies of making the Solar System habitable are regarding nowadays: (1) making objects of the Solar System habitable; and (2) making the space of the Solar System habitable. We think that it's better to combine them. We should dezine and build settlements ('technospheres') on such objects as asteroids and comets, using their resources. That is, it is necessary to create 'space technospheres' - a long-termed human settlements in the space. To save energy resources it is necessary to use Near-Earth asteroids enriched with water ice (i. e. extinguished comets) with Near-Earth orbits. To realize listed conceptions it is necessary to decrease (up to 100 times) the cost price of the long-termed settlements. That's why even average UN country will be able to create it's own space house - artificial planet ('technosphere') and maintain life activities there. About 50-100 such artificial planets will represent the future civilization of our Solar System. At the same time Earth will stay basic, maternal planet. There is an interesting problem of correcting orbits of that objects. Orbits can be changed into circular or elongated to make them comfortable for living activities of 5000-10000 settlers, and to maintain connection with maternal planet. Technospheres with the elongated orbits are more advantageous to assimilate the Solar System. While technospheres with circular orbits suit to the industrial cycle with certain specialization. The specialization of the technosphere will depend on mine-workings and/or chosen high-technology industrial process. Because it is profitable to convert raw materials at the technosphere and then to transport finished products to the maternal planet. It worth to be mentioned that because of the low gravitation and changed life cycle technosphere settlers, new 'Columb' of the Solar System will transform into new mankind. It will happen though it is difficult to imaging this. Because long ago, when fish left the ocean, they didn

  12. Space Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Xontech, Inc.'s software package, XonVu, simulates the missions of Voyager 1 at Jupiter and Saturn, Voyager 2 at Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, and Giotto in close encounter with Comet Halley. With the program, the user can generate scenes of the planets, moons, stars or Halley's nucleus and tail as seen by Giotto, all graphically reproduced with high accuracy in wireframe representation. Program can be used on a wide range of computers, including PCs. User friendly and interactive, with many options, XonVu can be used by a space novice or a professional astronomer. With a companion user's manual, it sells for $79.

  13. Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts receive the highest occupational radiation exposure. Effective protections are needed to ensure the safety of astronauts on long duration space missions. Increased cancer morbidity or mortality risk in astronauts may be caused by occupational radiation exposure. Acute and late radiation damage to the central nervous system (CNS) may lead to changes in motor function and behavior, or neurological disorders. Radiation exposure may result in degenerative tissue diseases (non-cancer or non-CNS) such as cardiac, circulatory, or digestive diseases, as well as cataracts. Acute radiation syndromes may occur due to occupational radiation exposure.

  14. Space Food

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In planning for the long duration Apollo missions, NASA conducted extensive research into space food. One of the techniques developed was freeze drying. Action Products commercialized this technique, concentrating on snack food including the first freeze-dried ice cream. The foods are cooked, quickly frozen and then slowly heated in a vacuum chamber to remove the ice crystals formed by the freezing process. The final product retains 98 percent of its nutrition and weighs only 20 percent of its original weight. Action snacks are sold at museums, NASA facilities and are exported to a number of foreign countries. Sales run to several million dollars annually.

  15. Open Space Conferences: A New Way of Working

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrington, Neil

    2006-01-01

    Recent attendance at two events hosted at the Channel 4 Television Centre by "Policy Unplugged" (a group styling themselves as policy entrepreneurs) has converted the author to a style of working called the Open Space Conference. Created in the mid-1980s by organizational consultant Harrison Owen, Open Space conferences allow participants to…

  16. 8-PSK Signaling over non-linear satellite channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, Sheila B.; Caballero, Ruben B. Eng.

    1996-01-01

    Space agencies are under pressure to utilize better bandwidth-efficient communication methods due to the actual allocated frequency bands becoming more congested. Also budget reductions is another problem that the space agencies must deal with. This budget constraint results in simpler spacecraft carrying less communication capabilities and also the reduction in staff to capture data in the earth stations. It is then imperative that the most bandwidth efficient communication methods be utilized. This thesis presents a study of 8-ary Phase Shift Keying (8PSK) modulation with respect to bandwidth, power efficiency, spurious emissions and interference susceptibility over a non-linear satellite channel.

  17. Minimum output entropy of a non-Gaussian quantum channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memarzadeh, Laleh; Mancini, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a model of a non-Gaussian quantum channel that stems from the composition of two physically relevant processes occurring in open quantum systems, namely, amplitude damping and dephasing. For it we find input states approaching zero output entropy while respecting the input energy constraint. These states fully exploit the infinite dimensionality of the Hilbert space. Upon truncation of the latter, the minimum output entropy remains finite, and optimal input states for such a case are conjectured thanks to numerical evidence.

  18. Atomic mutagenesis in ion channels with engineered stoichiometry

    PubMed Central

    Lueck, John D; Mackey, Adam L; Infield, Daniel T; Galpin, Jason D; Li, Jing; Roux, Benoît; Ahern, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    C-type inactivation of potassium channels fine-tunes the electrical signaling in excitable cells through an internal timing mechanism that is mediated by a hydrogen bond network in the channels' selectively filter. Previously, we used nonsense suppression to highlight the role of the conserved Trp434-Asp447 indole hydrogen bond in Shaker potassium channels with a non-hydrogen bonding homologue of tryptophan, Ind (Pless et al., 2013). Here, molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the Trp434Ind hydrogen bonding partner, Asp447, unexpectedly 'flips out' towards the extracellular environment, allowing water to penetrate the space behind the selectivity filter while simultaneously reducing the local negative electrostatic charge. Additionally, a protein engineering approach is presented whereby split intein sequences are flanked by endoplasmic reticulum retention/retrieval motifs (ERret) are incorporated into the N- or C- termini of Shaker monomers or within sodium channels two-domain fragments. This system enabled stoichiometric control of Shaker monomers and the encoding of multiple amino acids within a channel tetramer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18976.001 PMID:27710770

  19. Producing a Live HDTV Program from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grubbs, Rodney; Fontanot, Carlos; Hames, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    By the year 2000, NASA had flown HDTV camcorders on three Space Shuttle missions: STS-95, STS-93 and STS-99. All three flights of these camcorders were accomplished with cooperation from the Japanese space agency (then known as NASDA and now known as JAXA). The cameras were large broadcast-standard cameras provided by NASDA and flight certified by both NASA and NASDA. The high-definition video shot during these missions was spectacular. Waiting for the return of the tapes to Earth emphasized the next logical step: finding a way to downlink the HDTV live from space. Both the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station (ISS) programs were interested in live HDTV from space, but neither had the resources to fully fund the technology. Technically, downlinking from the ISS was the most effective approach. Only when the Japanese broadcaster NHK and the Japanese space agency expressed interest in covering a Japanese astronaut's journey to the ISS did the project become possible. Together, JAXA and NHK offered equipment, technology, and funding toward the project. In return, NHK asked for a live HDTV downlink during one of its broadcast programs. NASA and the ISS Program sought a US partner to broadcast a live HDTV program and approached the Discovery Channel. The Discovery Channel had proposed a live HDTV project in response to NASA's previous call for offers. The Discovery Channel agreed to provide addItional resources. With the final partner in place, the project was under way. Engineers in the Avionics Systems Division at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) had already studied the various options for downlinking HDTV from the ISS. They concluded that the easiest way was to compress the HDTV so that the resulting data stream would "look" like a payload data stream. The flight system would consist of a professional HDTV camcorder with live HD-SDI output, an HDTV MPEG-2 encoder, and a packetizer/protocol converter.

  20. Glass composition and process for sealing void spaces in electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Kirby, Brent W.

    2012-05-01

    A glass foaming material and method are disclosed for filling void spaces in electrochemical devices. The glass material includes a reagent that foams at a temperature above the softening point of the glass. Expansion of the glass fills void spaces including by-pass and tolerance channels of electrochemical devices. In addition, cassette to cassette seals can also be formed while channels and other void spaces are filled, reducing the number of processing steps needed.

  1. Generic theory for channel sinuosity

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Eli D.; Constantine, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Sinuous patterns traced by fluid flows are a ubiquitous feature of physical landscapes on Earth, Mars, the volcanic floodplains of the Moon and Venus, and other planetary bodies. Typically discussed as a consequence of migration processes in meandering rivers, sinuosity is also expressed in channel types that show little or no indication of meandering. Sinuosity is sometimes described as “inherited” from a preexisting morphology, which still does not explain where the inherited sinuosity came from. For a phenomenon so universal as sinuosity, existing models of channelized flows do not explain the occurrence of sinuosity in the full variety of settings in which it manifests, or how sinuosity may originate. Here we present a generic theory for sinuous flow patterns in landscapes. Using observations from nature and a numerical model of flow routing, we propose that flow resistance (representing landscape roughness attributable to topography or vegetation density) relative to surface slope exerts a fundamental control on channel sinuosity that is effectively independent of internal flow dynamics. Resistance-dominated surfaces produce channels with higher sinuosity than those of slope-dominated surfaces because increased resistance impedes downslope flow. Not limited to rivers, the hypothesis we explore pertains to sinuosity as a geomorphic pattern. The explanation we propose is inclusive enough to account for a wide variety of sinuous channel types in nature, and can serve as an analytical tool for determining the sinuosity a landscape might support. PMID:23610390

  2. River meanders and channel size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    This study uses an enlarged data set to (1) compare measured meander geometry to that predicted by the Langbein and Leopold (1966) theory, (2) examine the frequency distribution of the ratio radius of curvature/channel width, and (3) derive 40 empirical equations (31 of which are original) involving meander and channel size features. The data set, part of which comes from publications by other authors, consists of 194 sites from a large variety of physiographic environments in various countries. The Langbein-Leopold sine-generated-curve theory for predicting radius of curvature agrees very well with the field data (78 sites). The ratio radius of curvature/channel width has a modal value in the range of 2 to 3, in accordance with earlier work; about one third of the 79 values is less than 2.0. The 40 empirical relations, most of which include only two variables, involve channel cross-section dimensions (bankfull area, width, and mean depth) and meander features (wavelength, bend length, radius of curvature, and belt width). These relations have very high correlation coefficients, most being in the range of 0.95-0.99. Although channel width traditionally has served as a scale indicator, bankfull cross-sectional area and mean depth also can be used for this purpose. ?? 1986.

  3. TRP channels in the skin

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Balázs I; Oláh, Attila; Szöllősi, Attila Gábor; Bíró, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels not only act as ‘polymodal cellular sensors’ on sensory neurons but are also functionally expressed by a multitude of non-neuronal cell types. This is especially true in the skin, one of the largest organs of the body, where they appear to be critically involved in regulating various cutaneous functions both under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, we focus on introducing the roles of several cutaneous TRP channels in the regulation of the skin barrier, skin cell proliferation and differentiation, and immune functions. Moreover, we also describe the putative involvement of several TRP channels in the development of certain skin diseases and identify future TRP channel-targeted therapeutic opportunities. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24372189

  4. Gramicidin channels are internally gated.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tyson L; Fu, Riqiang; Nielson, Frederick; Cross, Timothy A; Busath, David D

    2010-04-21

    Gramicidin channels are archetypal molecular subjects for solid-state NMR studies and investigations of single-channel or cation conductance. Until now, the transitions between on and off conductance states have been thought, based on multichannel studies, to represent monomer <--> dimer reactions. Here we use a single-molecule deposition method (vesicle fusion to a planar bilayer) to show that gramicidin dimer channels do not normally dissociate when conductance terminates. Furthermore, the observation of two 13C peaks in solid-state NMR indicates very stable dichotomous conformations for both the first and second peptide bonds in the monomers, and a two-dimensional chemical exchange spectrum with a 12-s mixing time demonstrates that the Val1 carbonyl conformations exchange slowly, with lifetimes of several seconds. It is proposed that gramicidin channels are gated by small conformational changes in the channel near the permeation pathway. These studies demonstrate how regulation of conformations governing closed <--> open transitions may be achieved and studied at the molecular level.

  5. Charged and Neutral Particles Channeling Phenomena Channeling 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabagov, Sultan B.; Palumbo, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    On the discovery of coherent Bremsstrahlung in a single crystal at the Frascati National Laboratories / C. Barbiellini, G. P. Murtas and S. B. Dabagov -- Advances in coherent Bremsstrahlung and LPM-effect studies (to the lOOth anniversary from the birth of L. D. Landau) / N. F. Shul'ga -- Spectra of radiation and created particles at intermediate energy in oriented crystal taking into account energy loss / V. N. Baier and V. M. Katkov -- The coherent Bremsstrahlung beam at MAX-lab facility / K. Fissum ... [et al.] -- Radiation from thin, structured targets (CERN NA63) / A. Dizdar -- Hard incoherent radiation in thick crystals / N. F. Shul'ga, V. V. Syshchenko and A. I. Tarnovsky -- Coherent Bremsstrahlung in periodically deformed crystals with a complex base / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Induction of coherent x-ray Bremsstrahlung in crystals under the influence of acoustic waves / A. R. Mkrtchyan and V. V. Parazian -- Coherent processes in bent single crystals / V. A. Maisheev -- Experimental and theoretical investigation of complete transfer phenomenon for media with various heat exchange coefficients / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. E. Movsisyan and V. R. Kocharyan -- Coherent pair production in crystals / A. R. Mkrtchyan, A. A. Saharian and V. V. Parazian -- Negative particle planar and axial channeling and channeling collimation / R. A. Carrigan, Jr. -- CERN crystal-based collimation in modern hadron colliders / W. Scandale -- Studies and application of bent crystals for beam steering at 70 GeV IHEP accelerator / A. G. Afonin ... [et al.] -- Crystal collimation studies at the Tevatron (T-980) / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of crystals for channeling of particles in accellerators / A. Mazzolari ... [et al.] -- New possibilities to facilitate collimation of both positively and negatively charged particle beams by crystals / V. Guidi, A. Mazzolari and V. V. Tikhomirov -- Increase of probability of particle capture into the channeling

  6. Researches toward potassium channels on tumor progressions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheng; Yang, Qian; You, Qidong

    2009-01-01

    As trans-membrane proteins located in cytoplasm and organelle membrane, potassium (K(+)) channels are generally divided into four super-families: voltage-gated K(+) channels (K(v)), Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (K(Ca)), inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (K(ir)) and two-pore domain K(+) channels (K(2P)). Since dysfunctions of K(+) channels would induce many diseases, various studies toward their functions in physiologic and pathologic process have been extensively launched. This review focuses on the recent advances of K(+) channels in tumor progression, including the brief introduction of K(+) channels, the role of K(+) channels in tumor cells, the possible mechanism of action at cellular level, and the possible application of K(+) channel modulators in cancer chemotherapy.

  7. Insect sodium channels and insecticide resistance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the generation and propagation of action potentials (i.e., electrical impulses) in excitable cells. Although most of our knowledge about sodium channels is derived from decades of studies of mammalian isoforms, research on insect sodium channels is revealing both common and unique aspects of sodium channel biology. In particular, our understanding of the molecular dynamics and pharmacology of insect sodium channels has advanced greatly in recent years, thanks to successful functional expression of insect sodium channels in Xenopus oocytes and intensive efforts to elucidate the molecular basis of insect resistance to insecticides that target sodium channels. In this review, I discuss recent literature on insect sodium channels with emphases on the prominent role of alternative splicing and RNA editing in the generation of functionally diverse sodium channels in insects and the current understanding of the interactions between insect sodium channels and insecticides. PMID:17206406

  8. The Berlin oil channel for drag reduction research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechert, D. W.; Hoppe, G.; van der Hoeven, J. G. Th.; Makris, R.

    1992-03-01

    For drag reduction research an oil channel has been designed and built. It is also well suited for investigations on turbulent flow and in particular on the dynamics of the viscous sublayer near the wall. The thickness of the viscous sublayer ( y += 5) can be varied between 1 and 4 mm. Surfaces with longitudinal ribs (“riblets”), which are known to reduce drag, can have fairly large dimensions. The lateral spacing of the ribs can lie between 3 and 10 mm, as compared to about 0.5 mm spacing for conventional wind tunnels. It has been proved by appropriate tests that the oil channel data are completely equivalent to data from other facilities and with other mean flow geometries. However, the shear stress data from the new oil channel are much more accurate than previous data due to a novel differential shear force balance with an accuracy of ±0.2%. In addition to shear stress measurements, velocity fluctuation measurements can be carried out with hot wire or hot film probes. In order to calibrate these probes, a moving sled permits to emulate the flow velocities with the fluid in the channel at rest. A number of additional innovations contribute to the improvement of the measurements, such as, e.g., (i) novel adjustable turbulators to maintain equilibrium turbulence in the channel, (ii) a “bubble trap” to avoid bubbles in the channel at high flow velocities, (iii) a simple method for the precision calibration of manometers, and (iv) the elimination of (Coulomb) friction in ball bearings. This latter fairly general invention is used for the wheels of the calibration unit of the balance. The channel has a cross section of 25 × 85 cm and is 11 m long. It is filled with about 4.5 metric tons of baby oil (white paraffine oil), which is transparent and odorless like water. The kinematic viscosity of the oil is v = 1.2×10-5 m2/s, and the highest (average) velocity is 1.29 m/s. Thus, the Reynolds number range (calculated with the channel width, 0.25 m) lies between

  9. 5.0 GHz Continuum eEVN Observations of the Recoiling Supermassive Black Hole Candidate SDSSS J113323.97+550415.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Torres, M.; Piconcelli, N. Ramirez-Olivencia E.; Alberdi, A.; Komossa, S.; Herrero-Illana, R.

    2015-04-01

    We report electronic European VLBI Network (eEVN) radio observations of the recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) candidate SDSSS J113323.97+550415.8 (=SDSS1133), in the outskirts of the nearby (D=28.9 Mpc) galaxy Mrk 177 (Koss et al.

  10. Measurement of dielectric properties of whole and ground chicken breast meat over the frequency range from 500 MHz to 50 GHz

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dielectric properties of food greatly influence its interaction with RF and MW electromagnetic fields and subsequently determine the absorption of microwave energy and consequent heating behavior of food materials in microwave heating and processing applications. Microwave heating is usually re...

  11. Continuous equal channel angular pressing

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Lowe, Terry C.; Valiev, Ruslan Z.; Raab, Georgy J.

    2006-12-26

    An apparatus that continuously processes a metal workpiece without substantially altering its cross section includes a wheel member having an endless circumferential groove, and a stationary constraint die that surrounds the wheel member, covers most of the length of the groove, and forms a passageway with the groove. The passageway has a rectangular shaped cross section. An abutment member projects from the die into the groove and blocks one end of the passageway. The wheel member rotates relative to the die in the direction toward the abutment member. An output channel in the die adjacent the abutment member has substantially the same cross section as the passageway. A metal workpiece is fed through an input channel into the passageway and carried in the groove by frictional drag in the direction towards the abutment member, and is extruded through the output channel without any substantial change in cross section.

  12. Sodium Channel Inhibiting Marine Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn, Lyndon E.

    Saxitoxin (STX), tetrodotoxin (TTX) and their many chemical relatives are part of our daily lives. From killing people who eat seafood containing these toxins, to being valuable research tools unveiling the invisible structures of their pharmacological receptor, their global impact is beyond measure. The pharmacological receptor for these toxins is the voltage-gated sodium channel which transports Na ions between the exterior to the interior of cells. The two structurally divergent families of STX and TTX analogues bind at the same location on these Na channels to stop the flow of ions. This can affect nerves, muscles and biological senses of most animals. It is through these and other toxins that we have developed much of our fundamental understanding of the Na channel and its part in generating action potentials in excitable cells.

  13. Muon cooling in a quadrupole magnet channel

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; Poklonskiy, A.; /Michigan State U.

    2007-10-01

    As discussed before,[1] a cooling channel using quadrupole magnets in a FODO transport channel can be used for initial cooling of muons. In the present note we discuss this possibility of a FODO focusing channel for cooling, and we present ICOOL simulations of muon cooling within a FODO channel. We explore a 1.5m cell-length cooling channel that could be used for the initial transverse cooling stage of a muon collider or neutrino factory.

  14. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanck, Dorothy A.; Fozzard, Harry A.

    Voltage-gated sodium channels subserve regenerative excitation throughout the nervous system, as well as in skeletal and cardiac muscle. This excitation results from a voltage-dependent mechanism that increases regeneratively and selectively the sodium conductance of the channel e-fold for a 4-7 mV depolarization of the membrane with time constants in the range of tens of microseconds. Entry of Na+ into the cell without a companion anion depolarizes the cell. This depolarization, called the action potential, is propagated at rates of 1-20 meters/sec. In nerve it subserves rapid transmission of information and, in muscle cells, coordinates the trigger for contraction. Sodium-dependent action potentials depolarize the membrane to inside positive values of about 30-40 mV (approaching the electrochemical potential for the transmembrane sodium gradient). Repolarization to the resting potential (usually between -60 and -90 mV) occurs because of inactivation (closure) of sodium channels, which is assisted in different tissues by variable amounts of activation of voltage-gated potassium channels. This sequence results in all-or-nothing action potentials in nerve and fast skeletal muscle of 1-2 ms duration, and in heart muscle of 100-300 ms duration. Recovery of regenerative excitation, i.e., recovery of the ability of sodium channels to open, occurs after restoration of the resting potential with time constants of a few to several hundreds of milliseconds, depending on the channel isoform, and this rate controls the minimum interval for repetitive action potentials (refractory period).

  15. TIDALLY ENHANCED STELLAR WIND: A WAY TO MAKE THE SYMBIOTIC CHANNEL TO TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA VIABLE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Han, Z.

    2011-07-10

    In the symbiotic (or WD+RG) channel of the single-degenerate scenario for type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), the explosions occur a relatively long time after star formation. The birthrate from this channel would be too low to account for all observed SNe Ia were it not for some mechanism to enhance the rate of accretion on to the white dwarf. A tidally enhanced stellar wind, of the type which has been postulated to explain many phenomena related to giant star evolution in binary systems, can do this. Compared to mass stripping, this model extends the space of SNe Ia progenitors to longer orbital periods and hence increases the birthrate to about 0.0069 yr{sup -1} for the symbiotic channel. Two symbiotic stars, T CrB and RS Oph, considered to be the most likely progenitors of SNe Ia through the symbiotic channel, are well inside the period-companion mass space predicted by our models.

  16. Noisy quantum phase communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teklu, Berihu; Trapani, Jacopo; Olivares, Stefano; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2015-06-01

    We address quantum phase channels, i.e communication schemes where information is encoded in the phase-shift imposed to a given signal, and analyze their performances in the presence of phase diffusion. We evaluate mutual information for coherent and phase-coherent signals, and for both ideal and realistic phase receivers. We show that coherent signals offer better performances than phase-coherent ones, and that realistic phase channels are effective ones in the relevant regime of low energy and large alphabets.

  17. Channel incision and water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, F. D.

    2009-12-01

    Watershed development often triggers channel incision that leads to radical changes in channel morphology. Although morphologic evolution due to channel incision has been documented and modeled by others, ecological effects, particularly water quality effects, are less well understood. Furthermore, environmental regulatory frameworks for streams frequently focus on stream water quality and underemphasize hydrologic and geomorphic issues. Discharge, basic physical parameters, solids, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), chlorophyll and bacteria were monitored for five years at two sites along a stream in a mixed cover watershed characterized by rapid incision of the entire channel network. Concurrent data were collected from two sites on a nearby stream draining a watershed of similar size and cultivation intensity, but without widespread incision. Data sets describing physical aquatic habitat and fish fauna of each stream were available from other studies. The second stream was impacted by watershed urbanization, but was not incised, so normal channel-floodplain interaction maintained a buffer zone of floodplain wetlands between the study reach and the urban development upstream. The incised stream had mean channel depth and width that were 1.8 and 3.5 times as large as for the nonincised stream, and was characterized by flashier hydrology. The median rise rate for the incised stream was 6.4 times as great as for the nonincised stream. Correlation analyses showed that hydrologic perturbations were associated with water quality degradation, and the incised stream had levels of turbidity and solids that were two to three times higher than the nonincised, urbanizing stream. Total phosphorus, total Kjeldahl N, and chlorophyll a concentrations were significantly higher in the incised stream, while nitrate was significantly greater in the nonincised, urbanizing stream (p < 0.02). Physical aquatic habitat and fish populations in the nonincised urbanizing stream were

  18. Eight-Channel Continuous Timer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Steven

    2004-01-01

    A custom laboratory electronic timer circuit measures the durations of successive cycles of nominally highly stable input clock signals in as many as eight channels, for the purpose of statistically quantifying the small instabilities of these signals. The measurement data generated by this timer are sent to a personal computer running software that integrates the measurements to form a phase residual for each channel and uses the phase residuals to compute Allan variances for each channel. (The Allan variance is a standard statistical measure of instability of a clock signal.) Like other laboratory clock-cycle-measuring circuits, this timer utilizes an externally generated reference clock signal having a known frequency (100 MHz) much higher than the frequencies of the input clock signals (between 100 and 120 Hz). It counts the number of reference-clock cycles that occur between successive rising edges of each input clock signal of interest, thereby affording a measurement of the input clock-signal period to within the duration (10 ns) of one reference clock cycle. Unlike typical prior laboratory clock-cycle-measuring circuits, this timer does not skip some cycles of the input clock signals. The non-cycle-skipping feature is an important advantage because in applications that involve integration of measurements over long times for characterizing nominally highly stable clock signals, skipping cycles can degrade accuracy. The timer includes a field-programmable gate array that functions as a 20-bit counter running at the reference clock rate of 100 MHz. The timer also includes eight 20-bit latching circuits - one for each channel - at the output terminals of the counter. Each transition of an input signal from low to high causes the corresponding latching circuit to latch the count at that instant. Each such transition also sets a status flip-flop circuit to indicate the presence of the latched count. A microcontroller reads the values of all eight status flipflops

  19. MEMS Technology for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vandenBerg, A.; Spiering, V. L.; Lammerink, T. S. J.; Elwenspoek, M.; Bergveld, P.

    1995-01-01

    Micro-technology enables the manufacturing of all kinds of components for miniature systems or micro-systems, such as sensors, pumps, valves, and channels. The integration of these components into a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) drastically decreases the total system volume and mass. These properties, combined with the increasing need for monitoring and control of small flows in (bio)chemical experiments, makes MEMS attractive for space applications. The level of integration and applied technology depends on the product demands and the market. The ultimate integration is process integration, which results in a one-chip system. An example of process integration is a dosing system of pump, flow sensor, micromixer, and hybrid feedback electronics to regulate the flow. However, for many applications, a hybrid integration of components is sufficient and offers the advantages of design flexibility and even the exchange of components in the case of a modular set up. Currently, we are working on hybrid integration of all kinds of sensors (physical and chemical) and flow system modules towards a modular system; the micro total analysis system (micro TAS). The substrate contains electrical connections as in a printed circuit board (PCB) as well as fluid channels for a circuit channel board (CCB) which, when integrated, form a mixed circuit board (MCB).

  20. Proton radiation damage in P-channel CCDs fabricated on high-resistivity silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bebek, C.; Groom, D.; Holland, S.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Lee, J.; Levi, M.; Palaio, N.; Turko, B.; Uslenghi, M.; Wagner, M.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-28

    P-channel, backside illuminated silicon CCDs were developed and fabricated on high-resistivity n-type silicon. Devices have been exposed up to 1x1011 protons/cm2 at 12 MeV. The charge transfer efficiency and dark current were measured as a function of radiation dose. These CCDs were found to be significantly more radiation tolerant than conventional n-channel devices. This could prove to be a major benefit for long duration space missions.

  1. Connecting exact coherent states to turbulent dynamics in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Sung; Graham, Michael D.

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of nonlinear traveling wave solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations or exact coherent states has greatly advanced the understanding of the nature of turbulent shear flows. These solutions are unstable saddle points in state space, while the time evolution of a turbulent flow is a dynamical trajectory wandering around them. In this regard, it is of interest to investigate how closely the turbulent trajectories approach these invariant states. Here, we present connections between turbulent trajectories and one intriguing solution family in channel flow. A state space visualization of turbulent trajectories is presented in a three-dimensional space. The lifetime of the trajectories is well represented by closeness to two distinct solutions resembling in many ways the active and hibernating phases of minimal channel turbulence (Xi & Graham PRL 2010). The connections are then examined by comparing mean profiles and flow structures. More importantly, the connections are confirmed by calculating the L2 distance between the trajectories and the traveling waves. Lastly, paths of an intermittent bursting phenomenon are identified in state space and the relationship between bursting paths and the traveling waves or hibernating turbulence is further discussed. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research through grant FA9550-15-1-0062 (Flow Interactions and Control Program).

  2. River channel changes of the Subansiri in Assam, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, U.; Sarma, J. N.; Patgiri, A. D.

    1999-12-01

    The sequential changes in the position of banklines as a result of bank erosion, as well as various changes in the channel have been studied in the Subansiri river in Assam, India. The study was carried out from available topographic maps of 1920, 1970 and satellite imagery of 1990. The types of changes taking place in the Subansiri river channel as observed from the above-mentioned maps and imagery are grouped into four categories: (1) alteration of the direction of flow due to neck cut-off, (2) widening of a channel in response to bar development, (3) development (and subsequent abandonment) of anabranches, and (4) progressive shifting of meander bends. The river channel has become substantially wider during the period of 1970-1990. There has also been a progressive increase in the number and area of mid-channel bars with a corresponding decrease in the number and area of point bars during 1920-1990. These periodic and progressive changes are responsible for a change in channel pattern of the river. A study made on nature and amount of change in the banklines of the Subansiri river by dividing the channel (84 km in 1970) into 10 equal segments reveals that the types of change are varied, and in some cases chaotic in nature. Study of the bankline shift of the Subansiri determined separately for the periods 1920-1970, 1970-1990 and 1920-1990 at 20 evenly spaced transverse sections reveals that there has been a substantial westward shift of both the banklines, up to a maximum of 6 km, in the three upstream sections during 1920-1970. However, shifting of banklines in both directions and the unequal amount of shifting in the same direction have caused a marked increase in channel width during 1970-1990. It is found that due to bankline migration, the total amount of area eroded along the entire course under study during 1920-1970 and 1970-1990 are 107.90 and 57.50 km 2, respectively. The overall sinuosity which was 1.51 in 1920 has decreased to 1.30 in 1970, while the

  3. Space Science in Action: Space Exploration [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    In this videotape recording, students learn about the human quest to discover what is out in space. Students see the challenges and benefits of space exploration including the development of rocket science, a look back at the space race, and a history of manned space travel. A special section on the Saturn V rocket gives students insight into the…

  4. Large size space construction for space exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Space exploitation is impossible without large space structures. We need to make sufficient large volume of pressurized protecting frames for crew, passengers, space processing equipment, & etc. We have to be unlimited in space. Now the size and mass of space constructions are limited by possibility of a launch vehicle. It limits our future in exploitation of space by humans and in development of space industry. Large-size space construction can be made with using of the curing technology of the fibers-filled composites and a reactionable matrix applied directly in free space. For curing the fabric impregnated with a liquid matrix (prepreg) is prepared in terrestrial conditions and shipped in a container to orbit. In due time the prepreg is unfolded by inflating. After polymerization reaction, the durable construction can be fitted out with air, apparatus and life support systems. Our experimental studies of the curing processes in the simulated free space environment showed that the curing of composite in free space is possible. The large-size space construction can be developed. A project of space station, Moon base, Mars base, mining station, interplanet space ship, telecommunication station, space observatory, space factory, antenna dish, radiation shield, solar sail is proposed and overviewed. The study was supported by Humboldt Foundation, ESA (contract 17083/03/NL/SFe), NASA program of the stratospheric balloons and RFBR grants (05-08-18277, 12-08-00970 and 14-08-96011).

  5. Channel function reconstitution and re-animation: a single-channel strategy in the postcrystal age.

    PubMed

    Oiki, Shigetoshi

    2015-06-15

    The most essential properties of ion channels for their physiologically relevant functions are ion-selective permeation and gating. Among the channel species, the potassium channel is primordial and the most ubiquitous in the biological world, and knowledge of this channel underlies the understanding of features of other ion channels. The strategy applied to studying channels changed dramatically after the crystal structure of the potassium channel was resolved. Given the abundant structural information available, we exploited the bacterial KcsA potassium channel as a simple model channel. In the postcrystal age, there are two effective frameworks with which to decipher the functional codes present in the channel structure, namely reconstitution and re-animation. Complex channel proteins are decomposed into essential functional components, and well-examined parts are rebuilt for integrating channel function in the membrane (reconstitution). Permeation and gating are dynamic operations, and one imagines the active channel by breathing life into the 'frozen' crystal (re-animation). Capturing the motion of channels at the single-molecule level is necessary to characterize the behaviour of functioning channels. Advanced techniques, including diffracted X-ray tracking, lipid bilayer methods and high-speed atomic force microscopy, have been used. Here, I present dynamic pictures of the KcsA potassium channel from the submolecular conformational changes to the supramolecular collective behaviour of channels in the membrane. These results form an integrated picture of the active channel and offer insights into the processes underlying the physiological function of the channel in the cell membrane.

  6. Ion channels in analgesia research.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Tamara; Simon, Sidney A; Islas, Leon D

    2010-01-01

    Several recent techniques have allowed us to pinpoint the receptors responsible for the detection of nociceptive stimuli. Among these receptors, ion channels play a fundamental role in the recognition and transduction of stimuli that can cause pain. During the last decade, compelling evidence has been gathered on the role of the TRPV1 channel in inflammatory and neuropathic states. Activation of TRPV1 in nociceptive neurons results in the release of neuropeptides and transmitters, leading to the generation of action potentials that will be sent to higher CNS areas, where they will often be perceived as pain. Its activation will also evoke the peripheral release of pro-inflammatory compounds that may sensitize other neurons to physical, thermal, or chemical stimuli. For these reasons, and because its continuous activation causes analgesia, TRPV1 is now considered a viable drug target for clinical use in the management of pain. Using the TRPV1 channel as an example, here we describe some basic biophysical approaches used to study the properties of ion channels involved in pain and in analgesia.

  7. Store-Operated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) are a major pathway for calcium signaling in virtually all metozoan cells and serve a wide variety of functions ranging from gene expression, motility, and secretion to tissue and organ development and the immune response. SOCs are activated by the depletion of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), triggered physiologically through stimulation of a diverse set of surface receptors. Over 15 years after the first characterization of SOCs through electrophysiology, the identification of the STIM proteins as ER Ca2+ sensors and the Orai proteins as store-operated channels has enabled rapid progress in understanding the unique mechanism of store-operate calcium entry (SOCE). Depletion of Ca2+ from the ER causes STIM to accumulate at ER-plasma membrane (PM) junctions where it traps and activates Orai channels diffusing in the closely apposed PM. Mutagenesis studies combined with recent structural insights about STIM and Orai proteins are now beginning to reveal the molecular underpinnings of these choreographic events. This review describes the major experimental advances underlying our current understanding of how ER Ca2+ depletion is coupled to the activation of SOCs. Particular emphasis is placed on the molecular mechanisms of STIM and Orai activation, Orai channel properties, modulation of STIM and Orai function, pharmacological inhibitors of SOCE, and the functions of STIM and Orai in physiology and disease. PMID:26400989

  8. Arsenic removal from flowing irrigation water in bangladesh: impacts of channel properties.

    PubMed

    Lineberger, Ethan M; Badruzzaman, A Borhan M; Ali, M Ashraf; Polizzotto, Matthew L

    2013-11-01

    Across Bangladesh, dry-season irrigation with arsenic-contaminated well water is loading arsenic onto rice paddies, leading to increased arsenic concentrations in plants, diminished crop yields, and increased human health risks. As irrigation water flows through conveyance channels between wells and rice fields, arsenic concentrations change over space and time, indicating that channels may provide a location for removing arsenic from solution. However, few studies have systematically evaluated the processes controlling arsenic concentrations in irrigation channels, limiting the ability to manipulate these systems and enhance arsenic removal from solution. The central goal of this study was to quantify how channel design affected removal of dissolved arsenic from flowing irrigation water. Field experiments were conducted in Bangladesh using a chemically constant source of arsenic-contaminated irrigation water and an array of constructed channels with varying geometries. The resulting hydraulic conditions affected the quantity of arsenic removed from solution within the channels by promoting known hydrogeochemical processes. Channels three times the width of control channels removed ∼3 times the mass of arsenic over 32 min of flowing conditions, whereas negligible arsenic removal was observed in tarp-lined channels, which prevented soil-water contact. Arsenic removal from solution was ∼7 times higher in a winding, 200-m-long channel than in the straight, 45-m-long control channels. Arsenic concentrations were governed by oxidative iron-arsenic coprecipitation within the water column, sorption to soils, and phosphate competition. Collectively, these results suggest that better design and management of irrigation channels may play a part in arsenic mitigation strategies for rice fields in Southern Asia. PMID:25602413

  9. Theory for nanoparticle retention time in the helical channel of quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2009-05-01

    Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation (QMgFFF) is a separation and characterization technique for magnetic nanoparticles such as those used for cell labeling and for targeted drug therapy. A helical separation channel is used to efficiently exploit the quadrupole magnetic field. The fluid and sample components therefore have angular and longitudinal components to their motion in the thin annular space occupied by the helical channel. The retention ratio is defined as the ratio of the times for non-retained and a retained material to pass through the channel. Equations are derived for the respective angular and longitudinal components to retention ratio.

  10. Simulations of Filament Channel Formation in a Coronal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knizhnik, Kalman; DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2016-05-01

    A major unanswered problem in solar physics has been explaining the presence of sheared filament channels above photospheric polarity inversion lines (PILs) and the simultaneous lack of structure in the ‘loop’ portion of the coronal magnetic field. The shear inherent in filament channels represents not only a form of magnetic energy, but also magnetic helicity. As a result, models of filament channel formation need to explain not only why helicity is observed above PILs, but also why it is apparently not observed anywhere else in the corona. Previous results (Knizhnik, Antiochos & DeVore, 2015) have suggested that any helicity injected into the coronal field inverse-cascades in scale, a process known as magnetic helicity condensation (Antiochos, 2013). In this work, we present high resolution numerical simulations of photospheric helicity injection into a coronal magnetic field that contains both a PIL and a coronal hole (CH). We show conclusively that the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity terminates at the PIL, resulting in the formation of highly sheared filament channels and a smooth, untwisted corona. We demonstrate that even though magnetic helicity is injected throughout the flux system, it accumulates only at the PIL, where it manifests itself in the form of highly sheared filament channels, while any helicity obtained by the CH is ejected out of the system. We show that the formation of filament channels is both qualitatively and quantitatively in agreement with observations and discuss the implications of our simulations for observations.This work was supported by the NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship, LWS TR&T and H-SR Programs.

  11. Higgs in bosonic channels (CMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Valentina

    2015-05-01

    The main Higgs boson decays into bosonic channels will be considered, presenting and discussing results from the latest reprocessing of data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, using the full dataset recorded at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. For this purpose, results from the final Run-I papers for the H → ZZ → 4ℓ, H → γγ and H → WW analyses are presented, focusing on the Higgs boson properties, like the mass, the signal strenght, the couplings to fermions and vector bosons, the spin and parity properties. Furthermore, the Higgs boson width measurement exploiting the on-shell versus the off-shell cross section (in the H → ZZ → 4ℓ and H → ZZ → 2ℓ2ν decay channels) will be shown. All the investigated properties result to be fully consistent with the SM predictions: the signal strength and the signal strength modifiers are consistent with unity in all the bosonic channels considered; the hypothesis of a scalar particle is strongly favored, against the pseudoscalar or the vector/pseudovector or the spin-2 boson hypotheses (all excluded at 99% CL or higher in the H → ZZ → 4ℓ channel). The Higgs boson mass measurement from the combination of H → ZZ → 4ℓ and H → γγ channels gives a value mH = 125.03+0.26-0.27 (stat.) +0.13-0.15 (syst.). An upper limit ΓH < 22 MeV can be put on the Higgs boson width thanks to the new indirect method.

  12. Theoretical and experimental studies of turbo product code with time diversity in free space optical communication.

    PubMed

    Han, Yaoqiang; Dang, Anhong; Ren, Yongxiong; Tang, Junxiong; Guo, Hong

    2010-12-20

    In free space optical communication (FSOC) systems, channel fading caused by atmospheric turbulence degrades the system performance seriously. However, channel coding combined with diversity techniques can be exploited to mitigate channel fading. In this paper, based on the experimental study of the channel fading effects, we propose to use turbo product code (TPC) as the channel coding scheme, which features good resistance to burst errors and no error floor. However, only channel coding cannot cope with burst errors caused by channel fading, interleaving is also used. We investigate the efficiency of interleaving for different interleaving depths, and then the optimum interleaving depth for TPC is also determined. Finally, an experimental study of TPC with interleaving is demonstrated, and we show that TPC with interleaving can significantly mitigate channel fading in FSOC systems.

  13. Preparing future space leaders - International Space University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Barbara A.; Van Reeth, George P.

    1992-01-01

    The International Space University (ISU) concept of developing a cadre of space professionals that will lead the universities and industries into space is discussed. ISU is an innovative, permanent worldwide organization for training and academic instruction in all aspects of space studies. ISU's major goal is to provide the young professional academic instruction in technical and nontechnical areas of modern space exploration and research, and a forum to exchange ideas and develop both personal and professional ties at an international level.

  14. Space habitats. [prognosis for space colonization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    Differences between space industrialization and space colonization are outlined along with the physiological, psychological, and esthetic needs of the inhabitants of a space habitat. The detrimental effects of zero gravity on human physiology are reviewed, and the necessity of providing artificial gravity, an acceptable atmosphere, and comfortable relative humidity and temperature in a space habitat is discussed. Consideration is also given to social organization and governance, supply of food and water, and design criteria for space colonies.

  15. Multi-channel OLA Inversion for Local Helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackiewicz, Jason; Birch, A.; Gizon, L.

    2009-05-01

    We present preliminary results of a three-dimensional inversion for local helioseismology, in particular utilizing the time-distance technique. This inversion is unique in that in combines a Fourier-space multi-channel deconvolution with the optimally localized averages (OLA) method. The result is a very computationally efficient procedure that is fully parallelizable and suited for large-scale inversions needed for future studies. A simple example of the inversion is shown using point-to-point Born approximation kernels for sound-speed perturbations and the travel-time noise covariance. A step-by-step comparison is shown with a recently developed real-space OLA inversion to demonstrate the benefits of a Fourier-space formulation.

  16. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber. Task 13: Subscale helium ingestion and two dimensional heating test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Descriptions are given of the test hardware, facility, procedures, and results of electrically heated tube, channel and panel tests conducted to determine effects of helium ingestion, two dimensional conduction, and plugged coolant channels on operating limits of convectively cooled chambers typical of space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine designs. Helium ingestion in froth form, was studied in tubular and rectangular single channel test sections. Plugged channel simulation was investigated in a three channel panel. Burn-out limits (transition of film boiling) were studied in both single channel and panel test sections to determine 2-D conduction effects as compared to tubular test results.

  17. "Space, the Final Frontier"; Books on Space and Space Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1997-01-01

    Advocates play in a child's life. Describes how science fiction seizes the imaginations of young readers with its tales of the future and of outer space. Talks about various nonfiction books about space. Elaborates a workshop on books about space exploration. Gives 10 questions about stimulating student response. (PA)

  18. Space Biosciences, Space-X, and the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Space Biosciences Research on the International Space Station uses living organisms to study a variety of research questions. To enhance our understanding of fundamental biological processes. To develop the fundations for a safe, productive human exploration of space. To improve the quality of life on earth.

  19. Comparison of 8 × 112 Gb/s PS-QPSK and PDM-QPSK signals over transoceanic distances.

    PubMed

    Nölle, Markus; Fischer, Johannes Karl; Molle, Lutz; Schmidt-Langhorst, Carsten; Peckham, David; Schubert, Colja

    2011-11-21

    We experimentally investigate polarization-switched quadrature phase-shift keying (PS-QPSK) with a symbol rate of 37.3 GBd corresponding to a bit rate of 112 Gb/s. In a wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) experiment with 50 GHz channel spacing, the transmission performance of PS-QPSK is compared to that of polarization-division multiplexed QPSK (PDM-QPSK) over an EDFA amplified ultra-large-effective-area fiber link. For a bit-error ratio (BER) of 3.8 × 10(-3), the achieved transmission distance is 11000 km for PS-QSPK and 10000 km for PDM-QPSK. PMID:22109464

  20. Comparison of 8 × 112 Gb/s PS-QPSK and PDM-QPSK signals over transoceanic distances.

    PubMed

    Nölle, Markus; Fischer, Johannes Karl; Molle, Lutz; Schmidt-Langhorst, Carsten; Peckham, David; Schubert, Colja

    2011-11-21

    We experimentally investigate polarization-switched quadrature phase-shift keying (PS-QPSK) with a symbol rate of 37.3 GBd corresponding to a bit rate of 112 Gb/s. In a wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) experiment with 50 GHz channel spacing, the transmission performance of PS-QPSK is compared to that of polarization-division multiplexed QPSK (PDM-QPSK) over an EDFA amplified ultra-large-effective-area fiber link. For a bit-error ratio (BER) of 3.8 × 10(-3), the achieved transmission distance is 11000 km for PS-QSPK and 10000 km for PDM-QPSK.

  1. Boundary Layer Protuberance Simulations in Channel Nozzle Arc-Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marichalar, J. J.; Larin, M. E.; Campbell, C. H.; Pulsonetti, M. V.

    2010-01-01

    Two protuberance designs were modeled in the channel nozzle of the NASA Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Facility with the Data-Parallel Line Relaxation computational fluid dynamics code. The heating on the protuberance was compared to nominal baseline heating at a single fixed arc-jet condition in order to obtain heating augmentation factors for flight traceability in the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment on Space Shuttle Orbiter flights STS-119 and STS-128. The arc-jet simulations were performed in conjunction with the actual ground tests performed on the protuberances. The arc-jet simulations included non-uniform inflow conditions based on the current best practices methodology and used variable enthalpy and constant mass flow rate across the throat. Channel walls were modeled as fully catalytic isothermal surfaces, while the test section (consisting of Reaction Cured Glass tiles) was modeled as a partially catalytic radiative equilibrium wall. The results of the protuberance and baseline simulations were compared to the applicable ground test results, and the effects of the protuberance shock on the opposite channel wall were investigated.

  2. A model of channel response in disturbed alluvial channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, A.

    1989-01-01

    Dredging and straightening of alluvial channels between 1959 and 1978 in West Tennessee caused a series of morphologic changes along modified reaches and tributary streams. Degradation occurred for 10 to 15 years at sites upstream of the area of maximum disturbance and lowered bed-levels by as much as 6.1 m. Following degradation, reaches upstream of the area of maximum disturbance experienced a secondary aggradation phase in response to excessive incision and gradient reduction. -from Author

  3. Experimental free-space optical network for massively parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, S.; Kajita, M.; Kasahara, K.; Kubota, K.; Kurihara, K.; Redmond, I.; Schenfeld, E.; Suzaki, T.

    1996-03-01

    A free-space optical interconnection scheme is described for massively parallel processors based on the interconnection-cached network architecture. The optical network operates in a circuit-switching mode. Combined with a packet-switching operation among the circuit-switched optical channels, a high-bandwidth, low-latency network for massively parallel processing results. The design and assembly of a 64-channel experimental prototype is discussed, and operational results are presented.

  4. Multiband space time processing for torpedo alert sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Zhao, Anbang

    2013-12-01

    A space time processing technology using harmonic CW wave is introduced to enhance the detecting performance of motion target based on active towed sonar based on CW wave. The detecting ability of CW wave and harmonic CW wave in multi-path channel is analyzed comparatively. The simulation results indicate that in multi-path channel harmonic CW wave is provided with a better performance.

  5. Optimal Codes for the Burst Erasure Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Deep space communications over noisy channels lead to certain packets that are not decodable. These packets leave gaps, or bursts of erasures, in the data stream. Burst erasure correcting codes overcome this problem. These are forward erasure correcting codes that allow one to recover the missing gaps of data. Much of the recent work on this topic concentrated on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) codes. These are more complicated to encode and decode than Single Parity Check (SPC) codes or Reed-Solomon (RS) codes, and so far have not been able to achieve the theoretical limit for burst erasure protection. A block interleaved maximum distance separable (MDS) code (e.g., an SPC or RS code) offers near-optimal burst erasure protection, in the sense that no other scheme of equal total transmission length and code rate could improve the guaranteed correctible burst erasure length by more than one symbol. The optimality does not depend on the length of the code, i.e., a short MDS code block interleaved to a given length would perform as well as a longer MDS code interleaved to the same overall length. As a result, this approach offers lower decoding complexity with better burst erasure protection compared to other recent designs for the burst erasure channel (e.g., LDPC codes). A limitation of the design is its lack of robustness to channels that have impairments other than burst erasures (e.g., additive white Gaussian noise), making its application best suited for correcting data erasures in layers above the physical layer. The efficiency of a burst erasure code is the length of its burst erasure correction capability divided by the theoretical upper limit on this length. The inefficiency is one minus the efficiency. The illustration compares the inefficiency of interleaved RS codes to Quasi-Cyclic (QC) LDPC codes, Euclidean Geometry (EG) LDPC codes, extended Irregular Repeat Accumulate (eIRA) codes, array codes, and random LDPC codes previously proposed for burst erasure

  6. Sodium channel slow inactivation interferes with open channel block

    PubMed Central

    Hampl, Martin; Eberhardt, Esther; O’Reilly, Andrias O.; Lampert, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 are linked to inherited pain syndromes such as erythromelalgia (IEM) and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD). PEPD mutations impair Nav1.7 fast inactivation and increase persistent currents. PEPD mutations also increase resurgent currents, which involve the voltage-dependent release of an open channel blocker. In contrast, IEM mutations, whenever tested, leave resurgent currents unchanged. Accordingly, the IEM deletion mutation L955 (ΔL955) fails to produce resurgent currents despite enhanced persistent currents, which have hitherto been considered a prerequisite for resurgent currents. Additionally, ΔL955 exhibits a prominent enhancement of slow inactivation (SI). We introduced mutations into Nav1.7 and Nav1.6 that either enhance or impair SI in order to investigate their effects on resurgent currents. Our results show that enhanced SI is accompanied by impaired resurgent currents, which suggests that SI may interfere with open-channel block. PMID:27174182

  7. Clofilium inhibits Slick and Slack potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    de los Angeles Tejada, Maria; Stolpe, Kathleen; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Klaerke, Dan A

    2012-01-01

    Slick and Slack high-conductance potassium channels have been recently discovered, and are found in the central nervous system and in the heart. Both channels are activated by Na+ and Cl−, and Slick channels are also inhibited by adenosine triphospate (ATP). An important role of setting the resting membrane potential and controlling the basal excitability of neurons has been suggested for these channels. In addition, no specific blockers for these channels are known up to the present. With the purpose of studying the pharmacological characteristics of Slick and Slack channels, the effects of exposure to the antiarrhythmic compound clofilium were evaluated. Clofilium was able to modulate the activity of Slick and Slack channels effectively, with a stronger effect on Slack than Slick channels. In order to evaluate the pharmacological behavior of Slick and Slack channels further, 38 commonly used potassium channel blockers were tested. Screening of these compounds did not reveal any modulators of Slick and Slack channels, except for clofilium. The present study provides a first approach towards elucidating the pharmacological characteristics of Slick and Slack channels and could be the basis for future studies aimed at developing potent and specific blockers and activators for these channels. PMID:23271893

  8. Spatial Intensity Channel Replacement Daltonization (SIChaRDa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon-Liedtke, Joschua T.; Farup, Ivar

    2015-01-01

    Color-deficient observers are often confronted with problems in daily life due to the fact that some colors appear less differentiable than for normal sighted people. So-called daltonization methods have been proposed to increase color contrast for color-deficient people. We propose two methods for better daltonization solutions by Spatial Intensity Channel Replacement Daltonization (SIChaRDa). We propose replacing the intensity channel with a grayscale version of the image computed by using spatial color-to-gray methods that are either capable of translating color contrasts into lightness contrasts or that are capable of translating color edges into lightness edges, and/or integrating information from the red-green channel into the intensity channel. We tested two implementations on different types of images, and we could show that results depend on the one hand on the algorithm used for computing the grayscale image, and on the other hand on the content of the image. We show that the spatial methods work best on real-life images were confusing colors are directly adjacent to each other, respectively where they are in close proximity. On the contrary, using composed artificial images with borders of white space between colors - like for example in the Ishihara plates - leads only to unsatisfactory results.

  9. Oligomeric Structure of Colicin Ia Channel in Lipid Bilayer Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Sarah L.; Radjainia, Mazdak; Mitra, Alok K.

    2009-01-01

    Colicin Ia is a soluble, harpoon-shaped bacteriocin which translocates across the periplasmic space of sensitive Escherichia coli cell by parasitizing an outer membrane receptor and forms voltage-gated ion channels in the inner membrane. This process leads to cell death, which has been thought to be caused by a single colicin Ia molecule. To directly visualize the three-dimensional structure of the channel, we generated two-dimensional crystals of colicin Ia inserted in lipid-bilayer membranes and determined a ∼17 three-dimensional model by electron crystallography. Supported by velocity sedimentation, chemical cross-linking and single-particle image analysis, the three-dimensional structure is a crown-shaped oligomer enclosing a ∼35 Å-wide extrabilayer vestibule. Our study suggests that lipid insertion instigates a global conformational change in colicin Ia and that more than one molecule participates in the channel architecture with the vestibule, possibly facilitating the known large scale peptide translocation upon channel opening. PMID:19357078

  10. Flame Acceleration and Transition to Detonation in Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Gabriel; Houim, Ryan; Oran, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of a confined, homogeneous, chemically reactive gas were used to compute and catalog interactions leading to deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT). The geometrical configuration was a long rectangular channel with regularly spaced obstacles and adiabatic boundary conditions on all of the surfaces. The channel contained a stoichiometric mixture of ethylene-oxygen at 300 K and one atm that was ignited with a circular flame. The reactive Navier-Stokes equations were solved on an adapting grid by a high-order Godunov algorithm. The channel height was fixed at 0.32 cm and obstacle heights created blockage ratios ranging from 0.8 to 0.05, where the blockage ratio is defined as the obstacle height divided by the channel height. The computations show the development of a turbulent flame, the creation of shocks, shock-flame interactions, and a host of fluid and chemical-fluid instabilities. The result is an accelerating flame and eventual DDT in unburned, but shock-heated, material. Several DDT mechanisms were observed; these will be shown and discussed, with an emphasis on several new observations related to shock interactions. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  11. Precoding Method Interference Management for Quasi-EVD Channel

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Song, Sang Seob

    2014-01-01

    The Cholesky decomposition-block diagonalization (CD-BD) interference alignment (IA) for a multiuser multiple input multiple output (MU-MIMO) relay system is proposed, which designs precoders for the multiple access channel (MAC) by employing the singular value decomposition (SVD) as well as the mean square error (MSE) detector for the broadcast Hermitian channel (BHC) taken advantage of in our design. Also, in our proposed CD-BD IA algorithm, the relaying function is made use to restructure the quasieigenvalue decomposition (quasi-EVD) equivalent channel. This approach used for the design of BD precoding matrix can significantly reduce the computational complexity and proposed algorithm can address several optimization criteria, which is achieved by designing the precoding matrices in two steps. In the first step, we use Cholesky decomposition to maximize the sum-of-rate (SR) with the minimum mean square error (MMSE) detection. In the next step, we optimize the system BER performance with the overlap of the row spaces spanned by the effective channel matrices of different users. By iterating the closed form of the solution, we are able not only to maximize the achievable sum-of-rate (ASR), but also to minimize the BER performance at a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) region. PMID:25258731

  12. Transmission of mixed 260-Gb/s PDM-16QAM and 130-Gb/s PDM-QPSK over 960-km and 4160-km dispersion-managed SSMF spans.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chongjin; Raybon, Gregory

    2012-12-10

    We transmit a mix of 260-Gb/s polarization-division-multiplexed 16-ary quadrature-amplitude modulation (PDM-16QAM) and 130-Gb/s polarization-division-multiplexed quadrature-phase-shift-keying (PDM-QPSK) channels at a 50-GHz channel spacing in a dispersion-managed (DM) system with standard single-mode-fiber (SSMF) spans. We study the impact of pulse shaping, time interleaving of polarizations and maximum likelihood (ML) detection techniques on the performance of the system. We show that the pulse shaping and ML detection can increase the transmission distances of the PDM-16QAM channels and PDM-QPSK channels by 50% and 10%, respectively. With 20% overhead hard-decision forward-error-correction (FEC) coding, we successfully transmit the 260-Gb/s PDM-16QAM and 130-Gb/s PDM-QPSK channels over 960-km and 4,160-km, respectively, in the DM system.

  13. Surface acoustic wave induced particle manipulation in a PDMS channel--principle concepts for continuous flow applications.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Linda; Enlund, Johannes; Johansson, Stefan; Katardjiev, Ilia; Yantchev, Ventsislav

    2012-04-01

    A device for acoustic particle manipulation in the 40 MHz range for continuous-flow operation in a 50 μm wide PDMS channel has been evaluated. Unidirectional interdigital transducers on a Y-cut Z-propagation lithium nixobate wafer were used to excite a surface acoustic wave that generated an acoustic standing wave inside the microfluidic channel. It was shown that particle alignment nodes with different inter-node spacing could be obtained, depending on device design and driving frequency. The observed inter-node spacing differed from the standard half-wavelength inter-node spacing generally employed in bulk acoustic transducer excited resonant systems. This effect and the related issue of acoustic node positions relative the channel walls, which is fundamental for most continuous flow particle manipulation operations in channels, was evaluated in measurements and simulations. Specific applications of particle separation and alignment where these systems can offer benefits relative state-of the art designs were identified.

  14. Novel method of channel estimation for WCDMA downlink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Bin; You, XiaoHu

    2001-10-01

    A novel scheme for channel estimation is proposed in this paper for WCDMA Downlink where a pilot channel is simultaneously transmitted with a dada traffic channel. The proposed scheme exploits channel information in both pilot and data traffic channels by combining channel estimates from these two channels. It is demonstrated by computer simulations that the performance of the Rake receiver is improved obviously.

  15. Channel estimation in DCT-based OFDM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulin; Zhang, Gengxin; Xie, Zhidong; Hu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    This paper derives the channel estimation of a discrete cosine transform-(DCT-) based orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) system over a frequency-selective multipath fading channel. Channel estimation has been proved to improve system throughput and performance by allowing for coherent demodulation. Pilot-aided methods are traditionally used to learn the channel response. Least square (LS) and mean square error estimators (MMSE) are investigated. We also study a compressed sensing (CS) based channel estimation, which takes the sparse property of wireless channel into account. Simulation results have shown that the CS based channel estimation is expected to have better performance than LS. However MMSE can achieve optimal performance because of prior knowledge of the channel statistic.

  16. Process tomography for unitary quantum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Gutoski, Gus; Johnston, Nathaniel

    2014-03-15

    We study the number of measurements required for quantum process tomography under prior information, such as a promise that the unknown channel is unitary. We introduce the notion of an interactive observable and we show that any unitary channel acting on a d-level quantum system can be uniquely identified among all other channels (unitary or otherwise) with only O(d{sup 2}) interactive observables, as opposed to the O(d{sup 4}) required for tomography of arbitrary channels. This result generalizes to the problem of identifying channels with at most q Kraus operators, and slight improvements can be obtained if we wish to identify such a channel only among unital channels or among other channels with q Kraus operators. These results are proven via explicit construction of large subspaces of Hermitian matrices with various conditions on rank, eigenvalues, and partial trace. Our constructions are built upon various forms of totally nonsingular matrices.

  17. Membrane lipid modulations remove divalent open channel block from TRP-like and NMDA channels.

    PubMed

    Parnas, Moshe; Katz, Ben; Lev, Shaya; Tzarfaty, Vered; Dadon, Daniela; Gordon-Shaag, Ariela; Metzner, Henry; Yaka, Rami; Minke, Baruch

    2009-02-25

    Open channel block is a process in which ions bound to the inside of a channel pore block the flow of ions through that channel. Repulsion of the blocking ions by depolarization is a known mechanism of open channel block removal. For the NMDA channel, this mechanism is necessary for channel activation and is involved in neuronal plasticity. Several types of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, including the Drosophila TRP and TRP-like (TRPL) channels, also exhibit open channel block. Therefore, removal of open channel block is necessary for the production of the physiological response to light. Because there is no membrane depolarization before the light response develops, it is not clear how the open channel block is removed, an essential step for the production of a robust light response under physiological conditions. Here we present a novel mechanism to alleviate open channel block in the absence of depolarization by membrane lipid modulations. The results of this study show open channel block removal by membrane lipid modulations in both TRPL and NMDA channels of the photoreceptor cells and CA1 hippocampal neurons, respectively. Removal of open channel block is characterized by an increase in the passage-rate of the blocking cations through the channel pore. We propose that the profound effect of membrane lipid modulations on open channel block alleviation, allows the productions of a robust current in response to light in the absence of depolarization.

  18. Tuning Photochromic Ion Channel Blockers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Photochromic channel blockers provide a conceptually simple and convenient way to modulate neuronal activity with light. We have recently described a family of azobenzenes that function as tonic blockers of Kv channels but require UV-A light to unblock and need to be actively switched by toggling between two different wavelengths. We now introduce red-shifted compounds that fully operate in the visible region of the spectrum and quickly turn themselves off in the dark. Furthermore, we have developed a version that does not block effectively in the dark-adapted state, can be switched to a blocking state with blue light, and reverts to the inactive state automatically. Photochromic blockers of this type could be useful for the photopharmacological control of neuronal activity under mild conditions. PMID:22860175

  19. Ion channels meet auxin action.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, I; Philippar, K; Hedrich, R

    2006-05-01

    The regulation of cell division and elongation in plants is accomplished by the action of different phytohormones. Auxin as one of these growth regulators is known to stimulate cell elongation growth in the aerial parts of the plant. Here, auxin enhances cell enlargement by increasing the extensibility of the cell wall and by facilitating the uptake of osmolytes such as potassium ions into the cell. Starting in the late 1990s, the auxin regulation of ion channels mediating K+ import into the cell has been studied in great detail. In this article we will focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of K+ transport by auxin and present a model to explain how the regulation of K+ channels is involved in auxin-induced cell elongation growth. PMID:16807828

  20. GMSK co-channel demodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, D. J.; Hopkins, J. R.

    2009-08-01

    Gaussian Minimum Shift Keying (GMSK) is a modulation method used by GSM phone networks and the Automatic Identification System (AIS) used by commercial ships. Typically these systems transmit data in short bursts and accomodate a large number of users by time, frequency and power management. Co-channel interference is not a problem unless the system is heavily loaded. This system load is a function of the density of users and the footprint of the receiver. We consider the problem of demodulation of burst GMSK signals in the presence of severe noise and co-channel interference. We further examine the problem of signal detection and blind estimation and tracking of all of the parameters required in the demodulation process. These parameters include carrier frequency, carrier phase, baud rate, baud phase, modulation index and the start and duration of the signal.